WorldWideScience

Sample records for cavitation erosion resistance

  1. Development of a Cavitation Erosion Resistant Advanced Material System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kendrick, Light H; Caccese, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    .... Historically, neither of these materials has performed well in a cavitating environment. The objective of this effort was to evaluate cavitation erosion protection alternatives for a GRP composite structure used in a cavitating environment...

  2. The role of mechanical properties in cavitation erosion resistance. [parameters affecting metal fatigue under cavitation flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    Methods for determining the correlations of erosion resistance and mechanical properties of materials are discussed. The most common method of testing cavitation erosion resistance of materials is the vibratory cavitation probe. The instrument and its operation are described. The use of the whirling arm device is considered as a second method. Metallographic investigations of the earliest stages of cavitation erosion damage of metallic materials was conducted. The materials show plastic deformation occurring during the incubation period and increasing until cracks form and metal fragments are lost. The parameters of the work done to cause material fractures are identified. The reactions obtained with specific materials are reported.

  3. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  4. Combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of surface modified SS410 stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarendra, H. J.; Pratap, M. S.; Karthik, S.; Punitha Kumara, M. S.; Rajath, H. C.; Ranjith, H.; Shubhatunga, S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Slurry erosion and combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of thermal spray coatings are studied and compared with the as-received martensitic stainless steel material. 70Ni-Cr coatings are deposited on SS 410 material through plasma thermal spray process. The synergy effect of the combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of plasma thermal spray coatings were investigated in a slurry pot tester in the presence of bluff bodies known as Cavitation Inducers. Results showed the combined slurry and cavitation erosion resistance of martensitic stainless steel - 410 can be improved by plasma thermal spray coating. It is observed that the plasma spray coated specimens are better erosion resistant than the as- received material, subjected to erosion test under similar conditions. As-received and the surface modified steels are mechanically characterized for its hardness, bending. Morphological studies are conducted through scanning electron microscope.

  5. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun

    2014-01-01

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  6. Cavitation erosion resistance of diamond-like carbon coating on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Feng; Jiang, Shuyun, E-mail: jiangshy@seu.edu.cn

    2014-02-15

    Two diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings are prepared on stainless steel 304 by cathodic arc plasma deposition technology at different substrate bias voltages and arc currents (−200 V/80 A, labeled DLC-1, and −100 V/60 A, labeled DLC-2). Cavitation tests are performed by using a rotating-disk test rig to explore the cavitation erosion resistance of the DLC coating. The mass losses, surface morphologies, chemical compositions and the phase constituents of the specimens after cavitation tests are examined by using digital balance, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The results indicate that the DLC-2 coatings can elongate the incubation period of stainless steel, leading to an excellent cavitation erosion resistance as compared to the untreated stainless steel specimens. After duration of 100 h cavitation test, serious damaged surfaces and plenty of scratches can be observed on the surfaces of the stainless steel specimens, while only a few grooves and tiny pits are observed on the DLC-2 coatings. It is concluded that, decreasing micro defects and increasing adhesion can reduce the delamination of DLC coating, and the erosion continues in the stainless steel substrate after DLC coating failure, and the eroded surface of the substrate is subjected to the combined action from cavitation erosion and slurry erosion.

  7. Improvement of the cavitation erosion resistance for Cr3Si film on stainless steel by double cathode glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongqin; Qiu, Yujiang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, sputter-deposited Cr3Si film was prepared by double cathode glow discharge (DCGD) technique onto 304 stainless steel. The phase constituents, surface microstructure and chemical compositions of the film were examined by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After the DCGD process, the hardness of Cr3Si film was 26 GPa, about 10 times of the stainless steel, 2.5 GPa. The cavitation erosion resistance of Cr3Si film and stainless steel were investigated by using an ultrasonic vibration cavitation erosion system. After 30 hours of cavitation tests, the cumulative mass loss of Cr3Si film was only 60% of the stainless steel. Compared with the untreated stainless steel, the cavitation erosion resistance of Cr3Si film was improved. The cavitation mechanism of Cr3Si film is due to the delamination and spalling of local surface layer derived from its inherent brittleness.

  8. Exceptionally high cavitation erosion and corrosion resistance of a high entropy alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, R B; Arora, H S; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Singh, S; Singh, H; Grewal, H S

    2018-03-01

    Cavitation erosion and corrosion of structural materials are serious concerns for marine and offshore industries. Durability and performance of marine components are severely impaired due to degradation from erosion and corrosion. Utilization of advanced structural materials can play a vital role in limiting such degradation. High entropy alloys (HEAs) are a relatively new class of advanced structural materials with exceptional properties. In the present work, we report on the cavitation erosion behavior of Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA in two different media: distilled water with and without 3.5wt% NaCl. For comparison, conventionally used stainless steel SS316L was also evaluated in identical test conditions. Despite lower hardness and yield strength, the HEA showed significantly longer incubation period and lower erosion-corrosion rate (nearly 1/4th) compared to SS316L steel. Enhanced erosion resistance of HEA was attributed to its high work-hardening behavior and stable passivation film on the surface. The Al 0.1 CoCrFeNi HEA showed lower corrosion current density, high pitting resistance and protection potential compared to SS316L steel. Further, HEA showed no evidence of intergranular corrosion likely due to the absence of secondary precipitates. Although, the degradation mechanisms (formation of pits and fatigue cracks) were similar for both the materials, the damage severity was found to be much higher for SS316L steel compared to HEA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cavitation erosion resistance of 13/4 and 21-4-N steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    operating efficiency of the turbine. Considering the cost of electrical energy, even a relatively ..... During cavitation erosion, the target material is subjected to very high repeated loading by cavitation ... Due to the repeated attack by cavitation impact wave, the target material undergoes deforma- tion plastically. The hot rolled ...

  10. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-01-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  11. Cavitation erosion resistance of 13/4 and 21-4-N steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel (termed as 21-4-N steel) in as cast and hot rolled conditions has been investigated as an alternative to 13/4 steel (termed as CA6NM) to overcome the problems of cavitation erosion in hydro turbine underwater parts. The cavitation erosion of 21-4-N and 13/4 steels was ...

  12. Effects of Rare Earth Metal addition on the cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance of super duplex stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Sung-Ik; Park, Yong-Soo; Kim, Soon-Tae; Song, Chi-Bok

    2002-05-01

    Austenitic stainless steels such as AISI 316L have been used in equipment in which fluid flows at high speeds which can induce cavitation erosion on metallic surfaces due to the collapse of cavities, where the collapse is caused by the sudden change of local pressure within the liquid. Usually AISI 316L is susceptible to cavitation erosion. This research focuses on developing a better material to replace the AISI 316L used in equipment with high speed fluid flow, such as impellers. The effects of Rare Earth Metal (REM) additions on the cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels were studied using metallographic examination, the potentiodynamic anodic polarization test, the tensile test, the X-ray diffraction test and the ultrasonic cavitation erosion test. The experimental alloys were found to have superior mechanical properties due to interstitial solid solution strengthening, by adding high nitrogen (0.4%), as well as by the refinement of phases and grains induced by fine REM oxides and oxy-sulfides. Corrosion resistance decreases in a gentle gradient as the REM content increases. However, REM containing alloys show superior corrosion resistance compared with that of other commercial alloys (SAF 2507, AISI 316L). Owing to their excellent mechanical properties and corrosion resistance, the alloys containing REM have high cavitation erosion-corrosion resistance.

  13. A Study on Cavitation Erosion Behaviors of Corrosion-resistance Thermal Spray Coating Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Hee Seok

    2003-02-01

    The hydraulic machinery of screw propeller and pump impellers is damaged by cavitation erosion in sea water. The cavitation erosion is a phenomenon leading a functional disorder of various fluid machinery and dropping off in efficiency by cavity fluid fluctuation. This study is investigated the cavitation erosion of various metallic coatings made by thermal spraying methods. The coating materials are AMDRY625, Cr 2 O 3 , SUS316, Zn, Al. These metals are coated on substrate of high strength brass ( Cu - Zn ). Test specimens are immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution for 500 and 1000 hours, respectively. After pre-corrosion, the cavitation erosion test was conducted on coating specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution along 210 minutes. The results are summarized as follows : 1. Both substrate and test specimens coated by thermal spray underwent weight loss in proportion to the time length of the cavitation erosion test, and the weight loss happened more to 1,000 hour-immersed test specimens and 500 hour-immersed ones in the time order rather than the ones in non-corrosion condition. 2. Substrate and Amdry625 and SUS316 test specimens were all influenced very little by weight loss regardless of the time length and the conditions of the test. 3. The amount of weight loss of aluminum and zinc test specimens and Cr 2 O 3 test specimens heavily increased at the early stage regardless of the conditions but later decreased after the coated layers were fretted by cavitation erosion. 4. The comparison of weight loss after the test showed that Amdry625, SUS316 and substrate underwent very little weight loss, proving to be the very likely materials to bear cavitation erosion but aluminum and zinc and Cr 2 O 3 underwent very great weight loss, proving to be the very unlikely materials to bear cavitation erosion. 5. After the test, the surfaces of Amdry625, SUS316 and substrate showed that they had been less damaged by cavitation erosion but the rest showed that they had been very much damaged by

  14. Cavitation erosion resistance of 13/4 and 21-4-N steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ASTM G32-06 2007 Standard test method for cavitation erosion using vibratory apparatus, West. Conshohocken, PA. Liu W, Zheng Y G, Liu C S, Yao Z M and Ke W 2003 Wear 254: 713. Okada T, Iwai Y and Yamamoto A 1983 Wear 84: 297. Garzon C M, Thomas H, Santos J F and Tschiptschin A P 2005 Wear 259: 145.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of cavitation-erosion resistance of Ti-alloys in mercury for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawel, S.J.; Mansur, L.K.

    2010-01-01

    A number of Ti-based alloys in both the mill-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions were subjected to sonication conditions in Hg using a vibratory horn to assess relative cavitation-erosion resistance. Weight loss as a function of exposure time decreased monotonically with increasing hardness for all alloys/conditions examined, with Ti-6Al-4V (Grade 5) and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo yielding the best resistance to cavitation-erosion as evidenced by low weight losses and little or no tendency to form pits on the exposed surface. Unalloyed Ti (Grade 4) and Ti-0.12Pd (Grade 7) exhibited greater weight losses by a factor of about two and about five, respectively, with Ti-0.12Pd particularly prone to pitting development. The mean erosion rates of the best two Ti-alloys examined were about a factor of three higher than identically tested 316LN stainless steel following a low temperature carburizing treatment, but this difference is considered minor given that the rate for both materials is very low/manageable and represents a through-thickness property for the Ti-alloys. A nitriding surface treatment was also evaluated as a potential method to further increase the cavitation-erosion resistance of these alloys in Hg, but the selected treatment proved largely ineffective as measured by rapid weight loss. Recommendations for further work to evaluate the efficacy of Ti-based alloys for use in high-powered targets for the Spallation Neutron Source are given.

  16. Cavitation Erosion of Nodular Cast Iron − Microstructural Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orłowicz A.W.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with susceptibility of nodular cast iron with ferritic-pearlitic matrix on cavitation erosion. Cavitation tests were carried out with the use of a cavitation erosion vibratory apparatus employing a vibration exciter operated at frequency of 20 kHz. The study allowed to determine the sequence of subsequent stages in which microstructure of cast iron in superficial regions is subject to degradation. The first features to be damaged are graphite precipitates. The ferritic matrix of the alloy turned out to be definitely less resistant to cavitation erosion compared to the pearlitic matrix component.

  17. Surface decontamination by cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verry, P.; Lecoffre, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of the study is to show the interest of using erosion by cavitation to remove a thin layer of matter from an irradiated surface during nuclear power plant dismantling. Several cavitation devices are tested on different surfaces to erode: aluminum, stainless steel, plexiglas, paints... The process is efficient enough to measure mass loss on materials as hard as stainless steels for a pressure of only 60 bars. Qualification tests using a nozzle feed under a 300 to 600 bar pressure are envisaged

  18. Cavitation erosion in sodium flow, sodium cavitation tunnel testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, Pierre.

    1981-04-01

    The high-volume sodium flows present in fast neutron reactors are liable to induce cavitation phenomena in various portion of the sodium lines and pumps. The absence of sufficient data in this area led the C.E.A. to undertake an erosion research program in cavitating sodium flow. This paper discusses the considerations leading to the definition and execution of sodium cavitation erosion tests, and reviews the tests run with 400 0 C sodium on various steel grades: 316, 316 L, 316 Ti (Z8CNDT17-12), Poral (Z3CND18-12), 304 L and LN2 - clad 316 L (Ni coating-clad 316 L). Acoustic detection and signal processing methods were used with an instrument package designed and implemented at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center

  19. Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation in fluid machines or flow passages can cause loss of performance or material damage due to erosion. This conference reports the results of world-wide research into all aspects of the study of cavitation. Contents include: Cavitation effects in machinery such as pumps, water turbines, propellers and positive displacement machinery; Cavitation in structures, flow passages, valves, flow meters and bearings; Cavitation erosion, noise and instability effects; Cavitation inception; Developed flows; Supercavitating flows and machines; Fundamentals; Bubble dynamics and thermodynamics of cavitation in various fluids; Test facilities and methods of cavitation research and testing; Special instrumentation for cavitation studies, and standards and recommendations for cavitation or erosion

  20. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-06

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction.

  1. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of nodular cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitelea, Ion; Bordeaşu, Ilare; Pelle, Marius; Crăciunescu, Corneliu

    2015-03-01

    The cavitation erosion of ductile cast iron with ferrite-pearlite microstructure was analyzed based on ultrasonic experiments performed according to ASTM G32-2010 and the resistance was compared to the C45 steel with similar hardness. The microstructural observation of the surface for different exposure times to the ultrasonic cavitation reveals the fact that the process initiates at the nodular graphite-ferrite interface and is controlled by micro-galvanic activities and mechanical factors. The cavitation erosion resistance was evaluated based on the evolution of the mean depth erosion and the mean depth erosion rate as a function of the cavitation time. The cavitation erosion rate of the cast iron is up to 1.32 times higher than the one of the C 45 steel with similar hardness. This is explained by the occurrence of stress concentrators due to the expulsion of the graphite from the metallic matrix.

  2. Advanced experimental and numerical techniques for cavitation erosion prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Chahine, Georges; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Karimi, Ayat

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive treatment of the cavitation erosion phenomenon and state-of-the-art research in the field. It is divided into two parts. Part 1 consists of seven chapters, offering a wide range of computational and experimental approaches to cavitation erosion. It includes a general introduction to cavitation and cavitation erosion, a detailed description of facilities and measurement techniques commonly used in cavitation erosion studies, an extensive presentation of various stages of cavitation damage (including incubation and mass loss), and insights into the contribution of computational methods to the analysis of both fluid and material behavior. The proposed approach is based on a detailed description of impact loads generated by collapsing cavitation bubbles and a physical analysis of the material response to these loads. Part 2 is devoted to a selection of nine papers presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Experimental and Numerical Techniques for Cavitation Erosion (Gr...

  3. Assessment of Cavitation Erosion with a Multiphase Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Z.R.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation erosion is one of the remarkable catastrophic consequences of cavitation. Predicting the cavitation aggressiveness quantitatively and predicting the most probable location of cavitation erosion are complex problems that currently still motivate an important amount of basic and applied

  4. Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 nickel-based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhen; Han, Jiesheng; Lu, Jinjun; Chen, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 was studied by ultrasonic apparatus. • The cavitation-induced precipitates formed in the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. • The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. - Abstract: The cavitation erosion behavior of Hastelloy C-276 alloy was investigated using an ultrasonic vibratory apparatus and compared with that of 316L stainless steel. The mean depth of erosion (MDE) and erosion rate (ER) curves vs. test time were attained for Hastelloy C-276 alloy. Morphology and microstructure evolution of the eroded surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and the predominant erosion mechanism was also discussed. The results show that the MDE is about 1/6 times lower than that of the stainless steel after 9 h of testing. The incubation period of Hastelloy C-276 alloy is about 3 times longer than that of 316L stainless steel. The cavitation-induced nanometer-scaled precipitates were found in the local zones of the eroded surface for Hastelloy C-276. The selective cavitation erosion was found in Hastelloy C-276 alloy. The formation of nanometer-scaled precipitates in the eroded surface may play a significant role in the cavitation erosion resistance of Hastelloy C-276

  5. Cavitation erosion in a 400 deg. C sodium flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of cavitation erosion tests conducted in the Cavitation Tunnel at the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center. The CANASTA system was used for acoustic monitoring of cavitation noise during the experiments. Comparative results are also presented for sodium and water tests. (author)

  6. The cavitation erosion of ultrasonic sonotrode during large-scale metallic casting: Experiment and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Liu, Zhilin; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lihua; Li, Ruiqing; Jiang, Ripeng; Dong, Fang

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonic sonotrodes play an essential role in transmitting power ultrasound into the large-scale metallic casting. However, cavitation erosion considerably impairs the in-service performance of ultrasonic sonotrodes, leading to marginal microstructural refinement. In this work, the cavitation erosion behaviour of ultrasonic sonotrodes in large-scale castings was explored using the industry-level experiments of Al alloy cylindrical ingots (i.e. 630 mm in diameter and 6000 mm in length). When introducing power ultrasound, severe cavitation erosion was found to reproducibly occur at some specific positions on ultrasonic sonotrodes. However, there is no cavitation erosion present on the ultrasonic sonotrodes that were not driven by electric generator. Vibratory examination showed cavitation erosion depended on the vibration state of ultrasonic sonotrodes. Moreover, a finite element (FE) model was developed to simulate the evolution and distribution of acoustic pressure in 3-D solidification volume. FE simulation results confirmed that significant dynamic interaction between sonotrodes and melts only happened at some specific positions corresponding to severe cavitation erosion. This work will allow for developing more advanced ultrasonic sonotrodes with better cavitation erosion-resistance, in particular for large-scale castings, from the perspectives of ultrasonic physics and mechanical design. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cavitation erosion tests of high tensile stainless steels for the Techno-Superliner (TSL-F) hulls; Techno superliner (TSL-F) sentai kozoyo kokyodo stainless ko no cavitation erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, M.; Ito, H.; Shibasaki, K. [NKK Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Mizuta, A.; Sugimoto, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tomono, Y. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Investigations were given by using the magnetostrictive vibration method and the high-speed fluid testing method on cavitation erosion resistance of high-tensile stainless steels thought to have high applicability to submerged hull structures of Techno-Supeliner (TSL-L). The investigations revealed that these steels have nearly equivalent resistance to even SUS 304 or 15-5PH steel which is thought to have the highest cavitation erosion resistance among the conventional materials used customarily. An experiment using both materials provided a result different quantitatively but similar qualitatively in relative merits between the materials. Correlation between both materials was presented. A cavitation erosion experiment using a 1/6 scale model of the actual TSL-F was carried out to measure the amount of cavitation erosion generated on wing surfaces. Results from the experiment were used to attempt estimation of cavitation erosion amount at the level of the actual TSL-F. 21 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Standard Test Method for Cavitation Erosion Using Vibratory Apparatus

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the production of cavitation damage on the face of a specimen vibrated at high frequency while immersed in a liquid. The vibration induces the formation and collapse of cavities in the liquid, and the collapsing cavities produce the damage to and erosion (material loss) of the specimen. 1.2 Although the mechanism for generating fluid cavitation in this method differs from that occurring in flowing systems and hydraulic machines (see 5.1), the nature of the material damage mechanism is believed to be basically similar. The method therefore offers a small-scale, relatively simple and controllable test that can be used to compare the cavitation erosion resistance of different materials, to study in detail the nature and progress of damage in a given material, or—by varying some of the test conditions—to study the effect of test variables on the damage produced. 1.3 This test method specifies standard test conditions covering the diameter, vibratory amplitude and frequency of the...

  9. Sediment and Cavitation Erosion Studies through Dam Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of sediment and cavitation erosion through Tunnel 2 and Tunnel 3 of Tarbela Dam in Pakistan. Main bend and main branch of Tunnel 2 and outlet 1 and outlet 3 of Tunnel 3 are concluded to be critical for cavitation and sediment erosion. Studies are also performed for increased sediments flow rate, concluding 5 kg/sec as the critical value for sudden increase in erosion rate density. Erosion rate is concluded to be the function of sediment flow rate and head condition. Particulate mass presently observed is reasonably low, hence presently not affecting the velocity and the flow field.

  10. Cavitation erosion of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy deposited coatings and Fe base shape memory alloy solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Shuji; Fujisawa, Seiji; Owa, Tomonobu

    2007-01-01

    In this study, cavitation erosion tests were carried out by using thermal spraying and deposition of Ti-Ni shape memory alloy for the surface coating. The results show the test speciment of Ti-Ni thermal spraying has many initial defects, so that the erosion resistance is very low. The erosion resistance of Ti-Ni deposit is about 5-10 times higher than that of SUS 304, thus erosion resistance of Ti-Ni deposit is better than that of Ti-Ni thermal spraying. The cavitation erosion tests were carried out by using Fe-Mn-Si with shape memory and gunmetal with low elastic modulus. The erosion resistance of Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloy solid is about 9 times higher than that of SUS 304. The erosion resistance of gunmetal is almost the same as SUS 304, because the test specimen of gunmetal has many small defects on the original surface. (author)

  11. The dynamics of cavity clusters in ultrasonic (vibratory) cavitation erosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, I.; Mørch, Knud Aage

    1980-01-01

    The erosion of solids caused by cavitating liquids is a result of the concerted collapse of clusters of cavities. In vibratory cavitation equipment the clusters grow and collapse adjacent to a solid surface and are typically of hemispherical or cylindrical form. In the present paper the collapse...... process of these clusters is described and the collapse equations are developed and solved. The theoretical results are compared with results from high-speed photography of the clusters and with the initial stages of cavitation erosion on metal specimens. Experimental and theoretical results show...... the ambient pressure. Therefore the collapse velocity of the individual cavities increases towards the cluster center, which explains that the erosion, being caused by the individual cavities, occurs predominantly in this region. Likewise, the pressure increase at the cluster boundary explains why materials...

  12. An experimental study on cavitation erosion-corrosion performance of ANSI 1020 and ANSI 4135 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Leqin; Qiu, Ning; Hellmann, Dieter-Heinz; Zhu, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation erosion is quite complex, containing corrosion-erosion interaction effect. High temperature oxidization may be aroused after bubble collapse, accompanied by hot gas contacting with the pump component surface. The analysis of the erosion pits can be an effective way to know the mechanism of cavitation erosion. In present paper, the cavitation erosion resistance of carbon steel (ANSI 1020) and alloy steel (ANSI 4135) were tested in an ultrasonic vibration apparatus. By using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and three dimensional laser microscope, the chemical composition around erosion pits and the oxidation film structure were analyzed. By using metallographic microscope and scanning electronic microscope, the metallographic structure of specimens (e.g., carbon steel and alloy steel), the nano structured iron oxide and corresponding influence on specimen's anti-erosion performance were discussed. Based on the comparison between the different tests performed in distilled water and tap water respectively, results can be obtained that erosion rate of carbon steel and alloy steel varies with the component of water which had close correlation to the oxidation effect. Erosion rate of alloy steel 4135 was much lower in distilled water compared to tap water while the difference of carbon steel 1020 was not that large. The remarkable different responses of these two materials had close relationship with oxidation effect. The oxidation effect transferred the original structure of alloy steel surface which had high anti-erosion capability, into newly generated iron oxide structure, which was preferentially to be attacked. The pumping of slightly corrosive fluids frequently leads to erosion-corrosion damage on impellers, and corrosion can further amplify the erosion process

  13. Cavitation Erosion Behavior of Electroless Ni-P Coating and Optimization of Process Parameter Using Analysis of Variance with Orthogonal Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Cho; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated the cavitation erosion resistance of electroless Ni-P (EN) coated gray cast iron (GCI) in seawater solution. Furthermore, the optimum coating design parameters were examined to minimize cavitation erosion damage through analysis of variance (ANOVA) based on the L9 orthogonal array. In this study, four coating design factors were used: concentration of source of nickel (A), concentration of reducer agent (B), deposition temperature (C), and pressure of shot peening (D). In accordance with the regulation of the modified ASTM G32, the cavitation erosion experiment was conducted for 1 hour in a seawater solution to find the optimum design parameters which can minimize the cavitation erosion damage. Besides, ANOVA was performed to verify the contribution of each coating design parameter. As a result, the concentration of reducer agent among the EN process parameters was determined as the most significant factor in the cavitation erosion behavior.

  14. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  15. Cavitation pitting and erosion of Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    The authors are currently carrying out a study of the cavitation erosion of different bearing metals and alloys in mineral oils were studied. The variations of weight loss, the pit diameter and depth due to cavitation erosion on Al 6061-T6 in mineral oil and water are presented.

  16. The effect of casting porosities on cavitational erosion of intermetallic alloy FeAl36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jasionowski

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The machinery and equipment elements operating in a turbulent fluid flow, are exposed to destruction as a result of the impact of thecavitation, corrosion and abrasion processes, among which are hardest to minimize the imploding cavitation bubbles. Repeated cavitationimplosions of bubbles give rise to cracks, material loss, resulting in increased flow resistance and reduction of the efficiency of the device, or even its destruction. In order to prevent or mitigate the cavitation phenomenon and its harmful effects, two basic methods are applied. The first of these is the selection of geometrical parameters and hydraulic machinery and the relevant elements of the streamlined shape and flow channels. The second solution is the selection of engineering plastics with greater resistance to cavitation. In case of materials manufactured with the casting method, a very important role is being played by the quality of manufactured casting having the smallest number of casting defects. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of casting porosities of an intermetallic alloy FeAl36 on cavitational erosion.

  17. Effects of post annealing on the microstructure, mechanical properties and cavitation erosion behavior of arc-sprayed FeNiCrBSiNbW coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jinran; Wang, Zehua; Lin, Pinghua; Cheng, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xin; Hong, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • FeNiCrBSiNbW coatings were prepared by arc spraying process. • Microstructural changes of the coatings were investigated by TEM. • As-sprayed coating had higher cavitation erosion resistance than annealed coatings. • The mechanism for annealing-induced change in cavitation erosion was discussed. - Abstract: FeNiCrBSiNbW coatings were fabricated via arc spraying process and were subsequently annealed at 450, 550 and 650 °C for 1 h to study the effect of annealing treatment on the microstructure, mechanical properties and cavitation erosion behavior. Microstructure was studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that oxides, fine crystalline particles and borides were formed after annealing at 650 °C. With increasing annealing temperature, the coatings showed reductions in porosity and fracture toughness, and an increase in microhardness. The cavitation erosion behavior of the coatings was investigated in distilled water. The results showed that the cavitation erosion resistance of the coatings decreased with increasing annealing temperature, and the as-sprayed coating exhibited the best cavitation erosion resistance among the four kinds of coatings. This was attributed to the good fracture toughness, high amorphous phase content and the absence of oxides in the as-sprayed coating

  18. Effects of surface treatment on the cavitation erosion of high-chrome steel, zirconium, titanium and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinin, V.G.

    1994-01-01

    The erosion resistance of some structural materials used for equipment components of the first and second circuits of NPPs is studied under cavitation created by an ultrasonic vibrator. It appears that after various thermomechanical treatments (programmed loading, low-temperature rolling) and coating deposition (titanium, zirconium and titanium nitride), the erosion resistance of the materials under consideration increases and the plasticity value is not notably modified. The titanium coatings deposited onto the steel increase the corrosion-fatigue resistance in a sodium chloride environment, in several cases

  19. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of 316L steel weld joint in liquid Pb-Bi eutectic alloy at 550°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yucheng; Chang, Hongxia; Guo, Xiaokai; Li, Tianqing; Xiao, Longren

    2017-11-01

    Liquid lead-bismuth eutectic alloy (LBE) is applied in the Accelerator Driven transmutation System (ADS) as the high-power spallation neutron targets and coolant. A 19.2kHz ultrasonic device was deployed in liquid LBE at 550°C to induce short and long period cavitation erosion damage on the surface of weld joint, SEM and Atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to map out the surface properties, and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) was applied to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements in the micro region of the surface. The erosion mechanism for how the cavitation erosion evolved by studying the element changes, their morphology evolution, the surface hardness and the roughness evolution, was proposed. The results showed that the pits, caters and cracks appeared gradually on the erode surface after a period of cavitation. The surface roughness increased along with exposure time. Work hardening by the bubbles impact in the incubation stage strengthened the cavitation resistance efficiently. The dissolution and oxidation corrosion and cavitation erosion that simultaneously happened in liquid LBE accelerated corrosion-erosion process, and these two processes combined to cause more serious damage on the material surface. Contrast to the performance of weld metal, base metal exhibited a much better cavitation resistance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Acoustic methods in sodium flow for characterising pump cavitation and noise erosion correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, E.; Defaucheux, J.; Garnaud, P.

    1982-11-01

    Under the terms of agreements between the CEA and Jeumont-Schneider on fast breeder reactor sodium pumps, joint preliminary water mockup tests were carried out at the Jeumont facility. Similar experiments were carried out on the Superphenix primary sodium pumps during water testings at the EDF facility in Gennevilliers. The purpose of these tests was to define acoustic criteria for pump cavitation and to study the similitude between the mockup and the actual pump. This paper also presents the results of cavitation erosion tests conducted under CEA research programs. Two points are covered in the conclusion. (a) The test results show that pump noise changes with the drop in hydraulic performance characteristics, and can thus be representative of caviting conditions. (b) It should be possible to develop an acoustic method capable of discriminating between erosive and non-destructive cavitation

  1. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  2. Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2010-11-01

    The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

  3. A study on the behaviour of corrosion-erosion at the Bearing metals by cavitation(1) (for the influence of pH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Uh Hoh; Lee, Jin Yeol

    1991-01-01

    Recently, due to increased occurrence of cavitation-erosion at slide bearing metals with the tendency of high speed and large output at internal combustion engine, there is a need to study the role of corrosive environments on cavitation-erosion. Therefore, this paper were investigate on the behaviour of cavitation-erosion under the change of pH environments at slide bearing metals with using piezoelectric vibratory apparatus. The main results obtained were as follows: 1. The weight loss and its rate showed to be increased according to the order of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 7 > pH 4 environments, and also retarded extremely at pH 4 environment 2. The resistance of material on cavitation-erosion was excellent at pH 4 environment, and also was improved considerably its resistance with increasing of the space between specimen and horn tip. 3. It was showed that the incubation periods shortened with the tendency of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 4 > pH 7 environment, and enlarged greatly at pH 7 environment. 4. The pitted holes of damaged surface under pH 4 environment showed dense aspects by comparison with pH 7 environment

  4. Erosion-resistant composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.B.; Tennery, V.J.; Curlee, R.M.

    A highly erosion-resistant composite material is formed of chemical vapor-deposited titanium diboride on a sintered titanium diboride-nickel substrate. This material may be suitable for use in cutting tools, coal liquefaction systems, etc.

  5. Noise and erosion of self resonating cavitating jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courbiere, P.; Chahine, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    Self resonating jets have been developed which take advantage of the natural tendency of a jet to organize in large structures. Tests have shown that these jets are both highly erosive and a source of a discrete frequency high level noise. The erosion and noise effects are harnessed for improved cutting, drilling, and cleaning, as well as for sound generation. Simultaneous investigations of the noise and erosion of these jets have been conducted and have shown a definite trend toward correlation. For instance, time evolution of volume removal rates of an impacted surface and RSM readings of a transducer have been found to be correlated. Similarly, shifts in the relative importance of the various frequencies have followed the advancement of erosion. These results could be of great advantage in the determination of the evolution of a jet cutting operation in progress. In this paper, jet noise and erosion correlation tests will be described and the results analysed

  6. Real-time monitoring of controllable cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom with passive acoustic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shukuan; Shi, Aiwei; Jing, Bowen; Du, Xuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-11-01

    Cavitation erosion in blood vessel plays an important role in ultrasound thrombolysis, drug delivery, and other clinical applications. The controllable superficial vessel erosion based on ultrasonic standing wave (USW) has been used to effectively prevent vessel ruptures and haemorrhages, and optical method is used to observe the experiments. But optical method can only work in transparent media. Compared with standard B-mode imaging, passive acoustic mapping (PAM) can monitor erosion in real time and has better sensitivity of cavitation detection. However, the conventionally used PAM has limitations in imaging resolution and artifacts. In this study, a unique PAM method that combined the robust Capon beamformer (RCB) with the sign coherence factor (SCF) was proposed to monitor the superficial vessel erosion in real time. The performance of the proposed method was validated by simulations. In vitro experiments showed that the lateral (axial) resolution of the proposed PAM was 2.31±0.51 (3.19±0.38) times higher than time exposure acoustics (TEA)-based PAM and 1.73±0.38 (1.76±0.48) times higher than RCB-based PAM, and the cavitation-to-artifact ratio (CAR) of the proposed PAM could be improved by 22.5±3.2dB and 7.1±1.2dB compared with TEA and RCB-based PAM. These results showed that the proposed PAM can precisely monitor the superficial vessel erosion and the erosion shift after USW modulation. This work may have the potential of developing a useful tool for precise spatial control and real-time monitoring of the superficial vessel erosion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Relationships between spray parameters, microstructures and ultrasonic cavitation erosion behavior of HVOF sprayed Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Lei; Wu, Yuping; Hong, Sheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yugui

    2017-11-01

    Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline coatings were prepared on the AISI 321 steel substrate by the high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying technology. The effect of selected parameters (oxygen flow, kerosene flow and spray distance) on the cavitation erosion resistance (denoted as Rc) of the coating were investigated by using the Taguchi method. Statistical tools such as design of experiments (DOE), signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to meet the expected objective. It was concluded that the kerosene flow had greater influence on the Rc of the coating and followed by the spray distance and the oxygen flow, respectively. The optimum spray parameters (OSP) were 963L/min for the oxygen flow, 28L/h for the kerosene flow, and 330mm for the spray distance. The Rc of the coating increased with the increase of hardness or the decrease of porosity, and the hardness had a greater influence on Rc than the porosity. The Fe-based coating deposited under the OSP exhibited the best cavitation erosion resistance in distilled water. The cracks initiated at the edge of the pores and the interfaces between the un-melted or half-melted particles, and finally leaded to the delamination of the coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Drag Reducing and Cavitation Resistant Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pease, Leonard F.

    2016-12-28

    Client, Green Building Systems (GBS), presented PNNL a coating reported to reduce drag and prevent cavitation damage on marine vessels, turbines and pumps. The composition of the coating remains proprietary but has as constituents including silicon oxides, aliphatic carbon chains, and fluorine rich particles. The coating is spray applied to surfaces. Prior GBS testing and experiments suggest reduction of both drag and cavitation on industrial scale propellers, but the underlying mechanism for these effects remains unclear. Yet, the application is compelling because even modest reductions in drag to marine vessels and cavitation to propellers and turbines present a significant economic and environmental opportunity. To discern among possible mechanisms, PNNL considered possible mechanisms with the client, executed multiple experiments, and completed one theoretical analysis (see appendix). The remainder of this report first considers image analysis to gain insight into drag reduction mechanisms and then exposes the coating to cavitation to explore its response to an intensely cavitating environment. Although further efforts may be warranted to confirm mechanisms, this report presents a first investigation into these coatings within the scope and resources of the technology assistance program (TAP).

  9. Cavitation pitting and erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cavitation erosion studies of aluminum 6061-T6 in mineral oil and in ordinary tap water are presented. The maximum erosion rate (MDPR, or mean depth of penetration rate) in mineral oil was about four times that in water. The MDPR in mineral oil decreased continuously with time, but the MDPR in water remained approximately constant. The cavitation pits in mineral oil were of smaller diameter and depth than the pits in water. Treating the pits as spherical segments, we computed the radius r of the sphere. The logarithm of h/a, where h is the pit depth and 2a is the top width of the pit, was linear when plotted against the logarithm of 2r/h - 1.

  10. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    importance especially as obstacles against the penetration of erosive particles into the material surface. However, they are susceptible to ... with modifying heat treatment, the resistance to cavitation was found to be improved (Kim et al 2004). ..... Miller J 1992 Metals Handbook, 10th edn, Vol. 18, ASM Int. Materials Park 233.

  11. Cavitation simulation on marine propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo

    Cavitation on marine propellers causes thrust breakdown, noise, vibration and erosion. The increasing demand for high-efficiency propellers makes it difficult to avoid the occurrence of cavitation. Currently, practical analysis of propeller cavitation depends on cavitation tunnel test, empirical...

  12. Cavitation wear of pump impellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Szala

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is a common phenomenon in pump systems, negatively influencing their operating parameters and components such as impellers and, thus, causing considerable financial losses. This paper explains the problem of cavitation and cavitation erosion. The causes of cavitation in pump systems are analyzed. A selection of centrifugal pump impellers damaged by cavitation erosion are presented and examined. The authors also discuss ways of preventing cavitation and cavitation erosion in pump systems. Finally, relevant conclusions are drawn.

  13. Influence of Geometric Parameters of Inducer Bush Design on Cavitation Erosion Characteristics of Centrifugal Inducer Stage of Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, P. Y.

    2017-08-01

    The article represents the research results of a centrifugal inducer stage with inducer bush. We determined the optimal inducer bush design that would improve the cavitation erosion characteristics without deteriorating the energy levels and preserving overall dimensions of the centrifugal inducer stage at the same time.

  14. Erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in mineral oil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. C. S.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of the erosion of aluminum 6061-T6 under cavitation attack in distilled water, ordinary tap water and a viscous mineral oil are presented. The mean depth of penetration for the mineral oil was about 40 percent of that for water at the end of a 40 min test. The mean depth of penetration and its rate did not differ significantly for distilled and tap water. The mean depth of penetration rate for both distilled and tap water increased to a maximum and then decreased with test duration, while that for mineral oil had a maximum during the initial period. The ratio h/2a of the pit depth h to the pit diameter 2a varied from 0.04 to 0.13 in water and from 0.06 to 0.20 in mineral oil. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the pits are initially formed over the grain boundaries and precipitates while the surface grains are deformed under cavitation attack.

  15. Effect of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency of cavitation histotripsy on erosion at the surface of soft material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Xiaotong

    2018-03-01

    Cavitation histotripsy with the short pulse duration (PD) but high pulse repetition frequency (PRF) disintegrates the tissue at a fluid interface. However, longer PD and lower PRF are used in the other focused ultrasound applications, where the acoustic radiation force, streaming, and cavitation are different, and their effects on erosion are unknown. In this study, the erosion at the surface of phantom/ex vivo tissue and the characteristics of induced bubble cloud captured by high-speed photography, passive cavitation detection, and light transmission during histotripsy exposure at varied PDs and PRFs but the same duty cycle were compared. The peak negative pressure of 6.6 MPa at the PD of 20 ms and PRF of 1 Hz began to erode the phantom, which becomes more significant with the increase of peak negative pressure, PD, and interval time between bursts. The increase of the PRF from 1 Hz to 1000 Hz, while the decrease of the PD from 20 ms to 20 μs (duty cycle of 2%) at the same energy was delivered to the gel phantom immersed in the degassed water led to the decrease of erosion volume but a slight increase of the erosion area and smoother surface. Low PRF and long PD produce the significant tissue deformation, acoustic wave refocusing, confinement of bubbles in a conical region, and more bubble dissolution after the collapse for the high acoustic scattering and light transmission signals. In comparison, high PRF and low PD produce a wide distribution of bubbles with only little wave refocusing at the beginning of cavitation histotripsy and high inertial cavitation. Acoustic emission dose has a good correlation with the erosion volume. The erosion on the porcine kidney at the varied PRFs and PDs with the same energy output showed similar trends as those in the phantom but at a slow rate. In summary, the PRF and PD are important parameters for the cavitation histotripsy-induced erosion at the interface of fluid and soft material, and they should be

  16. Influence of Particle Size Distribution on the Morphology and Cavitation Resistance of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, L. L.; Sucharski, G. B.; Pukasiewicz, A. G. M.; Paredes, R. S. C.

    2018-02-01

    The cavitation wear process is one of the major wear mechanisms in turbines and rotors of hydroelectric power plants in Brazil. An effective way to increase the cavitation resistance is the use of coatings, applied by thermal spraying. The high-velocity oxy-fuel process (HVOF) is one of the most used thermal spraying processes, and it is widely adopted for applying coatings for protection against wear and in maintenance components. A FeCrMnSiB experimental alloy was deposited onto SAE 1020 substrate by HVOF process, in order to evaluate the influence of the powder particle size range on the morphology and cavitation resistance of the coatings. The morphology of the coatings showed an increase in oxide content with powder size reduction. The increase in the powder particle size reduced the wettability of the particles, observed by the increase in the quantity of non-melted particles. Higher particle size distribution led to an increase in erosion rate, due to higher presence of non-melted particles in the coatings and consequently reduction of splats adhesion. The cavitation damage was perceived mainly by the mechanism of lamellae detachment; however, part of the damage was also absorbed by strain hardening due to the γ-ɛ martensitic transformation.

  17. Influence of water air content on cavitation erosion in distilled water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available in bubble collapse cushioning and reduction of cavitation damage. When the water was oversaturated with air, large air bubbles formed and cavitation damage was drastically reduced, probably due to both bubble collapse cushioning and shock wave attenuation....

  18. Erosion resistance comparison of alternative surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Česánek, Z.; Schubert, J.; Houdková, Š.

    2017-05-01

    Erosion is a process characterized by the particle separation and the damage of component functional surfaces. Thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF (High Pressure / High Velocity Oxygen Fuel) is commonly used for protection of component surfaces against erosive wear. Alloy as well as cermet based coatings meet the requirements for high erosion resistance. Wear resistance is in many cases the determining property of required component functioning. The application suitability of coating materials is particularly influenced by different hardness. This paper therefore presents an erosion resistance comparison of alloy and cermet based coatings. The coatings were applied on steel substrates and were subjected to the erosive test using the device for evaluation of material erosion resistance working on the principle of centrifugal erodent flow. Abrasive sand Al2O3 with grain size 212-250 μm was selected as an erosive material. For this purpose, the specimens were prepared by thermal spraying technology HP/HVOF using commercially available powders Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, Cr3C2-25%NiCr, Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY, Hastelloy C-276 and experimental coating TiMoCN-29% Ni. Erosion resistance of evaluated coatings was compared with erosive resistance of 1.4923 high alloyed steel without nitridation and in nitrided state and further with surface treatment using technology PVD. According to the evaluation, the resulting erosive resistance depends not only on the selected erodent and surface protection, but also on the erodent impact angle.

  19. Erosion-Resistant Water-Blast Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Marion L.; Rice, R. M.; Cosby, S. A.

    1988-01-01

    Design of nozzle reduces erosion of orifice by turbulent high-pressure water flowing through it. Improved performance and resistance to erosion achieved by giving interior nozzle surface long, gradual convergence before exit orifice abrupt divergence after orifice and by machining surface to smooth finish.

  20. Dynamics and mechanism of cavitation erosion on perspex and epoxy resins tested in a rotating disk device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, N. S. L.; Rao, B. C. S.

    1982-01-01

    The cavitation erosion behavior including the initiation, dynamics and mechanism of damage process on perspex and epoxy resin specimens tested in a rotating disk device were discussed with respect to exposure time. The inception of erosion always took place at the location nearest to the center of rotation of the disk. Subsequently, as exposure time increased, erosion initiated at other locations as well. Light optical photographs and scanning electron micrographs clearly indicate that most of the material loss appears to occur form the networks of cracks due to their interaction and pits indicate particle debris. The optical degradation (loss of transmittance) on perspex was observed to be more on the rear side than on the front side.

  1. The use of image analysis for determination of surface deterioration level of improved alumina based materials subjected to cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alumina based specimens having different content of alumina based fibers were investigated for possible application as cavitation resistant material. Cavitation damages of the alumina based specimens were tested by the modified vibratory cavitation set up. Erosion rates were measured based on the method developed for metallic samples, mass loss was measured during the experiment. Surface erosion was determined during the experiment simultaneously to mass loss measurements. Image Pro Plus Program was applied for surface analysis during testing. Results indicate that investigated material exhibit excellent mechanical properties and very good resistance to cavitation erosion. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR34011, br. TR35002 i br. III 45012

  2. Relations between acoustic cavitation and skin resistance during intermediate- and high-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Kyle T; Hoerig, Cameron L; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-11-28

    Enhanced skin permeability is known to be achieved during sonophoresis due to ultrasound-induced cavitation. However, the mechanistic role of cavitation during sonophoresis has been extensively investigated only for low-frequency (LFS, sonophoresis (HFS, >1 MHz). The electrical resistance of skin, a surrogate measure of the permeability of skin to a variety of compounds, was measured to quantify the reduction and subsequent recovery of the skin barrier during and after exposure to pulsed (1 second pulse, 20% duty cycle) 0.41 and 2.0 MHz ultrasound over a range of acoustic powers (0-21.7 W) for 30 min. During IFS, significant skin resistance reductions and acoustic emissions from cavitation were measured exclusively when cavitation was isolated outside of the skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during IFS correlated significantly with subharmonic and broadband emission levels. During HFS, significant skin resistance reductions were accompanied by significant acoustic emissions from cavitation measured during trials that isolated cavitation activity either outside of skin or within skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during HFS correlated significantly greater with subharmonic than with broadband emission levels. The reduction of the skin barrier due to sonophoresis was reversible in all trials; however, effects incurred during IFS recovered more slowly and persisted over a longer period of time than HFS. These results quantitatively demonstrate the significance of cavitation during sonophoresis and suggest that the mechanisms and post-treatment longevity of permeability enhancement due to IFS and HFS treatments are different. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improvement of corrosion resistance of low-alloy steels by resurfacing using multifunction cavitation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijiri, Masataka; Yoshimura, Toshihiko

    2018-02-01

    Low-alloy steels are based on carbon steel in combination with several percent or less (in many cases, 1 mass%) alloying elements, and they offer improved resistance to corrosion at a cost slightly higher than that of carbon steel. However, these materials do not exhibit the same corrosion resistance as stainless steel. The authors have previously developed a novel multifunction cavitation (MFC) technique, which combines ultrasonic cavitation with water jet cavitation. In this study, MFC was used to modify the surface of Cr-Mo steel (SCM435) and Ni-Cr-Mo steel (SNCM630). MFC was found to improve the residual stress value of the material as the result of surface modification while also imparting high strength and superior corrosion resistance.

  4. Erosion resistance of bionic functional surfaces inspired from desert scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwu, Han; Junqiu, Zhang; Chao, Ge; Li, Wen; Ren, Luquan

    2012-02-07

    In this paper, a bionic method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components. Desert scorpion (Androctonus australis) is a typical animal living in sandy deserts, and may face erosive action of blowing sand at a high speed. Based on the idea of bionics and biologic experimental techniques, the mechanisms of the sand erosion resistance of desert scorpion were investigated. Results showed that the desert scorpions used special microtextures such as bumps and grooves to construct the functional surfaces to achieve the erosion resistance. In order to understand the erosion resistance mechanisms of such functional surfaces, the combination of computational and experimental research were carried out in this paper. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method was applied to predict the erosion performance of the bionic functional surfaces. The result demonstrated that the microtextured surfaces exhibited better erosion resistance than the smooth surfaces. The further erosion tests indicated that the groove surfaces exhibited better erosion performance at 30° injection angle. In order to determine the effect of the groove dimensions on the erosion resistance, regression analysis of orthogonal multinomials was also performed under a certain erosion condition, and the regression equation between the erosion rate and groove distance, width, and height was established.

  5. Ecological differentiation in xylem cavitation resistance is associated with stem and leaf structural traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markesteijn, L.; Poorter, L.; Paz, H.; Sack, L.; Bongers, F.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation resistance is a critical determinant of drought tolerance in tropical tree species, but little is known of its association with life history strategies, particularly for seasonal dry forests, a system critically driven by variation in water availability. We analysed vulnerability curves

  6. Erosion resistant elbow for solids conveyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Not Available

    An elvow and process for fabrication for use in particulate material conveying comprising a curved outer pipe, a curved inner pipe having the same radius of curvature as the outer pipe, concentric with and internal to the outer pipe, comprising an outer layer comprised of a first material and an inner layer comprised of a second material wherein said first material is characterized by high erosion resistance when impinged by particulate material and wherein said second material is characterized by high tensile strength and flexibility, and an inner pipe supporting means for providing support to said inner pipe, disposed between said inner pipe and said outer pipe. 4 figures.

  7. Effect of Cavitation on Surface Damage of 16.7Cr-10Ni-2Mo Stainless Steel in Marine Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Sang-Ok; Han, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steel is generally known to have characteristics of excellent corrosion resistance and durability, but in a marine environment it can suffer from localized corrosion due to the breakdown of passivity film due to chloride ion in seawater. Furthermore, the damage behaviors are sped up under a cavitation environment because of complex damage from electrochemical corrosion and cavitation-erosion. In this study the characteristics of electrochemical corrosion and cavitation erosion behavior were evaluated on 16.7Cr-10Ni-2Mo stainless steel under a cavitation environment in natural seawater. The electrochemical experiments have been conducted at both static conditions and dynamic conditions inducing cavitation with different current density parameters. The surface morphology and damage behaviors were compared after the experiment. After the cavitation test with time variables morphological examinations on damaged specimens were analyzed by using a scanning electron microscope and a 3D microscope. the galvanostatic experiment gave a cleaner surface morphology presented with less damage depth at high current density regions. It is due to the effect of water cavitation peening under the cavitation condition. In the cavitation experiment, with amplitude of 30 μm and seawater temperature of 25 ℃, weight loss and cavitation-erosion damage depth were dramatically increased after 5 hours inducing cavitation

  8. Cavitation in Hydraulic Machinery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldsen, M.

    1996-11-01

    The main purpose of this doctoral thesis on cavitation in hydraulic machinery is to change focus towards the coupling of non-stationary flow phenomena and cavitation. It is argued that, in addition to turbulence, superimposed sound pressure fluctuations can have a major impact on cavitation and lead to particularly severe erosion. For the design of hydraulic devices this finding may indicate how to further limit the cavitation problems. Chapter 1 reviews cavitation in general in the context of hydraulic machinery, emphasizing the initial cavitation event and the role of the water quality. Chapter 2 discusses the existence of pressure fluctuations for situations common in such machinery. Chapter 3 on cavitation dynamics presents an algorithm for calculating the nucleation of a cavity cluster. Chapter 4 describes the equipment used in this work. 53 refs., 55 figs.,10 tabs.

  9. Testing hypotheses that link wood anatomy to cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in the genus Acer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Frederic; Sperry, John S; Christman, Mairgareth A; Choat, Brendan; Rabaey, David; Jansen, Steven

    2011-05-01

    • Vulnerability to cavitation and conductive efficiency depend on xylem anatomy. We tested a large range of structure-function hypotheses, some for the first time, within a single genus to minimize phylogenetic 'noise' and maximize detection of functionally relevant variation. • This integrative study combined in-depth anatomical observations using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy of seven Acer taxa, and compared these observations with empirical measures of xylem hydraulics. • Our results reveal a 2 MPa range in species' mean cavitation pressure (MCP). MCP was strongly correlated with intervessel pit structure (membrane thickness and porosity, chamber depth), weakly correlated with pit number per vessel, and not related to pit area per vessel. At the tissue level, there was a strong correlation between MCP and mechanical strength parameters, and some of the first evidence is provided for the functional significance of vessel grouping and thickenings on inner vessel walls. In addition, a strong trade-off was observed between xylem-specific conductivity and MCP. Vessel length and intervessel wall characteristics were implicated in this safety-efficiency trade-off. • Cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in Acer appear to be controlled by a very complex interaction between tissue, vessel network and pit characteristics. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Compressor Impeller Erosion Resistant Surface Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael

    2000-01-01

    ...). Coatings based on tungsten carbide tantalum carbide. titanium carbide all with a cobalt matrix were evaluated for high velocity particle erosion in conventional wear test studies as well as wind tunnel testing...

  11. Laser processing of cast iron for enhanced erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.; Altstetter, C.J.; Rigsbee, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The surfaces of nodular and gray cast iron have been modified by CO 2 laser processing for enhanced hardness and erosion resistance. Control of the near-surface microstructure was achieved primarily by controlling resolidification of the laser melted layer through variations in laser beam/target interaction time and beam power density. Typical interaction times and power densities used were 5 msec and 500 kW/cm 2 . Two basic kinds of microstructure can be produced-a feathery microstructure with high hardness (up to 1245 HV) and a dendritic microstructure with a metastable, fully austenitic matrix and lower hardness (600 to 800 HV). Erosion testing was done using slurries of SiO 2 or SiC in water. Weight loss and crater profile measurements were used to evaluate the erosion characteristics of the various microstructures. Both ductile and gray cast iron showed marked improvement in erosion resistance after laser processing

  12. Cavitation and Electrochemical Characteristics in Seawater by Water Cavitation Peening of 5083-O al Alloy for Ships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Koangyong; Kim, Seong-Jong

    Aluminum (Al) alloy ships are vulnerable to both damage from chlorine ions in seawater environments and cavitation-erosion due to fast relative motion of metal and liquid resulting from lightweight and high-speed vessels moving through seawater. These corrosive processes cause damage to the hulls of ships, resulting in large economic losses. Recently, cavitation peening technology to improve the durability of a material has been in development. The technology works by forming compressive residual stress on the surface layer of the material in order to improve fatigue strength and fatigue life. In this study, we performed a water cavitation peening (WCP) on a 5083-O Al alloy for ships by applying an ultrasonic piezoelectric effect and cavitation effect, as described in ASTM-G32. From these experiments, we determined an optimum WCP duration, 2.5min, for sufficient cavitation resistance characteristics. This timing improved cavitation resistance by 48.68% compared to the untreated condition. A comprehensive comparison of all of results revealed that the optimum WCP duration was 3min with respect to the point of cavitation and corrosion resistance.

  13. Feasibility Study of Low Force Robotic Friction Stir Process and its Effect On Cavitation Erosion and Electrochemical Corrosion for Ni Al Bronze Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Azman; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi; Cuiuri, Dominic; van Duin, Stephen; Larkin, Nathan; Polden, Joseph; Lane, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    Robotic friction stir processing (FSP) has not been widely researched to date. This is perhaps due to the limited force capabilities of industrial robots in comparison with dedicated commercial FSP equipment. When operating a FSP machine, the force used to plunge the tools may range from 5000 to 8000 N which is currently beyond the capability of most robots. However, the capacity of robotic manipulators is increasing, so low force friction stir processing is becoming feasible. The ability of the robot arm to apply a controlled force that is normal to a 3-dimensional surface without the need to reorient the workpiece makes it a very useful tool for FSP of complex components. In this analysis, a robot arm with a capacity of 2500 N is used to improve the surface properties of nickel aluminum bronze (NAB) using low force FSP. Multiple passes were applied to the surface of the test sample for a more consistent spread of the stir zone. The sample was then microhardness tested and demonstrated a 62 pct increase in surface hardness. Cavitation erosion testing of the original and processed surfaces was also performed as per ASTM G-32. The erosion rate of the processed NAB sample was 44 pct of the rate experienced by the original cast NAB sample. Finally, the corrosion potentials of FSP NAB were measured at 45 mV less anodic than the unprocessed material, indicating that the processed material is more noble relative to the cast NAB sample.

  14. Analysis of the cavitating flow induced by an ultrasonic horn – Numerical 3D simulation for the analysis of vapour structures and the assessment of erosion-sensitive areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mottyll Stephan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the outcome of a numerical study of ultrasonic cavitation using a CFD flow algorithm based on a compressible density-based finite volume method with a low-Machnumber consistent flux function and an explicit time integration [15; 18] in combination with an erosion-detecting flow analysis procedure. The model is validated against erosion data of an ultrasonic horn for different gap widths between the horn tip and a counter sample which has been intensively investigated in previous material studies at the Ruhr University Bochum [23] as well as on first optical in-house flow measurement data which is presented in a companion paper [13]. Flow features such as subharmonic cavitation oscillation frequencies as well as constricted vapour cloud structures can also be observed by the vapour regions predicted in our simulation as well as by the detected collapse event field (collapse detector [12]. With a statistical analysis of transient wall loads we can determine the erosion sensitive areas qualitatively. Our simulation method can reproduce the influence of the gap width on vapour structure and on location of cavitation erosion.

  15. Effect of temperature change on the sealing properties of Cavit and Cavit G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, S; Rosenberg, P A

    1979-09-01

    Sixty recently extracted intact anterior teeth were filled with Cavit G or Cavit. They were examined for dye penetration at room temperature and subjected to temperature change. Under the test conditions Cavit G and Cavit were resistant to penetration by aqueous methylene blue dye.

  16. Erosion resistant nozzles for laser plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Bernardez, II, Luis J.

    2000-01-04

    A gas nozzle having an increased resistance to erosion from energetic plasma particles generated by laser plasma sources. By reducing the area of the plasma-facing portion of the nozzle below a critical dimension and fabricating the nozzle from a material that has a high EUV transmission as well as a low sputtering coefficient such as Be, C, or Si, it has been shown that a significant reduction in reflectance loss of nearby optical components can be achieved even after exposing the nozzle to at least 10.sup.7 Xe plasma pulses.

  17. Cavitation instabilities and rotordynamic effects in turbopumps and hydroturbines turbopump and inducer cavitation, experiments and design

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a detailed approach to the physics, fluid dynamics, modeling, experimentation and numerical simulation of cavitation phenomena, with special emphasis on cavitation-induced instabilities and their implications on the design and operation of high performance turbopumps and hydraulic turbines. The first part covers the fundamentals (nucleation, dynamics, thermodynamic effects, erosion) and forms of cavitation (attached cavitation, cloud cavitation, supercavitation, vortex cavitation) relevant to hydraulic turbomachinery, illustrates modern experimental techniques for the characterization, visualization and analysis of cavitating flows, and introduces the main aspects of the hydrodynamic design and performance of axial inducers, centrifugal turbopumps and hydo-turbines. The second part focuses on the theoretical modeling, experimental analysis, and practical control of cavitation-induced fluid-dynamic and rotordynamic instabilities of hydraulic turbomachinery, with special emphasis on cavitating...

  18. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microstructure is one of the most important parameters influencing erosion behaviour of materials. The role of carbides in the matrix is very complicated in controlling the erosion rate of the materials. Conflicting results have been reported in the literature about the effect of carbides on erosion resistance. Carbides are of ...

  19. Techniques of Ultrasound Cavitation Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Skvortsov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The control methods of ultrasonic cavitation applied now within the range from 20 kHz to 80 kHz use either control of ultrasound source parameters (amplitude, acoustic power, etc. or control of one of the cavitation effects (erosion of materials, sonoluminescence, power of acoustic noise, etc.. These methods provide effective management of technological processes, however, make it impossible to relate the estimated effect with parameters of pulsations of cavitation bubbles. This is, mainly, due to influence of a number of uncontrollable parameters, in particular, such as temperature, composition of liquid, gas content, etc. as well as because of the difficulty to establish interrelation between the estimated effect and parameters of pulsations. As a result, in most cases it is difficult to compare controlled parameters of ultrasonic cavitation among themselves, and quantitative characteristics of processes become depending on the type of ultrasonic installation and conditions of their measurement.In this regard, methods to determine parameters of bubble pulsations through sounding a cavitation area by low-intensity laser radiation or to record cavitation noise sub-harmonics reflecting dynamics of changing radius of cavitation bubbles are of interest. The method of optical sounding, via the analysis of spectral components of a scattered signal recorded by a photo-detector, allows us to define a phase of the bubbles collapse with respect to the sound wave and a moving speed of the bubbles wall, as well as to estimate a cavitation index within the light beam section.The method to record sub-harmonicas of cavitation noise allows us to define parameters of pulsations, average for cavitation areas.The above methods allow us both to study mechanisms of cavitation action and to form quantitative criteria of its efficiency based on the physical processes, rather than their consequences and are convenient for arranging a feedback in the units using

  20. Testing hypotheses that link wood anatomy to cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in the genus Acer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lens, F.; Sperry, J.S.; Christmas, M.A.; Rabaey, D.; Jansen, S.

    2011-01-01

    • Vulnerability to cavitation and conductive efficiency depend on xylem anatomy. We tested a large range of structure–function hypotheses, some for the first time, within a single genus to minimize phylogenetic ‘noise’ and maximize detection of functionally relevant variation. • This integrative

  1. Ice-Release and Erosion Resistant Materials for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Brinn, Cameron; Cook, Alex; Pascual-Marquez, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Icing conditions may cause wind turbine generators to partially lose productivity or to be completely shut down to avoid structural damage. At present, commercially available technologies to mitigate this problem consist of expensive, energy hungry heating elements, which costs roughly 70,000 euro per medium size turbine. Conventional passive ice protection coating systems heavily rely on delicate surface structures and expensive materials to create water repellent superhydrophobic / low surface energy surfaces, which have been proven to be ineffective against ice accumulation. The lack of performance among conventional ice protection materials stems from a flaw in the approach to the problem: failure to recognize that water in its liquid form (WATER) and water in its solid form (ICE) are two different things. Something that works for WATER does not automatically work for ICE. Another reason is that many superhydrophobic materials are often reliant upon often fragile micro-structured surfaces to achieve their intended effects. This paper discusses a fundamentally different approach to the creation of a robust, low cost, durable, and multifunctional materials for ice release and erosion resistance. This National Science Foundation sponsored ice-release coating technology holds promise for protecting wind turbine blades and towers, thus potentially increasing reliability for power generation under icing conditions. Because of the vulnerability of wind turbine blades to ice buildup and erosion damages, wind farm facilities stand to reap considerable benefits.

  2. Ion implantation method for preparing polymers having oxygen erosion resistant surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eal H.; Mansur, Louis K.; Heatherly, Jr., Lee

    1995-01-01

    Hard surfaced polymers and the method for making them are generally described. Polymers are subjected to simultaneous multiple ion beam bombardment, that results in a hardening of the surface, improved wear resistance, and improved oxygen erosion resistance.

  3. Effects of erodant particle shape and various heat treatments on erosion resistance of plain carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salik, J.; Buckley, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Erosion tests were conducted on 1045 steel samples which had been subjected to different heat treatments. The weight of material removed upon erosion with glass beads and crushed glass was measured. The data show that there is no correlation between hardness and erosion resistance. The erosion rate was strongly dependent on the shape of erodant particles, being an order of magnitude higher for erosion with crushed glass than with glass beads. Heat treatment had a profound effect on the erosion resistance when the erodant particles were glass beads but little or no effect when the particles were crushed glass. It is thus concluded that different mechanisms of material removal are involved with these two erodants. This conclusion is supported by the surface morphology of annealed 1045 steel samples which had been eroded by these two types of erodant particles. SEM micrographs of the eroded surfaces show that for erosion with glass beads it is deformation induced fracture of surface layers.

  4. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramm, D.A.J.; Hutchings, I.M.; Clyne, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharply reducing the erosive wear at high erodent impact angles, whilst retaining the good erosion resistance of ceramics at low angles. It is shown that the proportion of metal and ceramic at the free surface can be specified so as to optimise the erosion resistance. Experiments have also been carried out on the resistance of the coatings to debonding during four-point bending of the coated substrate. Progress is being made towards the tailoring of composition profiles in graded coatings so as to optimise the combination of erosion resistance and adhesion. (orig.)

  5. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating cavitation,...

  6. Assessment of Erosion Resistance of Coated Polymer Matrix Composites for Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Sutter, James K.; Horan, Richard A.; Naik, Subhash K.; Cupp, Randall J.

    2004-01-01

    The erosion behavior of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) coated and uncoated polymer matrix composites (PMCs) was examined with solid particle impingement using air jets. Erosion tests were conducted with Arizona road dust impinging at 20 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees angles at a velocity of 229 meters per second at both 294 and 366 K. Noncontact optical profilometry was used to measure the wear volume loss. Results indicate that the WC-Co coating enhanced erosion resistance and reduced erosion wear volume loss by a factor of nearly 2. This should contribute to longer wear lives, reduced related breakdowns, decreased maintenance costs, and increased product reliability.

  7. [Effects and mechanisms of plant roots on slope reinforcement and soil erosion resistance: a research review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-Mei; Xia, Han-Ping; Li, Zhi-An; Cai, Xi-An

    2007-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in resisting the shallow landslip and topsoil erosion of slopes by raising soil shear strength. Among the models in interpreting the mechanisms of slope reinforcement by plant roots, Wu-Waldron model is a widely accepted one. In this model, the reinforced soil strength by plant roots is positively proportional to average root tensile strength and root area ratio, the two most important factors in evaluating slope reinforcement effect of plant roots. It was found that soil erosion resistance increased with the number of plant roots, though no consistent quantitative functional relationship was observed between them. The increase of soil erosion resistance by plant roots was mainly through the actions of fiber roots less than 1 mm in diameter, while fiber roots enhanced the soil stability to resist water dispersion via increasing the number and diameter of soil water-stable aggregates. Fine roots could also improve soil permeability effectively to decrease runoff and weaken soil erosion.

  8. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  9. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics including: plasticity, : water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear strength. Many of these characteristics also : influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  10. Characterizing soil erosion potential using electrical resistivity imaging : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The erosion rate, or erodibility, of soil depends on many soil characteristics : including: plasticity, water content, grain size, percent clay, compaction, and shear : strength. Many of these characteristics also influence soil in situ bulk electric...

  11. Abrasion-erosion resistance of concrete made with two aggregates, Stonewall Jackson Dam, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, T. C.

    1983-09-01

    The resistance to abrasion-erosion of two concretes made with different coarse aggregates was evaluated. The aggregates used were selected as being representative of those that may be selected for use during construction of Stonewall Jackson Dam. The two coarse aggregates were limestones from different sources. All other concrete ingredients were identical for the two mixtures. Both concretes showed very high abrasion-erosion losses when tested using the Corps of Engineers standard test method. A recommendation was made that coarse aggregates with better wear-resistant properties be selected for use in areas of the structure that may be subjected to abrasion-erosion.

  12. Application of Computer Simulation to Identify Erosion Resistance of Materials of Wet-steam Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelyov, D. A.; Dergachyov, K. V.

    2017-10-01

    A problem of identifying the efficiency of using materials, coatings, linings and solderings of wet-steam turbine rotor blades by means of computer simulation is considered. Numerical experiments to define erosion resistance of materials of wet-steam turbine blades are described. Kinetic curves for erosion area and weight of the worn rotor blade material of turbines K-300-240 LMP and atomic icebreaker “Lenin” have been defined. The conclusion about the effectiveness of using different erosion-resistant materials and protection configuration of rotor blades is also made.

  13. Some experiments on cavitation damage produced by a submerged jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momma, T.; Lichtarowicz, A.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation erosion produced by a submerged jet can be utilized for cleaning surface contamination. This paper describes some results obtained from experiments at the University of Nottingham conducted on cavitating jets and their effects on surfaces. Some effects of cavitation on submerged jets were examined. High speed photography was used to show the structure of the jet. All stages of damage to soft aluminum specimens from plastically deformed indentations down to large concentric erosion rings were observed. The amount of erosion depended on the configuration of the set up and on the flow parameters. Early stages of erosion can be used for cleaning

  14. Loss of Plant Species Diversity Reduces Soil Erosion Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Ruijven, van J.; Jongejans, E.; Keesstra, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    In many estuarine areas around the world, the safety of human societies depends on the functioning of embankments (dikes) that provide protection against river floods and storm tides. Vegetation on land-side slopes protects these embankments from erosion by heavy rains or overtopping waves. We

  15. Spatial distribution of cavitation-shock-pressure around a jet-flow gate-valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oba, Risaburo; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ito, Yukio; Miyakura, Hideto; Nozaki, Satoru; Ishige, Tadashi; Sonoda, Shuji; Sakamoto, Kenji.

    1987-01-01

    To make clear the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the spatial distribution of cavitation shock pressures were quantitatively measured by a pressure sensitive sheet in the 1/10 scale model of a jet-flow gate-valve, for various valve-openings and cavitation numbers. The dynamic pressure response of the sheet was corrected by the shock wave generated from detonation explosives. It is made clear that the erosive shock pressures are distributed in a limited part of the whole cavitation region, and the safety region without the fatal cavitation erosion is defined. (author)

  16. Effect of thermal aging on the erosion resistance of air plasma sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janos, B.Z.; Lugscheider, E.; Remer, P.

    1999-01-01

    To increase the performance, efficiency and reliability of thermal barrier coatings, it is important to understand the influence of the microstructure on the erosion resistance. Therefore, the erosion behavior of air-plasma-sprayed 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC) at elevated temperatures was investigated. The paper focuses on both the porosity of the coating as well as the thermal pre-treatment of the ceramic. To simulate operating conditions on the ceramic samples, high-temperature erosion experiments at 1093 C were carried out on as-sprayed samples as well as on samples, thermally aged at different temperatures up to 1482 C in air prior to erosion testing. A significant dependence of erosion rate on porosity and thermal pre-treatment was found. Finally, a technique was developed to predict the erosion rates of air-plasma-sprayed 7YSZ TBCs independent of aging conditions or porosity levels. Erosion rates seem to be highly correlated to the micro-hardness of the zirconia TBC. A power-law model was empirically derived to estimate erosion rates of plasma-sprayed 7YSZ ceramic thermal barrier coatings. (orig.)

  17. Contribution to the prediction of cavitation erosion from numerical simulations: proposition of a two scales model to estimate the charge imposed by the fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumenacker, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During the life's cycle of a hydraulic installation, the occurrence of cavitation can cause significant damages on the material's surface. The quantification of the cavitation intensity in different geometry can be useful to get better designs for new installations, but also to improve the operating and to optimize maintenance of existing equipments. The development of universal laws of similarity from experiments is difficult due to the large number of parameters governing cavitating flows. With the increase of computational performance, numerical simulations offer the opportunity to study this phenomenon in various geometries. The main difficulty of this approach is the scale's difference existing between the numerical simulations U-RANS used to calculate the cavitating flow and mechanisms of bubble's collapse held responsible for damages on the solid. The proposed method in this thesis is based on a post-treatment of the U-RANS simulations to characterize a distribution of bubbles and to simulate their behavior at lower spatial and temporal scales. Our first objective is to make explicit a system of equations corresponding to phenomena occurring locally in the two-phase flow. This work leads to the development of mixture variables taking into account the presence of non-condensable gases in the fluid. Assumptions are taken to make the system, after using the Reynolds averaging procedure, equivalent to those, using a homogeneous approach, implemented in the unsteady cavitating flows solvers previously developed in the laboratory. The characterization of bubbles made by this post-treatment takes into account both the surface tension and the presence of non-condensable gases. The development of a solver for the simulation of the dynamic of a bubble cloud is started. It aims to take into account both the interactions between bubbles and non-spherical deformations with a potential method. First results of these simulations are presented and small

  18. Comparison of Different Mathematical Models of Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota HOMA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation occurs during the flow when local pressure drops to the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. It includes both evaporation and condensation of the vapor bubbles, which occur alternately with high frequency. Cavitation can be very dangerous, especially for pumps, because it leads to break of flow continuity, noise, vibration, erosion of blades and change in pump’s characteristics. Therefore it is very important for pump designers and users to avoid working in cavitation conditions. Simulation of flow can be very useful in that and can indicate if there is risk of cavitating flow occurrence. As this is a multiphase flow and quite complicated phenomena, there are a few mathematical models describing it. The aim of this paper is to make a short review of them and describe their approach to model cavitation. It is desirable to know differences between them to model this phenomenon properly.

  19. Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    OCT-11 -31-DEC-14 To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-12...239-18 Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors Jules W. Lindau The Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, State...flow nature, waterjets are expected to maintain resistance to cavitation , are amenable to ad- vanced concepts such as thrust vectoring, should

  20. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhe [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); Yu, Ting [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States); School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Kovacevic, Radovan, E-mail: kovacevi@smu.edu [Center for Laser-aided Manufacturing, Lyle School of Engineering, Southern Methodist University, 3101 Dyer Street, Dallas, TX 75206 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V{sub 8}C{sub 7}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content

  1. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The coatings of 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC were fabricated by high power direct diode laser. • The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was increased with the increase in the VC fraction. • No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. • The corrosion resistance of the cladded layer was decreased with the increase in the VC fraction. - Abstract: Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%–40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V 8 C 7 , M 7 C 3 , and M 23 C 6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement

  2. Erosion and corrosion resistance of laser cladded AISI 420 stainless steel reinforced with VC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Yu, Ting; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2017-07-01

    Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) fabricated by the laser cladding process have been widely applied as protective coatings in industries to improve the wear, erosion, and corrosion resistance of components and prolong their service life. In this study, the AISI 420/VC metal matrix composites with different weight percentage (0 wt.%-40 wt.%) of Vanadium Carbide (VC) were fabricated on a mild steel A36 by a high power direct diode laser. An induction heater was used to preheat the substrate in order to avoid cracks during the cladding process. The effect of carbide content on the microstructure, elements distribution, phases, and microhardness was investigated in detail. The erosion resistance of the coatings was tested by using the abrasive waterjet (AWJ) cutting machine. The corrosion resistance of the coatings was studied utilizing potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the surface roughness and crack susceptibility of the laser cladded layer were increased with the increase in VC fraction. The volume fraction of the precipitated carbides was increased with the increase in the VC content. The phases of the coating without VC consisted of martensite and austenite. New phases such as precipitated VC, V8C7, M7C3, and M23C6 were formed when the primary VC was added. The microhardness of the clads was increased with the increase in VC. The erosion resistance of the cladded layer was improved after the introduction of VC. The erosion resistance was increased with the increase in the VC content. No obvious improvement of erosion resistance was observed when the VC fraction was above 30 wt.%. The corrosion resistance of the clads was decreased with the increase in the VC content, demonstrating the negative effect of VC on the corrosion resistance of AISI 420 stainless steel

  3. Long term erosion resistance of unprotected radon suppression earth covers to wind stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bander, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Estimates of the amount of soil cover lost due to wind erosion are obtained using three different models. One model developed by W. S. Chepil employs a wind erosion equation which is based on wind tunnel and agricultural field measurements. The second model is based on an analytical solution of the saltation process obtained by P. R. Owen and agrees well with the data of Bagnold and Zingg. The third model was developed by Gillette and is based on a modification of the horizontal flux equation used by Bagnold and Chepil. Basic differences between the models are examined and a comparison of the soil movement predicted by each is presented. The usefulness of these wind erosion models as guidance in designing long term erosion-resistant covers for tailings piles is considered.

  4. International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  5. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and

  6. Erosion Resistant Compressor Blade Repair Technologies, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR program will demonstrate the use of wear resistant high strength nanocomposites in the turbine engine repair and refurbishment process. The...

  7. Seasonality of cavitation and frost fatigue in Acer mono Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Feng, Feng; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-12-08

    Although cavitation is common in plants, it is unknown whether the cavitation resistance of xylem is seasonally constant or variable. We tested the changes in cavitation resistance of Acer mono before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling and freeze-thaw cycles for a whole year. Cavitation resistance was determined from 'vulnerability curves' showing the percent loss of conductivity versus xylem tension. Cavitation fatigue was defined as a reduction of cavitation resistance following a cavitation-refilling cycle, whereas frost fatigue was caused by a freeze-thaw cycle. A. mono developed seasonal changes in native embolisms; values were relatively high during winter but relatively low and constant throughout the growing season. Cavitation fatigue occurred and changed seasonally during the 12-month cycle; the greatest fatigue response occurred during summer and the weakest during winter, and the transitions occurred during spring and autumn. A. mono was highly resistant to frost damage during the relatively mild winter months; however, a quite different situation occurred during the growing season, as the seasonal trend of frost fatigue was strikingly similar to that of cavitation fatigue. Seasonality changes in cavitation resistance may be caused by seasonal changes in the mechanical properties of the pit membranes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Erosion-Resistant Nanocoatings for Improved Energy Efficiency in Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alman, David; Marcio, Duffles

    2014-02-05

    The objective of this Stage Gate IV project was to test and substantiate the viability of an erosion-resistant nanocoating for application on compressor airfoils for gas turbines in both industrial power generation and commercial aviation applications. To effectively complete this project, the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Office of Research & Development teamed with MDS Coating Technologies Inc. (MCT), Delta Air Lines - Technical Operations Division (Delta Tech Ops), and Calpine Corporation. The coating targeted for this application was MCT’s Next Generation Coating, version 4 (NGC-v4 - with the new registered trademark name of BlackGold®). The coating is an erosion and corrosion resistant composite nanostructured coating. This coating is comprised of a proprietary ceramic-metallic nano-composite construction which provides enhanced erosion resistance and also retains the aerodynamic geometry of the airfoils. The objective of the commercial aviation portion of the project was to substantiate the coating properties to allow certification from the FAA to apply an erosion-resistant coating in a commercial aviation engine. The goal of the series of tests was to demonstrate that the durability of the airfoils is not affected negatively with the application of the NGC v4 coating. Tests included erosion, corrosion, vibration and fatigue. The results of the testing demonstrated that the application of the coating did not negatively impact the properties of the blades, especially fatigue performance – which is of importance in acceptance for commercial aviation applications. The objective of the industrial gas turbine element of the project was to evaluate the coating as an enabling technology for inlet fogging during the operation of industrial gas turbines. Fluid erosion laboratory scale tests were conducted to simulate inlet fogging conditions. Results of these tests indicated that the application of the erosion resistant NGC-v4 nanocoating improved the

  9. Report of sodium cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murai, Hitoshi; Shima, Akira; Oba, Toshisaburo; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki

    1975-01-01

    The damage of components for LMFBRs due to sodium cavitation is serious problem. This report summarizes the following items, (1) mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation, (2) damage due to sodium cavitation, (3) detection method for sodium cavitation, and (4) estimation method for sodium cavitation by the comparison with water cavitation. Materials were collected from the reports on liquid metal cavitation, sodium cavitation and water cavitation published from 1965 to now. The mechanism of the incipience of sodium cavitation cavitation parameters (mean location, distributed amount or occurrence aspect and stability), experiment of causing cavitation with Venturi tube, and growth of bubbles within superheated sodium. The sodium cavitation damage was caused by magnetostriction vibration method and with Venturi tube. The state of damage was investigated with the cavitation performance of a sodium pump, and the damage was examined in view of the safety of LMFBR plants. Sodium cavitation was detected with acoustic method, radiation method, and electric method. The effect of physical property of liquid on incipient cavitation was studied. These are thermodynamic effect based on quasistatic thermal equilibrium condition and the effect of the physical property of liquid based on bubble dynamics. (Iwase, T.)

  10. Cavitation resistance of surface composition "Steel-Ni-TiNi-TiNiZr-cBNCo", formed by High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blednova, Zh. M.; Dmitrenko, D. V.; Balaev, E. U. O.

    2018-01-01

    The object of the study is a multilayered surface composition "Steel - a Multicomponent material with Shape Memory Effect - a wear-resistant layer" under conditions of cavitation effects in sea water. Multicomponent TiNi-based coatings with addition of alloying elements such as Zr in an amount up to 10% mass, allow to create a composite material with a gradient of properties at the interface of layers, which gives new properties to coatings and improves their performance significantly. The use of materials with shape memory effect (SME) as surface layers or in the composition of surface layered compositions allows to provide an effective reaction of materials to the influence of external factors and adaptation to external influences. The surface composite layer cBN-10%Co has high hardness and strength, which ensures its resistance to shock cyclic influences of collapsing caverns. The increased roughness of the surface of a solid surface composite in the form of strong columnar structures ensures the crushing of vacuum voids, redistributing their effect on the entire surface, and not concentrating them in certain zones. In addition, the gradient structure of the multilayer composite coating TiNi-Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co Co makes it possible to create conditions for the relaxation of stresses created by the variable impact load of cavitation caverns and the manifestation of compensating internal forces due to thermo-elastic martensitic transformations of SME materials. The cavitation resistance of the coating TiNi-Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co according to the criterion of mass wear is 15-20 times higher than that of the base material without coating and 10-12 times higher than that of the TiNi-TiNiZr coating. The proposed architecture of the multifunctional gradient composition, "steel-Ni-TiNi- Ti33Ni49Zr18-cBN-10%Co", each layer of which has its functional purpose, allows to increase the service life of parts operating under conditions of cavitation-fatigue loading in

  11. Structural Analysis of Cavitation for Different Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina-Elena Mânzână

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The cavitation phenomenon is currently approaching all areas of technology and modern industry, where are fluid in motion. In this paper cavitational erosion was conducted on different samples of stainless steels. The cavitation were performed in magnetostrictive vibrating apparatus at Cavitation Laboratory (Polytechnic University of Timisoara. The present paper intends to identify specific structural features in stainless steels. Several investigations were done: macrostructural analysis (Olympus SZX57, scaning electron microscope (Philips SEM and X-ray diffraction (D8 ADVANCE. After quantitative and qualitative investigations structural features were put in evidence on experimental stainless steels.

  12. Plasma nitriding of a precipitation hardening stainless steel to improve erosion and corrosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabo, Amado; Bruhl, Sonia P.; Vaca, Laura S.; Charadia, Raul Charadia

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation hardening stainless steels are used as structural materials in the aircraft and the chemical industry because of their good combination of mechanical and corrosion properties. The aim of this work is to analyze the structural changes produced by plasma nitriding in the near surface of Thyroplast PH X Supra®, a PH stainless steel from ThyssenKrupp, and to study the effect of nitriding parameters in wear and corrosion resistance. Samples were first aged and then nitriding was carried out in an industrial facility at two temperatures, with two different nitrogen partial pressures in the gas mixture. After nitriding, samples were cut, polished, mounted in resin and etched with Vilella reagent to reveal the nitrided case. Nitrided structure was also analyzed with XRD. Erosion/Corrosion was tested against sea water and sand flux, and corrosion in a salt spray fog (ASTM B117). All nitrided samples presented high hardness. Samples nitrided at 390 deg C with different nitrogen partial pressure showed similar erosion resistance against water and sand flux. The erosion resistance of the nitrided samples at 500 deg C was the highest and XRD revealed nitrides. Corrosion resistance, on the contrary, was diminished; the samples suffered of general corrosion during the salt spray fog test. (author)

  13. TEMPEST code modifications and testing for erosion-resisting sludge simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    The TEMPEST computer code has been used to address many waste retrieval operational and safety questions regarding waste mobilization, mixing, and gas retention. Because the amount of sludge retrieved from the tank is directly related to the sludge yield strength and the shear stress acting upon it, it is important to incorporate the sludge yield strength into simulations of erosion-resisting tank waste retrieval operations. This report describes current efforts to modify the TEMPEST code to simulate pump jet mixing of erosion-resisting tank wastes and the models used to test for erosion of waste sludge with yield strength. Test results for solid deposition and diluent/slurry jet injection into sludge layers in simplified tank conditions show that the modified TEMPEST code has a basic ability to simulate both the mobility and immobility of the sludges with yield strength. Further testing, modification, calibration, and verification of the sludge mobilization/immobilization model are planned using erosion data as they apply to waste tank sludges

  14. Erosion resistance and adhesion of composite metal/ceramic coatings produced by plasma spraying

    OpenAIRE

    Ramm , D.; Hutchings , I.; Clyne , T.

    1993-01-01

    Ceramic coatings can exhibit greater erosion resistance than most metallic coatings. Such coatings are conveniently produced by thermal spraying. Unfortunately, thermally sprayed ceramic coatings often exhibit poor adhesion, partly as a consequence of the development of residual stresses during spraying and subsequent cooling. Composite coatings have been studied using aluminium/alumina deposits on steel substrates. The incorporation of ceramics within a ductile matrix has potential for sharp...

  15. Durability of Compressed Earth Bricks: Assessing Erosion Resistance Using the Modified Spray Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malarvizhi Baskaran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The discussion in this paper is part of research directed at establishing optimal stabilization strategy for compressed bricks. The deployment context for the use of the compressed bricks was Dar es Salaam (Tanzania where manually fabricated bricks are increasingly being used in low cost housing units. This discussion specifically focuses on strategies that can be used to counter deterioration due to wind-driven rain erosion. The impact of using cement, lime, fiber and a commercial stabilizing fluid was assessed. Factory-produced bricks were used for benchmarking. The durability of the bricks was assessed using the “modified” Bulletin 5 Spray Test. The different brick specimens were sprayed with water at 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa over one-hour time period while measuring the depth of erosion every 15 minutes. Factory-produced bricks hardly eroded at both 2.07 MPa and 4.14 MPa pressure levels. The maximum depth of erosion for Soil-Cement bricks ranged from a maximum of 0.5 mm at 2.07 MPa water pressure to 0.8 mm at 4.14 MPa. The maximum and minimum depths of erosion for Soil-Cement-Lime bricks were 25mm and 17 mm respectively. The inclusion of natural fiber in the bricks resulted in a sharp increase of the erosion depth to a maximum of 40 mm at 2.07 MPa and 55 mm at 4.14 Mpa. As the use of natural fibers and lime enhances some physio-mechanical properties, further research is necessary to determine ways of achieving this goal while maintaining acceptable levels of erosion resistance.

  16. Patterns of tree dieback in Queensland, Australia: the importance of drought stress and the role of resistance to cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kevin J; Matzner, Steven L; Byer, William; Brown, Joel R

    2004-04-01

    During the extreme 1992-1997 El Niño drought event, widespread stem mortality, or tree "dieback", of both mature and juvenile eucalypts occurred within the tropical savannas of northeast Australia. Most of the dieback occurred in individuals of the ironbark species complex ( Eucalyptus crebra- E. xanthoclada) while individuals of the bloodwood species Corymbia erythrophloia, exhibited significantly less stem mortality. Indicative of greater water stress, predawn and midday xylem water potentials of ironbark adults and saplings were significantly more negative than predawn values of bloodwoods. The very negative xylem water potentials in ironbarks suggest that stem mortality in both adult and juvenile ironbarks results from drought-induced embolism and that ironbarks perhaps have a shallower and less extensive root system than bloodwoods. Although predawn and midday water potentials for ironbark adults and saplings were similar, a census of mature and juvenile ironbark trees indicated that mortality was higher in adult trees. Cavitation vulnerability curves indicated that ironbark saplings may be better buffered against cavitation than adult trees. If they possess smaller root systems, saplings are more likely than adults to experience low xylem water potentials, even in non-drought years. Xylem conduits produced in adult trees during periods of normal rainfall, although perhaps more efficient in water conduction, may be more vulnerable to cavitation during infrequent severe droughts.

  17. Upgraded flowing liquid lithium limiter for improving Li coverage uniformity and erosion resistance in EAST device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, G. Z.; Hu, J. S.; Maingi, R.; Yang, Q. X.; Sun, Z.; Huang, M.; Chen, Y.; Yuan, X. L.; Meng, X. C.; Xu, W.; Gentile, C.; Carpe, A.; Diallo, A.; Lunsford, R.; Mansfield, D.; Osborne, T.; Tritz, K.; Li, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    We report on design and technology improvements for a flowing liquid lithium (FLiLi) limiter inserted into auxiliary heated discharges in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak device. In order to enhance Li coverage uniformity and erosion resistance, a new liquid Li distributor with homogenous channels was implemented. In addition, two independent electromagnetic pumps and a new horizontal capillary structure contributed to an improvement in the observed Li flow uniformity (from 30% in the previous FLiLi design to >80% in this FLiLi design). To improve limiter surface erosion resistance, hot isostatic press technology was applied, which improved the thermal contact between thin stainless steel protective layers covering the Cu heat sink. The thickness of the stainless steel layer was increased from 0.1 mm to 0.5 mm, which also helped macroscopic erosion resilience. Despite the high auxiliary heating power up to 4.5 MW, no Li bursts were recorded from FLiLi, underscoring the improved performance of this new design.

  18. Resistance of Silicon-Containing Carbonized Lignin to Atomic Oxygen Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Takeshi; Hata, Toshimitsu; Tagawa, Masahito; Kojima, Hirotsugu; Hayakawa, Hajime

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are exposed to atomic oxygen (AO). It is thus important to develop an environmentally friendly material that can be applied to the outer surfaces of spacecraft in LEO to protect them against AO. Carbonized material containing electroconductive graphitic microlayers is promising for this purpose. We produced carbonized lignin (CW) by separating wood in L-lactic acid and we investigated the AO erosion resistances of CW and CW containing Si. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that the O/C ratio increased on AO exposure. The CW sample without Si and CW samples containing 20% and 40% Si exhibited less erosion than CW samples containing 5% and 10% Si. XPS revealed that the presence of Si resulted in the formation of SiO2 on the sample surface. For CW with Si contents of 20% and 40%, the SiO2 coverage may be sufficiently large to prevent attack by AO.

  19. Oxygen plasma treatment and deposition of CNx on a fluorinated polymer matrix composite for improved erosion resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratore, C.; Korenyi-Both, A.; Bultman, J. E.; Waite, A. R.; Jones, J. G.; Storage, T. M.; Voevodin, A. A.

    2007-01-01

    The use of polymer matrix composites in aerospace propulsion applications is currently limited by insufficient resistance to erosion by abrasive media. Erosion resistant coatings may provide necessary protection; however, adhesion to many high temperature polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials is poor. A low pressure oxygen plasma treatment process was developed to improve adhesion of CN x coatings to a carbon reinforced, fluorinated polymer matrix composite. Fullerene-like CN x was selected as an erosion resistant coating for its high hardness-to-elastic modulus ratio and elastic resilience which were expected to reduce erosion from media incident at different angles (normal or glancing) relative to the surface. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to evaluate the effect of the plasma treatment on surface chemistry, and electron microscopy was used to identify changes in the surface morphology of the PMC substrate after plasma exposure. The fluorine concentration at the surface was significantly reduced and the carbon fibers were exposed after plasma treatment. CN x coatings were then deposited on oxygen treated PMC substrates. Qualitative tests demonstrated that plasma treatment improved coating adhesion resulting in an erosion resistance improvement of a factor of 2 compared to untreated coated composite substrates. The combination of PMC pretreatment and coating with CN x reduced the erosion rate by an order of magnitude for normally incident particles

  20. Influence of process parameters on the cavitation resistance of arc thermally sprayed cobalt stainless steel; Influencia dos parametros de processo na resistencia a cavitacao de uma liga inoxidavel com cobalto aspergido a arco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pukasiewicz, A. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Capra, A.R.; Chandelier, J. da L. [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento (LACTEC), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: anderson.geraldo@lactec.org.br; Paredes, R.S.C. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2006-07-01

    In this work the influence of the arc thermal spraying process on the microstructure, oxide volumetric fraction, porosity and cavitation resistance was studied. The characterization was performed by optical and electrical microscopy, microhardness and ultrasonic cavitation test, ASTM G32-96 in AS895HY cobalt stainless steel. The increase in air pressure, 280 to 410 kPa, modified the oxide fraction from 17,2 +- 3,6% to 10,9 +-1,8%, in the samples without pre-heating treatment. With 120 deg C pre-heating treatment the oxide fraction increase from 24,1 +- 2,8% to 12,8 +- 1,9% when the air pressure was modified from 280 to 550 kPa. The mass loss in vibration-induced cavitation were 1,55 and 1,42 mg/h for 410 kPa AS895HY samples, with and without pre heating treatment, and 2,12 mg/h for 280 kPa samples without pre heating treatment. The results showed that the process parameters modified the microstructure and the cavitation resistance of the arc thermal spraying coatings. (author)

  1. An in-situ pilot study to investigate the native clinical resistance of enamel to erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullan, Francesca; Austin, Rupert S; Parkinson, Charles R; Bartlett, David W

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the differences in susceptibility of the surface of native and polished enamel to dietary erosion using an in-situ model. Thirty healthy volunteers (n = 10 per group) wore mandibular appliances containing 2 native and 2 polished enamel samples for 30 min after which, the samples were exposed to either an ex-vivo or in-vivo immersion in orange juice for 5, 10 or 15 min and the cycle repeated twice with an hour's interval between them. Samples were scanned with a non-contacting laser profilometer and surface roughness was extracted from the data, together with step height and microhardness change on the polished enamel samples. All volunteers completed the study. For native enamel there were no statistical difference between baseline roughness values versus post erosion. Polished enamel significantly increased mean (SD) Sa roughness from baseline for each group resulting in roughness change of 0.04 (0.03), 0.06 (0.04), 0.04 (0.03), 0.06 (0.03), 0.08 (0.05) and 0.09 (0.05) μm respectively. With statistical differences between roughness change 45 min in-vivo versus 45 min ex-vivo (p < 0.05). Microhardness significantly decreased for each polished group, with statistical differences in hardness change between 30 min in-vivo versus 30 min ex-vivo (p < 0.05), 45 min in-vivo versus 30 min ex-vivo (p < 0.01), 45 min in-vivo versus 45 min ex-vivo (p < 0.01). The native resistance to erosion provided clinically is a combination of the ultrastructure of outer enamel, protection from the salivary pellicle and the overall effects of the oral environment. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT03178968. This study demonstrates that outer enamel is innately more resistant to erosion which is clinically relevant as once there has been structural breakdown at this level the effects of erosive wear will be accelerated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Solution to valve failures at Braidwood induced by service water cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozol, J.; Schipiour, B.K.; Wix, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Control valves throttle fluid from a high pressure to a lower pressure. On water systems, this throttling process may be accompanied by cavitation, which induces valve noise, vibration, and material damage. Extensive and significant caviation erosion has been experienced the last 10 years in most service water control valve bodies, downstream flanges, and reducers at Braidwood Station. There have been 40 different and distinct cavitation-induced failures in the service water system at Braidwood Station. These failures have created significant costs and continue to be a lingering source of operational maintenance costs to the Commonwealth Edison Company, which is incurring significant financial losses. It should be noted that almost all service water control valves experience some cavitation effects. Cavitation and cavitation damage are complex and elusive phenomena for which no single, simple analytical model exists. The purpose of this paper is to explain features of service water control valve cavitation failures and some of the solutions used by Commonwealth Edison at their six nuclear stations. The paper discusses the following: (1) Braidwood's history of erosion from cavitation; (2) Erosion-corrosion considerations; (3) The Instrument Society of America's valve sizing equations and how they relate to cavitation; (4) Methods to eliminate cavitation; (5) Corrective actions and practical approaches used by Commonwealth Edison to eliminate cavitation

  3. A New Laser-Processing Strategy for Improving Enamel Erosion Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves-Oliveira, M; Wollgarten, S; Liebegall, S; Jansen, P; Bilandzic, M; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Fischer, H; Stollenwerk, J; Poprawe, R

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, a new automatic laser-processing strategy allowing standardized irradiation of natural tooth areas was investigated. The objective was to find a combination of laser parameters that could cause over a 600°C temperature increase at the enamel surface while not damaging enamel, avoiding temperature change above 5.5°C in the pulp and increasing enamel erosion resistance. Seventy-seven bovine enamel samples were randomly divided into 6 laser groups and 1 negative control (C/no treatment/ n = 11). A scanning strategy (7 × 3 mm) was used for the CO 2 laser treatment (λ = 10.6 µm, 0.1-18 J/cm 2 ) with different pulse durations-namely, 20 µs (G20), 30 µs (G30), 55 µs (G55), and 490 µs (G490), as well as 2 modified pulse distances (G33d, G40d). Measurements of temperature change were performed at the surface (thermal camera/50 Hz), at the underside (thermocouples), and at the pulp chamber using a thermobath and human molars ( n = 10). In addition, histology and X-ray diffraction (XRD/ n = 10) were performed. Erosion was tested using an erosive cycling over 6 d, including immersion in citric acid (2 min/0.05 M/pH = 2.3) 6 times daily. Surface loss was measured using a profilometer and statistical analysis with a 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (α = 0.05). Only G20 fulfilled the temperature requirements at the surface (619 ± 21.8°C), at the underside (5.3 ± 1.4°C), and at the pulp (2.0 ± 1.0°C), and it caused no mineral phase change and significant reduction of enamel surface loss (-13.2 ± 4.0 µm) compared to C (-37.0 ± 10.1 µm, P resistance (64%) in vitro.

  4. Design and Performance Optimizations of Advanced Erosion-Resistant Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings for Rotorcraft Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future rotorcraft engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. For thermal barrier coatings designed for rotorcraft turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability, because the rotorcraft are often operated in the most severe sand erosive environments. Advanced low thermal conductivity and erosion-resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with the current emphasis being placed on thermal barrier coating toughness improvements using multicomponent alloying and processing optimization approaches. The performance of the advanced thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in a high temperature erosion burner rig and a laser heat-flux rig to simulate engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition and architecture optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic oxidation durability

  5. Cavitating Flow over a Mini Hydrofoil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Xian-Wu; Ji Bin; Xu Hong-Yuan; Zhang Yao

    2012-01-01

    We consider a cavitating flow over a mini hydrofoil (foil profile: Clark-Y-11.7) having a 14 mm chord length in a cavitation tunnel at various cavitation numbers. Experimental observations show that cavitating flows over a miniature hydrofoil display several types of cavitation behavior, such as cavitation inception, sheet cavitation, cloud cavitation and super cavitation with the decreasing cavitation number. Under the same cavitation conditions, cavitation over a mini hydrofoil would be suppressed in comparison to cavitation over an ordinary hydrofoil. This cavitation scale effect is suspected to be caused by the Reynolds number. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  6. Resistance of Silicon Nitride Turbine Components to Erosion and Hot Corrosion/oxidation Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangmen, Thomas E.; Fox, Dennis S.

    1994-01-01

    Silicon nitride turbine components are under intensive development by AlliedSignal to enable a new generation of higher power density auxiliary power systems. In order to be viable in the intended applications, silicon nitride turbine airfoils must be designed for survival in aggressive oxidizing combustion gas environments. Erosive and corrosive damage to ceramic airfoils from ingested sand and sea salt must be avoided. Recent engine test experience demonstrated that NT154 silicon nitride turbine vanes have exceptional resistance to sand erosion, relative to superalloys used in production engines. Similarly, NT154 silicon nitride has excellent resistance to oxidation in the temperature range of interest - up to 1400 C. Hot corrosion attack of superalloy gas turbine components is well documented. While hot corrosion from ingested sea salt will attack silicon nitride substantially less than the superalloys being replaced in initial engine applications, this degradation has the potential to limit component lives in advanced engine applications. Hot corrosion adversely affects the strength of silicon nitride in the 850 to 1300 C range. Since unacceptable reductions in strength must be rapidly identified and avoided, AlliedSignal and the NASA Lewis Research Center have pioneered the development of an environmental life prediction model for silicon nitride turbine components. Strength retention in flexure specimens following 1 to 3300 hour exposures to high temperature oxidation and hot corrosion has been measured and used to calibrate the life prediction model. Predicted component life is dependent upon engine design (stress, temperature, pressure, fuel/air ratio, gas velocity, and inlet air filtration), mission usage (fuel sulfur content, location (salt in air), and times at duty cycle power points), and material parameters. Preliminary analyses indicate that the hot corrosion resistance of NT154 silicon nitride is adequate for AlliedSignal's initial engine

  7. Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Energy Delivery: Pulse and Power Effects on Enamel Surface and Erosive Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renan Mota; de Souza, Vinicius Matsuzaki; Esteves, Camila Machado; de Oliveira Lima-Arsati, Ynara Bosco; Cassoni, Alessandra; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Brugnera Junior, Aldo

    2017-11-01

    High power lasers have been suggested as a useful tool for dental caries and erosion prevention due to the increase of enamel acid resistance. to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG (erbium,chromium:yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet) laser irradiation pulse frequency and power on enamel surface and acid erosion resistance. By combining pulse frequency (5-75 Hz) and power settings (0.10-1.00 W), 20 irradiated groups and one nonirradiated control group were tested. A total of 63 bovine enamel blocks (n = 3/group) were prepared for surface hardness and roughness evaluation, performed in three phases: baseline, after irradiation, and after erosive challenge. Enamel blocks were irradiated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser with MZ8 tip (iPlus; Waterlase, Biolase, CA) for 30 sec according to experimental group and submitted. Erosive challenge consisted of four cycles alternating immersion in 0.01 M HCl (5 mL/mm 2 ; 2 min; at 37°C) and immersion in artificial saliva for 3 h. Analysis of variance (three-way ANOVA), Tukey's test, and Pearson correlation were performed for the statistical analysis (p hardness. After erosive challenge, 5 and 75 W groups showed increase in surface hardness; 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 W groups showed minor alterations in surface roughness. the irradiation of Er,Cr:YSGG laser with different parameters of power and pulse frequency settings may alter enamel surface and erosive resistance differently. Pulse frequency of 30 Hz and power of 0.50 W was considered the best parameter to prevent enamel acid erosion.

  8. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached...

  9. Hydrodynamic Cavitation Reactors contd…

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Hydrodynamic Cavitation Reactors contd… Reservoir: 10 L capacity. Centrifugal Pump :1.5kW). Orifice plate (different configurations in terms of number and diameter of the holes). Bypass line (for controlling the inlet pressure and the flow rate into the cavitation ...

  10. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  11. CFD analysis of cloud cavitation on three tip-modified propellers with systematically varied tip geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, P.

    2015-12-01

    The blade tip loading is often reduced as an effort to restrain sheet and tip vortex cavitation in the design of marine propellers. This CFD analysis demonstrates that an excessive reduction of the tip loading can cause cloud cavitation responsible for much of noise and surface erosion. Detached eddy simulations (DES) are made for cavitating flows on three tip- modified propellers, of which one is a reference propeller having an experimental result from a cavitation tunnel test with a hull model, and the other two are modified from the reference propeller by altering the blade tip loading. DES results have been validated against the experiment in terms of sheet and cloud cavitation. In DES, non-uniform hull wake is modelled by using the inlet flow and momentum sources instead of including a hull model. A 4-bladed Kappel propeller with a smooth tip bending towards the suction side is used as the reference propeller. For the reference propeller, sheet cavitation extends over a whole chord length in the hull wake peak. As the blade gets out of the wake peak, the rear part of sheet cavity is detached in a form of cloud cavitation. For the reference propeller, the tip pitch reduction from the maximum is about 35%. When decreasing the tip pitch reduction to 10%, tip vortex cavitation is formed and cloud cavitation is significantly weakened. When increasing the tip pitch reduction to 60%, sheet cavitation slightly moves to inner radii and cloud cavitation grows larger.

  12. Effect of austempering temperature on cavitation behaviour of unalloyed ADI material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojcinovic, Marina [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade (Serbia); Eric, Olivera [Innovation Centre, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, Belgrade (Serbia); Rajnovic, Dragan; Sidjanin, Leposava [Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, Novi Sad (Serbia); Balos, Sebastian, E-mail: sebab@uns.ac.rs [Department of Production Engineering, Faculty of Technical Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovića 6, Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2013-08-15

    This paper provides an in-depth study and description of cavitation damage and microstructural changes in two types of unalloyed austempered ductile iron (ADI). ADI materials used were austempered at 300 and 400 °C having ausferrite microstructure with 16 and 31.4% of retained austenite, respectively. Metallographic examination was carried out to study the morphology of their cavitation-damaged surfaces. Cavitation damage was initiated at graphite nodules as well as in the interface between a graphite nodule and an ausferrite matrix. Furthermore, microcracking and ferrite/retained austenite morphology were proved to be of great importance for cavitation resistance. Mass loss rate revealed that ADI austempered at 400 °C has a higher cavitation resistance in water than ADI austempered at 300 °C. A higher amount of retained austenite in ADI austempered at 400 °C played an important role in increasing cavitation resistance. The good cavitation behaviour of ADI austempered at 400 °C was due to the matrix hardening by stress assisted phase transformation of retained austenite into martensite (SATRAM) phenomenon, as shown by X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • Cavitation rate of two ADI materials was tested. • ADI material with a lower hardness has had a lower cavitation rate. • The main reason is microstructural transformations during cavitation. • SATRAM phenomenon increases cavitation resistance.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis of cavitating flow around a hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Miloš

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes experiments carried out in the cavitation tunnel with the rectangular test section of 150 × 150 × 500 mm and the maximum test section inlet velocity of 25 m/s. These experiments have been aimed to visualize the cavitation phenomena as well as to quantify the erosion potential using pitting tests evaluated during the incubation period for the cast-iron prismatic hydrofoil with the modified NACA profile. A bypass section installed in the tunnel has allowed to measure the nuclei content in the inlet flow to the test section using the acoustic spectrometer. The measured data have been compared with the CFD analysis of the cavitation phenomena on the hydrofoil as well as the numerically determined location and magnitude of the first calculated collapses of the cavitating bubbles with a good agreement.

  14. Fundamentals of Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Franc, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    The present book is aimed at providing a comprehensive presentation of cavitation phenomena in liquid flows. It is further backed up by the experience, both experimental and theoretical, of the authors whose expertise has been internationally recognized. A special effort is made to place the various methods of investigation in strong relation with the fundamental physics of cavitation, enabling the reader to treat specific problems independently. Furthermore, it is hoped that a better knowledge of the cavitation phenomenon will allow engineers to create systems using it positively. Examples in the literature show the feasibility of this approach.

  15. Investigations of effect of phase change mass transfer rate on cavitation process with homogeneous relaxation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhixia; Zhang, Liang; Saha, Kaushik; Som, Sibendu; Duan, Lian; Wang, Qian

    2017-12-01

    The super high fuel injection pressure and micro size of nozzle orifice has been an important development trend for the fuel injection system. Accordingly, cavitation transient process, fuel compressibility, amount of noncondensable gas in the fuel and cavitation erosion have attracted more attention. Based on the fact of cavitation in itself is a kind of thermodynamic phase change process, this paper takes the perspective of the cavitation phase change mass transfer process to analyze above mentioned phenomenon. The two-phase cavitating turbulent flow simulations with VOF approach coupled with HRM cavitation model and U-RANS of standard k-ε turbulence model were performed for investigations of cavitation phase change mass transfer process. It is concluded the mass transfer time scale coefficient in the Homogenous Relaxation Model (HRM) representing mass transfer rate should tend to be as small as possible in a condition that ensured the solver stable. At very fast mass transfer rate, the phase change occurs at very thin interface between liquid and vapor phase and condensation occurs more focused and then will contribute predictably to a more serious cavitation erosion. Both the initial non-condensable gas in fuel and the fuel compressibility can accelerate the cavitation mass transfer process.

  16. Classification of lubricants according to cavitation criteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meged, Y.; Meged, Y.; Venner, Cornelis H.; ten Napel, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    Cavitation in lubrication liquids has long been known to be detrimental to components in hydraulic systems. Damage has been detected in journal bearings, especially under severe dynamic loading, gears, squeeze film dampers and valves. These findings have led to intensive studies of metal resistance

  17. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  18. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  19. Pump cavitation background noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.

    1976-01-01

    Cavitation is defined as the growth and collapse of cavities associated with the change in pressure in contrast to the case of boiling where change in temperature is the dominating factor. It is commonly accepted that cavitation inception occurs when the minimum pressure in a system reaches the vapor pressure corresponding to the local temperatures of the liquid. The foregoing statement is, in fact, another way of defining incipient boiling which is usually defined as the condition where the temperature reaches the saturation temperature corresponding to the system pressure. Therefore, there is no difference between cavitation and boiling since both are associated with the growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. Cavitation noise may not be avoidable for an LMFBR primary pump under normal operating conditions, and will be present as background during boiling detection by acoustic methods

  20. Cavitation cloud growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnin, J.

    1977-01-01

    The cavitation cloud growth in a pipeline submitted to a steep pressure drop (passage of a negative surge) is due to the simultaneous growth of a great number of homogeneous nuclei, thus producing a cloud of cavitation bubbles whose diameters become rapidly of the same order as their distances. Though their growth are independent at the beginning of the phenomenon, interactions take place when they become relatively close, due either to a change in the system planimetry, or to the interlocking of mass diffusion (gaseous cavitation) or heat (vaporous cavitation) boundary layers. After having examined known solutions to the problem of an unique bubble growth, and their possible use in case of interaction, the limits of the unique bubble growth are pointed out to conclude in favour of a preferential geometric limit, occuring near the minimum of the perturbation celerity in the mixture [fr

  1. Development of HVOF Sprayed Erosion/Oxidation Resistant Coatings for Composite Structural Components in Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.; Ivosevic, M.; Twardowski, T. E.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Sutter, James K.; Kim, D. Y.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are being studied and developed as methods of enabling lightweight composites to be used more extensively as structural components in propulsion applications in order to reduce costs and improve efficiency through weight reductions. The primary goal of this work is the development of functionally graded material [FGM] polymer/metal matrix composite coatings to provide improved erosion/oxidation resistance to polyimide-based polymer matrix composite [PMC] substrates. The goal is to grade the coating composition from pure polyimide, similar to the PMC substrate matrix on one side, to 100 % WC-Co on the other. Both step-wise and continuous gradation of the loading of the WC-Co reinforcing phase are being investigated. Details of the coating parameter development will be presented, specifically the high velocity oxy-fuel [HVOF] combustion spraying of pure PMR-11 matrix material and layers of various composition PMR-II/WC-Co blends onto steel and PMR-15 composite substrates. Results of the HVOF process optimization, microstructural characterization, and analysis will be presented. The sprayed coatings were evaluated using standard metallographic techniques - optical and scanning electron microscopy [SEM]. An SEM + electron dispersive spectroscopy [EDS] technique has also been used to confirm retention of the PMR-II component. Results of peel/butt adhesion testing to determine adhesion will also be presented.

  2. Cavitation During Superplastic Forming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Campbell

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is the opening of pores during superplastic forming, typically at grain boundary triple points or on second phase grain boundary particles during slip of grain boundaries. Theories for the initiation of cavitation are reviewed. It seems that cavitation is unlikely to occur by processes intrinsic to metals such as dislocation mechanisms or point defect condensation. It is proposed that cavitation can only occur at non-bonded interfaces such as those introduced extrinsically (i.e., from the outside during the original casting of the metal. These defects, known as oxide bifilms, are naturally introduced during pouring of the liquid metal, and are frozen into the solid, often pushed by dendritic growth into grain boundaries where they are difficult to detect because of their extreme thinness, often measured in nanometres. Their unbonded central interface acts as a crack and can initiate cavitation. Second phase precipitates probably do not nucleate and grow on grain boundaries but grow on bifilms in the boundaries, explaining the apparent association between boundaries, second phase particles and failure initiation. Improved melting and casting techniques can provide metal with reduced or zero bifilm population for which cavitation would not be possible, promising significant improvements in superplastic behaviour.

  3. Analysis of the Effect of Surface Modification on Polyimide Composites Coated with Erosion Resistant Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndalama, Tchinga; Hirschfeld, Deidre; Sutter, James K. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this research is to enhance performance of composite coatings through modification of graphite-reinforced polyimide composite surfaces prior to metal bond coat/ hard topcoat application for use in the erosive and/or oxidative environments of advanced engines. Graphite reinforced polyimide composites, PMR-15 and PMR-II-50, formed by sheet molding and pre-pregging will be surface treated, overlaid with a bond coat and then coated with WC-Co. The surface treatment will include cleaning, RF plasma or ultraviolet light- ozone etching, and deposition of SiO(x) groups. These surface treatments will be studied in order to investigate and improve adhesion and oxidation resistance. The following panels were provided by NASA-Glenn Research Center(NASA-GRC): Eight compression molded PMR-II-50; 6 x 6 x 0.125 in. Two vacuum-bagged PMR-II-50; 12 x 12 x 0.125 in. Eight compression molded PMR-15; 6 x 6 x 0.125 in. One vacuum-bagged PMR-15; 12 x 12 x 0.125 in. All panels were made using a 12 x 12 in. T650-35 8HS (3K-tow) graphite fabric. A diamond-wafering blade, with deionized water as a cutting fluid, was used to cut PMR-II-50 and PMR-15 panels into 1 x 1 in. pieces for surface tests. The panel edges exhibiting delamination were used for the preliminary surface preparation tests as these would be unsuitable for strength and erosion testing. PMR-15 neat resin samples were also provided by NASA GRC. Surface profiles of the as-received samples were determined using a Dektak III Surface profile measuring system. Two samples of compression molded PMR-II-50 and PMR-15, vacuum-bagged PMR-II-50 and PMR-15 were randomly chosen for surface profile measurement according to ANSI/ASME B46.1. Prior to each measurement, the samples were blasted with compressed air to remove any artifacts. Five 10 mm-long scans were made on each sample. The short and long wavelength cutoff filter values were set at 100 and 1000 m, diamond stylus radius was 12.5 microns. Table 1 is a summary of the

  4. Transmission of High Frequency Vibrations in Rotating Systems. Application to Cavitation Detection in Hydraulic Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valentín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of damage in hydraulic turbines is cavitation. While not all cavitation appearing in a turbine is of a destructive type, erosive cavitation can severely affect the structure, thus increasing maintenance costs and reducing the remaining useful life of the machine. Of all types of cavitation, the maximum erosion occurs when clouds of bubbles collapse on the runner surface (cloud cavitation. When this occurs it is associated with a substantial increase in noise, and vibrations that are propagated everywhere throughout the machine. The generation of these cavitation clouds may occur naturally or it may be the response to a periodic pressure fluctuation, like the rotor/stator interaction in a hydraulic turbine. Erosive bubble cavitation generates high-frequency vibrations that are modulated by the shedding frequency. Therefore, the methods for the detection of erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines are based on the measurement and demodulation of high-frequency vibrations. In this paper, the feasibility of detecting erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines is investigated experimentally in a rotating disk system, which represents a simplified hydraulic turbine structure. The test rig used consists of a rotating disk submerged in a tank of water and confined with nearby axial and radial rigid surfaces. The excitation patterns produced by cloud cavitation are reproduced with a PZT (piezoelectric patch located on the disk. These patterns include pseudo-random excitations of different frequency bands modulated by one low carrier frequency, which model the erosive cavitation characteristics. Different types of sensors have been placed in the stationary and in the rotating parts (accelerometers, acoustic emission (AE, and a microphone in order to detect the excitation pattern. The results obtained for all the sensors tested have been compared in detail for the different excitation patterns applied to the disk. With this information

  5. In Situ Synthesis of Reduced Graphene Oxide-Reinforced Silicone-Acrylate Resin Composite Films Applied in Erosion Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reduced graphene oxide reinforced silicone-acrylate resin composite films (rGO/SAR composite films were prepared by in situ synthesis method. The structure of rGO/SAR composite films was characterized by Raman spectrum, atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and thermogravimetric analyzer. The results showed that the rGO were uniformly dispersed in silicone-acrylate resin matrix. Furthermore, the effect of rGO loading on mechanical properties of composite films was investigated by bulge test. A significant enhancement (ca. 290% and 320% in Young’s modulus and yield stress was obtained by adding the rGO to silicone-acrylate resin. At the same time, the adhesive energy between the composite films and metal substrate was also improved to be about 200%. Moreover, the erosion resistance of the composite films was also investigated as function of rGO loading. The rGO had great effect on the erosion resistance of the composite films, in which the Rcorr (ca. 0.8 mm/year of composite film was far lower than that (28.7 mm/year of pure silicone-acrylate resin film. Thus, this approach provides a novel route to investigate mechanical stability of polymer composite films and improve erosion resistance of polymer coating, which are very important to be used in mechanical-corrosion coupling environments.

  6. Cavitation guide for control valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation

  7. Cavitation guide for control valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, J.P. [Tullis Engineering Consultants, Logan, UT (United States)

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  8. Cavitation in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-06

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble.

  9. Quantifying the Effects of Riparian Vegetation on Geotechnical Strength, and Resistance to Hydraulic Erosion: Alluvial Streambanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankhead, Natasha; Simon, Andrew; Thomas, Robert

    2010-05-01

    Streambank erosion by mass failure is actually a combination of hydraulic processes operating with a tendency to steepen the bank, and geotechnical (slope stability) processes operating on the bank mass. Riparian vegetation has a number of effects on the mechanics of these processes through direct root reinforcement, modification of shear strength through effects on pore-water pressure, increased resistance of the bank surface to hydraulic shear and reduced effective, hydraulic stress through increases in roughness. These effects can be classified as those that affect geotechnical stability, and those that affect hydraulic processes acting at the bank face and toe. Both aspects were investigated using a combination of modeling, field work and laboratory studies. Previous research has shown that the effect of mechanical root-reinforcement on geotechnical stability can be considerable, particularly on banks less than 3 m-high. Calculation and modeling of estimates of root-reinforcement were initially conducted using simple perpendicular root models, but recent work has made use of a fiber-bundle method so that progressive root breaking can be accounted for. Combining field and laboratory testing, the RipRoot fiber-bundle model was shown to provide more accurate estimates of root-reinforcement by allowing for progressive root breaking. Root-reinforcement is a function of a number of variables including root density, rooting depth and root orientations relative to the failure surface. For example, different distributions of root orientations relative to the failure plane can dramatically affect the shape and peak of the loading curves attained for a given bundle of roots; for 500 sycamore roots median reinforcement varied from 4.86 to 15.08 kPa on a slope and from 9.49 to 14.82 kPa when growing on the top of a streambank. To test the effect of common North American riparian-plant species on pore-water pressure within a streambank, young riparian trees and grasses were

  10. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riedel Marco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE. With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  11. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  12. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    3.3 Erosion rate. The cumulative weight loss of 23-8-N steel observed at the end of the erosion test for 24 h in as-received and heat- treated conditions are shown in figure 2. It is seen the cumu- lative weight loss of 23-8-N steel has decreased after solution annealing. 3.4 Scanning electron metallography of fracture surface.

  13. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai, E-mail: wsk@buaa.edu.cn; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets can be well exfoliated with the help of nanofibrillated cellulose. • A carpet-like rough surface and distortion in crystal structure of h-BN are found in both h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film after AO exposure. • H-BN/epoxy film exhibits a higher mass loss and erosion yield, different element content changes and chemical oxidations compared with h-BN film. - Abstract: Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 2} were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  14. Cavitation problems in sodium valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elie, X.

    1976-01-01

    Cavitation poses few problems for sodium valves, in spite of the fact that the loops are not pressurized. This is no doubt due to the low flow velocities in the pipes. For auxiliary loop valves we are attempting to standardize performances with respect to cavitation. For economic reasons cavitation thresholds are approached with large diameter valves. (author)

  15. Stress corrosion cracking mitigation by ultrasound induced cavitation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, C.; Lee, Y.C.; Yeh, T.K.

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as a damaging mechanism under erosion corrosion condition. However, if used appropriately, cavitation can be applied as a peening technique for surface stress modification process. The aim of surface stress modification is to alter the stress state of processed surface through direct or indirect thermo-mechanical treatments to reduce cracking problems initiated from surface. Ultrasonic devices are used to generate cavitation bubbles which when collapse will produce high intensity shock waves and high velocity micro-jet streams. The cavitation impact when properly controlled will create plastically deformed compressive layers in nearby surfaces and minimize cracking susceptibility in corrosive environments. This study is to investigate the effectiveness of Ultrasound Induced Cavitation (UIC) technique in surface stress improvement. Ultrasonic cavitation treatment of SS304 stainless steel under pure water is carried out with different controlling parameters. The cavitation impact on SS304 surface is measured in terms of surface roughness, surface strain, hardness, and microstructural characteristics. The in-depth residual stress distribution and crack mitigation effect are also evaluated. Test result indicates ultrasound induced cavitation treatment only has minor effect on surface physical characteristics. The extent of compressive stress produced on top surface exceeds the yield strength and can reach a depth above 150 μm. The maximum surface strain measured is generally below 20%, which is not considered detrimental to accelerate crack initiation. Stress corrosion verification tests show UIC treatment is capable in preventing environmental assisted cracking of stainless steels in severely corrosive conditions. In view of the test results, UIC technique has demonstrated to be a low cost, low contaminating, and effective surface stress improvement technology. (author)

  16. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Avnish; Sharma, Ashok; Goel, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of heat treatment on microstructure, mechanical properties and erosion behavior of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel were studied. A series of heat treatments were carried out in the temperature range of 1180–1240 °C to observe the effect on microstructure. Optimum heat treatment cycle was obtained at 1220 °C for holding time of 150 min, which leads to dissolution of carbides, formation of equiaxed grains and twins. Heat treatment has shown improvement in tensile strength, toughness, impact strength and work hardening capacity, however at the cost of marginal reduction in hardness and yield strength. This resulted in improvement of erosion resistance of cast 23-8-N nitronic steel. The microstructures, fractured surfaces and phases were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis respectively

  17. Research on the induction motor current signature for centrifugal pump at cavitation condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Luo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is a major undesirable phenomenon for centrifugal pump because it can cause hydraulic performance deterioration, pump damage by pitting and material erosion, and structural vibration and noise. Cavitation can appear within the entire range of the operating conditions; therefore, it must be prevented by all means. Sensorless monitoring technology based on motor current signature analysis is non-intrusive and economic for monitoring motor-driven equipment. Thus, this technology is suitable for centrifugal pump systems. The motor current signature for centrifugal pump load at the cavitation condition is the basis of this technology. However, systematic research is lacking on sensorless monitoring technology based on motor current signature. As a result, the tentative exploration for motor current signature at cavitation load was conducted in this study. The results show that the stator current is still a sinusoidal alternating current strictly to the law of sine. Moreover, the root mean square of the current fluctuates because of different flow regimes in the cavitation progress and decreases because vapor density is smaller than water density when cavitation is fully formed. For the stator current spectrum, the noise level, noise distribution, rotation speed, and vane pass frequency components show features in the cavitation process. These indicator indexes change according to the stage of cavitation development. Thus, the motor current signature analysis is found to be a feasible and cost-effective method for the stages of cavitation condition.

  18. Thermal load resistance of erosion-monitoring beryllium maker tile for JET ITER like wall project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, T.; Linke, J.; Sundelin, P.; Rubel, M.; Coad, J.P.; Matthews, G.F.; Lungu, C.P.

    2007-01-01

    The ITER reference materials, beryllium (Be), carbon fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten (W), have been tested separately in tokamaks. An integrated test demonstrating both compatibility of metal plasma facing components with high-power operation and acceptable tritium retention has not yet been carried out. At JET, the size, magnetic field strength and high plasma current allow to conducting tests with the combination of the materials. Thus, the ITER-like Wall (ILW) project has been launched. In the project, Be will be the plasmafacing material on the main chamber wall of JET. To assess the erosion of the Be tiles, a Be marker tile was proposed and designed. The test samples which simulate the JET Be marker tile have been produced in MEdC, Romania in order to study the thermal load resistance of the JET Be marker (20 x 20 mm 2 size with 30 mm height). The marker tile sample consists of bulk Be, high-Z interlayer (2-3 μm Ni coating) and 8-9 μm Be coating. Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) techniques based on the electron-induced evaporation have been selected for this purpose. In the present work, the global characterization of the maker tile samples and thermal load tests were performed. After the pre-characterization (microstructure observation by scanning electron microscope and elemental analysis by means of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy), the thermal loading tests were performed in the electron beam facility JUDITH. The coating consisted of tiny platelets of ∝0.1 um in diameter and localized larger platelets of 1 um in diameter. The surface and bulk temperature were observed during the tests. In the screening thermal load test, the samples were loaded to 6 MW/m 2 for 10 s. The layers did not show any macroscopic damages at up to 4.5 MW/m 2 for 10 s (45 MJ/m 2 ). However, the coating delaminated and the maker was damaged when the thermal loading reached at 5 MW/m 2 (∝50 MJ/m 2 ). Cyclic heat load tests were

  19. The effect of Bahiagrass roots on soil erosion resistance of Aquults in subtropical China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chao; Guo, Zhonglu; Li, Zhaoxia; Cai, Chongfa

    2017-05-01

    Herbaceous species, especially their roots, are believed to have an important role in enhancing soil strength and protecting soil against erosion. This study evaluated the effects of root distribution characteristics on soil shear resistance and soil detachment rates, correlations among root mechanical properties, root chemical composition and root parameters, and whether the Wu-Waldron model can accurately estimate soil reinforcement by roots. Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) was planted in planter boxes by overlapping four rectangle frames (0.4 × 0.1 × 0.1 m). A series of laboratory tests of direct shear strength and soil detachment were conducted on two soils that were derived from granite and shale with different soil depths and sowing densities. The results indicated that soil aggregate stability was positively correlated with root characteristics. Over 70% of the total measured root parameters were distributed in the upper 20 cm of the soil, and they decreased with increasing soil depth and decreasing sowing density. The tensile properties (root tensile strength and root tensile force) were significantly correlated with root diameter. The contents of root main chemical compositions were significantly correlated with root diameter while hemicellulose showed no obvious trend with root diameter (P = 0.12). Root tensile strength and root tensile force were also significantly correlated with the contents of these four compositions, except hemicellulose. The relative soil detachment demonstrated a significant negative correlation with root parameters with sowing densities from 5 to 30 g m- 2, and it remained at a relatively low value when the sowing density was > 20 g m- 2. The soil detachment rate, erodibility factor and critical flow shear stress were well correlated with the root area ratio, sowing density, and soil depth. The Wu-Waldron model was found to be inappropriate for these soils, as it overestimated additional soil shear strength due to roots by 152

  20. [Effects of gravel mulch technology on soil erosion resistance and plant growth of river flinty slope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Xie, San-Tao; Ruan, Ai-Dong; Bian, Xun-Wen

    2008-03-01

    Aiming at the technical difficulties such as the stability and water balance in the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope, a gravel mulch technology was proposed, with the effects of different gravel mulch treatments on the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property, and plant growth investigated by anti-erosion and pot experiments. The results showed that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size could obviously enhance the soil anti-erosion capacity, soil water retention property and plant biomass, but no obvious differences were observed between the mulch thickness of 5 cm and 8 cm. It was indicated that mulching with the gravels 1.5-2 cm in size and 5 cm in thickness was an effective and economical technology for the ecological rehabilitation of river flinty slope.

  1. Searching for plant root traits to improve soil cohesion and resist soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Smyth, Kevin; Denbigh, Tom; Weldon, Laura; Higgins, Ben; Matyjaszkiewicz, Antoni; Meersmans, Jeroen; Chenchiah, Isaac; Liverpool, Tannie; Quine, Tim; Grierson, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Soil erosion poses a serious threat to future food and environmental security. Soil erosion protection measures are therefore of great importance for soil conservation and food security. Plant roots have proven to be very effective in stabilizing the soil and protecting the soil against erosion. However, no clear insights are yet obtained into the root traits that are responsible for root-soil cohesion. This is important in order to better select the best species for soil protection. Research using Arabidopsis mutants has made great progress towards explaining how root systems are generated by growth, branching, and responses to gravity, producing mutants that affect root traits. In this study, the performance of selected Arabidopsis mutants is analyzed in three root-soil cohesion assays. Measurements of detachment, uprooting force and soil detachment are here combined with the microscopic analysis of root properties, such as the presence, length and density of root hairs in this case. We found that Arabidopsis seedlings with root hairs (wild type, wer myb23, rsl4) were more difficult to detach from gel media than hairless (cpc try) or short haired (rsl4, rhd2) roots. Hairy roots (wild type, wer myb23) on mature, non-reproductive rosettes were more difficult to uproot from compost or clay soil than hairless roots (cpc try). At high root densities, erosion rates from soils with hairless roots (cpc try) were as much as 10 times those seen from soils occupied by roots with hairs (wer myb23, wild type). We find therefore root hairs play a significant role in root-soil cohesion and in minimizing erosion. This framework and associated suite of experimental assays demonstrates its ability to measure the effect of any root phenotype on the effectiveness of plant roots in binding substrates and reducing erosion.

  2. Cavitating Hydrofoils: A Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Roger E. A.; Kawakami, Damien T.; Qin, Qiao; Song, Charles C. S.

    2004-11-01

    This paper reviews our recent research that is aimed at gaining a better understanding of the problem of unsteady cavitating flows on lifting surfaces. We have explored this issue with extensive numerical and experimental investigations. This includes the development of new numerical models of cavitating flows including the effects of dissolved incondensable gas and ventilation. Our simulations are based on a virtual single-phase cavitation model, that incorporates the assumptions of fully compressible and barotropic flow coupled with a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) approach. This approach has proven to be capable of capturing the complex dynamical features of highly unsteady cavitating flows. Experimental data are drawn from experiments carried out at two different scales in two different water tunnels; one in the US at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) and the other at the Versuchsanstalt fur Wasserbau (VFW) in Obernach, Germany. Several foils shapes have been examined. Examples are drawn from investigations of several different type hydrofoils. The tests were designed to complement each other and to capitalize on the special features of each facility. Suuported by the National Science Foundation.

  3. A method for measuring effects of bioturbation and consolidation on erosion resistance of aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zambrano, L.; Beijer, J.A.J.; Roozen, F.C.J.M.; Scheffer, M.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment erosion by water movement affects turbidity and thus benthic communities in numerous aquatic systems. This aspect has been widely studied in coastal habitats and estuaries, but less studied in freshwater systems such as shallow lakes. Here we present a simple device to study the effects of

  4. One-way-coupling simulation of cavitation accompanied by high-speed droplet impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita, E-mail: kando@mech.keio.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Erosion due to high-speed droplet impact is a crucial issue in industrial applications. The erosion is caused by the water-hammer loading on material surfaces and possibly by the reloading from collapsing cavitation bubbles that appear within the droplet. Here, we simulate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles accompanied by high-speed droplet impact against a deformable wall in order to see whether the bubble collapse is violent enough to give rise to cavitation erosion on the wall. The evolution of pressure waves in a single water (or gelatin) droplet to collide with a deformable wall at speed up to 110 m/s is inferred from simulations of multicomponent Euler flow where phase changes are not permitted. Then, we examine the dynamics of cavitation bubbles nucleated from micron/submicron-sized gas bubble nuclei that are supposed to exist inside the droplet. For simplicity, we perform Rayleigh–Plesset-type calculations in a one-way-coupling manner, namely, the bubble dynamics are determined according to the pressure variation obtained from the Euler flow simulation. In the simulation, the preexisting bubble nuclei whose size is either micron or submicron show large growth to submillimeters because tension inside the droplet is obtained through interaction of the pressure waves and the droplet interface; this supports the possibility of having cavitation due to the droplet impact. It is also found, in particular, for the case of cavitation arising from very small nuclei such as nanobubbles, that radiated pressure from the cavitation bubble collapse can overwhelm the water-hammer pressure directly created by the impact. Hence, cavitation may need to be accounted for when it comes to discussing erosion in the droplet impact problem.

  5. [Effects of biological regulated measures on active organic carbon and erosion-resistance in the Three Gorges Reservoir region soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ru; Huang, Lin; He, Bing-Hui; Zhou, Li-Jiang; Yu, Chuan; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    To gain a better knowledge of characteristics of soils and provide a scientific basis for soil erosion control in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area, contents of aggregates and total soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as soil active organic carbon fractions including particulate organic carbon (POC), readily oxidized organic carbon (ROC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in the 0-30 cm soil layer under seven different biological regulated measures were studied by the field investigation combined with the laboratory analysis. Results showed that the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions decreased with the increasing soil depth; the content of the SOC and active organic carbon fractions in 0-10 cm was significantly higher than that in 20-30 cm. The stability of soil aggregates were also significantly influenced by biological regulated measures, the content of > 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates in seven types of biological regulated measures was in the order of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa > hedgerows > closed forest > natural restoration > economic forest > traditional planting > control plot, moreover, the content of 0.25 mm water-stable aggregates correlated positively with the content of SOC. Soils under different biological regulated measures all demonstrated fractal features, and soil under the measure of Koelreuteria bipinnata + Cassia suffruticasa was found to have the lowest value of fractal dimension and soil erodiable K, indicating a relatively strong structure stability and erosion-resistant capacity. Negative correlation was observed when compared the content of active organic carbon fractions with the soil erodiable K. It can be concluded that properties of soil can be managed through biological regulated measures; thence had an influence on the soil erosion-resistant capacity.

  6. Preparation of high-content hexagonal boron nitride composite film and characterization of atomic oxygen erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Min; Gu, Yizhuo; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2017-04-01

    Space aircrafts circling in low earth orbit are suffered from highly reactive atomic oxygen (AO). To shield AO, a flexible thin film with 80 wt.% hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) and h-BN/epoxy film were fabricated through vacuum filtration and adding nanofibrillated cellulose fibers. H-BN nanosheets were hydroxylated for enhancing interaction in the films. Mass loss and erosion yield at accumulated AO fluence about 3.04 × 1020 atoms/cm2 were adopted to evaluate the AO resistance properties of the films. A carpet-like rough surface, chemical oxidations and change in crystal structure of h-BN were found after AO treatment, and the degrading mechanism was proposed. The mass loss and erosion yield under AO attack were compared between h-BN film and h-BN/epoxy film, and the comparison was also done for various types of shielding AO materials. Excellent AO resistance property of h-BN film is shown, and the reasons are analyzed.

  7. Cavitation Generation and Usage Without Ultrasound: Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R.; Pandit, Aniruddha B.

    Hydrodynamic Cavitation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, can be a serious contender as an alternative to acoustic cavitation for harnessing the spectacular effects of cavitation in physical and chemical processing. The present chapter covers the basics of hydrodynamic cavitation including the considerations for the bubble dynamics analysis, reactor designs and recommendations for optimum operating parameters. An overview of applications in different areas of physical, chemical and biological processing on scales ranging from few grams to several hundred kilograms has also been presented. Since hydrodynamic cavitation was initially proposed as an alternative to acoustic cavitation, it is necessary to compare the efficacy of both these modes of cavitations for a variety of applications and hence comparisons have been discussed either on the basis of energy efficiency or based on the scale of operation. Overall it appears that hydrodynamic cavitation results in conditions similar to those generated using acoustic cavitation but at comparatively much larger scale of operation and with better energy efficiencies.

  8. Erosion-corrosion resistance of engineering materials in various test conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rajahram, S.S; Harvey, T.J.; Wood, R.J.K.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion–corrosion is a complex phenomenon which involves the interaction between the mechanical processes of solid particle erosion and the electrochemical processes of corrosion. A whole range of issues is faced by a designer when trying to obtain relevant information on erosion–corrosion performance of a material. Amongst the constraints are the dispersed test conditions and test rigs available in the literature making comparisons and quantifying erosion–corrosion wear rates of different ma...

  9. Shock Waves in Cloud Cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Brennen, C. E.; Reisman, G. E.; Wang, Y.-C.

    1997-01-01

    Thie paper described experimental and computational investigations of the dynamics of clouds of cavitation bubbles. Recent studies have confirmed that the interactions between bubbles as they are manifest in the dynamics of bubble clouds lead to generation of very large impulsive pressures which, in turn, cause substantial enhancement of the radiated noise and the material damage which results from this form of cavitation. The experimental program focuses on cloud cavitation formed on th...

  10. Shock Induced Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    the explosion was provided by a 20-KV, 15-pF, 5-nil capacitor . The ex- ploding wire can be positioned anywhere in the tank - above or below the water...withstand tension, the total pressure would follow the dotted line. However, it cannot; hence, near the 35 DIAPHRAGM BULGES OUT, PROBABLY OWING TO LATE... bulged outward. It appears that this late impulse is a water hammer that takes place at cavitation closure. 6.2 PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS. Kennard has

  11. Warm Spraying of High-Strength Ni-Al-Bronze: Cavitation Characteristics and Property Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Sebastian; Kuroda, Seiji; Katanoda, Hiroshi; Gaertner, Frank; Klassen, Thomas; Araki, Hiroshi; Frede, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Bronze materials such as Ni-Al-bronze show exceptional performances against cavitation erosion, due to their high fatigue strength and high strength. These materials are used for ship propellers, pump systems or for applications with alternating stresses. Usually, the respective parts are cast. With the aim to use resources more efficiently and to reduce costs, this study aimed to evaluate opportunities to apply bronze as a coating to critical areas of respective parts. The coatings should have least amounts of pores and non-bonded areas and any contaminations that might act as crack nuclei and contribute to material damages. Processes with low oxidation and high kinetic impacts fulfill these criteria. Especially warm spraying, a nitrogen-cooled HVOF process, with similar impact velocities as cold gas spraying but enhanced process temperature, allows for depositing high-strength Ni-Al-bronze. This study systematically simulates and evaluates the formation and performance of warm-sprayed Ni-Al-bronze coatings for different combustion pressures and nitrogen flow rates. Substrate preheating was used to improve coating adhesion for lower spray parameter sets. Furthermore, this study introduces an energy-based concept to compare spray parameter sets and to predict coating properties. Coatings with low porosities and high mechanical strengths are obtained, allowing for a cavitation resistance similar to bulk material.

  12. Analysis of the cavitating flow induced by an ultrasonic horn – Experimental investigation on the influence of actuation phase, amplitude and geometrical boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Saskia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Till today, factors influencing the formation and collapse of densely distributed, interacting cavitation bubbles are only qualitatively understood. The aim of the present study is to investigate experimentally the influence of selected boundary conditions on the number and size distribution of cavitation bubbles created by an ultrasonic horn (sonotrode. Cavitation bubble clouds below the sonotrode were recorded by means of phase-locked shadowgraphy imaging. The time integrated number of cavitation bubbles was found to decrease exponentially with growing bubble radius. The number of bubbles was increased with growing actuation amplitude and gap width between the sonotrode tip and an opposing solid wall. Furthermore, it could be shown that the number of cavitation bubbles depends on the actuation phase. Future investigations will focus on establishing a statistical relation between the number and size distribution of cavitation bubbles in the near wall region and the resulting cavitation erosion on solid surfaces.

  13. Cavitation Nuclei: Experiments and Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2009-01-01

    us a chance to reflect on the character of the unknown parameters. In this way non-concordant experimental results may hold the key to the development of better theories - and to new experiments for the testing of their validity. Cavitation and cavitation nuclei are phenomena of that character....

  14. Cavitation onset caused by acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhao; Kiyama, Akihito; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Daily, David J.; Thomson, Scott L.; Hurd, Randy; Truscott, Tadd T.

    2017-08-01

    Striking the top of a liquid-filled bottle can shatter the bottom. An intuitive interpretation of this event might label an impulsive force as the culprit in this fracturing phenomenon. However, high-speed photography reveals the formation and collapse of tiny bubbles near the bottom before fracture. This observation indicates that the damaging phenomenon of cavitation is at fault. Cavitation is well known for causing damage in various applications including pipes and ship propellers, making accurate prediction of cavitation onset vital in several industries. However, the conventional cavitation number as a function of velocity incorrectly predicts the cavitation onset caused by acceleration. This unexplained discrepancy leads to the derivation of an alternative dimensionless term from the equation of motion, predicting cavitation as a function of acceleration and fluid depth rather than velocity. Two independent research groups in different countries have tested this theory; separate series of experiments confirm that an alternative cavitation number, presented in this paper, defines the universal criteria for the onset of acceleration-induced cavitation.

  15. Organo-Aluminate Polymeric Materials as Advanced Erosion/Corrosion Resistant Thin Film Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    ...) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). The coating system is based on the development of carboxylato- alumoxane precursors for fabrication of corrosion resistant oxide barrier layers and alumoxane-epoxy based primer coats...

  16. Fundamentos e testes preliminares de resistência a erosão em concretos refratários Erosion resistance of refractory castables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. A. dos Santos

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available O desgaste de revestimentos refratários é um dos principais problemas em processos industriais onde as linhas de transferência estão sujeitas à alta velocidade de fluidos contendo partículas sólidas. Os trabalhos encontrados na literatura sobre desgaste erosivo em materiais refratários são raros. Como conseqüência, o desenvolvimento de materiais mais resistentes à erosão tem sido lento e, em geral, por meios empíricos. Este trabalho teve como objetivos apresentar uma revisão sobre a importância da erosão nas aplicações industriais e averiguar a resistência ao desgaste de concretos refratários em unidades de fabricação de alumínio e em petroquímicas. As variáveis avaliadas foram: o ângulo de impacto, a pressão da linha, a granulometria e a dureza do agente erosivo, e a temperatura do tratamento térmico a que o material foi submetido. Verificou-se que o histórico do tratamento térmico pode levar a comportamentos distintos quanto ao desgaste erosivo, devido a mudanças nas características dos aditivos ligantes usados em cada material. Constatou-se que o maior desgaste ocorre com um ângulo de impacto de 90º entre o jato erosivo e o material, decrescendo gradativamente até o ângulo de 30º. Verificou-se também que maiores valores de velocidade, dureza e raio da partícula resultam em maior erosão.The wear of refractory linings is often a critical problem in process units where transfer lines are subject to high velocity gas stream containing solid particles. Knowledge related to erosive wear of refractories linings under these conditions is restricted, as consequence, technological development is slow and, in general, developed in an empirical way. The goals of the present work were to review relevant aspects regarding erosive wear on industrial applications and to investigate the erosion resistance of refractory castables currently used by the aluminum industry and in catalyst cracking units. The parameters

  17. ESTUDIO DEL DESGASTE EROSIVO POR CAVITACIÓN DE UN ACERO AUSTENÍTICO DE ALTO NITRÓGENO APOYADO EN EL USO DE LA DIFRACCIÓN DE ELECTRONES RETROPROYECTADOS-EBSD ASSESSMENT OF CAVITATION-EROSION WEAR OF A HIGH NITROGEN AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL FROM ELECTRON BACKSCATTERING DIFFRACTION-EBSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dairo Hernán Mesa Grajales

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Muestras de acero inoxidable con estructura austenítica y contenido aproximado de nitrógeno de 0,9% en peso en solución sólida fueron sometidas a ensayos de cavitación vibratoria en agua destilada, con el fin de estudiar la evolución del desgaste erosivo por cavitación (EC a escala del tamaño de grano (mesoescala. Las muestras fueron obtenidas por medio de nitruración gaseosa a alta temperatura (HTGN del acero inoxidable dúplex UNS S31803, las cuales fueron caracterizadas por difracción de electrones retroproyectados (EBSD, a fin de obtener información de la orientación cristalina de los granos en la superficie a ser cavitada. La técnica de microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM, fue usada para acompañar el proceso de desgaste para diferentes tiempos de ensayo. Como resultados de los ensayos de cavitación se determinó la pérdida de masa y se hizo un estudio secuencial de la apariencia superficial de las muestras para determinar los mecanismos de desgaste operantes en cada etapa. Los resultados fueron analizados a la luz de la caracterización cristalográfica previa. Para propósitos de comparación, fue usado el acero austenítico convencional UNS S30403. A partir de los resultados se observó que tanto la nucleación del daño como su evolución se dan de forma heterogénea a escala del tamaño de grano, resultado atribuido a la anisotropía en la deformación plástica. El carácter heterogéneo del daño por cavitación fue atribuido principalmente a las características de los límites de grano y a la microtextura dentro de los granos.Stainless steel samples with 100% austenitic microstructure and alloyed with 0.9 wt-% of nitrogen in solid solution were tested under vibratory cavitation experiments in distilled water to study the cavitation-erosion wear (EC at grain size level (mesoscale. Fully austenitic samples were obtained by high temperature gas nitriding (HTGN a commercially available dúplex stainless steel, UNS

  18. Nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, Martí; Barranco, Manuel; Navarro, Jesús; Ancilotto, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have constructed a density functional (DF) for parahydrogen between 14 and 32 K. ► The experimental equation of state and the surface tension are well reproduced. ► We have investigated nucleation and cavitations processes in the metastable phase. ► We have obtained the electron bubble explosion within the capillary model. - Abstract: We have used a density functional approach to investigate thermal homogeneous nucleation and cavitation in parahydrogen. The effect of electrons as seeds of heterogeneous cavitation in liquid parahydrogen is also discussed within the capillary model.

  19. Microleakage of Cavit, CavitW, CavitG and IRM by impedance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, B M; Panighi, M M; Steinmetz, P; G'Sell, C

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the sealing ability of four temporary filling materials over 9 days using a new electrochemical technique. Fifty-two extracted human maxillary bicuspids were selected and prepared for the measurements. They were divided into four groups of 12 teeth each, in addition to two positive and two negative controls. After preparation of the endodontic access cavity the sealing ability was registered. After a randomization procedure one group was obturated with IRM, another group with Cavit, a third group with CavitW and the last group with CavitG. The sealability was measured just after obturation (time 0) and after days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9. The results showed that the IRM group was significantly more watertight than the different Cavit formulations. Throughout the experiment no significant difference was noticed between the Cavit and CavitW groups (P > 0.05). The CavitG group was significantly less watertight throughout the measurements (P < 0.05).

  20. Computation and analysis of cavitating flow in Francis-class hydraulic turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Daniel J.

    Hydropower is the most proven renewable energy technology, supplying the world with 16% of its electricity. Conventional hydropower generates a vast majority of that percentage. Although a mature technology, hydroelectric generation shows great promise for expansion through new dams and plants in developing hydro countries. Moreover, in developed hydro countries, such as the United States, installing generating units in existing dams and the modern refurbishment of existing plants can greatly expand generating capabilities with little to no further impact on the environment. In addition, modern computational technology and fluid dynamics expertise has led to substantial improvements in modern turbine design and performance. Cavitation has always presented a problem in hydroturbines, causing performance breakdown, erosion, damage, vibration, and noise. While modern turbines are usually designed to be cavitation-free at their best efficiency point, due to the variable demand of the energy market it is fairly common to operate at off-design conditions. Here, cavitation and its deleterious effects are unavoidable, and hence, cavitation is a limiting factor on the design and operation of these turbines. Multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used in recent years to model cavitating flow for a large range of problems, including turbomachinery. However, CFD of cavitating flow in hydroturbines is still in its infancy. This dissertation presents steady-periodic Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations of a cavitating Francis-class hydroturbine at model and prototype scales. Computational results of the reduced-scale model and full-scale prototype, undergoing performance breakdown, are compared with empirical model data and prototype performance estimations based on standard industry scalings from the model data. Mesh convergence of the simulations is also displayed. Comparisons are made between the scales to display that cavitation performance breakdown

  1. Fracture of elastomers by cavitation

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdi, Adel

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation phenomenon is studied in rubber-like materials by combining experimental, theoretical and numerical approaches. Specific tests are carried out on a Styrene Butadiene Rubber to point out main characteristics of cavitation phenomenon. Hydrostatic depression is numerically modelled using finite element method. Numerical results are compared to Ball\\'s and Hou & Abeyaratne\\'s models with regard to cavity nucleation in the material. Both models well fit experimental observations suggesting that the cavitation nucleation in elastomers depends on the confinement degree of the specimen. Finally, critical hydrostatic pressure and critical global deformation are proved to govern cavitation nucleation in the studied material. Critical loadings are identified by comparing experimental and numerical load-displacement curves. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Cavitation onset of an accelerating liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyama, Akihito; Pan, Zhao; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Daily Jesse, David; Thomson, Scott; Hurd, Randy; Truscott, Tadd

    2017-11-01

    Accelerating a liquid-filled container can shatter the bottom. High-speed imaging reveals cavitation bubbles collapse near the bottom just before this fracture event. To avoid the damage caused by cavitation, accurate prediction of cavitation onset is crucial. However, the conventional cavitation number, as a function of the mean velocity of the flow does not correctly predict cavitation onset in an accelerating liquid. This study derives an alternative cavitation number from the equation of motion, predicting cavitation as a function of acceleration (cf. Pan & Kiyama et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 2017). We have conducted two separate series of experiments with a broad set of varied parameters. All the experimental results agreed with this theory, indicating that the proposed alternative cavitation number describes the universal threshold of cavitation onset within an accelerating liquid. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26709007, 16J08521, and 17H01246.

  3. Experimental and numerical investigation on cladding of corrosion-erosion resistant materials by a high power direct diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Parisa

    In oil and gas industry, soil particles, crude oil, natural gas, particle-laden liquids, and seawater can carry various highly aggressive elements, which accelerate the material degradation of component surfaces by combination of slurry erosion, corrosion, and wear mechanisms. This material degradation results into the loss of mechanical properties such as strength, ductility, and impact strength; leading to detachment, delamination, cracking, and ultimately premature failure of components. Since the failure of high valued equipment needs considerable cost and time to be repaired or replaced, minimizing the tribological failure of equipment under aggressive environment has been gaining increased interest. It is widely recognized that effective management of degradation mechanisms will contribute towards the optimization of maintenance, monitoring, and inspection costs. The hardfacing techniques have been widely used to enhance the resistance of surfaces against degradation mechanisms. Applying a surface coating improves wear and corrosion resistance and ensures reliability and long-term performance of coated parts. A protective layer or barrier on the components avoids the direct mechanical and chemical contacts of tool surfaces with process media and will reduce the material loss and ultimately its failure. Laser cladding as an advanced hardfacing technique has been widely used for industrial applications in order to develop a protective coating with desired material properties. During the laser cladding, coating material is fused into the base material by means of a laser beam in order to rebuild a damaged part's surface or to enhance its surface function. In the hardfacing techniques such as atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), high velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF), and laser cladding, mixing of coating materials with underneath surface has to be minimized in order to utilize the properties of the coating material most effectively. In this regard, laser cladding offers

  4. Surface mechanics design by cavitation peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although impacts at cavitation bubble collapses cause severe damage in hydraulic machineries, the cavitation impacts can be utilised for surface mechanics design such as introduction of compressive residual stress and/or improvement of fatigue strength. The peening method using the cavitation impacts was called as cavitation peening. In order to reveal the peening intensity of hydrodynamic cavitation and laser cavitation, the arc height of Almen strip and duralumin plate were measured. In the case of hydrodynamic cavitation, cavitation was generated by injecting a high speed water jet into water with a pressurised chamber and an open chamber, and the cavitating jet in air was also examined. The laser cavitation was produced by a pulse laser, and a high speed observation using a high speed video camera was carried out to clarify laser abrasion and laser cavitation with detecting noise by a hydrophone. It was concluded that the peening intensity by using the cavitating jet in water with the pressurized chamber was most aggressive, and the impact induced by the laser cavitation was larger than that of the laser abrasion at the present condition.

  5. Influence of hydrodynamic cavitation on biological objects

    OpenAIRE

    Мальований, Мирослав Степанович; Никифоров, Володимир Валентинович; Синельніков, Олександр Дмитрович; Харламова, Олена Володимирівна; Бунько, Василь Ярославович

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation, which yet has not found a wide application in industrial technologies, is an effective method of hydro-mechanical intensification of chemical-engineering, food, pharmaceutical, biological and other processes. The effectiveness of cavitation process is enabled by cavitation crashing of the solid phase, turbulent diffusion of boundary layer of the fluid by cavitation bubbles, emergence mass transfer aspects, which are characterized by high values of mass transfer coefficients. Proce...

  6. Experimental research of a microjet cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olšiak Róbert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of a cavitation research behind a micro-orifice. Investigated were the conditions of the origin of cavitation represented by parameters such as upstream pressure, downstream pressure, liquid temperature and cavitation number. Presented are also images of a cavitating microjet made by the high speed high definition camera RedLake Y3. Dimensions of a microjet are: diameter 0,3 mm; length 0,5 mm.

  7. Testing and prediction of erosion-corrosion for corrosion resistant alloys used in the oil and gas production industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Hernan E.

    The corrosion behavior of CRAs has been thoroughly investigated and documented in the public literature by many researchers; however, little work has been done to investigate erosion-corrosion of such alloys. When sand particles are entrained in the flow, the degradation mechanism is different from that observed for sand-free corrosive environment. There is a need in the oil and gas industry to define safe service limits for utilization of such materials. The effects of flow conditions, sand rate, pH and temperature on the erosion-corrosion of CRAs were widely studied. An extensive experimental work was conducted using scratch tests and flow loop tests using several experimental techniques. At high erosivity conditions, a synergistic effect between erosion and corrosion was observed. Under the high sand rate conditions tested, erosivity is severe enough to damage the passive layer protecting the CRA thereby enhancing the corrosion rate. In most cases there is likely a competition between the rates of protective film removal due to mechanical erosion and protective film healing. Synergism occurs for each of the three alloys examined (13Cr and Super13Cr and 22Cr); however, the degree of synergism is quite different for the three alloys and may not be significant for 22Cr for field conditions where erosivities are typically much lower that those occurring in the small bore loop used in this research. Predictions of the corrosion component of erosion-corrosion based on scratch test data compared reasonably well to test results from flow loops for the three CRAs at high erosivity conditions. Second order behavior appears to be an appropriate and useful model for representing the repassivation process of CRAs. A framework for a procedure to predict penetration rates for erosion-corrosion conditions was developed based on the second order model behavior observed for the re-healing process of the passive film of CRAs and on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

  8. Mechanical Properties and Plasma Erosion Resistance of ZrO{sub 2p}(3Y)/BN-SiO{sub 2} Ceramic Composites under Different Sintering Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Yu; Duan Xiaoming; Jia Dechang; Yang Zhihua; Meng Qingchang; Yu Yang [Institute for Advanced Ceramics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Yu Daren; Ding Yongjie, E-mail: dxmhit@126.com [School of Energy Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2011-10-29

    ZrO{sub 2p}(3Y)/BN-SiO{sub 2} ceramic composites were hot pressed under different sintering temperature. The ceramic composites were composed by BN, m-ZrO{sub 2}, t-ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}. The relative density, bending strength, elastic modulus and fracture toughness increase with the sintering temperature increasing, the maximum value of which at the sintering temperature of 1800 deg. C are 97.5%, 229.9MPa, 60.8GPa and 3.55MPam{sup 1/2}, respectively. The erosion resistance ability of ZrO{sub 2p}(3Y)/BN-SiO{sub 2} ceramic composites rise gradually with the sintering temperature increasing, and the erosion rate of the ceramic composite sintered at 1800 deg. C is 8.03x10{sup -3}mm/h.

  9. Cavitation pulse extraction and centrifugal pump analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hong Lind Shaoran [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China); Yu, Bo; Qing, Biao [Xihua University, Chengdu (China)

    2017-03-15

    This study extracted cavitation pulses from hydrophone signals sampled in a centrifugal pump and analyzed their characteristics. The modified and simplified Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) algorithm was proposed for extracting cavitation pulses from strong background noise. Experimental results showed that EMD can effectively suppress noise and obtain clear cavitation pulses, facilitating the identification of the number of pulses associated with the degree of cavitation. The cavitation characteristics were modeled to predict the value of incipient cavitation. Then, we proposed a method for detecting the wear of the impeller surface. That is, the information on the impeller surface of the centrifugal pump, including the roughness of the impeller surface and its wear trends, were quantified based on the net positive suction head available of incipient cavitation. The findings indicate that the proposed technique is suitable for condition monitoring of the pump.

  10. Tip-leakage cavitation in the clearance of a 2D hydrofoil with fillets: high-speed visualization and PIV/PTV measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapryagaev, Ivan I.; Timoshevskiy, Mikhail V.; Pervunin, Konstantin S.

    2017-09-01

    Tip-clearance cavitation is one of the most aggressive forms of cavitation as it can cause surface erosion of hydraulic machinery elements and, as a result, their fatigue damage and disturb designed operating conditions. At present, the literature lacks for detailed experimental data on the inception and development of this type of cavitation at various flow conditions. In the paper, a tip-leakage cavitation occurring in the clearance between an end face of a 2D hydrofoil (a scaled-down model of guide vanes (GV) of a Francis turbine) and a transparent wall of the test section was studied. The experiments were carried out for different cavitating regimes on the cavitation number and two attack angles of 3° and 9°, with the gap size (tip clearance width) varied in the range from 0.4 to 0.8 mm. In order to determine the cavitation inception conditions and investigate the dynamics of the tip-leakage cavitation, a high-speed visualization was applied. A modified PIV/PTV technique with a diverging laser beam instead of a laser light sheet was used to measure the mean velocity distributions within the gap. It was shown that the cavitation pattern on the suction side of the GV model impacts the dynamics of the leakage flow in the gap but does not affect the sheet cavity formed close to the foil leading edge in the clearance as well as its size and dynamics. When the gap size is increased, the tip-leakage cavitation initiates at higher cavitation numbers or, in other words, conditions for the cavitation occurrence become more favorable.

  11. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  12. In Vivo Microbubble Cavitation Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon, F.; Shi, W.; Liu, J.; Xie, F.; Gao, S.; Drvol, L.; Lof, J.; Everbach, C.; Porter, T.; Powers, J.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is the second cause of death and leading cause of disabilityworldwide. Less than 5% of ischemic stroke patients receive the state-of-the art treatment of a thrombolytic drug tPA, and only about 10% of these gain additional benefit from it. Ultrasound (US)-inducedmicrobubble (MB) cavitation

  13. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, C.D.; Arora, M.; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the

  14. Sonoporation from jetting cavitation bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.-D. Ohl (Claus-Dieter); M. Arora (Manish); R. Ikink (Roy); N. de Jong (Nico); M. Versluis (Michel); M. Delius (Michael); D. Lohse (Detlef)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads

  15. Use of microhardness as a simple means of estimating relative wear resistance of carbide thermal spray coatings: Part 2. wear resistance of cemented carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Michael; Roman, Itzhak

    2002-12-01

    A selection of WC-Co and Cr3C2-25%NiCr coatings produced by plasma spray and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) deposition techniques were subjected to various wear tests designed to simulate abrasion, cavitation, sliding, and particle erosion type wear mechanisms. All of the coatings were at least 200 µm thick and were deposited onto stainless steel substrates. In Part 1 of this contribution, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized and their mechanical properties were assessed using microindentation procedures. In this second part of the article, the behavior of the coatings when subjected to the various wear tests is reported and the utility of microhardness testing as an indication of relative wear resistance is discussed. It is shown that correctly performed, appropriate microhardness measurements are a good indication of abrasion resistance and sliding wear resistance, and also correlate well with cavitation resistance in Cr3C2-NiCr. The measurements were less useful for predicting erosion resistance for both Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co, however, and for abrasion resistance when WC-Co was ground against SiC. Here the contribution of micromechanisms involving fracturing and brittle failure is greater than that indicated by the coating microhardness, which is essentially a measurement of resistance to plastic deformation under equilibrium conditions.

  16. Pressure and velocity dependence of flow-type cavitation erosion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available for chemically corrosive waters, the disc, test chamber, stators, drive shaft, valves, reservoir and all connections were made of stainless steel, while pump ~mponents were nickel plated. The flow system was completed by reinforced...

  17. Role of cavitation in the phacoemulsification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Jaime

    2008-05-01

    To determine the role of cavitational energy as a mechanism responsible for the emulsification of the lens during phacoemulsification. Clinica Ophthalmologica Pasteur, Santiago, Chile. Cavitation and its relationship to phacoemulsification power were documented using a combination of light sources, high-speed video recording techniques, and computerized control and by monitoring environmental pressure. The suppression of cavitation from the phaco process was achieved by building an environmental hyperbaric system capable of retaining the phacoemulsification system's ability to provide irrigation, aspiration, and vacuum necessary at standard and elevated pressures. The pressure level was controlled and monitored through a computer interface alongside the simultaneous video monitoring of cavitation bubble creation changes during pressure rise or fall. Last, evaluation and measurement of phacoemulsification was performed on real cataract fragments in the presence and absence of cavitation. Cavitation around the phaco tip mainly occurred at longitudinal ultrasonic power levels of 30% or more. Cavitation bubble formation was observed during the backstroke or as the tip moved away from the lens material and collapsed during the forward displacement of the phaco tip. Cavitation at any power level was successfully suppressed when the pressure in the hyperbaric chamber increased beyond 2.0 bar (29.1 psi) above atmospheric pressure. Phacoemulsification performance in the presence or absence of cavitation was comparable. This study found strong evidence that cavitation plays no role in phacoemulsification, leaving the jackhammer effect as the only important mechanism responsible for the lens-disrupting power of phacoemulsification.

  18. Numerical Investigation Cavitation Buckets for Hydrofoil Parametrically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih KARAALİOĞLU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is a general fluid mechanics phenomenon that is appeared in system such as pumps, turbines, marine propellers and hydrofoils which induces pressure and velocity fluctuation in the fluid (Brennen, 2013. Cavitation can be defined as the formation of vapour regions due to a decrease in local pressure. Undesirable consequences which can cause a fall in the performance of a system, structural failure, production of noise and vibration, material damage, are encountered due to cavitation (Uşar, 2015. In this study, cavitation was analysed using a bucket diagram. Bucket diagram represents the cavitation behaviour of a wing, fin or propeller blade in a two dimensional sense. This diagram is plotted as a function of section (hydrofoil angle of attack (α versus section cavitation number (σ. Pressure distribution can be calculated on two dimensional geometry of hydrofoil by using BEM (Boundary Element Method and cavitation bucket diagram can be computed. The cavitation inception case and partial cavitation cases have been investigated and the results of the present BEM were successfully compared with those of given in literature in the past and each other. While a constant source-dipole panel method has been used to calculate the pressure distribution at cavitation inception case, PCPAN programme that solves the sheet type of cavity on the hydrofoil by potential based panel method, has been used to calculate pressure distribution for the cases of partial cavitation. Effects of maximum hydrofoil thickness, maximum camber and location of maximum camber on cavitation have been analyzed by means of cavitation bucklet diagrams. All results are discussed in a detailed manner.

  19. Prediction of cryogenic cavitation around hydrofoil by an extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, T. Z.; Wei, Y. J.; Wang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Developing a robust computational strategy to address the rich physics characteristic involved in the thermodynamic effects on the cryogenic cavitation remains a challenging problem. The objective of this present study is to model the numerical methodology to simulate the cryogenic cavitation by implanting the thermodynamic effects to the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model, and coupling the energy equation considered the latent heat. For this purpose, cavitating flows are investigated over a three dimensional hydrofoil in liquid hydrogen and nitrogen. Experimental measurements of pressure and temperature are utilized to validate the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model. Specifically, the further analysis of the cavitation solution with respect to the thermodynamic term is conducted. The results show that the extensional Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model predicts better accuracy to the quasi-steady cavitation over hydrofoil in the two cryogenic fluids.

  20. Numerical simulation of flow in centrifugal pump under cavitation and sediment condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, P. C.; Lu, J. L.; Zheng, X. B.; Zhao, Q.; Luo, X. Q.

    2012-11-01

    The sediment concentration is very high in many rivers in the world, especially in China. The pumps that designed for the clear water are usually seriously abraded. The probability of pump cavitation is greatly enhanced due to the existence of sand. Under the joint action and mutual promotion of sand erosion and cavitation, serious abrasion could occurred, and the hydraulic performance of the pump may be greatly descended, meanwhile the safety and stability of the whole pump are greatly threatened. Therefore, it is significant to investigate the cavitation characteristic of pump under sediment flow condition. In this paper, the flow in a single stage centrifugal pump under cleat water and sediment flow conditions was numerically simulated. The cavitation performance under clear water was firstly analyzed. Then, The pressure, velocity and solid particle distribution in centrifugal pump under different particle diameter and different particle concentration was investigated by using the two-fluid model; The area and extent of erosion was illustrated by using the particle track model. Finally, the influence of mixed sand on centrifugal pump performance was investigated.

  1. Cavitation Effect of Shock Pressure about Nuclear Power Plant Component Cleaning or Crud Removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Man; Lee, Seung Won; Park, Sung Dae; Kang, Sarah; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In nuclear power plant, the problems are caused by corrosion phenomena on the pipe or fuel elements. It can cause the additional cost for plant component recycling or disassembly. Those solutions of problem are chemical method and physical method. Recently ultrasonic and laser methods for cleaning are developing. If fluid flow is attached to the high speed surface of a blade, a large number of bubbles are developed. As it reaches vapor pressure, the fluid vaporizes and forms small bubbles of gas. This is cavitation. Previous study of cavitation shows that predict the onset of cavitation within the pump blade and the degradation in the pressure rise due to the generation and transport of vapor. But cavitation erosion effect can be used for optimized corrosion cleaning. Cavitation can be created in restrict region such as static mixer and orifice. When the bubbles collapse later, they typically cause very strong local shock waves in the fluid, which may be audible and may even damage the blades. Purpose of this study is using shock pressure by micro bubble collapse for second time cleaning in the fluid region of the on product surface

  2. Hull-Propeller Interaction and Its Effect on Propeller Cavitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regener, Pelle Bo

    computational effort. The boundary element method for propeller analysis includes a partially nonlinear cavitation model, which is able to predict partial sheet cavitation and supercavitation. The cavitation behaviour of the conventional propeller and the Kappel propeller from the earlier simulations...

  3. Erosive gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, S.H.; Conrad, C.; Kjoergaad, J.

    1982-01-01

    Erosive gastritis is a well-defined radiologic and endoscopic entity. It is one of the common causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, yet it is seldom diagnosed and often confused with a number of other diseases. This communication re-emphasizes the characteristic endoscopic and radiologic features of erosive gastritis and its differential diagnosis. Two representative cases are reported. (orig.)

  4. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years....... The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model...... and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes....

  5. Method of similarity for cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espanet, L.; Tekatlian, A.; Barbier, D. [CEA/Cadarache, Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles (DEC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gouin, H. [Aix-Marseille-3 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France). Laboratoire de Modelisation en Mecanique et Thermodynamique

    1998-07-01

    The knowledge of possible cavitation in subassembly nozzles of the fast reactor core implies the realization of a fluid dynamic model test. We propose a method of similarity based on the non-dimensionalization of the equation of motion for viscous capillarity fluid issued from the Cahn and Hilliard model. Taking into account the dissolved gas effect, a condition of compatibility is determined. This condition must be respected by the fluid in experiment, along with the scaling between the two similar flows. (author)

  6. Breaking beer bottles with cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sunny; Fontana, Jake; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter; Shelley, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Hitting the top of a beer bottle, nearly full of water, with an open hand can cause the bottle to break, with the bottom separating from upper section. We have studied this phenomenon using a high-speed camera, and observed the formation, coalescence and collapse of bubbles. The breaking of glass is due to cavitation, typically occurring near the bottom edge. We make numerical estimates of the relevant physical parameters, and compare these with experimental observations.

  7. Method of similarity for cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espanet, L.; Tekatlian, A.; Barbier, D.; Gouin, H.

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge of possible cavitation in subassembly nozzles of the fast reactor core implies the realization of a fluid dynamic model test. We propose a method of similarity based on the non-dimensionalization of the equation of motion for viscous capillarity fluid issued from the Cahn and Hilliard model. Taking into account the dissolved gas effect, a condition of compatibility is determined. This condition must be respected by the fluid in experiment, along with the scaling between the two similar flows. (author)

  8. Cavitation on hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, H.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation characteristics of hydrofoils with sinusoidal leading edge were examined experimentally at a Reynolds number of 7.2 × 105. The hydrofoils had an underlying NACA 634-021 profile and an aspect ratio of 4.3. The sinusoidal leading edge geometries included three amplitudes of 2.5%, 5%, and 12% and two wavelengths of 25% and 50% of the mean chord length. Results revealed that cavitation on the leading edge-modified hydrofoils existed in pockets behind the troughs whereas the baseline hydrofoil produced cavitation along its entire span. Moreover, cavitation on the modified hydrofoils appeared at consistently lower angles of attack than on the baseline hydrofoil.

  9. Temperature measurements in cavitation bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation is usually a nearly isothermal process in the liquid phase, but in some specific flow conditions like hot water or cryogenic fluids, significant temperature variations are detected. In addition, a large temperature increase happens inside the cavitation bubbles at the very end of their collapse, due to the fast compression of the gas at the bubble core, which is almost adiabatic. This process is of primary interest in various biomedical and pharmaceutical applications, where the mechanisms of bubble collapse plays a major role. To investigate the amplitude and the spatial distribution of these temperature variations inside and outside the cavitation bubbles, a system based on cold wires has been developed. They have been tested in a configuration of a single bubble obtained by submitting a small air bubble to a large amplitude pressure wave. Some promising results have been obtained after the initial validation tests. This work is funded by the Office of Naval Research Global under Grant N62909-16-1-2116, Dr. Salahuddin Ahmed & Ki-Han Kim program managers.

  10. CFD analysis of unsteady cavitation phenomena in multistage pump with inducer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlář, M.; Zima, Patrik; Bajorek, M.; Krátký, T.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2012), s. 1-8 ISSN 1755-1315. [IAHR Symposium on Hydraulic Machinery and Systems /26./. Beijing, 19.08.2012-23.08.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP101/10/1428 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : cavitating flow * CFD analysis * erosion risk Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics http://iopscience.iop.org/1755-1315/15/6/062024

  11. Numerical Analysis of Unsteady Cavitating Flow around Balancing Drum of Multistage Pump

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedlář, M.; Krátký, T.; Zima, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2 (2016), s. 119-128 ISSN 1882-9554. [Asian International Conference on Fluid Machinery /13./ (AICFM. Tokyo, 07.09.2015-10.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23550S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : cavitation erosion * numerical simulation * multistage pump Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/ijfms/9/2/9_119/_article

  12. Comprehensive study of the abrasive wear and slurry erosion behavior of an expanded system of high chromium cast iron and microstructural modification for enhanced wear resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Reinaldo Javier

    High chromium cast irons (HCCIs) have been demonstrated to be an effective material for a wide range of applications in aggressive environments, where resistances to abrasion, erosion and erosion-corrosion are required. For instance, machinery and facilities used in mining and extraction in Alberta's oil sands suffer from erosion and erosion-corrosion caused by silica-containing slurries, which create challenges for the reliability and maintenance of slurry pumping systems as well as other processing and handling equipment. Considerable efforts have been made to determine and understand the relationship between microstructural features of the HCCIs and their wear performance, in order to guide the material selection and development for specific service conditions with optimal performance. The focus was previously put on a narrow group of compositions dictated by ASTM A532. However, with recent advances in casting technology, the HCCI compositional range can be significantly expanded, which potentially brings new alloys that can be superior to those which are currently employed. This work consists of three main aspects of study. The first one is the investigation of an expanded system of white irons with their composition ranging from 1 to 6 wt.% C and 5 to 45 wt.% Cr, covering 53 alloys. This work has generated wear and corrosion maps and established correlation between the performance and microstructural features for the alloys. The work was conducted in collaboration with the Materials Development Center of Weir Minerals in Australia, and the results have been collected in a database that is used by the company to guide materials selection for slurry pump components in Alberta oil sands and in other mining operations throughout the world. The second part consists of three case studies on effects of high chromium and high carbon, respectively, on the performance of the HCCIs. The third aspect is the development of an approach to enhance the wear resistance of

  13. Laser-induced cavitation based micropump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    Lab-on-a-chip devices are in strong demand as versatile and robust pumping techniques. Here, we present a cavitation based technique, which is able to pump a volume of 4000 m3 within 75 s against an estimated pressure head of 3 bar. The single cavitation event is created by focusing a laser pulse in

  14. Reflections on cavitation nuclei in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Knud Aage

    2007-01-01

    to explaining why the tensile strength of water varies so dramatically between the experiments reported. A model for calculation of the critical pressure of skin-covered free gas bubbles as well as that of interfacial gaseous nuclei covered by a skin is presented. This model is able to bridge the apparently......The origin of cavitation bubbles, cavitation nuclei, has been a subject of debate since the early years of cavitation research. This paper presents an analysis of a representative selection of experimental investigations of cavitation inception and the tensile strength of water. At atmospheric...... pressure, the possibility of stabilization of free gas bubbles by a skin has been documented, but only within a range of bubble sizes that makes them responsible for tensile strengths up to about 1.5 bar, and values reaching almost 300 bar have been measured. However, cavitation nuclei can also be harbored...

  15. Superhigh Temperatures and Acoustic Cavitation

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, V B; Miller, M B; Sermyagin, A V; Topolnikov, A S

    2003-01-01

    The experimental results on thermonuclear synthesis under acoustic cavitation have been analyzed with the account of the latest data and their discussion. The analysis testifies that this avenue of research is a very promising one. The numerical calculations of the D(d, n)^{3}He reaction rate in the deuterated acetone (C_{3}D_{6}O) under the influence of ultrasound depending on T environment temperature within the range T=249-295 K have been carried out within the framework of hydrodynamic model. The results show that it is possible to improve substantially the effect/background relationship in experiments by decreasing the fluid temperature twenty-thirty degrees below zero.

  16. Model and mechanism of erosion fracture of refractories at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrajtis, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    A calculational technique to evaluate the refractory erosion resistance is proposed. It is shown that under erosion fracture due to breaking off flow erosion plasters are formed which cover all the fractured surface. The proposed model and mechanism of erosion fracture and erosion plaster stability allow one to perform evaluation calculations of erosion characteristics of refractiories based on zirconium dioxide

  17. Self-sustaining erosion-resistant low-Z coatings for first wall and limiter applications. I. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; DeWald, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that dilute alkali-metal alloys at surface facing a Tokamak plasma might be used to provide a self-sustaining low-Z alkali-metal surface which would shield the structural component of the alloy from erosion. At the same time, the alkali-metal overlayer could be expected to primarily sputter as secondary ions, which are returned to the wall and limiter without entering the plasma. In order to achieve this goal, a number of conditions which may be mutually exclusive must be met. Several of these conditions are analyzed, providing information on the feasibility and expected limits of performance for dilute alloys of Li in Al, Si, and Cu

  18. An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-05

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  19. Experimental and numerical studies on super-cavitating flow of axisymmetric cavitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Kwon Ahn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently underwater systems moving at high speed such as a super-cavitating torpedo have been studied for their practical advantage of the dramatic drag reduction. In this study we are focusing our attention on super-cavitating flows around axisymmetric cavitators. A numerical method based on inviscid flow is developed and the results for several shapes of the cavitator are presented. First using a potential based boundary element method, we find the shape of the cavitator yielding a sufficiently large enough cavity to surround the body. Second, numerical predictions of supercavity are validated by comparing with experimental observations carried out in a high speed cavitation tunnel at Chungnam National University (CNU CT.

  20. Basic study on vortex cavitation inception

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezure, Toshiki; Sato, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    In the FaCT Project for Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems, a compact reactor vessel and 2 loops system are investigated in terms of economical improvement of a sodium cooled fast reactor. In order to certificate the issues in thermal hydraulics, 1/10th scaled model water tests have been performed. In the flow visualization of the 1/10th scaled model tests, vortex cavitations were observed at the inlet of Hot Leg pipes. In order to estimate the occurrence of this type of cavitation in the reactor, cavitation number will be used. In the reactor design, cover gas in a reactor vessel is pressurized up to 0.25MPa. This results in higher velocity at the onset condition of the cavitation as compared to the open-air water experiment. In addition, viscosity of the sodium at 550degC is nearly 1/3rd of that of water at room temperature. These differences may affect the flow pattern and the inception of vortex cavitation. These factors will bring some difficulties in the estimation using the cavitation number. Thus, the effects of pressure and viscosity on the inception of vortex cavitations were examined in basic water experiments. As the results, it was found that the onset value of cavitation coefficient became higher with the increase of the pressure. In addition, it also appeared that the onset value of cavitation coefficient became higher under lower viscosity. However, this difference of onset value due to the viscosity became smaller with the increase of pressure, and was negligible under the same pressure in the real reactor. (author)

  1. Size-effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavity...... triaxiality, where cavitation instabilities are predicted by conventional plasticity theory, such instabilities are also found for the nonlocal theory, but the effects of gradient hardening delay the onset of the instability. Furthermore, in some cases the cavitation stress reaches a maximum and then decays...

  2. Cavitation studies on axi-symmetric underwater body with pumpjet propulsor in cavitation tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Suryanarayana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A pumpjet propulsor (PJP was designed for an underwater body (UWB with axi-symmetric configuration. Its performance was predicted through CFD study and models were manufactured. The propulsor design was evaluated for its propulsion characteristics through model tests conducted in a Wind Tunnel (WT. In the concluding part of the study, evaluation of the cavitation performance of the pumpjet was undertaken in a cavitation tunnel (CT. In order to assess the cavitation free operation speeds and depths of the body, cavitation tests of the PJP were carried out in behind condition to determine the inception cavitation numbers for rotor, stator and cowl. The model test results obtained were corrected for full scale Reynolds number and subsequently analyzed for cavitation inception speeds at different operating depths. From model tests it was also found that the cavitation inception of the rotor takes place on the tip face side at higher advance ratios and cavitation shifts towards the suction side as the RPS increases whereas the stator and cowl are free from cavitation.

  3. Research on the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation condition in a centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Yuan, J. P.; Ren, X. D.; Pei, J.; Si, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to research the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation (AC) condition in a centrifugal pump. The acoustic pressure signals at the pump inlet and outlet were measured respectively during the development of cavitation in a closed hydraulic test rig. It could be found that both the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressures changed obviously with the development of cavitation. The time domain and the power spectrum density of the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressure pulsations were analyzed. The broadband pulses of the acoustic pressure pulsations were found and the reasons for the phenomenon were given.

  4. Bacterial microleakage of Cavit, IRM, and TERM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveaux, E; Hildelbert, P; Neut, C; Boniface, B; Romond, C

    1992-11-01

    In this in vitro study, a model system was developed and tested to evaluate the sealing ability of temporary restorative materials used in endodontic access preparations. The materials studied, Cavit, IRM, and TERM, were tested on 40 premolars against a known bacterial species, Streptococcus sanguis. The leakage of bacterial cells was checked 4 and 8 days after initial immersion in the culture. Thermocycling was introduced on the fourth day. After 8 days the cement thicknesses were measured after the teeth had been longitudinally sectioned. Before and after thermocycling, IRM was less leakproof than Cavit (p Cavit, whereas TERM remained leakproof. The thicknesses were as follows: Cavit, 3.73 mm; IRM, 3.45 mm; and TERM, 5.49 mm. There was no statistically significant relationship between thickness and tightness.

  5. Cavitation in pumps, pipes and valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Ronald.

    1990-01-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation, often perceived as merely a nuisance, may have far more serious implications. These are discussed here. They include noise, loss of performance and damage to the constituent parts. (author)

  6. Vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation in poplars: synthesis and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichot, Régis; Brignolas, Franck; Cochard, Hervé; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-07-01

    Vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations. Here, we summarize the available literature on vulnerability to drought-induced cavitation in poplars (Populus spp.), a genus of agronomic, ecological and scientific importance. Vulnerability curves and vulnerability parameters (including the water potential inducing 50% loss in hydraulic conductivity, P50) were collected from 37 studies published between 1991 and 2014, covering a range of 10 species and 12 interspecific hybrid crosses. Results of our meta-analysis confirm that poplars are among the most vulnerable woody species to drought-induced cavitation (mean P50  = -1.44 and -1.55 MPa across pure species and hybrids, respectively). Yet, significant variation occurs among species (P50 range: 1.43 MPa) and among hybrid crosses (P50 range: 1.12 MPa), within species and hybrid crosses (max. P50 range reported: 0.8 MPa) as well as in response to environmental factors including nitrogen fertilization, irradiance, temperature and drought (max. P50 range reported: 0.75 MPa). Potential implications and gaps in knowledge are discussed in the context of poplar cultivation, species adaptation and climate modifications. We suggest that poplars represent a valuable model for studies on drought-induced cavitation, especially to elucidate the genetic and molecular basis of cavitation resistance in Angiosperms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Interspecific variation in xylem vulnerability to cavitation among tropical tree and shrub species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Omar R; Kursar, Thomas A; Cochard, Hervé; Tyree, Melvin T

    2005-12-01

    In tropical moist forests, seasonal drought limits plant survival, productivity and diversity. Drought-tolerance mechanisms of tropical species should reflect the maximum seasonal water deficits experienced in a particular habitat. We investigated stem xylem vulnerability to cavitation in nine tropical species with different life histories and habitat associations. Stem xylem vulnerability was scored as the xylem water potential causing 50 and 75% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 and P75, respectively). Four shade-tolerant shrubs ranged from moderately resistant (P50=-1.9 MPa for Ouratea lucens Kunth. Engl.) to highly resistant to cavitation (P50=-4.1 MPa for Psychotria horizontalis Sw.), with shallow-rooted species being the most resistant. Among the tree species, those characteristic of waterlogged soils, Carapa guianensis Aubl., Prioria copaifera Griseb. and Ficus citrifolia Mill., were the most vulnerable to cavitation (P50=-0.8 to -1.6 MPa). The wet-season, deciduous tree, Cordia alliodora (Ruiz and Pav.) Oken., had resistant xylem (P50=-3.2 MPa), whereas the dry-season, deciduous tree, Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. was among the most vulnerable to cavitation (P50=-0.8 MPa) of the species studied. For eight out of the nine study species, previously reported minimum seasonal leaf water potentials measured in the field during periods of drought correlated with our P50 and P75 values. Rooting depth, deciduousness, soil type and growth habit might also contribute to desiccation tolerance. Our results support the functional dependence of drought tolerance on xylem resistance to cavitation.

  8. Using cavitation for delignification of wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Pranav B; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2012-04-01

    The Kraft process is the most widely used chemical process for the removal of lignin and other polymers from wood to obtain cellulosic pulp fibres. In the present study, the effect of cavitation (growth and violent collapse of vapour bubbles in a liquid) on delignification of wood was investigated. Steam was introduced in the reactor in order to study the effect of steam driven hybrid cavitation on delignification. The results obtained were subjected to kinetic analysis. The rates of delignification obtained using hydrodynamic cavitation were about 4-5 orders of magnitude greater than those obtained using acoustic cavitation (rate constants for delignification were 9.78×10(-6) and 6.8×10(-1)min(-1) for acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation, respectively). The energy imparted by the pump in the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor was much higher than that imparted by the acoustic devices and this was considered to be the cause of the higher delignification rates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Erhversbetinget erosion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Gjørup, Hans; Nyvad, Bente

    2012-01-01

    Baggrund – I forbindelse med dental erosion er en grundig udredning af patienten vigtig, således at årsagen til erosionernes opståen findes, og der kan iværksættes adækvat forebyggende indsats. En sådan udredning er ikke mindst vigtig, når arbejdsmiljøet mistænkes. Patienttilfælde – En 30-årig...... arbejdsskade, men ikke anerkendt, da erosioner ikke er optaget på Arbejdsskadestyrelsens liste over erhvervssygdomme. En systematisk registrering af lignende tilfælde kunne imidlertid på sigt ændre retspraksis for fremtidige patienter med arbejdsbetinget erosion....

  10. Characterization of Cavitation Effects in Therapeutic Ultrasound: Sonophoresis Experiments and Quantitative Emission Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Kyle Thomas

    Fundamental to the use of ultrasound for therapeutic benefit is a comprehensive understanding and identification of the underlying mechanisms. Specifically, consequential bioeffects during therapeutic ultrasound commonly coincide with the onset of microbubble cavitation, especially for drug-delivery applications. Hence, there is a need for monitoring and characterization techniques that provide quantitative metrics for assessing cavitation activity during ultrasound exposure in order to monitor treatment progress, identify interactions of cavitation with tissue, and provide dosimetry metrics for avoiding potentially harmful exposures both for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The primary goal of the work presented in this dissertation was to characterize the role of cavitation during sonophoresis using quantitative and system-independent approaches. First, this goal was accomplished using traditional passive cavitation detection techniques to monitor cavitation emissions during in vitro intermediate- (IFS, insonation frequency f 0 = 0.1-1 MHz) and high-frequency sonophoresis (HFS, f0 >1 MHz) treatments of in vitro porcine skin samples in Chapter 2. The relative intensity of subharmonic acoustic emissions from stable cavitation occurring near the skin surface was measured using a single-element PCD and was shown to correspond with reductions in skin resistivity, a surrogate measure of permeability, for all sonophoresis treatments. However, the acoustic emissions measured during sonophoresis provided incommensurable quantities between the different treatment regimes due to unaccounted frequency-dependent variations in the sensitivity of the PCD and diffraction effects in the cavitation-radiated pressure field received by the PCD. Second, methods were developed and employed to characterize the wideband absolute receive sensitivity of single-element focused and unfocused receivers in Chapter 3. By employing these characterization techniques and by accounting for the

  11. Cavitation Measurement during Sonic and Ultrasonic Activated Irrigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macedo, Ricardo; Verhaagen, Bram; Rivas, David Fernandez; Versluis, Michel; Wesselink, Paul; van der Sluis, Luc

    Introduction: The aims of this study were to quantify and to visualize the possible occurrence of transient cavitation (bubble formation and implosion) during sonic and ultrasonic (UAI) activated irrigation. Methods: The amount of cavitation generated around several endodontic instruments was

  12. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Imaging of Microbubble Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon, F.; Shi, W.T.; Powers, J.E.; Liu, J.; Drvol, L.; Lof, J.; Everbach, C.; Gao, S.; Xie, F.; Porter, T.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potentialfor therapeutic applications, including sonothrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (e.g. stable versus inertial forms of

  13. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation on zooplankton: A tool for disinfection

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Anil, A.C.; Venkat, K.; Gaonkar, C.; Kolwalkar, J.; Khandeparker, L.; Desai, D.V.; Mahulkar, A.V.; Ranade, V.V.; Pandit, A.B.

    . Experimental results indicated that cavitation and/or turbulent fluid shear dominantly originating from cavitation are effective tools for sea water disinfection as more than 80% of the zooplankton present in the sea water were killed. It was also observed...

  14. Feedback loop process for controlling inertial cavitation: experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserra, Claude; Sabraoui, Abbas; Reslan, Lina; Bera, Jean-Christophe; Gilles, Bruno; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2011-09-01

    Applications involving cavitation mechanisms, such as sonoporation, are irreproducible in the case of a fixed-intensity sonication, due to the non-stationary behavior of cavitation. We then propose to work at a fixed-cavitation level instead of under fixed-intensity sonication conditions. For this purpose a regulated cavitation generator has been developed in a stationary wave field configuration, which allows regulation of the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop based on acoustic cavitation measurements. The cavitation level indicator was quantified by the broadband spectrum noise level relative to inertial cavitation events. This generated inertial cavitation was characterized by both acoustic and chemical measurements, quantifying hydroxyl radicals produced by water sonolysis. While the cavitation level is obtained with a 40% standard deviation for fixed applied acoustic intensities in the range [0.01 3.44] W/cm2, the regulated generator reproduces the cavitation level with a standard deviation of 3%. The results show that the hydroxyl radical production is better correlated with the cavitation level setting than with the applied acoustic intensity, highlighting the fact that broadband noise is a good indicator of inertial cavitation, with greatest interest for cavitation monitoring. In summary, the regulated device generates a cavitation level that is reproducible, repeatable and stable in time. This system produces reproducible effects that allow consideration of biological applications such as sonoporation to be independent of the experimental ultrasound device, as confirmed by transfection efficiency and cell cytotoxicity studies. Thus, this feedback loop process presents interesting perspectives for monitoring and controlling in-vivo cavitation.

  15. Vizualization of the cavitating jet using flashlamp for illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlkvik, Marek; Olšiak, Róbert; Knížat, Branislav

    2012-04-01

    The contribution deals with the ways of the illumination of the cavitating jet for the purposes of the visualization. The cavitation is induced by the fluid flow through the orifice with the diameter of 0,3mm. Region of the cavitating jet is illuminated by a different light sources. Goal of this paper is to compare the quality and the informative value of the obtained visual data. In addition, complicated structure of the cavitating jet is also shown and described.

  16. Mechanics modelling of fern cavitation catapult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jingtian; Li, Kai; Tan, Huifeng; Wang, Changguo; Cai, Shengqiang

    2017-12-01

    Cavitation is often regarded as a failure mode in soft materials. An intriguing phenomenon has been recently discovered that fern sporangium can take advantage of drying-induced cavitation instability in annulus cells to disperse spores at an extraordinarily high acceleration. Briefly, the decrease of environmental humidity causes continuous bending of the sporangium and growth of cavities inside the annulus cells, with the elastic energy accumulated in sporangium walls. When the humidity is lower than a critical value, the cavities suddenly expand dramatically inside the cells, causing a quick release of the elastic energy stored in the annular structure. As a result, like a catapult, the sporangium snaps back and ejects the seeds at a high speed. Motivated by the observation, in this article, we study cavitation instability in a similar structure as the sporangium. To simplify the problem, in our model, the mechanics of cells in the sporangium are described by the polymer gel model, while the sporangium wall is modelled as a hyperelastic material. When the environmental humidity is lower than a critical value, through energetic analyses, we can predict the cavitation catapult phenomenon using the model. We hope that our study in this article can provide useful insights into the bio-inspired design of structures which can take advantage of cavitation instability in soft materials.

  17. Real-time visualization of joint cavitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N Kawchuk

    Full Text Available Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking.

  18. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  19. Cavitation research from an intetrnational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, R E A

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews some current research at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory from the perspective of the experience gained from cooperative research in other laboratories that the author has had the opportunity to participate in for several decades. Examples are drawn from the author's experience with collaborative efforts in China, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, and the US. Emphasis is placed on the progress in our understanding of the physics of cavitation as influenced by water quality, i.e. the strength of the water as influenced by the concentration of free and dissolved gas and complex fluid dynamic factors such as turbulence. The shift from experimental research to studies involving an integrated experimental/numerical approach is also underscored. Examples are drawn from early studies of inception and acoustics, vortex cavitation and more recent research on sheet/cloud cavitation and supercavitation. Some thoughts on new directions are also presented.

  20. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  1. Analyses of cavitation instabilities in ductile metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2007-01-01

    , and also tests for a thin ductile metal layer bonding two ceramic blocks have indicated rapid void growth. Analyses for these material configurations are discussed here. When the void radius is very small, a nonlocal plasticity model is needed to account for observed size-effects, and recent analyses......Cavitation instabilities have been predicted for a single void in a ductile metal stressed under high triaxiality conditions. In experiments for a ceramic reinforced by metal particles a single dominant void has been observed on the fracture surface of some of the metal particles bridging a crack...... for the influence of such size-effects on cavitation instabilities are presented. When a metal contains a distribution of micro voids, and the void spacing compared to void size is not extremely large, the surrounding voids may affect the occurrence of a cavitation instability at one of the voids. This has been...

  2. The Impact of Manifold-to-Orifice Turning Angle on Sharp-Edge Orifice Flow Characteristics in both Cavitation and Non-Cavitation Turbulent Flow Regimes (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurick, W. H; Ohanian, T; Talley, D. G; Strakey, P. A

    2007-01-01

    .... This paper deals with predicting the initiation of cavitation, cavitation impacts on Cc, and non-cavitation impacts on Cd from L/D of 5 sharp-edge orifices with both single angle and compound angle directional flow...

  3. Experimental investigation of hydrodynamic cavitation through orifices of different geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamic cavitation in single and multihole orifices was experimentally investigated to assess their hydraulic characteristics: loss coefficients, inception cavitation number, cavitation number for transition to supercavitation. Significant difference for singlehole and multihole orifices was observed in terms of the measured loss coefficient. It is significantly more effective to use multihole orifices, where energy dissipation is much lower.It was found that using scaling factor given by ratio of orifice thickness suggests linear behaviour of both loss coefficient and inception cavitation number. Orifices seem to be convenient choice as flow constriction devices inducing cavitation due to their simplicity.

  4. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou-lin Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the numerical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for declining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  5. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hou-lin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  6. Development of High Erosivity Well Scale Cleaning Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. M. Kalumuck; G. L. Chahine; G. S. Frederick; P. D. Aley

    1999-07-01

    Build up of scale deposits on the walls of geothermal wells can occur rapidly due to the high dissolved solids content of geothermal fluids. Scale formation is a significant problem for both the well and for surface heat transfer equipment. Geothermal brines contain a wide variety if dissolved salts including carbonates, silicates, sulfates, and metal sulfides. One technology recently proposed for scale removal is the use of an ultrasonic device. In the present effort we apply cavitation in a more direct manner by the use of acoustically enhanced cavitating water jets which can be made to be much more efficient and aggressive than ultrasonic devices. Cavitating and self-resonating jet technologies have been proven to enhance the erosive power of liquid jets in a number of cutting, cleaning, and drilling applications. In this study we investigated two related technologies - one that employs cavitation and one that breaks the jet up into a series of slugs that produce water hammer type pressures upon impact. These technologies enable operation in both submerged and nonsubmerged conditions.

  7. Effects of cavitation on performance of automotive torque converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Ju

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is a phenomenon whereby vapor bubbles of a flowing liquid are formed in a local region where the pressure of the liquid is below its vapor pressure. It is well known that cavitation in torque converters occurs frequently when a car with an automatic transmission makes an abrupt start. Cavitation is closely related to a performance drop and noise generation at a specific operating condition in a car and a torque converter itself. This study addressed the relation between cavitation and performance in an automotive torque converter in a quantitative and qualitative manner using numerical simulations. The cavitation was calculated at various operating conditions using a commercial flow solver with the homogeneous cavitation model, and the torque converter performance was compared with the experimental data. Numerical results well match to the data and indicate that the cavitation causes significant performance drop, as the pump speed increases or both speed ratio and reference pressure decrease.

  8. Prevention of Pressure Oscillations in Modeling a Cavitating Acoustic Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klenow

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation effects play an important role in the UNDEX loading of a structure. For far-field UNDEX, the structural loading is affected by the formation of local and bulk cavitation regions, and the pressure pulses resulting from the closure of the cavitation regions. A common approach to numerically modeling cavitation in far-field underwater explosions is Cavitating Acoustic Finite Elements (CAFE and more recently Cavitating Acoustic Spectral Elements (CASE. Treatment of cavitation in this manner causes spurious pressure oscillations which must be treated by a numerical damping scheme. The focus of this paper is to investigate the severity of these oscillations on the structural response and a possible improvement to CAFE, based on the original Boris and Book Flux-Corrected Transport algorithm on structured meshes [6], to limit oscillations without the energy loss associated with the current damping schemes.

  9. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  10. Influence of cavitation bubble growth by rectified diffusion on cavitation-enhanced HIFU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2017-11-01

    Cavitation is becoming increasingly important in therapeutic ultrasound applications such as diagnostic, tumor ablation and lithotripsy. Mass transfer through gas-liquid interface due to rectified diffusion is important role in an initial stage of cavitation bubble growth. In the present study, influences of the rectified diffusion on cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was investigated numerically. Firstly, the mass transfer rate of gas from the surrounding medium to the bubble was examined as function of the initial bubble radius and the driving pressure amplitude. As the result, the pressure required to bubble growth was decreases with increasing the initial bubble radius. Next, the cavitation-enhanced HIFU, which generates cavitation bubbles by high-intensity burst and induces the localized heating owing to cavitation bubble oscillation by low-intensity continuous waves, was reproduced by the present simulation. The heating region obtained by the simulation is agree to the treatment region of an in vitro experiment. Additionally, the simulation result shows that the localized heating is enhanced by the increase of the equilibrium bubble size due to the rectified diffusion. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP26420125,JP17K06170.

  11. Measuring cavitation and its cleaning effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagen, B.; Fernandez Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of techniques for measuring the presence and amount of cavitation, and for quantifying the removal of contaminants, are provided. After reviewing chemical, physical, and biological studies, a universal cause for the cleaning effects of bubbles cannot yet be concluded.

  12. On cavitation instabilities with interacting voids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2012-01-01

    voids so far apart that the radius of the plastic zone around each void is less than 1% of the current spacing between the voids, can still affect each others at the occurrence of a cavitation instability such that one void stops growing while the other grows in an unstable manner. On the other hand...

  13. Mesoscale spatial variability in seawater cavitation thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, N. P.; Elistratov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the spatial variability of cavitation thresholds and some hydrological and hydrochemical parameters of seawater in the interfrontal zone of the Pacific Subarctic Front, in the Drake Passage, and in the equatorial part of the Pacific Ocean, measured in the near-surface layer to a depth of 70 m.

  14. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  15. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  16. The flow of a liquid with cavitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straškraba, Ivan; Vitásek, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2010), s. 668-681 ISSN 1548-5390 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/0315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : fluid flow with cavitation * special solutions Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. Cavitation for improved sludge conversion into biogas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoop, A.H.; Bakker, T.W.; Kramer, H.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In several studies the beneficial influence of pre-treatment of waste activated sludge with cavitation on the biogas production was demonstrated. It is however, still not fully certain whether this effect should be mainly contributed to an increase in conversion rate of organics into biogas by

  18. The making of a cavitation children's book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Patterson, Brandon; Lazar, Erika

    2016-11-01

    Engaging young children in science is particularly important to future scientific endeavors. From thunderstorms to the waterpark, children are constantly exposed to the wonders of fluid dynamics. Among fluid phenomena, bubbles have always fascinated children. Yet some of the most exciting aspects of bubbles, such as cavitation, are scarcely known to non-experts. To introduce cavitation to a five year old audience, we wrote "Brooke Bubble Breaks Things", a children's book about the adventures of a cavitation bubble learning about all the things she could break. In this talk, we discuss how a children's book is made by walking through the steps involved in creating the book from concept to publication. We focus on strategies for successfully communicating a technical message while balancing entertainment and fidelity to nature. To provide parents, teachers, and young inquiring minds with a detailed explanation of the physics and applications of cavitation, we also created a website with detailed explanations, animations, and links to further information. We aim to convince the fluids community that writing picture books is an intellectually stimulating and fun way of communicating fluids principles and applications to children. ArtsEngine Microgrant at the University of Michigan.

  19. Measurement of cavitation induced wall shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkink, R.J.; Ohl, C.D.

    2008-01-01

    The wall shear stress from cavitation bubbles collapsing close to a rigid boundary is measured with a constant temperature anemometer. The bubble is created with focused laser light, and its dynamics is observed with high-speed photography. By correlating the frames, a hydrophone signal, and the

  20. Optical Measurements of Cavitation in Tribological Contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tian; Morris, Nick; Coupland, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the use of a white light interformeter to measure the cavitation bubble and oil film thickness in a tribological contact and compares the results to theory. It is found that oil film thickness is best predicted by the theory proposed by Coyne and Elrod.

  1. Enhancing cavitation with micromachined surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Stricker, Laura; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea; Mesoscale Chemical System Group Collaboration; Physics of Fluids Group Collaboration; Department of Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    When a silicon surface with micromachined pits submerged in a liquid is exposed to continuous ultrasound at 200 kHz, bubbles are ejected from the air filled cavities. Depending on the pressure amplitude different scenarios are observed, as the bubbles ejected from the micropits interact in complex ways with each other, and with the silicon surface. We have determined the size distribution of bubbles ejected from one, two and three pits for three different electrical power settings, and correlated them with sonochemical OH* radical production. Numerical simulations of the sonochemical conversion reaction rates were obtained using the empirical bubble size distributions and are compared with experimental results. Experimental evidence of shock wave emission from the microbubble clusters, deformed microbubble shapes, jetting and surface erosion are also presented. Financially supported through the project 07391 of the Technology Foundation STW, The Netherlands.

  2. Centrifuge technique consistently overestimates vulnerability to water-stress induced cavitation in grapevines as confirmed with high resolution computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulnerability to cavitation is a key variable defining the limits to drought resistance in woody plants (e.g. Kursar et al., 2009). This trait is typically assessed by a vulnerability curve, which can be generated by a range of methods including dehydration (Sperry et al., 1988) air injection (Cocha...

  3. Erosion and corrosion of nuclear power plant materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This conference is composed of 23 papers, grouped in 3 sessions which main themes are: analysis of corrosion and erosion damages of nuclear power plant equipment and influence of water chemistry, temperature, irradiations, metallurgical and electrochemical factors, flow assisted cracking, stress cracking; monitoring and control of erosion and corrosion in nuclear power plants; susceptibility of structural materials to erosion and corrosion and ways to improve the resistance of materials, steels, coatings, etc. to erosion, corrosion and cracking

  4. Instability of the cavitating flow in a venturi reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayyaadi, Hoseyn

    2010-01-01

    The instability characteristics of cavitating flow were experimentally investigated in a venturi tube in a recirculating flow loop. The fluctuation process of cavitation flow in the venturi was observed using high-speed photography. The sequential images were analyzed using the light intensity comparison technique and the cavitation length for each image was evaluated. The temporal cavitation length fluctuation vectors were determined at the specified operating condition (the cavitation number and operating pressure). The frequency components of oscillation were obtained using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. The effects of cavitation number and operating pressure on the Strouhal numbers and amplitudes of fluctuations were obtained. It was found that cavitation number has a major effect on the fluctuation characteristics of the cavitating flow in comparison with the effect of operating pressure. It was observed that at lower cavitation numbers, periodic separation, shedding and collapsing of the cloud-like cavities are observed together with the re-entrant jet motion. At higher cavitation numbers, the simple fluctuation mode with a sinusoidal pattern is observed.

  5. PTEN induces apoptosis and cavitation via HIF-2-dependent Bnip3 upregulation during epithelial lumen formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Y; Liu, J; Saadat, S; Tian, X; Han, Y; Fong, G-H; Pandolfi, P P; Lee, L Y; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) dephosphorylates PIP3 and antagonizes the prosurvival PI3K-Akt pathway. Targeted deletion of PTEN in mice led to early embryonic lethality. To elucidate its role in embryonic epithelial morphogenesis and the underlying mechanisms, we used embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid body (EB), an epithelial cyst structurally similar to the periimplantation embryo. PTEN is upregulated during EB morphogenesis in parallel with apoptosis of core cells, which mediates EB cavitation. Genetic ablation of PTEN causes Akt overactivation, apoptosis resistance and cavitation blockade. However, rescue experiments using mutant PTEN and pharmacological inhibition of Akt suggest that the phosphatase activity of PTEN and Akt are not involved in apoptosis-mediated cavitation. Instead, hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bnip3, a proapoptotic BH3-only protein, mediates PTEN-dependent apoptosis and cavitation. PTEN inactivation inhibits hypoxia- and reactive oxygen species-induced Bnip3 elevation. Overexpression of Bnip3 in PTEN-null EBs rescues apoptosis of the core cells. Mechanistically, suppression of Bnip3 following PTEN loss is likely due to reduction of hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) because forced expression of an oxygen-stable HIF-2α mutant rescues Bnip3 expression and apoptosis. Lastly, we show that HIF-2α is upregulated by PTEN at both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Ablation of prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) in normal EBs or inhibition of PHD activities in PTEN-null EBs stabilizes HIF-2α and induces Bnip3 and caspase-3 activation. Altogether, these results suggest that PTEN is required for apoptosis-mediated cavitation during epithelial morphogenesis by regulating the expression of HIF-2α and Bnip3. PMID:25394489

  6. An investigation on the optimum corrosion protection potential for minimization of cavitation damage using the potentiostatic method in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Jong; Jang, Seok-Ki; Park, Jae-Cheul

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we replaced the expensive blade material with an aluminum-bronze alloy that has excellent corrosion resistance and cavitation characteristics and developed the corrosion protection method to improve durability using an electrochemical method. The objective of this study was to identify the electrochemical corrosion protection conditions to minimize cavitation damage due to generating hydrogen gas (2H₂O + 2e⁻ → 2OH⁻ + H₂) by means of hydrogen overvoltage before the impact pressure of the cavity is transferred to the surface. In the constant potential experiment under the cavitation environment, the energy was reflected or cancelled out by collision of the cavities with the hydrogen gas generated by the hydrogen overvoltage. As a result, the optimal corrosion prevention potential in the dynamic state is assumed to be the range of -1.4 to -1.7 V, which is the range at which active polarization took place.

  7. Development of advanced pump impeller fabrication technology using direct nano- ceramic dispersion casting for long time erosion durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Jin Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    Many components of pump impeller of nuclear power plants is generally made of stainless steel and Al-bronze with superior corrosion resistance to sea water. However, they should be replaced by one- to five-year period because of material damage by a very big cavitation impact load, even though their designed durability is twenty years. Especially, in case of Young-Gwang nuclear power plant located at the west sea, damage of components of pump impeller is so critical due to the additional damage by solid particle erosion and hence their replacement period is very short as several months compared to other nuclear power plants. In addition, it is very difficult to maintain and repair the components of pump impeller since there is no database on the exact durability and damage mechanism. Therefore, in this study, fabrication technology of new advanced materials modified by dispersion of nano-carbide and -oxide ceramics into the matrix is developed first. Secondly, technology to estimate the dynamic damage by solid particle erosion is established and hence applied to the prediction of the service life of the components of pump impeller.

  8. Hydrodynamic cavitation in Stokes flow of anisotropic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieger, Tillmann; Agha, Hakam; Schoen, Martin; Mazza, Marco G; Sengupta, Anupam

    2017-05-30

    Cavitation, the nucleation of vapour in liquids, is ubiquitous in fluid dynamics, and is often implicated in a myriad of industrial and biomedical applications. Although extensively studied in isotropic liquids, corresponding investigations in anisotropic liquids are largely lacking. Here, by combining liquid crystal microfluidic experiments, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical arguments, we report flow-induced cavitation in an anisotropic fluid. The cavitation domain nucleates due to sudden pressure drop upon flow past a cylindrical obstacle within a microchannel. For an anisotropic fluid, the inception and growth of the cavitation domain ensued in the Stokes regime, while no cavitation was observed in isotropic liquids flowing under similar hydrodynamic parameters. Using simulations we identify a critical value of the Reynolds number for cavitation inception that scales inversely with the order parameter of the fluid. Strikingly, the critical Reynolds number for anisotropic fluids can be 50% lower than that of isotropic fluids.

  9. STUDY UPON THE CAVITATION PHENOMENON OF THE ROTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beazit ALI

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of the hydrodynamics of cavitation implosion of a single bubble, consists inpressure and velocity fields determination, including the collapse velocity of the bubble wall. By analysis thetheoretic and experimental phenomenon it establish the implicit function which describes this phenomenon. Byapplication the  theorem for this implicit function it finds the criterion equation of phenomenon.Depending on operating condition various cavitation patterns can be observed on a body surface astravelling bubbles, attached sheet cavitation, shear cavitation or vortex cavitation. Leading edge attachedpartialcavitation is commonly encountered on rotor blades or on hydrofoil. It corresponds to the case for whichavapor cavity is attached in the vecinity of the leading edge and extends over a fraction of the foil surface. Itgenerally takes places at incidence angles for which a leading edge pressure peak occurs and reduced belowtheliquid vapor pressure. At the early phases of development, leading edge partial cavitation is steady.

  10. Simulations of Steady Cavitating Flow in a Small Francis Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Laouari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent flow through a small horizontal Francis turbine is solved by means of Ansys-CFX at different operating points, with the determination of the hydrodynamic performance and the best efficiency point. The flow structures at different regimes reveal a large flow eddy in the runner and a swirl in the draft tube. The use of the mixture model for the cavity/liquid two-phase flow allowed studying the influence of cavitation on the hydrodynamic performance and revealed cavitation pockets near the trailing edge of the runner and a cavitation vortex rope in the draft tube. By maintaining a constant dimensionless head and a distributor vane opening while gradually increasing the cavitation number, the output power and efficiency reached a critical point and then had begun to stabilize. The cavitation number corresponding to the safety margin of cavitation is also predicted for this hydraulic turbine.

  11. Regulating Ultrasound Cavitation in order to Induce Reproducible Sonoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; El Maalouf, J.; Béra, J.-C.; Gilles, B.

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation would be linked to cavitation, which generally appears to be a non reproducible and unstationary phenomenon. In order to obtain an acceptable trade-off between cell mortality and transfection, a regulated cavitation generator based on an acoustical cavitation measurement was developed and tested. The medium to be sonicated is placed in a sample tray. This tray is immersed in in degassed water and positioned above the face of a flat ultrasonic transducer (frequency: 445 kHz; intensity range: 0.08-1.09 W/cm2). This technical configuration was admitted to be conducive to standing-wave generation through reflection at the air/medium interface in the well thus enhancing the cavitation phenomenon. Laterally to the transducer, a homemade hydrophone was oriented to receive the acoustical signal from the bubbles. From this spectral signal recorded at intervals of 5 ms, a cavitation index was calculated as the mean of the cavitation spectrum integration in a logarithmic scale, and the excitation power is automatically corrected. The device generates stable and reproducible cavitation level for a wide range of cavitation setpoint from stable cavitation condition up to full-developed inertial cavitation. For the ultrasound intensity range used, the time delay of the response is lower than 200 ms. The cavitation regulation device was evaluated in terms of chemical bubble collapse effect. Hydroxyl radical production was measured on terephthalic acid solutions. In open loop, the results present a great variability whatever the excitation power. On the contrary the closed loop allows a great reproducibility. This device was implemented for study of sonodynamic effect. The regulation provides more reproducible results independent of cell medium and experimental conditions (temperature, pressure). Other applications of this regulated cavitation device concern internalization of different particles (Quantum Dot) molecules (SiRNA) or plasmids (GFP, DsRed) into different

  12. Unveiling the physical mechanism behind pistol shrimp cavitation

    OpenAIRE

    Koukouvinis, Phoevos; Bruecker, Christoph; Gavaises, Manolis

    2017-01-01

    Snapping shrimps use a special shaped claw to generate a cavitating high speed water jet. Cavitation formed in this way, may be used for hunting/stunning prey and communication. The present work is a novel computational effort to provide insight on the mechanisms of cavitation formation during the claw closure. The geometry of the claw used here is a simplified claw model, based on prior experimental work. Techniques, such as Immersed Boundary and Homogenous Equilibrium Model (HEM), are emplo...

  13. Outlook on marine propeller noise and cavitation modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Lidtke, Artur Konrad; Turnock, Stephen R.; Humphrey, Victor F.

    2014-01-01

    Two computational studies are presented in this paper. First, the Potsdam Propeller Test Case which is used to demonstrate the capabilities of mass transfer cavitation models, more precisely the model by Sauer and Schnerr, in tackling the problem of marine propeller cavitation. It is shown that the extents of the predicted cavitation regions agree well with the experiment but suffer from the fact that the tip vortices and the associated low pressure regions are under resolved when URANS is ut...

  14. Detached eddy simulation of unsteady cavitation and pressure fluctuation around 3-D NACA66 hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady cavitating flow and pressure fluctuation around the 3-D NACA66 hydrofoil were simulated and validated based on detached eddy simulation turbulence model and a homogeneous cavitation model. Numerical results show that detached eddy simulation can predict the evolution of cavity inception, sheet cavitation growth, cloud cavitation shedding, and breakup, as well as the pressure fluctuation on the surface of hydrofoil. The sheet cavitation growth, detachment, cloud cavitation shedding are responsible for the features of the pressure fluctuation.

  15. Standard Terminology Relating to Wear and Erosion

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 The terms and their definitions given herein represent terminology relating to wear and erosion of solid bodies due to mechanical interactions such as occur with cavitation, impingement by liquid jets or drops or by solid particles, or relative motion against contacting solid surfaces or fluids. This scope interfaces with but generally excludes those processes where material loss is wholly or principally due to chemical action and other related technical fields as, for instance, lubrication. 1.2 This terminology is not exhaustive; the absence of any particular term from this collection does not necessarily imply that its use within this scope is discouraged. However, the terms given herein are the recommended terms for the concepts they represent unless otherwise noted. 1.3 Certain general terms and definitions may be restricted and interpreted, if necessary, to make them particularly applicable to the scope as defined herein. 1.4 The purpose of this terminology is to encourage uniformity and accuracy ...

  16. Some Remarks on the Three Dimensionality of Hydrofoil Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Salih KARAALİOĞLU

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available As it is well-known that cavitation is a very important physical phenomenon that affects significantly the performance of three-dimensional hydrofoils. Prediction of cavitation on three-dimensional hydrofoils is very important in the design stage. In this study, some approaches have been verified for hydrofoil cavitation. The main aim of this paper is to compare the mid-section pressure distribution of three-dimensional cavitating rectangular hydrofoil for increasing aspect ratios, with the pressure distribution of two-dimensional cavitating hydrofoil having the same section geometry as in the three-dimensional hydrofoil. In this study, a boundary element (panel method (BEM has been applied to investigate the hydrofoil cavitation for both two- and three-dimensional cases. Two-dimensional analytical solution in case of cavitating flat-plate has also been applied for comparison. It has been shown that the pressure distributions on the mid-section of three-dimensional cavitating and non-cavitating hydrofoil for increasing aspect ratios have converged to the solutions in two-dimensional case.

  17. Are flowers vulnerable to xylem cavitation during drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-Ping; Brodribb, Timothy J

    2017-05-17

    Water stress is known to cause xylem cavitation in the leaves, roots and stems of plants, but little is known about the vulnerability of flowers to xylem damage during drought. This is an important gap in our understanding of how and when plants become damaged by water stress. Here we address fundamental questions about if and when flowers suffer cavitation damage, using a new technique of cavitation imaging to resolve the timing of cavitation in water-stressed flower petals compared with neighbouring leaves. Leaves and flowers from a sample of two herbaceous and two woody eudicots were exposed to a severe water stress while the spatial and temporal propagation of embolism through veins was recorded. Although in most cases water potentials inducing 50% embolism of herbaceous flower veins were more negative than neighbouring leaves, there was no significant difference between the average vulnerability of leaves and petals of herbaceous species. In both woody species, petals were more vulnerable to cavitation than leaves, in one case by more than 3 MPa. Early cavitation and subsequent damage of flowers in the two woody species would thus be expected to precede leaf damage during drought. Similar cavitation thresholds of flowers and leaves in the herb sample suggest that cavitation during water shortage in these species will occur simultaneously among aerial tissues. Species-specific differences in the cavitation thresholds of petals provide a new axis of variation that may explain contrasting flowering ecology among plant species. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Cavitational micro-particles: plasma formation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2005-01-01

    Cavitational micro-particles are a class to which the micro-spheres, the micro-tubes and the octopus-shaped micro-particles belong. The cavitational micro-particles (micro-spheres, micro-tubes and octopus-shaped micro-particles) at an environmental pressure. The micro-spheres, the micro-tubes and the ligaments of the octopus-shaped micro-particles are produced in the argon plasma and are formed of vapors with low values of the molar concentration in comparison with the molar density of the gas and vapor mixture, the first one on the unstable and the last two on the stable movement of the vapors. The ligaments of the octopus-shaped micro-particles are open at the top for well-chosen values of the sub-cooling of the vapor and gas cylinders. The nitrogen in the air favors the formation of pores in the wall of the micro-spheres. In this paper we present the cavitational micro-particles, their production in the plasma and some mechanisms for their formation in the plasma. (author)

  19. Discrete Bubble Modeling for Cavitation Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Keun; Chahine, Georges; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2007-03-01

    Dynaflow, Inc. has conducted extensive studies on non-spherical bubble dynamics and interactions with solid and free boundaries, vortical flow structures, and other bubbles. From these studies, emerged a simplified Surface Averaged Pressure (SAP) spherical bubble dynamics model and a Lagrangian bubble tracking scheme. In this SAP scheme, the pressure and velocity of the surrounding flow field are averaged on the bubble surface, and then used for the bubble motion and volume dynamics calculations. This model is implemented using the Fluent User Defined Function (UDF) as Discrete Bubble Model (DBM). The Bubble dynamics portion can be solved using an incompressible liquid modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation or a compressible liquid modified Gilmore equation. The Discrete Bubble Model is a very suitable tool for the studies on cavitation inception of foils and turbo machinery, bubble nuclei effects, noise from the bubbles, and can be used in many practical problems in industrial and naval applications associated with flows in pipes, jets, pumps, propellers, ships, and the ocean. Applications to propeller cavitation, wake signatures of waterjet propelled ships, bubble-wake interactions, modeling of cavitating jets, and bubble entrainments around a ship will be presented.

  20. Modeling Unsteady Cavitation Effects and Dynamic Loads in Cryogenic Systems, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There currently are no analytical or CFD tools that can reliably predict unsteady cavitation dynamics in liquid rocket turbopumps. Cavitation effects, particularly...

  1. Erosion and Errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, H.; Heeres, Glenn; Os, van Bertil; Derickx, Willem; Schoorl, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Slope soil erosion is one of the main threats to archaeological sites. Several methods were applied to establish the erosion rates at archaeological sites. Digital elevation models (DEMs) from three different dates were used. We compared the elevations from these three models to estimate erosion. We

  2. Assessing storm erosion hazards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ranasinghe, Ranasinghe W M R J B; Callaghan, D.; Ciavola, Paolo; Coco, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The storm erosion hazard on coasts is usually expressed as an erosion volume and/or associated episodic coastline retreat. The accurate assessment of present-day and future storm erosion volumes is a key task for coastal zone managers, planners and engineers. There are four main approaches that can

  3. Mapping erosion from space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soil erosion by water is the most important land degradation problem worldwide. Spatial information on erosion is required for defining effective soil and water conservation strategies. Satellite remote sensing can provide relevant input to regional erosion assessment. This thesis comprises a review

  4. VibroCav : Hydrodynamic Vibration and Cavitation Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    Vibration and cavitation can be generated in many ways and serve many useful purposes. This study describes physical aspects of useful vibration and cavitation for a broad spectrum of applications at atmospheric or elevated pressures. After a review of available devices, hydrodynamic

  5. Dental pulp reaction to Cavit temporary filling material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provant, D R; Adrian, J C

    1978-02-01

    Seventy-two teeth in three Macaque fasicularis monkeys were used to evaluate pulpal response to cavit. Displacement of odontoblastic nuclei was evaluated histologically at three time periods in order to identify initial, early, and final responses. There were no statistically significant differences in pulpal response between Cavit and the zinc oxide-eugenol controls when used in accordance with the manufacturer's directions.

  6. Reproducible cavitation activity in water-particle suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borkent, B.M.; Arora, M.; Ohl, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    The study of cavitation inception in liquids rarely yields reproducible data, unless special control is taken on the cleanliness of the experimental environment. In this paper, an experimental technique is demonstrated which allows repeatable measurements of cavitation activity in liquid-particle

  7. Compressible Turbulent Flow Numerical Simulations of Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatami, F.; van der Weide, Edwin Theodorus Antonius; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2015-01-01

    For an elliptic Arndt’s hydrofoil numerical simulations of vortex cavitation are presented. An equilibrium cavitation model is employed. This single-fluid model assumes local thermodynamic and mechanical equilibrium in the mixture region of the flow, is employed. Furthermore, for characterizing the

  8. Cavitation-aided grain refinement in aluminium alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atamanenko, T.V.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with grain refinement under the influence of ultrasonic-driven cavitation in aluminium casting processes. Three major goals of this research were: (1) to identify the mechanism of the cavitation-aided grain refinement at different stages of solidification; (2) to reveal the

  9. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  10. Hydrodynamic cavitation: a bottom-up approach to liquid aeration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raut, J.S.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Duggal, C.; Pelan, E.G.; Arnaudov, L.N.; Naik, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    We report the use of hydrodynamic cavitation as a novel, bottom-up method for continuous creation of foams comprising of air microbubbles in aqueous systems containing surface active ingredients, like proteins or particles. The hydrodynamic cavitation was created using a converging-diverging nozzle.

  11. A THERMODYNAMIC CAVITATION MODEL APPLICABLE TO HIGH TEMPERATURE FLOW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Min Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is not only related with pressure, but also affected by temperature. Under high temperature, temperature depression of liquids is caused by latent heat of vaporization. The cavitation characteristics under such condition are different from those under room temperature. The paper focuses on thermodynamic cavitation based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and modifies the mass transfer equation with fully consideration of the thermodynamic effects and physical properties. To validate the modified model, the external and internal flow fields, such as hydrofoil NACA0015 and nozzle, are calculated, respectively. The hydrofoil NACA0015's cavitation characteristic is calculated by the modified model at different temperatures. The pressure coefficient is found in accordance with the experimental data. The nozzle cavitation under the thermodynamic condition is calculated and compared with the experiment.

  12. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  13. Solid particle erosion and viscoelastic properties of thermoplastic polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Arena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The wear resistance of several thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPUs having different chemical nature and micronscale arrangement of the hard and soft segments has been investigated by means of erosion and abrasion tests. The goal was correlating the erosion performances of the materials to their macroscopic mechanical properties. Unlike conventional tests, such as hardness and tensile measurements, viscoelastic analysis proved to be a valuable tool to study the erosion resistance of TPUs. In particular, a strict correlation was found between the erosion rate and the high-frequency (~107 Hz loss modulus. The latter reflects the actual ability of TPU to dissipate the impact energy of the erodent particles.

  14. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai L.H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs at atomic scale.

  15. Retrograde root filling with amalgam and Cavit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finne, K; Nord, P G; Persson, G; Lennartsson, B

    1977-04-01

    In a 3-year review of 218 teeth with retrograde root filling with amalgam orCavit, the results obtained with the former proved significantly better than those obtained with the latter. The difference seemed to be due to a better obliteration of the canal by amalgam. The obliterating effect of amalgam probably eliminates the need for revision of incomplete othograde root filling, for example, in cases with a post in the root canal. Irrespective of type of filling materials, the results were less good in cases with marginal bone loss.

  16. Numerical 3D analysis of cloud cavitation shedding frequency on a circular leading edge hydrofoil with a barotropic cavitation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, M.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    A compressible density-based time-explicit low Mach number consistent viscous flow solver is utilised in combination with a barotropic cavitation model for the analysis of cloud cavitation on a circular leading edge (CLE) hydrofoil. For 5° angle of attack, cloud structure and shedding frequency for different cavitation numbers are compared to experimental data. A strong grid sensitivity is found in particular for high cavitation numbers. On a fine grid, a very good agreement with validation data is achieved even without explicit turbulence model. The neglect of viscous effects as well as a two-dimensional set-up lead to a less realistic prediction of cloud structures and frequencies. Comparative simulations with the Sauer-Schnerr cavitation model and modified pre-factors of the mass transfer terms underestimate the measured shedding frequency.

  17. Experimental investigation of the flow-induced vibration of hydrofoils in cavitating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoyu; Wu, Qin; Huang, Biao; Gao, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the correlation between fluid induced vibration and unsteady cavitation behaviours. Experimental results are presented for a modified NACA66 hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=8°. The high-speed camera is synchronized with a single point Laser Doppler Vibrometer to analyze the transient cavitating flow structures and the corresponding structural vibration characteristics. The results showed that, with the decreasing of the cavitation number, the cavitating flows in a water tunnel display several types of cavitation patterns, such as incipient cavitation, sheet cavitation and cloud cavitation. The cavity shedding frequency reduces with the decrease of the cavitation number. As for the cloud cavitation regime, the trend of the vibration velocity goes up with the growth of the attached cavity, accompanied with small amplitude fluctuations. Then the collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavities leads to substantial increase of the vibration velocity fluctuations.

  18. Dental erosion: causes, diagnostics and treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sosa-Puente

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite being a commonly studied topic, it is difficult to find studies which explain the problem of dental erosion. For this article, literature was analyzed to find information on the agents which trigger dental erosion, the main diagnosis methods, the most common treatments used nowadays and the interrelationship with dental materials. The etiology of dental erosion is multifactorial, including acids, eating disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, biological factors such as saliva or habits also play a part in the establishment of this condition. In order to establish a reliable diagnosis, clinical appearance becomes decisive. The Basic Index Erosive Wear Examination (BEWE, created in 2008, is an auxiliary diagnosis tool for assessing the status and progress of the erosion. Treatment should be linked to the eradication of the causative agent and it can range from simple observational monitoring of slightly affected teeth to the placement of total crowns in the most severe cases, but this will depend entirely on the extent, severity, symptoms and type of dentition. Regarding dental materials used in the treatment of eroded parts, there are glass ionomer and composite; the latter presents the greatest resistance to biodegradation when interacting with acids. Glass ionomers are the most vulnerable material while resin is seen as the most resistant. In conclusion, dental erosion has become an issue of great importance in the dental practice because of its serious impact on dental structures. Consequently, it is ranked among the most important dental disorders in the present day.

  19. On inhibition of dental erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rölla, Gunnar; Jonski, Grazyna; Saxegaard, Erik

    2013-11-01

    To examine the erosion-inhibiting effect of different concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. Thirty-six human molars were individually treated with 10 ml of 0.1 M citric acid for 30 min (Etch 1), acid was collected and stored until analysis. The teeth were randomly divided into six groups and then individually treated with 10 ml of one of six dilutions (from 0.1-1%) of hydrofluoric acid. The teeth were then again treated with citric acid (Etch 2). The individual acid samples from Etch 1 and 2 were analyzed for calcium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy and difference in calcium loss was calculated. The highest erosion inhibiting effect was obtained in groups with the highest concentrations of hydrofluoric acid, where the pH was lowest, below pKa of 3.17, thus the hydrofluoric acids being mainly in an undissociated state. Diluted hydrofluoric acid is present in aqueous solution of SnF2 and TiF4 (which are known to inhibit dental erosion): SnF2 + 3H2O = Sn(OH)2 + 2HF + H2O and TiF4 + 5H2O = Ti(OH)4 + 4HF + H2O. It is also known that pure, diluted hydrofluoric acid can inhibit dental erosion. Teeth treated with hydrofluoric acid are covered by a layer of CaF2-like mineral. This mineral is acid resistant at pH acid resistant mineral, initiated by tooth enamel treatment with hydrofluoric acid. Hydrofluoric acid is different in having fluoride as a conjugated base, which provides this acid with unique properties.

  20. Transition of cavitating flow to supercavitation within Venturi nozzle – hysteresis investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kozák; Pavel Rudolf; Rostislav Huzlík; Martin Hudec; Radomír Chovanec; Ondřej Urban; Blahoslav Maršálek; Eliška Maršálková; František Pochylý; David Štefan

    2017-01-01

    Cavitation is usually considered as undesirable phenomena. On the other hand, it can be utilized in many applications. One of the technical applications is using cavitation in water treatment, where hydrodynamic cavitation seems to be effective way how to reduce cyanobacteria within large bulks of water. The main scope of this paper is investigation of the cavitation within Venturi nozzle during the transition from fully developed cavitation to supercavitation regime and vice versa. Dynamics ...

  1. Numerical research on unsteady cavitating flow over a hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2016-10-01

    Cavitation is a widely known phenomenon in pumps and water turbines installations. It can lead to significant damage of blades and walls of the rotor therefore it is crucial during pump designing and exploitation to avoid working in flow conditions, that enabled cavitation to occur. Nowadays numerical simulations of flow can provide valuable information concerning pressure and velocity distribution and can indicate if there is a risk of cavitating flow appearance. There are a few mathematical models which describe cavitating flow. In the paper Schnerr & Sauer model was chosen for simulation. Aim of the paper is to verify its utility in case of different cavitating flow regimes over Clark-Y hydrofoil. After performing the grid independence study four different cavitation regimes were investigated. The vapour areas appearance, their shapes and changes in time were observed. The assumption of isothermal, two - phase flow was made. The calculations were performed using OpenFOAM and were compared to the available measurements data. The presented results concerned sheet and cloud cavitation regimes.

  2. Detecting cavitation in vivo from shock-wave therapy devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Yu, Jinfei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been used as a treatment for plantar faciitis, lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendonitis, non-unions, and other indications where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. However, in many areas, the efficacy of SW treatment has not been well established, and the mechanism of action, particularly the role of cavitation, is not well understood. Research indicates cavitation plays an important role in other ultrasound therapies, such as lithotripsy and focused ultrasound surgery, and in some instances, cavitation has been used as a means to monitor or detect a biological effect. Although ESWT can generate cavitation easily in vitro, it is unknown whether or not cavitation is a significant factor in vivo. The purpose of this investigation is to use diagnostic ultrasound to detect and monitor cavitation generated by ESWT devices in vivo. Diagnostic images are collected at various times during and after treatment. The images are then post-processed with image-processing algorithms to enhance the contrast between bubbles and surrounding tissue. The ultimate goal of this research is to utilize cavitation as a means for optimizing shock wave parameters such as amplitude and pulse repetition frequency. [Work supported by APL internal funds and NIH DK43881 and DK55674.

  3. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  4. Numerical investigation of tip clearance cavitation in Kaplan runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforova, K.; Semenov, G.; Kuznetsov, I.; Spiridonov, E.

    2016-11-01

    There is a gap between the Kaplan runner blade and the shroud that makes for a special kind of cavitation: cavitation in the tip leakage flow. Two types of cavitation caused by the presence of clearance gap are known: tip vortex cavitation that appears at the core of the rolled up vortex on the blade suction side and tip clearance cavitation that appears precisely in the gap between the blade tip edge and the shroud. In the context of this work numerical investigation of the model Kaplan runner has been performed taking into account variable tip clearance for several cavitation regimes. The focus is put on investigation of structure and origination of mechanism of cavitation in the tip leakage flow. Calculations have been performed with the help of 3-D unsteady numerical model for two-phase medium. Modeling of turbulent flow in this work has been carried out using full equations of Navier-Stokes averaged by Reynolds with correction for streamline curvature and system rotation. For description of this medium (liquid-vapor) simplification of Euler approach is used; it is based on the model of interpenetrating continuums, within the bounds of this two- phase medium considered as a quasi-homogeneous mixture with the common velocity field and continuous distribution of density for both phases. As a result, engineering techniques for calculation of cavitation conditioned by existence of tip clearance in model turbine runner have been developed. The detailed visualization of the flow was carried out and vortex structure on the suction side of the blade was reproduced. The range of frequency with maximum value of pulsation was assigned and maximum energy frequency was defined; it is based on spectral analysis of the obtained data. Comparison between numerical computation results and experimental data has been also performed. The location of cavitation zone has a good agreement with experiment for all analyzed regimes.

  5. Mechanical heart valve cavitation in patients with bileaflet valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Peter; Andersen, Tina S; Hasenkam, J Michael; Nygaard, Hans; Paulsen, Peter K

    2014-01-01

    Today, the quality of mechanical heart valves is quite high, and implantation has become a routine clinical procedure with a low operative mortality (mechanism found to be a possible contributor to these adverse effects is cavitation. In vitro, cavitation has been directly demonstrated by visualization and indirectly in vivo by registering of high frequency pressure fluctuations (HFPF). Tilting disc valves are thought of having higher cavitation potential than bileaflet valves due to higher closing velocities. However, the thromboembolic potential seems to be the same. Further studies are therefore needed to investigate the cavitation potential of bileaflet valves in vivo. The post processing of HFPF have shown difficulties when applied on bileaflet vavles due to asynchronous closure of the two leaflets. The aim of this study was therefore to isolate the pressure signature from each leaflet closure and perform cavitation analyses on each component. Six patients were included in the study (St. Jude Medical (n=3) and CarboMedics (n=3); all aortic bileaflet mechanical heart valves). HFPFs were recorded intraoperatively through a hydrophone at the aortic root. The pressure signature relating to the first and second leaflet closure was isolated and cavitation parameters were calculated (RMS after 50 kHz highpass filtering and signal energy). Data were averaged over 30 heart cycles. For all patients both the RMS value and signal energy of the second leaflet closure were higher than for the first leaflet closure. This indicates that the second leaflet closure is most prone to cause cavitation. Therefore, quantifying cavitation based on the HFPF related to the second leaflet closure may suggest that the cavitation potential for bileaflet valves in vivo may be higher than previous studies have suggested.

  6. Principles and effects of acoustic cavitation - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina GÂMBUŢEANU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, food industry has shown a real interest in ultrasound use because of its effect on physical, biochemical and microbial properties of food systems. In order to better understand how the acoustic cavity effects could be best applied in food industry, a review on acoustic cavitation and its effects was done. The present paper describes in detail the basic principles underlying the effects of ultrasounds on food processing applications. It also provides theoretical background on acoustic cavitation and ultrasound production method. Moreover, harnessing mechanic, optic, chemical and biological effects of acoustic cavitation in food industry were briefly highlighted.

  7. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; West, C.D.; Moraga, F.

    1998-01-01

    An overview is provided on cavitation threshold measurement experiments for water and mercury. Various aspects to be considered that affect onset determination are discussed along with design specifications developed for construction of appropriate apparatus types. Both static and transient-cavitation effects were studied using radically different apparatus designs. Preliminary data are presented for cavitation thresholds for water and mercury over a range of temperatures in static and high-frequency environments. Implications and issues related to spallation neutron source target designs and operation are discussed

  8. [Polyphenolic antioxidants efficiently protect urease from inactivation by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsa, D I; Tarun, E I; Losev, Iu P

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of urease (25 nM) in aqueous solutions (pH 5.0-6.0) treated with low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS; 27 kHz, 60 Wt/cm2, 36-56 degrees C) or high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS; 2.64 MHz, 1 Wt/cm2, 36 or 56 degrees C) has been characterized quantitatively, using first-order rate constants: kin, aggregate inactivation; kin*, thermal inactivation; and kin* (US), ultrasonic inactivation. Within the range from 1 nM to 10 microM, propyl gallate (PG) decreases approximately threefold the rate of LFUS-induced inactivation of urease (56 degrees C), whereas resorcinol poly-2-disulfide prevents this process at 1 nM or higher concentrations. PG completely inhibits HFUS-induced inactivation of urease at 1 nM (36 degrees C) or 10 nM (56 degrees C). At 0.2-10 microM, human serum albumin (HSA) increases the resistance of urease (at 56 degrees C) treated with HFUS to temperature- and cavitation-induced inactivation. Complexes of gallic acid polydisulfide (GAPDS) with HSA (GAPDS-HSA), formed by conjugation of 1.0 nM PGDS with 0.33 nM HSA, prevent HFUS-induced urease inactivation (56 degrees C).

  9. Protection from erosion following wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; William J. Elliot

    2006-01-01

    Erosion in the first year after a wildfire can be up to three orders of magnitude greater than the erosion from undisturbed forests. To mitigate potential postfire erosion, various erosion control treatments are applied on highly erodible areas with downstream resources in need of protection. Because postfire erosion rates generally decline by an order of magnitude for...

  10. Erosive wear of selected materials for fossil energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, Thomas A.; Rawers, James C.; Tylczak, Joseph H.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    A number of materials have been evaluated to determine their erosion resistance for fossil energy applications. This is part of a larger program to study wear and corrosion at Albany Research Center. This paper will present the results for some of these materials, including FeAl, FeAl cermets, WC-Co cemented carbides, Si3N4-MoSi2, Si3N4, Stellite 6B, white cast irons and 440C steel. Trends in erosion rates due to material properties and erosive conditions will be presented. FeAl cermets performed well compared to the WC-Co cemented carbides. The interparticle spacing of the WC-Co cemented carbides correlated with the erosion rate. The erosion rate of the WC-Co cemented carbides decreased as the interparticle spacing decreased. It is important to realize that erosion resistance is not an intrinsic material property, but is a system response. A change in the wear environment can significantly alter the relative rankings of materials with respect to their wear rate. For example, at relatively low velocities, the carbides in the white cast irons are more erosion resistant than the matrix, while at higher velocities the matrix is more erosion resistant.

  11. Thresholds of gully erosion in the coastal plains sands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of geomorphic threshold as applied in gully erosion studies assumes that water erosion occurs when the combined power of the rainfall energy and overland flow exceeds the resistance of surface materials to detachment and entrainment. This line of reasoning presupposes that certain environmental factors ...

  12. thresholds of gully erosion in the coastal plains sands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ada

    The concept of geomorphic threshold as applied in gully erosion studies assumes that water erosion occurs when the combined power of the rainfall energy and overland flow exceeds the resistance of surface materials to detachment and entrainment. This line of reasoning presupposes that certain environmental factors ...

  13. Microbial Quality and Shelf Life of Blueberry Purée Developed Using Cavitation Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lihua; Martynenko, Alex; Doucette, Craig; Hughes, Timothy; Fillmore, Sherry

    2018-03-01

    Blueberry purée was developed using hydrodynamic cavitation technology. The product was made from entire blueberries without adding any food additives. In this study, microbial reduction following each processing stage (at the industry setting) and after product pasteurization at 86, 88, 90, 92, 94, and 96 °C was investigated. Microbial quality including total plate counts, yeast and molds, and heat-resistant molds counts was determined. Shelf life of pasteurized products stored for up to 24 weeks at room temperature were assessed for microbial quality, soluble solids (°Brix), titratable acidity (citric acid %), pH, viscosity (cP) and flow rate (cm/30 s). Our results indicated that heat-resistant molds, initially present in frozen blueberries with counts at 2.03 log CFU/200g, were totally inactivated at 94 to 96 °C with 1 to 2 min holding time. Shelf life study showed that no product spoilage was caused by bacteria, yeasts and heat-resistant molds along with non-significant changes of textural characteristics. This study provided useful information for the food industry to develop variety of fruit purée products with no wastes of fruit materials. This study provides useful information for the food industry to develop safe liquid food products using cavitation technology without wasting any raw materials. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  14. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 2: Hydrofoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Boundary layer principles, along with two-phase concepts, are used to improve existing correlative theory for developed cavity data. Details concerning cavity instrumentation, data analysis, correlative techniques, and experimental and theoretical aspects of a cavitating hydrofoil are given. Both desinent and thermodynamic data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The thermodynamic data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cryogen cavities. The improved correlative formulas were used to evaluate these data. A new correlating parameter based on consideration of mass limiting two-phase flow flux across the cavity interface, is proposed. This correlating parameter appears attractive for future correlative and predictive applications. Agreement between theory and experiment is discussed, and directions for future analysis are suggested. The front half of the cavities, developed on the hydrofoil, may be considered as parabolically shaped.

  15. Saliva and dental erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective: This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods: A search was undertaken on MeDLINe website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results: Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions: Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects.

  16. Saliva and dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  17. Analysis of Acoustic Cavitation Surge in a Rocket Engine Turbopump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Nanri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In a liquid rocket engine, cavitation in an inducer of a turbopump sometimes causes instability phenomena when the inducer is operated at low inlet pressure. Cavitation surge (auto-oscillation, one such instability phenomenon, has been discussed mainly based on an inertia model assuming incompressible flow. When this model is used, the frequency of the cavitation surge decreases continuously as the inlet pressure of the turbopump decreases. However, we obtained an interesting experimental result in which the frequency of cavitation surge varied discontinuously. Therefore, we employed one-dimensional analysis based on an acoustic model in which the fluid is assumed to be compressible. The analytical result qualitatively corresponded with the experimental result.

  18. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, S F; Wang, Y; Liu, Z C; Zhu, Z T; Ning, C; Zhao, L F

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-ε model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head

  19. Inverse Analysis of Cavitation Impact Phenomena on Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambrakos, S. G; Tran, N. E

    2007-01-01

    A general methodology is presented for in situ detection of cavitation impact phenomena on structures based on inverse analysis of luminescent emissions resulting from the collapsing of bubbles onto surfaces...

  20. Mathematical Modelling of Fluid Flow in Cone and Cavitation Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milada KOZUBKOVÁ

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Problem of cavitation is the undesirable phenomena occuring in the fluid flow in many hydraulic application (pumps, turbines, valves, etc.. Therefore this is in the focus of interest using experimental and mathematical methods. Based on cavitation modelling in Laval nozzle results and experience [1], [2], [4], following problem described as the water flow at the outlet from turbine blade wheel was solved. Primarily the problem is simplified into modelling of water flow in cone. Profiles of axial, radial and tangential velocity are defined on inlet zone. The value of pressure is defined on the outlet. Boundary conditions were defined by main investigator of the grant project – Energy Institute, Victor Kaplan’s Department of Fluid Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology. The value of air volume was insignificant. Cavitation was solved by Singhal model of cavitation.

  1. Cavitational synthesis of nanostructured inorganic materials for enhanced heterogeneous catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Ivo Michael

    The synthesis of nanostructured inorganic materials by hydrodynamic cavitation processing was investigated. The goal of this work was to develop a general synthesis technique for nanostructured materials with a control over crystallite size in the 1--20 nm range. Materials with crystallite sizes in this range have shown enhanced catalytic activity compared to materials with larger crystallite sizes. Several supported and unsupported inorganic materials were studied to understand the effects of cavitation on crystallite size. Cavitation processing of calcium fluoride resulted in more spherical particles, attached to one another by melted necks. This work produced the first evidence of shock wave heating of nanostructured materials by hydrodynamic cavitation processing. Hydrodynamic cavitation synthesis of various catalytic support materials indicated that their phase composition and purity could be controlled by adjustment of the processing parameters. Zirconia/alumina supports synthesized using hydro-dynamic cavitation and calcined to 1368 K retained a high purity cubic zirconia phase, whereas classically prepared samples showed a phase transformation to monoclinic zirconia. Similarly, the synthesis of alumina resulted in materials with varying Bohmite and Bayerite contents as a function of the process parameters. High temperature calcination resulted in stable alumina supports with varying amounts of delta-, and theta-alumina. Synthesis studies of palladium and silver showed modest variations in crystallite size as a function of cavitation process parameters. Calcination resulted in larger grain materials, indicating a disappearance of intergrain boundaries. Based on these results, a new synthesis method was studied involving controlled agglomeration of small silver crystallites by hydrodynamic cavitation processing, followed by deposition on alumina. The optimal pH, concentration, and processing time for controlling the silver crystallite size in the cavitation

  2. Experimental Investigation on Cavitating Flow Induced Vibration Characteristics of a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitating flow developing in the blade channels is detrimental to the stable operation of centrifugal pumps, so it is essential to detect cavitation and avoid the unexpected results. The present paper concentrates on cavitation induced vibration characteristics, and special attention is laid on vibration energy in low frequency band, 10–500 Hz. The correlation between cavitating evolution and the corresponding vibration energy in 10–500 Hz frequency band is discussed through visualization analysis. Results show that the varying trend of vibration energy in low frequency band is unique compared with the high frequency band. With cavitation number decreasing, vibration energy reaches a local maximum at a cavitation number much larger than the 3% head drop point; after that it decreases. The varying trend is closely associated with the corresponding cavitation status. With cavitation number decreasing, cavitation could be divided into four stages. The decreasing of vibration energy, in particular cavitation number range, is caused by the partial compressible cavitation structure. From cavitation induced vibration characteristics, vibration energy rises much earlier than the usual 3% head drop criterion, and it indicates that cavitation could be detected in advance and effectively by means of cavitation induced vibration characteristics.

  3. Ash Leachate Can Reduce Surface Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    George J. Holcomb; Philip B. Durgin

    1979-01-01

    In laboratory analyses of the Larabee soil from north-western California, ash leachate flocculated the clay fractions. As a result, the soil quickly settled out of suspension. To test the hypothesis that field plots on disturbed areas treated with ash leachate would be more resistant to erosion than nontreated plots, a study was done in July and August 1978, on two...

  4. Erosion behaviour of hydro turbine steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    resist erosion, attention must be given to providing a micro- structure that ... Fully martensitic steels are air hardening and susceptible to hydrogen em- brittlement. Austenitic stainless steel, on the other hand, has been widely preferred by industry due to its good ... been gaining much attention; because N is a strong solid.

  5. Hydrodynamic cavitation applied to food waste anaerobic digestion

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, David

    2016-01-01

    Innovative pre-treatment methods applied to anaerobic digestion (AD) have developed to enhance the methane yields of food waste. This study investigates hydrodynamic cavitation, which induce disintegration of biomass through microbubble formations, impact on food waste solubilisation and methane production during following AD. Two different sub-streams of food waste (before and after the digestion) pre-treated by hydrodynamic cavitation were evaluated in lab scale for its potential for implem...

  6. A Study on Prediction of Cavitation for Centrifugal Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Myung Jin Kim; Hyun Bae Jin; Wui Jun Chung

    2012-01-01

    In this study, to accurately predict cavitation of a centrifugal pump, numerical analysis was compared with experimental results modeled on a small industrial centrifugal pump. In this study, numerical analysis was compared with experimental results modeled on a small industrial centrifugal pump for reliable prediction on cavitation of a centrifugal pump. To improve validity of the numerical analysis, transient analysis was conducted on the calculated domain of full-type ...

  7. Experience with control valve cavitation problems and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozol, J.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure reduction in control valves can induce cavitation, which has three effects on the control valve. Firstly, it modifies or changes the hydraulic performance of the control valve. Since control valves are designed for noncavitating conditions, the result is usually reduced stability of the control valve or, in extreme cavitating conditions known as supercavitation, the valve may limit the flow rate and thus be undersized. Secondly, cavitation can cause material damage to valve parts, trim, or valve body, or erodes downstream piping; consequently, the valve or piping leaks. Thirdly, cavitation causes noise and vibration, which may cause major damage or destruction to equipment such as valve positioners, actuators, pipe supports and sometimes to other downstream valves. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) It describes the I.S.A. valve sizing equations and how they relate to cavitation. (2) It describes experiences with these three problems, and discusses corrective actions and practical approaches to their solution. This paper discusses thirteen cavitation experiences

  8. Promotion of Cultural Heritage in Batangas and Cavite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Dexter R. Buted

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available – The study aimed to identify the commonly visited cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite; to assess the cultural heritage sites in Batangas and Cavite in terms of physical, social and economic aspects; and to determine existing promotional patterns of Batangas and Cavite. Descriptive type of research was utilized in the study. Results showed that the most visited cultural heritage attraction in Taal, Batangas was Basilica of St. Martin de Tours while in Maragondon, Cavite the most visited was Andres Bonifacio Trial House . Blogs, Websites and Facebook are mostly used by the municipality of Taal in promoting their cultural heritage sites. While Cavite sticks to always using leaflets/flyers, brochures as their promotional materials. Cultural heritage sites in both Taal and Maragondon were perceived to have positive results in the assessments based on different aspects such as physical, social and economic aspects. The promotional materials of Taal and Maragondon are often used. A proposed plan of action was made to promote cultural attraction in Maragondon, Cavite and Taal, Batangas.

  9. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow in journal bearing geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stücke P.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of cavitation is still a problem in technical and industrial applications. Especially in automotive internal combustion engines, hydrodynamic journal bearings are used due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Cavitation flows inside the bearings reduces the load capacity and leads to a risk of material damages. Therefore an understanding of the complex flow phenomena inside the bearing is necessary for the design development of hydrodynamic journal bearings. Experimental investigations in the fluid domain of the journal bearing are difficult to realize founded by the small dimensions of the bearing. In the recent years more and more the advantages of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD are used to investigate the detail of the cavitation flows. The analysis in the paper is carried out in a two-step approach. At first an experimental investigation of journal bearing including cavitation is selected from the literature. The complex numerical model validated with the experimental measured data. In a second step, typically design parameters, such as a groove and feed hole, which are necessary to distribute the oil supply across the gap were added into the model. The paper reflects on the influence of the used design parameters and the variation of the additional supply flow rate through the feed hole regarding to cavitation effects in the bearing. Detailed pictures of the three-dimensional flow structures and the cavitation regions inside the flow film of the bearing are presented.

  10. Biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghorbani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a biomedical device prototype based on small scale hydrodynamic cavitation. The application of small scale hydrodynamic cavitation and its integration to a biomedical device prototype is offered as an important alternative to other techniques, such as ultrasound therapy, and thus constitutes a local, cheap, and energy-efficient solution, for urinary stone therapy and abnormal tissue ablation (e.g., benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH. The destructive nature of bubbly, cavitating, flows was exploited, and the potential of the prototype was assessed and characterized. Bubbles generated in a small flow restrictive element (micro-orifice based on hydrodynamic cavitation were utilized for this purpose. The small bubbly, cavitating, flow generator (micro-orifice was fitted to a small flexible probe, which was actuated with a micromanipulator using fine control. This probe also houses an imaging device for visualization so that the emerging cavitating flow could be locally targeted to the desired spot. In this study, the feasibility of this alternative treatment method and its integration to a device prototype were successfully accomplished.

  11. Computing Thermal Effects of Cavitation in Cryogenic Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Dash, Sanford M.

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements a numerical model of thermal effects of cavitation in cryogenic fluids. The model and program were developed for use in designing and predicting the performances of turbopumps for cryogenic fluids. Prior numerical models used for this purpose do not account for either the variability of properties of cryogenic fluids or the thermal effects (especially, evaporative cooling) involved in cavitation. It is important to account for both because in a cryogenic fluid, the thermal effects of cavitation are substantial, and the cavitation characteristics are altered by coupling between the variable fluid properties and the phase changes involved in cavitation. The present model accounts for both thermal effects and variability of properties by incorporating a generalized representation of the properties of cryogenic fluids into a generalized compressible-fluid formulation for a cavitating pump. The model has been extensively validated for liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Using the available data on the properties of these fluids, the model has been shown to predict accurate temperature-depression values.

  12. Numerical investigation of cavitation flow in journal bearing geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, M.; Schmidt, M.; Stücke, P.

    2013-04-01

    The appearance of cavitation is still a problem in technical and industrial applications. Especially in automotive internal combustion engines, hydrodynamic journal bearings are used due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Cavitation flows inside the bearings reduces the load capacity and leads to a risk of material damages. Therefore an understanding of the complex flow phenomena inside the bearing is necessary for the design development of hydrodynamic journal bearings. Experimental investigations in the fluid domain of the journal bearing are difficult to realize founded by the small dimensions of the bearing. In the recent years more and more the advantages of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are used to investigate the detail of the cavitation flows. The analysis in the paper is carried out in a two-step approach. At first an experimental investigation of journal bearing including cavitation is selected from the literature. The complex numerical model validated with the experimental measured data. In a second step, typically design parameters, such as a groove and feed hole, which are necessary to distribute the oil supply across the gap were added into the model. The paper reflects on the influence of the used design parameters and the variation of the additional supply flow rate through the feed hole regarding to cavitation effects in the bearing. Detailed pictures of the three-dimensional flow structures and the cavitation regions inside the flow film of the bearing are presented.

  13. Investigation of the Methane Hydrate Formation by Cavitation Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, H.; Nagao, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate (hereafter called "MH") is crystalline solid compound consisting of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages and methane gas molecules enclosed in the cage. When using MH as an energy resource, MH is dissociated to methane gas and water and collect only the methane gas. The optimum MH production method was the "depressurization method". Here, the production of MH means dissociating MH in the geologic layers and collecting the resultant methane gas by production systems. In the production of MH by depressurization method, MH regeneration was consider to important problem for the flow assurance of MH production system. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the effect of flow phenomena in the pipeline on hydrate regeneration. Cavitation is one of the flow phenomena which was considered a cause of MH regeneration. Large quantity of microbubbles are produced by cavitation in a moment, therefore, it is considered to promote MH formation. In order to verify the possible of MH regeneration by cavitation, it is necessary to detailed understanding the condition of MH formation by cavitation. As a part of a Japanese National hydrate research program (MH21, funded by METI), we performed a study on MH formation using by cavitation. The primary objective of this study is to demonstrate the formation MH by using cavitation in the various temperature and pressure condition, and to clarify the condition of MH formation by using observation results.

  14. Plasticity in vulnerability to cavitation of Pinus canariensis occurs only at the driest end of an aridity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana eLópez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Water availability has been considered one of the crucial drivers of species distribution. However, the increasing of temperatures and more frequent water shortages could overcome the ability of long-lived species to cope with rapidly changing conditions. Growth and survival of natural populations adapted to a given site, transferred and tested in other environments as part of provenance trials, can be interpreted as a simulation of ambient changes at the original location. We compare the intraspecific variation and the relative contribution of plasticity to adaptation of key functional traits related to drought resistance: vulnerability to cavitation, efficiency of the xylem to conduct water and biomass allocation. We use six populations of Canary Island pine growing in three provenance trials (wet, dry and xeric. We found that the variability for hydraulic traits was largely due to phenotypic plasticity, whereas genetic variation was limited and almost restricted to hydraulic safety traits and survival. Trees responded to an increase in climate dryness by lowering growth, and increasing leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity by means of increasing the Huber value. Vulnerability to cavitation only showed a plastic response in the driest provenance trial located in the ecological limit of the species. This trait was more tightly correlated with annual precipitation, drought length and temperature oscillation at the origin of the populations than hydraulic efficiency or the Huber value. Vulnerability to cavitation was directly related to survival in the dry and the xeric provenance trials, illustrating its importance in determining drought resistance. In a new climatic scenario where more frequent and intense droughts are predicted, the magnitude of extreme events together with the fact that plasticity of cavitation resistance is only shown in the very dry limit of the species could hamper the capacity to adapt and buffer against environmental

  15. Specialists' meeting on cavitation criteria for designing mechanisms working in sodium: Application to pumps. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for discussions and exchanges of views on cavitation phenomena in sodium, cavitation tests on pump models in water and sodium, application of test results to LMFBR plants, impact on sodium pump design. Topics of interest were also detection methods for cavitation during tests and cavitation problems in electro-magnetic pumps. Two categories of papers were presented: national position papers and specialised topical papers. The main topics discussed, in three sessions were the following: National papers on cavitation; cavitation tests, performance, measuring methods and results; application of test results and implications on the future programmes

  16. Diagnostic Value of Conventional and Digital Radiography for Detection of Cavitated and Non-Cavitated Proximal Caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Dehghani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of conventional and digital radiography for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated proximal caries.Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted human premolars and molars were mounted in a silicone block. Charge-coupled device (CCD and photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP receptors and intra-oral films were exposed with 60 and 70 kVp with parallel technique. Two observers interpreted the radiographs twice with a two-week interval using a 5-point scale. Teeth were then serially sectioned in mesiodistal direction and evaluated under a stereomicroscope (gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated.Results: Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of enamel lesions was low (5.5-44.4% but it was higher for dentin lesions (42.8-62.8%; PSP with 70 kVp and 0.03s exposure time had the highest sensitivity for enamel lesions, but the difference among receptors was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of non-cavitated lesions was lower than that for cavitated lesions; PSP with 60 kVp and 0.07s exposure time had higher sensitivity and lower patient radiation dose for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated lesions, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05.Conclusions: Digital radiography using PSP receptor with 70 kVp is recommended to detect initial enamel caries. For detection of non-cavitated and cavitated dentin caries, PSP with 60 kVp is more appropriate. Change in kVp did not affect the diagnostic accuracy for detection of caries, and type of receptor was a more important factor.Keywords: Dental Caries; Diagnostic Imaging; Radiography, Dental, Digital

  17. Diagnostic Value of Conventional and Digital Radiography for Detection of Cavitated and Non-Cavitated Proximal Caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Mahdieh; Barzegari, Rasool; Tabatabai, Hosein; Ghanea, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the diagnostic value of conventional and digital radiography for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated proximal caries. Fifty extracted human premolars and molars were mounted in a silicone block. Charge-coupled device (CCD) and photostimulable phosphor plate (PSP) receptors and intra-oral films were exposed with 60 and 70 kVp with parallel technique. Two observers interpreted the radiographs twice with a two-week interval using a 5-point scale. Teeth were then serially sectioned in mesiodistal direction and evaluated under a stereomicroscope (gold standard). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were calculated. Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of enamel lesions was low (5.5-44.4%) but it was higher for dentin lesions (42.8-62.8%); PSP with 70 kVp and 0.03s exposure time had the highest sensitivity for enamel lesions, but the difference among receptors was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Sensitivity of all three receptors for detection of non-cavitated lesions was lower than that for cavitated lesions; PSP with 60 kVp and 0.07s exposure time had higher sensitivity and lower patient radiation dose for detection of cavitated and non-cavitated lesions, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). Digital radiography using PSP receptor with 70 kVp is recommended to detect initial enamel caries. For detection of non-cavitated and cavitated dentin caries, PSP with 60 kVp is more appropriate. Change in kVp did not affect the diagnostic accuracy for detection of caries, and type of receptor was a more important factor.

  18. Determination of sulfuric acid concentration for anti-cavitation characteristics of Al alloy by two step anodizing process to forming nano porous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Seong-Kweon; Jeong, Jae-Yong; Kim, Seong-Jong

    2014-12-01

    Al alloy is a highly active metal but forms a protective oxide film having high corrosion resistance in atmosphere environment. However, the oxide film is not suitable for practical use, since the thickness of the film is not uniform and it is severly altered with formation conditions. This study focused on developing an aluminum anodizing layer having hardness, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance equivalent to a commercial grade protective layer. Aluminum anodizing layer was produced by two-step aluminum anodizing oxide (AAO) process with different sulfuric acid concentrations, and the cavitation characteristics of the anodized coating layer was investigated. In hardness measurement, the anodized coating layer produced with 15 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition had the highest value of hardness but exhibited poor cavitation resistance due to being more brittle than those with other conditions. The 10 vol.% of sulfuric acid condition was thus considered to be the optimum condition as it had the lowest weight loss and damage depth.

  19. Erosion in America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-23

    The US loses about five billion tons of soil a year from erosion, and scientists estimate that from 20 to 50% of world cropland suffers from excessive erosion. The effect of erosion is a loss in both land and water productivity. When combined with the problems of overpopulation, overgrazing, and deforestation, the environmental impacts are very serious. There are some signs that countries are beginning to adopt conservation tilling techniques, but even cooperative government programs in the US such as the 1983 Payment-in-Kind (PIK) program have had only partial success because of expanded production on marginal farmlands. 20 reference 5 figures.

  20. Slurry erosion and abrasion of metal-ceramic coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagues, A.A.; Spencer, D.K.; Sethi, V.K.; Sargent, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    Four coatings, including tungsten carbide wear-resistant and cobalt-base corrosion-resistant materials, were tested for abrasion and erosion performance in silica sand and in Alundum slurries. A 1018 carbon steel sample was also tested for comparison. The abrasion tests were conducted with a wet sand rubber wheel device, whereas a slurry jet impingement apparatus was used in the erosion tests. The results revealed that the abrasive wear performance improves dramatically as the coating hardness increases. By contrast, the erosion performance was not clearly related to the hardness of the materials tested. The wear mechanisms and the suitability of the test methods to evaluate coatings are discussed

  1. Cavitation erosion of copper and aluminium in water at elevated-temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Auret, JG

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available ,r. 60 ¢ 4 0 ~ . o 2Oi ~ G asohne o 2'o do 6'o ,oo M¢1~ling Percentage of McTt-Boll Range B°\\]lin9 point point 800 o ~- 600 400 n 200 Gasoline "°"rS/ 0 20 40 60 80 IOO Melting PGrccntog( of Melt-B011 Range Boillng point point i.sl 12 i... tension and specific gravity of water, gasoline and Na-K eutectic mixture 17 422 1993 VOLUME 26 NUMBER 6 J. G. Auret et a l . - -Cav i ta t ion eros ion o f Cu and AI Test chamber i ~ c . , , ,e , pG ~:Lr water Flow F V V V I Va lve I Heat...

  2. The Effect on Blade Erosion of Injecting Air Ahead of a Cavitating Propeller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    DD 12’ 1473 EDITIONOF I N:V: IS OBSOLETE UCASFE SECURITY CLASIPICATION0 OF THIS PAGE (WMen Date Sno #"ed) UNCLASSIFIED S9CUNPIY CLASSIICATION OF...the cavity collapse impact pressure. Two gages were of the diaphragm ( semiconductor strain gage) type and two were of the piezoelectric type... Semiconductor strain gage type pressure gages were mounted in two existing holes on the suction side of one blade. One was at 0.8 radius and 0.6 chord and the

  3. Cavitation Erosion of Electro Spark Deposited Nitinol vs. Stellite Alloy on Stainless Steel Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Chromium Cu Copper ESD Electro Spark Deposition Fe Iron HB Brinnell Hardness in Inch kgf Kilogram-force ksi Kilo pounds per square inch, 1000 pound...1 Nickel and Nitinol Fused onto SS-304 The team at APAS theorized that Nitinol’s extreme hardness , along with high chromium levels in the...contaminate their microstructure with oxygen, vacancies, and other foreign substances. Welding also tends to deposit an uncontrolled and overly

  4. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homa, D; Wróblewski, W

    2014-01-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two – phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  5. Measurement of erosion: Is it possible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroosnijder, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reasons for erosion measurements are: (1) to determine the environmental impact of erosion and conservation practices, (2) scientific erosion research; (3) development and evaluation of erosion control technology; (4) development of erosion prediction technology and (5) allocation of conservation

  6. Does Canoeing Increase Streambank Erosion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward A. Hansen

    1975-01-01

    Describes research on the Pine River in Michigan to determine if large increases in canoeing accelerated streambank erosion. Most erosion was natural, but people sliding and camping on streambanks created some erosion. Heavy canoe traffic was not a cause of erosion.

  7. Research on 3D reconstruction measurement and parameter of cavitation bubble based on stereo vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengyong; Ai, Xiaochuan; Wu, Ronghua; Cao, Jing

    2017-02-01

    The problems caused by the cavitation bubble and caused many adverse effects on the ship propeller, hydraulic machinery and equipment. In order to research the production mechanism of cavitation bubble under different conditions, cavitation bubble zone parameter fine measurement and analysis technology is indispensable, this paper adopts a non-contact measurement method of optical autonomous construction of binocular stereo vision measurement system according to the characteristics of cavitation bubble, the texture features are not clear, transparent and difficult to obtain, 3D imaging measurement of cavitation bubble using composite dynamic lighting, and 3D reconstruction of cavitation bubble region and obtained the characteristics of more accurate parameters, test results show that the cavitation bubble characteristics of the fine technology can obtain and analyze cavitation bubble region and instability.

  8. Apparatus for Changing the Attack Angle of a Cavitator on a Supercavatating Underwater Research Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nedderman, William H

    2005-01-01

    ... tilt the cavitator tilt plate to a desired angle. Power components are remotely located and accessible to an operator so as to enable an operator to vary the angle of the cavitator tilt plate while the supercavitating underwater research model...

  9. Modeling Unsteady Cavitation Effects and Dynamic Loads in Cryogenic Systems, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There currently are no analytical or CFD tools that can reliably predict unsteady cavitation dynamics in liquid rocket cryogenic systems. Analysis of cavitating...

  10. Active Anti-erosion Protection Strategy in Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Yin, Wei; Zhang, Junqiu; Niu, Shichao; Ren, Luquan

    2013-12-01

    Plants have numerous active protection strategies for adapting to complex and severe environments. These strategies provide endless inspiration for extending the service life of materials and machines. Tamarisk (Tamarix aphylla), a tree that thrives in raging sandstorm regions, has adapted to blustery conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust erosion resistant characteristics. However, the relationships among its surface cracks, internal histology and biomechanics, such as cracks, rings, cells, elasticity modulus and growth stress, which account for its erosion resistance, remain unclear. This present study reveals that the directionally eccentric growth rings of tamarisk, which are attributed to reduced stress and accelerated cell division, promote the formation of surface cracks. The windward rings are more extensive than the leeward side rings. The windward surfaces are more prone to cracks, which improves erosion resistance. Our data provide insight into the active protection strategy of the tamarisk against wind-sand erosion.

  11. Rainfall erosivity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale; Meusburger, Katrin; Klik, Andreas; Rousseva, Svetla; Tadić, Melita Perčec; Michaelides, Silas; Hrabalíková, Michaela; Olsen, Preben; Aalto, Juha; Lakatos, Mónika; Rymszewicz, Anna; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Beguería, Santiago; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall is one the main drivers of soil erosion. The erosive force of rainfall is expressed as rainfall erosivity. Rainfall erosivity considers the rainfall amount and intensity, and is most commonly expressed as the R-factor in the USLE model and its revised version, RUSLE. At national and continental levels, the scarce availability of data obliges soil erosion modellers to estimate this factor based on rainfall data with only low temporal resolution (daily, monthly, annual averages). The purpose of this study is to assess rainfall erosivity in Europe in the form of the RUSLE R-factor, based on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century. Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months, average temperature), elevation and latitude/longitude. The mean R-factor for the EU plus Switzerland is 722 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1), with the highest values (>1000 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Mediterranean and alpine regions and the lowest (<500 MJ mm ha(-1) h(-1) yr(-1)) in the Nordic countries. The erosivity density (erosivity normalised to annual precipitation amounts) was also the highest in Mediterranean regions which implies high risk for erosive events and floods

  12. Experimental Investigation on Cavitating Flow Induced Vibration Characteristics of a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Gao; Pengming Guo; Ning Zhang; Zhong Li; Minguan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cavitating flow developing in the blade channels is detrimental to the stable operation of centrifugal pumps, so it is essential to detect cavitation and avoid the unexpected results. The present paper concentrates on cavitation induced vibration characteristics, and special attention is laid on vibration energy in low frequency band, 10–500 Hz. The correlation between cavitating evolution and the corresponding vibration energy in 10–500 Hz frequency band is discussed through visualization an...

  13. Numerical modeling of a two-dimensional aerated cavitation in a symmetrical venturi nozzle

    OpenAIRE

    Tomov, P; Khelladi, S; Ravelet, Florent; Sarraf, C; Bakir, F; Giroux, D

    2015-01-01

    National audience; Cavitation is a well-known physical phenomenon occurring in various technical applications. Its coupling with the aeration, is a recent technique, which allows the control of the overall effect of the cavitation. The aeration is achieved by introducing air bubbles into the flow. In order to reveal and explore the behaviour of air in the vicinity of the cavitation regions, the paper is oriented towards the physics of the colliding vapour phase in the presence of cavitation. ...

  14. Recent developments in cavitation mechanisms a guide for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Washio, Seiichi

    2014-01-01

    How does cavitation start? Presently, the nucleus theory provides the answer to this fundamental question. However the idea of nuclei contains inaccuracies that cannot be rationalized. Recent Developments in Cavitation Mechanisms discusses the uncertainties surrounding the nucleus theory, and proposes another theory of cavitation mechanism. Characteristically, the new theory is based on recent discoveries of cavity generation phenomena in separating flows. This book consists of chapters that introduce topics such as unsoundness of cavitation nuclei, and phenomena of cavity generation on walls

  15. Measurement on the cavitating vortex shedding behind rectangular obstacles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegedus, F; Hos, C; Pandula, Z; Kullmann, L

    2010-01-01

    Measurement results on the cavitating vortex shedding behind sharp-edged rectangular bodies are presented, intended to provide benchmark cases for the validation of unsteady cavitation models of CFD codes. Rectangular bodies of increasing aspect ratio (1, 2, 3 and 4) were used with a constant 25mm height (12.5% blockage ratio). The water velocity in the 0.2x0.05m test section of the channel was varied between 1 and 12 m/s resulting in a Reynolds number in the range of (0.4-3.5)x105. Pressure signals were measured at several locations, notably in the wake. Dominant frequencies and Strouhal numbers are reported from cavitation-free flow (classic von Karman vortex shedding) up to supercavitation as a function of the free-stream Reynolds number. The results are in good agreement with the literature in case of the square cylinder. We experienced a slight increase of the dominant Strouhal number with increasing aspect ratio. This result is somewhat inconsistent with the literature, in which a fall of the Strouhal number can be observed at side ratio 2. This may be the consequence of the different ranges of Reynolds numbers. It was also found that between the inception of cavitation and the formation of supercavitation the Strouhal number is not affected by cavitation.

  16. Numerical Calculation on Cavitation Pressure Pulsation in Centrifugal Pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Shi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the internal flow in centrifugal pump when cavitation occurs, numerical calculation of the unsteady flow field in the WP7 automobile centrifugal pump is conducted based on the Navier-Stokes equations with the RNG k – ε turbulence model and Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. The distributions of bubble volume fraction and pressure pulsation laws in the pump are analyzed when cavitation occurs. The conclusions are as follows: the bubble volume fraction is larger on the suction side of impeller blade near the inlet edge, which is consistent with the low-pressure region distribution. Bubble volume is determined by the growth rate and collapse rate of every bubble in the bubble group. The cavitation degree changes over time with the impeller rotation and the bubble growth and collapse coexist in the impeller flow channels. The main pulsation results from the cyclic and static coupling between the impeller and the tongue, while the fluctuating amplitude is increased by the cavitation.

  17. Numerical analysis for cavitation flow of marine propeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauviqirrahman, Mohammad; Muchammad, Ismail, Rifky; Jamari, J.

    2015-12-01

    Concerning the environmental issue and the increase of fuel price, optimizing the fuel consumption has been recently an important subject in all industries. In marine industries one of the ways to decrease the energy consumption was by reducing the presence of cavitation on marine propeller blades. This will give a higher propulsive efficiency. This paper provides an investigation into the influence of the cavitation on a hydrodynamic performance around the propeller based on numerical method. Hydrofoil representing the blade form of propeller was of particular of interest. Two types of cavitation model were investigated with respect to the accuracy of the result and the effectiveness of the method. The results include the hydrodynamic characteristics of cavitation phenomenon like lift/drag variation with respect to the cavity extent. It was found that a high accuracy and low computational time is achieved when the cavitation model of Zwart-Gerber-Belamri is used. The interesting outcome of this study is that the results can be used as a good evaluation tool for high marine propeller performance.

  18. Computation of Cavitating Flow in a Francis Hydroturbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Daniel; Lindau, Jay

    2013-11-01

    In an effort to improve cavitation characteristics at off-design conditions, a steady, periodic, multiphase, RANS CFD study of an actual Francis hydroturbine was conducted and compared to experimental results. It is well-known that operating hydroturbines at off-design conditions usually results in the formation of large-scale vaporous cavities. These cavities, and their subsequent collapse, reduce efficiency and cause damage and wear to surfaces. The conventional hydro community has expressed interest in increasing their turbine's operating ranges, improving their efficiencies, and reducing damage and wear to critical turbine components. In this work, mixing planes were used to couple rotating and stationary stages of the turbine which have non-multiple periodicity, and provide a coupled solution for the stay vanes, wicket gates, runner blades, and draft tube. The mixture approach is used to simulate the multiphase flow dynamics, and cavitation models were employed to govern the mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. The solution is compared with experimental results across a range of cavitation numbers which display all the major cavitation features in the machine. Unsteady computations are necessary to capture inherently unsteady cavitation phenomena, such as the precessing vortex rope, and the shedding of bubbles from the wicket gates and their subsequent impingement upon the leading edge of the runner blades. To display these features, preliminary unsteady simulations of the full machine are also presented.

  19. Numerical Modeling of Unsteady Cavitating Flows around a Stationary Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Ducoin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to evaluate the predictive capability of three popular transport equation-based cavitation models for the simulations of partial sheet cavitation and unsteady sheet/cloud cavitating flows around a stationary NACA66 hydrofoil. The 2D calculations are performed by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equation using the CFD solver CFX with the k-ω SST turbulence model. The local compressibility effect is considered using a local density correction for the turbulent eddy viscosity. The calculations are validated with experiments conducted in a cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy. The hydrofoil has a fixed angle of attack of α=6° with a Reynolds number of Re = 750,000 at different cavitation numbers σ. Without the density modification, over-prediction of the turbulent viscosity near the cavity closure reduces the cavity length and modifies the cavity shedding characteristics. The results show that it is important to capture both the mean and fluctuating values of the hydrodynamic coefficients because (1 the high amplitude of the fluctuations is critical to capturing the extremes of the loads to ensure structural safety and (2 the need to capture the frequency of the fluctuations, to avoid unwanted noise, vibrations, and accelerated fatigue issues.

  20. Imaging manifestations of the cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma of SARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chunwang; Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Jia Cuiyu; Bai Chunsheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging appearances of cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma and the clinical features of the cases of SARS. Methods: Chest imaging films and clinical data of 180 patients with clinically confirmed SARS were analyzed retrospectively. The imaging manifestations of cavitation and the clinical features of the patients were observed and evaluated. Results: Of 180 patients, cavitations were showed in 5 (2.8%), which were all found through X-ray or CT scanning. Most of them were round or irregular, and had thick wall. The 5 patients all had been in hospital and treated with more dosage antibiotics, antivirus medicines and glucocorticoid for long time, the glucocorticoid was used for 25-65 d, and in the first 10-15 days the dosage was 160-240 mg per day. In hospitalization, one of them had been diagnosed diabetes mellitus, four had increased fasting blood sugar, the counts of white blood cells [(14.1-20.4) x 10 9 /L] increased significantly, the percent of neutrophils might increased also. Meanwhile, there was a continue increase of lactate dehydrogenase (228.00-475.00 U/L), glutamic dehydrogenase (10.08-60.00 U/L) and hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (190.00-444.00 U/L) in lab examination. Conclusion: SARS can cause cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma in posterior process of the disease. CT scanning can find the cavitation earlier and accurately, catching the imaging features of them is helpful in differential diagnosis, guiding therapy and estimating prognosis

  1. Cavitation Simulation on Conventional and Highly-Skewed Propellers in the Behind Condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2011-01-01

    . The validation of the cavitation model in EllipSys has been conducted for the cavitating flows on 2D/3D hydrofoils (Shin 2010). Prior to the cavitation simulation, the open-water characteristics of the propellers from the computation are compared with those from the propulsion test for the fully-wetted flows (Li...

  2. Fluid dynamics of acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation in hydraulic power systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A

    2017-03-01

    Cavitation is the transition from a liquid to a vapour phase, due to a drop in pressure to the level of the vapour tension of the fluid. Two kinds of cavitation have been reviewed here: acoustic cavitation and hydrodynamic cavitation. As acoustic cavitation in engineering systems is related to the propagation of waves through a region subjected to liquid vaporization, the available expressions of the sound speed are discussed. One of the main effects of hydrodynamic cavitation in the nozzles and orifices of hydraulic power systems is a reduction in flow permeability. Different discharge coefficient formulae are analysed in this paper: the Reynolds number and the cavitation number result to be the key fluid dynamical parameters for liquid and cavitating flows, respectively. The latest advances in the characterization of different cavitation regimes in a nozzle, as the cavitation number reduces, are presented. The physical cause of choked flows is explained, and an analogy between cavitation and supersonic aerodynamic flows is proposed. The main approaches to cavitation modelling in hydraulic power systems are also reviewed: these are divided into homogeneous-mixture and two-phase models. The homogeneous-mixture models are further subdivided into barotropic and baroclinic models. The advantages and disadvantages of an implementation of the complete Rayleigh-Plesset equation are examined.

  3. Power cavitation-guided blood-brain barrier opening with focused ultrasound and microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, M. T.; Apostolakis, I.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2018-03-01

    Image-guided monitoring of microbubble-based focused ultrasound (FUS) therapies relies on the accurate localization of FUS-stimulated microbubble activity (i.e. acoustic cavitation). Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays can achieve this, but with insufficient spatial resolution. In this study, we address this limitation and perform high-resolution monitoring of acoustic cavitation-mediated blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening with a new technique called power cavitation imaging. By synchronizing the FUS transmit and passive receive acquisition, high-resolution passive cavitation imaging was achieved by using delay and sum beamforming with absolute time delays. Since the axial image resolution is now dependent on the duration of the received acoustic cavitation emission, short pulses of FUS were used to limit its duration. Image sets were acquired at high-frame rates for calculation of power cavitation images analogous to power Doppler imaging. Power cavitation imaging displays the mean intensity of acoustic cavitation over time and was correlated with areas of acoustic cavitation-induced BBB opening. Power cavitation-guided BBB opening with FUS could constitute a standalone system that may not require MRI guidance during the procedure. The same technique can be used for other acoustic cavitation-based FUS therapies, for both safety and guidance.

  4. Numerical Study on Characteristics of 3D Cavitating Hydrofoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The commercial software ANSYS CFX, APDL and Workbench are applied for modeling the hydrodynamic and structural interactions and characteristics of an elastic hydrofoil by means of a two-way FSI method. The SST (Shear Stress Transport turbulence model and the simplified Rayleigh-Plesset equations are employed for the cavitating flow simulation. Both CFX and APDL solvers are set to be transient. The fluid and solid computational domains are sequentially solved to simulate the interactions between the hydrofoil and the cavitating flow. The results show that the difference in stiffness of common metal materials has trifling effects on hydrofoil performance. But variations in cavitation number and angle of attack will dramatically affect the hydrodynamic and structural interactions and characteristics.

  5. Flow Modelling for partially Cavitating Two-dimensional Hydrofoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaswamy, Paddy

    2001-01-01

    The present work addresses te computational analysis of partial sheet hydrofoil cavitation in two dimensions. Particular attention is given to the method of simulating the flow at the end of the cavity. A fixed-length partially cavitating panel method is used to predict the height of the re...... of the model and comparing the present calculations with numerical results. The flow around the partially cavitating hydrofoil with a re-entrant jet has also been treated with a viscous/inviscid interactive method. The viscous flow model is based on boundary layer theory applied on the compound foil......, consisting of the union of the cavity and the hydrofoil surface. The change in the flow direction in the cavity closure region is seen to have a slightly adverse effect on the viscous pressure distribution. Otherwise, it is seen that the viscous re-entrant jet solution compares favourably with experimental...

  6. Neuroaxonal Dystrophy and Cavitating Leukoencephalopathy of Chihuahua Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Sara; Asiag, Nimrod; Zeira, Offer; Falzone, Cristian; Cantile, Carlo

    2017-09-01

    A novel form of neuroaxonal dystrophy is described in 3 Chihuahua pups, 2 of which were from the same litter. It was characterized not only by accumulation of numerous and widely distributed axonal swellings (spheroids) but also by a severe cavitating leukoencephalopathy. The dogs presented with progressive neurological signs, including gait abnormalities and postural reaction deficits. Magnetic resonance images and gross examination at necropsy revealed dilation of lateral ventricles and cerebral atrophy, accompanied by cavitation of the subcortical white matter. Histopathologically, severe axonal degeneration with formation of large spheroids was found in the cerebral and cerebellar white matter, thalamus, and brainstem nuclei. Small-caliber spheroids were observed in the cerebral and cerebellar gray matter. The telencephalic white matter had severe myelin loss and cavitation with relative sparing of the U-fibers. Different from previously reported cases of canine neuroaxonal dystrophy, in these Chihuahuas the spheroid distribution predominantly involved the white matter with secondary severe leukoencephalopathy.

  7. Unraveling the Anomalous Grain Size Dependence of Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J. W.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2016-11-01

    Experimental studies have identified an anomalous grain size dependence associated with the critical tensile pressure that a metal may sustain before catastrophic failure by cavitation processes. Here we derive the first quantitative theory (and its associated closed-form solution) capable of explaining this phenomena. The theory agrees well with experimental measurements and atomistic calculations over a very wide range of conditions. Utilizing this theory, we are able to map out three distinct regimes in which the critical tensile pressure for cavitation failure (i) increases with decreasing grain size in accordance with conventional wisdom, (ii) nonintuitively decreases with decreasing grain size, and (iii) is independent of grain size. The theory also predicts microscopic signatures of the cavitation process which agree with available data.

  8. Possibility of Metal Processing Using Ultrasonic Cavitation Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Ryoji; Fujiwara, Ryuichi; Niita, Tokuo

    2001-05-01

    Utilizing a high-intensity ultrasonic cavitation, a processing experiment was conducted with the aim of performing volumetric flow adjustment of a fuel jet nozzle to be used for a small engine, which cannot be carried out by a method such as machining. At the bottom of the nozzle used for the experiment, which is in the shape of a cup, a nozzle hole with a diameter of 0.15 mm is drilled. In this experiment, we make adjustments in the volumetric flow by grinding and removing the machining burr with the aid of the processing power of ultrasonic cavitation. The processing effect is highly dependent on the ultrasonic cavitation intensity. In the experiment, the processing reservoir was filled with pressurized highly deaerated water to increase the processing force by allowing cavitation with high intensity to be generated. The processing principle is to utilize the effect of a cavitation jet flow passing through the nozzle hole. To restrain the intake of the bubbles into the flow circuits during the pressure reduction cycle of the vibrator, the water flow was discharged into a pressure reduction reservoir. By allowing the horn tip with a diameter of 6 mm at a frequency of 28 kHz to approach the sample, followed by high-intensity ultrasonic irradiation, powerful cavitation was generated. As a result of the evaluation of the processing efficiency made based on the volumetric flow increase and microscopic observation of the nozzle, burrs smaller than 10 μm were almost entirely removed within 15 min of initial irradiation, resulting in a volumetric flow increase of more than 0.4%/min. However, in the case of burrs of more than 10 μm, no force that could remove the burrs was found. It was surprising for the burrs to generate deformation rather than to be removed.

  9. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  10. 3D analyses of cavitation instabilities accounting for plastic anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarth, Brian Nyvang; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    Full three dimensional cell model analyses are carried out for a solid containing a single small void, in order to determine the critical stress levels for the occurrence of cavitation instabilities. The material models applied are elastic‐viscoplastic, with a small rate‐hardening exponent...... that the quasi‐static solution is well approximated. A special procedure is used to strongly reduce the loading rate a little before the instability occurs. It is found that plastic anisotropy has a significant effect on the level of the critical stress for cavitation instabilities....

  11. Cavitation instabilities between fibres in a metal matrix composite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    2016-01-01

    induced by bonding to the ceramics that only show elastic deformation. In an MMC the stress state in the metal matrix is highly non-uniform, varying between regions where shear stresses are dominant and regions where hydrostatic tension is strong. An Al–SiC whisker composite with a periodic pattern......Short fibre reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are studied here to investigate the possibility that a cavitation instability can develop in the metal matrix. The high stress levels needed for a cavitation instability may occur in metal–ceramic systems due to the constraint on plastic flow...

  12. Cavitation Inception on Microparticles: A Self-Propelled Particle Accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arora, M.; Ohl, C.-D.; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2004-01-01

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 mum are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases......, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled by considering the momentum of the particle and the displaced liquid. The analysis suggests that all particles which cause cavitation are accelerated into translatory motion, and separate from...

  13. Effects of anti-freeze concentration in the engine coolant on the cavitation temperature of a water pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Huang, K.; Tzeng, S.-C.; Ma Weiping

    2004-01-01

    Improvements in engine-manufacturing technology have gradually increased the thermal efficiencies of engines as well as the burning temperature and pressure of fuels within the cylinders. Accordingly, greater heat dissipation are required. However, the volume of the radiators is constrained by the configuration of the engines, leading to excessive internal resistance in the engine-cooling system. Therefore, water pumps in engines are prone to cavitation, and air bubbles are likely to permeate into the anti-freeze, thereby severely reducing the performance, reliability and service life of the engines. Ethylene glycol (EG) is added to the radiator of some vehicles in cold areas to reduce the solidification point of the coolant and prevent freezing. This study probes the effects of the percentage of anti-freeze added to the cooling water in a water pump in an engine on the water-supply capability and cavitation temperature, whether air or burnt gas is present in the system. The results of this study have revealed that engines have a higher tolerance to air bubbles at lower rates of rotation. At a given fixed rotational speed, the tolerable cavitation temperature of an engine's water pump will fall slowly as the amount of air bubbles increases

  14. EROSION RATE OF RESERVOIR DEPOSIT AS REVEALED BY LABORATORY EXPERIMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Amar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of dams and reservoirs in a river can give significant impacts on its flow of water and sediment, and can cause long-term morphological changes on the river. Reservoir sedimentation can reduce a reservoir’s effective flood control volume, and in some severe cases can cause overtopping during floods. Sediment deposition against a dam can reduce its stability, and affect the operation of low-level outlet works, gates, and valves. The abrasive action of sediment particles can roughen the surface of release facilities and can cause cavitations and vibration. Sedimentation can also affect a reservoir’s water quality, and reduce its flood control, water supply, hydropower, and recreation benefits. Consequently, taking sedimentation into consideration not only in the planning and design, but also in the operation and maintenance of a dam and reservoir is important. Keywords: Erosion rate, reservoir deposit, shear stress.

  15. Erosive Lichen Planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauskar, Melissa

    2017-09-01

    Lichen planus is an inflammatory mucocutaneous condition with a myriad of clinical manifestations. There are 3 forms of lichen planus that effect the vulva: papulosquamous, hypertrophic, and erosive. Erosive lichen planus can progress to vulvar scaring, vaginal stenosis, and squamous cell carcinoma; these long-term sequelae cause sexual distress, depression, and decreased quality of life for patients. Diagnosis is often delayed because of patient embarrassment or clinician misdiagnosis. Early recognition and treatment is essential to decreasing the morbidity of this condition. Multimodal treatment, along with a multidisciplinary approach, will improve outcomes and further clinical advances in studying this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Erosion behavior of hard surface coatings/inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, A.V.; Bakker, T.W.

    1983-01-01

    This chapter attempts to determine the basic erosion behavior of several of the most promising refractory hard metal coatings and bodies that are currently either in development or commercial use. Discusses experimental conditions and metallographic analysis. Concludes that all of the materials tested eroded in a brittle manner, undergoing more erosion at a 90 0 impingement angle than a 30 0 angle; the CNTD SiC (hard) had the best erosion resistance; the coating materials had a peak erosion rate at the beginning of erosion; the amount of apparent plastic deformation that occurred in some of the materials can be related to the amount and condition of the metallic phases in the materials; and the large grain size near the coatingsubstrate interface of the CNTD SiC (hard) that eroded preferentially could be related to an instability in the deposition process that occurred near the initiation of deposition

  17. Statistical characteristics of suction pressure signals for a centrifugal pump under cavitating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Benxu; Ji, Yucheng; Lu, Jiaxin; Yuan, Shouqi

    2017-02-01

    Centrifugal pumps are often used in operating conditions where they can be susceptible to premature failure. The cavitation phenomenon is a common fault in centrifugal pumps and is associated with undesired effects. Among the numerous cavitation detection methods, the measurement of suction pressure fluctuation is one of the most used methods to detect or diagnose the degree of cavitation in a centrifugal pump. In this paper, a closed loop was established to investigate the pump cavitation phenomenon, the statistical parameters for PDF (Probability Density Function), Variance and RMS (Root Mean Square) were used to analyze the relationship between the cavitation performance and the suction pressure signals during the development of cavitation. It is found that the statistical parameters used in this research are able to capture critical cavitation condition and cavitation breakdown condition, whereas difficult for the detection of incipient cavitation in the pump. At part-load conditions, the pressure fluctuations at the impeller inlet show more complexity than the best efficiency point (BEP). Amplitude of PDF values of suction pressure increased steeply when the flow rate dropped to 40 m3/h (the design flow rate was 60 m3/h). One possible reason is that the flow structure in the impeller channel promotes an increase of the cavitation intensity when the flow rate is reduced to a certain degree. This shows that it is necessary to find the relationship between the cavitation instabilities and flow instabilities when centrifugal pumps operate under part-load flow rates.

  18. Erosion of buffer caused by groundwater leakages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, J.; Hanana, K.; Punkkinen, O.; Koskinen, K.; Olin, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the Finnish HLW disposal concept the most important properties of the bentonite clay being considered for these isolation purposes are its thermal behaviour, low hydraulic conductivity, diffusion limited transport, rheology, plasticity, sufficient swelling potential, and exchange capacity. All of these properties depend critically on bentonite density; therefore, any potential mass loss or redistribution events must be well characterized. One such event or process is the erosion of bentonite by flowing groundwater and the groundwater flowing in newly formed channels, in special. Mechanical erosion during the operational phase, due to high groundwater pressure gradients in open excavations, has been identified as a critical issue in TKS-2006 and SR-Can. This work addresses the mechanical erosion of bentonite by fluid shear. In order for buffer erosion to occur three processes must take place: detachment, entrainment, and transport. These processes are followed by the settling of the material and redistribution of buffer mass. Erosion begins with the detachment of a particle from surrounding material, which requires the application of shear forces greater than the attractive force between the particle and parent structure. Entrainment is the process by which the eroding medium lifts the detached particle into the flow. The most important aspect in entrainment is transfer of fluid's inertial forces via surface friction to particles' inertial forces, which, in turn, must overcome the frictional resistance between the particle and its surroundings. Factors influencing frictional resistance include gravity, particle mass, saturation degree of parent structure, composition of water present in parent structure, particle size, and surface roughness. Recent erosion tests, whereby water flow was directed over compacted bentonite blocks or through a system of bentonite pellets, have indicated that bentonite erodes

  19. Transition of cavitating flow to supercavitation within Venturi nozzle – hysteresis investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kozák

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is usually considered as undesirable phenomena. On the other hand, it can be utilized in many applications. One of the technical applications is using cavitation in water treatment, where hydrodynamic cavitation seems to be effective way how to reduce cyanobacteria within large bulks of water. The main scope of this paper is investigation of the cavitation within Venturi nozzle during the transition from fully developed cavitation to supercavitation regime and vice versa. Dynamics of cavitation was investigated using experimental data of pressure pulsations and analysis of high speed videos, where FFT of the pixel intensity and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD of the records were done to identify dominant frequencies connected with the presence of cavitation. The methodology of the high speed (HS records semiautomated analysis using the FFT was described. Obtained results were correlated and above that the possible presence of hysteresis was discussed.

  20. Microleakage of cavit in varnish-lined, matrix-supported endodontic access preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, M K; Saad, N A

    1998-07-01

    The effect of the application of a matrix band and the use of cavity varnish on the microleakage of Cavit in endodontic access preparations was investigated. Sixty human upper premolars were divided into six groups of ten specimens each. Access cavities with proximal extensions were prepared and filled with 1, Cavit only; 2, Cavit after application of varnish; 3, Cavit with the use of a matrix band; 4, Cavit with a matrix band and varnish; 5, incremental deposition of Cavit with the use of a matrix band and varnish; and 6, gutta percha stopping. The specimens were placed in 2% methylene blue dye, thermocycled, and evaluated for both proximal and occlusal linear leakage. The experimental group in which Cavit was incrementally deposited in varnish-lined and matrix-supported cavities exhibited significantly (p < 0.05) less proximal microleakage than those groups in which cavities were filled without the application of both a matrix band and a cavity varnish.

  1. Numerical simulation and experimental visualization of the separated cavitating boundary layer over NACA2412

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozák Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is physical phenomenon of crucial impact on the operation range and service lifetime of the hydraulic machines (pumps, turbines, valves etc.. Experimental measurement of cavitation is expensive and time consuming process, while some important characteristic of the flow are difficult to measure due to the nature of the phenomenon. Current possibilities of computational fluid dynamics provide a way for deeper understanding of cavitation which is important for many applications in the hydraulic machines industry such as expanding operation range or extending lifetime of the hydraulic machines. Simplified model consists of NACA 2412 hydrofoil with 8 degrees angle of attack fixed in between the walls of cavitation tunnel. Present investigation focuses on comparison of vapor volume fractions obtained by 3D CFD simulations and high speed visualization of the real cavitation phenomena. Several operating regimes corresponding to different cavitation numbers are studied with aim to assess the dynamics of the separated cavitating sheets/clouds

  2. Interactions of inertial cavitation bubbles with stratum corneum lipid bilayers during low-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezel, Ahmet; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of acoustic cavitation bubbles with biological tissues play an important role in biomedical applications of ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation plays a particularly important role in enhancing transdermal transport of macromolecules, thereby offering a noninvasive mode of drug delivery (sonophoresis). Ultrasound-enhanced transdermal transport is mediated by inertial cavitation, where collapses of cavitation bubbles microscopically disrupt the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum. In this study, we describe a theoretical analysis of the interactions of cavitation bubbles with the stratum corneum lipid bilayers. Three modes of bubble-stratum corneum interactions including shock wave emission, microjet penetration into the stratum corneum, and impact of microjet on the stratum corneum are considered. By relating the mechanical effects of these events on the stratum corneum structure, the relationship between the number of cavitation events and collapse pressures with experimentally measured increase in skin permeability was established. Theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally measured parameters of cavitation events.

  3. Propeller Cavitation in Non-Uniform Flow and Correlation with the Near Pressure Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alves Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study is carried out in a cavitation tunnel on a propeller operating downstream of a non-uniform wake. The goal of this work is to establish quantitative correlations between the near pressure field and the cavitation pattern that takes place on the propeller blades. The pressure field is measured at the walls of the test section and in the near wake of the propeller and is combined with quantitative high-speed image recording of the cavitation pattern. Through harmonic analysis of the pressure data and image processing techniques that allow retrieving the cavitation extension and volume, we discuss the potential sources that generate the pressure fluctuations. Time correlations are unambiguously established between pressure peak fluctuations and cavitation collapse events, based on the Rayleigh collapse time. Finally, we design a model to predict the cavitation-induced pressure fluctuations from the derivation of the cavitation volume acceleration. A remarkable agreement is observed with the actual pressure field.

  4. RESISTENCIA AL DESGASTE EROSIVO-CORROSIVO DE ACEROS AUSTENÍTICOS FERMANAL RESISTÊNCIA AO DESGASTE EROSIVO-CORROSIVO DE AÇOS AUSTENÍTICOS FERMANAL EROSIVE-CORROSIVE WEAR RESISTANCE OF FERMANAL AUSTENITIC STEELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Aperador

    2012-12-01

    the range (4.9~11.0 wt% Al - (17.49~34.3 wt% Mn - (0, 43~1.25 wt% C, which were melted in an induction furnace from high purity materials. The alloys were evaluated with respect to corrosion, wet erosion and corrosion-erosion at an impact angle of 90°. For the evaluation of corrosion a solution composed of 0.5 M NaCl and silica particles with size between 210 to 300 microns was used in order to analyze the effect of aluminum and manganese content in the resistance to erosion and corrosion-erosion of these alloys. To characterize the corrosion, response technique was used by potentiodynamic polarization curves and using the same technique as Tafel extrapolation, the microstructural characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and the composition of corrosion products were analyzed using diffraction of X-rays (XRD.

  5. Bentonite erosion. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgersson, Martin; Boergesson, Lennart; Hedstroem, Magnus; Karnland, Ola; Nilsson, Ulf (Clay Technology AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-12-15

    Low saline water may reach KBS-3 repository depth, e.g. during periods of glaciation. Under such aqueous conditions, the montmorillonite part of the bentonite buffer might transform into a sol and thereby be transported away with flowing water in fractures. The primary aim with this report is to improve the understanding of the basic principles for this possible montmorillonite particle release. The report includes experimental and theoretical work performed at Clay Technology. Natural bentonite and ion-exchanged purified montmorillonite from three different geographical origins, Wyoming (U.S.), Milos (Greece) and Kutch (India) have been studied. Experimental and/or theoretical investigations have been performed with respect to: - Free swelling ability; - Rheological properties; - Rate of bentonite loss into fractures; - Filtering; - Ion exchange; - Sol formation ability; - Ion diffusion; - Mass loss due to erosion. The performed erosion experiments show that erosion does not occur in a mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite with at least 20% calcium in exchange positions, when the external solution contains above 4 mM charge equivalents. This result is in agreement with the presented conceptual view of sol formation and measured equilibrium properties in mixed calcium/sodium montmorillonite. The findings imply that the buffer will be stable for non-glacial conditions. However, erosion due to sol formation cannot be ruled out for glacial conditions.

  6. Dune erosion above revetments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Thiel de Vries, J.S.M.

    2012-01-01

    In a situation with a narrow dune, the dune base can be protected with a revetment to reduce dune erosion during extreme events. To quantify the effects of a revetment on storm impact, the functionality of the numerical storm impact model XBeach (Roelvink et al., 2009) is extended to account for the

  7. Peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitations. The Beijing eye study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Sheng You

    Full Text Available To assess prevalence, size and location of peripapillary intrachoroidal cavitations (PICCs and their associations in a population-based sample. .The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6 ± 9.8 years (range:50-93 years. A detailed ophthalmic examination included enhanced depth imaging of the choroid by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and fundus photography. PICCs were defined as triangular thickening of the choroid with the base at the optic disc border and a distance between Bruch's membrane and sclera of ≥ 200 μm. Parapapillary large choroidal vessels were excluded.Out of 94 subjects with high myopia (refractive error 26.5mm in right eyes, OCT images were available for 89 (94.7% participants. A PICC was detected in 15 out of these 89 highly myopic subjects (prevalence:16.9 ± 4.0% and in none of hyperopic, emmetropic or medium myopic subgroups each consisting of 100 randomly selected subjects. Mean PICC width was 4.2 ± 2.3 hours (30° of disc circumference and mean length was 1363 ± 384 μm. PICCs were located most frequently (40% at the inferior disc border. On fundus photos, a typical yellow-orange lesion was found in 8 (53% eyes with PICCs. In binary regression analysis, presence of PICCs was significantly associated with optic disc tilting (P=0.04 and presence of posterior staphylomata (P=0.046.Prevalence of PICCs in the adult Chinese population was 16.9 ± 4.0% in the highly myopic group, with no PICCs detected in non-highly myopic eyes. PICCs were located most frequently at the inferior optic disc border. Only half of the PICCs detected on OCT images showed a yellow-orange lesion on fundus photos. Presence of PICC was significantly associated only with an increased optic disc tilting and presence of posterior staphylomata, while it was not associated with axial length, refractive error or other ocular or systemic parameters.

  8. Categorization of erosion control matting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    Erosion control is a critical aspect of any Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) : construction project, with the extreme negative impacts of high sediment loads in natural : waterways having been well documented. A variety of erosion control ...

  9. Modeling and computation of cavitation in vortical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Maksoud, M.; Haenel, D.; Lantermann, U.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents an investigation of Euler-Lagrangian methods for cavitating two-phase flows. The Euler-Euler methods, widely used for simulations of cavitating flows in ship technology, perform well in regions of moderate flow changes but fail in zones of strong, vortical flow. Reasons are the strong approximations of cavitation models in the Euler concept. Alternatively, Euler-Lagrangian concepts enable more detailed formulations for transport, dynamics and acoustic of discrete vapor bubbles. Test calculations are performed to study the influence of different parameters in the equations of motion and in the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for bubble dynamics. Results confirm that only Lagrangian models are able to describe correctly the bubble behavior in vortices, while Eulerian results deviate strongly. Lagrangian formulations enable additionally the determination of acoustic pressure of cavitation noise. Two-way coupling between the phases is required for large regions of the vapor phase. A new coupling concept between continuous fluid flow and discrete bubble phase is developed and demonstrated for flow through a nozzle. However, the iterative coupling between the phases via volume fractions is computationally expensive and should therefore be applied only in regions where Eulerian treatment fails. A corresponding local concept for combination with an Euler-Euler method is outlined and is in progress.

  10. Relating xylem cavitation to gas exchange in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acoustic emissions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Though a body of work using AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. The objective of...

  11. Cavitation in microscale confinement: new concept of mild brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhatov, Iskander; Wang, Cheng; Ziejewski, Mariusz

    2007-11-01

    The present effort is to understand the possible damages in brain caused by the cavitation bubbles generated when the impacting shock waves passing through human head. In order to build an adequate mathematical model of this phenomenon, one should be able to model inception and dynamics of cavitation in biological liquid confined in macroscale or microscale space between solids, elastic surfaces, or membranes -- biological tissues, in general. A more in-depth understanding of the outcomes from the dynamic response of brain tissue, including the location, size, and geometry of the damage site, will be of assistance to physicians in the properly interpreting the neurodiagnostic results. In the present study it is stated that in micro scale confinement bubble collapse can not cause any damage. This is due to the fact that collapse is damped by viscous dissipation in micro channels. Otherwise, the bubble inception itself may cause damage. It is shown that cavitation inception in micro scale may happen for much higher tensions than in infinite liquid. At such a strong tension substantial amount of elastic energy is stored in liquid. This energy being released during cavitation inception generates `recoil pressure' that may be high enough to damage biological tissue.

  12. Numerical modelling of unsteady 2D sheet cavitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Lange, D.F.; de Bruin, G.J.; van Wijngaarden, L.; van Wijngaarden, L.

    1996-01-01

    Unsteady 2D sheet cavitation has been calculated by a BEM. Cubics are used to represent various quantities like the potential on the wet part of the profile, the normal velocity on the sheet, the geometry of the profile and the sheet. The growing cavity sheet, the re-entrant jet and the sheet

  13. Prediction of tip vortex cavitation for ship propellers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oprea, A.I.

    2013-01-01

    An open propeller is the conventional device providing thrust for ships. Due to its working principles, regions with low pressure are formed on its blades specifically at the leading edge and in the tip region. If this pressure is becoming lower than the vapor pressure, the cavitation phenomenon is

  14. Relationship between cavitation and water uptake in rose stems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Suiro, V.

    1996-01-01

    Cavitation in rose stems (Rosa hybrida L.) was assessed in both intact plants and excised flowers, by measurement of ultrasonic acoustic emissions at the stem surface and determination of the air-conductivity of 2.5-cm segments that were attached at one end to air at low pressure (0.01 MPa). On

  15. Condensation and cavitation in water and water mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maršík, František; Delale, C. F.; Sedlář, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2003), s. 3-16 ISSN 1231-0956 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS2076003; GA ČR GA101/02/0364 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : condensation * cavitation * water mixtures Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  16. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-06

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  17. Cavitation inception on microparticles: a self-propelled particle accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arora, M.; Ohl, C.D.; Morch, Knud Aage

    2004-01-01

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150   μm are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases,

  18. Transfert convectif dans les cavites poreuses soumises a un champ ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    un champ magnétique transversal sur la convection naturelle bidimensionnelle en milieu poreux confiné dans une cavité horizontale. Le milieu poreux, de grande extension est chauffé isothermiquement par les côtés tandis que ses parois ...

  19. Experimental measurements of the cavitating flow after horizontal water entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tat Nguyen, Thang; Hai, Duong Ngoc; Quang Thai, Nguyen; Phuong, Truong Thi

    2017-10-01

    Water-entry cavitating flow is of considerable importance in underwater high-speed applications. That is because of the drag-reduction effect that concerns the presence of a cavity around moving objects. Though the study of the flow has long been carried out, little data are documented in literature so far. Besides, currently, in the case of unsteady flow, experimental measurements of some flow parameters such as the cavity pressure still encounter difficulties. Hence continuing research efforts are of important significance. The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally the unsteady cavitating flow after the horizontal water entry of projectiles. An experimental apparatus has been developed. Qualitative and quantitative optical visualizations of the flow have been carried out by using high-speed videography. Digital image processing has been applied to analyzing the recorded flow images. Based on the known correlations between the ellipsoidal super-cavity’s size and the corresponding cavitation number, the cavity pressure has been measured by utilizing the data of image processing. A comparison between the partial- and super-cavitating flow regimes is reported. The received results can be useful for the design of high-speed underwater projectiles.

  20. Pressure Transient Model of Water-Hydraulic Pipelines with Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Jiang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient pressure investigation of water-hydraulic pipelines is a challenge in the fluid transmission field, since the flow continuity equation and momentum equation are partial differential, and the vaporous cavitation has high dynamics; the frictional force caused by fluid viscosity is especially uncertain. In this study, due to the different transient pressure dynamics in upstream and downstream pipelines, the finite difference method (FDM is adopted to handle pressure transients with and without cavitation, as well as steady friction and frequency-dependent unsteady friction. Different from the traditional method of characteristics (MOC, the FDM is advantageous in terms of the simple and convenient computation. Furthermore, the mechanism of cavitation growth and collapse are captured both upstream and downstream of the water-hydraulic pipeline, i.e., the cavitation start time, the end time, the duration, the maximum volume, and the corresponding time points. By referring to the experimental results of two previous works, the comparative simulation results of two computation methods are verified in experimental water-hydraulic pipelines, which indicates that the finite difference method shows better data consistency than the MOC.

  1. Cavitation, subcooled boiling and a measuring method developed at ENEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirelli, D.

    1988-01-01

    A brief description of cavitation and subcooled boiling is reported; their effects, measuring methods, operating limits and prescribed standards are described. The whole, to better clarify the usefulness and the importance of a measuring instrument developed at ENEA, to study the above phenomena

  2. Effects of viscoelasticity on cavitation in drag reducing fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    To study cavitation inception in polymer solutions, a blow-down water tunnel with short running times was used. Tests were made using 1/4 and 1/2 inch diameter models of hemispherical-nose cylinders. To accurately detect the inception of cavitation, a reliable technique was developed using a continuously operating He-Ne gas laser. The laser beam was adjusted to grazing incidence with the model at the minimum pressure point where cavitation inception was to be expected. A sensitive photocell was placed at ninety degrees to detect the beam. As incipient cavitation occurred, the bubbles caused scattering of the laser beam which was picked up by the photocell. Static pressure near the model in the working section of the tunnel was measured using a solid-state pressure pick-up. The signals from the photocell and the pressure pick-up were recorded on an oscillograph. Velocity field visualization was achieved using one microsecond duration light pulses scattered by small polystryrene latex spheres in the flow.

  3. Soil erosion and agricultural sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, David R.

    2007-01-01

    Data drawn from a global compilation of studies quantitatively confirm the long-articulated contention that erosion rates from conventionally plowed agricultural fields average 1–2 orders of magnitude greater than rates of soil production, erosion under native vegetation, and long-term geological erosion. The general equivalence of the latter indicates that, considered globally, hillslope soil production and erosion evolve to balance geologic and climate forcing, whereas conventional plow-bas...

  4. Erosion on spark plug electrodes; Funkenerosion an Zuendkerzenelektroden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rager, J.

    2006-07-01

    Durability of spark plugs is mainly determined by spark gap widening, caused by electrode wear. Knowledge about the erosion mechanisms of spark plug materials is of fundamental interest for the development of materials with a high resistance against electrode erosion. It is therefore crucial to identify those parameters which significantly influence the erosion behaviour of a material. In this work, a reliable and reproducible testing method is presented which produces and characterizes electrode wear under well-defined conditions and which is capable of altering parameters specifically. Endurance tests were carried out to study the dependence of the wear behaviour of pure nickel and platinum on the electrode temperature, gas, electrode gap, electrode diameter, atmospheric pressure, and partial pressure of oxygen. It was shown that erosion under nitrogen is negligible, irrespective of the material. This disproves all common mechanism discussed in the literature explaining material loss of spark plug electrodes. Based on this observation and the variation of the mentioned parameters a new erosion model was deduced. This relies on an oxidation of the electrode material and describes the erosion of nickel and platinum separately. For nickel, electrode wear is caused by the removal of an oxide layer by the spark. In the case of platinum, material loss occurs due to the plasma-assisted formation and subsequent evaporation of volatile oxides in the cathode spot. On the basis of this mechanism a new composite material was developed whose erosion resistance is superior to pure platinum. Oxidation resistant metal oxide particles were added to a platinum matrix, thus leading to a higher erosion resistance of the composite. However, this can be decreased by a side reaction, the separation of oxygen from the metal oxides, which effectively assists the oxidation of the matrix. This reaction can be suppressed by using highly stable oxides, characterized by a large negative Gibbs

  5. Sugars from woody tissue photosynthesis reduce xylem vulnerability to cavitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baerdemaeker, Niels J F; Salomón, Roberto Luis; De Roo, Linus; Steppe, Kathy

    2017-11-01

    Reassimilation of internal CO 2 via woody tissue photosynthesis has a substantial effect on tree carbon income and wood production. However, little is known about its role in xylem vulnerability to cavitation and its implications in drought-driven tree mortality. Young trees of Populus nigra were subjected to light exclusion at the branch and stem levels. After 40 d, measurements of xylem water potential, diameter variation and acoustic emission (AE) were performed in detached branches to obtain acoustic vulnerability curves to cavitation following bench-top dehydration. Acoustic vulnerability curves and derived AE 50 values (i.e. water potential at which 50% of cavitation-related acoustic emissions occur) differed significantly between light-excluded and control branches (AE 50,light-excluded  = -1.00 ± 0.13 MPa; AE 50,control  = -1.45 ± 0.09 MPa; P = 0.007) denoting higher vulnerability to cavitation in light-excluded trees. Woody tissue photosynthesis represents an alternative and immediate source of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) that confers lower xylem vulnerability to cavitation via sugar-mediated mechanisms. Embolism repair and xylem structural changes could not explain this observation as the amount of cumulative AE and basic wood density did not differ between treatments. We suggest that woody tissue assimilates might play a role in the synthesis of xylem surfactants for nanobubble stabilization under tension. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. Cavitation assisted delignification of wheat straw: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskalieva, Asylzat; Yimmou, Bob Mbouyem; Gogate, Parag R; Horvath, Miklos; Horvath, Peter G; Csoka, Levente

    2012-09-01

    Wheat is grown in most of the Indian and Chinese regions and after harvesting, the remaining straw offers considerable promise as a renewable source most suitable for papermaking and as a pulping resource. Delignification of wheat straw offers ample scope for energy conservation by way of the application of the process intensification principles. The present work reviews the pretreatment techniques available for improving the effectiveness of the conventional approach for polysaccharide component separation, softening and delignification. A detailed overview of the cavitation assisted delignification process has been presented based on the earlier literature illustrations and important operational guidelines have been presented for overall low-cost and amenable energy utilization in the processes. The effectiveness of the methods has been evaluated according to yield and properties of the isolated fibers in comparison to the conventional treatment. Also the experimental results of one such non-conventional treatment scheme based on the use of hydrodynamic cavitation have been presented for the pulping of wheat straw. The effect of hydrodynamically induced cavitation on cell wall matrix and its components have been characterized using FT-IR analysis with an objective of understanding the cavitation assisted digestion mechanism on straws. It has been observed that the use of hydrodynamic cavitation does not degrade the fibrillar structure of cellulose but causes relocalisation and partial removal of lignin. Overall it appears that considerable improvement can be obtained due to the use of pretreatment or alternate techniques for delignification, which is an energy intensive step in the paper making industries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Numerical investigations on cavitating flows with thermodynamic effects in a diffuser-type centrifugal pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xuelin, Tang Xue; Liyuan, Bian; Fujun, Wang; Xiaoqin, Lin; Man, Hao [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2013-06-15

    A cavitation model with thermodynamic effects for cavitating flows in a diffuser-type centrifugal pump is developed based on the bubble two-phase flow model. The proposed cavitation model includes mass, momentum, and energy transportations according to the thermodynamic mechanism of cavitation. Numerical simulations are conducted inside the entire passage of the centrifugal pump by using the proposed cavitation model and the renormalization group-based k - ε turbulent model coupled with the energy transportation equation. By using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT 6.3, we have shown that the predicted performance characteristics of the pump, as well as the pressure, vapor, and density distributions in the impeller, agree well with that calculated by the full cavitation model. Simulation results show that cavitation initially occurs slightly behind the inlet of the blade suction surface, i.e., the area with maximum vapor concentration and minimum pressure. The predicted temperature field shows that the reduction in temperature restrains the growth of cavitating bubbles. Therefore, the thermodynamic effect should be treated as a necessary factor in cavitation models. Comparison results validate the efficiency and accuracy of the numerical technique in simulating cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps.

  8. Comparative CFD Investigation on the Performance of a New Family of Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzolara, S.; Bonfiglio, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a CFD characterization of a new type of super-cavitating hydrofoil section designed to have optimal performance both in super-cavitating conditions and in sub-cavitating conditions (including transitional regime). The basic concepts of the new profile family are first introduced. Lift, drag and cavity shapes at different cavitation numbers are calculated for a new foil and compared with those of conventional sub-cavitating and super-cavitating profiles. Numerical calculations confirm the superior characteristics of the new hydrofoil family, which is able to attain high lift and efficiency both in sub-cavitating and super-cavitating conditions. Numerical calculations are based on a multi-phase fully turbulent URANSE solver with a bubble dynamic cavitation model to follow the generation and evaporation of the vapor phase. The new profile family, initially devised for ultra-high speed hydrofoil crafts, may result useful for diverse applications such as super-cavitating or surface-piercing propellers or high-speed sailing boats.

  9. Influence of Thermodynamic Effect on Blade Load in a Cavitating Inducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Kikuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the blade load is one of the design parameters for a cavitating inducer. For experimental investigation of the thermodynamic effect on the blade load, we conducted experiments in both cold water and liquid nitrogen. The thermodynamic effect on cavitation notably appears in this cryogenic fluid although it can be disregarded in cold water. In these experiments, the pressure rise along the blade tip was measured. In water, the pressure increased almost linearly from the leading edge to the trailing edge at higher cavitation number. After that, with a decrease of cavitation number, pressure rise occurred only near the trailing edge. On the other hand, in liquid nitrogen, the pressure distribution was similar to that in water at a higher cavitation number, even if the cavitation number as a cavitation parameter decreased. Because the cavitation growth is suppressed by the thermodynamic effect, the distribution of the blade load does not change even at lower cavitation number. By contrast, the pressure distribution in liquid nitrogen has the same tendency as that in water if the cavity length at the blade tip is taken as a cavitation indication. From these results, it was found that the shift of the blade load to the trailing edge depended on the increase of cavity length, and that the distribution of blade load was indicated only by the cavity length independent of the thermodynamic effect.

  10. Numerical investigations on cavitating flows with thermodynamic effects in a diffuser-type centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelin, Tang Xue; Liyuan, Bian; Fujun, Wang; Xiaoqin, Lin; Man, Hao

    2013-01-01

    A cavitation model with thermodynamic effects for cavitating flows in a diffuser-type centrifugal pump is developed based on the bubble two-phase flow model. The proposed cavitation model includes mass, momentum, and energy transportations according to the thermodynamic mechanism of cavitation. Numerical simulations are conducted inside the entire passage of the centrifugal pump by using the proposed cavitation model and the renormalization group-based k - ε turbulent model coupled with the energy transportation equation. By using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT 6.3, we have shown that the predicted performance characteristics of the pump, as well as the pressure, vapor, and density distributions in the impeller, agree well with that calculated by the full cavitation model. Simulation results show that cavitation initially occurs slightly behind the inlet of the blade suction surface, i.e., the area with maximum vapor concentration and minimum pressure. The predicted temperature field shows that the reduction in temperature restrains the growth of cavitating bubbles. Therefore, the thermodynamic effect should be treated as a necessary factor in cavitation models. Comparison results validate the efficiency and accuracy of the numerical technique in simulating cavitation flows in centrifugal pumps.

  11. Seismicity, seismology and erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovius, Niels; Meunier, Patrick; Burtin, Arnaud; Marc, Odin

    2013-04-01

    At the interface of geomorphology and seismology, patterns of erosion can be used to constrain seismic processes, and seismological instruments to determine geomorphic activity. For example, earthquakes trigger mass wasting in proportion to peak ground velocity or acceleration, modulated by local geologic and topographic conditions. This geomorphic response determines the mass balance and net topographic effect of earthquakes. It can also be used to obtain information about the distribution of seismic slip where instrumental observations are not available. Equally, seismometers can register the signals of geomorphic processes, revealing their location, type and magnitude. The high temporal resolution of such records can help determine the exact meteorological conditions that gave rise to erosion events, and the interactions between individual surface processes during such events. We will illustrate this synergy of disciplines with examples from active mountain belts around the world, including Taiwan, Japan, Papua New Guinea and the Alps.

  12. Auto consolidated cohesive sediments erosion; Erosion des sediments cohesifs en autoconsolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternat, F

    2007-02-15

    Pollutants and suspended matters of a river can accumulate into the sedimentary column. Once deposited, they are submitted to self-weight consolidation processes, ageing and burying, leading to an increase of their erosion resistance. Pollutant fluxes can be related to sedimentary fluxes, determined by threshold laws. In this work, an erosion threshold model is suggested by introducing a cohesion force into the usual force balance. A model of cohesion is developed on the basis of interactions between argillaceous cohesive particles (clays), particularly the Van der Waals force, whose parameterization is ensured by means of granulometry and porosity. Artificial erosion experiments were performed in a recirculating erosion flume with natural cored sediments where critical shear stress measurements were performed. Other analyses provided granulometry and porosity. The results obtained constitute a good database for the literature. The model is then applied to the experimental conditions and gives good agreement with measurements. An example of the accounting for self-weight consolidation processes is finally suggested, before finishing on a Mohr like diagram dedicated to soft cohesive sediment erosion. (author)

  13. Rainfall erosivity map for Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oduro Afriyie, K.

    1995-10-01

    Monthly rainfall data, spanning over a period of more than thirty years, were used to compute rainfall erosivity indices for various stations in Ghana, using the Fournier index, c, defined as p 2 /P, where p is the rainfall amount in the wettest month and P is the annual rainfall amount. Values of the rainfall erosivity indices ranged from 24.5 mm at Sunyani in the mid-portion of Ghana to 180.9 mm at Axim in the south western coastal portion. The indices were used to construct a rainfall erosivity map for the country. The map revealed that Ghana may be broadly divided into five major erosion risk zones. The middle sector of Ghana is generally in the low erosion risk zone; the northern sector is in the moderate to severe erosion risk zone, while the coastal sector is in the severe to extreme severe erosion risk zone. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  14. Ultrahigh-Speed Dynamics of Micrometer-Scale Inertial Cavitation from NanoparticlesUltrahigh-Speed Dynamics of Micrometer-Scale Inertial Cavitation from Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwan, J.J.; Lajoinie, Guillaume Pierre Rene; de Jong, N.; Stride, E.; Versluis, Michel; Coussios, C.C.

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging of cavitation from solid nanoparticles has been a challenge due to the combined nanosized length and time scales involved. We report on high-speed microscopic imaging of inertial cavitation from gas trapped on nanoparticles with a tunable hemispherical depression (nanocups) at

  15. Actinides, accelerators and erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fifield L.K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fallout isotopes can be used as artificial tracers of soil erosion and sediment accumulation. The most commonly used isotope to date has been 137Cs. Concentrations of 137Cs are, however, significantly lower in the Southern Hemisphere, and furthermore have now declined to 35% of original values due to radioactive decay. As a consequence the future utility of 137Cs is limited in Australia, with many erosion applications becoming untenable within the next 20 years, and there is a need to replace it with another tracer. Plutonium could fill this role, and has the advantages that there were six times as many atoms of Pu as of 137Cs in fallout, and any loss to decay has been negligible due to the long half-lives of the plutonium isotopes. Uranium-236 is another long-lived fallout isotope with significant potential for exploitation as a tracer of soil and sediment movement. Uranium is expected to be more mobile in soils than plutonium (or caesium, and hence the 236U/Pu ratio will vary with soil depth, and so could provide an independent measure of the amount of soil loss. In this paper we discuss accelerator based ultra-sensitive measurements of plutonium and 236U isotopes and their advantages over 137Cs as tracers of soil erosion and sediment movement.

  16. Assessment of non-cavitated and cavitated carious lesions among 12- to 15-year-old government and private school children in Pune, Maharashtra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machale, Priyanka S; Hegde-Shetiya, Sahana; Shirahatti, Ravi; Agarwal, Deept

    2014-01-01

    The present cross-sectional study was conducted to assess and compare the mean number of non-cavitated (initial lesions, IL) and cavitated carious lesions (WHO criteria) per child in the permanent dentition and to correlate it with the plaque index among 12- to 15-year-old government and private school children. 481 schoolchildren aged 12-15 years were selected randomly by multistage random sampling from two government and two private schools. Demographic details were collected at the time of examination. Baseline plaque scores were recorded using the Silness and Löe plaque index. Immediately after brushing and drying the teeth, cavitated lesions were recorded based on WHO recommendations and non-cavitated lesions were recorded using the IL criteria of Nyvad et al and Fyffe et al. The mean number of surfaces with cavitated and non-cavitated lesions for government school children was 2.13 ± 2.98 and 3.21 ± 2.97, respectively, and 1.24 ± 1.86 and 3.08 ± 2.33 for private school children, respectively. WHO + IL surfaces among private school children were 4.33 ± 3.48 and in government school children 5.35 ± 4.45. There was a positive correlation of plaque score with IL (r = 0.63) and WHO+IL (r = 0.73). Non-cavitated lesions are about twice as common as cavitated carious lesions in school children. Government school children had a higher number of cavitated and non-cavitated carious lesions when compared with private school children.

  17. Water erosion of dystrophic Red Latosols (Oxisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Ernesto Bernardes Ayer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In their natural state, Latosols (Oxisols present great stability and resistance to erosion, being the most abundant and used soils for farming and cattle raising activities in southern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. However, along the last one hundred years, they have been submitted to intensive cultivation and managements which favor water erosion. This study aimed to estimate the water erosion rates of dystrophic Red Latosols from the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, compared with the soil loss tolerance limits, and assess the impact on water erosion of the managements more common in the region, by alternative conservation management simulation. Soil loss tolerance limits ranged from 8.94 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 9.99 Mg ha-1 year-1, with the study area presenting a susceptibility of soil loss of 23.86 Mg year-1, with an average rate of 8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1, corresponding to 34.80 % of the area with values above the soil loss tolerance limit. The biggest annual losses occur in areas with use and management of eucalyptus grown downhill (30.67 Mg ha-1 year-1 and pasture under continuous occupancy (11.10 Mg ha-1 year-1. However, when the average loss per type of use is considered, the areas more susceptible to water erosion are those with potato and eucalyptus crops, grown downhill, and those in bare soil. Nevertheless, in the simulated conservation management scenario, the average losses would be drastically reduced (8.40 Mg ha-1 year-1 to 2.84 Mg ha-1 year-1 and only 4.00 % of the area with soil loss would remain above the tolerance limits.

  18. Effect of ultrasonic cavitation on measurement of sound pressure using hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Nguyen, Tam; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Okada, Nagaya; Koda, Shinobu; Yasuda, Keiji

    2017-07-01

    Effect of ultrasonic cavitation on sound pressure at the fundamental, second harmonic, and first ultraharmonic frequencies was investigated from low to high ultrasonic intensities. The driving frequencies were 22, 304, and 488 kHz. Sound pressure was measured using a needle-type hydrophone and ultrasonic cavitation was estimated from the broadband integrated pressure (BIP). With increasing square root of electric power applied to a transducer, the sound pressure at the fundamental frequency linearly increased initially, dropped at approximately the electric power of cavitation inception, and afterward increased again. The sound pressure at the second harmonic frequency was detected just below the electric power of cavitation inception. The first ultraharmonic component appeared at around the electric power of cavitation inception at 304 and 488 kHz. However, at 22 kHz, the first ultraharmonic component appeared at a higher electric power than that of cavitation inception.

  19. Porous resins as a cavitation enhancer for low-frequency sonophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, Takaaki; Mitragotri, Samir; Langer, Robert

    2002-03-01

    The application of low-frequency ultrasound enhances drug transport through the skin, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This enhancement is mediated through cavitation, the formation and collapse of gaseous bubbles. We hypothesized that the efficacy of low-frequency sonophoresis can be significantly enhanced by provision of nuclei for cavitation. In this study, we used two porous resins, Diaion HP20 and Diaion HP2MG (2MG), as cavitation nuclei. We measured the effect of these resins on cavitation using pitting of aluminum foil. 2MG showed a higher efficacy in enhancing cavitation compared with Diaion HP20. 2MG was also effective in enhancing transdermal mannitol transport. These results confirm that the addition of cavitation nuclei such as porous resins further increases the effect of low-frequency ultrasound on skin permeability. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association.

  20. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 4: Combined correlations for venturi, hydrofoil, ogives, and pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, J.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a series of experimental and analytical cavitation studies are presented. Cross-correlation is performed of the developed cavity data for a venturi, a hydrofoil and three scaled ogives. The new correlating parameter, MTWO, improves data correlation for these stationary bodies and for pumping equipment. Existing techniques for predicting the cavitating performance of pumping machinery were extended to include variations in flow coefficient, cavitation parameter, and equipment geometry. The new predictive formulations hold promise as a design tool and universal method for correlating pumping machinery performance. Application of these predictive formulas requires prescribed cavitation test data or an independent method of estimating the cavitation parameter for each pump. The latter would permit prediction of performance without testing; potential methods for evaluating the cavitation parameter prior to testing are suggested.

  1. Localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using ray based matched field inversion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Seong, Woojae; Choo, Youngmin; Lee, Jeunghoon

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation of marine propeller is one of the main contributing factors of broadband radiated ship noise. In this research, an algorithm for the source localization of incipient vortex cavitation is suggested. Incipient cavitation is modeled as monopole type source and matched-field inversion method is applied to find the source position by comparing the spatial correlation between measured and replicated pressure fields at the receiver array. The accuracy of source localization is improved by broadband matched-field inversion technique that enhances correlation by incoherently averaging correlations of individual frequencies. Suggested localization algorithm is verified through known virtual source and model test conducted in Samsung ship model basin cavitation tunnel. It is found that suggested localization algorithm enables efficient localization of incipient tip vortex cavitation using a few pressure data measured on the outer hull above the propeller and practically applicable to the typically performed model scale experiment in a cavitation tunnel at the early design stage.

  2. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  3. Erosion-Corrosion Property of CeO2-Modified HVOF WC-Co Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Hang, Zongqiu; Chen, Hui; Ceng, Shengbo; Gou, Guoqing; Wang, Xiaomin; Tu, Mingjing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-04-01

    Rare-earth elements have been widely used in materials manufacturing to improve hardness and toughness. In this work, conventional, nanostructured, and CeO2-modified WC-12Co powders were sprayed using high-velocity oxygen flame spraying. The erosion-corrosion behavior and interaction of erosion and corrosion of the coatings in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution were investigated. In situ observation was employed to analyze the failure mechanism. The results showed that the CeO2-modified WC-12Co coating possessed the best erosion-corrosion resistance, while the lowest corrosion resistance was exhibited by the conventional WC-12Co coating. The results also suggested that the erosion-corrosion mechanism in the three coatings was dominated by corrosion-accelerated erosion. However, the extent of acceleration of erosion by corrosion differed.

  4. An experimental investigation of artificial supercavitation generated by air injection behind disk-shaped cavitators

    OpenAIRE

    Byoung-Kwon Ahn; So-Won Jeong; Ji-Hye Kim; Siyao Shao; Jiarong Hong; Roger E.A. Arndt

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated physical characteristics of an artificial supercavity generated behind an axisymmetric cavitator. Experiments for the same model were carried out at two different cavitation tunnels of the Chungnam National University and the University of Minnesota, and the results were compared and verified with each other. We measured pressures inside the cavity and observed the cavity formation by using a high-speed camera. Cavitation parameters were evaluated in considering...

  5. The Investigation of the Cavitation Phenomenon in the Laval Nozzle with Full and Partial Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jablonská Jana

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the cavitation phenomenon affected by full and partial wetting of the wall. For the numerical computation of flow in the Laval nozzle the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model was tested and was used for cavitation research of flow within the nozzle considering partial surface wetting. The coefficient of wetting for various materials was determined using experimental, theoretical and numerical methods of fluid flow due to partial surface wetting.

  6. Cavitation optimization for a centrifugal pump impeller by using orthogonal design of experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Ji; Yin, Tingyun; Yuan, Shouqi; Wang, Wenjie; Wang, Jiabin

    2017-01-01

    Cavitation is one of the most important performance of centrifugal pumps. However, the current optimization works of centrifugal pump are mostly focusing on hydraulic efficiency only, which may result in poor cavitation performance. Therefore, it is necessary to find an appropriate solution to improve cavitation performance with acceptable efficiency. In this paper, to improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump with a vaned diffuser, the influence of impeller geometric parameters on the cavitation of the pump is investigated using the orthogonal design of experiment (DOE) based on computational fluid dynamics. The impeller inlet diameter D 1, inlet incidence angle Δ β, and blade wrap angle φ are selected as the main impeller geometric parameters and the orthogonal experiment of L9(3*3) is performed. Three-dimensional steady simulations for cavitation are conducted by using constant gas mass fraction model with second-order upwind, and the predicated cavitation performance is validated by laboratory experiment. The optimization results are obtained by the range analysis method to improve cavitation performance without obvious decreasing the efficiency of the centrifugal pump. The internal flow of the pump is analyzed in order to identify the flow behavior that can affect cavitation performance. The results show that D 1 has the greatest influence on the pump cavitation and the final optimized impeller provides better flow distribution at blade leading edge. The final optimized impeller accomplishes better cavitation and hydraulic performance and the NPSHR decreases by 0.63m compared with the original one. The presented work supplies a feasible route in engineering practice to optimize a centrifugal pump impeller for better cavitation performance.

  7. Modeling of Unsteady Sheet Cavitation on Marine Propeller Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyros A. Kinnas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady sheet cavitation is very common on marine propulsor blades. The authors summarize a lifting-surface and a surface-panel model to solve for the unsteady cavitating flow around a propeller that is subject to nonaxisymmetric inflow. The time-dependent extent and thickness of the cavity were determined by using an iterative method. The cavity detachment was determined by applying the smooth detachment criterion in an iterative manner. A nonzeroradius developed vortex cavity model was utilized at the tip of the blade, and the trailing wake geometry was determined using a fully unsteady wake-alignment process. Comparisons of predictions by the two models and measurements from several experiments are given.

  8. Cavitation nuclei in water exposed to transient pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2015-01-01

    A model of skin-stabilized interfacial cavitation nuclei and their response to tensile and compressive stressing is presented. The model is evaluated in relation to experimental tensile strength results for water at rest at the bottom of an open water-filled container at atmospheric pressure...... and room temperature. These results are obtained by recording the initial growth of cavities generated by a short tensile pulse applied to the bottom of the container. It is found that the cavitation nuclei shift their tensile strength depending on their pressure history. Static pressurization...... for an extended period of time prior to testing is known to increase the tensile strength of water, but little information is available on how it is affected by compression pulses of short duration. This is addressed by imposing compression pulses of approximately 1 ms duration and a peak intensity of a few bar...

  9. System and method of detecting cavitation in pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Sharma, Santosh Kumar; Yan, Ting; Dimino, Steven A.

    2017-10-03

    A system and method for detecting cavitation in pumps for fixed and variable supply frequency applications is disclosed. The system includes a controller having a processor programmed to repeatedly receive real-time operating current data from a motor driving a pump, generate a current frequency spectrum from the current data, and analyze current data within a pair of signature frequency bands of the current frequency spectrum. The processor is further programmed to repeatedly determine fault signatures as a function of the current data within the pair of signature frequency bands, repeatedly determine fault indices based on the fault signatures and a dynamic reference signature, compare the fault indices to a reference index, and identify a cavitation condition in a pump based on a comparison between the reference index and a current fault index.

  10. Partial Averaged Navier-Stokes approach for cavitating flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L; Zhang, Y N

    2015-01-01

    Partial Averaged Navier Stokes (PANS) is a numerical approach developed for studying practical engineering problems (e.g. cavitating flow inside hydroturbines) with a resonance cost and accuracy. One of the advantages of PANS is that it is suitable for any filter width, leading a bridging method from traditional Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) to direct numerical simulations by choosing appropriate parameters. Comparing with RANS, the PANS model will inherit many physical nature from parent RANS but further resolve more scales of motion in great details, leading to PANS superior to RANS. As an important step for PANS approach, one need to identify appropriate physical filter-width control parameters e.g. ratios of unresolved-to-total kinetic energy and dissipation. In present paper, recent studies of cavitating flow based on PANS approach are introduced with a focus on the influences of filter-width control parameters on the simulation results

  11. The acceleration of solid particles subjected to cavitation nucleation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkent, B.M.; Arora, M.; Ohl, C.-D.

    2008-01-01

    The cavity -particle dynamics at cavitation inception on the surface of spherical particles suspended in water and exposed to a strong tensile stress wave is experimentally studied with high-speed photography. Particles, which serve as nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles, are set into a fast...... translatory motion during the explosive growth of the cavity. They reach velocities of ~40 ms-1 and even higher. When the volume growth of the cavity slows down, the particle detaches from the cavity through a process of neck-breaking, and the particle is shot away. The experimental observations are simulated...... with (i) a spherical cavity model and (ii) with an axisymmetric boundary element method (BEM). The input for both models is a pressure pulse, which is obtained from the observed radial cavity dynamics during an individual experiment. The model then allows us to calculate the resulting particle trajectory...

  12. A terminological matter: paragenesis, antigravitative erosion or antigravitational erosion ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasini G.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the speleological literature three terms are utilized to designate the “ascending erosion”: paragenesis (= paragénésis, coined in1968, antigravitative erosion (= erosione antigravitativa, coined in 1966 and antigravitational erosion (wrong English translation ofthe Italian term erosione antigravitativa, utilized later on. The term paragenesis should be abandoned because of the priority of theterm erosione antigravitativa - on the ground of the “law of priority” – and because of its ambiguous etimology. On the other hand,the term antigravitational erosion should be forsaken in favour of the term antigravitative erosion, given the meaning that the termsgravitation and gravity have in Physics. Therefore, to designate the phenomenon of the “ascending erosion” there would be nothingleft but the term antigravitative erosion.The antigravitative erosion process and its recognizability are illustrated.Examples of caves with evident antigravitative erosion phenomena, developed in different karstifiable rocks and in several partsof the world, are given.It is recalled that the antigravitative erosion is a phenomenon well-known since 1942 and widely proven and supported, and that it isrelatively easy – in many cases - to recognize the antigravitative origin of karstic passages.It is stressed that the antigravitative erosion is an important phenomenon, exclusive of the karstic caves and unique in nature.

  13. Eolian erosion of the Martian surface. I - Erosion rate similitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, J. D.; White, B. R.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    A similitude parameter is derived which is based on theoretical considerations of erosion due to sand in saltation. This parameter has been used to correlate wind tunnel experiments of particle flow over model craters. The characteristics of the flow field in the vicinity and downstream of a crater are discussed and it is shown that erosion is initiated in areas lying under a pair of trailing vortices. The erosion rate parameter is used to calculate erosion rates on Mars, reported in Part 2, to be published later.

  14. Radiolucencies and cavitation in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma: CT-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, M.; Bartiromo, G.; Caruso, R.; Blandino, A.; Scribano, E.; Pandolfo, I.

    1999-01-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a polymorphic lung cancer the incidence of which is rising. The presence of intratumoral radiolucencies is an important feature of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.The aim of this study was to present pictorially the spectrum of intratumoral radiolucencies visible in BAC. In 57 BACs studied with thin-slice CT, we identified six types of radiolucencies: (a) patent intratumoral bronchioles (air bronchiologram); (b) pseudocavitations; (c) cavitation; (d) serpentine radiolucencies; (e) internal alveologram; and (f) multiple cystic lesions. (orig.) (orig.)

  15. Improving methane production using hydrodynamic cavitation as pre-treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsson, Louise

    2016-01-01

    To develop anaerobic digestion (AD), innovative solutions to increase methane yields in existing AD processes are needed. In particular, the adoption of low energy pre-treatments to enhance biomass biodegradability is needed to provide efficient digestion processes increasing profitability. To obtain these features, hydrodynamic cavitation has been evaluated as an innovative solutions for AD of waste activated sludge (WAS), food waste (FW), macro algae and grass, in comparison with steam expl...

  16. Sono-chemiluminescence from a single cavitation bubble in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brotchie, Adam; Shchukin, Dmitry; Moehwald, Helmuth; Schneider, Julia; Pflieger, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    In summary, this study has revealed the conditions required for a single bubble to be sono-chemically active. Evidence of radical-induced processes surrounding the bubble was only observed below the SL threshold, where the bubble was not spatially stable, and did not correlate with emission from excited molecular states inside the bubble. Moreover, this work substantiates recent progress that has been made in bridging the gap between single and multi-bubble cavitation. (authors)

  17. A Numerical Study of Cavitation Inception in Complex Flow Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the...INCEPTION OF FINITE-SPAN HYDROFOIL [4] .........................................8 2.2 EFFECT OF VORTEX/VORTEX INTERACTION ON CAVITATION INCEPTION FOR...2M4001-1-ONR - p. 3 LIST OF TABLES TABLE 1. SUMMARY OF THE POWER CONSTANT IN THE SCALING LAW FOR THE NACA HYDROFOILS IN THE CASE OF A RELATIVELY

  18. The fern cavitation catapult: mechanism and design principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, C; Argentina, M; Rojas, N; Westbrook, J; Dumais, J; Noblin, X

    2016-01-01

    Leptosporangiate ferns have evolved an ingenious cavitation catapult to disperse their spores. The mechanism relies almost entirely on the annulus, a row of 12-25 cells, which successively: (i) stores energy by evaporation of the cells' content, (ii) triggers the catapult by internal cavitation, and (iii) controls the time scales of energy release to ensure efficient spore ejection. The confluence of these three biomechanical functions within the confines of a single structure suggests a level of sophistication that goes beyond most man-made devices where specific structures or parts rarely serve more than one function. Here, we study in detail the three phases of spore ejection in the sporangia of the fern Polypodium aureum. For each of these phases, we have written the governing equations and measured the key parameters. For the opening of the sporangium, we show that the structural design of the annulus is particularly well suited to inducing bending deformations in response to osmotic volume changes. Moreover, the measured parameters for the osmoelastic design lead to a near-optimal speed of spore ejection (approx. 10 m s(-1)). Our analysis of the trigger mechanism by cavitation points to a critical cavitation pressure of approximately -100 ± 14 bar, a value that matches the most negative pressures recorded in the xylem of plants. Finally, using high-speed imaging, we elucidated the physics leading to the sharp separation of time scales (30 versus 5000 µs) in the closing dynamics. Our results highlight the importance of the precise tuning of the parameters without which the function of the leptosporangium as a catapult would be severely compromised. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Cavitation Susceptibility Measurements of Ocean Lake and Laboratory Waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    can increase with depth. ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION This project was supported by the Ship and Submarine Technology Program Element 62543N Propulsor ...2) QV0 2 where P,, is the vapor pressure of the liquid. It has generally been assumed that cavitation inception occurs when the local pressure falls...to or below the vapor pressure of the fluid. One of the main goals in the present investigation is to examine the validity of this assumption

  20. Comment on "Nuclear Emissions During Self-Nucleated Acoustic Cavitation"

    OpenAIRE

    Naranjo, B.

    2006-01-01

    In a recent Letter to PRL, Taleyarkhan and coauthors claim to observe DD fusion produced by acoustic cavitation. Among other evidence, they provide a proton recoil spectrum that they interpret as arising from 2.45 MeV DD fusion neutrons. My analysis concludes the spectrum is inconsistent with 2.45 MeV neutrons, cosmic background, or a PuBe source, but it is consistent with a Cf-252 source.

  1. Does vegetation prevent wave erosion of salt marsh edges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feagin, R A; Lozada-Bernard, S M; Ravens, T M; Möller, I; Yeager, K M; Baird, A H

    2009-06-23

    This study challenges the paradigm that salt marsh plants prevent lateral wave-induced erosion along wetland edges by binding soil with live roots and clarifies the role of vegetation in protecting the coast. In both laboratory flume studies and controlled field experiments, we show that common salt marsh plants do not significantly mitigate the total amount of erosion along a wetland edge. We found that the soil type is the primary variable that influences the lateral erosion rate and although plants do not directly reduce wetland edge erosion, they may do so indirectly via modification of soil parameters. We conclude that coastal vegetation is best-suited to modify and control sedimentary dynamics in response to gradual phenomena like sea-level rise or tidal forces, but is less well-suited to resist punctuated disturbances at the seaward margin of salt marshes, specifically breaking waves.

  2. Nominal vs. Effective Wake Fields and their Influence on Propeller Cavitation Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regener, Pelle Bo; Mirsadraee, Yasaman; Andersen, Poul

    2017-01-01

    Propeller designers often need to base their design on thenominal model scale wake distribution, because the effectivefull scale distribution is not available. The effects of suchincomplete design data on cavitation performance is examinedin this paper. The behind-ship cavitation performanceof two...... flow, with a coupling ofthe two for the interaction of ship and propeller flows. Theeffect on sheet cavitation due to the different wake distributionsis examined for a typical full-form ship. Results showconsiderable differences in cavitation extent, volume, andhull pressure pulses....

  3. Advanced Simulation Capability for Turbopump Cavitation Dynamics Guided by Experimental Validation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Numerical cavitation modeling capability is critical in the design of liquid rocket engine turbopumps, feed lines, injector manifolds and engine test facilities....

  4. Study on tip leakage vortex cavitating flows using a visualization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Jiang, Yutong; Cao, Xiaolong; Wang, Guoyu

    2018-01-01

    Experimental investigations of unsteady cavitating flows in a hydrofoil tip leakage region with different gap sizes are conducted to highlight the development of gap cavitation. The experiments were taken in a closed cavitation tunnel, during which high-speed camera had been used to capture the cavitation patterns. A new visualization method based on image processing was developed to capture time-dependent cavitation patterns. The results show that the visualization method can effectively capture the cavitation patterns in the tip region, including both the attached cavity in the gap and the tip leakage vortex (TLV) cavity near the trailing edge. Moreover, with the decrease of cavitation number, the TLV cavity develops from a rapid onset-growth-collapse process to a continuous process, and extends both upstream and downstream. The attached cavity in the gap develops gradually stretching beyond the gap and combines with the vortex cavity to form the triangle cavitating region. Furthermore, the influences of gap size on the cavitation are also discussed. The gap size has a great influence on the loss across the gap, and hence the locations of the inception attached cavity. Besides, inception locations and extending direction of the TLV cavity with different gap sizes also differ. The TLV in the case with τ = 0.061 is more likely to be jet-like compared with that in the case with τ = 0.024, and the gap size has a great influence on the TLV strength.

  5. Study about the influence of cavitation on the dynamic characteristics for the sliding bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, L M; Luo, Y Y; Wang, Z W

    2015-01-01

    Sliding bearings are employed to support the rotor system and limit the vibration amplitude. In high speed rotor system, cavitation often occurs in the oil film and affects the dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing greatly. In this paper, numerical method is adopted to simulate the cavitation in the oil film with homogeneous two-phase mixture flow using Singhal-et-al cavitation model in the commercial code FLUENT-solver. Cases without cavitation model were also calculated at the same time. Many computations with different frequency ratios were conducted. Then the rotor dynamic characteristics of the sliding bearing were retrieved. The results show that the cavitation has great influences on the pressure distribution in the oil film. As the rotational speed or whirling speed of the journal increases, the cavitation will become prominent. The dynamic coefficients of the bearing such as stiffness and damping with cavitation model considered are quite different from that without cavitation. So it is worth to pay attention to and do further study about the cavitation in the sliding bearing in the high speed rotor system

  6. Hydrodynamic cavitation as a novel approach for delignification of wheat straw for paper manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badve, Mandar P; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Csoka, Levente

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with application of hydrodynamic cavitation for intensification of delignification of wheat straw as an essential step in the paper manufacturing process. Wheat straw was first treated with potassium hydroxide (KOH) for 48 h and subsequently alkali treated wheat straw was subjected to hydrodynamic cavitation. Hydrodynamic cavitation reactor used in the work is basically a stator and rotor assembly, where the rotor is provided with indentations and cavitational events are expected to occur on the surface of rotor as well as within the indentations. It has been observed that treatment of alkali treated wheat straw in hydrodynamic cavitation reactor for 10-15 min increases the tensile index of the synthesized paper sheets to about 50-55%, which is sufficient for paper board manufacture. The final mechanical properties of the paper can be effectively managed by controlling the processing parameters as well as the cavitational parameters. It has also been established that hydrodynamic cavitation proves to be an effective method over other standard digestion techniques of delignification in terms of electrical energy requirements as well as the required time for processing. Overall, the work is first of its kind application of hydrodynamic cavitation for enhancing the effectiveness of delignification and presents novel results of significant interest to the paper and pulp industry opening an entirely new area of application of cavitational reactors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. An Experimental Study of Cavitation Detection in a Centrifugal Pump Using Envelope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chek Zin; Leong, M. Salman

    Cavitation represents one of the most common faults in pumps and could potentially lead to a series of failure in mechanical seal, impeller, bearing, shaft, motor, etc. In this work, an experimental rig was setup to investigate cavitation detection using vibration envelope analysis method, and measured parameters included sound, pressure and flow rate for feasibility of cavitation detection. The experiment testing included 3 operating points of the centrifugal pump (B.E.P, 90% of B.E.P and 80% of B.E.P). Suction pressure of the centrifugal pump was decreased gradually until the inception point of cavitation. Vibration measurements were undertaken at various locations including casing, bearing, suction and discharge flange of the centrifugal pump. Comparisons of envelope spectrums under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions were presented. Envelope analysis was proven useful in detecting cavitation over the 3 testing conditions. During the normal operating condition, vibration peak synchronous to rotational speed was more pronounced. It was however during cavitation condition, the half order sub-harmonic vibration component was clearly evident in the envelope spectrums undertaken at all measurement locations except at the pump bearing. The possible explanation of the strong sub-harmonic (½ of BPF) during cavitation existence in the centrifugal pump was due to insufficient time for the bubbles to collapse completely before the end of the single cycle.

  8. Fast X-ray imaging of cavitating flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khlifa, Ilyass; Fuzier, Sylvie; Roussette, Olivier [Arts et Metiers ParisTech, Lille (France); Vabre, Alexandre [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hocevar, Marko [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Fezzaa, Kamel [Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Photon Source, Lemont, IL (United States); Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier [Virginia Tech, Kevin T. Crofton Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    A new method based on ultra-fast X-ray imaging was developed in this work for the investigation of the dynamics and the structures of complex two-phase flows. In this paper, cavitation was created inside a millimetric 2D Venturi-type test section, while seeding particles were injected into the flow. Thanks to the phase-contrast enhancement technique provided by the APS (Advanced Photon Source) synchrotron beam, high definition X-ray images of the complex cavitating flows were obtained. These images contain valuable information about both the liquid and the gaseous phases. By means of image processing, the two phases were separated, and velocity fields of each phase were, therefore, calculated using image cross-correlations. The local vapour volume fractions were also obtained, thanks to the local intensity levels within the recorded images. These simultaneous measurements, provided by this new technique, afford more insight into the structure and the dynamic of two-phase flows as well as the interactions between them, and hence enable to improve our understanding of their behaviour. In the case of cavitating flows inside a Venturi-type test section, the X-ray measurements demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of significant slip velocities between the phases within sheet cavities for both steady and unsteady flow configurations. (orig.)

  9. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Xu, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5−20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis. PMID:21973343

  10. In-transit wind erosion losses of coal and method of control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimerick, K.H.; Laflin, G.P.

    1979-08-01

    Wind tunnel tests show the effects of wind velocity and particle size on the amount of coal lost while in transit. Different coals were evaluated to determine the variables associated with wind erosion. The erosion losses can be substantially reduced by using a binder, or crusting agent, to consolidate the surfaces of the coal into a solid mass which resists erosion. This not only reduces economic loss but minimizes pollution.

  11. Shoulder erosions in renal osteodystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonavita, J.A.; Dalinka, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    The radiographic manifestations of renal osteodystrophy may be articular as well as osseous. The latter are well recognized, i.e. subperiosteal and subchondral bony resorption. Recently attention has been directed to the occurrence of an erosive arthritis of the hands and wrists in hyperparathyroidism. The authors present six patients with humeral head erosions, all of whom were on chronic long-term hemodialysis. These intra-articular erosions occurred at the 'bare' area of the humeral head and thus represent an erosive arthritis and therefore can be distinguished from the usual sites of subchondral and subperiosteal bony resorption seen in hyperparathyroidism. (orig.) [de

  12. Multiperspective analysis of erosion tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparovek Gerd

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Erosion tolerance is the most multidisciplinary field of soil erosion research. Scientists have shown lack in ability to adequately analyze the huge list of variables that influence soil loss tolerance definitions. For these the perspectives of erosion made by farmers, environmentalists, society and politicians have to be considered simultaneously. Partial and biased definitions of erosion tolerance may explain not only the polemic nature of the currently suggested values but also, in part, the nonadoption of the desired levels of erosion control. To move towards a solution, considerable changes would have to occur on how this topic is investigated, especially among scientists, who would have to change methods and strategies and extend the perspective of research out of the boundaries of the physical processes and the frontiers of the academy. A more effective integration and communication with the society and farmers, to learn about their perspective of erosion and a multidisciplinary approach, integrating soil, social, economic and environmental sciences are essential for improved erosion tolerance definitions. In the opinion of the authors, soil erosion research is not moving in this direction and a better understanding of erosion tolerance is not to be expected in the near future.

  13. Experiments for understanding soil erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Soil erosion processes are usually quantified by observation and measurement of their related forms. Rill, and gullies, moulds or sediment sinks are often used to estimate the soil loss. These forms are generally related directly to different types of processes, thus are also used to identify the dominant processes on a certain type of land-use. Nevertheless, the direct observation of erosion processes is constrained by their temporal and spatial erratic occurrence. As a consequence, the process understanding is generally deduced by analogies. Another possibility is to reproduce processes in experiments in both, the lab and in the field. Laboratory experiments are implemented when we want to have full control over all parameters we think are relevant for the process in our focus. So are very useful for identification of parameters influencing processes and their intensities, but also as physical models of the processes and process interactions in our focus. Therefore, we can use them to verify our concepts, and to define relevant parameters. Field experiments generally only simulate with controlled driving forces, this is the rain or the runoff, but dealing with the uncertainty of our study object, the soil. This enables two things: 1) similar as with lab experiments, we are able to identify processes and process interactions and so, to get a deeper understanding of soil erosion; 2) experiments are suitable for providing data about singular processes in the field and thus, to provide data suitable for model parametrisation and calibration. These may be quantitative data about erodibility or soil resistance, sediment detachment or transport. The Physical Geography Group at Trier University has a long lasting experience in the application of experiments in soil erosion research in the field, and has become lead in the further development conception and of devices and procedures to investigate splash detachment and initial transport of soil particles by wind and water

  14. Plasma erosion switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendel, C.W. Jr.; Goldstein, S.A.; Miller, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The plasma erosion switch is a device capable of initially carrying high currents, and then of opening in nanoseconds to stand off high voltages. It depends upon the erosion of a plasma which initially fills the switch. The sheath between the plasma and the cathode behaves as a diode with a rapidly increasing A-K gap. Preliminary tests of the switch on the Proto I accelerator at Sandia will be described. In these tests, the switch consisted of a cylinder of highly ionized plasma four inches in diameter and one-inch thick surrounding a one-inch cathode. The switch shorted out prepulse voltages and allowed energy to be stored in the diode inductance outside the switch until the accelerator current reached 75 kA. The switch impedance then rose rapidly to approximately 100 ω in 5 nanoseconds, whereupon the accelerator current transferred to the cathode. Current rise rates of 3.10 13 A/sec were limited by cathode turn-on. Voltage rise rates of 10 15 V/sec were achieved. The elimination of prepulse and machine turn-on transients allowed A-K gaps of 2 mm to be used with 2.5 MV pulses, yielding average E fields of 12 MV/cm. Staged versions of the device are being built and should improve rise rates. The switch shows promise for use with future, higher power, lower inductance machines

  15. Erosion in extruder flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Miron; Fodor, Petru S.

    A detailed analysis of the fluid flow in Tadmor's unwound channel model of the single screw extruder is performed by combining numerical and analytical methods. Using the analytical solution for the longitudinal velocity field (in the limit of zero Reynolds number) allows us to devote all the computational resources solely for a detailed numerical solution of the transversal velocity field. This high resolution 3D model of the fluid flow in a single-screw extruder allows us to identify the position and extent of Moffatt eddies that impede mixing. We further consider the erosion of particles (e.g. carbon-black agglomerates) advected by the polymeric flow. We assume a particle to be made of primary fragments bound together. In the erosion process a primary fragment breaks out of a given particle. Particles are advected by the laminar flow and they disperse because of the shear stresses imparted by the fluid. The time evolution of the numbers of particles of different sizes is described by the Bateman coupled differential equations used to model radioactivity. Using the particle size distribution we compute an entropic fragmentation index which varies from 0 for a monodisperse system to 1 for an extreme poly-disperse system.

  16. Erosion mechanism and erosion products in carbon-based materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V. E-mail: vsafr@rico.ttk.ru; Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Wuerz, H.; Zhitlukhin, A

    2002-12-01

    Plasma/material interaction was studied in disruption simulation experiments at the plasma gun facility MK-200. Graphite and carbon-fibre composites were exposed to pulsed energetic plasma under heat loads typically expected for disruptions in future tokamaks. Erosion rates, erosion mechanisms and the properties of the eroded carbon have been studied.

  17. Do erosion control and snakes mesh?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher Barton; Karen Kinkead

    2005-01-01

    In the battle to curb soil erosion and sedimentation, numberous techniques and products for controlling erosion and sedimentation have been developed and are being implemented. Rolled erosion control products, such as a temporary erosion control blankets and permanent turf reinforcement mats, represent one type of erosion control product that has been used extensively...

  18. Rill erosion rates in burned forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph W. Wagenbrenner; Peter R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Wildfires often produce large increases in runoff and erosion rates (e.g., Moody and Martin, 2009), and land managers need to predict the frequency and magnitude of postfire erosion to determine the needs for hazard response and possible erosion mitigation to reduce the impacts of increased erosion on public safety and valued resources. The Water Erosion...

  19. The role of bank erosion on the initiation and motion of gully debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Liqun; Wang, Zhaoyin; Cui, Peng; Xu, Mengzhen

    2017-05-01

    The erosion of sediment through the exchange of momentum and energy transfer within the debris flow affects the unstable motion of the debris flow. Many models have been established to study the impact of erosion on debris flow motion, but most of the models were based on bed erosion. This paper analyzed the process of unstable motion of debris flows through an experimental flume to contrast bank erosion-dominated conditions and bed erosion-only conditions. The experiments showed that bank erosion enhanced the formation and propagation of debris flows. The volume of sediments eroded by water and the debris flow mass for the bank erosion-dominated conditions was much greater than that for the bed erosion-only conditions. The height and velocity of the debris flows fluctuated, and the total basal normal stress and pore pressure increased unsteadily along the path under both conditions. However, bank erosion increased the velocity of the debris flow and made the motion fluctuation more obvious. Physical equations were established and the analyses suggested that bank erosion-dominated debris flows had increased resistance and gradient enhancement than that of bed erosion-only debris flows.

  20. Erosion corrosion in water-steam systems: Causes and countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitmann, H.G.; Kastner, W.

    1985-01-01

    For the purpose of a better understanding of erosion corrosion, the physical and chemical principles will be summarized briefly. Then results obtained at KWU in the BENSON test section in tests on test specimens in single-phase flow of fully demineralized water will be presented. The experimental studies provide information about the most important influencing parameters. These include flow rate, fluid temperature and water quality (pH value and oxygen content). In addition, the resistance of various materials is compared, and the resistance of magnetite coatings to erosion corrosion is investigated. Furthermore, tests are presented that will show the extent to which erosion corrosion in power plants can be influenced by chemical measures

  1. Comparison of cavitation prediction for a centrifugal pump with or without volute casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xianwu; Wei, Wei; Ji, Bin; Xu, Hongyuan [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Pan, Zaibing; Zhou, Wenchao [KSB Shanghai Pump Co., Shanghai (China)

    2013-06-15

    Cavitation may not only cause head and efficiency breakdown of hydraulic machines but also generate other unfavorable phenomena such as noise and vibration. Therefore, the accurate prediction of cavitation development is important for various pump applications. In this paper, two numerical models, namely, models A and B, are applied to simulate the turbulent cavitating flows inside a centrifugal pump to investigate the effect of calculation domain on the prediction accuracy of cavitation performance for hydraulic machines. Model A has a calculation domain with volute casing, whereas model B has a single blade-to-blade flow passage without volute casing. Steady simulations of cavitating flow in the pump have been conducted based on the shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model and the homogeneous cavitation model. Both models A and B predicted that the pump performance decreases with decreasing cavitation number. Experimental results show that model B can predict better the critical cavitation number at the best efficiency point compared with model A, which is the full flow passage model. Internal flow investigations indicate that an asymmetrical feature of cavitating flow exists when the calculation domain with volute casing is applied. The asymmetrical cavitation development in different blade-to-blade flow passages for model A results in an over-estimation of the decrease in pump performance because of the interaction between the impeller blade and the tongue of the volute casing. A simple calculation domain without volute casing is preferred for steady cavitation prediction in pumps rather than the full flow passage with volute casing because the former has better convergence, less resource requirements, and lower time consumption.

  2. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  3. Leading edge erosion of coated wind turbine blades: Review of coating life models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, H.M.; Gelinck, E.R.M.; Rentrop, A.; van der Heide, Emile

    2015-01-01

    Erosion of the leading edge of wind turbine blades by droplet impingement wear, reduces blade aerodynamic efficiency and power output. Eventually, it compromises the integrity of blade surfaces. Elastomeric coatings are currently used for erosion resistance, yet the life of such coatings cannot be

  4. Simulation of plasma erosion opening switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.J.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the modeling of Plasma Erosion Opening Switches is reviewed, and new results from both fluid and particle simulation compared. Three-fluid simulations with the ANTHEM code for switches on the NRL GAMBLE I machine and SNL PBFA II machine have shown strong dependence of the opening dynamics on the anode structure, the threshold for electron emission, on the possible presence of anomalous resistivity, and on advection of the magnetic field with cathode emitted electrons. Simulations with the implicit particle-in-cell code ISIS confirm these observations, but manifest broader current channels---in better agreement with GAMBLE I experimental results. 7 refs., 3 figs

  5. Cavitation during the protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) method – The trigger for de novo prion generation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigh, Cathryn L., E-mail: chaigh@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Drew, Simon C., E-mail: sdrew@unimelb.edu.au [Florey Department of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2015-06-05

    The protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) technique has become a widely-adopted method for amplifying minute amounts of the infectious conformer of the prion protein (PrP). PMCA involves repeated cycles of 20 kHz sonication and incubation, during which the infectious conformer seeds the conversion of normally folded protein by a templating interaction. Recently, it has proved possible to create an infectious PrP conformer without the need for an infectious seed, by including RNA and the phospholipid POPG as essential cofactors during PMCA. The mechanism underpinning this de novo prion formation remains unknown. In this study, we first establish by spin trapping methods that cavitation bubbles formed during PMCA provide a radical-rich environment. Using a substrate preparation comparable to that employed in studies of de novo prion formation, we demonstrate by immuno-spin trapping that PrP- and RNA-centered radicals are generated during sonication, in addition to PrP-RNA cross-links. We further show that serial PMCA produces protease-resistant PrP that is oxidatively modified. We suggest a unique confluence of structural (membrane-mimetic hydrophobic/hydrophilic bubble interface) and chemical (ROS) effects underlie the phenomenon of de novo prion formation by PMCA, and that these effects have meaningful biological counterparts of possible relevance to spontaneous prion formation in vivo. - Highlights: • Sonication during PMCA generates free radicals at the surface of cavitation bubbles. • PrP-centered and RNA-centered radicals are formed in addition to PrP-RNA adducts. • De novo prions may result from ROS and structural constraints during cavitation.

  6. Detecting Cavitation in a Vertical Sea water Centrifugal Lift Pump Related to Iran Oil Industry Cooling Water Circulation System

    OpenAIRE

    Omid A. Zargar

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation is one of the most well-known process faults that may occur in different industrial equipment especially centrifugal pumps. Cavitation also may happen in water pumps and turbines. Sometimes cavitation has been severe enough to wear holes in the impeller and damage the vanes to such a degree that the impeller becomes very ineffective. More commonly, the pump efficiency will decrease significantly during cavitation and continue to decrease as damage to the impeller increases. Typical...

  7. Rainfall erosivity: An historical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainfall erosivity is the capability of rainfall to cause soil loss from hillslopes by water. Modern definitions of rainfall erosivity began with the development of the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE), where rainfall characteristics were statistically related to soil loss from thousands of plot...

  8. Rainfall Erosivity in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Ballabio, Cristiano; Borrelli, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    on the best available datasets. Data have been collected from 1541 precipitation stations in all European Union (EU) Member States and Switzerland, with temporal resolutions of 5 to 60 min. The R-factor values calculated from precipitation data of different temporal resolutions were normalised to R......-factor values with temporal resolutions of 30 min using linear regression functions. Precipitation time series ranged from a minimum of 5 years to a maximum of 40 years. The average time series per precipitation station is around 17.1 years, the most datasets including the first decade of the 21st century....... Gaussian Process Regression (GPR) has been used to interpolate the R-factor station values to a European rainfall erosivity map at 1 km resolution. The covariates used for the R-factor interpolation were climatic data (total precipitation, seasonal precipitation, precipitation of driest/wettest months...

  9. Factors affecting soil erosion in Beijing mountain forestlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... estimate soil erosion under different forest conditions including regions, vegetation type, and stand density as influenced by ... health. The anti-scouring feature of the forest land soil is considered to be an important part of the assessment as such feature help soil resist from being washed. In the. 1960s, Zhu ...

  10. Thermo-Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Plain Journal Bearing on the Basis of a New Mass Conserving Cavitation Algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alakhramsing, S.; Van Ostayen, R.A.J.; Eling, R.P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of cavitation is an important feature in hydrodynamic bearing modeling. Especially for thermo-hydrodynamic modeling, it is crucial to use a mass-conservative cavitation algorithm. This paper introduces a new mass-conserving Reynolds cavitation algorithm, which provides fast

  11. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  12. 76 FR 55954 - Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Astralis Ltd., Cavit Sciences, Inc., Crystal International Travel Group, Inc., and Tasker Products... securities of Cavit Sciences, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended...

  13. Vibration Characteristics Induced by Cavitation in a Centrifugal Pump with Slope Volute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cavitation is one of the instability sources in centrifugal pump, which would cause some unexpected results. The goal of this paper was to analyze the influence of cavitation process on different frequency bands in a centrifugal pump with slope volute. And special attention was paid to low frequency signals, which were often filtered in the reported researches. Results show that at noncavitation condition, vibration level is closely related to flow structure interior pump. At partial flow rates, especially low flow rates, vibration level increases rapidly with the onset of rotating stall. At cavitation condition, it is proved that cavitation process has a significant impact on low frequency signals. With cavitation number decreasing, vibration level first rises to a local maximum, then it drops to a local minimum, and finally it rises again. At different flow rates, vibration trends in variable frequency bands differ obviously. Critical point inferred from vibration level is much larger than that from 3% head drop, which indicates that cavitation occurs much earlier than that reflected in head curve. Also, it is noted that high frequency signals almost increase simultaneously with cavitation occurring, which can be used to detect cavitation in centrifugal pump.

  14. Numerical investigation of three-dimensional cloud cavitation with special emphasis on collapse induced shock dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnerr, Günter; Sezal, I.H.; Schmidt, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to model and analyze compressible three-dimensional (3D) cavitating liquid flows with special emphasis on the detection of shock formation and propagation. We recently developed the conservative finite volume method CATUM (Cavitation Technische Universität

  15. Cavitation control on a 2D hydrofoil through a continuous tangential injection of liquid: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshevskiy, M. V.; Zapryagaev, I. I.; Pervunin, K. S.; Markovich, D. M.

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, the possibility of active control of a cavitating flow over a 2D hydrofoil that replicates a scaled-down model of high-pressure hydroturbine guide vane (GV) was tested. The flow manipulation was implemented by a continuous tangential liquid injection at different flow rates through a spanwise slot in the foil surface. In experiments, the hydrofoil was placed in the test channel at the attack angle of 9°. Different cavitation conditions were reached by varying the cavitation number and injection velocity. In order to study time dynamics and spatial patterns of partial cavities, high-speed imaging was employed. A PIV method was used to measure the mean and fluctuating velocity fields over the hydrofoil. Hydroacoustic measurements were carried out by means of a pressure transducer to identify spectral characteristics of the cavitating flow. It was found that the present control technique is able to modify the partial cavity pattern (or even totally suppress cavitation) in case of stable sheet cavitation and change the amplitude of pressure pulsations at unsteady regimes. The injection technique makes it also possible to significantly influence the spatial distributions of the mean velocity and its turbulent fluctuations over the GV section for non-cavitating flow and sheet cavitation.

  16. The Specialist Committee on Cavitation Induced Pressures, Final Report and Recommendations to the 23rd ITTC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesch, J.; Kim, K.-H.; Andersen, Poul

    2002-01-01

    . But the trend of CFD applications toward 2-D and 3-D cavitating hydrofoils shows the great potential of those codes for propeller applications as well. For all numerical predictions, potential methods as well as RANS, it is important that the cavitation simulation is fully unsteady, particularly if higher...

  17. Study of ultrasonic cavitation during extraction of the peanut oil at varying frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Cunshan; Wang, Bei; Yagoub, Abu El-Gasim A; Ma, Haile; Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Mian

    2017-07-01

    The ultrasonic extraction of oils is a typical physical processing technology. The extraction process was monitored from the standpoint of the oil quality and efficiency of oil extraction. In this study, the ultrasonic cavitation fields were measured by polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor. Waveform of ultrasonic cavitation fields was gained and analyzed. The extraction yield and oxidation properties were compared. The relationship between the fields and cavitation oxidation was established. Numerical calculation of oscillation cycle was done for the cavitation bubbles. Results showed that the resonance frequency, f r , of the oil extraction was 40kHz. At f r , the voltage amplitude was the highest; the time was the shortest as reaching the amplitude of the waveform. Accordingly, the cavitation effect worked most rapidly, resulting in the strongest cavitation intensity. The extraction yield and oxidation properties were closely related to the cavitation effect. It controlled the cavitation oxidation effectively from the viewpoint of chemical and physical aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Research on Cavitation Regions of Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal Based on Dynamic Mesh Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the cavitation area of the Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal, three-dimensional microgap inner flow field of the Upstream Pumping Mechanical Seal was simulated with multiphase flow cavitation model and dynamic mesh technique based on hydrodynamic lubrication theory. Furthermore, the simulated result was compared with the experimental data. The results show that the simulated result with the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model was much closer to the experimental data. The area of cavitation inception mainly occurred at the concave side of the spiral groove and surrounding region without spiral grooves, which was nearly covered by the inner diameter to roots of grooves; in addition, the region near the surface of the stationary ring was primary cavitation location. The area of cavitation has little relationship with the medium pressure; however, it became larger following increasing rotating speed in the range of researched operating conditions. Moreover the boundary of cavitated area was transformed from smooth to rough, which occurred in similar film thickness. When cavitation number was decreasing, which was conducive to improving the lubrication performance of sealed auxiliary, it made the sealing stability decline.

  19. Numerical study of unsteady flows with cavitation in a high-speed micro centrifugal pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yeqiang; Yuan, Shiwei; Lai, Huanxin

    2017-02-01

    The unsteady flows caused by the interaction between the impeller and the volute in a high-speed micro centrifugal pump are numerically studied. The internal flows of both with and without cavitations are analyzed using the CFX. The characteristics of unsteady pressure on the blade surfaces and the symmetric plane of the volute are presented and compared. The results show that the amplitudes of pressure fluctuations of critical cavitation on the blade pressure surface (PS) are bigger as compared with those at the non-cavitation condition, but on the suction surface (SS), the situation is on the contrary. When cavitation occurs, reduction of load in the impeller is a result. In the present study, such reduction of load is observed mainly on the first half of the blades. Pressure fluctuations at five monitoring points, denoted by WK1 to WK5 in the volute, are also analyzed. No matter at the critical cavitation or at the non-cavitation conditions, the monitored pressure fluctuations are at the same frequencies, which equal to the blade passing frequency (BPF) and its multiples. However, the amplitudes of the fluctuations at critical cavitation condition are considerably stronger, as compared with those for without cavitation.

  20. In-line holography for flow and cavitation visualization on hydrofoils and for nuclei measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renesse, R.L. van; Meulen, J.H.J. van der

    1980-01-01

    The boundary layer flow about two hydrofoils and the appearance of cavitation are investigated by means of in-line holography. Practical details on the hologram resolution and data collection time for nuclei size analysis are given. It is shown that the appearance of cavitation on the hydrofoils is

  1. Sonoporation of suspension cells with a single cavitation bubble in a microfluidic confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Gac, Severine; Zwaan, Ed; van den Berg, Albert; Ohl, C.D.

    2007-01-01

    We report here the sonoporation of HL60 (human promyelocytic leukemia) suspension cells in a microfluidic confinement using a single laser-induced cavitation bubble. Cavitation bubbles can induce membrane poration of cells located in their close vicinity. Membrane integrity of suspension cells

  2. Should cavitation in proximal surfaces be reported in cone beam computed tomography examination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sansare, K.; Singh, D.; Sontakke, S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: A clinical study was done to assess the clinical diagnostic accuracy of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in detecting proximal cavitated carious lesions in order to determine whether cavitation should be reported when a CBCT examination is available. Materials and Methods: 79 adjacent...

  3. Using REE tracers to measure sheet erosion changing to rill erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Puling; Xue Yazhou; Song Wei; Wang Mingyi; Ju Tongjun

    2004-01-01

    Rare Earth Elements (REE) tracer method was used to study sheet erosion changing to rill erosion on slope land. By placing different rare earth elements of different soil depth across a slope in an indoor plot, two simulated rainfalls were applied to study the change of erosion type and the rill erosion process. The results indicate that the main erosion type is sheet erosion at the beginning of the rainfalls, and serious erosion happens after rill erosion appears. Accumulated sheet and rill erosion amounts increase with the rainfalls time. The percentage of sheet erosion amount decreases and rill erosion percentage increases with time. At the end of the rainfalls, the total rill erosion amounts are 4-5 times more than sheet erosion. In this paper, a new REE tracer method was used to quantitatively distinguish sheet and rill erosion amounts. The new REE tracer method should be useful to future studying of erosion processes on slope lands. (authors)

  4. Comparison of methods for calculating water erosion

    OpenAIRE

    SVOBODOVÁ, Pavlína

    2011-01-01

    Bachelor thesis presents a comparison of methods for calculating water erosion. The aim is to summarize available evidence concerning the problems of water erosion. There are presented some methods how to calculate average annual erosion of soils, and selected models for calculating the erosion immediately. There are also listed possible erosion control measures through which we can at least slow the effects of erosion, rather than stop completely.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of Thermodynamic Effect of Cavitation in Cryogenic Inducer Using Singularity Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Watanabe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapor production in cavitation extracts the latent heat of evaporation from the surrounding liquid, which decreases the local temperature, and hence the local vapor pressure in the vicinity of cavity. This is called thermodynamic/thermal effect of cavitation and leads to the good suction performance of cryogenic turbopumps. We have already established the simple analysis of partially cavitating flow with the thermodynamic effect, where the latent heat extraction and the heat transfer between the cavity and the ambient fluid are taken into account. In the present study, we carry out the analysis for cavitating inducer and compare it with the experimental data available from literatures using Freon R-114 and liquid nitrogen. It is found that the present analysis can simulate fairly well the thermodynamic effect of cavitation and some modification of the analysis considering the real fluid properties, that is, saturation characteristic, is favorable for more qualitative agreement.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Signatures in an Automotive Torque Converter Using a Microwave Telemetry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Anderson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A unique experimental investigation of cavitation signatures in an automotive torque converter under stall conditions is reported. A quantitative criterion is proposed for predicting early and advanced cavitation in terms of suitable nondimensional pump speeds. The dimensionless pump speed that marks early cavitation is obtained by relating this parameter to the appearance of charge-pressure–dependent pressure fluctuations in the differential pressure transducer readings. The differential pressure transducers were mounted at well-defined locations in the pump passage of a torque converter. The data were transmitted by a wireless telemetry system mounted on the pump housing. Data were received and processed by a ground-based data acquisition system. Automatic transmission fluid exhibited cavitation for charge pressures of 70–130 psi and pump speeds of 1000– 2250 rpm. Advanced cavitation was marked by operating conditions that exhibited a 2% or more torque degradation from the converter's noncavitating performance.

  7. Cavitation and primary atomization in real injectors at low injection pressure condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumouchel, Christophe; Leboucher, Nicolas; Lisiecki, Denis

    2013-06-01

    This experimental work investigates the influence of the geometry of GDI devices on primary atomization processes under low injection pressure and reduced back pressure. These pressure conditions ensure cavitating flows and observable atomization processes. Measurements include mass flux, structure velocity from high-speed visualizations and spray characterization with a laser diffraction technique. Super-cavitation regime and cavitation string, which have their own influence on the mass flux, develop independently in different injector regions. These regimes impact the flow pattern in the orifice and the subsequent atomization process. A possible interaction between cavitation string and super-cavitation is found to promote a hydraulic-flip-like regime and to deteriorate atomization quality. As far as the geometry of the injector is concerned, the profile of the orifice inlet and the roughness of the sac volume region are found to be important geometrical characteristics.

  8. Study on cavitation effect of mechanical seals with laser-textured porous surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Chen, H. l.; Liu, Y. H.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Z. B.; Hou, D. H.

    2012-11-01

    Study on the mechanisms underlying generation of hydrodynamic pressure effect associated with laser-textured porous surface on mechanical seal, is the key to seal and lubricant properties. The theory model of mechanical seals with laser-textured porous surface (LES-MS) based on cavitation model was established. The LST-MS was calculated and analyzed by using Fluent software with full cavitation model and non-cavitation model and film thickness was predicted by the dynamic mesh technique. The results indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure and cavitation are the important reasons to generate liquid film opening force on LST-MS; Cavitation effect can enhance hydrodynamic pressure effect of LST-MS; The thickness of liquid film could be well predicted with the method of dynamic mesh technique on Fluent and it becomes larger as the increasing of shaft speed and the decreasing of pressure.

  9. Study on cavitation effect of mechanical seals with laser-textured porous surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, T; Chen, H l; Liu, Y H; Wang, Q; Liu, Z B; Hou, D H

    2012-01-01

    Study on the mechanisms underlying generation of hydrodynamic pressure effect associated with laser-textured porous surface on mechanical seal, is the key to seal and lubricant properties. The theory model of mechanical seals with laser-textured porous surface (LES-MS) based on cavitation model was established. The LST-MS was calculated and analyzed by using Fluent software with full cavitation model and non-cavitation model and film thickness was predicted by the dynamic mesh technique. The results indicate that the effect of hydrodynamic pressure and cavitation are the important reasons to generate liquid film opening force on LST-MS; Cavitation effect can enhance hydrodynamic pressure effect of LST-MS; The thickness of liquid film could be well predicted with the method of dynamic mesh technique on Fluent and it becomes larger as the increasing of shaft speed and the decreasing of pressure.

  10. Enhancing rates of erosion and uplift through glacial perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Kevin; Schlunegger, Fritz; Abbühl, Luca

    2010-05-01

    Research over the past decade has shown that the pattern of modern rock uplift in the Swiss Alps correlates with both long-term (thermochronometers) and short-term (cosmogenic nuclide-derived denudation rates, sediment loads, lake fills) measures of erosion. This correlation has been attributed alternately to isostatic causes (compensation to erosion and/or glacial unloading) and tectonic forces (ongoing collision and partial delamination). Of these potential driving forces, only isostatic compensation to erosion fits all available structural, geodetic, and flexural models. We explore this uplift-erosion relationship by analyzing river channel steepness for Alpine rivers. Zones of oversteepening, and hence enhanced stream power, are associated with glacial erosion and deposition during LGM and earlier glaciations, resulting in the focusing of erosion into the inner gorges which connect hanging tributary valleys to the main glacial trunk valley. These inner gorges are transient zones in which fluvial and hillslope processes are in the process of re-adjusting this glacially perturbed landscape. Bedrock properties also play a major role in the response time of these adjustments. Glacially generated knickzones are located within 5 km of the trunk stream in the Rhone valley where resistant lithologies dominate (gneiss), whereas the knickzones have migrated as much as 10 km or further in the less resistant rocks (buendnerschists) of the Rhine valley. We suggest that the rock uplift pattern is controlled by surface denudation as set by the glacial-interglacial history of the Alps. Rapid, focused erosion results in rapid rock uplift rates in the Central Swiss Alps, where glaciers were most active. An interesting ramification of this reasoning is that in the absence of glacial perturbation, both rock uplift rates and denudation rates would be substantially lower in this isostatically compensated mountain belt.

  11. Acoustic cavitation as an enhancing mechanism of low-frequency sonophoresis for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hideo; Mutoh, Mizue; Seki, Toshinobu; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Morimoto, Yasunori

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the role of acoustic cavitation on sonophoretic skin permeation of calcein, a model permeant, across excised hairless rat skin. Three different frequencies (41, 158, 445 kHz) and various intensities (60 to 300 mW/cm(2)) of ultrasound were applied. Cavitation generation in degassed and undegassed (normal) water was monitored using a commercially available cavitation meter, then compared with skin permeability from calcein solution consistent of them. In addition, the penetration of a fluorescent dye, rhodamine B, into gelatin gel as a skin alternative was observed to estimate the role of cavitation collapse in the solution at or near the skin surface. Cavitation generation in the undegassed water was dependent on the ultrasound frequency, and the rank order of the cavitation was 41 kHz>158 kHz>445 kHz. At 41 kHz, cavitation generation in degassed water was clearly lower than that in undegassed water. Calcein permeability during ultrasound application correlated well with the cavitation generation in the medium, suggesting the important role of the indirect actions of cavitation collapse which occurred in the applied solution rather than the direct action in the skin. When ultrasound (41 or 158 kHz) was applied to the gelatin gels covered with rhodamine B solution, alteration in the surface configuration, like spots, and the coincident penetration of the dye were observed only at 41 kHz, while no alteration in the surface configuration was evident at 158 kHz. These results suggest that cavitation collapses in the vicinity of the skin surface might be more important for solute penetration in addition to skin permeabilization.

  12. Radiolucencies and cavitation in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma: CT-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, M.; Bartiromo, G. [Service of Diagnostic Imaging, Piemonte Hospital, Messina (Italy); Caruso, R. [Institute of Pathology, University of Messina (Italy); Blandino, A.; Scribano, E.; Pandolfo, I. [Institute of Radiologic Sciences, University of Messina (Italy)

    1999-02-01

    Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a polymorphic lung cancer the incidence of which is rising. The presence of intratumoral radiolucencies is an important feature of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.The aim of this study was to present pictorially the spectrum of intratumoral radiolucencies visible in BAC. In 57 BACs studied with thin-slice CT, we identified six types of radiolucencies: (a) patent intratumoral bronchioles (air bronchiologram); (b) pseudocavitations; (c) cavitation; (d) serpentine radiolucencies; (e) internal alveologram; and (f) multiple cystic lesions. (orig.) (orig.) With 12 figs., 13 refs.

  13. Aspergillus infection in pulmonary cavitating lesions with right atrial myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divyesh; Dorgan, Eileen; Douglas, Hannah; Trouton, Tom; McMullan, Ronan; Parissis, Haralabos

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare primary tumors with varied clinical presentations that may pose a diagnostic challenge. Here, we describe the case of a 21-year-old man with multiple cavitating lung lesions with aspergillosis and underlying right atrial myxoma, who presented with hemoptysis and weight loss. He was successfully treated with right atrial myxoma resection and antifungal agents, with no recurrence or complications after one year of follow-up. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  14. Modeling Cavitation in ICE Pistons Made with Isothermal Forging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Astanin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Possible causes for cavitations in parts made with an Al-Si eutectic alloy AK12D (AlSi12 were explored with mathematical and physical modeling with involved acoustic emission. Pores were formed from micro-cracks, which appear during the early stages of a deformation process, with the help of micro-stresses appearing at phase boundaries (Al/Si interface due to thermal expansion. At the design stage of isothermal forgings of such products it is recommended to provide a scheme of the deformed shape, which is under uniform compression, to compensate for the inter-phase stresses.

  15. Method of forming cavitated objects of controlled dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.R.; Miller, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    A method of controllably varying the dimensions of cavitated objects such as hollow spherical shells wherein a precursor shell is heated to a temperature above the shell softening temperature in an ambient atmosphere wherein the ratio of gases which are permeable through the shell wall at that temperature to gases which are impermeable through the shell wall is substantially greater than the corresponding ratio for gases contained within the precursor shell. As the shell expands, the partial pressures of permeable gases internally and externally of the shell approach and achieve equilibrium, so that the final shell size depends solely upon the difference in impermeable gas partial pressures and shell surface tension

  16. Propeller Cavitation Noise Investigations in a Free-Field Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    se produire sur l’ar~te d’entr6e de la pale. Chacun de ces types de cavitation peut avoir des puissances et des spectres acoustiques divers. Un m...canisme d’entrainement des h6ices a 6t4 construit Sla P~niche de recherches acoustiques au Centre de recherches pour ia d~fense Atlantique. Cette p6niche...le son dans, le champ 6loign4 et les m6canismes de la source hydro- acoustique dans le champ proche de l’h6lice. Au moyen de doubles correlations, on a

  17. Physical erosion modelling of complex morphodynamics in the upper Val d'Orcia: a combination of EROSION 3D, UAV, SFM and CANUPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Arno; Kaiser, Andreas; Neugirg, Fabian; Schindewolf, Marcus; Schmidt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the Mediterranean Basin soil erosion is both a widely spread and a landscape shaping process. In order to increase the understanding of morphodynamics inside large Italian badland areas, so called Calanchi, the process based erosion model EROSION 3D was parameterized by artificial rainfall simulations, soil sampling and an UAV based high resolution digital elevation model. Vegetation structures were removed with the CANUPO-classifier in CloudCompare. The rainfall experiments proved to be a convenient but costly tool for deriving the model input parameters. While building up the model, different composition of the inhomogeneous soil surface was considered. A diverse behavior against erosion by water was observed. The results showed that the deposition surfaces of rotational or translational slides, besides calanco depth contour, tend to degrade. Although these deposits present a comparatively low bulk density, they reduce the infiltration due to soil surface clogging and cause less erosion resistances. The differential consideration of erosion sub-processes turns out as particularly challenging. The simulation of a reference year showed an annual soil export from the catchment of 43 t/ha, which corresponds to an average surface lowering of 3 mm. Sheet erosion represents an amount of about 5% of the total erosion of badlands. Furthermore, infiltration depth, amount of runoff, sediment concentration, and grain size composition of the deposits were calculated. This study makes a contribution to the understanding of denudation processes in Calanchi badlands. The presented process-based modeling of badlands is contributing a new aspect to erosion research.

  18. Erosion and deposition in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudenmaier, G.

    1985-01-01

    The flow of metal impurities from the wall and limiter to the plasma, and back towards the wall, is investigated using surface collection probes and subsequent surface analysis in order to understand impuritiy generation and impurity transport. Impurity fluxes and their scrapeoff lengths have been investigated for several years in a large number of tokamaks. The results are summarized and discussed. Erosion exceeding deposition was first observed to occur at limiterlike structures closest to the plasma edge. Recently, a new probe has been developed to measure quantitatively the erosion in ASDEX. Subsequent quantitative surface analysis is performed in situ by electron induced x-ray analysis. Erosion caused either by ions (limiter) or charge exchange neutrals (wall) can be investigated separately. The erosion at the wall is about two orders of magnitude smaller than the erosion at limiterlike structures, which is of the order of one monolayer per discharge. Simultaneous measurements of deposition and erosion have been performed to elucidate net values of deposition and erosion

  19. Gastric Mucosal Erosions - Radiologic evaluation -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hyup

    1985-01-01

    70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions were diagnosed by double contrast upper gastrointestinal examinations and endoscopic findings. Analyzing the radiologic findings of these 70 cases of gastric mucosal erosions, the following results were obtained. 1. Among the total 70 cases, 65 cases were typical varioliform erosions showing central depressions and surrounding mucosal elevations. Remaining 5 cases were erosions of acute phase having multiple irregular depressions without surrounding elevations. 2. The gastric antrum was involved alone or in part in all cases. Duodenal bulb was involved with gastric antrum in 4 cases. 3. The majority of the cases had multiple erosions. There were only 2 cases of single erosion. 4. In 65 cases of varioliform erosions; 1) The diameter of the surrounding elevations varied from 3 to 20 mm with the majority (47 cases) between 6 and 10 mm. 2) In general, the surrounding elevations with sharp margin on double contrast films were also clearly demonstrated on compression films but those with faint margin were not. 3) The size of the central barium collections varied from pinpoint to 10 mm with the majority under 5 mm. The shape of the central barium collections in majority of the cases were round with a few cases of linear, triangular or star-shape. 5. In 5 cases of acute phase erosions; 1) All the 5 cases were females. 2) On double contrast radiography, all the cases showed multiple irregular depressed lesions without surrounding elevations. 3) 1 case had the history of hematemesis. 4) In 1 case, there was marked radiological improvement on follow-up study of 2 months interval. 6. In 23 cases, there were coexistent diseases with gastric mucosal erosions. These were 13 cases of duodenal bulb ulcers,7 cases of benign gastric ulcers and 3 others

  20. Plant biodiversity effects in reducing fluvial erosion are limited to low species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel C; Cardinale, Bradley J; Wynn-Thompson, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that plant biodiversity may increase the erosion resistance of soils, yet direct evidence for any such relationship is lacking. We conducted a mesocosm experiment with eight species of riparian herbaceous plants, and found evidence that plant biodiversity significantly reduced fluvial erosion rates, with the eight-species polyculture decreasing erosion by 23% relative to monocultures. Species richness effects were largest at low levels of species richness, with little increase between four and eight species. Our results suggest that plant biodiversity reduced erosion rates indirectly through positive effects on root length and number of root tips, and that interactions between legumes and non-legumes were particularly important in producing biodiversity effects. Presumably, legumes increased root production of non-legumes by increasing soil nitrogen availability due to their ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen. Our data suggest that a restoration project using species from different functional groups might provide the best insurance to maintain long-term erosion resistance.