WorldWideScience

Sample records for causal dissipative hydrodynamics

  1. Causal dissipative hydrodynamics for heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2011-01-01

    We briefly discuss the recent developments in causal dissipative hydrodynamic for relativistic heavy ion collisions. Phenomenological estimate of QGP viscosity over entropy ratio from several experimental data, e.g. STAR's $\\phi$ meson data, centrality dependence of elliptic flow, universal scaling elliptic flow etc. are discussed. QGP viscosity, extracted from hydrodynamical model analysis can have very large systematic uncertainty due to uncertain initial conditions.

  2. The applicability of causal dissipative hydrodynamics to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Huovinen, Pasi

    2008-01-01

    We utilize nonequilibrium covariant transport theory to determine the region of validity of causal Israel-Stewart dissipative hydrodynamics (IS) and Navier-Stokes theory (NS) for relativistic heavy ion physics applications. A massless ideal gas with 2->2 interactions is considered in a 0+1D Bjorken scenario, appropriate for the early longitudinal expansion stage of the collision. In the scale invariant case of a constant shear viscosity to entropy density ratio eta/s ~ const, we find that Israel-Stewart theory is 10% accurate in calculating dissipative effects if initially the expansion timescale exceeds half the transport mean free path tau0/lambda0 > ~2. The same accuracy with Navier-Stokes requires three times larger tau0/lambda0 > ~6. For dynamics driven by a constant cross section, on the other hand, about 50% larger tau0/lambda0 > ~3 (IS) and ~9 (NS) are needed. For typical applications at RHIC energies s_{NN}**(1/2) ~ 100-200 GeV, these limits imply that even the Israel-Stewart approach becomes margina...

  3. Relativistic hydrodynamics - causality and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2007-01-01

    Causality and stability in relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics are important conceptual issues. We argue that causality is not restricted to hyperbolic set of differential equations. E.g. heat conduction equation can be causal considering the physical validity of the theory. Furthermore we propose a new concept of relativistic internal energy that clearly separates the dissipative and non-dissipative effects. We prove that with this choice we remove all known instabilities of the linear re...

  4. Hydrodynamic fluctuations and dissipation in an integrated dynamical model

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new integrated dynamical model to investigate the effects of the hydrodynamic fluctuations on observables in high-energy nuclear collisions. We implement hydrodynamic fluctuations in a fully 3-D dynamical model consisting of the hydrodynamic initialization models of the Monte-Carlo Kharzeev-Levin-Nardi model, causal dissipative hydrodynamics and the subsequent hadronic cascades. By analyzing the hadron distributions obtained by massive event-by-event simulations with both of hydrodynamic fluctuations and initial-state fluctuations, we discuss the effects of hydrodynamic fluctuations on the flow harmonics, $v_n$ and their fluctuations.

  5. Metriplectic framework for dissipative magneto-hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    M. Materassi; Tassi, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    The metriplectic framework, which allows for the formulation of an algebraic structure for dissipative systems, is applied to visco-resistive Magneto-Hydrodynamics (MHD), adapting what had already been done for non-ideal Hydrodynamics (HD). The result is obtained by extending the HD symmetric bracket and free energy to include magnetic field dynamics and resistive dissipation. The correct equations of motion are obtained once one of the Casimirs of the Poisson bracket for ideal MHD is identif...

  6. Adiabatic hydrodynamics: The eightfold way to dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Haehl, Felix M; Rangamani, Mukund

    2015-01-01

    We provide a complete solution to hydrodynamic transport at all orders in the gradient expansion compatible with the second law constraint. The key new ingredient we introduce is the notion of adiabaticity, which allows us to take hydrodynamics off-shell. Adiabatic fluids are such that off-shell dynamics of the fluid compensates for entropy production. The space of adiabatic fluids is quite rich, and admits a decomposition into seven distinct classes. Together with the dissipative class this establishes the eightfold way of hydrodynamic transport. Furthermore, recent results guarantee that dissipative terms beyond leading order in the gradient expansion are agnostic of the second law. While this completes a transport taxonomy, we go on to argue for a new symmetry principle, an Abelian gauge invariance that guarantees adiabaticity in hydrodynamics. We suggest that this symmetry is the macroscopic manifestation of the microscopic KMS invariance. We demonstrate its utility by explicitly constructing effective ac...

  7. Relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics with spontaneous symmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Pujol, C

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we consider dissipative hydrodynamic equations for systems with continuous broken symmetries. We first present the case of superfluidity, in which the symmetry U(1) is broken and then generalize to the chiral symmetry $SU(2)_L \\times SU(2)_R$. New transport coefficients are introduced and the consequences of their existence are discussed.

  8. Metriplectic Framework for Dissipative Magneto-Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Materassi, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    The metriplectic framework, which permits to formulate an algebraic structure for dissipative systems, is applied to visco-resistive Magneto-Hydrodynamics (MHD), adapting what had already been done for non-ideal Hydrodynamics (HD). The result is obtained by extending the HD symmetric bracket and free energy to include magnetic field dynamics and resistive dissipation. The correct equations of motion are obtained once one of the Casimirs of the Poisson bracket for ideal MHD is identified with the total thermodynamical entropy of the plasma. The metriplectic framework of MHD is shown to be invariant under the Galileo Group. The metriplectic structure also permits to obtain the asymptotic equilibria toward which the dynamics of the system evolves. This scheme is finally adapted to the two-dimensional incompressible resistive MHD, that is of major use in many applications.

  9. Dissipation in ferrofluids Mesoscopic versus hydrodynamic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H W; Müller, Hanns Walter; Engel, Andreas

    1999-01-01

    Part of the field dependent dissipation in ferrofluids occurs due to the rotational motion of the ferromagnetic grains relative to the viscous flow of the carrier fluid. The classical theoretical description due to Shliomis uses a mesoscopic treatment of the particle motion to derive a relaxation equation for the non-equilibrium part of the magnetization. Complementary, the hydrodynamic approach of Liu involves only macroscopic quantities and results in dissipative Maxwell equations for the magnetic fields in the ferrofluid. Different stress tensors and constitutive equations lead to deviating theoretical predictions in those situations, where the magnetic relaxation processes cannot be considered instantaneous on the hydrodynamic time scale. We quantify these differences for two situations of experimental relevance namely a resting fluid in an oscillating oblique field and the damping of parametrically excited surface waves. The possibilities of an experimental differentiation between the two theoretical app...

  10. Dissipative hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2006-01-01

    In 2+1 dimension, we have simulated the hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialised under the same conditions e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, reveal that the dissipative fluid evolve slowly, cooling at a slower rate. Cooling get still slower for higher viscosity. The fluid velocities on the otherhand evolve faster in a dissipative fluid than in an ideal fluid. The transverse expansion is also enhanced in dissipative evolution. For the same decoupling temperature, freeze-out surface for a dissipative fluid is more extended than an ideal fluid. Dissipation produces entropy as a result of which particle production is increased. Particle production is increased due to (i) extension of the freeze-out surface and (ii) change of the equilibrium distribution function to a non-equilibrium one, the last effect being prominent at large transverse momentum. Compared to ideal fluid, tran...

  11. Rapidity Correlation Structures from Causal Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gavin, Sean; Zin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Viscous diffusion can broaden the rapidity dependence of two-particle transverse momentum fluctuations. Surprisingly, measurements at RHIC by the STAR collaboration demonstrate that this broadening is accompanied by the appearance of unanticipated structure in the rapidity distribution of these fluctuations in the most central collisions. Although a first order classical Navier-Stokes theory can roughly explain the rapidity broadening, it cannot explain the additional structure. We propose that the rapidity structure can be explained using the second order causal Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics with stochastic noise.

  12. (Non)-Dissipative Hydrodynamics on Embedded Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Armas, Jay

    2014-01-01

    We construct the theory of dissipative hydrodynamics of uncharged fluids living on embedded space-time surfaces to first order in a derivative expansion in the case of codimension-1 surfaces (including fluid membranes) and the theory of non-dissipative hydrodynamics to second order in a derivative expansion in the case of codimension higher than one under the assumption of no angular momenta in transverse directions to the surface. This construction includes the elastic degrees of freedom, and hence the corresponding transport coefficients, that take into account transverse fluctuations of the geometry where the fluid lives. Requiring the second law of thermodynamics to be satisfied leads us to conclude that in the case of codimension-1 surfaces the stress-energy tensor is characterized by 2+1 independent transport coefficients to first order in the expansion while for codimension higher than one, and for non-dissipative flows, the stress-energy tensor is characterized by 7+3 independent transport coefficient...

  13. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics : effective actions versus entropy current.

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Bhattacharyya, Sayantani; Rangamani, Mukund

    2013-01-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized ...

  14. Non-dissipative hydrodynamics: Effective actions versus entropy current

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Jyotirmoy; Rangamani, Mukund

    2012-01-01

    While conventional hydrodynamics incorporating dissipative effects is hard to derive from an action principle, it is nevertheless possible to construct classical actions when the dissipative terms are switched off. In this note we undertake a systematic exploration of such constructions from an effective field theory approach and argue for the existence of non-trivial second order non-dissipative hydrodynamics involving pure energy-momentum transport. We find these fluids to be characterized by five second-order transport coefficients based on the effective action (a three parameter family is Weyl invariant). On the other hand since all flows of such fluids are non-dissipative, they entail zero entropy production; one can therefore understand them using the entropy current formalism which has provided much insight into hydrodynamic transport. An analysis of the most general stress tensor with zero entropy production however turns out to give a seven parameter family of non-dissipative hydrodynamics (a four pa...

  15. Microscopic formula for transport coefficients of causal hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Green-Kubo-Nakano formula should be modified in relativistic hydrodynamics because of the problem of acausality and the breaking of sum rules. In this work, we propose a formula to calculate the transport coefficients of causal hydrodynamics based on the projection operator method. As concrete examples, we derive the expressions for the diffusion coefficient, the shear viscosity coefficient, and corresponding relaxation times.

  16. Does stability of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics imply causality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the causality and stability of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics in the absence of conserved charges. We perform a linear stability analysis in the rest frame of the fluid and find that the equations of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics are always stable. We then perform a linear stability analysis in a Lorentz-boosted frame. Provided that the ratio of the relaxation time for the shear stress tensor τπ to the sound attenuation length Γs=4η/3(ε+P) fulfills a certain asymptotic causality condition, the equations of motion give rise to stable solutions. Although the group velocity associated with perturbations may exceed the velocity of light in a certain finite range of wave numbers, we demonstrate that this does not violate causality, as long as the asymptotic causality condition is fulfilled. Finally, we compute the characteristic velocities and show that they remain below the velocity of light if the ratio τπ/Γs fulfills the asymptotic causality condition.

  17. Microscopic formula of transport coefficients for causal hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2007-01-01

    The Green-Kubo-Nakano formula should be modified in relativistic hydrodynamics, because of the problem of acausality and the breaking of sum rules. In this work, we propose a new formula to calculate the transport coefficients of causal hydrodynamics based on the projection operator method. As concrete examples, we derive the expressions for the diffusion coefficient, the shear viscosity coefficient and corresponding relaxation times.

  18. Causal Viscous Hydrodynamics for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Huichao

    2009-01-01

    The viscosity of the QGP is a presently hotly debated subject. Since its computation from first principles is difficult, it is desirable to try to extract it from experimental data. Viscous hydrodynamics provides a tool that can attack this problem and which may work in regions where ideal hydrodynamics begins to fail. This thesis focuses on viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy ion collisions. We first review the 2nd order viscous equations obtained from different approaches, and then report on the work of the Ohio State University group on setting up the equations for causal viscous hydrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions and solving them numerically for central and noncentral Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies and above. We discuss shear and bulk viscous effects on the hydrodynamic evolution of entropy density, temperature, collective flow, and flow anisotropies, and on the hadron multiplicity, single particle spectra and elliptic flow. Viscous entropy production and its influence on the centrality...

  19. Dissipative hydrodynamics and heavy ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhuri, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    Space-time evolution and subsequent particle production from minimally viscous ($\\eta/s$=0.08) QGP fluid is studied using the 2nd order Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative relativistic fluid. Compared to ideal fluid, energy density or temperature evolves slowly in viscous dynamics. Particle yield at high $p_T$ is increased. Elliptic flow on the other hand decreases in viscous dynamics. Minimally viscous QGP fluid found to be consistent with a large number of experimental data.

  20. SPHS: Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with a higher order dissipation switch

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel implementation of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPHS) that uses the spatial derivative of the velocity divergence as a higher order dissipation switch. Our switch -- which is second order accurate -- detects flow convergence before it occurs. If particle trajectories are going to cross, we switch on the usual SPH artificial viscosity, as well as conservative dissipation in all advected fluid quantities (for example, the entropy). The viscosity and dissipation terms (that are numerical errors) are designed to ensure that all fluid quantities remain single-valued as particles approach one another, to respect conservation laws, and to vanish on a given physical scale as the resolution is increased. SPHS alleviates a number of known problems with `classic' SPH, successfully resolving mixing, and recovering numerical convergence with increasing resolution. An additional key advantage is that -- treating the particle mass similarly to the entropy -- we are able to use multimass particles, givi...

  1. SPHS: smoothed particle hydrodynamics with a higher order dissipation switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, J. I.; Hayfield, T.

    2012-06-01

    We present a novel implementation of smoothed particle hydrodynamics that uses the spatial derivative of the velocity divergence as a higher order dissipation switch. Our switch - which is second order accurate - detects flow convergence before it occurs. If particle trajectories are going to cross, we switch on the usual SPH artificial viscosity, as well as conservative dissipation in all advected fluid quantities (e.g. the entropy). The viscosity and dissipation terms (that are numerical errors) are designed to ensure that all fluid quantities remain single valued as particles approach one another, to respect conservation laws, and to vanish on a given physical scale as the resolution is increased. SPHS alleviates a number of known problems with 'classic' SPH, successfully resolving mixing, and recovering numerical convergence with increasing resolution. An additional key advantage is that - treating the particle mass similarly to the entropy - we are able to use multimass particles, giving significantly improved control over the refinement strategy. We present a wide range of code tests including the Sod shock tube, Sedov-Taylor blast wave, Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability, the 'blob test' and some convergence tests. Our method performs well on all tests, giving good agreement with analytic expectations.

  2. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we use a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture the void probability and solvation free energy of nonpolar hard particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for an understanding of emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  3. Modeling nanoscale hydrodynamics by smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huan; Mundy, Christopher J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos

    2015-05-21

    Thermal fluctuation and hydrophobicity are two hallmarks of fluid hydrodynamics on the nano-scale. It is a challenge to consistently couple the small length and time scale phenomena associated with molecular interaction with larger scale phenomena. The development of this consistency is the essence of mesoscale science. In this study, we develop a nanoscale fluid model based on smoothed dissipative particle dynamics that accounts for the phenomena of associated with density fluctuations and hydrophobicity. We show consistency in the fluctuation spectrum across scales. In doing so, it is necessary to account for finite fluid particle size. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the present model can capture of the void probability and solvation free energy of apolar particles of different sizes. The present fluid model is well suited for a understanding emergent phenomena in nano-scale fluid systems.

  4. Mapping of dissipative particle dynamics in fluctuating hydrodynamics simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Qiao, R

    2008-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a novel particle method for mesoscale modeling of complex fluids. DPD particles are often thought to represent packets of real atoms, and the physical scale probed in DPD models are determined by the mapping of DPD variables to the corresponding physical quantities. However, the non-uniqueness of such mapping has led to difficulties in setting up simulations to mimic real systems and in interpreting results. For modeling transport phenomena where thermal fluctuations are important (e.g., fluctuating hydrodynamics), an area particularly suited for DPD method, we propose that DPD fluid particles should be viewed as only 1) to provide a medium in which the momentum and energy are transferred according to the hydrodynamic laws and 2) to provide objects immersed in the DPD fluids the proper random "kicks" such that these objects exhibit correct fluctuation behaviors at the macroscopic scale. We show that, in such a case, the choice of system temperature and mapping of DPD sca...

  5. Dilepton emission in high-energy heavy-ion collisions with dissipative hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Vujanovic, Gojko; Shen, Chun; Luzum, Matthew; Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyoung; Gale, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we study the effects of three transport coefficients of dissipative hydrodynamics on thermal dilepton anisotropic flow observables. The first two transport coefficients investigated influence the overall size and growth rate of shear viscous pressure, while the last transport coefficient governs the magnitude of net baryon number diffusion in relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics. All calculations are done using state-of-the-art 3+1D hydrodynamical simulations. We show that thermal dileptons are sensitive probes of the transport coefficients of dissipative hydrodynamics.

  6. Dilepton emission in high-energy heavy-ion collisions with dissipative hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Vujanovic, Gojko; Denicol, Gabriel S.; Shen, Chun; Luzum, Matthew; Schenke, Bjoern; Jeon, Sangyoung; Gale, Charles

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we study the effects of three transport coefficients of dissipative hydrodynamics on thermal dilepton anisotropic flow observables. The first two transport coefficients investigated influence the overall size and growth rate of shear viscous pressure, while the last transport coefficient governs the magnitude of net baryon number diffusion in relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics. All calculations are done using state-of-the-art 3+1D hydrodynamical simulations. We show ...

  7. Sub-fluid models in dissipative magneto-hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Materassi, Massimo; Consolini, Giuseppe; Tassi, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of a description of plasma dynamics by means of magnetohydrodynamic models coupling the macroscopic, large scale fluid behavior, with the microscopic degrees of freedom. Three relevant subjects in this direction are described: the "algebrization" of dissipation in magnetohydrodynamics via the metriplectic formalism, a stochastic field theory for magnetohydrodynamics and a fractal model for fast magnetic reconnection.

  8. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaresh Jaiswal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing a Chapman–Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current can be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity. Moreover, we show that in the relaxation-time approximation, the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is qualitatively similar to that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  9. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Friman, Bengt; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing a Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the second-order evolution equations for the shear stress tensor and the dissipative charge current can be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity. Moreover, we show that in the relaxation-time approximation, the limiting behaviour of the ratio of heat conductivity to shear viscosity is qualitatively similar to that obtained for a strongly coupled conformal plasma.

  10. Relativistic second-order dissipative hydrodynamics at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation in the relaxation time approximation and employing Chapman-Enskog like expansion for the distribution function close to equilibrium, we derive second-order evolution equations for shear stress tensor and dissipative charge current for a system of massless quarks and gluons. The transport coefficients are obtained exactly using quantum statistics for the phase space distribution functions at non-zero chemical potential. We show that, within the relaxation time approximation, the evolution equations for shear stress tensor and dissipative charge current could be decoupled. We find that, for large values of the ratio of chemical potential to temperature, the charge conductivity is small compared to the coefficient of shear viscosity.

  11. Relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics with memory functions and colored noises

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics including hydrodynamic fluctuations is formulated by putting an emphasis on non-linearity and causality. As a consequence of causality, dissipative currents become dynamical variables and noises appeared in an integral form of constitutive equations should be colored ones from fluctuation-dissipation relations. Nevertheless noises turn out to be white ones in its differential form when noises are assumed to be Gaussian. The obtained ifferential equations are very useful in numerical implementation of relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics.

  12. Dissipation in the effective field theory for hydrodynamics: First order effects

    CERN Document Server

    Endlich, Solomon; Porto, Rafael A; Wang, Junpu

    2013-01-01

    We introduce dissipative effects in the effective field theory of hydrodynamics. We do this in a model-independent fashion by coupling the long-distance degrees of freedom explicitly kept in the effective field theory to a generic sector that "lives in the fluid", which corresponds physically to the microscopic constituents of the fluid. At linear order in perturbations, the symmetries, the derivative expansion, and the assumption that this microscopic sector is thermalized, allow us to characterize the leading dissipative effects at low frequencies via three parameters only, which correspond to bulk viscosity, shear viscosity, and--in the presence of a conserved charge--heat conduction. Using our methods we re-derive the Kubo relations for these transport coefficients.

  13. Stability, Causality, and Shock Waves in the Israel - Theory of Relativistic Dissipative Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Timothy Scott

    1990-08-01

    The stability, causality, and hyperbolicity properties were analyzed for the Israel-Stewart theory of relativistic dissipative fluids formulated in the energy frame. The equilibria of the theory which are stable for small perturbations were found by constructing a Liapunov functional. The conditions which guarantee that small perturbations about equilibrium will propagate with velocities less than the speed of light and will obey a system of hyperbolic differential equations were determined by calculating the characteristic velocities. It was shown that the stability conditions are equivalent to the causality and hyperbolicity conditions. The behavior of the theory far from equilibrium was studied by considering the plane symmetric motions of an inviscid ultrarelativistic Boltzmann gas. The theory was shown to be hyperbolic for large deviations from equilibrium, and acausality implies instability in this example. The plane steady shock wave solutions were also studied for the Israel-Stewart theory formulated in the Eckart frame. The theory was shown to fail to adequately describe the structure of strong shock waves. Physically acceptable solutions do not exist above a maximum upstream Mach number in any thermally nonconducting and viscous fluid described by the theory because the solutions become multiple-valued when the characteristic velocity is exceeded. It was also proven that physically acceptable solutions do not exist for thermally conducting and viscous fluids above either a maximum upstream Mach number, or else below a minimum downstream Mach number (or both). These limiting Mach numbers again correspond to the characteristic velocities of the fluid. Only extremely weak plane steady shock solutions can be single-valued in the Israel-Stewart theory for the ultrarelativistic Boltzmann gas or for the degenerate free Fermi gas.

  14. Relativistic causal hydrodynamics derived from Boltzmann equation: A novel reduction theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Kyosuke; Kikuchi, Yuta; Kunihiro, Teiji

    2015-10-01

    We derive the second-order hydrodynamic equation and the microscopic formulas of the relaxation times as well as the transport coefficients systematically from the relativistic Boltzmann equation. Our derivation is based on a novel development of the renormalization-group method, a powerful reduction theory of dynamical systems, which has been applied successfully to derive the nonrelativistic second-order hydrodynamic equation. Our theory nicely gives a compact expression of the deviation of the distribution function in terms of the linearized collision operator, which is different from those used as an ansatz in the conventional fourteen-moment method. It is confirmed that the resultant microscopic expressions of the transport coefficients coincide with those derived in the Chapman-Enskog expansion method. Furthermore, we show that the microscopic expressions of the relaxation times have natural and physically plausible forms. We prove that the propagating velocities of the fluctuations of the hydrodynamical variables do not exceed the light velocity, and hence our second-order equation ensures the desired causality. It is also confirmed that the equilibrium state is stable for any perturbation described by our equation.

  15. Highly-anisotropic and strongly-dissipative hydrodynamics for early stages of relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new framework of highly-anisotropic hydrodynamics that includes dissipation effects. Dissipation is defined by the form of the entropy source that depends on the pressure anisotropy and vanishes for the isotropic fluid. With a simple ansatz for the entropy source obeying general physical requirements, we are led to a non-linear equation describing the time evolution of the anisotropy in purely-longitudinal boost-invariant systems. Matter that is initially highly anisotropic app...

  16. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of dilute polymer solutions—Inertial effects and hydrodynamic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Tongyang; Wang, Xiaogong, E-mail: wxg-dce@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Lei [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Larson, Ronald G., E-mail: rlarson@umich.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-07-01

    We examine the accuracy of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations of polymers in dilute solutions with hydrodynamic interaction (HI), at the theta point, modeled by setting the DPD conservative interaction between beads to zero. We compare the first normal-mode relaxation time extracted from the DPD simulations with theoretical predictions from a normal-mode analysis for theta chains. We characterize the influence of bead inertia within the coil by a ratio L{sub m}/R{sub g}, where L{sub m} is the ballistic distance over which bead inertia is lost, and R{sub g} is the radius of gyration of the polymer coil, while the HI strength per bead h* is determined by the ratio of bead hydrodynamic radius (r{sub H}) to the equilibrium spring length. We show how to adjust h* through the spring length and monomer mass, and how to optimize the accuracy of DPD for fixed h* by increasing the friction coefficient (γ ≥ 9) and by incorporating a nonlinear distance dependence into the frictional interaction. Even with this optimization, DPD simulations exhibit deviations of over 20% from the theoretical normal-mode predictions for high HI strength with h* ≥ 0.20, for chains with as many as 100 beads, which is a larger deviation than is found for Stochastic rotation dynamics simulations for similar chains lengths and values of h*.

  17. Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Judea

    2000-03-01

    Written by one of the pre-eminent researchers in the field, this book provides a comprehensive exposition of modern analysis of causation. It shows how causality has grown from a nebulous concept into a mathematical theory with significant applications in the fields of statistics, artificial intelligence, philosophy, cognitive science, and the health and social sciences. Pearl presents a unified account of the probabilistic, manipulative, counterfactual and structural approaches to causation, and devises simple mathematical tools for analyzing the relationships between causal connections, statistical associations, actions and observations. The book will open the way for including causal analysis in the standard curriculum of statistics, artifical intelligence, business, epidemiology, social science and economics. Students in these areas will find natural models, simple identification procedures, and precise mathematical definitions of causal concepts that traditional texts have tended to evade or make unduly complicated. This book will be of interest to professionals and students in a wide variety of fields. Anyone who wishes to elucidate meaningful relationships from data, predict effects of actions and policies, assess explanations of reported events, or form theories of causal understanding and causal speech will find this book stimulating and invaluable.

  18. Hydrodynamics of the Developing Region in Hydrophobic Microchannels: A Dissipative Particle Dynamics Study

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjith, S Kumar; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is becoming a popular particle based method to study flow through microchannels due to the ease with which the presence of biological cells or DNA chains can be modeled. Many Lab-On-Chip (LOC) devices require the ability to manipulate the transport of cells or DNA chains in the fluid flow. Microchannel surfaces coated with combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic materials have been found useful for this purpose. In this work, we have numerically studied the hydrodynamics of a steady nonuniform developing flow between two infinite parallel plates with hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces using DPD for the first time. The hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces were modeled using partial-slip and no-slip boundary conditions respectively in the simulations. We also propose a new method to model the inflow and outflow boundaries for the DPD simulations. The simulation results of the developing flow match analytical solutions from continuum theory for no-slip and partial-slip s...

  19. Using the PPML approach for constructing a low-dissipation, operator-splitting scheme for numerical simulations of hydrodynamic flows

    OpenAIRE

    Kulikov, Igor; Vorobyov, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    An approach for constructing a low-dissipation numerical method is described. The method is based on a combination of the operator-splitting method, Godunov method, and piecewise-parabolic method on the local stencil. Numerical method was tested on a standard suite of hydrodynamic test problems. In addition, the performance of the method is demonstrated on a global test problem showing the development of a spiral structure in a gravitationally unstable gaseous galactic disk.

  20. On the absence of dissipative instability of negative energy waves in hydrodynamic shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, S; Joarder, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    Stability criterion for the surface gravity capillary waves in a flowing two-layered fluid system with viscous dissipation is investigated. It is seen that the dissipative instability of negative energy waves is absent,- contrary to what earlier authors have concluded. Their error is identified to arise from an erroneous choice of the dissipation law, in which the wave profile velocity is wrongly equated to the particle velocity. Our corrected dissipation law is also shown to restore Galilean...

  1. Relativistic Causal Hydrodynamics Derived from Boltzmann Equation: a novel reduction theoretical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tsumura, Kyosuke; Kikuchi, Yuta; Kunihiro, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    We derive the second-order hydrodynamic equation and the microscopic formulae of the relaxation times as well as the transport coefficients systematically from the relativistic Boltzmann equation. Our derivation is based on a novel development of the renormalization-group method, a powerful reduction theory of dynamical systems, which has been applied successfully to derive the non-relativistic second-order hydrodynamic equation Our theory nicely gives a compact expression of the deviation of...

  2. Shear viscosity, bulk viscosity, and relaxation times of causal dissipative relativistic fluid-dynamics at finite temperature and chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Koide, Tomoi

    2012-09-01

    The microscopic formulas for the shear viscosity η, the bulk viscosity ζ, and the corresponding relaxation times τπ and τΠ of causal dissipative relativistic fluid-dynamics are obtained at finite temperature and chemical potential by using the projection operator method. The non-triviality of the finite chemical potential calculation is attributed to the arbitrariness of the operator definition for the bulk viscous pressure. We show that, when the operator definition for the bulk viscous pressure Π is appropriately chosen, the leading-order result of the ratio, ζ over τΠ, coincides with the same ratio obtained at vanishing chemical potential. We further discuss the physical meaning of the time-convolutionless (TCL) approximation to the memory function, which is adopted to derive the main formulas. We show that the TCL approximation violates the time reversal symmetry appropriately and leads results consistent with the quantum master equation obtained by van Hove. Furthermore, this approximation can reproduce an exact relation for transport coefficients obtained by using the f-sum rule derived by Kadanoff and Martin. Our approach can reproduce also the result in Baier et al. (2008) [8] by taking into account the next-order correction to the TCL approximation, although this correction causes several problems.

  3. Relativistic Causal Hydrodynamics Derived from Boltzmann Equation: a novel reduction theoretical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tsumura, Kyosuke; Kunihiro, Teiji

    2015-01-01

    We derive the second-order hydrodynamic equation and the microscopic formulae of the relaxation times as well as the transport coefficients systematically from the relativistic Boltzmann equation. Our derivation is based on a novel development of the renormalization-group method, a powerful reduction theory of dynamical systems, which has been applied successfully to derive the non-relativistic second-order hydrodynamic equation Our theory nicely gives a compact expression of the deviation of the distribution function in terms of the linearized collision operator, which is different from those used as an ansatz in the conventional fourteen-moment method. It is confirmed that the resultant microscopic expressions of the transport coefficients coincide with those derived in the Chapman-Enskog expansion method. Furthermore, we show that the microscopic expressions of the relaxation times have natural and physically plausible forms. We prove that the propagating velocities of the fluctuations of the hydrodynamica...

  4. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: Riemann solver for quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Nonaka, Chiho; Takamoto, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamic equation with QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which are crucial in describing of quark-gluon plasma in high energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In the sound wave propagation, the intrinsic {\\em numerical} viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of {\\em physical} viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation.

  5. New derivation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relativistic dissipative hydrodynamics has been quite successful in explaining the spectra and azimuthal anisotropy of particles produced in heavy-ion collisions at the RHIC and recently at the LHC. The first-order dissipative fluid dynamics or the relativistic Navier-Stokes (NS) theory involves parabolic differential equations and suffers from a causality and instability. The second-order or Israel-Stewart (IS) theory with its hyperbolic equations restores causality but may not guarantee stability. The correct formulation of relativistic viscous fluid dynamics is far from settled and is under intense investigation

  6. Horava-Lifshitz Black Hole Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eling, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    We consider the holographic hydrodynamics of black holes in generally covariant gravity theories with a preferred time foliation. Gravitational perturbations in these theories have spin two and spin zero helicity modes with generically different speeds. The black hole solutions possess a spacelike causal boundary called the universal horizon. We relate the flux of the spin zero perturbation across the universal horizon to the new dissipative transport in Lifshitz field theory hydrodynamics found in arXiv:1304.7481. We construct in detail the hydrodynamics of one such black hole solution, and calculate the ratio of the shear viscosity to the entropy density.

  7. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quark-gluon plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Akamatsu, Yukinao; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro; Nonaka, Chiho; Takamoto, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quark-gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the ...

  8. A new scheme of causal viscous hydrodynamics for relativistic heavy-ion collisions: A Riemann solver for quark–gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, we present a state-of-the-art algorithm for solving the relativistic viscous hydrodynamics equation with the QCD equation of state. The numerical method is based on the second-order Godunov method and has less numerical dissipation, which is crucial in describing of quark–gluon plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. We apply the algorithm to several numerical test problems such as sound wave propagation, shock tube and blast wave problems. In sound wave propagation, the intrinsic numerical viscosity is measured and its explicit expression is shown, which is the second-order of spatial resolution both in the presence and absence of physical viscosity. The expression of the numerical viscosity can be used to determine the maximum cell size in order to accurately measure the effect of physical viscosity in the numerical simulation

  9. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    Hydrodynamics Front Fitting Artificial Dissipation The Adaptive Grid The TITAN Code References

  10. Hydrodynamics on graphic cards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC ideal and dissipative relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. A large body of current numerical tools employs relativistic hydrodynamics in various facets. The acceleration of relativistic hydrodynamics using graphic cards (GPUs) is therefore of highest relevance to this fields. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm SHASTA, which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  11. Causal mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2006-01-01

    The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method......The lecture note explains how to use the causal mapping method as well as the theoretical framework aoosciated to the method...

  12. Causality Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Do Minh

    2001-01-01

    We advance a famous principle - causality principle - but under a new view. This principle is a principium automatically leading to most fundamental laws of the nature. It is the inner origin of variation, rules evolutionary processes of things, and the answer of the quest for ultimate theories of the Universe.

  13. Hydrodynamic equations for granular mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Garzo, V.; Dufty, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    Many features of granular media can be modeled by a fluid of hard spheres with inelastic collisions. Under rapid flow conditions, the macroscopic behavior of grains can be described through hydrodynamic equations accounting for dissipation among the interacting particles. A basis for the derivation of hydrodynamic equations and explicit expressions appearing in them is provided by the Boltzmann kinetic theory conveniently modified to account for inelastic binary collisions. The goal of this r...

  14. Relativistic Conformal Magneto-Hydrodynamics from Holography

    OpenAIRE

    Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Buchel, Alex

    2009-01-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to study first-order relativistic viscous magneto-hydrodynamics of (2+1) dimensional conformal magnetic fluids. It is shown that the first order magneto-hydrodynamics constructed following Landau and Lifshitz from the positivity of the entropy production is inconsistent. We propose additional contributions to the entropy motivated dissipative current and, correspondingly, new dissipative transport coefficients. We use the strongly coupled M2-brane plasma in e...

  15. Nonlinear waves in second order conformal hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogaça, D.A., E-mail: david@if.usp.br; Marrochio, H.; Navarra, F.S.; Noronha, J.

    2015-02-15

    In this work we study wave propagation in dissipative relativistic fluids described by a simplified set of the 2nd order viscous conformal hydrodynamic equations corresponding to Israel–Stewart theory. Small amplitude waves are studied within the linearization approximation while waves with large amplitude are investigated using the reductive perturbation method, which is generalized to the case of 2nd order relativistic hydrodynamics. Our results indicate the presence of a “soliton-like” wave solution in Israel–Stewart hydrodynamics despite the presence of dissipation and relaxation effects.

  16. Causal Diffusion and the Survival of Charge Fluctuations in Nuclear Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Gavin, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Diffusion may obliterate fluctuation signals of the QCD phase transition in nuclear collisions at SPS and RHIC energies. We propose a hyperbolic diffusion equation to study the dissipation of net charge fluctuations. This equation is needed in a relativistic context, because the classic parabolic diffusion equation violates causality. We find that causality substantially limits the extent to which diffusion can dissipate these fluctuations.

  17. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: a causal approach

    OpenAIRE

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large scale structures. We analyse the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the non-causal Eckart theory, we obtain a third order evo...

  18. Towards better integrators for dissipative particle dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besold, Gerhard; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Karttunen, Mikko;

    2000-01-01

    Coarse-grained models that preserve hydrodynamics provide a natural approach to study collective properties of soft-matter systems. Here, we demonstrate that commonly used integration schemes in dissipative particle dynamics give rise to pronounced artifacts in physical quantities...

  19. Relativistic Hydrodynamics on Graphic Cards

    CERN Document Server

    Gerhard, Jochen; Bleicher, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    We show how to accelerate relativistic hydrodynamics simulations using graphic cards (graphic processing units, GPUs). These improvements are of highest relevance e.g. to the field of high-energetic nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC where (ideal and dissipative) relativistic hydrodynamics is used to calculate the evolution of hot and dense QCD matter. The results reported here are based on the Sharp And Smooth Transport Algorithm (SHASTA), which is employed in many hydrodynamical models and hybrid simulation packages, e.g. the Ultrarelativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics model (UrQMD). We have redesigned the SHASTA using the OpenCL computing framework to work on accelerators like graphic processing units (GPUs) as well as on multi-core processors. With the redesign of the algorithm the hydrodynamic calculations have been accelerated by a factor 160 allowing for event-by-event calculations and better statistics in hybrid calculations.

  20. Variational approach to supersolid hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the consistent unification of the principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and classical mechanics, we construct a Lagrangian, describing the Hamiltonian dynamics of supersolids. This Lagrangian enables to obtain the closed algebra of the Poisson brackets for the local thermodynamic variables and to derive the Hamilton equations of motion. These equations, in the leading order in spatial gradients of the local thermodynamic variables, result in the non-dissipative supersolid hydrodynamics. The derived hydrodynamic equations do not assume any dynamic symmetry associated with Galilean or Lorentz invariance. The constraint on the thermodynamic potential related to Galilean invariance leads to Andreev-Lifshitz hydrodynamics. We also require relativistic invariance of a constructed theory and obtain a relativistically-invariant supersolid hydrodynamics. (author)

  1. Collision-dominated nonlinear hydrodynamics in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskot, U.; Schütt, M.; Gornyi, I. V.; Titov, M.; Narozhny, B. N.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    We present an effective hydrodynamic theory of electronic transport in graphene in the interaction-dominated regime. We derive the emergent hydrodynamic description from the microscopic Boltzmann kinetic equation taking into account dissipation due to Coulomb interaction and find the viscosity of Dirac fermions in graphene for arbitrary densities. The viscous terms have a dramatic effect on transport coefficients in clean samples at high temperatures. Within linear response, we show that viscosity manifests itself in the nonlocal conductivity as well as dispersion of hydrodynamic plasmons. Beyond linear response, we apply the derived nonlinear hydrodynamics to the problem of hot-spot relaxation in graphene.

  2. Blast Dynamics in a Dissipative Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, M; Villamaina, D; Trizac, E

    2015-11-20

    The blast caused by an intense explosion has been extensively studied in conservative fluids, where the Taylor-von Neumann-Sedov hydrodynamic solution is a prototypical example of self-similarity driven by conservation laws. In dissipative media, however, energy conservation is violated, yet a distinctive self-similar solution appears. It hinges on the decoupling of random and coherent motion permitted by a broad class of dissipative mechanisms. This enforces a peculiar layered structure in the shock, for which we derive the full hydrodynamic solution, validated by a microscopic approach based on molecular dynamics simulations. We predict and evidence a succession of temporal regimes, as well as a long-time corrugation instability, also self-similar, which disrupts the blast boundary. These generic results may apply from astrophysical systems to granular gases, and invite further cross-fertilization between microscopic and hydrodynamic approaches of shock waves. PMID:26636851

  3. Blast Dynamics in a Dissipative Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, M.; Villamaina, D.; Trizac, E.

    2015-11-01

    The blast caused by an intense explosion has been extensively studied in conservative fluids, where the Taylor-von Neumann-Sedov hydrodynamic solution is a prototypical example of self-similarity driven by conservation laws. In dissipative media, however, energy conservation is violated, yet a distinctive self-similar solution appears. It hinges on the decoupling of random and coherent motion permitted by a broad class of dissipative mechanisms. This enforces a peculiar layered structure in the shock, for which we derive the full hydrodynamic solution, validated by a microscopic approach based on molecular dynamics simulations. We predict and evidence a succession of temporal regimes, as well as a long-time corrugation instability, also self-similar, which disrupts the blast boundary. These generic results may apply from astrophysical systems to granular gases, and invite further cross-fertilization between microscopic and hydrodynamic approaches of shock waves.

  4. Implosion hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implosion hydrodynamics are examined, from the conditions in the imploded target to the initial target configuration and the driver performance. The subject is discussed under the topic headings: inertial configuration, thermonuclear fusion processes, ignition model, shock waves, acceleration by a constant pressure, spherical shock waves and imploding flows, drive pressure requirements, pulse shaping, pressure generation by lasers and ion beams, symmetry and hydrodynamic stability and typical target designs. (U.K.)

  5. Causal reasoning in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Much has been written on the role of causal notions and causal reasoning in the so-called 'special sciences' and in common sense. But does causal reasoning also play a role in physics? Mathias Frisch argues that, contrary to what influential philosophical arguments purport to show, the answer is yes. Time-asymmetric causal structures are as integral a part of the representational toolkit of physics as a theory's dynamical equations. Frisch develops his argument partly through a critique of anti-causal arguments and partly through a detailed examination of actual examples of causal notions in physics, including causal principles invoked in linear response theory and in representations of radiation phenomena. Offering a new perspective on the nature of scientific theories and causal reasoning, this book will be of interest to professional philosophers, graduate students, and anyone interested in the role of causal thinking in science.

  6. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  7. Regression to Causality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordacconi, Mats Joe; Larsen, Martin Vinæs

    2014-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally primed for making causal attributions based on correlations. This implies that researchers must be careful to present their results in a manner that inhibits unwarranted causal attribution. In this paper, we present the results of an experiment that suggests regression...... models should note carefully both their models’ identifying assumptions and which causal attributions can safely be concluded from their analysis....

  8. The Equation of Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Do Minh

    1999-01-01

    We research the natural causality of the Universe. We find that the equation of causality provides very good results on physics. That is our first endeavour and success in describing a quantitative expression of the law of causality. Hence, our theoretical point suggests ideas to build other laws including the law of the Universe's evolution.

  9. Relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Luciano, Rezzolla

    2013-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics is a very successful theoretical framework to describe the dynamics of matter from scales as small as those of colliding elementary particles, up to the largest scales in the universe. This book provides an up-to-date, lively, and approachable introduction to the mathematical formalism, numerical techniques, and applications of relativistic hydrodynamics. The topic is typically covered either by very formal or by very phenomenological books, but is instead presented here in a form that will be appreciated both by students and researchers in the field. The topics covered in the book are the results of work carried out over the last 40 years, which can be found in rather technical research articles with dissimilar notations and styles. The book is not just a collection of scattered information, but a well-organized description of relativistic hydrodynamics, from the basic principles of statistical kinetic theory, down to the technical aspects of numerical methods devised for the solut...

  10. Hydrodynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alex P. L.

    The main aim of this lecture is to provide a broad overview of the area of hydrodynamic simulation. The provision of introductions to a couple of basic algorithms for solving the equations of gas dynamics is a secondary objective. Hydrodynamic simulation in the context of laser-plasma physics and inertial fusion is now a large and mature field, deserving of an entire book (or books…) for a proper treatment. Individual topics will not be treated in great depth, and mathematical detail is avoided where possible. It is hoped that the reader will understand the key aspects of hydrodynamic simulation and the ability to write a very simple 1D hydro-solver with a view to using this knowledge as a "springboard" for more in-depth study.

  11. The Relativistic Rindler Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eling, Christopher; Oz, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    We consider a (d+2)-dimensional class of Lorentzian geometries holographically dual to a relativistic fluid flow in (d+1) dimensions. The fluid is defined on a (d+1)-dimensional time-like surface which is embedded in the (d+2)-dimensional bulk space-time and equipped with a flat intrinsic metric. We find two types of geometries that are solutions to the vacuum Einstein equations: the Rindler metric and the Taub plane symmetric vacuum. These correspond to dual perfect fluids with vanishing and negative energy densities respectively. While the Rindler geometry is characterized by a causal horizon, the Taub geometry has a timelike naked singularity, indicating pathological behavior. We construct the Rindler hydrodynamics up to the second viscous order and show the positivity of its entropy current divergence.

  12. Ship Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafrance, Pierre

    1978-01-01

    Explores in a non-mathematical treatment some of the hydrodynamical phenomena and forces that affect the operation of ships, especially at high speeds. Discusses the major components of ship resistance such as the different types of drags and ways to reduce them and how to apply those principles for the hovercraft. (GA)

  13. Hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the rheological models and the equations of lubrication. It also presents the numerical approaches used to solve the above equations by finite differences, finite volumes and finite elements methods.

  14. Theoretical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Milne-Thomson, L M

    2011-01-01

    This classic exposition of the mathematical theory of fluid motion is applicable to both hydrodynamics and aerodynamics. Based on vector methods and notation with their natural consequence in two dimensions - the complex variable - it offers more than 600 exercises and nearly 400 diagrams. Prerequisites include a knowledge of elementary calculus. 1968 edition.

  15. Anomalous transport in second order hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Megias, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    We study the non-dissipative transport effects appearing at second order in the hydrodynamic expansion for a non-interacting gas of chiral fermions by using the partition function formalism. We discuss some features of the corresponding constitutive relations, derive the explicit expressions for the conductivities and compare with existing results in the literature.

  16. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  17. Bacterial hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lauga, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass, and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds-number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micron scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically-complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, we review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  18. Times and Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Russell

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of causal chains and mechanisms is an essential part of any scientific activity that aims at better explanation of its subject matter, and better understanding of it. While any account of causality requires that a cause should precede its effect, accounts of causality inphysics are complicated by the fact that the role of time in current theoretical physics has evolved very substantially throughout the twentieth century. In this article, I review the status of time and causa...

  19. Circulation and Dissipation on Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Many global circulation models predict supersonic zonal winds and large vertical shears in the atmospheres of short-period jovian exoplanets. Using linear analysis and nonlinear local simulations, we investigate hydrodynamic dissipation mechanisms to balance the thermal acceleration of these winds. The adiabatic Richardson criterion remains a good guide to linear stability, although thermal diffusion allows some modes to violate it at very long wavelengths and very low growth rates. Nonlinearly, wind speeds saturate at Mach numbers $\\approx 2$ and Richardson numbers $\\lesssim 1/4$ for a broad range of plausible diffusivities and forcing strengths. Turbulence and vertical mixing, though accompanied by weak shocks, dominate the dissipation, which appears to be the outcome of a recurrent Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. An explicit shear viscosity, as well as thermal diffusivity, is added to ZEUS to capture dissipation outside of shocks. The wind speed is not monotonic nor single valued for shear viscosities larger...

  20. CIRCULATION AND DISSIPATION ON HOT JUPITERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many global circulation models predict supersonic zonal winds and large vertical shears in the atmospheres of short-period Jovian exoplanets. Using linear analysis and nonlinear local simulations, we investigate hydrodynamic dissipation mechanisms to balance the thermal acceleration of these winds. The adiabatic Richardson criterion remains a good guide to linear stability, although thermal diffusion allows some modes to violate it at very long wavelengths and very low growth rates. Nonlinearly, wind speeds saturate at Mach numbers ∼2 and Richardson numbers ∼-3 of the sound speed times the pressure scale height. Coarsening the numerical resolution can also increase the speed. Hence global simulations that are incapable of representing vertical turbulence and shocks, either because of reduced physics or because of limited resolution, may overestimate wind speeds. We recommend that such simulations include artificial dissipation terms to control the Mach and Richardson numbers and to capture mechanical dissipation as heat.

  1. Causality in Europeanization Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet

    2012-01-01

    Discourse analysis as a methodology is perhaps not readily associated with substantive causality claims. At the same time the study of discourses is very much the study of conceptions of causal relations among a set, or sets, of agents. Within Europeanization research we have seen endeavours to......, it suggests that discourse analysis and the study of causality are by no means opposites. The study of Europeanization discourses may even be seen as an essential step in the move towards claims of causality in Europeanization research. This chapter deals with the question of how we may move from the...

  2. Causal Temperature Profiles in Horizon-free Collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N. F. Naidu; M. Govender

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the causal temperature profiles in a recent model of a radiating star undergoing dissipative gravitational collapse without the formation of a horizon. It is shown that this simple exact model provides physically reasonable behaviour for the temperature profile within the framework of extended irreversible thermodynamics.

  3. Viscous causal cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of spatially homogeneous and isotropic cosmological geometries generated by a class of non-perfect is investigated fluids. The irreversibility if this system is studied in the context of causal thermodynamics which provides a useful mechanism to conform to the non-violation of the causal principle. (author)

  4. Causality in Classical Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Causality in electrodynamics is a subject of some confusion, especially regarding the application of Faraday's law and the Ampere-Maxwell law. This has led to the suggestion that we should not teach students that electric and magnetic fields can cause each other, but rather focus on charges and currents as the causal agents. In this paper I argue…

  5. Lifshitz Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    We construct the hydrodynamics of quantum field theories with a Lifshitz scaling symmetry. New transport coefficients are allowed by the absence of boost invariance, however, only one is compatible with a local increase of the entropy density. The formulation is applicable, in general, to fluids with an explicit breaking of boost symmetry. We use a Drude model of a strange metal to study the physical effects of the new transport coefficient. It can be measured using electric fields with non-zero gradients, or via the heat production when an external force is turned on. Scaling arguments fix the resistivity to be linear in the temperature.

  6. Causality in demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Max; Jensen, Frank; Setälä, Jari;

    2011-01-01

    to fish demand. On the German market for farmed trout and substitutes, it is found that supply sources, i.e. aquaculture and fishery, are not the only determinant of causality. Storing, tightness of management and aggregation level of integrated markets might also be important. The methodological......This article focuses on causality in demand. A methodology where causality is imposed and tested within an empirical co-integrated demand model, not prespecified, is suggested. The methodology allows different causality of different products within the same demand system. The methodology is applied...... implication is that more explicit focus on causality in demand analyses provides improved information. The results suggest that frozen trout forms part of a large European whitefish market, where prices of fresh trout are formed on a relatively separate market. Redfish is a substitute on both markets. The...

  7. Causality and Composite Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Satish D

    2007-01-01

    We study the question of whether a composite structure of elementary particles, with a length scale $1/\\Lambda$, can leave observable effects of non-locality and causality violation at higher energies (but $\\lesssim \\Lambda$). We formulate a model-independent approach based on Bogoliubov-Shirkov formulation of causality. We analyze the relation between the fundamental theory (of finer constituents) and the derived theory (of composite particles). We assume that the fundamental theory is causal and formulate a condition which must be fulfilled for the derived theory to be causal. We analyze the condition and exhibit possibilities which fulfil and which violate the condition. We make comments on how causality violating amplitudes can arise.

  8. Agency, time and causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eWidlok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Scientists interested in causal cognition increasingly search for evidence from non-WEIRD people but find only very few cross-cultural studies that specifically target causal cognition. This article suggests how information about causality can be retrieved from ethnographic monographs, specifically from ethnographies that discuss agency and concepts of time. Many apparent cultural differences with regard to causal cognition dissolve when cultural extensions of agency and personhood to non-humans are taken into account. At the same time considerable variability remains when we include notions of time, linearity and sequence. The article focuses on ethnographic case studies from Africa but provides a more general perspective on the role of ethnography in research on the diversity and universality of causal cognition.

  9. Calculating rotating hydrodynamic and magneto-hydrodynamic waves to understand magnetic effects on dynamical tides

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2016-01-01

    For understanding magnetic effects on dynamical tides, we study the rotating magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) flow driven by harmonic forcing. The linear responses are analytically derived in a periodic box under the local WKB approximation. Both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are calculated and the various parameters are investigated. Although magnetic pressure may be negligible compared to thermal pressure, magnetic field can be important for the first-order perturbation, e.g. dynamical tides. It is found that magnetic field splits the resonant frequency, namely the rotating hydrodynamic flow has only one resonant frequency but the rotating MHD flow has two, one positive and the other negative. In the weak field regime the dissipations are asymmetric around the two resonant frequencies and this asymmetry is more striking with a weaker magnetic field. It is also found that both the kinetic and Ohmic dissipations at the resonant frequencies are inversely proportional to the Ekman num...

  10. Submarine hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Renilson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This book adopts a practical approach and presents recent research together with applications in real submarine design and operation. Topics covered include hydrostatics, manoeuvring, resistance and propulsion of submarines. The author briefly reviews basic concepts in ship hydrodynamics and goes on to show how they are applied to submarines, including a look at the use of physical model experiments. The issues associated with manoeuvring in both the horizontal and vertical planes are explained, and readers will discover suggested criteria for stability, along with rudder and hydroplane effectiveness. The book includes a section on appendage design which includes information on sail design, different arrangements of bow planes and alternative stern configurations. Other themes explored in this book include hydro-acoustic performance, the components of resistance and the effect of hull shape. Readers will value the author’s applied experience as well as the empirical expressions that are presented for use a...

  11. Supernova hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The explosion of a star supernova occurs at the end of its evolution when the nuclear fuel in its core is almost, or completely, consumed. The star may explode due to a small residual thermonuclear detonation, type I SN or it may collapse, type I and type II SN leaving a neutron star remnant. The type I progenitor should be thought to be an old accreting white dwarf, 1.4 M/sub theta/, with a close companion star. A type II SN is thought to be a massive young star 6 to 10 M/sub theta/. The mechanism of explosion is still a challenge to our ability to model the most extreme conditions of matter and hydrodynamics that occur presently and excessively in the universe. 39 references

  12. Physical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guyon, Etienne; Petit, Luc; Mitescu, Catalin D

    2015-01-01

    This new edition is an enriched version of the textbook of fluid dynamics published more than 10 years ago. It retains the same physically oriented pedagogical perspective. This book emphasizes, as in the first edition, experimental inductive approaches and relies on the study of the mechanisms at play and on dimensional analysis rather than more formal approaches found in many classical textbooks in the field. The need for a completely new version also originated from the increase, over the last few decades, of the cross-overs between the mechanical and physical approaches, as is visible in international meetings and joint projects. Hydrodynamics is more widely linked today to other fields of experimental sciences: materials, environment, life sciences and earth sciences, as well as engineering sciences.

  13. Relativistic hydrodynamics from quantum field theory on the basis of the generalized Gibbs ensemble method

    CERN Document Server

    Hayata, Tomoya; Hongo, Masaru; Noumi, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    We derive relativistic hydrodynamics from quantum field theories by assuming that the density operator is given by a local Gibbs distribution at initial time. We decompose the energy-momentum tensor and particle current into nondissipative and dissipative parts, and analyze their time-evolution in detail. Performing the path-integral formulation of the local Gibbs distribution, we microscopically derive the generating functional for the nondissipative hydrodynamics. We also construct a basis to study dissipative corrections. In particular, we derive the first-order dissipative hydrodynamic equations without choice of frame such as the Landau-Lifshitz or Eckart frame.

  14. Transport coefficients in second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ryblewski, Radoslaw

    2014-01-01

    Based on the exact solution of Boltzmann kinetic equation in the relaxation-time approximation, the precision of the two most recent formulations of relativistic second-order non-conformal viscous hydrodynamics (14-moment approximation and causal Chapman-Enskog method), standard Israel-Stewart theory, and anisotropic hydrodynamics framework, in the simple case of one-dimensional Bjorken expansion, is tested. It is demonstrated that the failure of Israel-Stewart theory in reproducing exact solutions of the Boltzmann kinetic equation occurs due to neglecting and/or choosing wrong forms of some of the second-order transport coefficients. In particular, the importance of shear--bulk couplings in the evolution equations for dissipative quantities is shown. One finds that, in the case of the bulk viscous pressure correction, such coupling terms are as important as the corresponding first-order Navier-Stokes term and must be included in order to obtain, at least qualitative, overall agreement with the kinetic theory...

  15. Dynamics and causality constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical meaning and the geometrical interpretation of causality implementation in classical field theories are discussed. Causality in field theory are kinematical constraints dynamically implemented via solutions of the field equation, but in a limit of zero-distance from the field sources part of these constraints carries a dynamical content that explains old problems of classical electrodynamics away with deep implications to the nature of physicals interactions. (author)

  16. Dynamics and causality constraints

    CERN Document Server

    De Souza, M M

    2000-01-01

    The physical meaning and the geometrical interpretation of causality implementation in classical field theories are discussed. Local causality are kinematical constraints dynamically implemented via solutions of the field equations, but in a limit of zero-distance from the field sources part of these constraints carries a dynamical content that explains old problems of classical electrodynamics away and implies on deep implications to the nature of physical interactions.

  17. Broken Lifshitz invariance, spin waves and hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, Dibakar

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, based on the basic principles of thermodynamics, we explore the hydrodynamic regime of interacting Lifshitz field theories in the presence of broken rotational invariance. We compute the entropy current and discover new dissipative effects those are consistent with the principle of local entropy production in the fluid. In our analysis, we consider both the parity even as well as the parity odd sector upto first order in the derivative expansion. Finally, we argue that the present construction of the paper could be systematically identified as that of the hydrodynamic description associated with \\textit{spin waves} (away from the domain of quantum criticality) under certain limiting conditions.

  18. Parity Breaking Transport in Lifshitz Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyos, Carlos; Oz, Yaron

    2015-01-01

    We derive the constitutive relations of first order charged hydrodynamics for theories with Lifshitz scaling and broken parity in $2+1$ and $3+1$ spacetime dimensions. In addition to the anomalous (in $3+1$) or Hall (in $2+1$) transport of relativistic hydrodynamics, there is an additional non-dissipative transport allowed by the absence of boost invariance. We analyze the non-relativistic limit and use a phenomenological model of a strange metal to argue that these effects can be measured in principle by using electromagnetic fields with non-zero gradients.

  19. Thermo-hydrodynamic lubrication in hydrodynamic bearings

    CERN Document Server

    Bonneau, Dominique; Souchet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    This Series provides the necessary elements to the development and validation of numerical prediction models for hydrodynamic bearings. This book describes the thermo-hydrodynamic and the thermo-elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication. The algorithms are methodically detailed and each section is thoroughly illustrated.

  20. Quantum Causal Graph Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Consider a graph having quantum systems lying at each node. Suppose that the whole thing evolves in discrete time steps, according to a global, unitary causal operator. By causal we mean that information can only propagate at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. Suppose, moreover, that the graph itself is subject to the evolution, and may be driven to be in a quantum superposition of graphs---in accordance to the superposition principle. We show that these unitary causal operators must decompose as a finite-depth circuit of local unitary gates. This unifies a result on Quantum Cellular Automata with another on Reversible Causal Graph Dynamics. Along the way we formalize a notion of causality which is valid in the context of quantum superpositions of time-varying graphs, and has a number of good properties. Keywords: Quantum Lattice Gas Automata, Block-representation, Curtis-Hedlund-Lyndon, No-signalling, Localizability, Quantum Gravity, Quantum Graphity, Causal Dynamical Triangula...

  1. Causal Inference and Causal Explanation with Background Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents correct algorithms for answering the following two questions; (i) Does there exist a causal explanation consistent with a set of background knowledge which explains all of the observed independence facts in a sample? (ii) Given that there is such a causal explanation what are the causal relationships common to every such causal explanation?

  2. Formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics and its applications in heavy-ion collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic fluid dynamics finds application in astrophysics, cosmology and the physics of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, we present our work on the formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics within the framework of relativistic kinetic theory. We employ the second law of thermodynamics as well as the relativistic Boltzmann equation to obtain the dissipative evolution equations. We present a new derivation of the dissipative hydrodynamic equations using the sec...

  3. Hydrodynamic Supercontinuum

    CERN Document Server

    Chabchoub, A; Onorato, M; Genty, G; Dudley, J M; Akhmediev, N

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally multi-bound-soliton solutions of the Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (NLS) in the context of surface gravity waves. In particular, the Satsuma-Yajima N-soliton solution with N=2,3,4 is investigated in detail. Such solutions, also known as breathers on zero background, lead to periodic self-focussing in the wave group dynamics, and the consequent generation of a steep localized carrier wave underneath the group envelope. Our experimental results are compared with predictions from the NLS for low steepness initial conditions where wave-breaking does not occur, with very good agreement. We also show the first detailed experimental study of irreversible massive spectral broadening of the water wave spectrum, which we refer to by analogy with optics as the first controlled observation of hydrodynamic supercontinuum a process which is shown to be associated with the fission of the initial multi-soliton bound state into individual fundamental solitons similar to what has been observe i...

  4. Causality and the Doppler Peaks

    OpenAIRE

    Turok, Neil

    1996-01-01

    Could cosmic structure have formed by the action of causal physics within the standard hot big bang, or was a prior period of inflation required? Recently there has been some discussion of whether causal sources could reproduce the pattern of Doppler peaks of the standard scale-invariant adiabatic theory. This paper gives a rigorous definition of causality, and a causal decomposition of a general source. I present an example of a simple causal source which mimics the standard adiabatic theory...

  5. Dynamics of Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Rideout, D

    2002-01-01

    The Causal Set approach to quantum gravity asserts that spacetime, at its smallest length scale, has a discrete structure. This discrete structure takes the form of a locally finite order relation, where the order, corresponding with the macroscopic notion of spacetime causality, is taken to be a fundamental aspect of nature. After an introduction to the Causal Set approach, this thesis considers a simple toy dynamics for causal sets. Numerical simulations of the model provide evidence for the existence of a continuum limit. While studying this toy dynamics, a picture arises of how the dynamics can be generalized in such a way that the theory could hope to produce more physically realistic causal sets. By thinking in terms of a stochastic growth process, and positing some fundamental principles, we are led almost uniquely to a family of dynamical laws (stochastic processes) parameterized by a countable sequence of coupling constants. This result is quite promising in that we now know how to speak of dynamics ...

  6. Dynamics Of Causal Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Rideout, D P

    2001-01-01

    The Causal Set approach to quantum gravity asserts that spacetime, at its smallest length scale, has a discrete structure. This discrete structure takes the form of a locally finite order relation, where the order, corresponding with the macroscopic notion of spacetime causality, is taken to be a fundamental aspect of nature. After an introduction to the Causal Set approach, this thesis considers a simple toy dynamics for causal sets. Numerical simulations of the model provide evidence for the existence of a continuum limit. While studying this toy dynamics, a picture arises of how the dynamics can be generalized in such a way that the theory could hope to produce more physically realistic causal sets. By thinking in terms of a stochastic growth process, and positing some fundamental principles, we are led almost uniquely to a family of dynamical laws (stochastic processes) parameterized by a countable sequence of coupling constants. This result is quite promising in that we now know how to speak of dynamics ...

  7. Biased causal inseparable game

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Some Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Here we study the \\emph{causal inseparable} game introduced in [\\href{http://www.nature.com/ncomms/journal/v3/n10/full/ncomms2076.html}{Nat. Commun. {\\bf3}, 1092 (2012)}], but it's biased version. Two separated parties, Alice and Bob, generate biased bits (say input bit) in their respective local laboratories. Bob generates another biased bit (say decision bit) which determines their goal: whether Alice has to guess Bob's bit or vice-verse. Under the assumption that events are ordered with respect to some global causal relation, we show that the success probability of this biased causal game is upper bounded, giving rise to \\emph{biased causal inequality} (BCI). In the \\emph{process matrix} formalism, which is locally in agreement with quantum physics but assume no global causal order, we show that there exist \\emph{inseparable} process matrices that violate the BCI for arbitrary bias in the decision bit. In such scenario we also derive the maximal violation of the BCI under local operations involving tracele...

  8. Effective field theory of dissipative fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, Michael; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory for dissipative fluids which governs the dynamics of gapless modes associated to conserved quantities. The system is put in a curved spacetime and coupled to external sources for charged currents. The invariance of the hydrodynamical action under gauge symmetries and diffeomorphisms suggests a natural set of dynamical variables which provide a mapping between an emergent "fluid spacetime" and the physical spacetime. An essential aspect of our formulation is to identify the appropriate symmetries in the fluid spacetime. Our theory applies to nonlinear disturbances around a general density matrix. For a thermal density matrix, we require an additional Z_2 symmetry, to which we refer as the local KMS condition. This leads to the standard constraints of hydrodynamics, as well as a nonlinear generalization of the Onsager relations. It also leads to an emergent supersymmetry in the classical statistical regime, with a higher derivative version required for the full quantum regim...

  9. Polarizable water model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkin, Igor; Peter, Emanuel

    2015-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is an efficient particle-based method for modeling mesoscopic behavior of fluid systems. DPD forces conserve the momentum resulting in a correct description of hydrodynamic interactions. Polarizability has been introduced into some coarse-grained particle-based simulation methods; however it has not been done with DPD before. We developed a new polarizable coarse-grained water model for DPD, which employs long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators. In this talk, we will present the model and its applications in simulations of membrane systems, where polarization effects play an essential role.

  10. Ensemble of Causal Trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the geometry of trees endowed with a causal structure using the conventional framework of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show how this ensemble is related to popular growing network models. In particular we demonstrate that on a class of afine attachment kernels the two models are identical but they can differ substantially for other choice of weights. We show that causal trees exhibit condensation even for asymptotically linear kernels. We derive general formulae describing the degree distribution, the ancestor--descendant correlation and the probability that a randomly chosen node lives at a given geodesic distance from the root. It is shown that the Hausdorff dimension dH of the causal networks is generically infinite. (author)

  11. Ensemble of Causal Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialas, Piotr

    2003-10-01

    We discuss the geometry of trees endowed with a causal structure using the conventional framework of equilibrium statistical mechanics. We show how this ensemble is related to popular growing network models. In particular we demonstrate that on a class of afine attachment kernels the two models are identical but they can differ substantially for other choice of weights. We show that causal trees exhibit condensation even for asymptotically linear kernels. We derive general formulae describing the degree distribution, the ancestor--descendant correlation and the probability that a randomly chosen node lives at a given geodesic distance from the root. It is shown that the Hausdorff dimension dH of the causal networks is generically infinite.

  12. Causal graph dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    We generalize the theory of Cellular Automata to arbitrary, time-varying graphs. In other words we formalize, and prove theorems about, the intuitive idea of a labelled graph which evolves in time - but under the natural constraint that information can only ever be transmitted at a bounded speed, with respect to the distance given by the graph. The notion of translation-invariance is also generalized. The definition we provide for these `causal graph dynamics' is simple and axiomatic. The theorems we provide also show that it is robust. For instance, causal graph dynamics are stable under composition and under restriction to radius one. In the finite case some fundamental facts of Cellular Automata theory carry through: causal graph dynamics admit a characterization as continuous functions and they are stable under inversion. The provided examples suggest a wide range of applications of this mathematical object, from complex systems science to theoretical physics. Keywords: Dynamical networks, Boolean network...

  13. Causal inference in econometrics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreinovich, Vladik; Sriboonchitta, Songsak

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to the analysis of causal inference which is one of the most difficult tasks in data analysis: when two phenomena are observed to be related, it is often difficult to decide whether one of them causally influences the other one, or whether these two phenomena have a common cause. This analysis is the main focus of this volume. To get a good understanding of the causal inference, it is important to have models of economic phenomena which are as accurate as possible. Because of this need, this volume also contains papers that use non-traditional economic models, such as fuzzy models and models obtained by using neural networks and data mining techniques. It also contains papers that apply different econometric models to analyze real-life economic dependencies.

  14. A Causal Entropy Bound

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram

    2000-01-01

    The identification of a causal-connection scale motivates us to propose a new covariant bound on entropy within a generic space-like region. This "causal entropy bound", scaling as the square root of EV, and thus lying around the geometric mean of Bekenstein's S/ER and holographic S/A bounds, is checked in various "critical" situations. In the case of limited gravity, Bekenstein's bound is the strongest while naive holography is the weakest. In the case of strong gravity, our bound and Bousso's holographic bound are stronger than Bekenstein's, while naive holography is too tight, and hence typically wrong.

  15. A Causal Entropy Bound

    OpenAIRE

    Brustein, R; Veneziano, G

    1999-01-01

    The identification of a causal-connection scale motivates us to propose a new covariant bound on entropy within a generic space-like region. This "causal entropy bound", scaling as the square root of EV, and thus lying around the geometric mean of Bekenstein's S/ER and holographic S/A bounds, is checked in various "critical" situations. In the case of limited gravity, Bekenstein's bound is the strongest while naive holography is the weakest. In the case of strong gravity, our bound and Bousso...

  16. Entanglement generated by dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Krauter, Hanna; Jensen, Kasper; Wasilewski, Wojciech; Petersen, Jonas M; Cirac, J Ignacio; Polzik, Eugene S

    2010-01-01

    Entanglement is not only one of the most striking features of Quantum Mechanics but also an essential ingredient in most applications in the field of Quantum Information. Unfortunately, this property is very fragile. In experiments conducted so far, coupling of the system to a quantum mechanical environment, commonly referred to as dissipation, either inhibits entanglement or prevents its generation. In this Letter, we report on an experiment in which dissipation induces entanglement between two atomic objects rather than impairing it. This counter-intuitive effect is achieved by engineering the dissipation by means of laser- and magnetic fields, and leads to entanglement which is very robust and therefore long-lived. Our system consists of two distant macroscopic ensembles containing about 10^{12} atoms coupled to the environment composed of the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. The two atomic objects are kept entangled by dissipation at room temperature for about 0.015s. The prospects of using this...

  17. Causality and Free Will

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hvorecký, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, Supp.2 (2012), s. 64-69. ISSN 1335-0668 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP401/12/0833 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : conciousness * free will * determinism * causality Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  18. Hydrodynamics, Fungal Physiology, and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Carreón, L; Galindo, E; Rocha-Valadéz, J A; Holguín-Salas, A; Corkidi, G

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cultures, such as fungi and actinomycetes, contribute substantially to the pharmaceutical industry and to enzyme production, with an annual market of about 6 billion dollars. In mechanically stirred reactors, most frequently used in fermentation industry, microbial growth and metabolite productivity depend on complex interactions between hydrodynamics, oxygen transfer, and mycelial morphology. The dissipation of energy through mechanically stirring devices, either flasks or tanks, impacts both microbial growth through shearing forces on the cells and the transfer of mass and energy, improving the contact between phases (i.e., air bubbles and microorganisms) but also causing damage to the cells at high energy dissipation rates. Mechanical-induced signaling in the cells triggers the molecular responses to shear stress; however, the complete mechanism is not known. Volumetric power input and, more importantly, the energy dissipation/circulation function are the main parameters determining mycelial size, a phenomenon that can be explained by the interaction of mycelial aggregates and Kolmogorov eddies. The use of microparticles in fungal cultures is also a strategy to increase process productivity and reproducibility by controlling fungal morphology. In order to rigorously study the effects of hydrodynamics on the physiology of fungal microorganisms, it is necessary to rule out the possible associated effects of dissolved oxygen, something which has been reported scarcely. At the other hand, the processes of phase dispersion (including the suspended solid that is the filamentous biomass) are crucial in order to get an integral knowledge about biological and physicochemical interactions within the bioreactor. Digital image analysis is a powerful tool for getting relevant information in order to establish the mechanisms of mass transfer as well as to evaluate the viability of the mycelia. This review focuses on (a) the main characteristics of the two most

  19. Variational principle for theories with dissipation from analytic continuation

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The analytic continuation from the Euclidean domain to real space of the one-particle irreducible quantum effective action is discussed in the context of generalized local equilibrium states. Discontinuous terms associated with dissipative behavior are parametrized in terms of a conveniently defined sign operator. A generalized variational principle is then formulated, which allows to obtain causal and real dissipative equations of motion from the analytically continued quantum effective action. Differential equations derived from the implications of general covariance determine the space-time evolution of the temperature and fluid velocity fields and allow for a discussion of entropy production including a local form of the second law of thermodynamics.

  20. The relaxation effect in dissipative relativistic fluid theories

    CERN Document Server

    Lindblom, L

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of the fluid fields in a large class of causal dissipative fluid theories is studied. It is shown that the physical fluid states in these theories must relax (on a time scale that is characteristic of the microscopic particle interactions) to ones that are essentially indistinguishable from the simple relativistic Navier-Stokes descriptions of these states. Thus, for example, in the relaxed form of a physical fluid state the stress energy tensor is in effect indistinguishable from a perfect fluid stress tensor plus small dissipative corrections proportional to the shear of the fluid velocity, the gradient of the temperature, etc.

  1. Hydrodynamics in heavy-ion collisions: recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic hydrodynamics has been quite successful in explaining the collective behaviour of the QCD matter produced in high energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We briefly review the latest developments in the hydrodynamical modeling of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Essential ingredients of the model such as the hydrodynamic evolution equations, dissipation, initial conditions, equation of state, and freeze-out process are reviewed. We discuss observable quantities such as particle spectra and anisotropic flow as well as the event-by-event fluctuations of these quantities. We also discuss the extraction of transport coefficients of the hot and dense QCD matter from the experimental data of collective flow.

  2. Hydrodynamics with spontaneous symmetry breaking application to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lallouet, Y; Pujol, C

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply hydrodynamics for systems with continuous broken symmetries to heavy ion collisions in the framework of (1+1) dimensional Bjorken model. The temperature profile with respect to proper time determined in that context is compared with the one obtained when M\\"{u}ller-Israel-Stewart second order theory of dissipation is included on top of standard hydrodynamics.

  3. Staggered Schemes for Fluctuating Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Balboa, F; Delgado-Buscalioni, R; Donev, A; Fai, T; Griffith, B; Peskin, C S

    2011-01-01

    We develop numerical schemes for solving the isothermal compressible and incompressible equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics on a grid with staggered momenta. We develop a second-order accurate spatial discretization of the diffusive, advective and stochastic fluxes that satisfies a discrete fluctuation-dissipation balance, and construct temporal discretizations that are at least second-order accurate in time deterministically and in a weak sense. Specifically, the methods reproduce the correct equilibrium covariances of the fluctuating fields to third (compressible) and second (incompressible) order in the time step, as we verify numerically. We apply our techniques to model recent experimental measurements of giant fluctuations in diffusively mixing fluids in a micro-gravity environment [A. Vailati et. al., Nature Communications 2:290, 2011]. Numerical results for the static spectrum of non-equilibrium concentration fluctuations are in excellent agreement between the compressible and incompressible simula...

  4. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: a causal approach

    CERN Document Server

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large scale structures. We analyse the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the non-causal Eckart theory, we obtain a third order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behaviour in $\\Lambda$CDM when $z \\geq 1$. Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  5. Cold pool dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leah D.; Heever, Susan C.

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms by which sensible heat fluxes (SHFs) alter cold pool characteristics and dissipation rates are investigated in this study using idealized two-dimensional numerical simulations and an environment representative of daytime, dry, continental conditions. Simulations are performed with no SHFs, SHFs calculated using a bulk formula, and constant SHFs for model resolutions with horizontal (vertical) grid spacings ranging from 50 m (25 m) to 400 m (200 m). In the highest resolution simulations, turbulent entrainment of environmental air into the cold pool is an important mechanism for dissipation in the absence of SHFs. Including SHFs enhances cold pool dissipation rates, but the processes responsible for the enhanced dissipation differ depending on the SHF formulation. The bulk SHFs increase the near-surface cold pool temperatures, but their effects on the overall cold pool characteristics are small, while the constant SHFs influence the near-surface environmental stability and the turbulent entrainment rates into the cold pool. The changes to the entrainment rates are found to be the most significant of the SHF effects on cold pool dissipation. SHFs may also influence the timing of cold pool-induced convective initiation by altering the environmental stability and the cold pool intensity. As the model resolution is coarsened, cold pool dissipation is found to be less sensitive to SHFs. Furthermore, the coarser resolution simulations not only poorly but sometimes wrongly represent the SHF impacts on the cold pools. Recommendations are made regarding simulating the interaction of cold pools with convection and the land surface in cloud-resolving models.

  6. Nonlinear absorption of Alfven wave in dissipative plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taiurskii, A. A., E-mail: tayurskiy2001@mail.ru; Gavrikov, M. B., E-mail: nadya-p@cognitive.ru [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 4 Miusskaya sq. Moscow 125047 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method for studying absorption of Alfven wave propagation in a homogeneous non-isothermal plasma along a constant magnetic field, and relaxation of electron and ion temperatures in the A-wave. The absorption of a A-wave by the plasma arises due to dissipative effects - magnetic and hydrodynamic viscosities of electrons and ions and their elastic interaction. The method is based on the exact solution of two-fluid electromagnetic hydrodynamics of the plasma, which for A-wave, as shown in the work, are reduced to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations.

  7. Nonlinear absorption of Alfven wave in dissipative plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a method for studying absorption of Alfven wave propagation in a homogeneous non-isothermal plasma along a constant magnetic field, and relaxation of electron and ion temperatures in the A-wave. The absorption of a A-wave by the plasma arises due to dissipative effects - magnetic and hydrodynamic viscosities of electrons and ions and their elastic interaction. The method is based on the exact solution of two-fluid electromagnetic hydrodynamics of the plasma, which for A-wave, as shown in the work, are reduced to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations

  8. Tachyon Kinematics and causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chronological order of the events along a space-like path is not invariant under Lorentz transformations, as wellknown. This led to an early conviction that tachyons would give rise to causal anomalies. A relativistic version of the Stuckelberg-Feynman switching procedure (SWP) has been invoked as the suitable tool to eliminate those anomalies. The application of the SWP does eliminate the motions backwards in time, but interchanges the roles of source and dector. This fact triggered the proposal of a host of causal paradoxes. Till now, however, it has not been recognized that such paradoxes can be sensibly discussed (and completely solved, at least in microphysics) only after having properly developed the tachyon relativistic mechanics. We start by showing how to apply the SWP, both in the case of ordiry Special Relativity, and in the case with tachyons. Then, we carefully exploit the kinematics of the tachyon-exchange between to (ordinary) bodies. Being finally able to tackle the tachyon-causality problem, we successively solve the paradoxes: (i) by Tolman-Regge; (ii) by Pirani; (iii) by Edmonds; (iv) by Bell. At last, we discuss a further, new paradox associated with the transmission of signals by modulated tachyon beams

  9. Causality between time series

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, X San

    2014-01-01

    Given two time series, can one tell, in a rigorous and quantitative way, the cause and effect between them? Based on a recently rigorized physical notion namely information flow, we arrive at a concise formula and give this challenging question, which is of wide concern in different disciplines, a positive answer. Here causality is measured by the time rate of change of information flowing from one series, say, X2, to another, X1. The measure is asymmetric between the two parties and, particularly, if the process underlying X1 does not depend on X2, then the resulting causality from X2 to X1 vanishes. The formula is tight in form, involving only the commonly used statistics, sample covariances. It has been validated with touchstone series purportedly generated with one-way causality. It has also been applied to the investigation of real world problems; an example presented here is the cause-effect relation between two climate modes, El Ni\\~no and Indian Ocean Dipole, which have been linked to the hazards in f...

  10. Dissipative structures and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Hazime

    1998-01-01

    This monograph consists of two parts and gives an approach to the physics of open nonequilibrium systems. Part I derives the phenomena of dissipative structures on the basis of reduced evolution equations and includes Bénard convection and Belousov-Zhabotinskii chemical reactions. Part II discusses the physics and structures of chaos. While presenting a construction of the statistical physics of chaos, the authors unify the geometrical and statistical descriptions of dynamical systems. The shape of chaotic attractors is characterized, as are the mixing and diffusion of chaotic orbits and the fluctuation of energy dissipation exhibited by chaotic systems.

  11. Quantum Dissipative Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Major advances in the quantum theory of macroscopic systems, in combination with stunning experimental achievements, have brightened the field and brought it to the attention of the general community in natural sciences. Today, working knowledge of dissipative quantum mechanics is an essential tool for many physicists. This book - originally published in 1990 and republished in 1999 as an enlarged second edition - delves much deeper than ever before into the fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of quantum dissipative systems, including the most recent developments. In this third edi

  12. Magnetic field dissipation in converging flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Converging flows (e.g., gas accreting on to compact objects) are often ionized and magnetized. As the gas in these systems compresses towards smaller radii, flux conservation acts to intensify the magnetic field B, which can attain superequipartition values. (Throughout this paper, equipartition is meant to imply a comparison between the energy density in the field and that of the particles only, not including turbulence.) Since such a field probably cannot remain anchored in the gas, it is often assumed that the field intensity in excess of equipartition (i.e., Beq) is dissipated as heat, and that B therefore saturates at its Beq value -the so-called 'equipartition assumption'. In this paper we make an attempt at developing a model for magnetic field dissipation based on resistive magnetic tearing, in order to provide a more realistic means of determining the evolution of B in cases where the contribution to the spectrum from magnetic bremsstrahlung is important. We find that the violation of equipartition can vary in degree from large to small radii, and in either direction. Thus the spectrum predicted on the basis of the equipartition assumption is not always an adequate representation of the actual state of the system. However, several major shortcomings remain in our formulation. For example, our approach in this paper is to consider the turbulence as being initiated primarily by hydrodynamic processes. Arguing that the magnetic field is frozen into the highly ionized plasma, we therefore adopt a magnetic field spatial distribution that mirrors that of the gas. This may be valid Only when the field is subequipartition, for otherwise the turbulent cascade may be influenced primarily by magnetic dissipation, rather than the hydrodynamics

  13. Symmetry boundary condition in dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Souvik; Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Ma, Yanbao

    2015-07-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a coarse-grained particle method for modeling mesoscopic hydrodynamics. Most of the DPD simulations are carried out in 3D requiring remarkable computation time. For symmetric systems, this time can be reduced significantly by simulating only one half or one quarter of the systems. However, such simulations are not yet possible due to a lack of schemes to treat symmetric boundaries in DPD. In this study, we propose a numerical scheme for the implementation of the symmetric boundary condition (SBC) in both dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and multibody dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) using a combined ghost particles and specular reflection (CGPSR) method. We validate our scheme in four different configurations. The results demonstrate that our scheme can accurately reproduce the system properties, such as velocity, density and meniscus shapes of a full system with numerical simulations of a subsystem. Using a symmetric boundary condition for one half of the system, we demonstrate about 50% computation time saving in both DPD and MDPD. This approach for symmetric boundary treatment can be also applied to other coarse-grained particle methods such as Brownian and Langevin Dynamics to significantly reduce computation time.

  14. The Relaxation Effect in Dissipative Relativistic Fluid Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblom, Lee

    1995-01-01

    The dynamics of the fluid fields in a large class of causal dissipative fluid theories is studied. It is shown that the physical fluid states in these theories must relax (on a time scale that is characteristic of the microscopic particle interactions) to ones that are essentially indistinguishable from the simple relativistic Navier-Stokes descriptions of these states. Thus, for example, in the relaxed form of a physical fluid state the stress energy tensor is in effect indistinguishable fro...

  15. Revisiting Causality in Markov Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Shojaee, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Identifying causal relationships is a key premise of scientific research. The growth of observational data in different disciplines along with the availability of machine learning methods offers the possibility of using an empirical approach to identifying potential causal relationships, to deepen our understandings of causal behavior and to build theories accordingly. Conventional methods of causality inference from observational data require a considerable length of time series data to capture cause-effect relationship. We find that potential causal relationships can be inferred from the composition of one step transition rates to and from an event. Also known as Markov chain, one step transition rates are a commonly available resource in different scientific disciplines. Here we introduce a simple, effective and computationally efficient method that we termed 'Causality Inference using Composition of Transitions CICT' to reveal causal structure with high accuracy. We characterize the differences in causes,...

  16. A study in cosmology and causal thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The especial relativity of thermodynamic theories for reversible and irreversible processes in continuous medium is studied. The formalism referring to equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations, and theories which includes the presence of gravitational fields are discussed. The nebular model in contraction with dissipative processes identified by heat flux and volumetric viscosity is thermodymically analysed. This model is presented by a plane conformal metric. The temperature, pressure, entropy and entropy production within thermodynamic formalism which adopts the hypothesis of local equilibrium, is calculated. The same analysis is carried out considering a causal thermodynamics, which establishes a local entropy of non-equilibrium. Possible homogeneous and isotropic cosmological models, considering the new phenomenological equation for volumetric viscosity deriving from cause thermodynamics are investigated. The found out models have plane spatial section (K=0) and some ones do not have singularities. The energy conditions are verified and the entropy production for physically reasobable models are calculated. (M.C.K.)

  17. Collective variables and dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This course is an introduction to some basic concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. We put stress on the relevant entropy associated to a set of collective variables, on the meaning of the projection method in Liouville space and its use to establish equations of motion for these variables, and on the interpretation of dissipation in the framework of information theory

  18. Dissipative work in thermodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work explores the concept of dissipative work and shows that such a kind of work is an invariant non-negative quantity. This feature is then used to get a new insight into adiabatic irreversible processes; for instance, why the final temperature in any adiabatic irreversible process is always higher than that attained in a reversible process having the same initial state and equal final pressure or volume. Based on the concept of identical processes, numerical simulations of adiabatic irreversible compression and expansion were performed, enabling a better understanding of differences between configuration and dissipative work. The positive nature of the dissipative work was used to discuss the case where the dissipated energy ends up in the surroundings, while the invariance of such work under a system-surroundings interchange enabled the resulting modification in thermodynamical quantities to be determined. The ideas presented in this study are primarily intended for undergraduate students with a background in thermodynamics, but they may also be of interest to graduate students and teachers.

  19. Dissipative Work in Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacleto, Joaquim; Pereira, Mario G.; Ferreira, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This work explores the concept of dissipative work and shows that such a kind of work is an invariant non-negative quantity. This feature is then used to get a new insight into adiabatic irreversible processes; for instance, why the final temperature in any adiabatic irreversible process is always higher than that attained in a reversible process…

  20. Quantum information causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitalúa-García, Damián

    2013-05-24

    How much information can a transmitted physical system fundamentally communicate? We introduce the principle of quantum information causality, which states the maximum amount of quantum information that a quantum system can communicate as a function of its dimension, independently of any previously shared quantum physical resources. We present a new quantum information task, whose success probability is upper bounded by the new principle, and show that an optimal strategy to perform it combines the quantum teleportation and superdense coding protocols with a task that has classical inputs. PMID:23745844

  1. Inferring deterministic causal relations

    OpenAIRE

    Daniusis, Povilas; Janzing, Dominik; Mooij, Joris; Zscheischler, Jakob; Steudel, Bastian; Zhang, Kun; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We consider two variables that are related to each other by an invertible function. While it has previously been shown that the dependence structure of the noise can provide hints to determine which of the two variables is the cause, we presently show that even in the deterministic (noise-free) case, there are asymmetries that can be exploited for causal inference. Our method is based on the idea that if the function and the probability density of the cause are chosen independently, then the ...

  2. Causal inference based on counterfactuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Höfler M

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The counterfactual or potential outcome model has become increasingly standard for causal inference in epidemiological and medical studies. Discussion This paper provides an overview on the counterfactual and related approaches. A variety of conceptual as well as practical issues when estimating causal effects are reviewed. These include causal interactions, imperfect experiments, adjustment for confounding, time-varying exposures, competing risks and the probability of causation. It is argued that the counterfactual model of causal effects captures the main aspects of causality in health sciences and relates to many statistical procedures. Summary Counterfactuals are the basis of causal inference in medicine and epidemiology. Nevertheless, the estimation of counterfactual differences pose several difficulties, primarily in observational studies. These problems, however, reflect fundamental barriers only when learning from observations, and this does not invalidate the counterfactual concept.

  3. Experimental test of nonlocal causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbauer, Martin; Giarmatzi, Christina; Chaves, Rafael; Costa, Fabio; White, Andrew G; Fedrizzi, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Explaining observations in terms of causes and effects is central to empirical science. However, correlations between entangled quantum particles seem to defy such an explanation. This implies that some of the fundamental assumptions of causal explanations have to give way. We consider a relaxation of one of these assumptions, Bell's local causality, by allowing outcome dependence: a direct causal influence between the outcomes of measurements of remote parties. We use interventional data from a photonic experiment to bound the strength of this causal influence in a two-party Bell scenario, and observational data from a Bell-type inequality test for the considered models. Our results demonstrate the incompatibility of quantum mechanics with a broad class of nonlocal causal models, which includes Bell-local models as a special case. Recovering a classical causal picture of quantum correlations thus requires an even more radical modification of our classical notion of cause and effect. PMID:27532045

  4. Curvature-induced dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Debus, J -D; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    By inspecting the effect of curvature on a moving fluid, we find that local sources of curvature not only exert inertial forces on the flow, but also generate viscous stresses as a result of the departure of streamlines from the idealized geodesic motion. The curvature-induced viscous forces are shown to cause an indirect and yet appreciable energy dissipation. As a consequence, the flow converges to a stationary equilibrium state solely by virtue of curvature-induced dissipation. In addition, we show that flow through randomly-curved media satisfies a non-linear transport law, resembling Darcy-Forchheimer's law, due to the viscous forces generated by the spatial curvature. It is further shown that the permeability can be characterized in terms of the average metric perturbation.

  5. Relationship of causal effects in a causal chain and related inference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG; Zhi; HE; Yangbo; WANG; Xueli

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the relationship among the total causal effect and local causal effects in a causal chain and identifiability of causal effects. We show a transmission relationship of causal effects in a causal chain. According to the relationship, we give an approach to eliminating confounding bias through controlling for intermediate variables in a causal chain.

  6. Quantum tunneling with dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors derive an exact solution to the problem of determining the rate of decay Γ of the metastable state of a quantum system when T = O with arbitrary dissipation. A potential of the type V(q) = aq2 + b(x - q)Θ(1 - x) is considered; this is realized in quantum decay of current states of superconducting bridges with a normal interlayer. The expression for Γ differs significantly from the case (Vq) = q2 - β q3 examined previously

  7. Dissipative fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With restriction to an irrotational velocity field, equations of motion for a nuclear fluid with dissipation are derived from the quantum-mechanical variational principle. Memory effects in the resulting Navier-Stokes-like equations ascribe elastoplasticity to the fluid whenever the intrinsic equilibration times are comparable to the collective time scale. The markovian limits yield the Euler equation, the Navier-Stokes equation and the fluid-dynamical equation for irrotational velocity fields. (orig.)

  8. Quantum dissipative Higgs model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amooghorban, Ehsan, E-mail: Ehsan.amooghorban@sci.sku.ac.ir; Mahdifar, Ali, E-mail: mahdifar_a@sci.sku.ac.ir

    2015-09-15

    By using a continuum of oscillators as a reservoir, we present a classical and a quantum-mechanical treatment for the Higgs model in the presence of dissipation. In this base, a fully canonical approach is used to quantize the damped particle on a spherical surface under the action of a conservative central force, the conjugate momentum is defined and the Hamiltonian is derived. The equations of motion for the canonical variables and in turn the Langevin equation are obtained. It is shown that the dynamics of the dissipative Higgs model is not only determined by a projected susceptibility tensor that obeys the Kramers–Kronig relations and a noise operator but also the curvature of the spherical space. Due to the gnomonic projection from the spherical space to the tangent plane, the projected susceptibility displays anisotropic character in the tangent plane. To illuminate the effect of dissipation on the Higgs model, the transition rate between energy levels of the particle on the sphere is calculated. It is seen that appreciable probabilities for transition are possible only if the transition and reservoir’s oscillators frequencies to be nearly on resonance.

  9. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yifan

    2016-02-01

    We outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces to that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.

  10. Off-shell hydrodynamics from holography

    CERN Document Server

    Crossley, Michael; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    We outline a program for obtaining an action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics by considering the holographic Wilsonian renormalization group applied to systems with a gravity dual. As a first step, in this paper we restrict to systems with a non-dissipative horizon. By integrating out gapped degrees of freedom in the bulk gravitational system between an asymptotic boundary and a horizon, we are led to a formulation of hydrodynamics where the dynamical variables are not standard velocity and temperature fields, but the relative embedding of the boundary and horizon hypersurfaces. At zeroth order, this action reduces to that proposed by Dubovsky et al. as an off-shell formulation of ideal fluid dynamics.

  11. Causality Statistical Perspectives and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Berzuini, Carlo; Bernardinell, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    A state of the art volume on statistical causality Causality: Statistical Perspectives and Applications presents a wide-ranging collection of seminal contributions by renowned experts in the field, providing a thorough treatment of all aspects of statistical causality. It covers the various formalisms in current use, methods for applying them to specific problems, and the special requirements of a range of examples from medicine, biology and economics to political science. This book:Provides a clear account and comparison of formal languages, concepts and models for statistical causality. Addr

  12. Electro-hydrodynamics near Hydrophobic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Maduar, S R; Lobaskin, V; Vinogradova, O I

    2014-01-01

    We show that the dynamics of the electrostatic diffuse layer at the slippery hydrophobic surface depends strongly on the mobility of surface charges. For a hydrophobic surface with immobile charges the fluid transport is considerably amplified by the existence of a hydrodynamic slippage. In contrast, near the hydrophobic surface with mobile adsorbed charges it is also controlled by an additional electric force, which increases the shear stress at the slipping interface. To account for this we formulate electro-hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the slipping interface, which are applied to quantify electro-osmotic flows. Our theoretical predictions are fully supported by dissipative particle dynamics simulations with explicit charges. These results lead to a new general concept of zeta-potential of hydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication

    CERN Document Server

    Dowson, D; Hopkins, D W

    1977-01-01

    Elasto-Hydrodynamic Lubrication deals with the mechanism of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, that is, the lubrication regime in operation over the small areas where machine components are in nominal point or line contact. The lubrication of rigid contacts is discussed, along with the effects of high pressure on the lubricant and bounding solids. The governing equations for the solution of elasto-hydrodynamic problems are presented.Comprised of 13 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication and representation of contacts by cylinders, followed by a discussio

  14. Elementary classical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chirgwin, B H; Langford, W J; Maxwell, E A; Plumpton, C

    1967-01-01

    Elementary Classical Hydrodynamics deals with the fundamental principles of elementary classical hydrodynamics, with emphasis on the mechanics of inviscid fluids. Topics covered by this book include direct use of the equations of hydrodynamics, potential flows, two-dimensional fluid motion, waves in liquids, and compressible flows. Some general theorems such as Bernoulli's equation are also considered. This book is comprised of six chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the fundamental principles of fluid hydrodynamics, with emphasis on ways of studying the motion of a fluid. Basic c

  15. Hydrodynamic Phase Locking of Swimming Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfring, Gwynn J.; Lauga, Eric

    2009-08-01

    Some microorganisms, such as spermatozoa, synchronize their flagella when swimming in close proximity. Using a simplified model (two infinite, parallel, two-dimensional waving sheets), we show that phase locking arises from hydrodynamics forces alone, and has its origin in the front-back asymmetry of the geometry of their flagellar waveform. The time evolution of the phase difference between coswimming cells depends only on the nature of this geometrical asymmetry, and microorganisms can phase lock into conformations which minimize or maximize energy dissipation.

  16. Hydrodynamic phase-locking of swimming microorganisms

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J

    2009-01-01

    Some microorganisms, such as spermatozoa, synchronize their flagella when swimming in close proximity. Using a simplified model (two infinite, parallel, two-dimensional waving sheets), we show that phase-locking arises from hydrodynamics forces alone, and has its origin in the front-back asymmetry of the geometry of their flagellar waveform. The time-evolution of the phase difference between co-swimming cells depends only on the nature of this geometrical asymmetry, and microorganisms can phase-lock into conformations which minimize or maximize energy dissipation.

  17. Thermo-electric transport in gauge/gravity models with momentum dissipation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Amoretti; Alessandro Braggio; Nicola Maggiore; Nicodemo Magnoli(Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Genova and INFN, Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146, Genova, Italy); Daniele Musso

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic definition and analysis of the thermo-electric linear response in gauge/gravity systems focusing especially on models with massive gravity in the bulk and therefore momentum dissipation in the dual field theory. A precise treatment of finite counter-terms proves to be essential to yield a consistent physical picture whose hydrodynamic and beyond-hydrodynamics behaviors noticeably match with field theoretical expectations. The model furnishes a possible gauge/gravity de...

  18. Small systems and regulator dependence in relativistic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spalinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Consistent theories of hydrodynamics necessarily include nonhydrodynamic modes, which can be viewed as a regulator necessary to ensure causality. Under many circumstances the choice of regulator is not relevant, but this is not always the case. In particular, for sufficiently small systems (such as those arising in pA or pp collisions) such dependence may be inevitable. We address this issue in the context of M\\"uller-Israel-Stewart theory of relativistic hydrodynamics. In this case, by demanding that the nonhydrodynamic modes do not dominate, we find that regulator dependence becomes inevitable only for multiplicities $dN/dY$ of the order of a few. This conclusion supports earlier studies based on hydrodynamic simulations of small systems, at the same time providing a simple physical picture of how hydrodynamics can be reliable even in such seemingly extreme conditions.

  19. Inferring deterministic causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    Daniusis, Povilas; Mooij, Joris; Zscheischler, Jakob; Steudel, Bastian; Zhang, Kun; Schoelkopf, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    We consider two variables that are related to each other by an invertible function. While it has previously been shown that the dependence structure of the noise can provide hints to determine which of the two variables is the cause, we presently show that even in the deterministic (noise-free) case, there are asymmetries that can be exploited for causal inference. Our method is based on the idea that if the function and the probability density of the cause are chosen independently, then the distribution of the effect will, in a certain sense, depend on the function. We provide a theoretical analysis of this method, showing that it also works in the low noise regime, and link it to information geometry. We report strong empirical results on various real-world data sets from different domains.

  20. An extended dissipative particle dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, C J

    2003-01-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was introduced by Hoogerbrugge & Koelman to study meso-scale material processes. The theoretical investigation of the DPD method was initiated by Espanol who used a Fokker-Planck formulation of the DPD method and applied the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator calculus to obtain the equations of hydrodynamics for DPD. A current limitation of DPD is that it requires a clear separation of scales between the resolved and unresolved processes. In this note, we suggest a simple extension of DPD that allows for inclusion of unresolved processes with exponentially decaying variance for any value of the decay rate. The main point of the extension is that it is as easy to implement as DPD in a numerical algorithm.

  1. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  2. Re-thinking local causality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friederich, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread belief in a tension between quantum theory and special relativity, motivated by the idea that quantum theory violates J. S. Bell's criterion of local causality, which is meant to implement the causal structure of relativistic space-time. This paper argues that if one takes the es

  3. Expert Causal Reasoning and Explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuipers, Benjamin

    The relationship between cognitive psychologists and researchers in artificial intelligence carries substantial benefits for both. An ongoing investigation in causal reasoning in medical problem solving systems illustrates this interaction. This paper traces a dialectic of sorts in which three different types of causal resaoning for medical…

  4. Dissipative cosmological solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Chimento, Luis P.; Jakubi, Alejandro S.

    1997-01-01

    The exact general solution to the Einstein equations in a homogeneous Universe with a full causal viscous fluid source for the bulk viscosity index $m=1/2$ is found. We have investigated the asymptotic stability of Friedmann and de Sitter solutions, the former is stable for $m\\ge 1/2$ and the latter for $m\\le 1/2$. The comparison with results of the truncated theory is made. For $m=1/2$, it was found that families of solutions with extrema no longer remain in the full case, and they are repla...

  5. Chirped Dissipative Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Kalashnikov, Vladimir L

    2010-01-01

    The analytical theory of chirped dissipative soliton solutions of nonlinear complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is exposed. Obtained approximate solutions are easily traceable within an extremely broad range of the equation parameters and allow a clear physical interpretation as a representation of the strongly chirped pulses in mode-locked both solid-state and fiber oscillators. Scaling properties of such pulses demonstrate a feasibility of sub-mJ pulse generation in the continuous-wave mode-locking regime directly from an oscillator operating at the MHz repetition rate.

  6. Hydrodynamics and Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Hirano, Tetsufumi; Bilandzic, Ante

    2008-01-01

    In this lecture note, we present several topics on relativistic hydrodynamics and its application to relativistic heavy ion collisions. In the first part we give a brief introduction to relativistic hydrodynamics in the context of heavy ion collisions. In the second part we present the formalism and some fundamental aspects of relativistic ideal and viscous hydrodynamics. In the third part, we start with some basic checks of the fundamental observables followed by discussion of collective flow, in particular elliptic flow, which is one of the most exciting phenomenon in heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies. Next we discuss how to formulate the hydrodynamic model to describe dynamics of heavy ion collisions. Finally, we conclude the third part of the lecture note by showing some results from ideal hydrodynamic calculations and by comparing them with the experimental data.

  7. The Visual Causality Analyst: An Interactive Interface for Causal Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Uncovering the causal relations that exist among variables in multivariate datasets is one of the ultimate goals in data analytics. Causation is related to correlation but correlation does not imply causation. While a number of casual discovery algorithms have been devised that eliminate spurious correlations from a network, there are no guarantees that all of the inferred causations are indeed true. Hence, bringing a domain expert into the casual reasoning loop can be of great benefit in identifying erroneous casual relationships suggested by the discovery algorithm. To address this need we present the Visual Causal Analyst-a novel visual causal reasoning framework that allows users to apply their expertise, verify and edit causal links, and collaborate with the causal discovery algorithm to identify a valid causal network. Its interface consists of both an interactive 2D graph view and a numerical presentation of salient statistical parameters, such as regression coefficients, p-values, and others. Both help users in gaining a good understanding of the landscape of causal structures particularly when the number of variables is large. Our framework is also novel in that it can handle both numerical and categorical variables within one unified model and return plausible results. We demonstrate its use via a set of case studies using multiple practical datasets. PMID:26529703

  8. Dissipation of Tidal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The moon's gravity imparts tremendous energy to the Earth, raising tides throughout the global oceans. What happens to all this energy? This question has been pondered by scientists for over 200 years, and has consequences ranging from the history of the moon to the mixing of the oceans. Richard Ray at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Gary Egbert of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. studied six years of altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite to address this question. According to their report in the June 15 issue of Nature, about 1 terawatt, or 25 to 30 percent of the total tidal energy dissipation, occurs in the deep ocean. The remainder occurs in shallow seas, such as on the Patagonian Shelf. 'By measuring sea level with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter, our knowledge of the tides in the global ocean has been remarkably improved,' said Richard Ray, a geophysicist at Goddard. The accuracies are now so high that this data can be used to map empirically the tidal energy dissipation. (Red areas, above) The deep-water tidal dissipation occurs generally near rugged bottom topography (seamounts and mid-ocean ridges). 'The observed pattern of deep-ocean dissipation is consistent with topographic scattering of tidal energy into internal motions within the water column, resulting in localized turbulence and mixing', said Gary Egbert an associate professor at OSU. One important implication of this finding concerns the possible energy sources needed to maintain the ocean's large-scale 'conveyor-belt' circulation and to mix upper ocean heat into the abyssal depths. It is thought that 2 terawatts are required for this process. The winds supply about 1 terawatt, and there has been speculation that the tides, by pumping energy into vertical water motions, supply the remainder. However, all current general circulation models of the oceans ignore the tides. 'It is possible that properly

  9. ["Karoshi" and causal relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, N

    1992-08-01

    This paper aims to introduce a measure for use by physicians for stating the degree of probable causal relationship for "Karoshi", ie, a sudden death from cerebrovascular diseases or ischemic heart diseases under occupational stresses, as well as to give a brief description for legal procedures associated with worker's compensation and civil trial in Japan. It is a well-used measure in epidemiology, "attributable risk percent (AR%)", which can be applied to describe the extent of contribution to "Karoshi" of the excess occupational burdens the deceased worker was forced to bear. Although several standards such as average occupational burdens for the worker, average occupational burdens for an ordinary worker, burdens in a nonoccupational life, and a complete rest, might be considered for the AR% estimation, the average occupational burdens for an ordinary worker should normally be utilized as a standard for worker's compensation. The adoption of AR% could be helpful for courts to make a consistent judgement whether "Karoshi" cases are compensatable or not. PMID:1392028

  10. Thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    The microscopic mechanism of thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence has been numerically studied by solving the coupled system involving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. At low temperatures, the obtained dissipation does not work at scales greater than the vortex core size. However, as the temperature increases, dissipation works at large scales and it affects the vortex dynamics. We successfully obtained the mutual friction coefficients of the vortex dy...

  11. Hydrodynamic Description of Transport in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, A. V.; Kivelson, Steven A.; Spivak, B.

    2011-06-01

    We develop a hydrodynamic description of the resistivity and magnetoresistance of an electron liquid in a smooth disorder potential. This approach is valid when the electron-electron scattering length is sufficiently short. In a broad range of temperatures, the dissipation is dominated by heat fluxes in the electron fluid, and the resistivity is inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity, κ. This is in striking contrast to the Stokes flow, in which the resistance is independent of κ and proportional to the fluid viscosity. We also identify a new hydrodynamic mechanism of spin magnetoresistance.

  12. Hydrodynamic model of Fukushima-Daiichi site flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on conservative assumptions, this paper proposes a hydrodynamic model to describe the occurrence and spread of a tsunami. Numerical simulation has shown that a wave can reach 15 m on the Fukushima-Daiichi coastline with the reduced hydrodynamic resistance factor being 1.8. According to the developed model, the likelihood of flooding is determined not only by the site level, earthquake intensity and distance, but also by the duration of seismic impacts, conditions of energy dissipation, epicenter size and other factors

  13. Principal stratification in causal inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangakis, Constantine E; Rubin, Donald B

    2002-03-01

    Many scientific problems require that treatment comparisons be adjusted for posttreatment variables, but the estimands underlying standard methods are not causal effects. To address this deficiency, we propose a general framework for comparing treatments adjusting for posttreatment variables that yields principal effects based on principal stratification. Principal stratification with respect to a posttreatment variable is a cross-classification of subjects defined by the joint potential values of that posttreatment variable tinder each of the treatments being compared. Principal effects are causal effects within a principal stratum. The key property of principal strata is that they are not affected by treatment assignment and therefore can be used just as any pretreatment covariate. such as age category. As a result, the central property of our principal effects is that they are always causal effects and do not suffer from the complications of standard posttreatment-adjusted estimands. We discuss briefly that such principal causal effects are the link between three recent applications with adjustment for posttreatment variables: (i) treatment noncompliance, (ii) missing outcomes (dropout) following treatment noncompliance. and (iii) censoring by death. We then attack the problem of surrogate or biomarker endpoints, where we show, using principal causal effects, that all current definitions of surrogacy, even when perfectly true, do not generally have the desired interpretation as causal effects of treatment on outcome. We go on to forrmulate estimands based on principal stratification and principal causal effects and show their superiority. PMID:11890317

  14. Dark matter perturbations and viscosity: A causal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Giovanni; John, Anslyn; Pénin, Aurélie

    2016-08-01

    The inclusion of dissipative effects in cosmic fluids modifies their clustering properties and could have observable effects on the formation of large-scale structures. We analyze the evolution of density perturbations of cold dark matter endowed with causal bulk viscosity. The perturbative analysis is carried out in the Newtonian approximation and the bulk viscosity is described by the causal Israel-Stewart (IS) theory. In contrast to the noncausal Eckart theory, we obtain a third-order evolution equation for the density contrast that depends on three free parameters. For certain parameter values, the density contrast and growth factor in IS mimic their behavior in Λ CDM when z ≥1 . Interestingly, and contrary to intuition, certain sets of parameters lead to an increase of the clustering.

  15. Classical planning and causal implicatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Benotti, Luciana

    In this paper we motivate and describe a dialogue manager (called Frolog) which uses classical planning to infer causal implicatures. A causal implicature is a type of Gricean relation implicature, a highly context dependent form of inference. As we shall see, causal implicatures are important for...... generate clarification requests"; as a result we can model task-oriented dialogue as an interactive process locally structured by negotiation of the underlying task. We give several examples of Frolog-human dialog, discuss the limitations imposed by the classical planning paradigm, and indicate the...

  16. Functional equations with causal operators

    CERN Document Server

    Corduneanu, C

    2003-01-01

    Functional equations encompass most of the equations used in applied science and engineering: ordinary differential equations, integral equations of the Volterra type, equations with delayed argument, and integro-differential equations of the Volterra type. The basic theory of functional equations includes functional differential equations with causal operators. Functional Equations with Causal Operators explains the connection between equations with causal operators and the classical types of functional equations encountered by mathematicians and engineers. It details the fundamentals of linear equations and stability theory and provides several applications and examples.

  17. On causality of extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Zanin, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Multiple metrics have been developed to detect causality relations between data describing the elements constituting complex systems, all of them considering their evolution through time. Here we propose a metric able to detect causality within static data sets, by analysing how extreme events in one element correspond to the appearance of extreme events in a second one. The metric is able to detect both linear and non-linear causalities; to analyse both cross-sectional and longitudinal data sets; and to discriminate between real causalities and correlations caused by confounding factors. We validate the metric through synthetic data, dynamical and chaotic systems, and data representing the human brain activity in a cognitive task.

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins.

  19. Hydrodynamic effects in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymczak, Piotr [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Cieplak, Marek, E-mail: piotr.szymczak@fuw.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Aleja Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-01-26

    Experimental and numerical results pertaining to flow-induced effects in proteins are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on shear-induced unfolding and on the role of solvent mediated hydrodynamic interactions in the conformational transitions in proteins. (topical review)

  20. Causal reasoning with mental models

    OpenAIRE

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Barbey, Aron K.; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews e...

  1. Consciousness and the "Causal Paradox"

    OpenAIRE

    Velmans, Max

    1996-01-01

    Viewed from a first-person perspective consciousness appears to be necessary for complex, novel human activity - but viewed from a third-person perspective consciousness appears to play no role in the activity of brains, producing a "causal paradox". To resolve this paradox one needs to distinguish consciousness of processing from consciousness accompanying processing or causing processing. Accounts of consciousness/brain causal interactions switch between first- and third-person perspectives...

  2. Realist Magic : Objects, Ontology, Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Object-oriented ontology offers a startlingly fresh way to think about causality that takes into account developments in physics since 1900. Causality, argues, Object Oriented Ontology (OOO), is aesthetic. In this book, Timothy Morton explores what it means to say that a thing has come into being, that it is persisting, and that it has ended. Drawing from examples in physics, biology, ecology, art, literature and music, Morton demonstrates the counterintuitive yet elegant explanatory power of...

  3. Conformal Anomalies in Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eling, Christopher; Theisen, Stefan; Yankielowicz, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of conformal anomalies on the hydrodynamic description of conformal field theories in four spacetime dimensions. We consider equilibrium curved backgrounds characterized by a time-like Killing vector and construct a local low energy effective action that captures the conformal anomalies. Using as a special background the Rindler spacetime we derive a formula for the effect of the anomaly on the hydrodynamic pressure.

  4. Correlation Measure Equivalence in Dynamic Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We prove an equivalence transformation between the correlation measure functions of the causally-unbiased quantum gravity space and the causally-biased standard space. The theory of quantum gravity fuses the dynamic (nonfixed) causal structure of general relativity and the quantum uncertainty of quantum mechanics. In a quantum gravity space, the events are causally nonseparable and all time bias vanishes, which makes it no possible to use the standard causally-biased entropy and the correlation measure functions. Since a corrected causally-unbiased entropy function leads to an undefined, obscure mathematical structure, in our approach the correction is made in the data representation of the causally-unbiased space. We prove that the standard causally-biased entropy function with a data correction can be used to identify correlations in dynamic causal structures. As a corollary, all mathematical properties of the causally-biased correlation measure functions are preserved in the causally-unbiased space. The eq...

  5. A Lagrangian formulation of relativistic Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Torrieri, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    We rederive relativistic hydrodynamics as a Lagrangian effective theory using the doubled coordinates technique, allowing us to include dissipative terms. We include Navier-Stokes shear and bulk terms, as well as Israel-Stewart relaxation time terms, within this formalism. We show how the inclusion of shear viscosity, and the requirement of a bounded energy-momentum "vacuum", forces the inclusion of the Israel-Stewart term into the theory, thereby providing a justification for the origin and uniqueness of these terms.

  6. A Lagrangian formulation of relativistic Israel-Stewart hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Torrieri, Giorgio; Montenegro, David

    2016-01-01

    We rederive relativistic hydrodynamics as a Lagrangian effective theory using the doubled coordinates technique, allowing us to include dissipative terms. We include Navier-Stokes shear and bulk terms, as well as Israel-Stewart relaxation time terms, within this formalism. We show how the inclusion of shear viscosity, and the requirement of a bounded energy-momentum "vacuum", forces the inclusion of the Israel-Stewart term into the theory, thereby providing a justification for the origin and ...

  7. Chiral Magnetic Effect in Hydrodynamic Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, Valentin I

    2012-01-01

    We review derivations of the chiral magnetic effect (ChME) in hydrodynamic approximation. The reader is assumed to be familiar with the basics of the effect. The main challenge now is to account for the strong interactions between the constituents of the fluid. The main result is that the ChME is not renormalized: in the hydrodynamic approximation it remains the same as for non-interacting chiral fermions moving in an external magnetic field. The key ingredients in the proof are general laws of thermodynamics and the Adler-Bardeen theorem for the chiral anomaly in external electromagnetic fields. The chiral magnetic effect in hydrodynamics represents a macroscopic manifestation of a quantum phenomenon (chiral anomaly). Moreover, one can argue that the current induced by the magnetic field is dissipation free and talk about a kind of "chiral superconductivity". More precise description is a ballistic transport along magnetic field taking place in equilibrium and in absence of a driving force. The basic limitat...

  8. Magneto-hydrodynamic Waves in the Ionosphere and their Application to Giant Pulsations

    OpenAIRE

    Lehnert, B.

    2011-01-01

    In magneto-hydrodynamics conservation of energy leads to the adiabatic relation, du = pd?/?2, between the internal energy u per unit mass, the pressure p, and the density ?. The relation is valid for arbitrary amplitudes in a non-dissipative medium. The Hall current modifies the properties of magneto-hydrodynamic waves in an ionized gas. The compressive modes and the Alfvèn mode earlier discussed by van de Hulst are shown to be coupled by means of the Hall current. The dissipation of s...

  9. Causality and stability of cosmic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2015-09-01

    In stark contrast to their laboratory and terrestrial counterparts, cosmic jets appear to be very stable. They are able to penetrate vast spaces, which exceed by up to a billion times the size of their central engines. We propose that the reason behind this remarkable property is the loss of causal connectivity across these jets, caused by their rapid expansion in response to fast decline of external pressure with the distance from the `jet engine'. In atmospheres with power-law pressure distribution, pext ∝ z-κ, the total loss of causal connectivity occurs, when κ > 2 - the steepness which is expected to be quite common for many astrophysical environments. This conclusion does not seem to depend on the physical nature of jets - it applies both to relativistic and non-relativistic flows, both magnetically dominated and unmagnetized jets. In order to verify it, we have carried out numerical simulations of moderately magnetized and moderately relativistic jets. The results give strong support to our hypothesis and provide with valuable insights. In particular, we find that the z-pinched inner cores of magnetic jets expand slower than their envelopes and become susceptible to instabilities even when the whole jet is stable. This may result in local dissipation and emission without global disintegration of the flow. Cosmic jets may become globally unstable when they enter flat sections of external atmospheres. We propose that the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) morphological division of extragalactic radio sources into two classes is related to this issue. In particular, we argue that the low power FR-I jets become reconfined, causally connected and globally unstable on the scale of galactic X-ray coronas, whereas more powerful FR-II jets reconfine much further out, already on the scale of radio lobes and remain largely intact until they terminate at hotspots. Using this idea, we derived the relationship between the critical jet power and the optical luminosity of the host

  10. Evolution of Hot, Dissipative Quark Matter in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Muronga, Azwinndini; Rischke, Dirk H.(Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main, Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Non-ideal fluid dynamics with cylindrical symmetry in transverse direction and longitudinal scaling flow is employed to simulate the space-time evolution of the quark-gluon plasma produced in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. The dynamical expansion is studied as a function of initial energy density and initial time. A causal theory of dissipative fluid dynamics is used instead of the standard theories which are acausal. We compute the parton momentum spectra and HBT radii from two-parti...

  11. Reversible dissipative processes, conformal motions and Landau damping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, L., E-mail: laherrera@cantv.net.ve [Departamento de Física Teórica e Historia de la Ciencia, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao (Spain); Di Prisco, A., E-mail: adiprisc@fisica.ciens.ucv.ve [Departamento de Física Teórica e Historia de la Ciencia, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao (Spain); Ibáñez, J., E-mail: j.ibanez@ehu.es [Departamento de Física Teórica e Historia de la Ciencia, Universidad del País Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)

    2012-02-06

    The existence of a dissipative flux vector is known to be compatible with reversible processes, provided a timelike conformal Killing vector (CKV) χ{sup α}=(V{sup α})/T (where V{sup α} and T denote the four-velocity and temperature respectively) is admitted by the spacetime. Here we show that if a constitutive transport equation, either within the context of standard irreversible thermodynamics or the causal Israel–Stewart theory, is adopted, then such a compatibility also requires vanishing dissipative fluxes. Therefore, in this later case the vanishing of entropy production generated by the existence of such CKV is not actually associated to an imperfect fluid, but to a non-dissipative one. We discuss also about Landau damping. -- Highlights: ► We review the problem of compatibility of dissipation with reversibility. ► We show that the additional assumption of a transport equation renders such a compatibility trivial. ► We discuss about Landau damping.

  12. Causality, causality, causality: the view of education inputs and outputs from economics

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Barrow; Cecilia Elena Rouse

    2005-01-01

    Educators and policy makers are increasingly intent on using scientifically-based evidence when making decisions about education policy. Thus, education research today must necessarily be focused on identifying the causal relationships between education inputs and student outcomes. In this paper we discuss methodologies for estimating the causal effect of resources on education outcomes; we also review what we believe to be the best evidence from economics on a few important inputs: spending,...

  13. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  14. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  15. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  16. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafnick, Ryan C.; García, Angel E.

    2015-12-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies.

  17. Efficient Schmidt number scaling in dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafnick, Ryan C; García, Angel E

    2015-12-28

    Dissipative particle dynamics is a widely used mesoscale technique for the simulation of hydrodynamics (as well as immersed particles) utilizing coarse-grained molecular dynamics. While the method is capable of describing any fluid, the typical choice of the friction coefficient γ and dissipative force cutoff rc yields an unacceptably low Schmidt number Sc for the simulation of liquid water at standard temperature and pressure. There are a variety of ways to raise Sc, such as increasing γ and rc, but the relative cost of modifying each parameter (and the concomitant impact on numerical accuracy) has heretofore remained undetermined. We perform a detailed search over the parameter space, identifying the optimal strategy for the efficient and accuracy-preserving scaling of Sc, using both numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The composite results recommend a parameter choice that leads to a speed improvement of a factor of three versus previously utilized strategies. PMID:26723591

  18. From Field Theory to the Hydrodynamics of Relativistic Superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Stetina, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic description of a superfluid is usually based on a two-fluid picture. In this thesis, basic properties of such a relativistic two-fluid system are derived from the underlying microscopic physics of a complex scalar quantum field theory. To obtain analytic results of all non-dissipative hydrodynamic quantities in terms of field theoretic variables, calculations are first carried out in a low-temperature and weak-coupling approximation. In a second step, the 2-particle-irreducible formalism is applied: This formalism allows for a numerical evaluation of the hydrodynamic parameters for all temperatures below the critical temperature. In addition, a system of two coupled superfluids is studied. As an application, the velocities of first and second sound in the presence of a superflow are calculated. The results show that first (second) sound evolves from a density (temperature) wave at low temperatures to a temperature (density) wave at high temperatures. This role reversal is investigated for ult...

  19. Noise and Dissipation During Preheating

    CERN Document Server

    Jorás, S E; Joras, Sergio E.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2002-01-01

    We study the consequences of noise and dissipation for parametric resonance during preheating. The effective equations of motion for the inflaton and the radiation field are obtained and shown to present self-consistent noise and dissipation terms. The equations exhibit the usual parametric resonance phenomenon, allowing for exponential amplification of the radiation modes inside the instability bands. By focusing on the dimension of the border of those bands we explicitly show that they are fractal, indicating the strong dependence of the outcome in the initial conditions. The simultaneous effect of noise and dissipation to the fractality of the borders are then examined.

  20. Hierarchical organisation of causal graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the design of a supervision system using a hierarchy of models formed by graphs, in which the variables are the nodes and the causal relations between the variables of the arcs. To obtain a representation of the variables evolutions which contains only the relevant features of their real evolutions, the causal relations are completed with qualitative transfer functions (QTFs) which produce roughly the behaviour of the classical transfer functions. Major improvements have been made in the building of the hierarchical organization. First, the basic variables of the uppermost level and the causal relations between them are chosen. The next graph is built by adding intermediary variables to the upper graph. When the undermost graph has been built, the transfer functions parameters corresponding to its causal relations are identified. The second task consists in the upwelling of the information from the undermost graph to the uppermost one. A fusion procedure of the causal relations has been designed to compute the QFTs relevant for each level. This procedure aims to reduce the number of parameters needed to represent an evolution at a high level of abstraction. These techniques have been applied to the hierarchical modelling of nuclear process. (authors). 8 refs., 12 figs

  1. Dissipative-particle-dynamics model of biofilm growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-06-13

    A dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for the quantitative simulation of biofilm growth controlled by substrate (nutrient) consumption, advective and diffusive substrate transport, and hydrodynamic interactions with fluid flow (including fragmentation and reattachment) is described. The model was used to simulate biomass growth, decay, and spreading. It predicts how the biofilm morphology depends on flow conditions, biofilm growth kinetics, the rheomechanical properties of the biofilm and adhesion to solid surfaces. The morphology of the model biofilm depends strongly on its rigidity and the magnitude of the body force that drives the fluid over the biofilm.

  2. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Aniceto, Inês

    2015-01-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the M\\"uller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent, and that this large order behaviour is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed, that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of \\symm\\ plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  3. Resurgence in extended hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniceto, Inês; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-04-01

    It has recently been understood that the hydrodynamic series generated by the Müller-Israel-Stewart theory is divergent and that this large-order behavior is consistent with the theory of resurgence. Furthermore, it was observed that the physical origin of this is the presence of a purely damped nonhydrodynamic mode. It is very interesting to ask whether this picture persists in cases where the spectrum of nonhydrodynamic modes is richer. We take the first step in this direction by considering the simplest hydrodynamic theory which, instead of the purely damped mode, contains a pair of nonhydrodynamic modes of complex conjugate frequencies. This mimics the pattern of black brane quasinormal modes which appear on the gravity side of the AdS/CFT description of N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma. We find that the resulting hydrodynamic series is divergent in a way consistent with resurgence and precisely encodes information about the nonhydrodynamic modes of the theory.

  4. Causal reasoning with mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Barbey, Aron K; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews evidence both to corroborate the theory and to account for phenomena sometimes taken to be incompatible with it. Finally, it reviews neuroscience evidence indicating that mental models for causal inference are implemented within lateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:25389398

  5. Causal reasoning with mental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeet eKhemlani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the model-based theory of causal reasoning. It postulates that the core meanings of causal assertions are deterministic and refer to temporally-ordered sets of possibilities: A causes B to occur means that given A, B occurs, whereas A enables B to occur means that given A, it is possible for B to occur. The paper shows how mental models represent such assertions, and how these models underlie deductive, inductive, and abductive reasoning yielding explanations. It reviews evidence both to corroborate the theory and to account for phenomena sometimes taken to be incompatible with it. Finally, it reviews neuroscience evidence indicating that mental models for causal inference are implemented within lateral prefrontal cortex.

  6. Causal Models for Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neysis Hernández Díaz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work a study about the process of risk management in major schools in the world. The project management tools worldwide highlights the need to redefine risk management processes. From the information obtained it is proposed the use of causal models for risk analysis based on information from the project or company, say risks and the influence thereof on the costs, human capital and project requirements and detect the damages of a number of tasks without tribute to the development of the project. A study on the use of causal models as knowledge representation techniques causal, among which are the Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (DCM and Bayesian networks, with the most favorable MCD technique to use because it allows modeling the risk information witho ut having a knowledge base either itemize.

  7. Rank of Stably Dissipative Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    For the class of stably dissipative Lotka-Volterra systems we prove that the rank of its defining matrix, which is the dimension of the associated invariant foliation, is completely determined by the system's graph.

  8. Choosing Hydrodynamic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Dufty, James W.; Brey, J. Javier

    2011-01-01

    Continuum mechanics (e.g., hydrodynamics, elasticity theory) is based on the assumption that a small set of fields provides a closed description on large space and time scales. Conditions governing the choice for these fields are discussed in the context of granular fluids and multi-component fluids. In the first case, the relevance of temperature or energy as a hydrodynamic field is justified. For mixtures, the use of a total temperature and single flow velocity is compared with the use of m...

  9. On Causality in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Harnack, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Identification of causal links is fundamental for the analysis of complex systems. In dynamical systems, however, nonlinear interactions may hamper separability of subsystems which poses a challenge for attempts to determine the directions and strengths of their mutual influences. We found that asymmetric causal influences between parts of a dynamical system lead to characteristic distortions in the mappings between the attractor manifolds reconstructed from respective local observables. These distortions can be measured in a model-free, data-driven manner. This approach extends basic intuitions about cause-effect relations to deterministic dynamical systems and suggests a mathematically well defined explanation of results obtained from previous methods based on state space reconstruction.

  10. Cohomology with causally restricted supports

    CERN Document Server

    Khavkine, Igor

    2014-01-01

    De Rham cohomology with spacelike compact and timelike compact supports has recently been noticed to be of importance for understanding the structure of classical and quantum field theories on curved spacetimes. We compute these cohomology groups for globally hyperbolic spacetimes in terms of their standard de Rham cohomologies. The calculation exploits the fact that the de Rham-d'Alambert wave operator can be extended to a chain map that is homotopic to zero and that its causal Green function fits into a convenient exact sequence. This method extends also to the Calabi (or Killing-Riemann-Bianchi) complex and possibly other differential complexes. We also discuss generalized causal structures and functoriality.

  11. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  12. Formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics and its applications in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, Amaresh

    2014-01-01

    Relativistic fluid dynamics finds application in astrophysics, cosmology and the physics of high-energy heavy-ion collisions. In this thesis, we present our work on the formulation of relativistic dissipative fluid dynamics within the framework of relativistic kinetic theory. We employ the second law of thermodynamics as well as the relativistic Boltzmann equation to obtain the dissipative evolution equations. We present a new derivation of the dissipative hydrodynamic equations using the second law of thermodynamics wherein all the second-order transport coefficients get determined uniquely within a single theoretical framework. An alternate derivation of the dissipative equations which does not make use of the two major approximations/assumptions namely, Grad's 14-moment approximation and second moment of Boltzmann equation, inherent in the Israel-Stewart theory, is also presented. Moreover, by solving the Boltzmann equation iteratively in a Chapman-Enskog like expansion, we have derived the form of second-...

  13. On the Axioms of Causal Set Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dribus, Benjamin F

    2013-01-01

    This paper offers suggested improvements to the causal sets program in discrete gravity, which treats spacetime geometry as an emergent manifestation of causal structure at the fundamental scale. This viewpoint, which I refer to as the causal metric hypothesis, is summarized by Rafael Sorkin's phrase, "order plus number equals geometry." Proposed improvements include recognition of a generally nontransitive causal relation more fundamental than the causal order, an improved local picture of causal structure, development and use of relation space methods, and a new background-independent version of the histories approach to quantum theory. Besides causal set theory, \\`a la Bombelli, Lee, Meyer, and Sorkin, this effort draws on Isham's topos-theoretic framework for physics, Sorkin's quantum measure theory, Finkelstein's causal nets, and Grothendieck's structural principles. This approach circumvents undesirable structural features in causal set theory, such as the permeability of maximal antichains, studied by ...

  14. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and moments which the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull.The first part of the text is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections (with and without cavitation) and a...

  15. Hydrodynamic aspect of caves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Gabrovsek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available From a hydrological point of view, active caves are a series of connected conduits which drain water through an aquifer. Water tends to choose the easiest way through the system but different geological and morphological barriers act as flow restrictions. The number and characteristics of restrictions depends on the particular speleogenetic environment, which is a function of geological, geomorphological, climatological and hydrological settings. Such a variety and heterogeneity of underground systems has presented a challenge for human understanding for many centuries. Access to many underground passages, theoretical knowledge and recent methods (modeling, water pressure-resistant dataloggers, precise sensors etc. give us the opportunity to get better insight into the hydrodynamic aspect of caves. In our work we tried to approach underground hydrodynamics from both theoretical and practical points of view. We present some theoretical background of open surface and pressurized flow in underground rivers and present results of some possible scenarios. Moreover, two case studies from the Ljubljanica river basin are presented in more detail: the cave system between Planinsko polje and Ljubljansko barje, and the cave system between Bloško polje and Cerkniško polje. The approach and methodology in each case is somewhat different, as the aims were different at the beginning of exploration. However, they both deal with temporal and spatial hydrodynamics of underground waters. In the case of Bloško polje-Cerkniško polje system we also explain the feedback loop between hydrodynamics and Holocene speleogenesis.

  16. Granger Causality and Unit Roots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-Caballero, Carlos Vladimir; Ventosa-Santaulària, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the Granger-causality test under stochastic nonstationarity is studied. Our results confirm that the inference drawn from the test is not reliable when the series are integrated to the first order. In the presence of deterministic components, the test statistic diverges...

  17. Causal feedbacks in climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, van E.H.; Scheffer, M.; Brovkin, V.; Lenton, T.M.; Ye, H.; Deyle, E.; Sugihara, G.

    2015-01-01

    The statistical association between temperature and greenhouse gases over glacial cycles is well documented1, but causality behind this correlation remains difficult to extract directly from the data. A time lag of CO2 behind Antarctic temperature—originally thought to hint at a driving role for tem

  18. Causal Behaviour on Carter spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Oihane F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we will focus on the causal character of Carter Spacetime (see B. Carter, Causal structure in space-time, Gen. Rel. Grav. 1 4 337-406, 1971). The importance of this spacetime is the following: for the causally best well behaved spacetimes (the globally hyperbolic ones), there are several characterizations or alternative definitions. In some cases, it has been shown that some of the causal properties required in these characterizations can be weakened. But Carter spacetime provides a counterexample for an impossible relaxation in one of them. We studied the possibility of Carter spacetime to be a counterexample for impossible lessening in another characterization, based on the previous results. In particular, we will prove that the time-separation or Lorentzian distance between two chosen points in Carter spacetime is infinite. Although this spacetime turned out not to be the counterexample we were looking for, the found result is interesting per se and provides ideas for alternate approaches to t...

  19. Causality problem in Economic Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ LUIS RETOLAZA

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main point of the paper is the problem of the economy to be consider like a science in the most strict term of the concept. In the first step we are going to tackle a presentation about what we understand by science to subsequently present some of the fallacies which have bring certain scepticism about the scientific character of the investigation in economy, to know: 1 The differences between hard and weak sciences -physics and social; 2 The differences between paradigm, —positivist and phenomenological— 3 The differences between physic causalityand historic causality. In the second step we are going to talk about two fundamental problems which are questioned: 1 the confusion between ontology and gnoseology and, 2 the erroneous concept of causality that commonly is used. In the last step of the paper we are going over the recent models of «causal explanation» and we suggest the probabilistic casualty development next with a more elaborated models of causal explanation, like a way to conjugate the scientific severity with the possibility to tackle complex economic realities.

  20. Hydrodynamics of granular gases of viscoelastic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilliantov, Nikolai V; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2002-03-15

    Our study examines the long-time behaviour of a force-free granular gas of viscoelastic particles, for which the coefficient of restitution depends on the impact velocity, as it follows from the solution of the impact problem for viscoelastic spheres. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we derived the hydrodynamic equations and obtained microscopic expressions for the transport coefficients in terms of the elastic and dissipative parameters of the particle material. We performed the stability analysis of the linearized set of equations and found that any inhomogeneities and vortices vanish after a long time and the system approaches the flow-free stage of homogeneous density. This behaviour is in contrast to that of a gas consisting of particles which interact via a (non-realistic) constant coefficient of restitution, for which inhomogeneities (clusters) and vortex patterns have been proven to arise and to continuously develop. PMID:16214686

  1. Hydrodynamics of circulating and bubbling fluidized beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that a review of modeling of the hydrodynamics of fluidization of bubbling beds showed that inviscid two-fluid models were able to predict a great deal of the behavior of bubbling beds because the dominant mechanism of energy dissipation is the drag between the particles and the fluid. The formation, the growth and the bursting of bubbles were predicted. Predicted wall-to-bed heat transfer coefficients and velocity profiles of jets agreed with measurements. Time average porosity distributions agreed with measurements done using gamma-ray densitometers without the use of any adjustable parameters. However, inviscid models could not correctly predict rates of erosion around tubes immersed into fluidized beds. To correctly model such behavior, granular stresses involving solids viscosity were added into the computer model. This viscosity arises due to random collision of particles. Several models fro this viscosity were investigated and the results compared to measurements of solids distributions in two-dimensional beds and to particle velocities reported in the literature. While in the case of bubbling beds the solids viscosity plays the role of a correction, modeling of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) without a viscosity is not possible. Recent experimental data obtained at IIT and at IGT show that in CFB the solids viscous dissipation is responsible for as much as half of the pressure drop. From such measurement, solids viscosities were computed. These were used in the two fluid hydrodynamic model, to predict radial solids distributions and solids velocities which matched the experimental distributions. Most important, the model predicted cluster formation and transient internal circulation which is responsible for the favorable characteristics of CFBs, such as good wall-to-bed heat transfer. Video tape movies of computations compared favorably with high speed movies of the experiments

  2. Nonlinear energy dissipation of magnetic nanoparticles in oscillating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Aquino, D. [ERC Incorporated, Air Force Research Laboratory, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, CA 93524 (United States); Rinaldi, C., E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, PO Box 116131, Gainesville, FL 32611-6131 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The heating of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields enables a variety of emerging applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia and triggered drug release. Rosensweig (2002) [25] obtained a model for the heat dissipation rate of a collection of non-interacting particles. However, the assumptions made in this analysis make it rigorously valid only in the limit of small applied magnetic field amplitude and frequency (i.e., values of the Langevin parameter that are much less than unity and frequencies below the inverse relaxation time). In this contribution we approach the problem from an alternative point of view by solving the phenomenological magnetization relaxation equation exactly for the case of arbitrary magnetic field amplitude and frequency and by solving a more accurate magnetization relaxation equation numerically. We also use rotational Brownian dynamics simulations of non-interacting magnetic nanoparticles subjected to an alternating magnetic field to estimate the rate of energy dissipation and compare the results of the phenomenological theories to the particle-scale simulations. The results are summarized in terms of a normalized energy dissipation rate and show that Rosensweig's expression provides an upper bound on the energy dissipation rate achieved at high field frequency and amplitude. Estimates of the predicted dependence of energy dissipation rate, quantified as specific absorption rate (SAR), on magnetic field amplitude and frequency, and particle core and hydrodynamic diameter, are also given. - Highlights: • Rosensweig's model for SAR was extended to high fields. • The MRSh relaxation equation was used to predict SAR at high fields. • Rotational Brownian dynamics simulations were used to predict SAR. • The results of these models were compared. • Predictions of effect of size and field conditions on SAR are presented.

  3. Quantum state preparation using dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigate the possibility of using a dissipative process to prepare a quantum system in a desired state. We derive for any multipartite pure state a dissipative process for which this state is the unique stationary state and solve the corresponding master equation analytically. For certain states, like the cluster states, we use this process to show that the jump operators can be chosen quasi-locally, i.e. they act non-trivially only on a few, neighboring qubits. We demonstrate the general formalism by considering MPS-PEPS states. In particular, we show that the ground state of the AKLT-model can be prepared employing a quasi-local dissipative process. Furthermore, we discuss a dissipatively driven Bose-Einstein condensate, where for non-interacting atoms a pure state exhibiting long range order is generated as the steady state by quasi-local coupling to an environment with finite correlation length. Applying standard linearization schemes in the weakly interacting situations, allows us to determine the solution of the master equation, revealing a steady state with properties similar to bosons in thermal contact to a heat bath. Furthermore, we consider a special class of states, called locally maximally entangleable states and discuss their applications for quantum information tasks. The generation of those states using either dissipative processes, or unitary evolutions is presented. (author)

  4. Anticipation of physical causality guides eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Wende, Kim; Theunissen, Laetitia; Missal, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Causality is a unique feature of human perception. We present here a behavioral investigation of the influence of physical causality during visual pursuit of object collisions. Pursuit and saccadic eye movements of human subjects were recorded during ocular pursuit of two concurrently launched targets, one that moved according to the laws of Newtonian mechanics (the causal target) and the other one that moved in a physically implausible direction (the non-causal target). We found that anticip...

  5. Causal discovery from medical textual data.

    OpenAIRE

    Mani, S.; Cooper, G. F.

    2000-01-01

    Medical records usually incorporate investigative reports, historical notes, patient encounters or discharge summaries as textual data. This study focused on learning causal relationships from intensive care unit (ICU) discharge summaries of 1611 patients. Identification of the causal factors of clinical conditions and outcomes can help us formulate better management, prevention and control strategies for the improvement of health care. For causal discovery we applied the Local Causal Discove...

  6. Estimating causal structure using conditional DAG models

    OpenAIRE

    Oates, Chris J.; Smith, Jim Q.; Mukherjee, Sach

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers inference of causal structure in a class of graphical models called "conditional DAGs". These are directed acyclic graph (DAG) models with two kinds of variables, primary and secondary. The secondary variables are used to aid in estimation of causal relationships between the primary variables. We give causal semantics for this model class and prove that, under certain assumptions, the direction of causal influence is identifiable from the joint observational distribution ...

  7. About some peculiarities of a drift-dissipative instability in an inhomogeneous plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local quasiclassical theory of the drift-dissipative instability is in good agreement with the experimental data but it cannot explain some detected peculiarities of the phenomenon, namely the radial wave structure and the absence of the m=1 oscillations. It is shown that these discrepancies can be explained substituting the local quasiclassical approximation theory by a hydrodynamical theory. Solving the differential equations by taking into account the cylindrical walls limiting the plasma, the experimental results can be reproduced. The plasma limits play an important role in the drift-dissipative instability. (D.Gy.)

  8. Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2009-08-01

    Particle methods are less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation. However, they have important advantages including rigorous mass conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing and code development effort is relatively low. We describe applications of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role.

  9. Energy dissipation in circular tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Girgidov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy dissipation distribution along the circular tube radius is important in solving such problems as calculation of heat transfer by the air flow through building envelope; calculation of pressure loss in spiral flows; calculation of cyclones with axial and tangential supply of dust-containing gas.Two types of one-dimensional radially axisymmetric flows in circular tube were considered: axial flow and rotation about the axis (Rankine vortex. Relying on two- and four-layer description of axial turbulent flow energy dissipation was calculated in each layer.Similar calculation for Rankine vortex with viscous sublayer at the tube surface was provided. By employing the dissipation minimum principle the boundary radius between rigid rotation and free vortex is calculated. Approximation of the velocity distribution in Rankine vortex is proposed.

  10. Dissipative structures and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhorst, Benjamin R; Chu, Henry S

    2013-11-05

    Dissipative structures include at least one panel and a cell structure disposed adjacent to the at least one panel having interconnected cells. A deformable material, which may comprise at least one hydrogel, is disposed within at least one interconnected cell proximate to the at least one panel. Dissipative structures may also include a cell structure having interconnected cells formed by wall elements. The wall elements may include a mesh formed by overlapping fibers having apertures formed therebetween. The apertures may form passageways between the interconnected cells. Methods of dissipating a force include disposing at least one hydrogel in a cell structure proximate to at least one panel, applying a force to the at least one panel, and forcing at least a portion of the at least one hydrogel through apertures formed in the cell structure.

  11. DISSIPATIVE DIVERGENCE OF RESONANT ORBITS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batygin, Konstantin [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Morbidelli, Alessandro, E-mail: kbatygin@gps.caltech.edu [Departement Cassiopee, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d' Azur, F-06304 Nice (France)

    2013-01-01

    A considerable fraction of multi-planet systems discovered by the observational surveys of extrasolar planets reside in mild proximity to first-order mean-motion resonances. However, the relative remoteness of such systems from nominal resonant period ratios (e.g., 2:1, 3:2, and 4:3) has been interpreted as evidence for lack of resonant interactions. Here, we show that a slow divergence away from exact commensurability is a natural outcome of dissipative evolution and demonstrate that libration of critical angles can be maintained tens of percent away from nominal resonance. We construct an analytical theory for the long-term dynamical evolution of dissipated resonant planetary pairs and confirm our calculations numerically. Collectively, our results suggest that a significant fraction of the near-commensurate extrasolar planets are in fact resonant and have undergone significant dissipative evolution.

  12. Hydrodynamic drift ratchet scalability

    CERN Document Server

    Herringer, James; Dorrington, Graham E; Mitchell, James G; Rosengarten, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The rectilinear "drift" of particles in a hydrodynamic drift ratchet arises from a combination of diffusive motion and particle-wall hydrodynamic interactions, and is therefore dependent on particle diffusivity, particle size, the amplitude and frequency of fluid oscillation and pore geometry. Using numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the drift velocity relative to the pore size is constant across different sized drift ratchet pores, if all the relevant non-dimensional groups (Peclet number, Strouhal number and ratio of particle to pore size) remain constant. These results clearly indicate for the first time the scaling parameters under which the drift ratchet achieves dynamic similarity, and so facilitates design, fabrication and testing of drift ratchets for experiments and eventually as commercial micro/nano fluidic separation devices.

  13. Hydrodynamics of Turning Flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2015-12-01

    We present a hydrodynamic model of flocking that generalizes the familiar Toner-Tu equations to incorporate turning inertia of well-polarized flocks. The continuum equations controlled by only two dimensionless parameters, orientational inertia and alignment strength, are derived by coarse-graining the inertial spin model recently proposed by Cavagna et al. The interplay between orientational inertia and bend elasticity of the flock yields anisotropic spin waves that mediate the propagation of turning information throughout the flock. The coupling between spin-current density to the local vorticity field through a nonlinear friction gives rise to a hydrodynamic mode with angular-dependent propagation speed at long wavelengths. This mode becomes unstable as a result of the growth of bend and splay deformations augmented by the spin wave, signaling the transition to complex spatiotemporal patterns of continuously turning and swirling flocks.

  14. Spin-Electromagnetic Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Koide, T

    2013-01-01

    The hydrodynamic model including the spin degree of freedom and the electromagnetic field was discussed. In this derivation, we applied electromagnetism for macroscopic medium proposed by Minkowski. For the equation of motion of spin, we assumed that the hydrodynamic equation of the Pauli equation is reproduced when the many-body effect is neglected. The fluid and spin stress tensors induced by the many-body effect were obtained by employing the algebraic positivity of the entropy production in the framework of linear irreversible thermodynamics. In our model, the effect of the spin-magnetic interaction is absorbed into the magnetic polarization so as to satisfy the momentum and angular momentum conservations. We further compared our result with other existing models.

  15. Representing Personal Determinants in Causal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Responds to Staddon's critique of the author's earlier article and addresses issues raised by Staddon's (1984) alternative models of causality. The author argues that it is not the formalizability of causal processes that is the issue but whether cognitive determinants of behavior are reducible to past stimulus inputs in causal structures.…

  16. The argumentative impact of causal relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Ellerup

    1996-01-01

    causality, explanation and justification. In certain types of discourse, causal relations also imply an intentional element. This paper describes the way in which the semantic and pragmatic functions of causal markers can be accounted for in terms of linguistic and rhetorical theories of argumentation....

  17. Expectations and Interpretations during Causal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, Christian C.; Ahn, Woo-kyoung

    2011-01-01

    In existing models of causal induction, 4 types of covariation information (i.e., presence/absence of an event followed by presence/absence of another event) always exert identical influences on causal strength judgments (e.g., joint presence of events always suggests a generative causal relationship). In contrast, we suggest that, due to…

  18. Thermo-electric transport in gauge/gravity models with momentum dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Amoretti, Andrea; Maggiore, Nicola; Magnoli, Nicodemo; Musso, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic definition and analysis of the thermo-electric linear response in gauge/gravity systems focusing especially on models with massive gravity in the bulk and therefore momentum dissipation in the dual field theory. A precise treatment of finite counter-terms proves to be essential to yield a consistent physical picture whose hydrodynamic and beyond-hydrodynamics behaviors noticeably match with non-holographic field theoretical expectations. The model furnishes a possible gauge/gravity description of the crossover from the quantum-critical to the disorder-dominated Fermi-liquid behaviors, as expected in graphene.

  19. A discretized integral hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Romero-Rochin, Victor; Rubi, J. Miguel

    1997-01-01

    Using an interpolant form for the gradient of a function of position, we write an integral version of the conservation equations for a fluid. In the appropriate limit, these become the usual conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy. We also discuss the special cases of the Navier-Stokes equations for viscous flow and the Fourier law for thermal conduction in the presence of hydrodynamic fluctuations. By means of a discretization procedure, we show how these equations can give rise to th...

  20. Nonlinear hydrodynamic stability

    CERN Document Server

    Isichenko, M B

    1998-01-01

    The variational principle of V. I. Arnold [J. Appl. Math. Mech. Vol. 29, P. 1002 (1965)] is extended to the general conservative inhomogeneous, compressible, and conducting fluid. The concept of iso-vortical flows is generalized to an "invariant foliation" of the phase space. The foliation, which may or may not correspond to explicit conservation laws, is derived from the equations of motion and used for Lyapunov stability. A nonlinear three-dimensional (magneto-) hydrodynamic stability criterion is formulated.

  1. Granular Solid Hydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Granular elasticity, an elasticity theory useful for calculating static stress distribution in granular media, is generalized to the dynamic case by including the plastic contribution of the strain. A complete hydrodynamic theory is derived based on the hypothesis that granular medium turns transiently elastic when deformed. This theory includes both the true and the granular temperatures, and employs a free energy expression that encapsulates a full jamming phase diagram, in the space spanne...

  2. A Variational approach to thin film hydrodynamics of binary mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2015-02-04

    In order to model the dynamics of thin films of mixtures, solutions, and suspensions, a thermodynamically consistent formulation is needed such that various coexisting dissipative processes with cross couplings can be correctly described in the presence of capillarity, wettability, and mixing effects. In the present work, we apply Onsager\\'s variational principle to the formulation of thin film hydrodynamics for binary fluid mixtures. We first derive the dynamic equations in two spatial dimensions, one along the substrate and the other normal to the substrate. Then, using long-wave asymptotics, we derive the thin film equations in one spatial dimension along the substrate. This enables us to establish the connection between the present variational approach and the gradient dynamics formulation for thin films. It is shown that for the mobility matrix in the gradient dynamics description, Onsager\\'s reciprocal symmetry is automatically preserved by the variational derivation. Furthermore, using local hydrodynamic variables, our variational approach is capable of introducing diffusive dissipation beyond the limit of dilute solute. Supplemented with a Flory-Huggins-type mixing free energy, our variational approach leads to a thin film model that treats solvent and solute in a symmetric manner. Our approach can be further generalized to include more complicated free energy and additional dissipative processes.

  3. Dissipative heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of lecture notes of a series of lectures held at Argonne National Laboratory in October and November 1984. The lectures are a discussion of dissipative phenomena as observed in collisions of atomic nuclei. The model is based on a system which has initially zero temperature and the initial energy is kinetic and binding energy. Collisions excite the nuclei, and outgoing fragments or the compound system deexcite before they are detected. Brownian motion is used to introduce the concept of dissipation. The master equation and the Fokker-Planck equation are derived. 73 refs., 59 figs

  4. A Lagrangian staggered grid Godunov-like approach for hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Lipnikov, Konstantin N.; Burton, Donald E.; Kenamond, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Much research in Lagrangian staggered-grid hydrodynamics (SGH) has focused on explicit viscosity models for adding dissipation to a calculation that has shocks. The explicit viscosity is commonly called “artificial viscosity”. Recently, researchers have developed hydrodynamic algorithms that incorporate approximate Riemann solutions on the dual grid [28,29,35,30,2,3]. This approach adds dissipation to the calculation via solving a Riemann-like problem. In this work, we follow the works of [28,29,35,30] and solve a multidirectional Riemann-like problem at the cell center. The Riemann-like solution at the cell center is used in the momentum and energy equations. The multidirectional Riemann-like problem used in this work differs from previous work in that it is an extension of the cell-centered hydrodynamics (CCH) nodal solution approach in [7]. Incorporating the multidirectional Riemann-like problem from [7] into SGH has merits such as the ability to resist mesh instabilities like hourglass null modes and chevron null modes. The approach is valid for complex multidimensional flows with strong shocks. Numerical details and test problems are presented.

  5. Principal Stratification in Causal Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Frangakis, Constantine E.; Rubin, Donald B.

    2002-01-01

    Many scientific problems require that treatment comparisons be adjusted for posttreatment variables, but the estimands underlying standard methods are not causal effects. To address this deficiency, we propose a general framework for comparing treatments adjusting for posttreatment variables that yields principal effects based on principal stratification. Principal stratification with respect to a posttreatment variable is a cross-classification of subjects defined by the joint potential valu...

  6. Energy Dissipation Processes in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Xu, X. J.; Zhang, J.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  7. Entanglement, Holography and Causal Diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Jan; Heller, Michal P; Myers, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We argue that the degrees of freedom in a d-dimensional CFT can be re-organized in an insightful way by studying observables on the moduli space of causal diamonds (or equivalently, the space of pairs of timelike separated points). This 2d-dimensional space naturally captures some of the fundamental nonlocality and causal structure inherent in the entanglement of CFT states. For any primary CFT operator, we construct an observable on this space, which is defined by smearing the associated one-point function over causal diamonds. Known examples of such quantities are the entanglement entropy of vacuum excitations and its higher spin generalizations. We show that in holographic CFTs, these observables are given by suitably defined integrals of dual bulk fields over the corresponding Ryu-Takayanagi minimal surfaces. Furthermore, we explain connections to the operator product expansion and the first law of entanglement entropy from this unifying point of view. We demonstrate that for small perturbations of the va...

  8. On Dissipation in Stochastic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    1999-01-01

    We define the property of dissipativity for controlled Ito diffusions. We investigate elementary properties, and we demonstrate that the framework is useful for control problems in which both probabilistic and worst-case representations of dynamic uncertainty are present. As an example we discuss...

  9. Impacts on Dissipative Sonic Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichao; Nesterenko, Vitali

    We investigate the propagating compression bell shape stress waves generated by the strikers with different masses impacting the sonic vacuum - the discrete dissipative strongly nonlinear metamaterial with zero long wave sound speed. The metamaterial is composed of alternating steel disks and Nitrile O-rings. Being a solid material, it has exceptionally low speed of the investigated stress waves in the range of 50 - 74 m/s, which is a few times smaller than the speed of sound or shock waves in air generated by blast. The shape of propagating stress waves was dramatically changed by the viscous dissipation. It prevented the incoming pulses from splitting into trains of solitary waves, a phenomenon characteristic of the non-dissipative strongly nonlinear discrete systems when the striker mass is larger than the cell mass. Both high-speed camera images and numerical simulations demonstrate the unusual rattling behavior of the top disk between the striker and the rest of the system. The linear momentum and energy from the striker were completely transferred to the metamaterial. This strongly nonlinear dissipative metamaterial can be designed for the optimal attenuation of dynamic loads generated by impact or contact explosion. Author 1 wants to acknowledge the support provided by UCSD.

  10. Mudflows: Assessment of Energy Dissipation on an Experimental Bottom Grid Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Paola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Grid devices with a terminal wall barrier have been widely used for dissipation of energy load of water piped from the outfall works of artificial reservoirs. The satisfactory results obtained have led to the commitment to usage of such devices, with good results even in the case of mudflows for which design criteria were suggested. In this study, the experimental results of an evaluation of pressure on a vertical terminal wall are shown with the evaluation of the overall hydrodynamic thrust. The correct evaluation of the dynamic impact of a mudflow front against a structure is an important task in its design procedure. The hydrodynamic drive calculated from the tests with corresponding theoretical model values derived has shown a good matching. According to the test and speed range detected, the maximum dissipation rate due to the wall was about 35% of the available total load.

  11. The role of coral reef rugosity in dissipating wave energy and coastal protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Casella, Elisa

    2016-04-01

    Coral reefs are the most effective natural barrier in dissipating wave energy through breaking and bed friction. The attenuation of wave energy by coral reef flats is essential in the protection and stability of coral reef aligned coasts and reef islands. However, the effectiveness of wave energy dissipation by coral reefs may be diminished under future climate change scenarios with a potential reduction of coral reef rugosity due to increased stress environmental stress on corals. The physical roughness or rugosity of coral reefs is directly related to ecological diversity, reef health, and hydrodynamic roughness. However, the relationship between physical roughness and hydrodynamic roughness is not well understood despite the crucial role of bed friction in dissipating wave energy in coral reef aligned coasts. We examine the relationship between wave energy dissipation across a fringing reef in relation to the cross-reef ecological zonation and the benthic hydrodynamic roughness. Waves were measured by pressure transducers in a cross-reef transect on the reefs flats and post processed on a wave by wave basis to determine wave statistics such as significant wave height and wave period. Results from direct wave measurement were then used to calibrate a 1D wave dissipation model that incorporates dissipation functions due to bed friction and wave breaking. This model was used to assess the bed roughness required to produce the observed wave height dissipation during propagation from deep water and across the coral reef flats. Changes in wave dissipation was also examined under future scenarios of sea level rise and reduced bed roughness. Three dimensional models of the benthic reef structure were produced through structure-from-motion photogrammetry surveys. Reef rugosity was then determined from these surveys and related to the roughness results from the calibrated model. The results indicate that applying varying roughness coefficients as the benthic ecological

  12. A Dissipative-Particle-Dynamics Model for Simulating Dynamics of Charged Colloid

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    A mesoscopic colloid model is developed in which a spherical colloid is represented by many interacting sites on its surface. The hydrodynamic interactions with thermal fluctuations are taken accounts in full using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, and the electrostatic interactions are simulated using Particle-Particle-Particle Mesh method. This new model is applied to investigate the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid under an external electric field, and the influence of salt conce...

  13. Linking dissipation-induced instabilities with nonmodal growth: the case of helical magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Mamatsashvili, George

    2016-01-01

    The helical magnetorotational instability is known to work for resistive rotational flows with comparably steep negative or extremely steep positive shear. The corresponding lower and upper Liu limits of the shear are continuously connected when some axial electrical current is allowed to flow through the rotating fluid. Using a local approximation we demonstrate that the magnetohydrodynamic behavior of this dissipation-induced instability is intimately connected with the nonmodal growth and the pseudospectrum of the underlying purely hydrodynamic problem.

  14. Constraints on Rindler Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Adiel

    2013-01-01

    We study uncharged Rindler hydrodynamics at second order in the derivative expansion. The equation of state of the theory is given by a vanishing equilibrium energy density. We derive relations among the transport coefficients by employing two frameworks. First, by the requirement of having an entropy current with a non-negative divergence, second by studying the thermal partition function on stationary backgrounds. The relations derived by these two methods are consistent with each other. However, we find that the entropy current yields stronger constraints than the thermal partition function. We verify the results by studying explicit examples in flat and curved space-time geometries.

  15. Incompressible smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a smoothed particle hydrodynamic model for incompressible fluids. As opposed to solving a pressure Poisson equation in order to get a divergence-free velocity field, here incompressibility is achieved by requiring as a kinematic constraint that the volume of the fluid particles is constant. We use Lagrangian multipliers to enforce this restriction. These Lagrange multipliers play the role of non-thermodynamic pressures whose actual values are fixed through the kinematic restriction. We use the SHAKE methodology familiar in constrained molecular dynamics as an efficient method for finding the non-thermodynamic pressure satisfying the constraints. The model is tested for several flow configurations

  16. Foundations of radiation hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    1999-01-01

    Radiation hydrodynamics is a broad subject that cuts across many disciplines in physics and astronomy: fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, and radiative transfer, among others. The theory developed in this book by two specialists in the field can be applied to the study of such diverse astrophysical phenomena as stellar winds, supernova explosions, and the initial phases of cosmic expansion, as well as the physics of laser fusion and reentry vehicles. As such, it provides students with the basic tools for research on radiating flows.Largely self-contained,

  17. Finitary Spacetime Sheaves of Quantum Causal Sets Curving Quantum Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Mallios, A

    2001-01-01

    A locally finite, causal and quantal substitute for a locally Minkowskian principal fiber bundle $\\cal{P}$ of modules of Cartan differential forms $\\omg$ over a bounded region $X$ of a curved $C^{\\infty}$-smooth differential manifold spacetime $M$ with structure group ${\\bf G}$ that of orthochronous Lorentz transformations $L^{+}:=SO(1,3)^{\\uparrow}$, is presented. ${\\cal{P}}$ is the structure on which classical Lorentzian gravity, regarded as a Yang-Mills type of gauge theory of a $sl(2,\\com)$-valued connection 1-form $\\cal{A}$, is usually formulated. The mathematical structure employed to model this replacement of ${\\cal{P}}$ is a principal finitary spacetime sheaf $\\vec{\\cal{P}}_{n}$ of quantum causal sets $\\amg_{n}$ with structure group ${\\bf G}_{n}$, which is a finitary version of the group ${\\bf G}$ of local symmetries of General Relativity, and a finitary Lie algebra ${\\bf g}_{n}$-valued connection 1-form ${\\cal{A}}_{n}$ on it, which is a section of its sub-sheaf $\\amg^{1}_{n}$. ${\\cal{A}}_{n}$ is phys...

  18. A New Approach to Non-Abelian Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Melgarejo, Jose J; Surówka, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach to hydrodynamics carrying non-Abelian macroscopic degrees of freedom. Our derivation is based on the Kaluza-Klein compactification of higher-dimensional neutral dissipative fluid on a group manifold. We obtain colored dissipative fluid coupled to Yang-Mills gauge field in reduced spacetime. The transport coefficients of the new fluid, which show a non-Abelian character, are expressed in terms of the higher-dimensional quantities. In particular, we obtain group-valued terms in the gradient expansions and response quantities such as the conductivity matrix and the chemical potentials. We discuss links between this system and quark-gluon plasma as well as fluid/gravity duality.

  19. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  20. Interfacial hydrodynamics: a microscopic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Baus, Marc; Fernández Tejero, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Linearized hydrodynamic equations for a nonuniform anisotropic fluid are obtained from the exact Mori-Zwanzig equations for the conserved densities. In the particular case of a two-phase system with a planar equilibrium interface, these equations can be reduced to the ordinary hydrodynamic equations inside each bulk phase and to surface hydrodynamic equations for the interfacial layer. Surface transport coefficients and surface thermodynamic parameters are hereby obtained as Gibbs surface exc...

  1. The Impossibility of Causality Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Conway, Roger K.; P. A. V. B. Swamy; Yanagida, John F.; Muehlen, Peter von zur

    1984-01-01

    Causality tests developed by Sims and Granger are fatally flawed for several reasons First, when two variables, X and Y, are uncorrelated, X has no linear predictive value for Y, but X,and Y may be nonlinearly related unless they are statistically Independent, In which case X and Y are not related at all The light-hand side variables In a regression equation are exogenous If they are mean Independent of the disturbance term Mean Independence IS stronger than uncorrelatedness The proofs for de...

  2. Breaking the arrows of causality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsiner, Jaan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models of catalysis have proven to bring with them major breakthroughs in chemistry and biology, from the 1830s onward. It can be argued that the scientific status of chemistry has become established through the move from causal to catalytic models. Likewise, the central explanatory...... role of cyclical models in biology has made it possible to move from the idea of genetic determination to that of epigenetic negotiation as the core of biological theory. In psychology, catalytic thinking has been outside of the realm of accepted scientific schemes, as the axiomatic dependence upon the...

  3. Latest developments in anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tinti, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics expansion. It has already been shown that in the (0+1) and (1+1)-dimensional cases it is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics, and it provides a striking agreement with the exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation. Quite recently, a new set of equations has been proposed for the leading order of anisotropic hydrodynamics, which is consistent with the second order viscous hydrodynamics in the most general (3+1)-dimensional case, and does not require a next-to-leading treatment for describing pressure anisotropies in the transverse plane.

  4. Molecular Hydrodynamics from Memory Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as t-3 /2 . We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, which is at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. Lastly, we discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales, and the crossover between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  5. Hydrodynamic modes for granular gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James W; Brey, J Javier

    2003-09-01

    The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the linearized Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres (d=3) or disks (d=2) corresponding to d+2 hydrodynamic modes are calculated in the long wavelength limit for a granular gas. The transport coefficients are identified and found to agree with those from the Chapman-Enskog solution. The dominance of hydrodynamic modes at long times and long wavelengths is studied via an exactly solvable kinetic model. A collisional continuum is bounded away from the hydrodynamic spectrum, assuring a hydrodynamic description at long times. The bound is closely related to the power law decay of the velocity distribution in the reference homogeneous cooling state. PMID:14524742

  6. Molecular hydrodynamics from memory kernels

    CERN Document Server

    Lesnicki, Dominika; Carof, Antoine; Rotenberg, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The memory kernel for a tagged particle in a fluid, computed from molecular dynamics simulations, decays algebraically as $t^{-3/2}$. We show how the hydrodynamic Basset-Boussinesq force naturally emerges from this long-time tail and generalize the concept of hydrodynamic added mass. This mass term is negative in the present case of a molecular solute, at odds with incompressible hydrodynamics predictions. We finally discuss the various contributions to the friction, the associated time scales and the cross-over between the molecular and hydrodynamic regimes upon increasing the solute radius.

  7. The Functions of Danish Causal Conjunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Therkelsen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article I propose an analysis of the Danish causal conjunctions fordi, siden and for based on the framework of Danish Functional Grammar. As conjunctions they relate two clauses, and their semantics have in common that it indicates a causal relationship between the clauses. The causal conjunctions are different as far as their distribution is concerned; siden conjoins a subordinate clause and a main clause, for conjoins two main clauses, and fordi is able to do both. Methodologically I have based my analysis on these distributional properties comparing siden and fordi conjoining a subordinate and a main clause, and comparing for and fordi conjoining two main clauses, following the thesis that they would establish a causal relationship between different kinds of content. My main findings are that fordi establishes a causal relationship between the events referred to by the two clauses, and the whole utterance functions as a statement of this causal relationship. Siden presupposes such a general causal relationship between the two events and puts forward the causing event as a reason for assuming or wishing or ordering the caused event, siden thus establishes a causal relationship between an event and a speech act. For equally presupposes a general causal relationship between two events and it establishes a causal relationship between speech acts, and fordi conjoining two main clauses is able to do this too, but in this position it also maintains its event-relating ability, the interpretation depending on contextual factors.

  8. Space and time in perceptual causality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Straube

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Inferring causality is a fundamental feature of human cognition that allows us to theorize about and predict future states of the world. Michotte suggested that humans automatically perceive causality based on certain perceptual features of events. However, individual differences in judgments of perceptual causality cast doubt on Michotte’s view. To gain insights in the neural basis of individual difference in the perception of causality, our participants judged causal relationships in animations of a blue ball colliding with a red ball (a launching event while fMRI-data were acquired. Spatial continuity and temporal contiguity were varied parametrically in these stimuli. We did not find consistent brain activation differences between trials judged as caused and those judged as non-caused, making it unlikely that humans have universal instantiation of perceptual causality in the brain. However, participants were slower to respond to and showed greater neural activity for violations of causality, suggesting that humans are biased to expect causal relationships when moving objects appear to interact. Our participants demonstrated considerable individual differences in their sensitivity to spatial and temporal characteristics in perceiving causality. These qualitative differences in sensitivity to time or space in perceiving causality were instantiated in individual differences in activation of the left basal ganglia or right parietal lobe, respectively. Thus, the perception that the movement of one object causes the movement of another is triggered by elemental spatial and temporal sensitivities, which themselves are instantiated in specific distinct neural networks.

  9. Regularity criterion for the 3D Hall-magneto-hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mimi

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the regularity problem for the 3D incompressible resistive viscous Hall-magneto-hydrodynamic (Hall-MHD) system. The Kolmogorov 41 phenomenological theory of turbulence [14] predicts that there exists a critical wavenumber above which the high frequency part is dominated by the dissipation term in the fluid equation. Inspired by this idea, we apply an approach of splitting the wavenumber combined with an estimate of the energy flux to obtain a new regularity criterion. The regularity condition presented here is weaker than conditions in the existing criteria (Prodi-Serrin type criteria) for the 3D Hall-MHD system.

  10. Astrophysical Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosswog, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In this review the basic principles of smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) are outlined in a pedagogical fashion. To start, a basic set of SPH equations that is used in many codes throughout the astrophysics community is derived explicitly. Much of SPH's success relies on its excellent conservation properties and therefore the numerical conservation of physical invariants receives much attention throughout this review. The self-consistent derivation of the SPH equations from the Lagrangian of an ideal fluid is the common theme of the remainder of the text. Such a variational approach is applied to derive a modern SPH version of Newtonian hydrodynamics. It accounts for gradients in the local resolution lengths which result in corrective, so-called "grad-h-terms". This strategy naturally carries over to the special-relativistic case for which we derive the corresponding grad-h set of equations. This approach is further generalized to the case of a fluid that evolves on a curved, but fixed background space-time.

  11. Modeling helicity dissipation-rate equation

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu

    2016-01-01

    Transport equation of the dissipation rate of turbulent helicity is derived with the aid of a statistical analytical closure theory of inhomogeneous turbulence. It is shown that an assumption on the helicity scaling with an algebraic relationship between the helicity and its dissipation rate leads to the transport equation of the turbulent helicity dissipation rate without resorting to a heuristic modeling.

  12. From Molecular Dynamics to Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Flekkoy, Eirik G.; Coveney, Peter V.

    1999-01-01

    A procedure is introduced for deriving a coarse-grained dissipative particle dynamics from molecular dynamics. The rules of the dissipative particle dynamics are derived from the underlying molecular interactions, and a Langevin equation is obtained that describes the forces experienced by the dissipative particles and specifies the associated canonical Gibbs distribution for the system.

  13. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S D Maharaj; G Govender; M Govender

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a radiating sphere evolving into a final static configuration described by the interior Schwarzschild solution. The temperature profiles of this particular model are obtained within the framework of causal thermodynamics. The overall temperature evolution is enhanced by contributions from the temperature gradient induced by perturbations as well as relaxational effects within the stellar core.

  14. Dissipation and nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution is intended to give a brief summary of a forthcoming paper which shall review extensively the linear response theory for dissipation and statistical fluctuations as well as its application to heavy-ion collisions. It shall contain new results on the following subjects: numerical computations of response functions and transport coefficients; dissipation in a self-consistent treatment of harmonic vibrations; introduction of collective variables within a quantum theory. The method used consists of an extended version of the Bohm and Pines treatment of the electron gas. It allows to deduce a quantum Hamiltonian for the collective and intrinsic motion including coupling terms; discussion and solution of a quantal Master equation for non-linear collective motion. Additionally, a somewhat elaborate discussion of the problems of irreversibility is given, especially in connection to a treatment within the moving basis

  15. Nuclear Dissipation from Fission Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontchar, I.; Morjean, M.; Basnary, S. [GANIL DSM/CEA, IN2P3/CNRS, BP 5027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2000-04-21

    Fission times, pre-scission neutron multiplicities and GDR pre-scission {gamma}-ray multiplicities measured for uranium or thorium nuclei formed with temperatures T {approx} 1.8 MeV have been compared with calculations performed with CDSM2, a two-dimensional dynamical model combined with a statistical one. Among the three experimental approaches considered, fission times give access to the most precise pieces of information on nuclear dissipation at high excitation energy. For the temperature range under consideration, an agreement between the model and data is achieved if one-body dissipation is used with a strength factor k{sub red} {approx} 0.45 {+-} 0.10 applied to the wall term for the mononuclear configuration. (authors)

  16. Kinetic energy dissipation of a tuning fork immersed in superfluid helium at different frequencies of oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study is made of the drag coefficient, which is the characteristics of energy dissipation during oscillations of the tuning forks, immersed in liquid helium. The experiments were performed in the temperature range from 0.1 to 3.5 K covering both the range of a hydrodynamic flow, and the ballistic regime of transfer of thermal excitations of superfluid helium below 0.6 K. It is found that there is the frequency dependence of the drag coefficient in the hydrodynamic limit, when the main dissipation mechanism is the viscous friction of the fluid against the walls of the oscillating body at temperatures above 0.7 K. In this case, the drag coefficient is proportional to the square root of the frequency of oscillation, and its temperature dependence in He II is determined by the respective dependence of the normal component density of the normal component and the viscosity of the fluid. At lower temperatures, the dependence of drag coefficient on the frequency is not available, and the magnitude of the dissipative losses is determined only by the temperature dependence of the density of the normal component. At the same time in the entire range of temperatures value of dissipative losses depends on the geometry of the oscillating body.

  17. Probabilistic causality and radiogenic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review and scrutiny of the literature on probability and probabilistic causality shows that it is possible under certain assumptions to estimate the probability that a certain type of cancer diagnosed in an individual exposed to radiation prior to diagnosis was caused by this exposure. Diagnosis of this causal relationship like diagnosis of any disease - malignant or not - requires always some subjective judgments by the diagnostician. It is, therefore, illusory to believe that tables based on actuarial data can provide objective estimates of the chance that a cancer diagnosed in an individual is radiogenic. It is argued that such tables can only provide a base from which the diagnostician(s) deviate in one direction or the other according to his (their) individual (consensual) judgment. Acceptance of a physician's diagnostic judgment by patients is commonplace. Similar widespread acceptance of expert judgment by claimants in radiation compensation cases does presently not exist. Judicious use of the present radioepidemiological tables prepared by the Working Group of the National Institutes of Health or of updated future versions of similar tables may improve the situation. 20 references

  18. Dissipative effects in projectile fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaction mechanisms in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions are studied. A two step model is proposed. Dissipative stage and abrasion stage are considered with special emphasis to phase space configuration of participant region. Fragmentation and damped collisions are found with their relative importance. Results are given for main observables and are compared to existing experimental data. Comparisons with other models are also discussed. (41 refs, 18 figs)

  19. Energy dissipation in circular tube

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Girgidov

    2012-01-01

    Energy dissipation distribution along the circular tube radius is important in solving such problems as calculation of heat transfer by the air flow through building envelope; calculation of pressure loss in spiral flows; calculation of cyclones with axial and tangential supply of dust-containing gas.Two types of one-dimensional radially axisymmetric flows in circular tube were considered: axial flow and rotation about the axis (Rankine vortex). Relying on two- and four-layer description of a...

  20. Dissipative generalized Chaplygin gas as phantom dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Norman [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: ncruz@lauca.usach.cl; Lepe, Samuel [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Basicas y Matematicas, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Avenida Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)]. E-mail: slepe@ucv.cl; Pena, Francisco [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Ciencias y Administracion, Universidad de la Frontera, Avda. Francisco Salazar 01145, Casilla 54-D, Temuco (Chile)]. E-mail: fcampos@ufro.cl

    2007-03-15

    The generalized Chaplygin gas, characterized by the equation of state p=-A/{rho}{sup {alpha}}, has been considered as a model for dark energy due to its dark-energy-like evolution at late times. When dissipative processes are taken into account, within the framework of the standard Eckart theory of relativistic irreversible thermodynamics, cosmological analytical solutions are found. Using the truncated causal version of the Israel-Stewart formalism, a suitable model was constructed which crosses the w=-1 barrier. The future-singularities encountered in both approaches are of a new type, and not included in the classification presented by Nojiri and Odintsov [S. Nojiri, S.D. Odintsov, Phys. Rev. D 72 (2005) 023003].

  1. Causal relationship: a new tool for the causal characterization of Lorentzian manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We define and study a new kind of relation between two diffeomorphic Lorentzian manifolds called a causal relation, which is any diffeomorphism characterized by mapping every causal vector of the first manifold onto a causal vector of the second. We perform a thorough study of the mathematical properties of causal relations and prove in particular that two given Lorentzian manifolds (say V and W) may be causally related only in one direction (say from V to W, but not from W to V). This leads us to the concept of causally equivalent (or isocausal in short) Lorentzian manifolds as those mutually causally related and to a definition of causal structure over a differentiable manifold as the equivalence class formed by isocausal Lorentzian metrics upon it. Isocausality is a more general concept than the conformal relationship, because we prove the remarkable result that a conformal relation φ is characterized by the fact of being a causal relation of the particular kind in which both φ and φ-1 are causal relations. Isocausal Lorentzian manifolds are mutually causally compatible, they share some important causal properties, and there are one-to-one correspondences, which are sometimes non-trivial, between several classes of their respective future (and past) objects. A more important feature is that they satisfy the same standard causality constraints. We also introduce a partial order for the equivalence classes of isocausal Lorentzian manifolds providing a classification of all the causal structures that a given fixed manifold can have. By introducing the concept of causal extension we put forward a new definition of causal boundary for Lorentzian manifolds based on the concept of isocausality, and thereby we generalize the traditional Penrose constructions of conformal infinity, diagrams and embeddings. In particular, the concept of causal diagram is given. Many explicit clarifying examples are presented throughout the paper

  2. FDI and growth: a causal relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Abdur; Mavrotas, George

    2005-01-01

    The paper examines the causal relationship between FDI and economic growth by using an innovative econometric methodology to study the direction of causality between the two variables. We apply our methodology, based on the Toda-Yamamoto test for causality, to time-series data covering the period 1969-2000 for three developing countries, namely Chile, Malaysia and Thailand, all of them major recipients of FDI with a different history of macroeconomic episodes, policy regimes and growth patter...

  3. Linear causal modeling with structural equations

    CERN Document Server

    Mulaik, Stanley A

    2009-01-01

    Emphasizing causation as a functional relationship between variables that describe objects, Linear Causal Modeling with Structural Equations integrates a general philosophical theory of causation with structural equation modeling (SEM) that concerns the special case of linear causal relations. In addition to describing how the functional relation concept may be generalized to treat probabilistic causation, the book reviews historical treatments of causation and explores recent developments in experimental psychology on studies of the perception of causation. It looks at how to perceive causal

  4. The problem of causality in cultivation research

    OpenAIRE

    Rossmann, Constanze; Brosius, Hans-Bernd

    2004-01-01

    This paper offers an up-to-date review of problems in determining causal relationships in cultivation research, and considers the research rationales of various approaches with special reference to causal interpretation. It describes in turn a number of methodologies for addressing the problem and resolving it as far as this is possible. The issue of causal inference arises not only in cultivation research, however, but is basic to all media effects theories and approaches primarily at the ma...

  5. Causal inference in economics and marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Hal R

    2016-07-01

    This is an elementary introduction to causal inference in economics written for readers familiar with machine learning methods. The critical step in any causal analysis is estimating the counterfactual-a prediction of what would have happened in the absence of the treatment. The powerful techniques used in machine learning may be useful for developing better estimates of the counterfactual, potentially improving causal inference. PMID:27382144

  6. Causal inference in economics and marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Hal R.

    2016-01-01

    This is an elementary introduction to causal inference in economics written for readers familiar with machine learning methods. The critical step in any causal analysis is estimating the counterfactual—a prediction of what would have happened in the absence of the treatment. The powerful techniques used in machine learning may be useful for developing better estimates of the counterfactual, potentially improving causal inference. PMID:27382144

  7. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, R. S.; Szezech, J. D.; Batista, A. M.; de Souza, S. L. T.; Caldas, I. L.; Viana, R. L.; Sanjuán, M. A. F.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  8. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how...... causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects...

  9. Magnetic dissipation Spatial and temporal structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nordlund, A A

    2002-01-01

    A magnetically dominated plasma driven by motions on boundaries at which magnetic field lines are anchored is forced to dissipate the work being done upon it, no matter how small the electrical resistivity. Numerical experiments have clarified that dissipation is achieved through the formation of a hierarchy of electrical current sheets. The probability distribution function of the local winding of magnetic field lines is nearly Gaussian, with a width of the order unity. The dissipation is highly irregular in space and time, but the average level of dissipation is well described by a scaling law that is independent of the electrical resistivity. If the boundary driving is suspended for a period of time the magnetic dissipation rapidly drops to insignificant levels, leaving the magnetic field in a nearly force-free state. Renewed boundary driving leads to a quick return to dissipation levels compatible with the rate of boundary work, with dissipation starting much more rapidly than when starting from idealized...

  10. Waves in vertically inhomogeneous dissipative atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Dmitrienko, I S

    2015-01-01

    A method of construction of solution for acoustic-gravity waves (AGW) above a wave source, taking dissipation throughout the atmosphere into account (Dissipative Solution above Source, DSAS), is proposed. The method is to combine three solutions for three parts of the atmosphere: an analytical solution for the upper isothermal part and numerical solutions for the real non-isothermal dissipative atmosphere in the middle part and for the real non-isothermal small dissipation atmosphere in the lower one. In this paper the method has been carried out for the atmosphere with thermal conductivity but without viscosity. The heights of strong dissipation and the total absorption index in the regions of weak and average dissipation are found. For internal gravity waves the results of test calculations for an isothermal atmosphere and calculations for a real non-isothermal atmosphere are shown in graphical form. An algorithm and appropriate code to calculate DSAS, taking dissipation due to finite thermal conductivity i...

  11. Lifshitz Superfluid Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Shira; Oz, Yaron

    2014-01-01

    We construct the first order hydrodynamics of quantum critical points with Lifshitz scaling and a spontaneously broken symmetry. The fluid is described by a combination of two flows, a normal component that carries entropy and a super-flow which has zero viscosity and carries no entropy. We analyze the new transport effects allowed by the lack of boost invariance and constrain them by the local second law of thermodynamics. Imposing time-reversal invariance, we find eight new parity even transport coefficients. The formulation is applicable, in general, to any superfluid/superconductor with an explicit breaking of boost symmetry, in particular to high $T_c$ superconductors. We discuss possible experimental signatures.

  12. Hydrodynamic effects on coalescence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimiduk, Thomas G.; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Baer, Thomas A.; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Loewenberg, Michael (Yale University, New Haven, CT); Gorby, Allen D.; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this project was to design, build and test novel diagnostics to probe the effect of hydrodynamic forces on coalescence dynamics. Our investigation focused on how a drop coalesces onto a flat surface which is analogous to two drops coalescing, but more amenable to precise experimental measurements. We designed and built a flow cell to create an axisymmetric compression flow which brings a drop onto a flat surface. A computer-controlled system manipulates the flow to steer the drop and maintain a symmetric flow. Particle image velocimetry was performed to confirm that the control system was delivering a well conditioned flow. To examine the dynamics of the coalescence, we implemented an interferometry capability to measure the drainage of the thin film between the drop and the surface during the coalescence process. A semi-automated analysis routine was developed which converts the dynamic interferogram series into drop shape evolution data.

  13. Hydrodynamics, resurgence, and transasymptotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Gökçe; Dunne, Gerald V.

    2015-12-01

    The second order hydrodynamical description of a homogeneous conformal plasma that undergoes a boost-invariant expansion is given by a single nonlinear ordinary differential equation, whose resurgent asymptotic properties we study, developing further the recent work of Heller and Spalinski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 072501 (2015)]. Resurgence clearly identifies the nonhydrodynamic modes that are exponentially suppressed at late times, analogous to the quasinormal modes in gravitational language, organizing these modes in terms of a trans-series expansion. These modes are analogs of instantons in semiclassical expansions, where the damping rate plays the role of the instanton action. We show that this system displays the generic features of resurgence, with explicit quantitative relations between the fluctuations about different orders of these nonhydrodynamic modes. The imaginary part of the trans-series parameter is identified with the Stokes constant, and the real part with the freedom associated with initial conditions.

  14. Gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Florkowski, Wojciech; Spaliński, Michał

    2016-01-01

    We compute the gradient expansion for anisotropic hydrodynamics. The results are compared with the corresponding expansion of the underlying kinetic-theory model with the collision term treated in the relaxation time approximation. We find that a recent formulation of anisotropic hydrodynamics based on an anisotropic matching principle yields the first three terms of the gradient expansion in agreement with those obtained for the kinetic theory. This gives further support for this particular hydrodynamic model as a good approximation of the kinetic-theory approach. We further find that the gradient expansion of anisotropic hydrodynamics is an asymptotic series, and the singularities of the analytic continuation of its Borel transform indicate the presence of non-hydrodynamic modes.

  15. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics. A superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-07-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly [non-causal] processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the [non-causal]. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That is, the QM world is sub-luminally, luminally and superluminally local-causal throughout, and the Law of Causality is ubiquitous in the micro-world. Thus, ''probabilistic causality'' is a merely epistemic term.

  16. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics. A superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly [non-causal] processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the [non-causal]. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That is, the QM world is sub-luminally, luminally and superluminally local-causal throughout, and the Law of Causality is ubiquitous in the micro-world. Thus, ''probabilistic causality'' is a merely epistemic term.

  17. Dynamic capillary wetting studied with dissipative particle dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cupelli, Claudio; Glatzel, Thomas; Zengerle, Roland; Santer, Mark [Laboratory for MEMS applications, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 106, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Henrich, Bjoern; Moseler, Michael [Freiburg Materials Research Center (FMF), Stefan-Meier-Strasse 21, 79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: cupelli@imtek.de

    2008-04-15

    We present a study on dynamic capillary wetting in the framework of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) based on a novel wall model for wetting on solid boundaries. We consider capillary impregnation of a slit pore in two situations: (i) forced (piston-driven) steady state flow and (ii) capillarity driven imbibition out of a finite reservoir. The dynamic contact angle behavior under condition (i) is consistent with the hydrodynamic theories of Cox under partial wetting conditions and Eggers for complete wetting. The flow field near the contact line shows a region of apparent slip flow which provides a natural way of avoiding a stress singularity at the triple line. The dynamics of the capillary imbibition, i.e. condition (ii), is consistently described by the Lucas-Washburn equation augmented by expressions that account for inertia and the influence of the dynamic contact angle.

  18. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsev, Nikolai D.; Leal, L. Gary; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-02-01

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales.

  19. Multiscale simulation of ideal mixtures using smoothed dissipative particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsev, Nikolai D; Leal, L Gary; Shell, M Scott

    2016-02-28

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) [P. Español and M. Revenga, Phys. Rev. E 67, 026705 (2003)] is a thermodynamically consistent particle-based continuum hydrodynamics solver that features scale-dependent thermal fluctuations. We obtain a new formulation of this stochastic method for ideal two-component mixtures through a discretization of the advection-diffusion equation with thermal noise in the concentration field. The resulting multicomponent approach is consistent with the interpretation of the SDPD particles as moving volumes of fluid and reproduces the correct fluctuations and diffusion dynamics. Subsequently, we provide a general multiscale multicomponent SDPD framework for simulations of molecularly miscible systems spanning length scales from nanometers to the non-fluctuating continuum limit. This approach reproduces appropriate equilibrium properties and is validated with simulation of simple one-dimensional diffusion across multiple length scales. PMID:26931689

  20. Onsager and the theory of hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lars Onsager, a giant of twentieth-century science and the 1968 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, made deep contributions to several areas of physics and chemistry. Perhaps less well known is his ground-breaking work and lifelong interest in the subject of hydrodynamic turbulence. He wrote two papers on the subject in the 1940s, one of them just a short abstract. Unbeknownst to Onsager, one of his major results was derived a few years earlier by A. N. Kolmogorov, but Onsager's work contains many gems and shows characteristic originality and deep understanding. His only full-length article on the subject in 1949 introduced two novel ideas - negative-temperature equilibria for two-dimensional ideal fluids and an energy-dissipation anomaly for singular Euler solutions - that stimulated much later work. However, a study of Onsager's letters to his peers around that time, as well as his private papers of that period and the early 1970s, shows that he had much more to say about the problem than he published. Remarkably, his private notes of the 1940s contain the essential elements of at least four major results that appeared decades later in the literature: (1) a mean-field Poisson-Boltzmann equation and other thermodynamic relations for point vortices; (2) a relation similar to Kolmogorov's 4/5 law connecting singularities and dissipation; (3) the modern physical picture of spatial intermittency of velocity increments, explaining anomalous scaling of the spectrum; and (4) a spectral turbulence closure quite similar to the modern eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian equations. This paper is a summary of Onsager's published and unpublished contributions to hydrodynamic turbulence and an account of their place in the field as the subject has evolved through the years. A discussion is also given of the historical context of the work, especially of Onsager's interactions with his contemporaries who were acknowledged experts in the subject at the time. Finally, a brief speculation is

  1. Quantum retrodiction and causality principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum mechanics is factually a predictive science. But quantum retrodiction may also be needed, e.g., for the experimental verification of the validity of the Schroedinger equation for the wave function in the past if the present state is given. It is shown that in the retrodictive analog of the prediction the measurement must be replaced by another physical process called the retromeasurement. In this process, the reduction of a state vector into eigenvectors of a measured observable must proceed in the opposite direction of time as compared to the usual reduction. Examples of such processes are unknown. Moreover, they are shown to be forbidden by the causality principle stating that the later event cannot influence the earlier one. So quantum retrodiction seems to be unrealizable. It is demonstrated that the approach to the retrodiction given by S.Watanabe and F.Belinfante must be considered as an unsatisfactory ersatz of retrodicting. 20 refs., 3 figs

  2. Comparison theorems for causal diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Berthiere, Clement; Solodukhin, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    We formulate certain inequalities for the geometric quantities characterizing causal diamonds in curved and Minkowski spacetimes. These inequalities involve the red-shift factor which, as we show explicitly in the spherically symmetric case, is monotonic in the radial direction and it takes its maximal value at the centre. As a byproduct of our discussion we re-derive Bishop's inequality without assuming the positivity of the spatial Ricci tensor. We then generalize our considerations to arbitrary, static and not necessarily spherically symmetric, asymptotically flat spacetimes. In the case of spacetimes with a horizon our generalization involves the so-called {\\it domain of dependence}. The respective volume, expressed in terms of the duration measured by a distant observer compared with the volume of the domain in Minkowski spacetime, exhibits behaviours which differ if $d=4$ or $d>4$. This peculiarity of four dimensions is due to the logarithmic subleading term in the asymptotic expansion of the metric nea...

  3. The Power of Causal Beliefs and Conflicting Evidence on Causal Judgments and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Muller, Stephanie M.; Catena, Andres; Maldonado, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the relative impact of causal beliefs and empirical evidence on both decision making and causal judgments, and whether this relative impact could be altered by previous experience. 2. Selected groups of participants in both experiments received pre-training with either causal or neutral cues, or no pre-training…

  4. Non-equilibrium Stokes-Einstein relation via active microrheology of hydrodynamically interacting suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry; Zia, Roseanna

    In our recently developed non-equilibrium Stokes-Einstein relation, we showed that, in the absence of hydrodynamic interactions, the stress in a suspension is given by a balance between fluctuation and dissipation. Here, we generalize our theory for systems of hydrodynamically interacting colloids, via active microrheology, where motion of a Brownian probe through the medium reveals rheological properties. The strength of probe forcing compared to the entropic restoring force defines a Peclet number, Pe. In the absence of hydrodynamics, the first normal stress difference and the osmotic pressure scale as Pe4 and Pe2 respectively when probe forcing is weak, and uniformly as Pe for strong probe forcing. As hydrodynamics become important, interparticle forces give way to lubrication interactions. Hydrodynamic coupling leads to a new low-Pe scaling of the first normal stress difference and the osmotic pressure as Pe2, and high-Pe scaling as Peδ, where 0.799 <= δ <= 1 as hydrodynamics vary from strong to weak. For the entire range of the strength of hydrodynamic interactions and probe forcing, the new phenomenological theory is shown to agree with standard micromechanical definitions of the stress. We further draw a connection between the stress and the energy storage in a suspension, and the entropic nature of such storage is identified.

  5. Designing Biomimetic, Dissipative Material Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Anna C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Whitesides, George M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brinker, C. Jeffrey [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. Center for Micro-Engineered Materials; Aranson, Igor S. [UChicago, LLC., Argonne, IL (United States); Chaikin, Paul [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dogic, Zvonimir [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glotzer, Sharon [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering Physics; Hammer, Daniel [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Irvine, Darrell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering; Little, Steven R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Parikh, Atul N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Stupp, Samuel [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Medicine. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Szostak, Jack [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2016-01-21

    Throughout human history, new materials have been the foundation of transformative technologies: from bronze, paper, and ceramics to steel, silicon, and polymers, each material has enabled far-reaching advances. Today, another new class of materials is emerging—one with both the potential to provide radically new functions and to challenge our notion of what constitutes a “material”. These materials would harvest, transduce, or dissipate energy to perform autonomous, dynamic functions that mimic the behaviors of living organisms. Herein, we discuss the challenges and benefits of creating “dissipative” materials that can potentially blur the boundaries between living and non-living matter.

  6. Hydrodynamical noise and Gubser flow

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Hydrodynamical noise is introduced on top of Gubser's analytical solution to viscous hydrodynamics. With respect to the ultra-central collision events of Pb-Pb, p-Pb and p-p at the LHC energies, we solve the evolution of noisy fluid systems and calculate the radial flow velocity correlations. We show that the absolute amplitude of the hydrodynamical noise is determined by the multiplicity of the collision event. The evolution of azimuthal anisotropies, which is related to the generation of harmonic flow, receives finite enhancements from hydrodynamical noise. Although it is strongest in the p-p systems, the effect of hydrodynamical noise on flow harmonics is found to be negligible, especially in the ultra-central Pb-Pb collisions. For the short-range correlations, hydrodynamical noise contributes to the formation of a near-side peak on top of the correlation structure originated from initial state fluctuations. The shape of the peak is affected by the strength of hydrodynamical noise, whose height and width g...

  7. Spin foam models as energetic causal sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2016-04-01

    Energetic causal sets are causal sets endowed by a flow of energy-momentum between causally related events. These incorporate a novel mechanism for the emergence of space-time from causal relations [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014); Phys. Rev. D 90, 044035 (2014)]. Here we construct a spin foam model which is also an energetic causal set model. This model is closely related to the model introduced in parallel by Wolfgang Wieland in [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 015016 (2015)]. What makes a spin foam model also an energetic causal set is Wieland's identification of new degrees of freedom analogous to momenta, conserved at events (or four-simplices), whose norms are not mass, but the volume of tetrahedra. This realizes the torsion constraints, which are missing in previous spin foam models, and are needed to relate the connection dynamics to those of the metric, as in general relativity. This identification makes it possible to apply the new mechanism for the emergence of space-time to a spin foam model. Our formulation also makes use of Markopoulou's causal formulation of spin foams [arXiv:gr-qc/9704013]. These are generated by evolving spin networks with dual Pachner moves. This endows the spin foam history with causal structure given by a partial ordering of the events which are dual to four-simplices.

  8. Controlling for causally relevant third variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodie, Adam S; Williams, Cristina C; Crooks, C L

    2003-10-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors tested the conditions under which 3rd variables are controlled for in making causal judgments. The authors hypothesized that 3rd variables are controlled for when the 3rd variables are themselves perceived as causal. In Experiment 1, the participants predicted test performance after seeing information about wearing a lucky garment, taking a test-preparation course, and staying up late. The course (perceived as more causally relevant) was controlled for more than was the garment (perceived as less causally relevant) in assessing the effectiveness of staying up late. In Experiments 2 and 3, to obviate the many alternative accounts that arise from the realistic cover story of Experiment 1, participants predicted flowers' blooming after the presentation or nonpresentation of liquids. When one liquid was trained as causal, it was controlled for more in judging another liquid than when it was trained as neutral. Overall, stimuli perceived as causal were controlled for more when judging other stimuli. The authors concluded that the effect of perceived causal relevance on causal conditionalizing is real and normatively reasonable. PMID:14672103

  9. Causal processes and propensities in quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio SUÁREZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available I offer an alternative interpretation of Van Fraassen's influential arguments against causal realism in quantum mechanics. These arguments provide in fact a good guide to the different causal models available for the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen correlations, which in turn shed light on the nature of quantum propensities.

  10. Compact Representations of Extended Causal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Joseph Y.; Hitchcock, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Judea Pearl (2000) was the first to propose a definition of actual causation using causal models. A number of authors have suggested that an adequate account of actual causation must appeal not only to causal structure but also to considerations of "normality." In Halpern and Hitchcock (2011), we offer a definition of actual causation…

  11. mediation: R Package for Causal Mediation Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin Tingley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the R package mediation for conducting causal mediation analysis in applied empirical research. In many scientific disciplines, the goal of researchers is not only estimating causal effects of a treatment but also understanding the process in which the treatment causally affects the outcome. Causal mediation analysis is frequently used to assess potential causal mechanisms. The mediation package implements a comprehensive suite of statistical tools for conducting such an analysis. The package is organized into two distinct approaches. Using the model-based approach, researchers can estimate causal mediation effects and conduct sensitivity analysis under the standard research design. Furthermore, the design-based approach provides several analysis tools that are applicable under different experimental designs. This approach requires weaker assumptions than the model-based approach. We also implement a statistical method for dealing with multiple (causally dependent mediators, which are often encountered in practice. Finally, the package also offers a methodology for assessing causal mediation in the presence of treatment noncompliance, a common problem in randomized trials.

  12. Causalities of the Taiwan Stock Market

    OpenAIRE

    Juhi-Lian Julian Ting

    2003-01-01

    Volatility, fitting with first order Landau expansion, stationarity, and causality of the Taiwan stock market (TAIEX) are investigated based on daily records. Instead of consensuses that consider stock market index change as a random time series we propose the market change as a dual time series consists of the index and the corresponding volume. Therefore, causalities between these two time series are investigated.

  13. Campbell's and Rubin's Perspectives on Causal Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Stephen G.; Thoemmes, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Donald Campbell's approach to causal inference (D. T. Campbell, 1957; W. R. Shadish, T. D. Cook, & D. T. Campbell, 2002) is widely used in psychology and education, whereas Donald Rubin's causal model (P. W. Holland, 1986; D. B. Rubin, 1974, 2005) is widely used in economics, statistics, medicine, and public health. Campbell's approach focuses on…

  14. Unpacking the causal chain of financial literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Carpena, Fenella; Cole, Shawn; Shapiro, Jeremy; Zia, Bilal

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of literature examines the causal impact of financial literacy on individual, household, and firm level outcomes. This paper unpacks the mechanism of impact by focusing on the first link in the causal chain. Specifically, it studies the experimental impact of financial literacy on three distinct dimensions of financial knowledge. The analysis finds that financial literacy do...

  15. Causal random geometry from stochastic quantization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Jan; Loll, R.; Westra, W.; Zohren, S.

    2010-01-01

     in this short note we review a recently found formulation of two-dimensional causal quantum gravity defined through Causal Dynamical Triangulations and stochastic quantization. This procedure enables one to extract the nonperturbative quantum Hamiltonian of the random surface model including the...

  16. Granger causality in wall-bounded turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger causality is based on the idea that if a variable helps to predict another one, then they are probably involved in a causality relationship. This technique is based on the identification of a predictive model for causality detection. The aim of this paper is to use Granger causality to study the dynamics and the energy redistribution between scales and components in wall-bounded turbulent flows. In order to apply it on flows, Granger causality is generalized for snapshot-based observations of large size using linear-model identification methods coming from model reduction. Optimized DMD, a variant of the Dynamic Mode Decomposition, is considered for building a linear model based on snapshots. This method is used to link physical events and extract physical mechanisms associated to the bursting process in the logarithmic layer of a turbulent channel flow.

  17. Quantum-coherent mixtures of causal relations

    CERN Document Server

    MacLean, Jean-Philippe W; Spekkens, Robert W; Resch, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the causal influences that hold among the parts of a system is critical both to explaining that system's natural behaviour and to controlling it through targeted interventions. In a quantum world, understanding causal relations is equally important, but the set of possibilities is far richer. The two basic ways in which a pair of time-ordered quantum systems may be causally related are by a cause-effect mechanism or by a common cause acting on both. Here, we show that it is possible to have a coherent mixture of these two possibilities. We realize such a nonclassical causal relation in a quantum optics experiment and derive a set of criteria for witnessing the coherence based on a quantum version of Berkson's paradox. The interplay of causality and quantum theory lies at the heart of challenging foundational puzzles, such as Bell's theorem and the search for quantum gravity, but could also provide a resource for novel quantum technologies.

  18. Causal ubiquity in quantum physics a superluminal and local-causal physical ontology

    CERN Document Server

    Neelamkavil, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    A fixed highest criterial velocity (of light) in STR (special theory of relativity) is a convention for a layer of physical inquiry. QM (Quantum Mechanics) avoids action-at-a-distance using this concept, but accepts non-causality and action-at-a-distance in EPR (Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Paradox) entanglement experiments. Even in such allegedly non-causal processes, something exists processually in extension-motion, between the causal and the non-causal. If STR theoretically allows real-valued superluminal communication between EPR entangled particles, quantum processes become fully causal. That

  19. Viscosity parameter in dissipative accretion flows with mass outflow around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Nagarkoti, Shreeram

    2016-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic simulation of inviscid and viscous flows have shown that significant outflows could be produced from the CENtrifugal pressure supported BOundary Layer or CENBOL of an advective disk. However, this barrier is weakened in presence of viscosity, more so, if there are explicit energy dissipations at the boundary layer itself. We study effects of viscosity and energy dissipation theoretically on the outflow rate and show that as the viscosity or energy dissipation (or both) rises, the prospect of formation of outflows is greatly reduced, thereby verifying results obtained through observations and numerical simulations. Indeed, we find that in a dissipative viscous flow, shocks in presence of outflows can be produced only if the Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter {\\alpha} is less than 0.2. This is a direct consequence of modification of the Rankine-Hugoniot relation across the shock in a viscous flow, when the energy dissipation and mass loss in the form of outflows from the post-shock regio...

  20. Natural approach to quantum dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taj, David; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2015-12-01

    The dissipative dynamics of a quantum system weakly coupled to one or several reservoirs is usually described in terms of a Lindblad generator. The popularity of this approach is certainly due to the linear character of the latter. However, while such linearity finds justification from an underlying Hamiltonian evolution in some scaling limit, it does not rely on solid physical motivations at small but finite values of the coupling constants, where the generator is typically used for applications. The Markovian quantum master equations we propose are instead supported by very natural thermodynamic arguments. They themselves arise from Markovian master equations for the system and the environment which preserve factorized states and mean energy and generate entropy at a non-negative rate. The dissipative structure is driven by an entropic map, called modular, which introduces nonlinearity. The generated modular dynamical semigroup (MDS) guarantees for the positivity of the time evolved state the correct steady state properties, the positivity of the entropy production, and a positive Onsager matrix with symmetry relations arising from Green-Kubo formulas. We show that the celebrated Davies Lindblad generator, obtained through the Born and the secular approximations, generates a MDS. In doing so we also provide a nonlinear MDS which is supported by a weak coupling argument and is free from the limitations of the Davies generator.

  1. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics with angular momentum conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Kathrin, E-mail: k.mueller@fz-juelich.de; Fedosov, Dmitry A., E-mail: d.fedosov@fz-juelich.de; Gompper, Gerhard, E-mail: g.gompper@fz-juelich.de

    2015-01-15

    Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) combines two popular mesoscopic techniques, the smoothed particle hydrodynamics and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) methods, and can be considered as an improved dissipative particle dynamics approach. Despite several advantages of the SDPD method over the conventional DPD model, the original formulation of SDPD by Español and Revenga (2003) [9], lacks angular momentum conservation, leading to unphysical results for problems where the conservation of angular momentum is essential. To overcome this limitation, we extend the SDPD method by introducing a particle spin variable such that local and global angular momentum conservation is restored. The new SDPD formulation (SDPD+a) is directly derived from the Navier–Stokes equation for fluids with spin, while thermal fluctuations are incorporated similarly to the DPD method. We test the new SDPD method and demonstrate that it properly reproduces fluid transport coefficients. Also, SDPD with angular momentum conservation is validated using two problems: (i) the Taylor–Couette flow with two immiscible fluids and (ii) a tank-treading vesicle in shear flow with a viscosity contrast between inner and outer fluids. For both problems, the new SDPD method leads to simulation predictions in agreement with the corresponding analytical theories, while the original SDPD method fails to capture properly physical characteristics of the systems due to violation of angular momentum conservation. In conclusion, the extended SDPD method with angular momentum conservation provides a new approach to tackle fluid problems such as multiphase flows and vesicle/cell suspensions, where the conservation of angular momentum is essential.

  2. Advanced in Macrostatistical Hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of research that focuses on slow flows of suspensions in which colloidal and inertial effects are negligibly small (Macrostatistical Hydrodynamics). First, we describe nuclear magnetic resonance imaging experiments to quantitatively measure particle migration occurring in concentrated suspensions undergoing a flow with a nonuniform shear rate. These experiments address the issue of how the flow field affects the microstructure of suspensions. In order to understand the local viscosity in a suspension with such a flow-induced, spatially varying concentration, one must know how the viscosity of a homogeneous suspension depends on such variables as solids concentration and particle orientation. We suggest the technique of falling ball viscometry, using small balls, as a method to determine the effective viscosity of a suspension without affecting the original microstructure significantly. We also describe data from experiments in which the detailed fluctuations of a falling ball's velocity indicate the noncontinuum nature of the suspension and may lead to more insights into the effects of suspension microstructure on macroscopic properties. Finally, we briefly describe other experiments that can be performed in quiescent suspensions (in contrast to the use of conventional shear rotational viscometers) in order to learn more about the microstructure and boundary effects in concentrated suspensions

  3. Spin hydrodynamic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, R.; Matsuo, M.; Ono, M.; Harii, K.; Chudo, H.; Okayasu, S.; Ieda, J.; Takahashi, S.; Maekawa, S.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic generation is the conversion of fluid kinetic energy into electricity. Such conversion, which has been applied to various types of electric power generation, is driven by the Lorentz force acting on charged particles and thus a magnetic field is necessary. On the other hand, recent studies of spintronics have revealed the similarity between the function of a magnetic field and that of spin-orbit interactions in condensed matter. This suggests the existence of an undiscovered route to realize the conversion of fluid dynamics into electricity without using magnetic fields. Here we show electric voltage generation from fluid dynamics free from magnetic fields; we excited liquid-metal flows in a narrow channel and observed longitudinal voltage generation in the liquid. This voltage has nothing to do with electrification or thermoelectric effects, but turned out to follow a universal scaling rule based on a spin-mediated scenario. The result shows that the observed voltage is caused by spin-current generation from a fluid motion: spin hydrodynamic generation. The observed phenomenon allows us to make mechanical spin-current and electric generators, opening a door to fluid spintronics.

  4. Bosonization and quantum hydrodynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girish S Setlur

    2006-03-01

    It is shown that it is possible to bosonize fermions in any number of dimensions using the hydrodynamic variables, namely the velocity potential and density. The slow part of the Fermi field is defined irrespective of dimensionality and the commutators of this field with currents and densities are exponentiated using the velocity potential as conjugate to the density. An action in terms of these canonical bosonic variables is proposed that reproduces the correct current and density correlations. This formalism in one dimension is shown to be equivalent to the Tomonaga-Luttinger approach as it leads to the same propagator and exponents. We compute the one-particle properties of a spinless homogeneous Fermi system in two spatial dimensions with long-range gauge interactions and highlight the metal-insulator transition in the system. A general formula for the generating function of density correlations is derived that is valid beyond the random phase approximation. Finally, we write down a formula for the annihilation operator in momentum space directly in terms of number conserving products of Fermi fields.

  5. Power dissipation of air turbine VT - 400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noga, Tomas; Žitek, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    This article provides an overview of ongoing systematic research of a turbine stage efficiency on a model air turbine VT 400. It contains an analysis of existing mathematical relations for a rotor friction dissipation calculation, on which basis a practical procedure of a calculation of those dissipations is recommended. Friction dissipations in the turbine rotor were divided into three main tasks: disc friction dissipations, shaft friction dissipations and dissipations in bearings. A contribution of performed work lies in the fact, that there is a dependence of rotor friction losses on its speed and a stage reaction has been revealed. This knowledge is completely essential for a further research, and will lead to more precise results of experiments. For the future, we plan to adjust the measuring track by adding a moment collar. We also assume an experimental verification of calculated friction losses.

  6. Dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent

    OpenAIRE

    Makarieva, A. M.; Gorshkov, V. G.

    2009-01-01

    A heat engine operating on the basis of the Carnot cycle is considered, where the mechanical work performed is dissipated within the engine at the temperature of the warmer isotherm and the resulting heat is added to the engine together with an external heat input. The resulting work performed by the engine per cycle is increased at the expense of dissipated work produced in the previous cycle. It is shown that such a dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent violating the fir...

  7. Dissipative quantum theory: Implications for quantum entanglement

    OpenAIRE

    Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    Three inter-related topics are discussed here. One, the Lindblad dynamics of quantum dissipative systems; two, quantum entanglement in composite systems and its quantification based on the Tsallis entropy; and three, robustness of entanglement under dissipation. After a brief review of the Lindblad theory of quantum dissipative systems and the idea of quantum entanglement in composite quantum systems illustrated by describing the three particle systems, the behavior of entanglement under the ...

  8. Semiclassics for a Dissipative Quantum Map

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, D; Haake, F; Braun, Daniel; Braun, Petr A.; Haake, Fritz

    1998-01-01

    We present a semiclassical analysis for a dissipative quantum map with an area-nonpreserving classical limit. We show that in the limit of Planck's constant to 0 the trace of an arbitrary natural power of the propagator is dominated by contributions from periodic orbits of the corresponding classical dissipative motion. We derive trace formulae of the Gutzwiller type for such quantum maps. In comparison to Tabor's formula for area-preserving maps, both classical action and stability prefactor are modified by the dissipation. We evaluate the traces explicitly in the case of a dissipative kicked top with integrable classical motion and find good agreement with numerical results.

  9. Dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M

    2009-01-01

    A heat engine operating on the basis of the Carnot cycle is considered, where the mechanical work performed is dissipated within the engine at the temperature of the warmer isotherm and the resulting heat is added to the engine together with an external heat input. The resulting work performed by the engine per cycle is increased at the expense of dissipated work produced in the previous cycle. It is shown that such a dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent violating the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The existing physical models employing the dissipative heat engine concept, in particular, the heat engine model of hurricane development, are physically invalid.

  10. An introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, Steven N

    1992-01-01

    This book is an introduction to astrophysical hydrodynamics for both astronomy and physics students. It provides a comprehensive and unified view of the general problems associated with fluids in a cosmic context, with a discussion of fluid dynamics and plasma physics. It is the only book on hydrodynamics that addresses the astrophysical context. Researchers and students will find this work to be an exceptional reference. Contents include chapters on irrotational and rotational flows, turbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, and instabilities.

  11. Holographic hydrodynamics: models and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Nabamita; Dutta, Suvankar(Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Bhopal, India)

    2011-01-01

    We review recent developments in holographic hydrodynamics. We start from very basic discussion on hydrodynamic systems and motivate why string theory is an essential tool to deal with these systems when they are strongly coupled. The main purpose of this review article is to understand different holographic techniques to compute transport coefficients (first order and higher order) and their corrections in presence of higher derivative terms in the bulk Lagrangian. We also mention some open ...

  12. Hydrodynamic Modes for Granular Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Dufty, James W.; Brey, J. Javier

    2003-01-01

    The eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the linearized Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres (d=3) or disks (d=2) corresponding to d+2 hydrodynamic modes, are calculated in the long wavelength limit for a granular gas. The transport coefficients are identified and found to agree with those from the Chapman-Enskog solution. The dominance of hydrodynamic modes at long times and long wavelengths is studied via an exactly solvable kinetic model. A collisional continuum is bounded away from ...

  13. Boltzmann equation and hydrodynamic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, Matteo; Kröger, Martin; Ottinger, Hans Christian

    2009-11-01

    We apply the method of invariant manifolds to derive equations of generalized hydrodynamics from the linearized Boltzmann equation and determine exact transport coefficients, obeying Green-Kubo formulas. Numerical calculations are performed in the special case of Maxwell molecules. We investigate, through the comparison with experimental data and former approaches, the spectrum of density fluctuations and address the regime of finite Knudsen numbers and finite frequencies hydrodynamics. PMID:20364972

  14. Boltzmann equation and hydrodynamic fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Colangeli, M.; Kroger, M.; Ottinger, H. C.

    2009-01-01

    We apply the method of invariant manifolds to derive equations of generalized hydrodynamics from the linearized Boltzmann equation and determine exact transport coefficients, obeying Green-Kubo formulas. Numerical calculations are performed in the special case of Maxwell molecules. We investigate, through the comparison with experimental data and former approaches, the spectrum of density fluctuations and address the regime of finite Knudsen numbers and finite frequencies hydrodynamics.

  15. Hydrodynamic Interactions in Protein Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Cieplak, Marek; Niewieczerzał, Szymon

    2008-01-01

    We incorporate hydrodynamic interactions (HI) in a coarse-grained and structure-based model of proteins by employing the Rotne-Prager hydrodynamic tensor. We study several small proteins and demonstrate that HI facilitate folding. We also study HIV-1 protease and show that HI make the flap closing dynamics faster. The HI are found to affect time correlation functions in the vicinity of the native state even though they have no impact on same time characteristics of the structure fluctuations ...

  16. Hydrodynamics and beyond in the strongly coupled N=4 plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Amado, Irene; Landsteiner, Karl; Montero, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    We continue our investigations on the relation between hydrodynamic and higher quasinormal modes in the AdS black hole background started in arXiv:0710.4458 [hep-th]. As is well known, the quasinormal modes can be interpreted as the poles of the retarded Green functions of the dual N=4 gauge theory at finite temperature. The response to a generic perturbation is determined by the residues of the poles. We compute these residues numerically for energy-momentum and R-charge correlators. We find that the diffusion modes behave in a similar way: at small wavelengths the residues go over into a form of a damped oscillation and therefore these modes decouple at short distances. The sound mode behaves differently: its residue does not decay and at short wavelengths this mode behaves as the higher quasinormal modes. Applications of our findings include the definition of hydrodynamic length and time scales. We also show that the quasinormal modes, including the hydrodynamic diffusion modes, obey causality.

  17. Hydrodynamics and beyond in the strongly coupled N = 4 plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue our investigations on the relation between hydrodynamic and higher quasinormal modes in the AdS black hole background started in arXiv:0710.4458 [hep-th]. As is well known, the quasinormal modes can be interpreted as the poles of the retarded Green functions of the dual N = 4 gauge theory at finite temperature. The response to a generic perturbation is determined by the residues of the poles. We compute these residues numerically for energy-momentum and R-charge correlators. We find that the diffusion modes behave in a similar way: at small wavelengths the residues go over into a form of a damped oscillation and therefore these modes decouple at short distances. The sound mode behaves differently: its residue does not decay and at short wavelengths this mode behaves as the higher quasinormal modes. Applications of our findings include the definition of hydrodynamic length and time scales. We also show that the quasinormal modes, including the hydrodynamic diffusion modes, obey causality.

  18. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castrigiano, Domenico P. L., E-mail: castrig@ma.tum.de; Leiseifer, Andreas D., E-mail: andreas.leiseifer@tum.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, TU München, Boltzmannstraße 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Causal localizations describe the position of quantum systems moving not faster than light. They are constructed for the systems with finite spinor dimension. At the center of interest are the massive relativistic systems. For every positive mass, there is the sequence of Dirac tensor-localizations, which provides a complete set of inequivalent irreducible causal localizations. They obey the principle of special relativity and are fully Poincaré covariant. The boosters are determined by the causal position operator and the other Poincaré generators. The localization with minimal spinor dimension is the Dirac localization. Thus, the Dirac equation is derived here as a mere consequence of the principle of causality. Moreover, the higher tensor-localizations, not known so far, follow from Dirac’s localization by a simple construction. The probability of localization for positive energy states results to be described by causal positive operator valued (PO-) localizations, which are the traces of the causal localizations on the subspaces of positive energy. These causal Poincaré covariant PO-localizations for every irreducible massive relativistic system were, all the more, not known before. They are shown to be separated. Hence, the positive energy systems can be localized within every open region by a suitable preparation as accurately as desired. Finally, the attempt is made to provide an interpretation of the PO-localization operators within the frame of conventional quantum mechanics attributing an important role to the negative energy states.

  19. Mining Causality for Explanation Knowledge from Text

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaveevan Pechsiri; Asanee Kawtrakul

    2007-01-01

    Mining causality is essential to provide a diagnosis. This research aims at extracting the causality existing within multiple sentences or EDUs (Elementary Discourse Unit). The research emphasizes the use of causality verbs because they make explicit in a certain way the consequent events of a cause, e.g., "Aphids suck the sap from rice leaves. Then leaves will shrink. Later, they will become yellow and dry.". A verb can also be the causal-verb link between cause and effect within EDU(s), e.g., "Aphids suck the sap from rice leaves causing leaves to be shrunk" ("causing" is equivalent to a causal-verb link in Thai). The research confronts two main problems: identifying the interesting causality events from documents and identifying their boundaries. Then, we propose mining on verbs by using two different machine learning techniques, Naive Bayes classifier and Support Vector Machine. The resulted mining rules will be used for the identification and the causality extraction of the multiple EDUs from text. Our multiple EDUs extraction shows 0.88 precision with 0.75 recall from Na'ive Bayes classifier and 0.89 precision with 0.76 recall from Support Vector Machine.

  20. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causal localizations describe the position of quantum systems moving not faster than light. They are constructed for the systems with finite spinor dimension. At the center of interest are the massive relativistic systems. For every positive mass, there is the sequence of Dirac tensor-localizations, which provides a complete set of inequivalent irreducible causal localizations. They obey the principle of special relativity and are fully Poincaré covariant. The boosters are determined by the causal position operator and the other Poincaré generators. The localization with minimal spinor dimension is the Dirac localization. Thus, the Dirac equation is derived here as a mere consequence of the principle of causality. Moreover, the higher tensor-localizations, not known so far, follow from Dirac’s localization by a simple construction. The probability of localization for positive energy states results to be described by causal positive operator valued (PO-) localizations, which are the traces of the causal localizations on the subspaces of positive energy. These causal Poincaré covariant PO-localizations for every irreducible massive relativistic system were, all the more, not known before. They are shown to be separated. Hence, the positive energy systems can be localized within every open region by a suitable preparation as accurately as desired. Finally, the attempt is made to provide an interpretation of the PO-localization operators within the frame of conventional quantum mechanics attributing an important role to the negative energy states

  1. Hydrodynamics of Rotating Stars and Close Binary Interactions: Compressible Ellipsoid Models

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Dong; Rasio, Frederic A.; Shapiro, Stuart L.

    1994-01-01

    We develop a new formalism to study the dynamics of fluid polytropes in three dimensions. The stars are modeled as compressible ellipsoids and the hydrodynamic equations are reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations for the evolution of the principal axes and other global quantities. Both viscous dissipation and the gravitational radiation reaction are incorporated. We establish the validity of our approximations and demonstrate the simplicity and power of the method by rederiving a...

  2. Hydrodynamic limits for kinetic equations and the diffusive approximation of radiative transport for acoustic waves

    OpenAIRE

    Portilheiro, Manuel; Tzavaras, Athanasios E.

    2005-01-01

    We consider a class of kinetic equations, equipped with a single conservation law, which generate L1-contractions. We discuss the hydrodynamic limit to a scalar conservation law and the diffusive limit to a (possibly) degenerate parabolic equation. The limits are obtained in the "dissipative" sense, equivalent to the notion of entropy solutions for conservation laws, which permits the use of the perturbed test function method and allows for simple proofs. A general compactness framework is ob...

  3. 7. Radiation hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gathers 6 articles whose common point is to deal with radiation hydrodynamics in the context of inertial fusion. 2 indirect drive inertial fusion targets driven by heavy ions beams for fusion energy production are presented. Target physics issues as will as the implications for the accelerator from each design are discussed. Recent advances in the ignition design for the laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility is briefly described. A robustness study concerning LMJ has been achieved, this study aims at specifying the sensitivity of the yield to power imbalances, laser beam pointing and target fabrication errors. We have computed and validated a Monte-Carlo calculation that provides, from standard deviations of these parameters values, the probability of failing to reach ignition. An article discusses how images recorded at different x-ray frequencies, combined with spatially-integrated spectroscopic information, can be manipulated to extract the space-dependent matter temperature, mass density and mix friction of LTE (local thermodynamic equilibrium) implosions. In another article the interaction of soft x-ray thermal radiation with foam-layered metal targets is studied. The x-ray radiation was produced by focusing a high energy laser inside a small size hohlraum. An increment in shock pressure was observed with the foam layer as compared to bare metal targets. The last article is dedicated to the measurement of x-ray absorption by nickel and aluminium, the knowledge of the absorption coefficients is necessary in order to estimate the energy transfer efficiency to the cavity and to the target. (A.C.)

  4. Causality and momentum conservation from relative locality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Bianco, Stefano; Brighenti, Francesco; Buonocore, Riccardo Junior

    2015-04-01

    Theories involving curved momentum space, which recently became a topic of interest in the quantum-gravity literature, can, in general, violate many apparently robust aspects of our current description of the laws of physics, including relativistic invariance, locality, causality, and global momentum conservation. Here, we explore some aspects of the pathologies arising in generic theories involving curved momentum space for what concerns causality and momentum conservation. However, we also report results suggesting that when momentum space is maximally symmetric, and the theory is formulated relativistically, most notably including translational invariance with the associated relativity of spacetime locality, momentum is globally conserved and there is no violation of causality.

  5. Causal localizations in relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sufficient and necessary conditions for causal localizations of massive relativistic systems are developed. It is proven that the Dirac- and the Dirac tensor-system are up to unitary equivalence the only irreducible causal localizations with finite spinor dimension which have a massive relativistic extension. A formula for this extension is given. The existence of arbitrarily good localized states of positive energy is shown. In the context of the causality condition a Paley-Wiener theorem for bounded measurable matrix-valued functions is proven.

  6. The CMB in a Causal Set Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Zuntz, Joe

    2007-01-01

    We discuss Cosmic Microwave Background constraints on the causal set theory of quantum gravity, which has made testable predictions about the nature of dark energy. We flesh out previously discussed heuristic constraints by showing how the power spectrum of causal set dark energy fluctuations can be found from the overlap volumes of past light cones of points in the universe. Using a modified Boltzmann code we put constraints on the single parameter of the theory that are somewhat stronger than previous ones. We conclude that causal set theory cannot explain late-time acceleration without radical alterations to General Relativity.

  7. Causality in 3D Massive Gravity Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Edelstein, Jose D; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Leoni, Matias; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    We study the constraints coming from local causality requirement in various 2+1 dimensional dynamical theories of gravity. In Topologically Massive Gravity, with a single parity noninvariant massive degree of freedom, and in New Massive Gravity, with two massive spin-$2$ degrees of freedom, causality and unitarity are compatible with each other and they both require the Newton's constant to be negative. In their extensions, such as the Born-Infeld gravity and the minimal massive gravity the situation is similar and quite different from their higher dimensional counterparts, such as quadratic (e.g., Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet) or cubic theories, where causality and unitarity are in conflict.

  8. Dissipation Bound for Thermodynamic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized deterministically driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider fully realizable, entropically driven systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is subextensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  9. Dissipative Dynamics of Quantum Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Benatti, F; Floreanini, R

    2015-01-01

    One way to look for complex behaviours in many-body quantum systems is to let the number $N$ of degrees of freedom become large and focus upon collective observables. Mean-field quantities scaling as $1/N$ tend to commute, whence complexity at the quantum level can only be inherited from complexity at the classical level. Instead, fluctuations of microscopic observables scale as $1/\\sqrt{N}$ and exhibit collective Bosonic features, typical of a mesoscopic regime half-way between the quantum one at the microscopic level and the classical one at the level of macroscopic averages. Here, we consider the mesoscopic behaviour emerging from an infinite quantum spin chain undergoing a microscopic dissipative, irreversible dynamics and from global states without long-range correlations and invariant under lattice translations and dynamics. We show that, from the fluctuations of one site spin observables whose linear span is mapped into itself by the dynamics, there emerge bosonic operators obeying a mesoscopic dissipa...

  10. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  11. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop entitled Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State (Volume 88)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsch,F.; Kharzeev, D.; Molnar, K.; Petreczky, P.; Teaney, D.

    2008-04-21

    The interpretation of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies with thermal concepts is largely based on the relative success of ideal (nondissipative) hydrodynamics. This approach can describe basic observables at RHIC, such as particle spectra and momentum anisotropies, fairly well. On the other hand, recent theoretical efforts indicate that dissipation can play a significant role. Ideally viscous hydrodynamic simulations would extract, if not only the equation of state, but also transport coefficients from RHIC data. There has been a lot of progress with solving relativistic viscous hydrodynamics. There are already large uncertainties in ideal hydrodynamics calculations, e.g., uncertainties associated with initial conditions, freezeout, and the simplified equations of state typically utilized. One of the most sensitive observables to the equation of state is the baryon momentum anisotropy, which is also affected by freezeout assumptions. Up-to-date results from lattice quantum chromodynamics on the transition temperature and equation of state with realistic quark masses are currently available. However, these have not yet been incorporated into the hydrodynamic calculations. Therefore, the RBRC workshop 'Hydrodynamics in Heavy Ion Collisions and QCD Equation of State' aimed at getting a better understanding of the theoretical frameworks for dissipation and near-equilibrium dynamics in heavy-ion collisions. The topics discussed during the workshop included techniques to solve the dynamical equations and examine the role of initial conditions and decoupling, as well as the role of the equation of state and transport coefficients in current simulations.

  12. Causal hydrodynamics from kinetic theory by doublet scheme in renormalization-group method

    OpenAIRE

    Tsumura, Kyosuke; Kikuchi, Yuta; Kunihiro, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    We develop a general framework in the renormalization-group (RG) method for extracting a mesoscopic dynamics from an evolution equation by incorporating some excited (fast) modes as additional components to the invariant manifold spanned by zero modes. We call this framework the doublet scheme. The validity of the doublet scheme is first tested and demonstrated by taking the Lorenz model as a simple three-dimensional dynamical system; it is shown that the two-dimensional reduced dynamics on t...

  13. Mid-Band Dissipative Spatial Solitons

    OpenAIRE

    Staliunas, Kestutis

    2003-01-01

    We show dissipative spatial solitons in nonlinear optical micro-resonators in which the refractive index is laterally modulated. In addition to "normal" and "staggered" dissipative solitons, similar to those in spatially modulated conservative systems, a narrow "mid-band" soliton is shown, having no counterparts in conservative systems.

  14. Taylor's dissipation surrogate and its associated anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    McComb, David

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, for stationary isotropic turbulence, Taylor's well known surrogate for the dissipation can be derived directly from the Karman-Howarth equation and is in fact a surrogate for inertial transfer, which becomes equal to the dissipation rate as the Reynolds number tends to infinity.

  15. Robust dissipativity for uncertain impulsive dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the robust dissipativity with respect to the quadratic supply rate for uncertain impulsive dynamical systems. By employing the Hamilton-Jacobi inequality approach, some sufficient conditions of robust dissipativity for this kind of system are established. Finally, we specialize the obtained results to the case of uncertain linear impulsive dynamical systems.

  16. Symmetries of the dissipative Hofstadter model

    CERN Document Server

    Freed, D E

    1993-01-01

    The dissipative Hofstadter model, which describes a particle in 2-D subject to a periodic potential, uniform magnetic field, and dissipation, is also related to open string boundary states. This model exhibits an SL(2,Z) duality symmetry and hidden reparametrization invariance symmetries. These symmetries are useful for finding exact solutions for correlation functions.

  17. $U(1)$ current from the AdS/CFT: diffusion, conductivity and causality

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, Yanyan; Sharon, Amir

    2015-01-01

    For a holographically defined finite temperature theory, we derive an off-shell constitutive relation for a global $U(1)$ current driven by a weak external non-dynamical electromagnetic field. The constitutive relation involves an all order gradient expansion resummed into three momenta-dependent transport coefficient functions: diffusion, electric conductivity, and "magnetic" conductivity. These transport functions are first computed analytically in the hydrodynamic limit, up to third order in the derivative expansion, and then numerically for generic values of momenta. We also compute a diffusion memory function, which, as a result of all order gradient resummation, is found to be causal.

  18. Causality, Knowledge and Coordination in Distributed Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Zvi, Ido

    2011-01-01

    Effecting coordination across remote sites in a distributed system is an essential part of distributed computing, and also an inherent challenge. In 1978, an analysis of communication in asynchronous systems was suggested by Leslie Lamport. Lamport's analysis determines a notion of temporal precedence, a sort of weak notion of time, which is otherwise missing in asynchronous systems. This notion has been extensively utilized in various applications. Yet the analysis is limited to systems that are asynchronous. In this thesis we go beyond by investigating causality in synchronous systems. In such systems, the boundaries of causal influence are not charted out exclusively by message passing. Here time itself, passing at a uniform (or almost uniform) rate for all processes, is also a medium by which causal influence may fan out. This thesis studies, and characterizes, the combinations of time and message passing that govern causal influence in synchronous systems. It turns out that knowledge based analysis [FHMV...

  19. What becomes of a causal set

    CERN Document Server

    Wuthrich, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the relativity theory it seeks to replace, causal set theory has been interpreted to leave space for a substantive, though perhaps 'localized', form of 'becoming'. The possibility of fundamental becoming is nourished by the fact that the analogue of Stein's theorem from special relativity does not hold in causal set theory. Despite this, we find that in many ways, the debate concerning becoming parallels the well-rehearsed lines it follows in the domain of relativity. We present, however, some new twists and challenges. In particular, we show that a novel and exotic notion of becoming is compatible with causal sets. In contrast to the 'localized' becoming considered compatible with the dynamics of causal set theory by its advocates, our novel kind of becoming, while not answering to the typical A-theoretic demands, is 'global' and objective.

  20. Causality Between Urban Concentration and Environmental Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Pujiati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Population is concentrated in urban areas can cause the external diseconomies on environment if it exceeds the carrying capacity of the space and the urban economy. Otherwise the quality of the environment is getting better, led to the concentration of population in urban areas are increasingly high. This study aims to analyze the relationship of causality between the urban concentration and environmental quality in urban agglomeration areas. The data used in the study of secondary data obtained from the Central Bureau of statistics and the City Government from 2000 to 2013. The analytical method used is the Granger causality and descriptive. Granger causality study results showed no pattern of reciprocal causality, between urban concentration and the quality of the environment, but there unidirectional relationship between the urban concentration and environmental quality. This means that increasing urban concentration led to decreased environmental quality.

  1. Granger-causality maps of diffusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Benjamin; Feudel, Ulrike; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Wächter, Matthias; Peinke, Joachim; Freund, Jan A.

    2016-02-01

    Granger causality is a statistical concept devised to reconstruct and quantify predictive information flow between stochastic processes. Although the general concept can be formulated model-free it is often considered in the framework of linear stochastic processes. Here we show how local linear model descriptions can be employed to extend Granger causality into the realm of nonlinear systems. This novel treatment results in maps that resolve Granger causality in regions of state space. Through examples we provide a proof of concept and illustrate the utility of these maps. Moreover, by integration we convert the local Granger causality into a global measure that yields a consistent picture for a global Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. Finally, we recover invariance transformations known from the theory of autoregressive processes.

  2. The Gravity Dual of Boundary Causality

    CERN Document Server

    Engelhardt, Netta

    2016-01-01

    In gauge/gravity duality, points which are not causally related on the boundary cannot be causally related through the bulk; this is the statement of boundary causality. By the Gao-Wald theorem, the averaged null energy condition in the bulk is sufficient to ensure this property. Here we proceed in the converse direction: we derive a necessary as well as sufficient condition for the preservation of boundary causality under perturbative (quantum or stringy) corrections to the bulk. The condition that we find is a (background-dependent) constraint on the amount by which light cones can "open" over all null bulk geodesics. We show that this constraint is weaker than the averaged null energy condition.

  3. Selecting appropriate cases when tracing causal mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beach, Derek; Pedersen, Rasmus Brun

    2016-01-01

    , ontological determinism, causal asymmetry and causal homogeneity and the importance of context. We then develop a set of case selection guidelines that are in methodological alignment with these underlying assumptions. Section 4 develops guidelines for research where the mechanism is the primary focus......The last decade has witnessed resurgence in the interest in studying the causal mechanisms linking causes and outcomes in the social sciences. This article explores the overlooked implications for case selection when tracing mechanisms using in-depth case studies. Our argument is that existing case...... selection guidelines are appropriate for research aimed at making cross-case claims about causal relationships, where case selection is primarily used to control for other causes. However, existing guidelines are not in alignment with case-based research that aims to trace mechanisms, where the goal is to...

  4. Quantum probability assignment limited by relativistic causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yeong Deok; Choi, Taeseung

    2016-01-01

    Quantum theory has nonlocal correlations, which bothered Einstein, but found to satisfy relativistic causality. Correlation for a shared quantum state manifests itself, in the standard quantum framework, by joint probability distributions that can be obtained by applying state reduction and probability assignment that is called Born rule. Quantum correlations, which show nonlocality when the shared state has an entanglement, can be changed if we apply different probability assignment rule. As a result, the amount of nonlocality in quantum correlation will be changed. The issue is whether the change of the rule of quantum probability assignment breaks relativistic causality. We have shown that Born rule on quantum measurement is derived by requiring relativistic causality condition. This shows how the relativistic causality limits the upper bound of quantum nonlocality through quantum probability assignment. PMID:26971717

  5. The Temporal Logic of Causal Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinberg, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Computational analysis of time-course data with an underlying causal structure is needed in a variety of domains, including neural spike trains, stock price movements, and gene expression levels. However, it can be challenging to determine from just the numerical time course data alone what is coordinating the visible processes, to separate the underlying prima facie causes into genuine and spurious causes and to do so with a feasible computational complexity. For this purpose, we have been developing a novel algorithm based on a framework that combines notions of causality in philosophy with algorithmic approaches built on model checking and statistical techniques for multiple hypotheses testing. The causal relationships are described in terms of temporal logic formulae, reframing the inference problem in terms of model checking. The logic used, PCTL, allows description of both the time between cause and effect and the probability of this relationship being observed. We show that equipped with these causal f...

  6. Causality and the semantics of provenance

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, James

    2010-01-01

    Provenance, or information about the sources, derivation, custody or history of data, has been studied recently in a number of contexts, including databases, scientific workflows and the Semantic Web. Many provenance mechanisms have been developed, motivated by informal notions such as influence, dependence, explanation and causality. However, there has been little study of whether these mechanisms formally satisfy appropriate policies or even how to formalize relevant motivating concepts such as causality. We contend that mathematical models of these concepts are needed to justify and compare provenance techniques. In this paper we review a theory of causality based on structural models that has been developed in artificial intelligence, and describe work in progress on a causal semantics for provenance graphs.

  7. Causality and the Semantics of Provenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cheney

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Provenance, or information about the sources, derivation, custody or history of data, has been studied recently in a number of contexts, including databases, scientific workflows and the Semantic Web. Many provenance mechanisms have been developed, motivated by informal notions such as influence, dependence, explanation and causality. However, there has been little study of whether these mechanisms formally satisfy appropriate policies or even how to formalize relevant motivating concepts such as causality. We contend that mathematical models of these concepts are needed to justify and compare provenance techniques. In this paper we review a theory of causality based on structural models that has been developed in artificial intelligence, and describe work in progress on using causality to give a semantics to provenance graphs.

  8. Causality and the Semantics of Provenance

    CERN Document Server

    Cheney, James

    2010-01-01

    Provenance, or information about the sources, derivation, custody or history of data, has been studied recently in a number of contexts, including databases, scientific workflows and the Semantic Web. Many provenance mechanisms have been developed, motivated by informal notions such as influence, dependence, explanation and causality. However, there has been little study of whether these mechanisms formally satisfy appropriate policies or even how to formalize relevant motivating concepts such as causality. We contend that mathematical models of these concepts are needed to justify and compare provenance techniques. In this paper we review a theory of causality based on structural models that has been developed in artificial intelligence, and describe work in progress on using causality to give a semantics to provenance graphs.

  9. Ten simple rules for dynamic causal modeling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephan, K.E.; Penny, W.D.; Moran, R.J.; Ouden, H.E.M. den; Daunizeau, J.; Friston, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic causal modeling (DCM) is a generic Bayesian framework for inferring hidden neuronal states from measurements of brain activity. It provides posterior estimates of neurobiologically interpretable quantities such as the effective strength of synaptic connections among neuronal populations and

  10. A Causal Model for Diagnostic Reasoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Guoqiang; CHENG Hu

    2000-01-01

    Up to now, there have been many methods for knowledge representation and reasoning in causal networks, but few of them include the research on the coactions of nodes. In practice, ignoring these coactions may influence the accuracy of reasoning and even give rise to incorrect reasoning. In this paper, based on multilayer causal networks, the definitions on coaction nodes are given to construct a new causal network called Coaction Causal Network, which serves to construct a model of neural network for diagnosis followed by fuzzy reasoning, and then the activation rules are given and neural computing methods are used to finish the diagnostic reasoning. These methods are proved in theory and a method of computing the number of solutions for the diagnostic reasoning is given. Finally, the experiments and the conclusions are presented.

  11. Causal Structure and Birefringence in Nonlinear Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    de Melo, C. A. M.; Medeiros, L. G.; Pompeia, P. J.(Instituto de Fomento e Coordenação Industrial, Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Praça Mal. Eduardo Gomes 50, 12228-901, São José dos Campos, SP , Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the causal structure of general nonlinear electrodynamics and determine which Lagrangians generate an effective metric conformal to Minkowski. We also proof that there is only one analytic nonlinear electrodynamics presenting no birefringence.

  12. Material Systems for Blast-Energy Dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Schondel; Henry S. Chu

    2010-10-01

    Lightweight panels have been designed to protect buildings and vehicles from blast pressures by activating energy dissipation mechanisms under the influence of blast loading. Panels were fabricated which featured a variety of granular materials and hydraulic dissipative deformation mechanisms and the test articles were subjected to full-scale blast loading. The force time-histories transmitted by each technology were measured by a novel method that utilized inexpensive custom-designed force sensors. The array of tests revealed that granular materials can effectively dissipate blast energy if they are employed in a way that they easily crush and rearrange. Similarly, hydraulic dissipation can effectively dissipate energy if the panel features a high fraction of porosity and the panel encasement features low compressive stiffness.

  13. Exploring quantum phases by driven dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Nicolai; Büchler, Hans Peter

    2015-07-01

    Dephasing and decay are the intrinsic dissipative processes prevalent in any open quantum system and the dominant mechanisms for the loss of coherence and entanglement. This inadvertent effect not only can be overcome but can even be capitalized on in a dissipative quantum simulation by means of tailored couplings between the quantum system and the environment. In this context it has been demonstrated that universal quantum computation can be performed using purely dissipative elements, and furthermore, the efficient preparation of highly entangled states is possible. In this article, we are interested in nonequilibrium phase transitions appearing in purely dissipative systems and the exploration of quantum phases in terms of a dissipative quantum simulation. To elucidate these concepts, we scrutinize exemplarily two paradigmatic models: the transverse-field Ising model and the considerably more complex Z2 lattice gauge theory. We show that the nonequilibrium phase diagrams parallel the quantum phase diagrams of the Hamiltonian "blueprint" theories.

  14. Analytical study of dissipative solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, Fatemeh [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emamzadeh, Mehdi Molaie [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bobin, Jean Louis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Amrollahi, Reza [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sodagar, Majid [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnegar, Milad [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the analytical solution to a new class of nonlinear solitons is presented with cubic nonlinearity, subject to a dissipation term arising as a result of a first-order derivative with respect to time, in the weakly nonlinear regime. Exact solutions are found using the combination of the perturbation and Green's function methods up to the third order. We present an example and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Green's function. The dissipative solitary equation is also studied in the phase space in the non-dissipative and dissipative forms. Bounded and unbounded solutions of this equation are characterized, yielding an energy conversation law for non-dissipative waves. Applications of the model include weakly nonlinear solutions of terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  15. Analytical study of dissipative solitary waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the analytical solution to a new class of nonlinear solitons is presented with cubic nonlinearity, subject to a dissipation term arising as a result of a first-order derivative with respect to time, in the weakly nonlinear regime. Exact solutions are found using the combination of the perturbation and Green's function methods up to the third order. We present an example and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Green's function. The dissipative solitary equation is also studied in the phase space in the non-dissipative and dissipative forms. Bounded and unbounded solutions of this equation are characterized, yielding an energy conversation law for non-dissipative waves. Applications of the model include weakly nonlinear solutions of terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  16. The Causal Effects of Father Absence

    OpenAIRE

    McLanahan, Sara; TACH, LAURA; Schneider, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The literature on father absence is frequently criticized for its use of cross-sectional data and methods that fail to take account of possible omitted variable bias and reverse causality. We review studies that have responded to this critique by employing a variety of innovative research designs to identify the causal effect of father absence, including studies using lagged dependent variable models, growth curve models, individual fixed effects models, sibling fixed effects models, natural ...

  17. Inter-causal Independence and Heterogeneous Factorization

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Nevin Lianwen; Poole, David L

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that conditional independence can be used to factorize a joint probability into a multiplication of conditional probabilities. This paper proposes a constructive definition of inter-causal independence, which can be used to further factorize a conditional probability. An inference algorithm is developed, which makes use of both conditional independence and inter-causal independence to reduce inference complexity in Bayesian networks.

  18. Catastrophizing and Causal Beliefs in Whiplash

    OpenAIRE

    Buitenhuis, J.; de Jong, P J; Jaspers, J. P. C.; Groothoff, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective cohort study. Objective. This study investigates the role of pain catastrophizing and causal beliefs with regard to severity and persistence of neck complaints after motor vehicle accidents. Summary of Background Data. In previous research on low back pain, somatoform disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome, pain catastrophizing and causal beliefs were found to be related to perceived disability and prognosis. Furthermore, it has been argued with respect to whiplash t...

  19. Causal Inference in Urban and Regional Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Nathaniel Baum-Snow; Fernando Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of causal relationships in data is an essential part of scholarly inquiry in the social sciences. This chapter discusses strategies that have been successfully used in urban and regional economics for recovering such causal relationships. Essential to any successful empirical inquiry is careful consideration of the sources of variation in the data that identify parameters of interest. Interpretation of such parameters should take into account the potential for their heterogeneity as ...

  20. Causal transmission in reduced-form models

    OpenAIRE

    Vassili Bazinas; Bent Nielsen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to explore the causal transmission of a catalyst variable through two endogenous variables of interest. The method is based on the reduced-form system formed from the conditional distribution of the two endogenous variables given the catalyst. The method combines elements from instru- mental variable analysis and Cholesky decomposition of structural vector autoregressions. We give conditions for uniqueness of the causal transmission.

  1. Invited Commentary: Causal Diagrams and Measurement Bias

    OpenAIRE

    Hernán, Miguel A.; Cole, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Causal inferences about the effect of an exposure on an outcome may be biased by errors in the measurement of either the exposure or the outcome. Measurement errors of exposure and outcome can be classified into 4 types: independent nondifferential, dependent nondifferential, independent differential, and dependent differential. Here the authors describe how causal diagrams can be used to represent these 4 types of measurement bias and discuss some problems that arise when using measured expo...

  2. A Definition and Graphical Representation for Causality

    OpenAIRE

    Heckerman, David; Shachter, Ross D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a precise definition of cause and effect in terms of a fundamental notion called unresponsiveness. Our definition is based on Savage's (1954) formulation of decision theory and departs from the traditional view of causation in that our causal assertions are made relative to a set of decisions. An important consequence of this departure is that we can reason about cause locally, not requiring a causal explanation for every dependency. Such local reasoning can be beneficial because i...

  3. Causales de ausencia de responsabilidad penal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sandoval Fernández

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se ocupa de las causales de ausencia de responsabilidad penal, especialmente de aquellas que tienen efecto en el injusto. Como subtemas se delimita el concepto de responsabilidad penal y su ausencia. Se estudian las principales teorias a cerca de la relación tipicidad-antijuridicidad y su incidencia en el derecho penal colombiano. Por último contiene una propuesta acerca de cómo deberian agruparse las causales del arto 32 C. PlOO.

  4. Entropy-based artificial viscosity stabilization for non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The entropy viscosity method is extended to the non-equilibrium Grey Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations. The method employs a viscous regularization to stabilize the numerical solution. The artificial viscosity coefficient is modulated by the entropy production and peaks at shock locations. The added dissipative terms are consistent with the entropy minimum principle. A new functional form of the entropy residual, suitable for the Radiation-Hydrodynamic equations, is derived. We demonstrate that the viscous regularization preserves the equilibrium diffusion limit. The equations are discretized with a standard Continuous Galerkin Finite Element Method and a fully implicit temporal integrator within the MOOSE multiphysics framework. The method of manufactured solutions is employed to demonstrate second-order accuracy in both the equilibrium diffusion and streaming limits. Several typical 1-D radiation-hydrodynamic test cases with shocks (from Mach 1.05 to Mach 50) are presented to establish the ability of the technique to capture and resolve shocks

  5. Associative foundation of causal learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Cody W; McConnell, Bridget L; Miller, Ralph R

    2013-03-01

    Are humans unique in their ability to interpret exogenous events as causes? We addressed this question by observing the behavior of rats for indications of causal learning. Within an operant motor-sensory preconditioning paradigm, associative surgical techniques revealed that rats attempted to control an outcome (i.e., a potential effect) by manipulating a potential exogenous cause (i.e., an intervention). Rats were able to generate an innocuous auditory stimulus. This stimulus was then paired with an aversive stimulus. The animals subsequently avoided potential generation of the predictive cue, but not if the aversive stimulus was subsequently devalued or the predictive cue was extinguished (Exp. 1). In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that the aversive stimulus we used was in fact aversive, that it was subject to devaluation, that the cue-aversive stimulus pairings did make the cue a conditioned stimulus, and that the cue was subject to extinction. In Experiments 3 and 4, we established that the decrease in leverpressing observed in Experiment 1 was goal-directed instrumental behavior rather than purely a product of Pavlovian conditioning. To the extent that interventions suggest causal reasoning, it appears that causal reasoning can be based on associations between contiguous exogenous events. Thus, contiguity appears capable of establishing causal relationships between exogenous events. Our results challenge the widely held view that causal learning is uniquely human, and suggest that causal learning is explicable in an associative framework. PMID:22562460

  6. Group-invariant solutions of hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coggeshall, S.V.

    1993-08-01

    Using the property of invariance under Lie groups of transformations, the equations of hydrodynamics are transformed from partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations, for which special analytic solutions can be found. These particular solutions can be used for (1) numerical benchmarks, (2) the basis for analytic models, and (3) insight into more general solutions. Additionally, group transformations can be used to construct new solutions from existing ones. A space-time projective group is used to generate complicated solutions from simpler solutions. Discussion of these procedures is presented along with examples of analytic of 1,2 and 3-D hydrodynamics.

  7. Thermal development of the laminar flow of a Bingham fluid between two plane plates with viscous dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal development of the hydrodynamically developing laminar flow of a viscoplastic fluid (fluid of Bingham) between two plane plates maintained at a constant temperature has been studied numerically. This analysis has shown the effect caused by inertia and the rheological behaviour of the fluid on the velocity, pressure and temperature fields. The effects of Bingham and Peclet numbers on the Nusselt values with the inclusion of viscous dissipation are also discussed. (authors)

  8. Thermal development of the laminar flow of a Bingham fluid between two plane plates with viscous dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boualit, A.; Boualit, S. [Unite de recherche appliquee en energies renouvelables, Ghardaia (Algeria); Zeraibi, N. [Universite de Boumerdes, Faculte des hydrocarbures dept. Transport et equipement, Boumerdes (Algeria); Amoura, M. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumedienne, Faculte de Physique, Dept. Energetique, Alger (Algeria)

    2011-01-15

    The thermal development of the hydrodynamically developing laminar flow of a viscoplastic fluid (fluid of Bingham) between two plane plates maintained at a constant temperature has been studied numerically. This analysis has shown the effect caused by inertia and the rheological behaviour of the fluid on the velocity, pressure and temperature fields. The effects of Bingham and Peclet numbers on the Nusselt values with the inclusion of viscous dissipation are also discussed. (authors)

  9. HYDRODYNAMIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN TWO BODIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of model tests, potential flow theory, and viscous Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method, the hydrodynamic interactions between two underwater bodies were investigated to determine the influencing factors, changing rule, interaction mechanism, and appropriate methods describing them. Some special phenomena were discovered in two series of near-wall interaction experiments. The mathematical model and predicting methods were presented for interacting forces near wall, and the calculation results agreed well with the experimental ones. From the comparisons among numerical results with respect to nonviscosity, numerical results with respect to viscosity, and measured results, data on the influence of viscosity on hydrodynamic interactions were obtained. For hydrodynamic interaction related to multi-body unsteady motions with six degrees of freedom that is difficult to simulate in tests, numerical predictions of unsteady interacting forces were given.

  10. Comparative hydrodynamics of bacterial polymorphism

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2011-01-01

    Most bacteria swim through fluids by rotating helical flagella which can take one of twelve distinct polymorphic shapes. The most common helical waveform is the "normal" form, used during forward swimming runs. To shed light on the prevalence of the normal form in locomotion, we gather all available experimental measurements of the various polymorphic forms and compute their intrinsic hydrodynamic efficiencies. The normal helical form is found to be the most hydrodynamically efficient of the twelve polymorphic forms by a significant margin - a conclusion valid for both the peritrichous and polar flagellar families, and robust to a change in the effective flagellum diameter or length. The hydrodynamic optimality of the normal polymorph suggests that, although energetic costs of locomotion are small for bacteria, fluid mechanical forces may have played a significant role in the evolution of the flagellum.

  11. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics in Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Springel, Volker

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) in the astrophysical context, with a focus on inviscid gas dynamics. The particle-based SPH technique allows an intuitive and simple formulation of hydrodynamics that has excellent conservation properties and can be coupled to self-gravity easily and highly accurately. The Lagrangian character of SPH allows it to automatically adjust its resolution to the clumping of matter, a property that makes the scheme ideal for many applications in astrophysics, where often a large dynamic range in density is encountered. We discuss the derivation of the basic SPH equations in their modern formulation, and give an overview about extensions of SPH developed to treat physics such as radiative transfer, thermal conduction, relativistic dynamics or magnetic fields. We also briefly describe some of the most important applications areas of SPH in astrophysical research. Finally, we provide a critical discussion of the accuracy of SPH for different hydrodynamical prob...

  12. θ-vacuum and dissipation. The perturbation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of Ohmic dissipation on the θ-vacuum oscillations is studied. The weak dissipation decreases the magnitude of oscillations, and the strong dissipation cancels the oscillatory contribution. (author). 17 refs

  13. Ohmic Dissipation in Mini-Neptunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Diana; Pu, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In the quest of characterizing low-mass exoplanets, it is important to consider all sources that may contribute to the interpretation of planetary composition given mass and a radius measurements. While it has been firmly established that inferring the composition of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes suffers from the inherent problem of compositional degeneracy, the effect from ohmic dissipation on these planets and its connection to compositional interpretation has not been studied so far. Ohmic dissipation is arguably the leading theory that aims to explain the large radii seen in highly-irradiated exo-Jupiters. In this study, we determine the strength of ohmic dissipation on mini-Neptunes and its effect on their H/He envelope structure as a function of insolation temperature and planetary mass. We find that ohmic dissipation is strong enough to halt the contraction of mini-Neptunes during their thermal evolution and therefore, inflate their radii in comparison to planets that do not suffer dissipation. This means that the radius of highly irradiated of this class of planets may be explained by the presence of volatiles and ohmic dissipation. In other words, there is a trade-off between ohmic dissipation and H/He content for hot mini-Neptunes.

  14. Hydrodynamic constants from cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a gravity dual of Bjorken flow of N=4 SYM-theory plasma. We point out that the cosmic censorship hypothesis may explain why the regularity of the dual geometry constrains the hydrodynamic constants. We also investigate the apparent horizon of the dual geometry. We find that the dual geometry constructed on Fefferman-Graham (FG) coordinates is not appropriate for examination of the apparent horizon since the coordinates do not cover the trapped region. However, the preliminary analysis on FG coordinates suggests that the location of the apparent horizon is very sensitive to the hydrodynamic parameters. (author)

  15. Hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Eckart, Carl

    1960-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of Oceans and Atmospheres is a systematic account of the hydrodynamics of oceans and atmospheres. Topics covered range from the thermodynamic functions of an ideal gas and the thermodynamic coefficients for water to steady motions, the isothermal atmosphere, the thermocline, and the thermosphere. Perturbation equations, field equations, residual equations, and a general theory of rays are also presented. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic equations and their solutions, with the aim of illustrating the laws of dynamics. The nonlinear

  16. Anisotropic hydrodynamics: Motivation and methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this proceedings contribution I review recent progress in our understanding of the bulk dynamics of relativistic systems that possess potentially large local rest frame momentum-space anisotropies. In order to deal with these momentum-space anisotropies, a reorganization of relativistic viscous hydrodynamics can be made around an anisotropic background, and the resulting dynamical framework has been dubbed “anisotropic hydrodynamics”. I also discuss expectations for the degree of momentum-space anisotropy of the quark–gluon plasma generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC from second-order viscous hydrodynamics, strong-coupling approaches, and weak-coupling approaches

  17. Hydrodynamic interactions in protein folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek; Niewieczerzał, Szymon

    2009-03-01

    We incorporate hydrodynamic interactions (HIs) in a coarse-grained and structure-based model of proteins by employing the Rotne-Prager hydrodynamic tensor. We study several small proteins and demonstrate that HIs facilitate folding. We also study HIV-1 protease and show that HIs make the flap closing dynamics faster. The HIs are found to affect time correlation functions in the vicinity of the native state even though they have no impact on same time characteristics of the structure fluctuations around the native state.

  18. Energy method for multi-dimensional balance laws with non-local dissipation

    KAUST Repository

    Duan, Renjun

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with a class of multi-dimensional balance laws with a non-local dissipative source which arise as simplified models for the hydrodynamics of radiating gases. At first we introduce the energy method in the setting of smooth perturbations and study the stability of constants states. Precisely, we use Fourier space analysis to quantify the energy dissipation rate and recover the optimal time-decay estimates for perturbed solutions via an interpolation inequality in Fourier space. As application, the developed energy method is used to prove stability of smooth planar waves in all dimensions n2, and also to show existence and stability of time-periodic solutions in the presence of the time-periodic source. Optimal rates of convergence of solutions towards the planar waves or time-periodic states are also shown provided initially L1-perturbations. © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulations of Domain Growth and Phase Separation in Binary Immiscible Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhao; Hong Liu; Zhong-yuan Lu; Chia-chung Sun

    2008-01-01

    It was investigated that the domain growth processes of spinodal decomposition with different quenching depth in two and three dimensional binary immiscible fluids by using parallel dissipative particle dynamics simulations. In two dimensions, the dynamic scaling exponent 1/2 for coalescence and 2/3 for inertial regimes in the shallow quench and strong finite size effects in the cases of deep quenching were obtained. In three dimensions, it was used that the diffusive regime with exponent n=1/3 in the shallow quench and the inertial hydrodynamic regime with n=2/3 for different quenches. The viscous effects are not clearly reflected, showing n=l/2 in both shallow and deep quenches in this time period, due to the soft nature of interaction potential adopted in dissipative particle dynamics.

  20. Mesoscopic simulation of a thinning liquid bridge using the dissipative particle dynamics method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Chao-jie; Yang, Li-jun; Zhao, Fei; Cui, Kun-da

    2015-08-01

    In this research, the dissipative particle dynamics method was used to investigate the problem of thinning and breakup in a liquid bridge. It was found that both the inertial-force-dominated thinning process and the thermal-fluctuation-dominated thinning process can be reproduced with the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method by varying the simulation parameters. A highly suspect viscous thinning regime was also found, but the conclusion is not irrefutable because of the complication of the shear viscosity of DPD fluid. We show in this article that the DPD method can serve as a good candidate to elucidate crossover problem in liquid bridge thinning from being hydrodynamics dominated to being thermal fluctuation dominated.

  1. On the numerical treatment of dissipative particle dynamics and related systems

    CERN Document Server

    Leimkuhler, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    We review and compare numerical methods that simultaneously control temperature while preserving the momentum, a family of particle simulation methods commonly used for mesoscale models for complex fluids and polymers. The class of methods considered includes dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as well as extended stochastic-dynamics models incorporating a generalized pairwise thermostat scheme in which stochastic forces are eliminated and the coefficient of dissipation is treated as an additional auxiliary variable subject to a feedback (kinetic energy) control mechanism. In the latter case, we consider the addition of a coupling of the auxiliary variable, as in the Nos\\'{e}-Hoover-Langevin (NHL) method, with stochastic dynamics to ensure ergodicity, and find that the convergence of ensemble averages is substantially improved. The techniques discussed here are fully consistent with hydrodynamics (Galilean invariant) and straightforward to treat numerically. To this end, splitting methods are developed and st...

  2. Viscous dissipation effect on the flow of a thermodependent Herschel-Bulkley fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labsi Nabila

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns the numerical analysis of both hydrodynamic and thermal properties of a Herschel-Bulkley fluid flow in a pipe. The flow, which involves forced heat transfer convection, is steady and takes place within a pipe of circular cross section with uniform wall temperature. The Herschel-Bulkley model with the Papanastasiou regularization is used and flow index values of 1 and 1.5 are considered. The study focuses on the effect of neglecting both viscous dissipation and temperature dependence of the fluid consistency on its hydrodynamic and thermal properties. For that purpose, we investigate both wall heating (Br0 as well as the exponential temperature dependence of the consistency. The results show that neglecting both of these parameters results in more than a 50% underestimation of the heat transfer due to the viscous nature of this kind of fluid.

  3. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-01

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics (SDPD) model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semianalytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  4. Optimizing the microstructure of dissipative materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    with inspiration from experimental results in (Schaedler, 2011), where a highly energy absorbing material, constructed from structural elements with a small cross sectional area but large area moment of inertia, is presented. Furthermore, the applicability of multiscale finite element methods (Efendiev......The aim of this work is to present a method to design material microstructures with high dissipation using topology optimization. In order to compute the macroscopic energy dissipation in periodic structures, we focus both on capturing the physical dissipation mechanism and to find the effective......, 2009) to account for boundary conditions of periodic structures that possess a finite extent is investigated....

  5. ATOMIZATION CAUSED BY BOTTOM FLOW ENERGY DISSIPATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Bottom flow energy dissipation is one of the common energydissipation methods for flood-releasing structures with high water head. Measures of this energy dissipation depend mainly on the turbulent action of hydraulic jump.In this paper, the physical process and the calculating methods of the atomization caused by bottom flow energy dissipation were studied, the computation models of atomization quantity for the self-aerated flow in overflow and hydraulic jump regions are presented, and the main results are of theoretical and practical significance for the hydraulic and electric engineering.

  6. Multicritical behavior in dissipative Ising models

    CERN Document Server

    Overbeck, Vincent R; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Weimer, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We analyze theoretically the many-body dynamics of a dissipative Ising model in a transverse field using a variational approach. We find that the steady state phase diagram is substantially modified compared to its equilibrium counterpart, including the appearance of a multicritical point belonging to a different universality class. Building on our variational analysis, we establish a field-theoretical treatment corresponding to a dissipative variant of a Ginzburg-Landau theory, which allows us to compute the upper critical dimension of the system. Finally, we present a possible experimental realization of the dissipative Ising model using ultracold Rydberg gases.

  7. Dissipation effects in mechanics and thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Guemez, Julio; Fiolhais, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    With the discussion of three examples, we aim at clarifying the concept of energy transfer associated with dissipation in mechanics and in thermodynamics. The dissipation effects due to dissipative forces, such as the friction force between solids or the drag force in motions in fluids, lead to an internal energy increase of the system and/or to a heat transfer to the surrounding. This heat flow is consistent with the second law, which states that the entropy of the universe should increase w...

  8. On a Model for Mixture Flows: Derivation, Dissipation and Stability Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudon, Thierry; Vasseur, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    We propose a new model describing mixture flows. The non linear system couples heterogeneous Navier-Stokes equations with a constraint on the mean volume velocity of the flow. The PDE system is obtained from a more microscopic viewpoint, involving a Vlasov-like equation describing the disperse phase, through a certain hydrodynamic limit. The model has remarkable dissipation properties, inherited from the structure of the fluid-kinetic description. Based on these properties, together with additional estimates that can be obtained in the one-dimension framework, we establish the stability of weak solutions.

  9. Electrostatic Nonlinear Structures in Dissipative Electron-Positron-Ion Quantum Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. A. Khan; Q. Haque

    2008-01-01

    @@ Low frequency (in comparison to ion plasma frequency) ion-acoustic shocks and solitons in superdense electron-positron-ion quantum plasmas are studied.The quantum hydrodynamic model is used incorporating quantum Bohm forces and Fermi-Dirac statistical corrections to derive the deformed Korteweg de Vries-Burgers (dKdVB) equation in weakly nonlinear limit.The travelling wave solution of dKdVB equation is presented and results are discussed in different limits.It is found that shock height increases with increase of quantum pressure, positron concentration and dissipation.Further, it is seen that the width of soliton decreases with increase of quantum pressure.

  10. Preschoolers prefer to learn causal information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aubry eAlvarez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Young children, in general, appear to have a strong drive to explore the environment in ways that reveal its underlying causal structure. But are they really attuned specifically to casual information in this quest for understanding, or do they show equal interest in other types of non-obvious information about the world? To answer this question, we introduced 20 three-year-old children to two puppets who were anxious to tell the child about a set of novel artifacts and animals. One puppet consistently described causal properties of the items while the other puppet consistently described carefully matched non-causal properties of the same items. After a familiarization period in which children learned which type of information to expect from each informant, children were given the opportunity to choose which they wanted to hear describe each of eight pictured test items. On average, children chose to hear from the informant that provided causal descriptions on 72% of the trials. This preference for causal information has important implications for explaining the role of conceptual information in supporting early learning and may suggest means for maximizing interest and motivation in young children.

  11. Quantum causality in closed timelike curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, S. M.; Kiktenko, E. O.

    2015-08-01

    Although general relativity allows the existence of closed timelike curves (CTCs), self-consistency problems arise (the ‘grandfather paradox’ among others). It is known that quantum mechanical consideration of the matter formally removes all the paradoxes, but the questions about causal structure remain. On the other hand, the idea of postselected CTCs (P-CTC) in quantum teleportation has know been put forward and experimentally implemented. We consider these problems with the aid of quantum causal analysis, where causality is defined without invoking the time relation. It implements the Cramer principle of weak causality, which admits time reversal in entangled states. We analyze Deutsch CTCs (D-CTC) with different kinds of interactions between the chronology-violating and chronology-respecting particles, with refined inferences about mixedness, quantum/classical correlations, entanglement and thermodynamics in the D-CTC. The main result is that time reversal causality can really exist, however, the final quantum state does not place retrospective constraints on the initial state, instead the final state can influence the state inside the D-CTC. This is effectively the implementation of Novikov self-consistency principle. The P-CTC has radically different properties; in particular, if the initial state was pure, the final state is always pure too. Self-consistency is controlled by the initial state-dependent traversability of the P-CTC.

  12. Energy dissipation in biomolecular machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lervik, Anders

    2012-07-01

    thermodynamic efficiency is found to be low (< 13 %) in all cases for the experimental conditions considered, which means that a large amount of the energy released from the ATP-hydrolysis is dissipated as heat. A complementary molecular dynamics study targeted on a bilayer for which the protein shows a relatively large efficiency (compared to other bilayers) shows that membrane deformation and large efficiency are not mutually exclusive. Overall, this thesis highlights the usefulness of the mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework applied to molecular machines and energy transduction and dissipation in these. The main result is that the mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework is applicable to molecular pumps and can be extended to include heat effects. This framework is general and can be applied to other molecular machines as well. Further, the results also support the notion that the calcium pump may contribute to non-shivering thermogenesis in certain tissues.(Author)

  13. Radiation hydrodynamics in the laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a collection of five preprints devoted to the subject of laser induced phenomena of radiation hydrodynamics. These preprints cover approximately the contents of the presentations made by the MPQ experimental laser-plasma group at the 17th European Conference on Laser Interaction with Matter (ECLIM), Rome, November 18-22, 1985. (orig.)

  14. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  15. Anomalous hydrodynamics in two dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rabin Banerjee

    2016-02-01

    A new approach is presented to discuss two-dimensional hydrodynamics with gauge and gravitational anomalies. Exact constitutive relations for the stress tensor and charge current are obtained. Also, a connection between response parameters and anomaly coefficients is discussed. These are new results which, in the absence of the gauge sector, reproduce the results found by the gradient expansion approach.

  16. Holographic Gravitational Anomaly in First and Second Order Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Megias, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    We compute, in the framework of the fluid/gravity correspondence, the transport coefficients of a relativistic fluid affected by chiral and gauge-gravitational anomalies, including external electromagnetic fields. The computation is performed at first and second order in the hydrodynamical expansion. We use a 5-dim holographic model with pure gauge and mixed gauge-gravitational Chern-Simons terms in the action. We reproduce at first order previous results on the anomaly induced current of a magnetic field and a vortex in a relativistic fluid, and compute at second order the anomalous and non anomalous transport coefficients by using a Weyl covariant formalism. We find a dissipative and anomalous correction to the chiral magnetic conductivity due to the time dependence of the magnetic field. We also find a new contribution from the mixed gauge-gravitational anomaly to the shear waves dispersion relation. The role played by the chiral and gravitational anomalies in other transport coefficients is discussed.

  17. Quantum Phase Transition, Dissipation, and Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarty, Sudip

    2009-01-01

    A selected set of topics in quantum phase transition is discussed. It includes dissipative quantum phase transitions, the role of disorder, and the relevance of quantum phase transition to measurement theory in quantum mechanics.

  18. Dissipation effects in mechanics and thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guemez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    With the discussion of three examples, we aim at clarifying the concept of energy transfer associated with dissipation in mechanics and in thermodynamics. The dissipation effects due to dissipative forces, such as the friction force between solids or the drag force in motions in fluids, lead to an internal energy increase of the system and/or to a heat transfer to the surrounding. This heat flow is consistent with the second law, which states that the entropy of the universe should increase when those forces are present because of the irreversibility always associated with their actions. As far as mechanics is concerned the effects of the dissipative forces are include in the Newton's equations as impulses and pseudo-works.

  19. Dissipation effects in mechanics and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2016-07-01

    With the discussion of three examples, we aim at clarifying the concept of energy transfer associated with dissipation in mechanics and in thermodynamics. The dissipation effects due to dissipative forces, such as the friction force between solids or the drag force in motions in fluids, lead to an internal energy increase of the system and/or to heat transfer to the surroundings. This heat flow is consistent with the second law, which states that the entropy of the universe should increase when those forces are present because of the irreversibility always associated with their actions. As far as mechanics is concerned, the effects of the dissipative forces are included in Newton’s equations as impulses and pseudo-works.

  20. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  1. Phenomenological approaches of dissipative heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These lectures describe the properties of dissipative heavy ion collisions observed in low bombarding energy heavy ion reactions. These dissipative collisions are of two different types: fusion and deep inelastic reactions. Their main experimental properties are described on selected examples. It is shown how it is possible to give a simple interpretation to the data. A large number of phenomenological models have been developped to understand dissipative heavy ion collisions. The most important are those describing the collision by classical mechanics and friction forces, the diffusion models, and transport theories which merge both preceding approaches. A special emphasis has been done on two phenomena observed in dissipative heavy ion collisions: charge equilibratium for which we can show the existence of quantum fluctuations, and fast fission which appears as an intermediate mechanism between deep inelastic reactions and compound nucleus formation

  2. Towards a Measurement of the Spacetime Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Huan; Smith, Nicolas D; Adhikari, Rana X; Miao, Haixing; Chen, Yanbei

    2015-01-01

    It has been speculated that gravity could be an emergent phenomenon, with classical general relativity as an effective, macroscopic theory, valid only for classical systems at large temporal and spatial scales. As in classical continuum dynamics, the existence of underlying microscopic degrees of freedom may lead to macroscopic dissipative behaviors. With the hope that such dissipative behaviors of gravity could be revealed by carefully designed experiments in the laboratory, we consider a family of phenomenological models that add dissipations to the gravitational field, much similar to frictions in solids and fluids. Constraints to such dissipative behavior can already be imposed by astrophysical observations and existing experiments, but mostly in lower frequencies. We propose a series of experiments working in higher frequency regimes, which may potentially put more stringent bounds on these models.

  3. Fluctuation, Dissipation and Irreversibility in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, B L

    1993-01-01

    We discuss the appearance of time-asymmetric behavior in physical processes in cosmology and in the dynamics of the Universe itself. We begin with an analysis of the nature and origin of irreversibility in well-known physical processes such as dispersion, diffusion, dissipation and mixing, and make the distinction between processes whose irreversibility arises from the stipulation of special initial conditions, and those arising from the system's interaction with a coarse-grained environment. We then study the irreversibility associated with quantum fluctuations in cosmological processes like particle creation and the `birth of the Universe'. We suggest that the backreaction effect of such quantum processes can be understood as the manifestation of a fluctuation-dissipation relation relating fluctuations of quantum fields to dissipations in the dynamics of spacetime. For the same reason it is shown that dissipation is bound to appear in the dynamics of minisuperspace cosmologies. This provides a natural cours...

  4. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco [National Institute for Theoretical Physics and Quantum Research Group, School of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  5. Precisely timing dissipative quantum information processing

    CERN Document Server

    Kastoryano, M J; Eisert, J

    2012-01-01

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by weak (Markovian) system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource, and consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that large classes of initial states are rapidly driven to desirable steady states. One apparent drawback of this scheme is that it does not seem to allow for precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements or error correction. In this work, we provide a solution to these challenges, by introducing some basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger and time dissipative operations, while keeping the system Liouvillian time independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed, protected dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how universal computation can be performed with ...

  6. Causality, initial conditions and inflationary magnetogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Tsagas, Christos G

    2016-01-01

    The post-inflationary evolution of inflation-produced magnetic fields, conventional or not, can change dramatically when two fundamental issues are accounted for. The first is causality, which demands that local physical processes can never affect superhorizon perturbations. The second is the nature of the transition from inflation to reheating and then to the radiation era, which determine the initial conditions at the start of these epochs. Technically, the latter issue can be addressed by appealing to Israel's junction conditions. Causality implies that inflationary magnetic fields dot not freeze into the matter until they have re-entered the causal horizon. The nature of cosmological transitions and the associated initial conditions, on the other hand, determine the large-scale magnetic evolution after inflation. Put together, the two can slow down the adiabatic decay of superhorizon-sized magnetic fields throughout their post-inflationary life and thus lead to considerably stronger residual strengths. Th...

  7. Causal Mediation Analyses for Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kevin G; Cary, Mark; Gallop, Robert; Ten Have, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    In the context of randomized intervention trials, we describe causal methods for analyzing how post-randomization factors constitute the process through which randomized baseline interventions act on outcomes. Traditionally, such mediation analyses have been undertaken with great caution, because they assume that the mediating factor is also randomly assigned to individuals in addition to the randomized baseline intervention (i.e., sequential ignorability). Because the mediating factors are typically not randomized, such analyses are unprotected from unmeasured confounders that may lead to biased inference. We review several causal approaches that attempt to reduce such bias without assuming that the mediating factor is randomized. However, these causal approaches require certain interaction assumptions that may be assessed if there is enough treatment heterogeneity with respect to the mediator. We describe available estimation procedures in the context of several examples from the literature and provide resources for software code. PMID:19484136

  8. Bulk viscous cosmology with causal transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider cosmological scenarios originating from a single imperfect fluid with bulk viscosity and apply Eckart's and both the full and the truncated Müller-Israel-Stewart's theories as descriptions of the non-equilibrium processes. Our principal objective is to investigate if the dynamical properties of Dark Matter and Dark Energy can be described by a single viscous fluid and how such description changes when a causal theory (Müller-Israel-Stewart's, both in its full and truncated forms) is taken into account instead of Eckart's non-causal one. To this purpose, we find numerical solutions for the gravitational potential and compare its behaviour with the corresponding ΛCDM case. Eckart's and the full causal theory seem to be disfavoured, whereas the truncated theory leads to results similar to those of the ΛCDM model for a bulk viscous speed in the interval 10−11 || cb2 ∼−8

  9. The causal meaning of Hamilton's rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okasha, Samir; Martens, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Hamilton's original derivation of his rule for the spread of an altruistic gene (rb>c) assumed additivity of costs and benefits. Recently, it has been argued that an exact version of the rule holds under non-additive pay-offs, so long as the cost and benefit terms are suitably defined, as partial regression coefficients. However, critics have questioned both the biological significance and the causal meaning of the resulting rule. This paper examines the causal meaning of the generalized Hamilton's rule in a simple model, by computing the effect of a hypothetical experiment to assess the cost of a social action and comparing it to the partial regression definition. The two do not agree. A possible way of salvaging the causal meaning of Hamilton's rule is explored, by appeal to R. A. Fisher's 'average effect of a gene substitution'. PMID:27069669

  10. Causal inheritance in plane wave quotients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality

  11. Causal inheritence in plane wave quotients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubeny, Veronika E.; Rangamani, Mukund; Ross, Simon F.

    2003-11-24

    We investigate the appearance of closed timelike curves in quotients of plane waves along spacelike isometries. First we formulate a necessary and sufficient condition for a quotient of a general spacetime to preserve stable causality. We explicitly show that the plane waves are stably causal; in passing, we observe that some pp-waves are not even distinguishing. We then consider the classification of all quotients of the maximally supersymmetric ten-dimensional plane wave under a spacelike isometry, and show that the quotient will lead to closed timelike curves iff the isometry involves a translation along the u direction. The appearance of these closed timelike curves is thus connected to the special properties of the light cones in plane wave spacetimes. We show that all other quotients preserve stable causality.

  12. Normalizing the causality between time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X. San

    2015-08-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula was derived to evaluate information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing a Lyapunov exponent-like, one-dimensional phase-space stretching rate and a noise-to-signal ratio from the rate of information flow in the balance of the marginal entropy evolution of the flow recipient. It is verified with autoregressive models and applied to a real financial analysis problem. An unusually strong one-way causality is identified from IBM (International Business Machines Corporation) to GE (General Electric Company) in their early era, revealing to us an old story, which has almost faded into oblivion, about "Seven Dwarfs" competing with a giant for the mainframe computer market.

  13. Local mapping of dissipative vortex motion

    OpenAIRE

    Raes, Bart; Van de Vondel, Joris; Silhanek, A. V; de Souza Silva, C.C.; Gutierrez, J; Kramer, R. B. G.; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2012-01-01

    We explore, with unprecedented single vortex resolution, the dissipation and motion of vortices in a superconducting ribbon under the influence of an external alternating magnetic field. This is achieved by combining the phase sensitive character of ac susceptibility, allowing us to distinguish between the inductive and dissipative responses, with the local power of scanning Hall probe microscopy. Whereas the induced reversible screening currents contribute only inductively, the vortices do l...

  14. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    As with their macroscopic counterparts, the moving parts of nanoscale protein machines grow hot while in operation. A portion of the energy biomolecules harness to perform meaningful work is always dissipated as heat into the surroundings. Here, we feature a methodology by which dominant dissipative trajectories can be extracted from detailed models of protein dynamics. In two important classes of signaling proteins [kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs)], we find that the regions o...

  15. Dissipative electromagnetism from a nonequilibrium thermodynamics perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Jelic, A; Hütter, M Markus; Öttinger, HC

    2006-01-01

    Dissipative effects in electromagnetism on macroscopic scales are examined by coarse graining the microscopic Maxwell equations with respect to time. We illustrate a procedure to derive the dissipative effects on the macroscopic scale by using a Green-Kubo type expression in terms of the microscopic fluctuations and the correlations between them. The resulting macroscopic Maxwell equations are formulated within the General Equation for the Non-Equilibrium Reversible-Irreversible Coupling (GEN...

  16. Energy Dissipation Control of Hysteretic Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Riess; Krenk, Steen

    2006-01-01

    contrast the energy dissipated by a hysteretic damper is independent of frequency, but depends on the amplitude and also contains a stiffness component. The present paper presents a procedure for predicting the magnitude of the closed hysteresis loops and thereby the energy dissipation, and a procedure for...... on-line tuning of the damper properties for random response. The approach is illustrated for the bilinear elasto-plastic damper, where the optimal relation between yield level and displacement amplitude is derived....

  17. Harmonic Oscillator Potential to describe Internal Dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, R D

    2003-01-01

    Assuming that a constant potential energy function has meaning for a dissipated harmonic oscillator, then an important issue is the time dependence of the turning points. Turning point studies demonstrate that the common model of external (viscous) damping fails to properly describe those many systems where structural (internal friction) damping is the most important source of dissipation. For internal friction damping, the better model of potential energy is one in which the function is not stationary.

  18. Quantum Markov Chain Mixing and Dissipative Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is the fruit of investigations on the extension of ideas of Markov chain mixing to the quantum setting, and its application to problems of dissipative engineering. A Markov chain describes a statistical process where the probability of future events depends only on the state of the sy....... Finally, we consider three independent tasks of dissipative engineering: dissipatively preparing a maximally entangled state of two atoms trapped in an optical cavity, dissipative preparation of graph states, and dissipative quantum computing construction.......This thesis is the fruit of investigations on the extension of ideas of Markov chain mixing to the quantum setting, and its application to problems of dissipative engineering. A Markov chain describes a statistical process where the probability of future events depends only on the state...... (stationary states). The aim of Markov chain mixing is to obtain (upper and/or lower) bounds on the number of steps it takes for the Markov chain to reach a stationary state. The natural quantum extensions of these notions are density matrices and quantum channels. We set out to develop a general mathematical...

  19. Lectures on hydrodynamic fluctuations in relativistic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These are pedagogical lecture notes on hydrodynamic fluctuations in normal relativistic fluids. The lectures discuss correlation functions of conserved densities in thermal equilibrium, interactions of the hydrodynamic modes, an effective action for viscous fluids and the breakdown of the derivative expansion in hydrodynamics. (topical review)

  20. Hume’s understanding of causal explanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Igor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with actuality of Hume’s positive thesis about causality, specifically in modern science. According to Dauer, Hume in his Treatise of Human Nature does not deal with scientific theory which allows us, in modern times, to come to the truth, and then necessity. Also, he claims that observation alone, without theory is useless, which is the reason why we need science to predict future events. I intend to show that all three claims are incorrect, and to show an intimate connection of causality and our intuitions.

  1. A causally connected superluminal Warp Drive spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Loup, F; Waite, D; Halerewicz, E F; Stabno, M; Kuntzman, M; Sims, R

    2002-01-01

    It will be shown that while horizons do not exist for warp drive spacetimes traveling at subluminal velocities horizons begin to develop when a warp drive spacetime reaches luminal velocities. However it will be shown that the control region of a warp drive ship lie within the portion of the warped region that is still causally connected to the ship even at superluminal velocities, therefore allowing a ship to slow to subluminal velocities. Further it is shown that the warped regions which are causally disconnected from a warp ship have no correlation to the ship velocity.

  2. Causal interpretation of stochastic differential equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Alexander; Hansen, Niels Richard

    2014-01-01

    We give a causal interpretation of stochastic differential equations (SDEs) by defining the postintervention SDE resulting from an intervention in an SDE. We show that under Lipschitz conditions, the solution to the postintervention SDE is equal to a uniform limit in probability of postintervention...... structural equation models based on the Euler scheme of the original SDE, thus relating our definition to mainstream causal concepts. We prove that when the driving noise in the SDE is a Lévy process, the postintervention distribution is identifiable from the generator of the SDE....

  3. Causal Entropy Bound for a Spacelike Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustein, R.; Veneziano, G.

    2000-06-01

    The identification of a causal-connection scale motivates us to propose a new covariant bound on entropy within a generic spacelike region. This ``causal entropy bound,'' scaling as EV, and thus lying around the geometric mean of Bekenstein's S/ER and holographic S/A bounds, is checked in various ``critical'' situations. In the case of limited gravity, Bekenstein's bound is the strongest while naive holography is the weakest. In the case of strong gravity, our bound and Bousso's holographic bound are stronger than Bekenstein's, while naive holography is too tight, and hence typically wrong.

  4. Final Report. Hydrodynamics by high-energy-density plasma flow and hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves

  5. The way from microscopic many-particle theory to macroscopic hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-23

    Starting from the microscopic description of a normal fluid in terms of any kind of local interacting many-particle theory we present a well defined step by step procedure to derive the hydrodynamic equations for the macroscopic phenomena. We specify the densities of the conserved quantities as the relevant hydrodynamic variables and apply the methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics with projection operator techniques. As a result we obtain time-evolution equations for the hydrodynamic variables with three kinds of terms on the right-hand sides: reversible, dissipative and fluctuating terms. In their original form these equations are completely exact and contain nonlocal terms in space and time which describe nonlocal memory effects. Applying a few approximations the nonlocal properties and the memory effects are removed. As a result we find the well known hydrodynamic equations of a normal fluid with Gaussian fluctuating forces. In the following we investigate if and how the time-inversion invariance is broken and how the second law of thermodynamics comes about. Furthermore, we show that the hydrodynamic equations with fluctuating forces are equivalent to stochastic Langevin equations and the related Fokker-Planck equation. Finally, we investigate the fluctuation theorem and find a modification by an additional term. PMID:26902659

  6. The way from microscopic many-particle theory to macroscopic hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Starting from the microscopic description of a normal fluid in terms of any kind of local interacting many-particle theory we present a well defined step by step procedure to derive the hydrodynamic equations for the macroscopic phenomena. We specify the densities of the conserved quantities as the relevant hydrodynamic variables and apply the methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics with projection operator techniques. As a result we obtain time-evolution equations for the hydrodynamic variables with three kinds of terms on the right-hand sides: reversible, dissipative and fluctuating terms. In their original form these equations are completely exact and contain nonlocal terms in space and time which describe nonlocal memory effects. Applying a few approximations the nonlocal properties and the memory effects are removed. As a result we find the well known hydrodynamic equations of a normal fluid with Gaussian fluctuating forces. In the following we investigate if and how the time-inversion invariance is broken and how the second law of thermodynamics comes about. Furthermore, we show that the hydrodynamic equations with fluctuating forces are equivalent to stochastic Langevin equations and the related Fokker-Planck equation. Finally, we investigate the fluctuation theorem and find a modification by an additional term.

  7. Hydrodynamic simulations with the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murante, G.; Borgani, S.; Brunino, R.; Cha, S.-H.

    2011-10-01

    We present results based on an implementation of the Godunov smoothed particle hydrodynamics (GSPH), originally developed by Inutsuka, in the GADGET-3 hydrodynamic code. We first review the derivation of the GSPH discretization of the equations of moment and energy conservation, starting from the convolution of these equations with the interpolating kernel. The two most important aspects of the numerical implementation of these equations are (a) the appearance of fluid velocity and pressure obtained from the solution of the Riemann problem between each pair of particles, and (b) the absence of an artificial viscosity term. We carry out three different controlled hydrodynamical three-dimensional tests, namely the Sod shock tube, the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a shear-flow test and the 'blob' test describing the evolution of a cold cloud moving against a hot wind. The results of our tests confirm and extend in a number of aspects those recently obtained by Cha, Inutsuka & Nayakshin: (i) GSPH provides a much improved description of contact discontinuities, with respect to smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), thus avoiding the appearance of spurious pressure forces; (ii) GSPH is able to follow the development of gas-dynamical instabilities, such as the Kevin-Helmholtz and the Rayleigh-Taylor ones; (iii) as a result, GSPH describes the development of curl structures in the shear-flow test and the dissolution of the cold cloud in the 'blob' test. Besides comparing the results of GSPH with those from standard SPH implementations, we also discuss in detail the effect on the performances of GSPH of changing different aspects of its implementation: choice of the number of neighbours, accuracy of the interpolation procedure to locate the interface between two fluid elements (particles) for the solution of the Riemann problem, order of the reconstruction for the assignment of variables at the interface, choice of the limiter to prevent oscillations of

  8. A Causal Construction of Diffusion Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Banek, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    A simple nonlinear integral equation for Ito's map is obtained. Although, it does not include stochastic integrals, it does give causal construction of diffusion processes which can be easily implemented by iteration systems. Applications in financial modelling and extension to fBm are discussed.

  9. Causality and analyticity in quantum fields theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a presentation of results on the causal and analytical structure of Green functions and on the collision amplitudes in fields theories, for massive particles of one type, with a positive mass and a zero spin value. (A.B.)

  10. Manipulation and the causal Markov condition

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Daniel; Woodward, James

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between a manipulability conception of causation and the causal Markov condition (CM). We argue that violations of CM also violate widely shared expectations—implicit in the manipulability conception—having to do with the absence of spontaneous correlations. They also violate expectations concerning the connection between independence or dependence relationships in the presence and absence of interventions.

  11. Escaping Myopia: Teaching Students about Historical Causality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    There are so many aspects to teaching history that are vital to creating well-rounded historical thinkers, but one of the most fundamental and most overlooked elements is the idea of causality. Far too many students do not understand the idea of causation, that there are multiple reasons for why historical events occurred and transpired in the way…

  12. Causality and Teleology in High School Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Pinchas

    1985-01-01

    Ability to distinguish between causal (cause-effect) and teleological (means-ends) explanations was measured in 1905 twelfth-grade biology students and found to be dependent on student knowledge. Although the inability to make these distinctions contributes to misconceptions in biology, appropriate instruction can easily remedy the problem. Sample…

  13. Causal and Teleological Explanations in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2009-01-01

    A causal explanation in biology focuses on the mechanism by which a biological process is brought about, whereas a teleological explanation considers the end result, in the context of the survival of the organism, as a reason for certain biological processes or structures. There is a tendency among students to offer a teleological explanation…

  14. Comments: Causal Interpretations of Mediation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Booil; Stuart, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The authors thank Dr. Lindsay Page for providing a nice illustration of the use of the principal stratification framework to define causal effects, and a Bayesian model for effect estimation. They hope that her well-written article will help expose education researchers to these concepts and methods, and move the field of mediation analysis in…

  15. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The role of education in the process of socioeconomic attainment is a topic of long standing interest to sociologists and economists. Recently there has been growing interest not only in estimating the average causal effect of education on outcomes such as earnings, but also in estimating how cau...

  16. Inferring causality from noisy time series data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Dan; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian;

    2016-01-01

    even causality direction in synchronized time-series and in the presence of intermediate coupling. We find that the presence of noise deterministically reduces the level of cross-mapping fidelity, while the convergence rate exhibits higher levels of robustness. Finally, we propose that controlled noise...

  17. Linear Response Laws and Causality in Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuffa, Alex J.; Scales, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Linear response laws and causality (the effect cannot precede the cause) are of fundamental importance in physics. In the context of classical electrodynamics, students often have a difficult time grasping these concepts because the physics is obscured by the intermingling of the time and frequency domains. In this paper, we analyse the linear…

  18. Entropy current in conformal hydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent work [1, 2], the energy-momentum tensor for the N = 4 SYM fluid was computed up to second derivative terms using holographic methods. The aim of this note is to propose an entropy current (accurate up to second derivative terms) consistent with this energy-momentum tensor and to explicate its relation with the existing theories of relativistic hydrodynamics. In order to achieve this, we first develop a Weyl-covariant formalism which simplifies the study of conformal hydrodynamics. This naturally leads us to a proposal for the entropy current of an arbitrary conformal fluid in any spacetime (with d>3). In particular, this proposal translates into a definite expression for the entropy flux in the case of N = 4 SYM fluid. We conclude this note by comparing the formalism presented here with the conventional Israel-Stewart formalism.

  19. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Powers, Thomas R.

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the “runs” of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices.

  20. Hydrodynamic interactions between rotating helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, MunJu; Powers, Thomas R

    2004-06-01

    Escherichia coli bacteria use rotating helical flagella to swim. At this scale, viscous effects dominate inertia, and there are significant hydrodynamic interactions between nearby helices. These interactions cause the flagella to bundle during the "runs" of bacterial chemotaxis. Here we use slender-body theory to solve for the flow fields generated by rigid helices rotated by stationary motors. We determine how the hydrodynamic forces and torques depend on phase and phase difference, show that rigid helices driven at constant torque do not synchronize, and solve for the flows. We also use symmetry arguments based on kinematic reversibility to show that for two rigid helices rotating with zero phase difference, there is no time-averaged attractive or repulsive force between the helices. PMID:15244620

  1. Hydrodynamic Processes in Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Meakin, Casey A

    2008-01-01

    The hydrodynamic processes operating within stellar interiors are far richer than represented by the best stellar evolution model available. Although it is now widely understood, through astrophysical simulation and relevant terrestrial experiment, that many of the basic assumptions which underlie our treatments of stellar evolution are flawed, we lack a suitable, comprehensive replacement. This is due to a deficiency in our fundamental understanding of the transport and mixing properties of a turbulent, reactive, magnetized plasma; a deficiency in knowledge which stems from the richness and variety of solutions which characterize the inherently non-linear set of governing equations. The exponential increase in availability of computing resources, however, is ushering in a new era of understanding complex hydrodynamic flows; and although this field is still in its formative stages, the sophistication already achieved is leading to a dramatic paradigm shift in how we model astrophysical fluid dynamics. We high...

  2. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Abhisek [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Gerhard, Jochen [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Germany; Torrieri, Giorgio [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Instituto de Física " Gleb Wataghin" (IFGW), Sao Paulo, Brazil; Read jr, Kenneth F. [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  3. Brain vascular and hydrodynamic physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Tasker, Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Protecting the brain in vulnerable infants undergoing surgery is a central aspect of perioperative care. Understanding the link between blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption leads to a more informed approach to bedside care. In some cases, we need to consider how high can we let the partial pressure of carbon dioxide go before we have concerns about risk of increased cerebral blood volume and change in intracranial hydrodynamics? Alternatively, in almost all such cases, we have t...

  4. Membrane Paradigm and Holographic Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eling, Christopher; Oz, Yaron

    2010-01-01

    We discuss recent work showing that in certain cases the membrane paradigm equations governing the dynamics of black hole horizons can be recast as relativistic conservation law equations. In the context of gauge/gravity dualities, these equations are interpreted as defining the viscous hydrodynamics of a holographically dual relativistic field theory. Using this approach, one can derive the viscous transport coefficients and the form of the entropy current for field theories dual to gravity plus matter fields.

  5. Hydrodynamic Model for Charge Carriers

    OpenAIRE

    Choquet, Isabelle; Degond, Pierre; Schmeiser, Christian

    2003-01-01

    A set of hydrodynamic equations modeling strong ionization in semiconductors is formally derived from a kinetic framework. To that purpose, a system of Boltzmann transport equations governing the distribution functions of conduction electrons and holes is considered. Apart from impact ionization, the model accounts for phonon, lattice defects, and particle-particle scattering. Also degeneracy effects are included. The band diagram models are approximations close to the extre...

  6. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  7. Hydrodynamics for inelastic Maxwell model

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Hisao

    2002-01-01

    Hydrodynamic equations for an inelastic Maxwell model are derived from the inelastic Boltzmann equation based on a systematic Chapman-Enskog perturbative scheme. Transport coefficients appear in Navier-Stokes order have been determined as a function of the restitution coefficient $e$, which cannot be defined for small $e$ as a result of the high energy tail of the velocity distribution function obeying a power law. The dispersion relations for the linearized equation around a homogeneous cool...

  8. HYDRODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF LAKE YANAKA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    As part of a major effort to undersand and quantify the cnvironmental conditions in Lake Yanaka, the circulation patterns in Lake Yanaka were analyzed through the application of a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The model was validated with field observation, and then used to study the response of the lake to different forcing. The information on flow structures obtained in the present study is useful for further study of water quality in the lake.

  9. Laser driven hydrodynamic instability experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An extensive series of experiments has been conducted on the Nova laser to measure hydrodynamic instabilities in planar foils accelerated by x-ray ablation. Single mode experiments allow a measurement of the fundamental growth rates from the linear well into the nonlinear regime. Two-mode foils allow a first direct observation of mode coupling. Surface-finish experiments allow a measurement of the evolution of a broad spectrum of random initial modes

  10. Hydrodynamics of mine impact burial

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Ashley D.

    2002-01-01

    A general physics based hydrodynamic flow model is developed that predicts the three-dimensional six degrees of freedom free fall time history of a circular cylinder through the water column to impact with an unspecified bottom. Accurate vertical impact velocity and impact angle parameters are required inputs to subsequent portions of any Impact Mine Burial Model. The model vertical impact velocity and impact angle are compared with experimental data, vertical impact velocities and impact ang...

  11. Modeling and simulations for molecular scale hydrodynamics of the moving contact line in immiscible two-phase flows

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Tiezheng

    2009-10-29

    This paper starts with an introduction to the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation which governs the optimal paths of deviation and restoration to equilibrium. Then there is a review of the variational approach to moving contact line hydrodynamics. To demonstrate the validity of our continuum hydrodynamic model, numerical results from model calculations and molecular dynamics simulations are presented for immiscible Couette and Poiseuille flows past homogeneous solid surfaces, with remarkable overall agreement. Our continuum model is also used to study the contact line motion on surfaces patterned with stripes of different contact angles (i.e. surfaces of varying wettability). Continuum calculations predict the stick-slip motion for contact lines moving along these patterned surfaces, in quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulation results. This periodic motion is tunable through pattern period (geometry) and contrast in wetting property (chemistry). The consequence of stick-slip contact line motion on energy dissipation is discussed. © 2009 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Dissipative particle dynamics incorporating non-Markovian effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu

    2015-11-01

    The coarse-graining methodology of molecular simulations is of great importance to analyze large-scale, complex hydrodynamic phenomena. In the present study, we derive the equation of motion for non-Markovian dissipative particle dynamics (NMDPD) by introducing the history effects on the time evolution of the system. Our formulation is based on the generalized Langevin equation, which describes the motions of the centers of mass of clusters comprising microscopic particles. The mean, friction, and fluctuating forces in the NMDPD model are directly constructed from an underlying MD system without any scaling procedure. For the validation of our formulation, we construct NMDPD models from high-density Lennard-Jones systems, in which the typical time scales of the coarse-grained particle motions and the fluctuating forces are not fully separable. The NMDPD models reproduce the temperatures, diffusion coefficients, and viscosities of the corresponding MD systems more accurately than the conventional DPD models based on a Markovian approximation. Our results suggest that the NMDPD method is a promising alternative for simulating mesoscale flows where a Markovian approximation is not valid.

  13. Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2008-06-01

    Particle methods are much less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation, and they have been used much less extensively, particularly for engineering applications. However, they have important advantages for some applications. These advantages include rigorous mast conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing. Code development effort is relatively low, and it is relatively simple to simulate flows with moving boundaries. In addition, it is often quite easy to include coupling of fluid flow with other physical phenomena such a phase separation. Here we describe the application of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. While these methods were developed to simulate fluids and other materials on three quite different scales – the molecular, meso and continuum scales, they are very closely related from a computational point of view. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role. Important examples include polymer solutions, gels, small particle suspensions and membranes. In these applications inter particle and intra molecular hydrodynamic interactions are automatically included

  14. The Energy Dissipation Rate of Supersonic, Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    MacLow, M M

    1998-01-01

    Molecular clouds have broad linewidths suggesting turbulent supersonic motions in the clouds. These motions are usually invoked to explain why molecular clouds take much longer than a free-fall time to form stars. It has classically been thought that supersonic hydrodynamical turbulence would dissipate its energy quickly, but that the introduction of strong magnetic fields could maintain these motions. In a previous paper it has been shown, however, that isothermal, compressible, MHD and hydrodynamical turbulence decay at virtually the same rate, requiring that constant driving occur to maintain the observed turbulence. In this paper direct numerical computations of uniformly driven turbulence with the ZEUS astrophysical MHD code are used to derive the absolute value of energy dissipation as a function of the driving wavelength and amplitude. The ratio of the formal decay time of turbulence E_{kin}/\\dot{E}_{kin} to the free-fall time of the gas can then be derived as a function of the ratio of driving wavelen...

  15. Theory of the lattice Boltzmann Method: Dispersion, Dissipation, Isotropy, Galilean Invariance, and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallemand, Pierre; Luo, Li-Shi

    2000-01-01

    The generalized hydrodynamics (the wave vector dependence of the transport coefficients) of a generalized lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) is studied in detail. The generalized lattice Boltzmann equation is constructed in moment space rather than in discrete velocity space. The generalized hydrodynamics of the model is obtained by solving the dispersion equation of the linearized LBE either analytically by using perturbation technique or numerically. The proposed LBE model has a maximum number of adjustable parameters for the given set of discrete velocities. Generalized hydrodynamics characterizes dispersion, dissipation (hyper-viscosities), anisotropy, and lack of Galilean invariance of the model, and can be applied to select the values of the adjustable parameters which optimize the properties of the model. The proposed generalized hydrodynamic analysis also provides some insights into stability and proper initial conditions for LBE simulations. The stability properties of some 2D LBE models are analyzed and compared with each other in the parameter space of the mean streaming velocity and the viscous relaxation time. The procedure described in this work can be applied to analyze other LBE models. As examples, LBE models with various interpolation schemes are analyzed. Numerical results on shear flow with an initially discontinuous velocity profile (shock) with or without a constant streaming velocity are shown to demonstrate the dispersion effects in the LBE model; the results compare favorably with our theoretical analysis. We also show that whereas linear analysis of the LBE evolution operator is equivalent to Chapman-Enskog analysis in the long wave-length limit (wave vector k = 0), it can also provide results for large values of k. Such results are important for the stability and other hydrodynamic properties of the LBE method and cannot be obtained through Chapman-Enskog analysis.

  16. The causal link between energy and output growth: Evidence from Markov switching Granger causality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we empirically investigate the causal link between energy consumption and economic growth employing a Markov switching Granger causality analysis. We carry out our investigation using annual U.S. real GDP, total final energy consumption and total primary energy consumption data which cover the period between 1968 and 2010. We find that there are significant changes in the causal relation between energy consumption and economic growth over the sample period under investigation. Our results show that total final energy consumption and total primary energy consumption have significant predictive content for real economic activity in the U.S. economy. Furthermore, the causality running from energy consumption to output growth seems to be strongly apparent particularly during the periods of economic downturn and energy crisis. We also document that output growth has predictive power in explaining total energy consumption. Furthermore, the power of output growth in predicting total energy consumption is found to diminish after the mid of 1980s. - Highlights: • Total energy consumption has predictive content for real economic activity. • The causality from energy to output growth is apparent in the periods of recession. • The causality from energy to output growth is strong in the periods of energy crisis. • Output growth has predictive power in explaining total energy consumption. • The power of output growth in explaining energy diminishes after the mid of 1980s

  17. Dynamics of quasi-stable dissipative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chueshov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This book is  devoted to background material and recently developed mathematical methods in the study of infinite-dimensional dissipative systems. The theory of such systems is motivated by the long-term goal to establish rigorous mathematical models for turbulent and chaotic phenomena. The aim here is to offer general methods and abstract results pertaining to fundamental dynamical systems properties related to dissipative long-time behavior. The book systematically presents, develops and uses the quasi-stability method while substantially extending it by including for consideration new classes of models and PDE systems arising in Continuum Mechanics. The book can be used as a textbook in dissipative dynamics at the graduate level.   Igor Chueshov is a Professor of Mathematics at Karazin Kharkov National University in Kharkov, Ukraine.

  18. Topological protection of multiparticle dissipative transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehr, Johannes; Loenne, Michael; Ernst, Adrian; de Las Heras, Daniel; Fischer, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Topological protection allows robust transport of localized phenomena such as quantum information, solitons and dislocations. The transport can be either dissipative or non-dissipative. Here, we experimentally demonstrate and theoretically explain the topologically protected dissipative motion of colloidal particles above a periodic hexagonal magnetic pattern. By driving the system with periodic modulation loops of an external and spatially homogeneous magnetic field, we achieve total control over the motion of diamagnetic and paramagnetic colloids. We can transport simultaneously and independently each type of colloid along any of the six crystallographic directions of the pattern via adiabatic or deterministic ratchet motion. Both types of motion are topologically protected. As an application, we implement an automatic topologically protected quality control of a chemical reaction between functionalized colloids. Our results are relevant to other systems with the same symmetry. PMID:27249049

  19. Dissipative Effect in Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Roberto L N

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of neutrinos in long baselines experiments may be influenced by dissipation effects. Using Lindblad Master Equation we evolve neutrinos taking into account these dissipative effects. The MSW and the dissipative effects may change the probabilities behavior. In this work, we show and explain how the behavior of the probabilities can change due to the decoherence and relaxation effects acting individually with the MSW effect. A new exotic peak appears in this case and we show the difference between the decoherence and relaxation effects in the appearance of this peak. We also adapt the usual approximate expression for survival and appearance probabilities with all possible decoherence effects. We suppose the baseline of DUNE and show how each decoherence parameters change the probabilities analyzing the possible modification using numeric and analytic approach.

  20. Bistability in a Driven-Dissipative Superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labouvie, Ralf; Santra, Bodhaditya; Heun, Simon; Ott, Herwig

    2016-06-01

    We experimentally study a driven-dissipative Josephson junction array, realized with a weakly interacting Bose-Einstein condensate residing in a one-dimensional optical lattice. Engineered losses on one site act as a local dissipative process, while tunneling from the neighboring sites constitutes the driving force. We characterize the emerging steady states of this atomtronic device. With increasing dissipation strength γ the system crosses from a superfluid state, characterized by a coherent Josephson current into the lossy site, to a resistive state, characterized by an incoherent hopping transport. For intermediate values of γ , the system exhibits bistability, where a superfluid and an incoherent branch coexist. We also study the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state, where we find a critical slowing down, indicating the presence of a nonequilibrium phase transition.

  1. Turbulent Dissipation Challenge: A community Driven Effort

    CERN Document Server

    Parashar, Tulasi N

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present document is to present the idea of, and convince the community to participate in, Turbulent Dissipation Challenge. The idea was discussed in Solar Heliospheric and Interplanetary ENvironment (SHINE) 2012 meeting. The proponents of the idea Tulasi Parashar and Chadi Salem have prepared this document to circulate the idea in the community. The Turbulent Dissipation Challenge idea is to bring the community together and simulate the same set of problems and try to come to a common set of conclusions about the relative strengths of two different kinds of dissipative processes (current sheets/ reconnection sites vs. wave particle interactions). To take the challenge further, the simulators will provide artificial spacecraft data from the simulations for the observers to analyze.

  2. Hypocoercivity of Linear Degenerately Dissipative Kinetic Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Duan, Renjun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study the hypocoercivity for a class of linear kinetic equations with both transport and degenerately dissipative terms. As concrete examples, the relaxation operator, Fokker-Planck operator and linearized Boltzmann operator are considered. By constructing equivalent temporal energy functionals, time rates of the solution approaching equilibrium in some Hilbert spaces are obtained when the spatial domain takes the whole space or torus and when there is a confining force or not. The main tool of the proof is the macro-micro decomposition combined with Kawashima's argument on dissipation of the hyperbolic-parabolic system. Finally, a Korn-type inequality with probability measure is provided to deal with dissipation of momentum components.

  3. Hypocoercivity of linear degenerately dissipative kinetic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Renjun

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we develop a general approach of studying the hypocoercivity for a class of linear kinetic equations with both transport and degenerately dissipative terms. As concrete examples, the relaxation operator, Fokker-Planck operator and linearized Boltzmann operator are considered when the spatial domain takes the whole space or torus and when there is a confining force or not. The key part of the developed approach is to construct some equivalent temporal energy functionals for obtaining time rates of the solution trending towards equilibrium in some Hilbert spaces. The result in the case of the linear Boltzmann equation with confining forces is new. The proof mainly makes use of the macro-micro decomposition combined with Kawashima's argument on dissipation of the hyperbolic-parabolic system. At the end, a Korn-type inequality with probability measure is provided to deal with dissipation of momentum components.

  4. Hypocoercivity of linear degenerately dissipative kinetic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we develop a general approach of studying the hypocoercivity for a class of linear kinetic equations with both transport and degenerately dissipative terms. As concrete examples, the relaxation operator, Fokker–Planck operator and linearized Boltzmann operator are considered when the spatial domain takes the whole space or torus and when there is a confining force or not. The key part of the developed approach is to construct some equivalent temporal energy functionals for obtaining time rates of the solution trending towards equilibrium in some Hilbert spaces. The result in the case of the linear Boltzmann equation with confining forces is new. The proof mainly makes use of the macro–micro decomposition combined with Kawashima's argument on dissipation of the hyperbolic–parabolic system. At the end, a Korn-type inequality with probability measure is provided to deal with dissipation of momentum components

  5. Cascaded generation of coherent Raman dissipative solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharenko, Denis S; Bednyakova, Anastasia E; Podivilov, Evgeniy V; Fedoruk, Mikhail P; Apolonski, Alexander; Babin, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    The cascaded generation of a conventional dissipative soliton (at 1020 nm) together with Raman dissipative solitons of the first (1065 nm) and second (1115 nm) orders inside a common fiber laser cavity is demonstrated experimentally and numerically. With sinusoidal (soft) spectral filtering, the generated solitons are mutually coherent at a high degree and compressible down to 300 fs. Numerical simulation shows that an even higher degree of coherence and shorter pulses could be achieved with step-like (hard) spectral filtering. The approach can be extended toward a high-order coherent Raman dissipative soliton source offering numerous applications such as frequency comb generation, pulse synthesis, biomedical imaging, and the generation of a coherent mid-infrared supercontinuum. PMID:26696187

  6. Dissipation and traversal time in Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The various ways of evaluating dissipative effects in macroscopic quantum tunneling are re-examined. The results obtained by using functional integration, while confirming those of previously given treatments, enable a comparison with available experimental results relative to Josephson junctions. A criterion based on the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time τ of the barrier with regard to dissipation can be established, according to which Δτ/τ > or approx. N/Q, where Q is the quality factor of the junction and N is a numerical constant of order unity. The best agreement with the experiments is obtained for N=1.11, as it results from a semiempirical analysis based on an increase in the potential barrier caused by dissipative effects.

  7. Rotational dissipation and the Miesowicz coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, M; Yamaguti, K; Palangana, A J

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we will study the relative contribution of each of the two dissipative channels of the Eriksen, Leslie, and Parodi (ELP) approach to the observed values of the Miesowicz viscosity coefficients of the nematic liquid crystals. According to the fundamental equation of the liquid crystal's viscosity dissipative process, TS=-integral d3r(sigma)ijA(ij)+hxN , there are two channels by which the nematic viscous dissipation can occur: or it occurs by means of a shear flow configuration, where A(ij) is the characterizing term, or it occurs by means of a rotational configuration, where N is the characterizing term (these parameters will be defined in the paper). It will be also shown that this relative contribution can be measured by a simple relationship connecting the Miesowicz coefficients, which exhibits a quasitemperature independent behavior, suggesting that it is nearly constant through the entire domain of the nematic phase. PMID:20365179

  8. Dissipation regimes for short wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulliez, Guillemette

    2013-02-01

    The dissipation processes affecting short wind waves of centimeter and decimeter scales are investigated experimentally in laboratory. The processes include damping due to molecular viscosity, generation of capillary waves, microbreaking, and breaking. The observations were made in a large wind wave tank for a wide range of fetches and winds, using a laser sheet and a high-resolution video camera. The work aims at constructing a comprehensive picture of dissipative processes in the short wind wave field, to find for which scales particular dissipative mechanism may become important. Four distinct regimes have been identified. For capillary-gravity wave fields, i.e., for dominant waves with scales below 4 cm, viscous damping is found to be the main dissipation mechanism. The gravity-capillary wave fields with dominant wavelength less than 10 cm usually exhibit a train of capillary ripples at the crest wavefront, but no wave breaking. For such waves, the main dissipation process is molecular viscosity occurring through nonlinear energy cascade toward high-frequency motions. Microscale breaking takes place for waves longer than 10 cm and manifests itself in a very localized surface disruption on the forward face of the crest. Such events generate turbulent motions in water and thus enhance wave dissipation. Plunging breaking, characterized by formation of a crest bulge, a microjet hitting the water surface and a splash-up, occurs for short gravity waves of wavelength exceeding 20 cm. Macroscale spilling breaking is also observed for longer waves at high winds. In both cases, the direct momentum transfer from breaking waves to the water flow contributes significantly to wave damping.

  9. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  10. Identification, Inference and Sensitivity Analysis for Causal Mediation Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Imai, Kosuke; Keele, Luke; Yamamoto, Teppei

    2010-01-01

    Causal mediation analysis is routinely conducted by applied researchers in a variety of disciplines. The goal of such an analysis is to investigate alternative causal mechanisms by examining the roles of intermediate variables that lie in the causal paths between the treatment and outcome variables. In this paper we first prove that under a particular version of sequential ignorability assumption, the average causal mediation effect (ACME) is nonparametrically identified. We compare our ident...

  11. Institutional Investors and Stock Market Development: A Causality Study

    OpenAIRE

    Guler Aras; Alovsat Muslumov

    2008-01-01

    This article examines causality relationships between institutional investors and stock market development based on the panel data compiled from 23 OECD countries for the years 1982 through 2000. In order to test causality relationship, Sims’ causality test based on Granger definition of causality was used in our study. Our empirical results provide evidence that there are statistically significant positive relationship between institutional investors and stock market development. The develop...

  12. Trimmed Granger causality between two groups of time series

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Ying-Chao; Tseng, Neng-Fang; Balakrishnan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    The identification of causal effects between two groups of time series has been an important topic in a wide range of applications such as economics, engineering, medicine, neuroscience, and biology. In this paper, a simplified causal relationship (called trimmed Granger causality) based on the context of Granger causality and vector autoregressive (VAR) model is introduced. The idea is to characterize a subset of “important variables” for both groups of time series so that the underlying cau...

  13. Phase transitions in dissipative Josephson chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors of this paper study the zero temperature phase transitions of a chain of Josephson junctions, taking into account the quantum fluctuations due to the charging energy and the effects of an Ohmic dissipation. The authors map the problem onto a generalized coulomb gas model, which then is transformed into a sine-Gordon field theory. Apart from the expected dipole unbinding transition, which describes a transition between globally superconducting and resistive behavior, the authors find a quadrupole unbinding transition at a critical strength of the dissipation. This transition separates two superconducting states characterized by different local properties

  14. Dissipation in Relativistic Pair-Plasma Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the relativistic dissipation in magnetic reconnection. The investigated system consists of an electron-positron plasma. A relativistic generalization of Ohm's law is derived. We analyze a set of numerical simulations, composed of runs with and without guide magnetic field, and of runs with different species temperatures. The calculations indicate that the thermal inertia-based dissipation process survives in relativistic plasmas. For anti-parallel reconnection, it is found that the pressure tensor divergence remains the sole contributor to the reconnection electric field, whereas relativistic guide field reconnection exhibits a similarly important role of the bulk inertia terms.

  15. Complex Fluids in Energy Dissipating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of engineered systems for energy dissipation (or absorption during impacts or vibrations is an increasing need in our society, mainly for human protection applications, but also for ensuring the right performance of different sort of devices, facilities or installations. In the last decade, new energy dissipating composites based on the use of certain complex fluids have flourished, due to their non-linear relationship between stress and strain rate depending on the flow/field configuration. This manuscript intends to review the different approaches reported in the literature, analyses the fundamental physics behind them and assess their pros and cons from the perspective of their practical applications.

  16. Effective dissipation: breaking time-reversal symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Aidan I

    2016-01-01

    At molecular scales, fluctuations play a significant role and prevent biomolecular processes from always proceeding in a preferred direction, raising the question of how limited amounts of free energy can be dissipated to obtain directed progress. We examine the system and process characteristics that efficiently break time-reversal symmetry at fixed energy loss; in particular for a simple model of a molecular machine, an intermediate energy barrier produces unusually high asymmetry for a given dissipation. Such insight into symmetry-breaking factors that produce particularly high time asymmetry suggests generalizations to a broader class of systems.

  17. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  18. Characterizing pesticide dissipation in food crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Juraske, R.; Jolliet, O.

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of residues via consumption of food crops is the predominant exposure route of the general population toward pesticides. However, pesticide dissipation in crops constitutes a main source of uncertainty in estimating residues in harvested crop parts and subsequent human exposure. Neverth......Ingestion of residues via consumption of food crops is the predominant exposure route of the general population toward pesticides. However, pesticide dissipation in crops constitutes a main source of uncertainty in estimating residues in harvested crop parts and subsequent human exposure...

  19. A Bayesian Theory of Sequential Causal Learning and Abstract Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongjing; Rojas, Randall R.; Beckers, Tom; Yuille, Alan L.

    2016-01-01

    Two key research issues in the field of causal learning are how people acquire causal knowledge when observing data that are presented sequentially, and the level of abstraction at which learning takes place. Does sequential causal learning solely involve the acquisition of specific cause-effect links, or do learners also acquire knowledge about…

  20. Causality and Nonlocality as Axioms for Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Sandu; Rohrlich, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    Quantum mechanics permits nonlocality - both nonlocal correlations and nonlocal equations of motion - while respecting relativistic causality. Is quantum mechanics the unique theory that reconciles nonlocality and causality? We consider two models, going beyond quantum mechanics, of nonlocality: "superquantum" correlations, and nonlocal "jamming" of correlations. These models are consistent with some definitions of nonlocality and causality.