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Sample records for cathodic vacuum arc

  1. An interchangeable-cathode vacuum arc plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified vacuum arc design [based on metal vapor vacuum arc (MeVVA) concepts] is employed as a plasma source for a study of a 7Be non-neutral plasma. The design includes a mechanism for interchanging the cathode source. Testing of the plasma source showed that it is capable of producing on the order of 1012 charges at confinable energies using a boron-carbide disk as the cathode target. The design is simplified from typical designs for lower energy and lower density applications by using only the trigger spark rather than the full vacuum arc in high current ion beam designs. The interchangeability of the cathode design gives the source the ability to replace only the source sample, simplifying use of radioactive materials in the plasma source. The sample can also be replaced with a completely different conductive material. The design can be easily modified for use in other plasma confinement or full MeVVA applications.

  2. INFLUENCE OF VACUUM ARC PLASMA EVAPORATOR CATHODE GEOMETRY OF ON VALUE OF ADMISSIBLE ARC DISCHARGE CURRENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Ivanou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of main design parameters that determine a level of droplet formation intensity at the generating stage of plasma flow has been given in the paper. The paper considers the most widely used designs of water cooled consumable cathodes. Ti or Ti–Si and Fe–Cr alloys have been taken as a material for cathodes. The following calculated data: average ionic charge Zi for titanium plasma +1.6; for «titanium–silicon plasma» +1.2, an electronic discharge 1.6022 ⋅ 10–19 C, an ion velocity vi = 2 ⋅ 104 m/s, an effective volt energy equivalent of heat flow diverted in the cathode Uк = 12 V, temperature of erosion cathode surface Тп = 550 К; temperature of the cooled cathode surface То = 350 К have been accepted in order to determine dependence of a maximum admissible arc discharge current on cathode height. The calculations have been carried out for various values of the cathode heights hк (from 0.02 to 0.05 m. Diameter of a target cathode is equal to 0.08 m for a majority of technological plasma devices, therefore, the area of the erosion surface is S = 0.005 m2.A thickness selection for a consumable target cathode part in the vacuum arc plasma source has been justified in the paper. The thickness ensures formation of minimum drop phase in the plasma flow during arc cathode material evaporation. It has been shown that a maximum admissible current of an arc discharge is practically equal to the minimum current of stable arcing when thickness of the consumable cathode part is equal to 0.05 m. The admissible discharge current can be rather significant and ensure high productivity during coating process with formation of relatively low amount of droplet phase in the coating at small values of hк.

  3. The fractal nature of vacuum arc cathode spots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2005-05-27

    Cathode spot phenomena show many features of fractals, for example self-similar patterns in the emitted light and arc erosion traces. Although there have been hints on the fractal nature of cathode spots in the literature, the fractal approach to spot interpretation is underutilized. In this work, a brief review of spot properties is given, touching the differences between spot type 1 (on cathodes surfaces with dielectric layers) and spot type 2 (on metallic, clean surfaces) as well as the known spot fragment or cell structure. The basic properties of self-similarity, power laws, random colored noise, and fractals are introduced. Several points of evidence for the fractal nature of spots are provided. Specifically power laws are identified as signature of fractal properties, such as spectral power of noisy arc parameters (ion current, arc voltage, etc) obtained by fast Fourier transform. It is shown that fractal properties can be observed down to the cutoff by measurement resolution or occurrence of elementary steps in physical processes. Random walk models of cathode spot motion are well established: they go asymptotically to Brownian motion for infinitesimal step width. The power spectrum of the arc voltage noise falls as 1/f {sup 2}, where f is frequency, supporting a fractal spot model associated with Brownian motion.

  4. The investigation of carbon nitride films prepared at various arc currents by vacuum cathode arc method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon nitride films have been prepared in the arc currents range of 20-60 A at the Ar/N2 atmosphere of 50/400 sccm by the vacuum cathode arc deposition method. The properties of the films were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The N concentration showed a maximum of 35 at% at 20 A and decreased gradually with the arc currents. The films below 40 A consisted of linear polymeric-like component and sp2 graphitic cluster. With the increasing of the arc current from 20 to 40 A, the ID/IG rose and the photoluminescence (PL) fell gradually, which resulted from the development of the sp2 graphitic phase and the decrease of the polymeric-like phase. As a result, the CC bonds increased and sp3CN and sp2CN decreased. Above 40 A, with the increasing of arc currents, ID/IG fell and the PL increased gradually, which reflected the decreasing of sp2 graphitic phase and the modification of C and N atoms in sp2 cluster. The CC bonds and sp3CN fell and the sp2CN rose. The nanohardness of films showed increasing tendency with the arc currents. The variation of the relative ratio and the average energy of N-containing species and C-containing species at the atmosphere would be responsible for the change in the properties of films. (author)

  5. The evolution of ion charge states in cathodic vacuum arc plasmas: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2011-12-18

    Cathodic vacuum arc plasmas are known to contain multiply charged ions. 20 years after “Pressure Ionization: its role in metal vapour vacuum arc plasmas and ion sources” appeared in vol. 1 of Plasma Sources Science and Technology, it is a great opportunity to re-visit the issue of pressure ionization, a non-ideal plasma effect, and put it in perspective to the many other factors that influence observable charge state distributions, such as the role of the cathode material, the path in the density-temperature phase diagram, the “noise” in vacuum arc plasma as described by a fractal model approach, the effects of external magnetic fields and charge exchange collisions with neutrals. A much more complex image of the vacuum arc plasma emerges putting decades of experimentation and modeling in perspective.

  6. Influence of the vacuum-arc source configuration and arc discharge parameters on the evolution and location of arc spots on the cathode surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Walkowicz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper presents investigations of the evolution, structure and location of arc spots on the cathode frontal surfaces of two types of industrial arc sources.Design/methodology/approach: The temporal behaviour of cathode spots was recorded with the use of a fast CCD camera. The experiments were performed at four values of arc current, nine compositions of the process atmosphere N2+C2H2 and three pressure ranges of the process atmosphere.Findings: The analysis of the recorded pictures revealed the fine structure of the arc discharge for the investigated range of process conditions. Both temporal and spatial behaviour of cathode spots were different for both investigated arc sources. The correspondence between radial distributions of the cathode spots on the cathode surface and radial distribution of plasma flow elements analysed in the volume of the vacuum chamber was revealed.Research limitations/implications: The paper show experimental methodology that can be used for the research of the specificity of cathode spots movement on the cathodes made from different materials.Originality/value: The originality of the research presented in the paper consists in assigning overall correlation between vacuum-arc source configuration and parameters of vacuum-arc discharge – on the one hand, and space-time behaviour of the arc spots during their movement on the circular cathode surface and radial distribution of excited and ionized atoms of the cathode material in the deposition chamber – on the other.

  7. Distribution of Cathode Spots in Vacuum Arc Under Nonuniform Axial Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zong-qian; JIA Shen-li; WANG Li-jun; LI Xing-wen; WANG Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Recent results on the distribution of vacuum arc cathode spots (CSs) in nonuniform axial magnetic field (AMF) are presented.Based on previous studies,we deem that two contrary influences of AMF,inward effect and outward effect,are attributed to CSs distribution.With this notion,we have analyzed the controlling effectiveness of nonuniform AMF on CSs distribution. Experiments were conducted in a detachable vacuum chamber with iron-style AMF electrodes.Images of vacuum arc column and the distribution of CSs were photographed with a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results agreed well with the theoretical analysis.

  8. Ion spectra of vacuum arc plasma with compound and alloy cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out an experimental investigation of the charge state distribution of ions produced in the vacuum arc plasma for the case when the cathode is a compound or alloy. The plasma was generated in a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source, and the charge state spectra were measured using a time-of-flight method. We have compared these spectra to the spectra obtained from cathodes of the constituent elements. The cathode materials used and reported on here were the following groups: SiC/Si/C [i.e., we have compared the spectra obtained using a cathode of silicon carbide with the spectra obtained using (a) a silicon cathode and (b) a carbon cathode], TiC/TiN/TiO2/Ti/C, WC/W/C, (UC-ZrC)/UN/U/Zr/C, brass/Cu/Zn, and stainless steel/Fe/Cr/Ni. The arc current employed throughout was approximately 100 A. We find that the charge state distributions change depending on the elemental composition of the alloy or compound of which the cathode is fabricated

  9. On the mechanism of operation of a cathode spot cell in a vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Petrov, A. A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Leninsky Ave., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Bochkarev, M. B. [Institute of Electrophysics, UB, RAS, 106 Amundsen St., Ekaterinburg 620016 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, S. A., E-mail: sb@nsc.gpi.ru [A. M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, 38 Vavilov St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-05

    The erosive structures formed on a tungsten cathode as a result of the motion of the cathode spot of a vacuum arc over the cathode surface have been examined. It has been found that the average mass of a cathode microprotrusion having the shape of a solidified jet is approximately equal to the mass of ions removed from the cathode within the lifetime of a cathode spot cell carrying a current of several amperes. The time of formation of a new liquid-metal jet under the action of the reactive force of the plasma ejected by the cathode spot is about 10 ns, which is comparable to the lifetime of a cell. The growth rate of a liquid-metal jet is ∼10{sup 4} cm/s. The geometric shape and size of a solidified jet are such that a new explosive emission center (spot cell) can be initiated within several nanoseconds during the interaction of the jet with the dense cathode plasma. This is the underlying mechanism of the self-sustained operation of a vacuum arc.

  10. Lifetime of hydrogenated composite cathodes in a vacuum arc ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savkin, K. P., E-mail: savkin@opee.hcei.tsc.ru; Frolova, V. P.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Barengolts, S. A. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    The paper reports on a study of the mass-charge state of the plasma produced in a vacuum arc discharge with composite cathodes which were copper-disk coated with a hydrogenated Zr film of thicknesses 9, 22, and 35 μm. The cathodes allow the generation of multicomponent gas and metal ion beams with a hydrogen ion content from several to several tens of percent. Also investigated is the dependence of the H ion fraction in a beam on the Zr film thickness during erosion to the point of disappearance of Zr peaks in mass-charge spectra. The ability of the vacuum arc system to produce H ions is analyzed by analyzing the cathode lifetime as a function of the film thickness and pulse repetition frequency.

  11. Time and material dependence of the voltage noise generated by cathodic vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high frequency fluctuations of the burning voltage of cathodic vacuum arcs have been investigated in order to extract information on cathode processes, especially concerning evolution in time after arc ignition. Eight cathode materials (W, Ta, Hf, Ti, Ni, Au, Sn, Bi) were selected covering a wide range of cohesive energy. The voltage noise was recorded using both a broad-band voltage divider and an attenuator connected to a fast oscilloscope (limits 1 GHz analog and 5 GS s-1 digital). Fast Fourier transform revealed a power spectrum that is linear in log-log presentation, with a slope of 1/f 2, where f is the frequency (brown noise). The amplitude of the spectral power of the voltage noise was found to scale with the cohesive energy, in agreement with earlier measurements at lower resolution. These basic results do not depend on the time after arc initiation. However, lower arc current in the beginning of the pulse shows greater voltage noise, suggesting an inverse relation between the noise amplitude and number of emission sites (cathode spot fragments)

  12. Vacuum arc plasma generation and thin film deposition from a TiB2 cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the utilization of TiB2 cathodes for thin film deposition in a DC vacuum arc system. We present a route for attaining a stable, reproducible, and fully ionized plasma flux of Ti and B by removal of the external magnetic field, which leads to dissipation of the vacuum arc discharge and an increased active surface area of the cathode. Applying a magnetic field resulted in instability and cracking, consistent with the previous reports. Plasma analysis shows average energies of 115 and 26 eV, average ion charge states of 2.1 and 1.1 for Ti and B, respectively, and a plasma ion composition of approximately 50% Ti and 50% B. This is consistent with measured resulting film composition from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, suggesting a negligible contribution of neutrals and macroparticles to the film growth. Also, despite the observations of macroparticle generation, the film surface is very smooth. These results are of importance for the utilization of cathodic arc as a method for synthesis of metal borides

  13. Preparation and investigation of diamond-like carbon stripper foils by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin diamond-like carbon (DLC) stripper foils ∼5μg/cm2 in thickness were produced and evaluated as heavy-ion strippers for the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator. The DLC layers ∼4μg/cm2 in thickness were produced by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology onto glass slides coated with betaine–saccharose as releasing agent, which were previously covered with evaporated carbon layers ∼1μg/cm2 in thickness by the controlled ac arc-discharge method. Irradiation lifetimes of the DLC stripper foils were tested using the heavy-ion beams at the terminal of the Beijing HI-13 Tandem Accelerator, and compared with those of the standard carbon stripper foils made by the combined dc and ac arc-discharge method. The measurements indicate that the DLC stripper foils outlast the standard combined dc and ac arc-discharge carbon stripper foils by a factor of at least 13 and 4 for the 197Au− (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) and 63Cu− (∼9MeV, ∼1μA) ion beams, respectively. The structure and properties of the DLC foils deposited onto silicon substrates by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology were also evaluated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The scanning electron microscopy images show that the DLC foils contain hardly droplets through the double 90° filters. The X-ray photoelectron spectrum indicates that sp3 bonds of the DLC foils exceed 70%. The integral intensity ratio of the D peak to the G peak (ID/IG) measured by the Raman spectroscopy is 0.78

  14. Physical phenomena in a hollow cathode and interaction of powder with the vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic design of an arc discharge is a tube with the inner diameter R and working gas being fed through it into the low pressure chamber. The open end of the tube is directed to the anode. The length of the cathode tube is several inner diameters of the tube. There are four main working regimes of hollow arc discharge being distinguished by the magnitudes of plasma gas flow rate G, pressure P in a vacuum chamber and discharge current j : 1) normal regime, 2) low flow rate of plasma gas regime, 3) low current regime and 4) high pressure regime. The normal regime is of the greatest interest for its applications in plasma technologies so the latter one was thoroughly investigated in the present paper

  15. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  16. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%

  17. Influences of arc current on composition and properties of MgO thin films prepared by cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MgO thin films with high optical transmittances (more than 90%) were prepared by cathodic vacuum arc deposition technique. With the increase of arc current from 40 to 80 A, the deposition pressure decreases and the film thickness increases; the atomic ratio of Mg/O in MgO thin films (obtained by RBS) increases from 0.97 to 1.17, giving that deposited at 50 A most close to the stoichiometric composition of the bulk MgO; the grains of MgO thin films grow gradually as shown in SEM images. XRD patterns show that MgO (1 1 0) orientation is predominant for films prepared at the arc currents ranged from 50 to 70 A. The MgO (1 0 0) orientation is much enhanced and comparable to that of MgO (1 1 0) for films prepared at the arc current of 80 A. The secondary electron emission coefficient of MgO thin film increases with arc current ranged from 50 to 70 A.

  18. Device quality ZnO grown using a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

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    Elzwawi, Salim, E-mail: salim.elzwawi@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Kim, Hyung Suk, E-mail: david.kim@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Heinhold, Robert, E-mail: robert.heinhold@pg.canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Lynam, Max, E-mail: mfl38@uclive.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Turner, Gary, E-mail: gary.turner@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); Partridge, Jim G., E-mail: jim.partridge@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch 8140, Canterbury (New Zealand); The MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology (New Zealand); McCulloch, Dougal G., E-mail: dougal.mcculloch@rmit.edu.au [Applied Sciences, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476 V, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia)

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we report on the structural, electrical and optical characteristics of unintentionally doped ZnO films grown on a-plane sapphire substrates using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc (FCVA) technique. The resulting films showed considerable promise for device applications with properties including high transparency, moderate intrinsic carrier concentrations (10{sup 17}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}), electron mobilities up to 30 cm{sup 2}/Vs, low surface roughness (typically <2% of film thickness) and well-structured photoluminescence. Post-annealing in oxygen at temperatures up to 800 Degree-Sign C produced significant improvements in the properties of these films. Silver oxide Schottky diodes fabricated on FCVA ZnO showed ideality factors as low as 1.20 and good sensitivity to ultraviolet light.

  19. Growth of single and bilayer graphene by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesarwani, A. K.; Panwar, O. S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in; Bisht, Atul [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012, India and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR Campus, New Delhi 110012 (India); Dhakate, S. R. [Physics and Engineering of Carbon Materials, Division of Materials Physics and Engineering, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012, India and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR Campus, New Delhi 110012 (India); Rakshit, R. K. [Quantum Phenomena and Applications Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012, India and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR Campus, New Delhi 110012 (India); Singh, V. N. [Electron and Ion Microscopy, Sophisticated and Analytical Instruments, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012, India and Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR Campus, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kumar, Ashish [Polymorphic Carbon Thin Films Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2016-03-15

    The authors present a viable process to grow the high quality graphene films with control over number of layers by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. In the FCVA process, the different carbon concentrations can be controlled by precisely tuning the arc time (1–4 s). The arc generated carbon was deposited on the nickel catalyst at 800 °C, annealed for 10 min, and cooled down to room temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas, resulting in the graphene films with control over number of layers. Prior to arcing, hydrogen etching of nickel was carried out to clean the surface of the substrate. A growth model to prepare the high quality graphene has also been proposed. The as-grown graphene films were transferred to different substrates and are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy to determine the number of layers present in these films. Raman spectra of the prepared graphene films exhibit change in the G peak position from 1582.4 to 1578.1 cm{sup −1}, two-dimensional (2D) peak shifts from 2688.5 to 2703.8 cm{sup −1}, the value of I{sub 2D}/I{sub G} increased from 0.38 to 3.82, and the full width at half maxima of 2D peak changed from 41 to 70 cm{sup −1}, for different layers of graphene films. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy image revealed that the graphene films prepared for 1 and 2 s arc times have single and bi- or trilayered structures, respectively.

  20. Growth of single and bilayer graphene by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present a viable process to grow the high quality graphene films with control over number of layers by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. In the FCVA process, the different carbon concentrations can be controlled by precisely tuning the arc time (1–4 s). The arc generated carbon was deposited on the nickel catalyst at 800 °C, annealed for 10 min, and cooled down to room temperature in the presence of hydrogen gas, resulting in the graphene films with control over number of layers. Prior to arcing, hydrogen etching of nickel was carried out to clean the surface of the substrate. A growth model to prepare the high quality graphene has also been proposed. The as-grown graphene films were transferred to different substrates and are characterized by Raman spectroscopy, optical microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy to determine the number of layers present in these films. Raman spectra of the prepared graphene films exhibit change in the G peak position from 1582.4 to 1578.1 cm−1, two-dimensional (2D) peak shifts from 2688.5 to 2703.8 cm−1, the value of I2D/IG increased from 0.38 to 3.82, and the full width at half maxima of 2D peak changed from 41 to 70 cm−1, for different layers of graphene films. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy image revealed that the graphene films prepared for 1 and 2 s arc times have single and bi- or trilayered structures, respectively

  1. Erosion behaviour of a Ti3SiC2 cathode under low-current vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, the arc erosion behaviour of high-purity Ti3SiC2 in vacuum was investigated by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. From the results obtained, Ti3SiC2 is unstable due to the high energy intensity and high temperature of the vacuum arc. The dissociation of Ti3SiC2 takes place at the sample surface, resulting in the formation of solid TiCx and gaseous Si. TiCx is ejected from cathode to the surface of anode while Si is evaporated to the vacuum chamber. The micro-Raman results reveal that small amounts of carbon appeared as a by-product of the dissociation of Ti3SiC2, indicating that the Ti–C bonding is broken down under the vacuum arc. (paper)

  2. Contribution of moving speed of vacuum arc cathode spot to the heat conduction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Chihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2015-11-01

    Thermal spraying has been widely used because it can give various functions by coating materials on the surface. It is necessary to remove an oxide layer and form a roughness. However, the blast has problems that occurs crushing and wear of the particles, and residual grid becomes a starting point of rust and peeling. The pretreatment with vacuum arc cathode spot is focused by this problem. Cathode spot with high energy density evaporates the oxide layer and melts the bulk for roughness. However, this process is believed that surface state is changed by the power density and sojourn time because the roughness depends on the location. It remains to be elucidated the formation factor of roughness and removal process. Therefore, the models of heat conduction process and vapor mixed affected by moving speed were proposed. To elucidate the formation factor of roughness and removal process, the contribution of moving speed to the heat conduction process is analyzed. As a result, the molten depth, width, and volume depend on the moving speed.

  3. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure PN2, substrate bias voltage Vs and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with PN2 of 0.1 Pa, Vs of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  4. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, J. L.; Zhu, M. H.

    2009-06-01

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P, substrate bias voltage Vs and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P of 0.1 Pa, Vs of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  5. Micromachining of large area amorphous carbon membranes prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liujiang, Yu; Tay, B. K.; Sheeja, D.; Fu, Y. Q.; Miao, J. M.

    2004-02-01

    Currently, there is a strong drive to make micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices from higher performance materials such as diamond-like carbon or amorphous carbon (a-C) films, due to their excellent tribological properties, low-stiction (hydrophobic) surfaces, chemical inertness and high elastic modulus, compared to that of Si. The hydrogen free a-C films prepared, by Nanyang Technological University's (NTUs) patented filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique, at 100 eV exhibits high fraction of tetrahedral (sp 3 bonded) carbon atoms. These films exhibit relatively high hardness, stiffness and wear resistance in addition to low friction and stiction behaviour. However, the primary problem lies in the large intrinsic compressive stress induced during the deposition process. By making use of high substrate pulse bias, we have successfully produced low stress, thick a-C films. The films were then characterised using different equipments to evaluate the stress, microstructure and morphological roughness. Large area a-C membranes, of 2 mm×2 mm in size, have also been fabricated using the low stress, thick film deposited by the above method.

  6. Low temperature deposition of tantalum diffusion barrier by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tantalum (Ta) diffusion barrier films were deposited on un-patterned and patterned silicon substrates at ambient temperature and without substrate bias by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA). The films were characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, four-point resistivity probe and surface profilometer. It was found that the Ta film was 750 A thick and free of C and O except for surface contamination. The film morphology was smooth and uniform with root-mean-square roughness of ∼0.82 A. The Ta film was polycrystalline β phase with a mean grain size of ∼3 nm and possessed a dense microstructure, which are ascribed to the high energy of the condensing species in FCVA. It was shown that the Ta filling of the trenches (0.33 μm wide, 1 : 1 aspect ratio) was very conformal and quite uniform. Also, it was preliminarily found that at the Ta film was effective against diffusion of Cu into Si at 600 deg. C

  7. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  8. Effects of filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) conditions on photovoltaic TiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Titanium dioxide films were synthesized using the FCVAD technique. • Various FCVAD conditions were tested. • The TiO2 films were characterized. • The FCVAD condition effects on the film characteristics were studied. • The O2 pressure had the most important effect on the film quality. - Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) films for photovoltaic applications were synthesized using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD) technique. Various deposition conditions were tested for an optimal film formation. The conditions included the oxygen (O2) pressure which was varied from a base pressure 10−5 to 10−4, 10−3, 10−2 and 10−1 Torr, sample holder bias varied using 0 or −250 V, deposition time varied from 10, 20 to 30 min, and deposition distance varied from 1 to 3 cm. The deposited films were also annealed and compared with unannealed ones. The films under various conditions were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy techniques. The film transparency increased and thickness decreased to a nanoscale with increasing of the O2 pressure. The transparent deposited films contained stoichiometric titanium and oxygen under the medium O2 pressure. The as-deposited films were TiO2 containing some rutile but no anatase which needed annealing to form

  9. Micromachining of large area amorphous carbon membranes prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liujiang, Yu; Tay, B.K.; Sheeja, D.; Fu, Y.Q.; Miao, J.M

    2004-02-29

    Currently, there is a strong drive to make micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) devices from higher performance materials such as diamond-like carbon or amorphous carbon (a-C) films, due to their excellent tribological properties, low-stiction (hydrophobic) surfaces, chemical inertness and high elastic modulus, compared to that of Si. The hydrogen free a-C films prepared, by Nanyang Technological University's (NTUs) patented filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique, at 100 eV exhibits high fraction of tetrahedral (sp{sup 3} bonded) carbon atoms. These films exhibit relatively high hardness, stiffness and wear resistance in addition to low friction and stiction behaviour. However, the primary problem lies in the large intrinsic compressive stress induced during the deposition process. By making use of high substrate pulse bias, we have successfully produced low stress, thick a-C films. The films were then characterised using different equipments to evaluate the stress, microstructure and morphological roughness. Large area a-C membranes, of 2 mmx2 mm in size, have also been fabricated using the low stress, thick film deposited by the above method.

  10. Tribological characterization of chromium nitride coating deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, J.L. [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhu, M.H., E-mail: zhuminhao@swjtu.cn [Tribology Research Institute, Traction Power State Key Laboratory, Southwest Jiaotong University, 111 Er Huan Road, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2009-06-15

    CrN coatings were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technique. The influence of the deposition parameters (nitrogen partial pressure P{sub N{sub 2}}, substrate bias voltage V{sub s} and preheating of the substrate) on the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings was investigated. Further, the FCVA CrN coating was compared in dry reciprocating sliding with commercial multi-arc ion plating (MAIP) CrN coating as to friction and wear properties. Profilometer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) were used to evaluate the wear scars and the wear mechanisms were discussed. The results showed that the structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the FCVA CrN coatings were significantly dependent on the deposition parameters. The FCVA CrN coating deposited with P{sub N{sub 2}} of 0.1 Pa, V{sub s} of -100 V and without preheating exhibited the optimal mechanical and tribological properties. The FCVA CrN coating exhibited much better anti-abrasive and anti-spalling properties than the MAIP CrN coating, which was resulted from significant reduction of macroparticles and pitting defects by the FCVA technique. The MAIP CrN coating suffered severe concentrated wear by a combination wear mechanisms of delamination, abrasive and oxidative wear when high normal load was applied, while for the FCVA CrN coating the wear mechanisms were ultra-mild abrasive and oxidative wear.

  11. RF properties at 6 GHz of ultra-high vacuum cathodic arc films up to 450 oersted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several films of niobium were deposited on copper plates via the ultra-high vacuum cathodic arc (UHVCA) deposition method as described by R. Russo et al. [R. Russo et al., Supercond. Sci. Tech. 18 (2005) L41; R. Russo et al., J. Appl. Phys., submitted for publication]. We attached these end plates to a 6 GHz cavity operating in the TE011 mode for characterizing the film quality by measuring the Q versus surface magnetic field

  12. Generation of super-size macroparticles in a direct current vacuum arc discharge from a Mo-Cu cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirkov, Igor; Petruhins, Andrejs; Polcik, Peter; Kolozsvári, Szilard; Rosen, Johanna

    2016-02-01

    An inherent property of cathodic arc is the generation of macroparticles, of a typical size ranging from submicrometer up to a few tens of μm. In this work, we have studied macroparticle generation from a Mo0.78Cu0.22 cathode used in a dc vacuum arc discharge, and we present evidence for super-size macroparticles of up to 0.7 mm in diameter. All analyzed particles are found to be rich in Mo (≥98 at. %). The particle generation is studied by visual observation of the cathode surface during arcing, by analysis of composition and geometrical features of the used cathode surface, and by examination of the generated macroparticles with respect to shape and composition. A mechanism for super-size macroparticle generation is suggested based on observed segregated layers of Mo and Cu identified in the topmost part of the cathode surface, likely due to the discrepancy in melting and evaporation temperatures of Mo and Cu. The results are of importance for increasing the fundamental understanding of macroparticle generation, which in turn may lead to increased process control and potentially provide paths for tuning, or even mitigating, macroparticle generation.

  13. Properties of TiAlCrN coatings prepared by vacuum cathodic arc ion plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RU Qiang; HU Shejun; HUANG Nacan; ZHAO Lingzhi; QIU Xiuli; HU Xianqi

    2008-01-01

    TiAlCrN coatings were deposited by means of vacuum cathodic arc ion plating technique on TC11 (Ti-6.5 Al-3.5 Mo-1.5 Zr-0.3Si) titanium alloy substrates. The composition, phase structure, mechanical performance, and oxidation-resistance of the nitride coatings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). A new process for preparing protective coatings of the titanium alloy is successfully acquired. The experimental results indicate that the added element chromium in the TiAlN coatings make a contribution to form the (220) preferred direction. The phases of the coatings are composed of (Ti, Al)N and (Ti, Cr)N. After 700℃ and 800℃ oxidation, AES analysis shows that the diffusion distribution of the TiAlCrN coatings emerges a step shape. From the outside to the inner, the concentrations of O, Al, and Cr reduce, but those of Ti and N increase. The Al-rich oxide is formed on the surface of the coatings, and the mixed structure of Ti-rich and Cr-rich oxides is formed in the internal layer. The oxidation resistance of the TiAlCrN coatings is excellent at the range of 700 to 800℃. Adhesion wear is the dominant mechanical characteristic for the titanium alloy at room temperature, and the protective coatings with high hardness can improve the mechanical properties of the titanium alloy. The wear resistance of the TC11 alloy is considerably improved by the TiAlCrN coatings.

  14. Vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirov, R. Kh., E-mail: ravus46@yandex.ru; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Lizyakin, G. D.; Polishchuk, V. P.; Samoilov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Results from experimental studies of a vacuum arc with a distributed cathode spot on the heated cathode are presented. Such an arc can be used as a plasma source for plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste. The experiments were performed with a gadolinium cathode, the properties of which are similar to those of an uranium arc cathode. The heat flux from the plasma to the cathode (and its volt equivalent) at discharge voltages of 4-15 V and discharge currents of 44-81 A, the radial distribution of the emission intensity of gadolinium atoms and singly charged ions in the arc channel at a voltage of 4.3 V, and the plasma electron temperature behind the anode were measured. The average charge of plasma ions at arc voltages of 3.5-8 V and a discharge current of 52 A and the average rate of gadolinium evaporation in the discharge were also determined.

  15. Hydrogen absorption by Zr-1Nb alloy with TiN[x] film deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    OpenAIRE

    Kashkarov, Egor Borisovich; Nikitenkov, Nikolai Nikolaevich; Syrtanov, Maksim Sergeevich; Babihina, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the opportunity of titanium nitride (TiNx) films application as protective coating for Zr-2.5Nb alloy from hydrogenation. Dense TiN[x] films were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (CVA). Hydrogen absorption rate was calculated from the kinetic curves of hydrogen sorption at elevated temperature of the sample (T=673 K) and pressure (P=2 atm). Results revealed that TiN[x] films significantly reduced hydrogen absorption rate of Zr-2.5Nb.

  16. Room temperature deposition of highly dense TiO2 thin films by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, E.; Heras, I.; Rincón Llorente, G.; Lungwitz, F.; Alcon-Camas, M.; Escobar-Galindo, R.

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study of TiO2 films deposited by dc filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was carried out by varying the deposition parameters in a reactive oxygen atmosphere. The influence of the oxygen partial pressure on film properties is analyzed. Composition was obtained by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements, which also allow us to obtain the density of the films. Morphology of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their optical properties by ellipsometry. Transparent, very dense and stoichiometric TiO2 films were obtained by FCVA at room temperature.

  17. Influence of the vacuum-arc source configuration and arc discharge parameters on the evolution and location of arc spots on the cathode surface

    OpenAIRE

    J. Walkowicz; J. Smolik; Z. Słomka; B. Kułakowska-Pawlak; W. Żyrnicki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The paper presents investigations of the evolution, structure and location of arc spots on the cathode frontal surfaces of two types of industrial arc sources.Design/methodology/approach: The temporal behaviour of cathode spots was recorded with the use of a fast CCD camera. The experiments were performed at four values of arc current, nine compositions of the process atmosphere N2+C2H2 and three pressure ranges of the process atmosphere.Findings: The analysis of the recorded picture...

  18. Vacuum arc cathode spot parameters from high‐resolution luminosity measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Jüttner, B.; Pursch, H.; Bötticher, W.; Lück, H.

    1992-01-01

    Cathode spots on arc‐cleaned copper and molybdenum electrodes in vacuum were studied by fast image converter framing and streak camera photography with high temporal and spatial resolution. The frame exposure time was 20 ns and the interframe period was 200 ns; the streak sweep time was between 200 ns and 1 μs. Spatial structures with a resolution of 5 μm could be determined by observing the spot movement with a small slit at the streak camera and a high sweep speed. Strong fluctuations of th...

  19. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment

  20. DUPLEX Al2O3/DLC COATING ON 15SiCp/2024 ALUMINUM MATRIX COMPOSITE USING COMBINED MICROARC OXIDATION AND FILTERED CATHODIC VACUUM ARC DEPOSITION

    OpenAIRE

    WENBIN XUE; HUA TIAN; JIANCHENG DU; MING HUA; XU ZHANG; YONGLIANG LI

    2012-01-01

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment produces a thick Al2O3 coating on the 15SiCp/2024 aluminum matrix composite. After pretreatment of Ti ion implantation, a thin diamond-like carbon film (DLC) was deposited on the top of polished Al2O3 coating by a pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition system with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The morphology and tribological properties of the duplex Al2O3/DLC multiplayer coating were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning elec...

  1. Mechanism of cathode spot splitting in vacuum arcs in an oblique magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilis, I. I. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, School of Electrical Engineering, Fleischman Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box. 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2015-10-15

    Experiments in the last decade showed that for cathode spots in a magnetic field that obliquely intercepts the cathode surface, the current per spot increased with the transverse component of the magnetic field and decreased with the normal component. The present work analyzes the nature of cathode spot splitting in an oblique magnetic field. A physical model for cathode spot current splitting was developed, which considered the relation between the plasma kinetic pressure, self-magnetic pressure, and applied magnetic pressure in a current carrying cathode plasma jet. The current per spot was calculated, and it was found to increase with the tangential component of the magnetic field and to decrease with the normal component, which agrees well with the experimental dependence.

  2. Vacuum arc under axial magnetic fields: experimental and simulation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axial magnetic field (AMF) technology is a most important control method of vacuum arc, particularly for high-current vacuum arcs in vacuum interrupters. In this paper, a review of the state of current research on vacuum arcs under AMF is presented. The major aspects of vacuum arc in an AMF such as arc voltage, the motion of cathode spots, and anode activities are discussed, and the most recent progress both of experimental and simulation research is presented. (topical review)

  3. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  4. Properties of boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films grown using filtered cathodic vacuum arc process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the electrical, mechanical, structural and field emission properties of as grown and also boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films, deposited using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc process. The effect of varying boron and phosphorous content (up to 2.0 at.% in to ta-C) on the conductivity (σD), activation energy (ΔE1), hardness, microstructure, emission threshold (Eturn-ON) and emission current density (J) at 12.5 V/μm of ta-C: B and ta-C: P films deposited at a high negative substrate bias of -300 V are reported. It is observed that both boron and phosphorous incorporation leads to a nearly an order increase in σD and corresponding decrease in ΔE1 and a slight increase in hardness as compared to as grown ta-C films. In the case of field assisted electron emission, it is observed that Eturn-ON increases and J decreases. The changes are attributed to the changes in the sp3/sp2 ratio of the films due to boron and phosphorous incorporation. The effect of boron on ta-C is to give a p-type effect whereas the effect of phosphorous gives n-type doping effect.

  5. Density changes with substrate negative bias for ta-C films deposited by filter cathode vacuum arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Man-lin; ZHU Jia-qi; HAN Jie-cai; MENG Song-he

    2004-01-01

    Specular X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements were used to study the density and cross-section information of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films deposited by filter cathode vacuum arc(FCVA) system at different substrate bias. According to the correlation between density and substrate negative bias, it is found that the value of density reaches a maximum at -80 V bias. As the substrate bias increases or decreases, the density tends to lower gradually. Based on the density of diamond and graphite, sp3 bonding ratio of ta-C films was obtained from their corresponding density according to a simple equation between the two. And a similar parabolic variation was observed for ta-C films with the sp3 content changes with substrate negative bias. The mechanical properties such as hardness and elastic modulus were also measured and compared with the corresponding density for ta-C films. From the distribution of data points, a linear proportional correlation between them was found, which shows that the density is a critical parameter to characterize the structure variation for ta-C films.

  6. Superhard nanocomposite nc-TiC/a-C:H film fabricated by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superhard nanocomposite nc-TiC/a-C:H films, with an excellent combination of high elastic recovery, low friction coefficient and good H/E ratio, were prepared by filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique using the C2H2 gas as the precursor. The effect of C2H2 flow rate on the microstructure, phase composition, mechanical and tribological properties of nanocomposite nc-TiC/a-C:H films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy disperse spectroscopy (EDS), microindentation and tribotester measurements. It was observed that the C2H2 flow rate significantly affected the Ti content and hardness of films. Furthermore, by selecting the proper value for C2H2 flow rate, 20 sccm, one can deposit the nanocomposite film nc-TiC/a-C:H with excellent properties such as superhardness (66.4 GPa), high elastic recovery (83.3%) and high H/E ratio (0.13)

  7. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp3 content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms

  8. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  9. Vacuum arc anode phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of anode phenomena in vacuum arcs is presented. Discussed in succession are: the transition of the arc into the anode spot mode; the temperature of the anode before, during and after the anode spot forms; and anode ions. Characteristically the anode spot has a temperature of the order of the atmospheric boiling point of the anode material and is a copious source of vapor and energetic ions. The dominant mechanism controlling the transition of the vacuum arc into the anode spot mode appears to depend upon the electrode geometry, the electrode material, and the current waveform of the particular vacuum arc being considered. Either magnetic constriction in the gap plasma or gross anode melting can trigger the transition; indeed, a combination of the two is a common cause of anode spot formation

  10. Annealing effect of thermal spike in MgO thin film prepared by cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MgO films were prepared by using pulsed cathodic vacuum arc deposition technique. The substrate bias voltage was in the range of −150 to −750 V. Film structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The annealing effect of thermal spike produced by the impacting of energetic ions was analyzed. The calculated results showed that the lifetime of a thermal spike generated by an energetic ion with the energy of 150 eV was less than one picosecond and it was sufficient to allow Mg2+ or O2- to move one bond length to satisfy the intrinsic stress relief in the affected volume. The MgO(200) lattice spacings of the films deposited at different bias voltages were all larger than the ideal value of 2.1056 Å. As the bias amplitude increased the lattice spacing decreased, which indicated that the compressive stress in the film was partially relieved with increasing impacting ion energy. The stress relief also could be reflected from the film orientation with bias voltage. The biaxial elastic modulus for MgO(100), MgO(110) and MgO(111) planes were calculated and they were M(100) = 199 GPa, M(110) = 335 GPa and M(111) = 340 GPa, respectively. The M values indicated that the preferred orientation will be MgO(200) due to the minimum energy configuration when the lattice strain was large. It was confirmed by the XRD results in our experiments. - Highlights: • MgO thin films with preferred orientation were obtained by CVAD technique. • Annealing effect of a thermal spike in MgO film was discussed. • Lattice spacing of MgO film decreased with the increase of bias voltage. • Film preferred orientation changed from (200) to (220) as the bias voltage increased

  11. TRIBOLOGICAL BEHAVIORS OF DUPLEX DLC/Al2O3 COATINGS FABRICATED USING MICRO-ARC OXIDATION AND FILTERED CATHODIC VACUUM ARC SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, X. L.; Li, X. J.; Zhang, X; W. B. XUE; G. A. CHENG; A. D. LIU

    2007-01-01

    Micro-arc oxidation technique (MAO) treatment produces a layer of alumina film on the surface of the aluminum alloy. A hard and uniform tetrahedral amorphous carbon film (diamond-like carbon, DLC) was deposited on the top of the alumina layer of the 2024 aluminum alloy by a pulsed filtered catholic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition system with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The morphology and tribological properties of the duplex DLC/Al2O3 coating were investigated by a scanning electron...

  12. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, I.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved into a more or less standard laboratory tool for the production of high-current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. Applications include primarily ion implantation for material surface modification research, and good performance has been obtained for the injection of high-current beams of heavy-metal ions, in particular uranium, into particle accelerators. As the use of the sourc...

  13. 小电流下真空电弧阴极斑点实验研究%Experimental research on vacuum arc cathode spots in small current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国顺; 吴国林; 庄劲武; 武瑾

    2015-01-01

    A cathode spots research platform which was based on vacuum arcing chamber was con‐structed ,the contacts material was CuCr50 ,the maximum distance was 4 .5 mm .Through high‐speed camera on the cathode spots ,a lot of small current vacuum arc cathode spots observation experiments were performed . Analysis found that cathode spots usually consist of multiple micro spots , these spots stay together and form a micro‐spot group .The current range of a single micro spot is from 7 A to 25 A .The upper limit current of a single cathode spot is 100 A .Along with the increase of current , the division of the micro‐spot group will be more and more obvious ,and eventually evolve into two in‐dependent cathode spots .%构建了基于可拆卸真空灭弧室的真空电弧阴极斑点研究平台,触头材料为CuCr50,极间最大开距4.5 mm .在极间无磁场影响的情况下,通过高速摄像机对阴极斑点进行拍摄,进行了大量小电流下阴极斑点的观测实验.结果发现:阴极斑点通常由多个微斑点组成,这些微斑点聚集在一起,形成一个微斑点群;单个微斑点的维持通流范围为7~25 A ;单个阴极斑点的通流上限为100 A ;随着电流的增大,单个阴极斑点会出现越来越明显的分裂现象,最终演变为两个相互独立的阴极斑点.

  14. Duplex Al2O3/DLC Coating on 15SiCp/2024 Aluminum Matrix Composite Using Combined Microarc Oxidation and Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenbin; Tian, Hua; Du, Jiancheng; Hua, Ming; Zhang, Xu; Li, Yongliang

    2012-08-01

    Microarc oxidation (MAO) treatment produces a thick Al2O3 coating on the 15SiCp/2024 aluminum matrix composite. After pretreatment of Ti ion implantation, a thin diamond-like carbon film (DLC) was deposited on the top of polished Al2O3 coating by a pulsed filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition system with a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) source. The morphology and tribological properties of the duplex Al2O3/DLC multiplayer coating were investigated by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and SRV ball-on-disk friction tester. It is found that the duplex Al2O3/DLC coating had good adhesion and a low friction coefficient of less than 0.07. As compared to a single Al2O3 or DLC coating, the duplex Al2O3/DLC coating on aluminum matrix composite exhibited a better wear resistance against ZrO2 ball under dry sliding, because the Al2O3 coating as an intermediate layer improved load support for the top DLC coating on 15SiCp/2024 composite substrate, meanwhile the top DLC coating displayed low friction coefficient.

  15. Structural and optical properties of Ti-doped ZnO thin films prepared by the cathodic vacuum arc technique with different annealing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly transparent Ti-doped ZnO thin films were prepared on glass substrates at a deposition rate of approximately 33 nm/min using the cathodic vacuum arc technique with a Zn target power of 550 W and a Ti target power of 750 W, respectively. X-ray diffraction measurements have shown that the Ti-doped ZnO thin film with a vacuum post-annealing condition is c-axis oriented but an amorphous phase at the other post-annealing atmosphere and as-deposited condition. Transmittance measurements show that the best optical quality of the Ti-doped ZnO thin films occurred at a post-annealing atmosphere of N2/H2 mixed gases. Additionally, the optical transmittance of all films has been found more than 85% in a range of 500-700 nm. The lowest electrical resistivity was 3.48 x 10-3 Ω cm, obtained on as-deposited films. However, the post-annealing condition greatly increased the resistivity.

  16. TiN/CrN multilayered hard coatings with TiCrN interlayer deposited by a filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengming Li; Qi He; Gang Lin; Xiaojun Sun; Weizhong Tang; Fanxiu Lu

    2004-01-01

    TiN/CrN multilayered hard coatings with TiCrN interlayer were deposited on high speed steel substrates by using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc technique. The structure and composition of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). A high adhesion of up to 80 N was demonstrated by scratching tests for the multilayered coatings. Nanoindentation tests were performed to determine the hardness and elastic modulus of the coatings as a function of the multiplayer modulation period. It was observed that the hardness of the multilayered coatings is higher than those of either TiN or CrN single coatings, and it increases with decreasing modulation periods, which is consistent with predictions from the Hall-Perch type strengthening mechanism, though at small modulation periods, deviation from the Hall-Petch relation has been observed for the multilayered coatings. The life-span of drills coated with TiN/CrN multilayered is triple as long as that coated with TiN layer.

  17. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Effect of pulsed bias on the properties of ZrN/TiZrN films deposited by a cathodic vacuum arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Guo-Ping; Wang Xing-Quan; Lü Guo-Hua; Zhou Lan; Huang Jun; Chen Wei; Yang Si-Ze

    2013-01-01

    .ZrN/TiZrN multilayers are deposited by using the cathodic vacuum arc method with different substrate bias (from 0 to-800 V),using Ti and Zr plasma flows in residual N2 atmosphere,combined with ion bombardment of sample surfaces.The effect of pulsed bias on the structure and properties of films is investigated.Microstructure of the coating is analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD),and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).In addition,nanohardness,Young's modulus,and scratch tests are performed.The experimental results show that the films exhibit a nanoscale multilayer structure consisting of TiZrN and ZrN phases.Solid solutions are formed for component TiZrN films.The dominant preferred orientation of TiZrN films is (111) and (220).At a pulsed bias of-200 V,the nanohardness and the adhesion strength of the ZrN/TiZrN multilayer reach a maximum of 38 GPa,and 78 N,respectively.The ZrN/TiZrN multilayer demonstrates an enhanced nanohardness compared with binary TiN and ZrN films deposited under equivalent conditions.

  19. Effect of modulation periods on the microstructure and mechanical properties of DLC/TiC multilayer films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DLC/TiC multilayer films with different modulation periods at same modulation ratio 1:1 were deposited by FCVA. • The residual stress of DLC/TiC multilayer films decreases with the modulation periods decrease. • The hardness of the multilayer DLC films decreases with modulation periods increasing. - Abstract: The high stress of diamond-like carbon (DLC) film limits its thickness and adhesion on substrate. Multilayer structure is one approach to overcome this disadvantage. In this paper, the DLC/TiC multilayer films with different modulation periods (80 nm, 106 nm or 160 nm) at same modulation ratio of 1:1 were deposited on Si(1 0 0) wafer and Ti-6Al-4V substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), nanoindention and wear test were employed to investigate the effect of modulation periods on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the multilayer films. The results showed that the residual stress of the DLC/TiC multilayer films could be effectively reduced and the residual stress decreased with the modulation periods decreasing. The hardness of the DLC/TiC multilayer films increased with modulation periods decreasing. The DLC/TiC multilayer film with modulation period of 106 nm had the best wear resistance due to the good combination of hardness, ductility and low compressive stress

  20. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-01-01

    A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had a geometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as a correction factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials was measured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesin the range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current is gener...

  1. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings deposited by cathodic vacuum arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings with alternating Zr-O and Al-O layers having a bi-layer period of 6-7 nm and total coating thickness of 1.0-1.2 μm were deposited using a cathodic vacuum arc plasma process on rotating Si substrates. Plasmas generated from two cathodes, Zr and Al, were deposited simultaneously in a mixture of Ar and O2 background gases. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings, as well as bulk ZrO2 and Al2O3 reference samples, were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS spectra were analyzed on the surface and after sputtering with a 4 kV Ar+ ion gun. High resolution angle resolved spectra were obtained at three take-off angles: 15o, 45o and 75o relative to the sample surface. It was shown that preferential sputtering of oxygen took place during XPS of bulk reference ZrO2 samples, producing ZrO and free Zr along with ZrO2 in the XPS spectra. In contrast, no preferential sputtering was observed with Al2O3 reference samples. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings contained a large amount of free metals along with their oxides. Free Zr and Al were observed in the coating spectra both before and after sputtering, and thus cannot be due solely to preferential sputtering. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Zr-O/Al-O coatings had a nano-multilayered structure with well distinguished alternating layers. However, both of the alternating layers of the coating contained of a mixture of aluminum and zirconium oxides and free Al and Zr metals. The concentration of Zr and Al changed periodically with distance normal to the coating surface: the Zr maximum coincided with the Al minimum and vice versa. However the concentration of Zr in both alternating layers was significantly larger than that of Al. Despite the large free metal concentration, the Knoop hardness, 21.5 GPa, was relatively high, which might be attributed to super-lattice formation or formation of a metal-oxide nanocomposite within the layers.

  2. Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

    2005-05-25

    The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

  3. Study on nanocomposite Ti–Al–Si–Cu–N films with various Si contents deposited by cathodic vacuum arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► XRD peaks show a tendency of decreasing intensity with increasing Si content. ► Ti–Al–Si–Cu–N films present different microstructure with increasing Si content. ► Films with 6 at.% Si content obtain the highest hardness, elastic modulus and H3/E2. ► The wear rate decreases with an increase in hardness. - Abstract: In this study, nanocomposite Ti–Al–Si–Cu–N films were deposited on high speed steel substrates by the vacuum cathode arc ion plating (AIP) technique. By virtue of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), the influence of silicon content on the film microstructure and characteristics was investigated systematically, including the chemical composition, crystalline structure as well as cross-section morphologies. With increasing the silicon content, a deterioration of the preferred orientation and a dense globular structure were detected. In the meanwhile, atomic force microscopy (AFM), nano-indentation, Rockwell indenter and reciprocating test were also utilized to analyze the hardness, elastic modulus, H3/E2, friction coefficient, adhesive strength and wear rate of the Ti–Al–Si–Cu–N films. The results showed that an optimal silicon content correlated with the best mechanical and tribological properties of the presented Ti–Al–Si–Cu–N films existed. With increasing the silicon content, the hardness, elastic modulus and the ratio H3/E2 first were improved gradually, and then were impaired sharply again. When the silicon content reached to 6 at.%, the film possessed the highest hardness, elastic modulus and ratio H3/E2 of approximately 24 GPa, 218 GPa and 0.31, respectively. Besides, films containing both 6 at.% and 10 at.% Si contents obtained a relatively low friction coefficient and a good adhesive strength. The wear rate decreased with an increase in hardness, with the highest hardness corresponding to a wear rate

  4. Study on nanocomposite Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films with various Si contents deposited by cathodic vacuum arc ion plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, J. [State Key Laboratory of Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Strasse 9-11, Siegen 57076 (Germany); Muders, C.M.; Kumar, A. [Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Strasse 9-11, Siegen 57076 (Germany); Jiang, X., E-mail: xin.jiang@uni-siegen.de [Institute of Materials Engineering, University of Siegen, Paul-Bonatz-Strasse 9-11, Siegen 57076 (Germany); Pei, Z.L.; Gong, J. [State Key Laboratory of Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, C., E-mail: csun@imr.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD peaks show a tendency of decreasing intensity with increasing Si content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films present different microstructure with increasing Si content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Films with 6 at.% Si content obtain the highest hardness, elastic modulus and H{sup 3}/E{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The wear rate decreases with an increase in hardness. - Abstract: In this study, nanocomposite Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films were deposited on high speed steel substrates by the vacuum cathode arc ion plating (AIP) technique. By virtue of X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), the influence of silicon content on the film microstructure and characteristics was investigated systematically, including the chemical composition, crystalline structure as well as cross-section morphologies. With increasing the silicon content, a deterioration of the preferred orientation and a dense globular structure were detected. In the meanwhile, atomic force microscopy (AFM), nano-indentation, Rockwell indenter and reciprocating test were also utilized to analyze the hardness, elastic modulus, H{sup 3}/E{sup 2}, friction coefficient, adhesive strength and wear rate of the Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films. The results showed that an optimal silicon content correlated with the best mechanical and tribological properties of the presented Ti-Al-Si-Cu-N films existed. With increasing the silicon content, the hardness, elastic modulus and the ratio H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} first were improved gradually, and then were impaired sharply again. When the silicon content reached to 6 at.%, the film possessed the highest hardness, elastic modulus and ratio H{sup 3}/E{sup 2} of approximately 24 GPa, 218 GPa and 0.31, respectively. Besides, films containing both 6 at.% and 10 at.% Si contents obtained a relatively low friction coefficient and a good adhesive

  5. Transition characteristics from radio-frequency discharge to arc in hollow cathode configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许建平; 巩春志; 吴明忠; 田修波

    2014-01-01

    The technique ofglow discharges in radio frequency configuration was applied to ignite hollow cathode vacuum arc discharge.The effect of discharge parameters on the building up of hollow cathode arc discharge was investigated.The emission spectrum during the vacuum arc ignition process was measured to disclose the discharge dynamics.There exists a threshold radio frequency power (300 W),beyond which hollow cathode is in γmode discharge status while radio frequency discharge changes into the arc discharge.With the increase of the radio frequency power,the plasma temperature and electronic density increase,and the discharge mode transits more rapidly.The ignition time ofhollow cathode vacuum arc discharge is less than 4 s with a radio frequency power of700 W.

  6. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  7. A highly reliable trigger for vacuum ARC plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardet, H.; Godechot, X.; Jarjat, F. [SODERN, Limeil-Brevannes (France)

    1996-08-01

    The authors have developed a reliable electrical trigger and its associated circuitry to fire vacuum arc plasma or ion source. They tested different embodiments of the trigger device in order to get a highly reliable one, which is able to perform more than 1.2 x 10{sup 6} shots at 60 A and 6.5 ps pulse length. The evolution of the ion current emitted has been recorded as a function of the number of shots. They have also investigated in which direction the plasma jet is emitted : axially or radially. This device can be used to fire a vacuum arc plasma or ion source by plasma injection. It has obvious advantage to be placed outside the cathode and therefore would ease maintenance of vacuum arc devices.

  8. Simple filtered repetitively pulsed vacuum arc plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A very simple design of cathodic filtered vacuum arc plasma source is proposed. The source without filter has only four components and none of them require precise machining. The source operates in a repetitively pulsed regime, and for laboratory experiments it can be used without water cooling. Despite the simple construction, the source provides high ion current at the filter outlet reaching 2.5% of 400 A arc current, revealing stable operation in a wide pressure range from high vacuum to oxygen pressure up to more than 10-2 mbar. There is no need in complicated power supply system for this plasma source, only one power supply can be used to ignite the arc, to provide the current for the arc itself, to generate the magnetic field in the filter, and provide its positive electric biasing without any additional high power resistance.

  9. Corrosion durability of nanostructured TiAlYN coatings, deposited by PIII and D method from filtered vacuum-arc cathodic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical characteristics of nanostructured TiAlYN coatings deposited on 12X18H10T steel substrates are investigated in 3% aqueous solution of NaCl. The coatings were deposited from filtered vacuum-arc plasma by PIII and D method. Measurements of corrosion potentials Ecor and anodic polarization curves showed that the best protection against galvanic corrosion (GC) provides TiA1YN coating containing 0.2 at.% Y deposited on the substrate when applying pulsed bias potential of -1.5 kV amplitude. Addition DC bias potential of -150 V to pulse one leads to deterioration of the protective properties: activation potential of anodic processes (APAP) decreases in 3...4 times. Increase in TiA1YN coatings deposition rate promotes improvement their protective properties due to improved adhesion and decreased level of residual stress

  10. Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

    2004-04-12

    A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collections from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had ageometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as acorrection factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials wasmeasured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by thearc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesinthe range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current isgenerally greater for light elements than for heavy elements. The ionerosion rates were determined fromvalues of ion currentand ion chargestates, which were previously measured in the same experimental system.The ion erosion rates range from 12-94 mu g/C.

  11. Note: Triggering behavior of a vacuum arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, C. H.; Long, J. D.; Zheng, L.; Dong, P.; Yang, Z.; Li, J.; Wang, T.; He, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    Axial symmetry of discharge is very important for application of vacuum arc plasma. It is discovered that the triggering method is a significant factor that would influence the symmetry of arc discharge at the final stable stage. Using high-speed multiframe photography, the transition processes from cathode-trigger discharge to cathode-anode discharge were observed. It is shown that the performances of the two triggering methods investigated are quite different. Arc discharge triggered by independent electric source can be stabilized at the center of anode grid, but it is difficult to achieve such good symmetry through resistance triggering. It is also found that the triggering process is highly correlated to the behavior of emitted electrons.

  12. Operational characteristics of a metal vapor vacuum arc ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MEVVA ion source can produce high current pulsed beams of metallic ions using a metal vapor vacuum arc discharge as the plasma medium from which the ions are extracted. In this study, the operational characteristics of the MEVVA IV ion source are summarized. Results are presented of measurements of the ion beam current as a function of arc current over a range of extraction voltage. Ti, Ta and Pb were examined as the cathode materials. The arc current ranged from 50A to 250A and the extraction voltage from 10kV to 80kV. The ion beam current was measured at two different distances from the ion source using Faraday cups, so as to investigate the beam divergence. Additionally, the cathode erosion rates were measured. Optimum operating conditions of the MEVVA ion source were determined. 10 refs., 6 figs

  13. Plasma plume characterization of a vacuum arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael James

    A Vacuum Arc Thruster (VAT) is a thruster that uses the plasma created in a vacuum arc, an electrical discharge in a vacuum that creates high velocity and highly ionized plasmas, as the propellant without additional acceleration. A VAT would be a small and inexpensive low thrust ion thruster, ideal for small satellites and formation flying spacecraft. The purpose of this thesis was to quantitatively and qualitatively examine the VAT plasma plume to determine operating characteristics and limitations. A VAT with a titanium cathode was operated in two regimes: (A) single ˜100mus pulse, discharge current JD=510A, and (B) multiple ˜1500mus pulses at f=40.8Hz, JD=14A. The cathode was 3.18mm diameter Ti rod, surrounded by a 0.80mm thick alumina insulator, set in a molybdenum anode. Three Configurations were tested: Cfg1 (Regime A, cathode recessed 3.00mm from anode), Cfg2 (Regime A, cathode and anode flush), Cfg3 (Regime B, cathode recessed 3.00mm). A semi-empirical model was derived for VAT performance based on the MHD equation of motion using data for ion velocity, ion charge state distribution, ion current fraction (F), and ion current density distribution (ICDD). Additional performance parameters were a2, the peak ion current density angular offset from the cathode normal, and a3, the width of the ion current distribution. Measurements were taken at 162 points on a plane in the plasma plume using a custom faraday probe, and the ICDD empirical form was determined to be a Gaussian. The discharge voltage (VD) and F were Cfg1: VD=25.5V, F=0.025-0.035; Cfg2: VD=40.7V, F=0.08-0.10; Cfg3: VD=14.9V, F=0.006-0.021. For Cfg1, a2 started 15° off-axis while a2˜0 for Cfg2 and 3. In Cfg1, a 3=0.7-0.6, and in Cfg2 a3=1.0-1.1, so the recessed cathode focused the plasma more. However, F is more important for VAT performance because upper and lower bounds for thrust, specific impulse, thrust-to-power, and efficiency were calculated and Cfg2 had the highest performance. High

  14. Metals purification by improved vacuum arc remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanner, Frank J.; Williamson, Rodney L.; Smith, Mark F.

    1994-12-13

    The invention relates to improved apparatuses and methods for remelting metal alloys in furnaces, particularly consumable electrode vacuum arc furnaces. Excited reactive gas is injected into a stationary furnace arc zone, thus accelerating the reduction reactions which purify the metal being melted. Additionally, a cooled condensation surface is disposed within the furnace to reduce the partial pressure of water in the furnace, which also fosters the reduction reactions which result in a purer produced ingot. Methods and means are provided for maintaining the stationary arc zone, thereby reducing the opportunity for contaminants evaporated from the arc zone to be reintroduced into the produced ingot.

  15. High separative power vacuum arc centrifuge (HSP-VAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability of supply of stable isotopes needed in medicine and science has been a problem for decades. Among the many sources of enriched stable isotopes are the Calutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ICONS of Cambridge Isotopes Limited, and reactors such as at Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and elsewhere. Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) staff have spearheaded the development of a new type of isotope separator, dubbed the Vacuum Arc Centrifuge (VAC). This effort dates to the 1980s under National Science Foundation sponsorship at Yale, the early 1990s under a U.S. Department of Energy grant, and more recently, under AASC internal funding. The VAC consists of a vacuum arc discharge between a metal cathode (containing the substances to be separated) and a mesh anode across a small gap

  16. Complex technology of vacuum-arc processing of structural material surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arustamov, V. N.; Ashurov, Kh. B.; Kadyrov, Kh. Kh.; Khudoikulov, I. Kh.

    2015-08-01

    The development of environmentally friendly and energy-resource-saving technologies based on vacuum arc discharge is a topical problem in science and engineering. In view of their unique properties, cathode spots of a vacuum arc induce cleaning of the surface of an article (cathode) from various contaminations and pulsed thermal action on the surface layers. These processes occur in complex with vacuum-arc deposition of coatings in the same technological cycle, which makes it possible to considerably increase the efficiency of methods for changing physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the surface of steel articles, which considerably increase their service life. Analysis of the formation of the temperature regime of the surface during vacuum arc action and of the parameters of the deposited coating will make it possible to optimize the regimes of complex treatment of the surfaces of articles and is of considerable theoretical and practical importance.

  17. Mathematical models of pre-arcing and arcing phenomena in vacuum circuit breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this paper is to show that properties of electrical contact materials are responsible for the metallic vapour pressure at contact closure. Dynamic phenomena accompanying electrical contacts closure in vacuum circuit breakers are considered as consecutive stages, including breakdown, touch, penetration, restitution, bridging and arcing at bouncing. The hybrid mathematical model is elaborated to describe dynamics of the arc and forces acting in contact gap. It includes experimental oscillograms of current, voltage and contact displacement and nonlinear equations for arc, anode and cathode temperature fields and contact motion. Experiments are carried out using a standard vacuum circuit breaker with laser sensors for measurement of contact gap. The special difference path method techniques was applied to take into account oscillations of a fixed contact. The axisymmetrical Stefan problem with two free boundaries corresponding to melting and evaporation interfaces is solved to find dynamics of contact evaporation. It is shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that in the range of high current the force of metallic vapour pressure at arcing in vacuum is comparable with magnetic repulsion force and should be taken into consideration. Two mechanisms of vapour pressure formation and evolution are discussed, which occur due to explosion of micro-asperities at contact touch or due to arcing after bridge rupture at contact bouncing. (author)

  18. Diffuse and spot mode of cathode arc attachments in an atmospheric magnetically rotating argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model including the cathode, near-cathode region, and arc column was constructed. Specifically, a thermal perturbation layer at the arc fringe was calculated in order to couple sheath/presheath modelling with typical arc column modelling. Comparative investigation of two modes of attachment of a dc (100, 150, 200 A) atmospheric-pressure arc in argon to a thermionic cathode made of pure tungsten was conducted. Computational data revealed that there exists two modes of arc discharge: the spot mode, which has an obvious cathode surface temperature peak in the arc attachment centre; and the diffuse mode, which has a flat cathode surface temperature distribution and a larger arc attachment area. The modelling results of the arc attachment agree with previous experimental observations for the diffuse mode. A further 3D simulation is obviously needed to investigate the non-axisymmetrical features, especially for the spot mode. (paper)

  19. Hollow cathode arc: effect of the cathode material on the internal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In discharges with hollow cathodes functioning in the arc regime, the cathode emits thermionic electrons which ionize the gas. To reduce the electrical power consumed by these discharges, cathodes made of thoriated tungsten and lathanum hexaboride have been used. The parameters of the plasma generated into the cathode have been measured with electrostatic probes. (Auth.)

  20. Experimental investigation and numerical simulation of triggered vacuum arc behavior under TMF/RMF-AMF contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Qin, Kang; Zhang, Xiao; Jia, Shenli

    2016-06-01

    A series of triggering experiments was carried out to investigate the characteristics of vacuum arc controlled by TMF/RMF-AMF contacts. During all the experiments, the current ranged from 5–20 kA (rms) and both the arc appearance and behavior of cathode spots were captured by high-speed camera with corresponding arc current and arc voltage. A 3D steady magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model was built to simulate and analyze the vacuum arc behavior under TMF/RMF-AMF contacts, and arc plasma parameters were calculated based on the above model. The experimental results showed that arc deflection was visible under both low and high current. Under high current, arc core formed, which meant the arc contracted significantly. In addition, the anode became much more active under high current. The behavior of the cathode spots showed that they split themselves into other new cathode spots. Under high current, the bulk of the spots rotated along a clockwise direction on a transverse magnetic field (TMF) plate, which caused much noise and oscillation in the arc voltage. The simulation results show that ions are likely to gather on the branches of the TMF plate on the anode plane, as a result of the effects between the electromagnetic force and pressure gradient of the arc plasma. The current contracts in the center of the TMF plate on the cathode which was due to the thin connecting rod there. The anode contraction of the current is caused by the Hall effect. Ions move along a clockwise direction on the TMF plate, which is driven by Ampere force. The current contraction resulted in significant melting in the center of the cathode surface while the other region suffered from uniform melting. The melting caused by the anode contraction is more significant than that of the cathode.

  1. The motion of a vacuum arc in a transvers magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On two rail electrodes vacuum arc is driven by transverse magnetic field induced by self conduction current. Experiments was conducted in a vacuum chamber, and chamber pressure was usually under 10-4 pa. With cupper rail electrodes, at the center of a cathode the arc is triggered. Main ark current is supplied by Pulse Forming Network, and current shape is roughly rectangular with pulse width about 10 ms. When the arc current is under 45-50A, arc moves to retrograde direction from the triggered point. From 50A to 1000A, arc at first moves to forward direction for some distance, then it moves to the retrograde direction. As the arc current increases, forward moving distance increases. It is reported, that over several thousand Ampers, the arc always move to forward direction. On the cathode surface, the start point is concentrated in one spot, and as it moves to forward direction, it spreads and separates to many small cathode spots. The decisive factor of moving derection is considered to the shape of the cathode spot, and this mechanism will be explained by applying Drouet's model. (J.P.N.)

  2. Emission mechanism in high current hollow cathode arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large (2 cm-diameter) hollow cathodes have been operated in a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc over wide ranges of current (0.25 to 17 kA) and mass flow (10-3 to 8 g/sec), with orifice current densities and mass fluxes encompassing those encountered in low current steady-state hollow cathode arcs. Detailed cathode interior measurements of current and potential distributions show that maximum current penetration into the cathode is about one diameter axially upstream from the tip, with peak inner surface current attachment up to one cathode diameter upstream of the tip. The spontaneous attachment of peak current upstream of the cathode tip is suggested as a criterion for characteristic hollow cathode operation. This empirical criterion is verified by experiment

  3. Investigation of firing properties of a vacuum arcs triggered by plasma injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardet, H.; Godechot, X.; Riviere, C. [SODERN, Limeil-Brevannes (France)

    1996-08-01

    The firing characteristic of a vacuum arc, by means of plasma injection, is described. In this method, a plasma, created from a trigger device, plumes away to the space between the cathode and anode. As the plasma is quasi-neutral, the electrostatic field is concentrated across the sheath at the surface of the cathode, thus, creating a high electrical field. As a result, a vacuum arc fires between the cathode and anode. The authors have investigated the firing rate as a function of the trigger cathode distance, trigger current, the anode-cathode distance and voltage. They found a firing rate between 90 to 100% for a trigger current in the range of 400-1200 A, the trigger pulse length was 4 ps, and the trigger-cathode distance was 1.6 to 3.6 cm. The anode cathode gap length changes the firing rate to a low extent for values between 2 to 5 cm. The anode cathode voltage do not change the firing rate. The effect of a magnetic field applied axially over the trigger have also been investigated. Using a version of a highly reliable trigger, the authors were able to deposit stainless steel, copper, carbon and molybdenum, thin films.

  4. Modeling Vacuum Arcs On Spacecraft Solar Panel Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft charging and subsequent vacuum arcing poses a significant threat to satellites in LEO and GEO plasma conditions. Localized arc discharges can cause a...

  5. Unusual Cathode Erosion Patterns Observed for Steered Arc Sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kolbeck, Jonathan; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    A cathodic arc source with a magnetron-type magnetic field was investigated for stability, erosion, and compatibility with a linear macroparticle filter. Here we report about unusual arc spot erosion patterns, which were narrow (~ 2 mm) with periodic pits when operating in argon, and broad (~ 10 mm) with periodic groves and ridges when operating in an argon and oxygen mixtures. These observations can be correlated with the ignition probability for type 2 and type 1 arc spots, respectively.

  6. Effect of surface roughness on erosion rates of pure copper coupons in pulsed vacuum arc system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc erosion measurements were performed on copper cathodes having different surface roughness and surface patterns in 10-5 Torr vacuum (1.3324 mPa), in an external magnetic field of 0.04 T. Different surface patterns and surface roughness were created by grit blasting with alumina grits (G-cathodes) and grinding with silicon carbide emery paper (E-cathodes). The erosion rates of these cathodes were obtained by measuring the weight loss of the electrode after igniting as many as 135 arc pulses, each of which was 500 μs long at an arc current of 125 A. The erosion rates measured indicate that erosion rates decrease with decreasing roughness levels. Results obtained indicate that both surface roughness and surface patterns affect the erosion rate. Having patterns perpendicular to the direction of cathode spot movement gives lower erosion rates than having patterns parallel to arc movement. Isotropic surfaces give lower erosion rates than patterned surfaces at the same roughness

  7. Cyclic erosion of a cathode in high-pressure arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian [ESAB Welding and Cutting Products and Francis Marion University, Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    Erosion that occurred during arc shut down was investigated. The arc current was 200 A; the cathode was made of hafnium. Different gases were used: oxygen, nitrogen, and noble gases (argon, helium, and hydrogen-argon mixture). The gas pressure was 3 atm. It was shown that erosion in noble gases is higher compared to gases that create chemical compounds with hafnium (oxygen and nitrogen). The following model of arc-off erosion is suggested. An amount of plasma gas is diluted in the molten tip of the cathode. When the arc is terminated, the gas pressure in the cathode vicinity drops down. The diluted gas then leaves the molten puddle and carries some liquid material with it.

  8. Vacuum arc velocity and erosion rate measurements on nanostructured plasma and HVOF spray coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc velocity and erosion rate measurements were performed on nanostructured pure Cu cathodes in 10-5 Torr vacuum (1.3324 m Pa), in an external magnetic field of 0.04 T. Five different kinds of nanostructured cathodes were produced by spraying pure Cu powders of three different sizes, on Cu coupons by atmospheric pressure plasma spraying and high velocity oxygen fuel spraying techniques. The erosion rates of these electrodes were obtained by measuring the weight loss of the electrode after igniting as many as 135 arc pulses, each of which was 500 μs long at an arc current of 125 A. The arc erosion values measured on three kinds of nanostructured coatings were 50% lower than the conventional pure massive Cu cathodes. Microscopic analyses of the arc traces on these nanostructured coatings show that the craters formed on these coatings were smaller than those formed on conventional Cu (<1 μm in diameter compared with 7-12 μm diameter on conventional Cu). It was concluded that nanostructured cathodes had lower erosion rates than conventional pure Cu cathodes

  9. Influence of Gap Distance on Vacuum Arc Characteristics of Cup Type AMF Electrode in Vacuum Interrupters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoyong; Xiu, Shixin; Wang, Jimei; Shen, Zhengchao

    2006-11-01

    The greenhouse effect of SF6 is a great concern today. The development of high voltage vacuum circuit breakers becomes more important. The vacuum circuit breaker has minimum pollution to the environment. The vacuum interrupter is the key part of a vacuum circuit breaker. The interrupting characteristics in vacuum and arc-controlling technique are the main problems to be solved for a longer gap distance in developing high voltage vacuum interrupters. To understand the vacuum arc characteristics and provide effective technique to control vacuum arc in a long gap distance, the arc mode transition of a cup-type axial magnetic field electrode is observed by a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) video camera under different gap distances while the arc voltage and arc current are recorded. The controlling ability of the axial magnetic field on vacuum arc obviously decreases when the gap distance is longer than 40 mm. The noise components and mean value of the arc voltage significantly increase. The effective method for controlling the vacuum arc characteristics is provided by long gap distances based on the test results. The test results can be used as a reference to develop high voltage and large capacity vacuum interrupters.

  10. Field to thermo-field to thermionic electron emission: A practical guide to evaluation and electron emission from arc cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, M. S.; Benilova, L. G.

    2013-08-01

    This work is concerned with devising a method of evaluation of electron emission in the framework of the Murphy-Good theory, which would be as simple and computationally efficient as possible while being accurate in the full range of conditions of validity of the theory. The method relies on Padé approximants. A comparative study of electron emission from cathodes of arcs in ambient gas and vacuum arcs is performed with the use of this method. Electron emission from cathodes of arcs in ambient gas is of thermionic nature even for extremely high gas pressures characteristic of projection and automotive arc lamps and is adequately described by the Richardson-Schottky formula. The electron emission from vaporizing (hot) cathodes of vacuum arcs is of thermo-field nature and is adequately described by the Hantzsche fit formula. Since no analytical formulas are uniformly valid for field to thermo-field to thermionic emission, a numerical evaluation of the Murphy-Good formalism is inevitable in cases where a unified description of the full range of conditions is needed, as is the general case of plasma-cathode interaction in vacuum arcs, and the technique proposed in this work may be the method of choice to this end.

  11. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  12. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catani, L. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Lorkiewicz, J. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Tazzari, S. [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Langner, J. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Strzyzewski, P. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Andreone, A. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Cifariello, G. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Di Gennaro, E. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Lamura, G. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Russo, R. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, INFN-NA, Naples (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Z {sub s} as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  13. A review of vacuum ARC ion source research at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors talk briefly describes the history and current status of vacuum arc ion source research at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). In addition, the author makes some mention of the important role of previous Vacuum Arc Ion Source Workshops in fostering the development of this research field internationally. During the period 1986 -89, a type of plasma centrifuge known as a vacuum arc centrifuge was developed at ANSTO as part of a research project on stable isotope separation. In this device, a high current vacuum arc discharge was used to produce a metal plasma which was subsequently rotated in an axial magnetic field. The high rotational speeds (105 - 106 rad sec-1) achievable with this method produce centrifugal separation of ions with different mass:charge ratios such as isotopic species. The first portent of things to come occurred in 1985 when Dr. Ian Brown visited ANSTO's Lucas Heights Research Laboratories and presented a talk on the metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source which had only recently been invented by Brown and co-workers, J. Galvin and R. MacGill, at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. For those of us involved in vacuum arc centrifuge research, this was an exciting development primarily because the metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source was common to both devices. Thus, a type of arc, which had since the 1930's been extensively investigated as a means of switching high current loads, had found wider application as a useful plasma source

  14. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...

  15. Study of Metal and Ceramic Thermionic Vacuum arc Discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamer AKAN; Serdar DEMIRKOL; Naci EKEM; Suat PAT; Geavit MUSA

    2007-01-01

    The thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) is a new type of plasma source, which generates a pure metal and ceramic vapour plasma containing ions with a directed energy. TVA discharges can be ignited in high vacuum conditions between a heated cathode (electron gun) and an anode (tungsten crucible) containing the material. The accelerated electron beam, incident on the anode, heats the crucible, together with its contents, to a high temperature. After establishing a steady-state density of the evaporating anode material atoms, and when the voltage applied is high enough, a bright discharge is ignited between the electrodes. We generated silver and AI2O3 TVA discharges in order to compare the metal and ceramic TVA discharges. The electrical and optical characteristics of silver and AI2O3 TVA discharges were analysed. The TVA is also a new technique for the deposition of thin films. The film condenses on the sample from the plasma state of the vapour phase of the anode material, generated by a TVA. We deposited silver and AI2O3 thin films onto an aluminium substrate layer-by-layer using their TVA discharges, and produced micro and/or nano-layer Ag-Ab2O3 composite samples. The composite samples using scanning electron microscopy was also analysed.

  16. Charge state distribution studies of the metal vapor vacuum arc ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the charge state distribution of the ion beam produced by the MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion source. Beams produced from a wide range of cathode materials have been examined and the charge state distributions have been measured as a function of many operational parameters. In this paper we review the charge state data we have accumulated, with particular emphasis on the time history of the distribution throughout the arc current pulse duration. We find that in general the spectra remain quite constant throughout most of the beam pulse, so long as the arc current is constant. There is an interesting early-time transient behavior when the arc is first initiated and the arc current is still rising, during which time the ion charge states produced are observed to be significantly higher than during the steady current region that follows. 12 refs., 5 figs

  17. Arc Behaviours in Vacuum Interrupters with Axial Magnetic Field Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhongyi; ZHENG Yuesheng; LIU Zhiyuan; CHENG Shaoyong

    2008-01-01

    To improve the limiting current interruption capability and minimizing vacuum interrupter with axial magnetic field (AMF) electrodes,it is significant to investigate the vacuum arc behaviours between the contacts.AMF distributions of the slot type electrodes were studied by both numerical analysis and experiments. Furthermore,the behaviours of vacuum arcs for different parameters of the slot type AMF electrodes were investigated by using high-speed CCD camera.The influences of gap distance,contact diameter and phase shift time between AMF and arc current on the vacuum arc were investigated.The results provide a reference for research and development of vacuum interrupters with slot type or other types of AMF electrode.

  18. Cathodic Arcs From Fractal Spots to Energetic Condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Emphasizes the fractal character of cathode spots, and describes strongly fluctuating plasma properties such as the presence of multiply charged ions that move with supersonic velocity. This book also deals with issues, such as arc source construction, and macroparticle removal. It is intended for scientists, practitioners, and students alike

  19. High ion charge states in a high-current, short-pulse, vacuum ARC ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, A.; Brown, I.; MacGill, R.; Dickinson, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ions of the cathode material are formed at vacuum arc cathode spots and extracted by a grid system. The ion charge states (typically 1-4) depend on the cathode material and only little on the discharge current as long as the current is low. Here the authors report on experiments with short pulses (several {mu}s) and high currents (several kA); this regime of operation is thus approaching a more vacuum spark-like regime. Mean ion charge states of up to 6.2 for tungsten and 3.7 for titanium have been measured, with the corresponding maximum charge states of up to 8+ and 6+, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of Saha calculations and freezing of the charge state distribution.

  20. Molecular beam sampling of a hollow cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the description of the process of molecular beam sampling of a Hollow Cathode Arc. The aim of the study is twofold, i.e. investigation of the applicability of molecular beam sampling as a plasma diagnostic and the use of a Hollow Cathode Arc as a high intensity beam source for ground state atoms and metastable state atoms in the superthermal energy range. Suitable models are introduced, describing the process of molecular beam sampling of both ground state atoms and metastable state atoms. Fast ground state atoms produced by ion-atom collisions. The experimental facilities, i.e. the Hollow Cathode Arc, the time-of-flight machine and the dye laser system are described. And an alternative detection scheme for ground state atoms is presented and experimental results on the molecular beam sampling of a low density plasma (densities 1019-1020 m-3) in the long arc configuration are reported. The results on the short arc configuration (densities 1021-1022 m-3) are discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Numerical analysis of the rotating arc root on the cathode surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional heat transfer equation was used to discuss the circular region of high temperature formed on the surface of the tubular tungsten cathode, the cathode surface temperature in the region becomes uniform gradually (except that at the point of the cathode arc root) when the cathode arc root of the secondary arc is rotating on surface of the tungsten cathode and the rotating frequency of the secondary arc root is increasing. And the necessary condition of the cathode surface temperature is provided to form the model of the multi-arc-root or diffusive arc root. At the same time, the cathode surface temperature at the point of the cathode arc root decreases and reaches a constant when the rotating frequency increases

  2. Plasma flow crisis and limiting electron temperature in a vacuum arc and in axial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One studied possibility of supersonic motion of cathode plasma in a weak-current vacuum arc placed in axial magnetic field. Increase of electron temperature is shown to result inevitably in reduction of plasma speed up to sonic speed, that is, flow crisis. One derived dependence of the boundary length of plasma stationary flow on magnetic field. The maximum attainable electron temperature of plasma was determined to be governed by ion initial energy and to be equal to the triple value of electron temperature within cathode spot range

  3. A review of vacuum ARC ion source research at ANSTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, P.J.; Noorman, J.T.; Watt, G.C. [ANSTO, Menai (Australia)

    1996-08-01

    The authors talk briefly describes the history and current status of vacuum arc ion source research at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO). In addition, the author makes some mention of the important role of previous Vacuum Arc Ion Source Workshops in fostering the development of this research field internationally. During the period 1986 - 89, a type of plasma centrifuge known as a vacuum arc centrifuge was developed at ANSTO as part of a research project on stable isotope separation. In this device, a high current vacuum arc discharge was used to produce a metal plasma which was subsequently rotated in an axial magnetic field. The high rotational speeds (10{sup 5} - 10{sup 6} rad sec{sup {minus}1}) achievable with this method produce centrifugal separation of ions with different mass:charge ratios such as isotopic species. The first portent of things to come occurred in 1985 when Dr. Ian Brown visited ANSTO`s Lucas Heights Research Laboratories and presented a talk on the metal vapour vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source which had only recently been invented by Brown and co-workers, J. Galvin and R. MacGill, at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. For those of us involved in vacuum arc centrifuge research, this was an exciting development primarily because the metal vapour vacuum arc plasma source was common to both devices. Thus, a type of arc, which had since the 1930`s been extensively investigated as a means of switching high current loads, had found wider application as a useful plasma source.

  4. Mass Spectrum Analysis of Gas Emitted during Organic Contaminant Removal from a Metal Surface with an Arc in Low Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas emitted during organic contaminant removal from a metal surface with an arc in low vacuum is investigated using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The experimental results show that fragment molecules of the contaminant material, which are created by the decomposition of the contaminant material, exist in the emitted gas. The decomposition rate of the contaminant increased with the treatment current, which indicates that the decomposition occurs not in the cathode spot, but in the arc column

  5. The Best Arc Heater Regime for Minimum Copper Cathode Erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the experimental investigations and simple theoretical model, which regards electrode erosion as ablation of the electrode material under the action of intensive heat fluxes in the arc spot, we give estimations of the range of operating regimes of copper cathode with the minimum erosion. We show, that application of a magnetic field for displacing of arc over the electrodes surface has a number of specific limitations from point of view of electrode erosion. These limitations are related with a variation in the energy parameters of the arc spot and heat transfer between electric arc and the electrodes under the variation of magnetic field. As a result, an optimal magnetic field exists, which is a function of an electrode temperature θ0 and derivative dθ/ds. Here θ0=T/Tf; Tf - melting point of electrode material; s = v/I0.5; v - arc velocity; I - current. We give here relationships and diagrams, which make it possible to evaluate the range of the operation of copper cathode with the minimum erosion

  6. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, C. C.; Hazelton, R. C.; Yadlowsky, E. J.; Carlson, E. P.; Keitz, M. D.; Williams, J. M.; Zuhr, R. A.; Poker, D. B.

    2002-05-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresponding modulus of 180 GPa. This gives a very high value for the H/E ratio, a figure-of-merit for impact resistance of the film. A number of applications are contemplated, including corrosion/abrasion protection for die-casting dies and improved wear resistance for biomedical implants.

  7. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    CERN Document Server

    Klepper, C C; Yadlowsky, E J; Carlson, E P; Keitz, M D; Williams, J M; Zuhr, R A; Poker, D B

    2002-01-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresp...

  8. Properties of Coatings Deposited Using a Filtered Vacuum Arc Carbon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A filtered vacuum arc plasma source with an adjustable cathode-anode gap was used to produce a carbon plasma for deposition of coatings on various substrates. The deposition apparatus consisted of a plasma gun, a toroidal plasma duct, a deposition chamber, and a cooled substrate holder. The plasma gun consisted of a cylindrical graphite cathode, an annular graphite anode, and a mechanism providing axial movement of the cathode to the anode. The arc was ignited in vacuum by momentarily contacting the cathode with the anode, while applying a D.C. current of 100 A between the cathode and the anode, and then withdrawing the cathode away from the anode in the axial direction, forming a cathode-anode gap of 12 mm. A carbon plasma jet passed through the anode into the toroidal duct and then to the substrate. The substrates were stainless steel and polycarbonate coupons, glass slides, and glass and polycarbonate substrates with a SnO2 coating. It was shown that the structure of the coatings deposited on stainless steel substrates depended on the negative bias voltage (Vbias) applied to the substrate. With Vbias=0, the coatings were not adherent, at Vbias =-10 V the coatings were porous, but the pore density decreased with increasing negative Vbias. At Vbias =-20-25 V the adhesion of the coating was good, and dense, hard (HV-34-60 GPa) DLC coatings were formed. At Vbias 235 V, the formation of graphite phase was observed whose area increased with increasing Vbias. Coatings deposited on polycarbonate surfaces were adherent without applying bias. However, the substrate surface was damaged due to heat flux to the substrate produced by the plasma, after a deposition duration which depended on the magnetic field strength

  9. Interruption Phenomenon in Intermediate-Frequency Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan; Wu, Jianwen

    2016-03-01

    In the condition of the 3 mm gap, experiments for 360 Hz intermediate-frequency vacuum arc are carried out in interrupters with the diameters being 41 mm and with the contact materials being CuCr50 and Cu-W-WC alloy respectively. The results indicate that the contacts material is closely related to the breaking capacity of the vacuum interrupters and characteristics of an intermediate-frequency vacuum arc. For contacts with the same diameter, the breaking capacity of CuCr50 is better than that of Cu-W-WC. When the current fails to be interrupted, the arcs overflow the gap and present irregular performances in the first half wave. Consequently a voltage spike appears. More macroscopic metal droplets can be seen in the arc column between CuCr50 contacts because of the lower melting point. It is observed that the droplet emission is much more severe during arc reignition than that in the first half wave. It is much more conspicuous that the high frequency arc voltage noises appear in Cu-W-WC contacts when the vacuum arcs reignite, for higher temperature and stronger electronic emission ability of Cu-W-WC contacts. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51377007), Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20131102130006), and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China

  10. High thrust-to-power ratio micro-cathode arc thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Lukas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Micro-Cathode Arc Thruster (μCAT is an electric propulsion device that ablates solid cathode material, through an electrical vacuum arc discharge, to create plasma and ultimately produce thrust in the μN to mN range. About 90% of the arc discharge current is conducted by electrons, which go toward heating the anode and contribute very little to thrust, with only the remaining 10% going toward thrust in the form of ion current. A preliminary set of experiments were conducted to show that, at the same power level, thrust may increase by utilizing an ablative anode. It was shown that ablative anode particles were found on a collection plate, compared to no particles from a non-ablative anode, while another experiment showed an increase in ion-to-arc current by approximately 40% at low frequencies compared to the non-ablative anode. Utilizing anode ablation leads to an increase in thrust-to-power ratio in the case of the μCAT.

  11. Contribution of neutral production to ion flux from a vacuum arc source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stanley, Jr.; Lockner, Thomas R.

    1996-02-01

    This article describes studies of the effect of electrode spacing on the performance of vacuum arc plasma sources for ion accelerators and other applications. We measured the time-resolved emission of neutrals from a compact arc source with a titanium cathode and 100 A drive current and found that the source emitted roughly 100 atoms for each extracted ion. The inferred neutral pressure in the arc gap was about 500 mTorr. The result suggested the possibility of achieving significant ionization in the plasma expansion region by increasing the anode-cathode gap length, thereby forcing the drive current to flow through the gas column. With a new two-stage trigger, we were able to ignite arcs with gaps as long as 20 cm. Extended gaps doubled the ion flux, gave better output directionality, and helped to stabilize the location of emission spots on the cathode. These improvements, coupled with direct observations of discharge luminosity, support the hypothesis of ionization of the expanding vapor.

  12. Protective coating of inner surface of steel tubes via vacuum arc deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maile, K.; Roos, E.; Lyutovich, A.; Boese, J.; Itskov, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (DE). Materialpruefungsanstalt (MPA); Ashurov, Kh.; Mirkarimov, A.; Kazantsev, S.; Kadirov, Kh. [Uzbek Academy of Science, Tashkent (Uzbekistan). Arifov Inst. of Electronics

    2010-07-01

    The Vacuum Arc Deposition (VAD) technique based on sputtering a chosen electrode material and its deposition via plasma allows highly-productive technology for creating a wide class of protecting coatings on complex structures. In this work, VAD was applied as a method for the protection of the inner surface of tubes for power-plant boilers against steam oxidation. For this aim, a source cathode of an alloy with high chromium and nickel content was employed in two different VAD treatment systems: a horizontal vacuum chamber (MPA) and a vertical system where the work-piece of the tubes to be protected served as a vacuum changer (Arifov Institute of Electronics). Surface coating with variation of deposition parameters and layer thickness was performed. Characterisation of coated tubes has shown that the method realised in this work allows attainment of material transfer from the cathode to the inner surface with nearly equal chemical composition. It was demonstrated that the initial martensitic structure of the tubes was kept after the vacuum-arc treatment which can provide for both the high mechanical robustness and the corrosion-resistance of the final material. (orig.)

  13. Radial profiles of electron density and current components at cathode surface in LaB6 hollow cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15 % - 20 % of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode. (author)

  14. Ion velocities in a micro-cathode arc thruster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion velocities in the plasma jet generated by the micro-cathode arc thruster are studied by means of time-of-flight method using enhanced ion detection system (EIDS). The EIDS triggers perturbations (spikes) on arc current waveform, and the larger current in the spike generates denser plasma bunches propagating along with the mainstream plasma. The EIDS utilizes double electrostatic probes rather than single probes. The average Ti ion velocity is measured to be around 2×104 m/s without a magnetic field. It was found that the application of a magnetic field does not change ion velocities in the interelectrode region while leads to ion acceleration in the free expanding plasma plume by a factor of about 2. Ion velocities of about 3.5×104 m/s were detected for the magnetic field of about 300 mT at distance of about 100–200 mm from the cathode. It is proposed that plasma is accelerated due to Lorentz force. The average thrust is calculated using the ion velocity measurements and the cathode mass consumption rate, and its increase with the magnetic field is demonstrated.

  15. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  16. p-Type Sb-Doped ZnO Thin Films Prepared with Filtered Vacuum Arc Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    David, T; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Thin p-type Sb-doped ZnO films were grown by filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD), on untreated glass samples. The arc cathode was prepared by dissolving Sb into molten Zn. The deposition was performed with 200 A arc current, running for 120-240 s in 0.426 Pa oxygen pressure. The film thickness was 330-500 nm. The aotmic concentration of Sb in the films was ~1.5%, whereas the O/Zn atomic concentration ratio was ~0.7. Sb incorporation into the polycrystalline ZnO matrix was concluded from XRD...

  17. Vacuum ARC ion sources - activities & developments at LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The author describes work at LBL on the development and application of vacuum arc ion sources. Work has been done on vacuum spark sources - to produce very high charge states, studies of high charge states in magnetic field, hybrid ion source operation on metal/gas plasma, multipole operation, work on MEVVA V for implantation applications, development of broad beam sources, and removal of particles from the output of the source.

  18. Some novel design features of the LBL metal vapor vacuum arc ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The family of MEVVA (metal vapor vacuum arc) high current metal ion sources developed at LBL over the past several years has grown to include a number of different source versions with a wide range of some of the design and operational parameters. The MicroMEVVA source is a particularly compact version, about 2 cm diameter and 10 cm long, while the MEVVA IV weighs some 30 kG. MEVVAs IV and V incorporate multiple cathode assemblies (16 and 18 separate cathodes, respectively), and the operating cathode can be switched rapidly and without down-time. The new MEVVA V embodiment is quite compact considering its broad beam (10 cm), high voltage (100 kV) and multiple cathode features. The large-area extractor grids used in the MEVVA V were fabricated using a particularly simple technique, and they are clamped into position and so can be changed simply and quickly. The electrical system used to drive the arc is particularly simple and incorporates several attractive features. In this paper we review and describe a number of the mechanical and electrical design features that have been developed for these sources. 9 refs., 5 figs

  19. Characteristics of Single Cathode Cascaded Bias Voltage Arc Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Wei; Deng, Baiquan; Zeng, Xianjun; Gou, Fujun; Xue, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weiwei; Cao, Xiaogang; Yang, Dangxiao; Cao, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    A single cathode with a cascaded bias voltage arc plasma source has been developed with a new quartz cathode chamber, instead of the previous copper chambers, to provide better diagnostic observation and access to the plasma optical emission. The cathode chamber cooling scheme is also modified to be naturally cooled only by light emission without cooling water to improve the optical thin performance in the optical path. A single-parameter physical model has been developed to describe the power dissipated in the cascaded bias voltage arc discharge argon plasmas, which have been investigated by utilizing optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Langmuir probe. In the experiments, discharge currents from 50 A to 100 A, argon flow rates from 800 sccm to 2000 sccm and magnetic fields of 0.1 T and 0.2 T were chosen. The results show: (a) the relationship between the averaged resistivity and the averaged current density exhibits an empirical scaling law as \\barη \\propto \\bar {j}-0.63369 and the power dissipated in the arc has a strong relation with the filling factor; (b) through the quartz, the argon ions optical emission lines have been easily observed and are dominating with wavelengths between 340 nm and 520 nm, which are the emissions of Ar+‑434.81 nm and Ar+‑442.60 nm line, and the intensities are increasing with the arc current and decreasing with the inlet argon flow rate; and (c) the electron density and temperature can reach 2.0 × 1019 m‑3 and 0.48 eV, respectively, under the conditions of an arc current of 90 A and a magnetic field of 0.2 T. The half-width of the ne radial profile is approximatively equal to a few Larmor radii of electrons and can be regarded as the diameter of the plasma jet in the experiments. supported by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Program Special of Ministry of Science and Technology (No. 2013GB114003), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275135, 11475122)

  20. Measurement of cathode surface temperature using the method of CCD imaging in arc discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-wavelength pyrometry device using ordinary array CCD (charge coupled device) to collect the radiation data in the horizontal and vertical directions has been developed for measuring the cathode surface temperature during the arc discharge. Analyses of experimental results show that the device can make the measurement of the cathode surface temperature feasible. The cathode surface temperatures measured are lower than the melting point of tungsten (3653 K), and the arc current, cathode diameter, and the cathode length are the main influencing factors of the cathode surface temperature.

  1. The Discharge Development and Arc Modes in Vacuum at A Long Gap Distance in Vacuum Interrupters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Shaoyong; XIU Shixin; WANG Jimei; SHEN Zhengchao

    2007-01-01

    The influence of an arc current on the discharge development and the arc modes of a single coil type axial magnetic field (AMF) electrode were investigated by a high-speed charge couple device (CCD) video camera in a long gap distance of 40 mm. The distribution of the axial magnetic field of the single coil type AMF electrode was computed. By computational results, the single coil type AMF electrode could generate higher axial magnetic flux density than the slot type AMF electrode. It was found that the single coil type AMF electrode could perform better than the slot type AMF electrode with the same designing parameters. And the development of the arc modes experienced diffuse mode, constricted but unstable mode, and constricted and stable mode with the amplitude of the arc current increasing. The correlation between the vacuum arc and the noise components of arc voltage was investigated too. The interruption capability could be known in a practical commercial vacuum interrupter by the test results in a demountable vacuum interrupter (DVC) with a electrode diameter of 50 mm and a gap distance of 40mm.The test results could provide reference to design the high voltage vacuum interrupter adopting the single coil type AMF electrode.

  2. The Discharge Development and Arc Modes in Vacuum at A Long Gap Distance in Vacuum Interrupters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of an arc current on the discharge development and the arc modes of a single coil type axial magnetic field (AMF) electrode were investigated by a high-speed charge couple device (CCD) video camera in a long gap distance of 40 mm. The distribution of the axial magnetic field of the single coil type AMF electrode was computed. By computational results, the single coil type AMF electrode could generate higher axial magnetic flux density than the slot type AMF electrode. It was found that the single coil type AMF electrode could perform better than the slot type AMF electrode with the same designing parameters. And the development of the arc modes experienced diffuse mode, constricted but unstable mode, and constricted and stable mode with the amplitude of the arc current increasing. The correlation between the vacuum arc and the noise components of arc voltage was investigated too. The interruption capability could be known in a practical commercial vacuum interrupter by the test results in a demountable vacuum interrupter (DVC) with a electrode diameter of 50 mm and a gap distance of 40 mm.The test results could provide reference to design the high voltage vacuum interrupter adopting the single coil type AMF electrode

  3. Measurement of the tungsten ion concentration after forced extinction of a vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of singly ionized and neutral tungsten atoms were measured by laser-induced fluorescence after the forced extinction of vacuum arcs between tungsten-copper butt contacts, 28-mm in diam and 10-mm apart. The 50-Hz current was forced to zero at its maximum of 200 A in 1.3 μs by application of a reverse voltage. Near current zero, the ion concentration of 4 x 1017 m- 3 is of the same order of magnitude as the atomic tungsten concentration, which is 6 x 1017 m- 3. While the concentration of the neutrals remains virtually constant during 20 μs after current zero, the ion concentration decays by three orders of magnitude in the same time. The decay-time constant varies from 1.9 μs close to the post-arc cathode to 3.6 μs near the post-arc anode. It is concluded that the dielectric recovery of vacuum gaps after diffuse arcs is mainly controlled by residual charge carriers

  4. Cryogenic and vacuum sectorisation of the LHC arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Bóna, M; Erdt, W K; Perinet-Marquet, J L; Poncet, Alain; Rohmig, P; Wikberg, Tore

    1996-01-01

    Following the recommendation of the LHC TC of June 20th, 1995 to introduce a separate cryogenic distribution line (QRL), which opened the possibility to have a finer cryogenic and vacuum sectorisation of the LHC machine than the original 8 arcs scheme, a working group was set up to study the implications: technical feasibility, advantages and drawbacks as well as cost of such a sectorisation (DG/DI/LE/dl, 26 July 1995). This report presents the conclusions of the Working Group. In the LHC Conceptual Design Report, ref. CERN/AC/95-05 (LHC), 20 October 1995, the so-called "Yellow Book", a complete cryostat arc (~ 2.9 km) would have to be warmed up in order to replace a defective cryomagnet. Even by coupling the two large refrigerators feeding adjacent arcs at even points to speed up the warm-up and cool down of one arc, the minimum down-time of the machine needed to replace a cryomagnet would be more than a full month (and even 52 days with only one cryoplant). Cryogenic and vacuum sectorisation of an arc int...

  5. Influence of Oxygen Pressure on Filtered Vacuum Arc Deposition of Tin Oxide Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin oxide is a conducting material which is transparent in the visible region, reflective in the infra-red, and absorbing in the ultraviolet. Applied as a thin film, it is used for transparent electrodes for solar cells and in energy conserving coatings on architectural glass. This paper presents the results of experiments in which tin oxide films were deposited using filtered vacuum arc deposition. A plasma jet of ionized Sn vapor was produced by cathode spots on a 93 mm diameter Sn cathode by a 160 A d.c. arc. The plasma jet was directed through a quarter torus duct using a magnetic field, while droplets of liquid Sn collided with the duct walls and were thus filtered from the plasma stream. The plasma jet was directed either to a probe or to a substrate placed downstream from the duct outlet, and where an oxygen atmosphere was maintained at a pressure P 0-6 mTorr. Arc voltage, ion current, coating transmission and coating conductivity were measured as a function of the oxygen pressure. It was found that the arc voltage was 30V, and relatively independent of p for P<4 mTorr. With higher pressures, the arc increasingly operated in a high voltage mode, with an arc voltage typically 10 V higher than in the low voltage mode. The change from the low to the high voltage mode is likewise associated with a trebling in the extracted ion current, from 250 to 750 mA. The deposition rate decreased linearly from 14 to 5 nm/s when the pressure was increased from 3 to 5 mTorr. The optical extinction length had a maximum value of 2.6 m in the pressure range of 3.9-4.3 mTorr, while minimum electrical conductivities of 410-3 - cm were obtained for 3.8-4.1 mTorr

  6. Simulation Research of Magnetic Constriction Effect and Controlling by Axial Magnetic Field of Vacuum Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立军; 贾申利; 史宗谦; 荣命哲

    2005-01-01

    Based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of vacuum arc, the computer simulation of vacuum arc was carried out in this paper. In the MHD model, mass conservation equation,momentum conservation equations, energy conservation equations, generalized ohm's law and Maxwell equation were considered. MHD equations were calculated by numerical method, and the distribution of vacuum arc plasma parameters and current density were obtained. Simulation results showed that the magnetic constriction effect of vacuum arc is primarily caused by the Hall effect. In addition, the inhibition of axial magnetic field (AMF) on constriction of vacuum arc was calculated and analyzed.

  7. Contamination due to memory effects in filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film synthesis by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition is a widely used technique with a number of important emerging technological applications. A characteristic feature of the method is that during the deposition process not only is the substrate coated by the plasma, but the plasma gun itself and the magnetic field coil and/or vacuum vessel section constituting the macroparticle filter are also coated to some extent. If then the plasma gun cathode is changed to a new element, there can be a contamination of the subsequent film deposition by sputtering from various parts of the system of the previous coating species. We have experimentally explored this effect and compared our results with theoretical estimates of sputtering from the stopping and range of ions in matter code. We find film contamination of the order of 10-4-10-3, and the memory of the prior history of the deposition hardware can be relatively long lasting

  8. Contamination due to memory effects in filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film synthesis by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition is a widely used technique with a number of important emerging technological applications. A characteristic feature of the method is that during the deposition process not only is the substrate coated by the plasma, but the plasma gun itself and the magnetic field coil and/or vacuum vessel section constituting the macroparticle filter are also coated to some extent. If then the plasma gun cathode is changed to a new element, there can be a contamination of the subsequent film deposition by sputtering from various parts of the system of the previous coating species. We have experimentally explored this effect and compared our results with theoretical estimates of sputtering from the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code. We find film contamination of order 10-4 - 10-3, and the memory of the prior history of the deposition hardware can be relatively long-lasting

  9. Contamination due to memory effects in filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition systems

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, D R; Verdonck, P; Brown, I G

    2002-01-01

    Thin film synthesis by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition is a widely used technique with a number of important emerging technological applications. A characteristic feature of the method is that during the deposition process not only is the substrate coated by the plasma, but the plasma gun itself and the magnetic field coil and/or vacuum vessel section constituting the macroparticle filter are also coated to some extent. If then the plasma gun cathode is changed to a new element, there can be a contamination of the subsequent film deposition by sputtering from various parts of the system of the previous coating species. We have experimentally explored this effect and compared our results with theoretical estimates of sputtering from the SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) code. We find film contamination of order 10-4 - 10-3, and the memory of the prior history of the deposition hardware can be relatively long-lasting.

  10. Vacuum arc localization in CLIC prototype radio frequency accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2091976; Koivunen, Visa

    2016-04-04

    A future linear collider capable of reaching TeV collision energies should support accelerating gradients beyond 100 MV/m. At such high fields, the occurrence of vacuum arcs have to be mitigated through conditioning, during which an accelerating structure’s resilience against breakdowns is slowly increased through repeated radio frequency pulsing. Conditioning is very time and resource consuming, which is why developing more efficient procedures is desirable. At CERN, conditioning related research is conducted at the CLIC high-power X-band test stands. Breakdown localization is an important diagnostic tool of accelerating structure tests. Abnormal position distributions highlight issues in structure design, manufacturing or operation and may consequently help improve these processes. Additionally, positioning can provide insight into the physics of vacuum arcs. In this work, two established positioning methods based on the time-difference-ofarrival of radio frequency waves are extended. The first method i...

  11. Erosion behaviour of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Al$_{x}$Cr$_{1-x}$ composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres and their erosion behaviour was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres were non-uniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded centre region of the cathodes.

  12. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlxCr1−x composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N2, and O2 atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N2 and O2 atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes

  13. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Ian; Oks, Efim

    2005-05-01

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used.

  14. Vacuum Arc Ion Sources: Recent Developments and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum arc ion source has evolved over the past twenty years into a standard laboratory tool for the production of high current beams of metal ions, and is now used in a number of different embodiments at many laboratories around the world. The primary application of this kind of source has evolved to be ion implantation for material surface modification. Another important use is for injection of high current beams of heavy metal ions into the front ends of particle accelerators, and much excellent work has been carried out in recent years in optimizing the source for reliable accelerator application. The source also provides a valuable tool for the investigation of the fundamental plasma physics of vacuum arc plasma discharges. As the use of the source has grown and diversified, at the same time the ion source performance and operational characteristics have been improved in a variety of different ways also. Here we review the growth and status of vacuum arc ion sources around the world, and summarize some of the applications for which the sources have been used

  15. THE EFFECTS OF NEGATIVE BIAS AND FLUX RATIO ON THE PROPERTIES OF TiN THIN FILMS FORMED BY FILTERED CATHODIC ARC PLASMA TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.J. Zhang; P.X. Yan; Z.G. Wu; W.W. Zhang; J. Wang; Q.J. Xue

    2005-01-01

    The filtered cathodic vacuum-arc (FCVA) technique is a supplementary and alternative technique with respect to convendtional physical and chemical vapour deposition which can remove macro-particles effectively and make the deposition process at ambient temperature.In this work, high quality TiN thin films were deposited on silicon substrates at low temperature using the improved filtered cathodic arc plasma (FCAP) technique. AFM, XRD, TEM were employed to characterize the TiN thin films. The effects of the negative substrate bias on the grain size, preferred crystalline orientation, surface roughness of TiN thin films were discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic investigation of vacuum-arc anode plasmas for thin film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A vacuum-arc plasma source has been designed and tested for fabrication of thin films, which are clear of droplets. In order to avoid these droplets, the source has been designed to produce pulsed plasmas generated by the anode, and to screen the substrate against the plasma streaming away from the cathode spot. We present here spectroscopic measurements and analyses carried out in order to characterize the electron population of this anode plasma. The vacuum arc was first operated with a carbon anode of diameter 0.5 mm and an arc current of 192 A. The visible and near-infrared spectra were recorded with various resolutions, in direct view of the anode spot, with an intensified CCD camera. Dominant C+ and C2+ lines were identified and the plasma parameters deduced from their relative intensities showed that local thermal equilibrium was reached, giving an electron temperature about 3.2 eV and an electron density around 2.5x1017 cm-3. The study was extended to lower currents of 140, 92 and 65 A. The temperature and the density monotonically decreased down to about 2 eV and 1.5x1015 cm-3

  17. Beam Vacuum Interconnects for the LHC Cold Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Veness, R J M; Gröbner, Oswald; Lepeule, P; Reymermier, C; Schneider, G; Skoczen, Blazej; Kleimenok, V; Nikitin, I N

    1999-01-01

    The design of the beam vacuum interconnect is described in this paper. Features include a novel RF bridge design to maximise lateral flexibility during cryostat Cold arcs of the LHC will consist of twin aperture dipole, quadrupole and corrector magnets in cryostats, operating at 1.9 K. Beam vacuum chambers, along with all connecting elements require flexible 'interconnects' between adjacent cryostats to allow for thermal and mechanical offsets foreseen during machine operation and alignment. In addition, the beam vacuum chambers contain perforated beam screens to intercept beam induced heat loads at an intermediate temperature. These must also be connected with low impedance RF bridges in the interconnect zones.alignment and so-called 'nested' bellows to minimise the required length of the assembly.

  18. Review of cathodic arc deposition technology at the start of the new millennium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, D M; Anders, A

    2000-02-24

    The vacuum cathodic arc has been known to provide a means of producing coatings since the second half of the 19th century. This makes it one of the oldest known means for making coatings in a vacuum. In the last century it has been recognized that the copious quantities of ions produced by the process offers certain advantages in terms of coating properties. Specifically, ions can be steered and/or accelerated toward the parts to be coated. This, in turn, can provide enhanced adhesion, film density, and composition stoichiometry in the case of compound coatings. The ions generated by the cathodic arc have high ''natural'' kinetic energy values in the range 20-200 eV, leading to enhanced surface mobility during the deposition process and even ion subplantation. In many cases, dense coatings are achieved even when non-normal arrival angles are involved. The ion energy can further manipulated by the plasma immersion biasing technique. The issue of macroparticle contamination has been addressed by a variety of novel plasma filters. In spite of all of these advantages, this deposition technique has not been widely adopted in the western nations for commercial coating except in the case of enhancing the performance of cutting tools. The purpose of the this review is to explore reasons for this lack of general use of the technology and to point out some encouraging recent developments which may lead to its accelerated adoption for a much wider variety of applications in the near future.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Low Current Vacuum Arc Supersonic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li-jun; JIA Shen-li; SHI Zong-qian; ZHANG Ling; RONG Ming-zhe

    2007-01-01

    Based on a two-dimensional axisymmetric magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model,low current vacuum are (LCVA) characteristics are studied.The influence of cathode process under different axial magnetic fields and different anode radii on LCVA characteristics is also simulated.The results show that the influence of both cathode process and anode radii on LCVA is significant.The sign of anode sheath potentials can change from negative to positive with the decrease of anode radii.The simulation results are in part verified by experimental results.Especially,as the effect of ion kinetic energy is considered,ion temperature is improved significantly; which is in agreement with experimental results.

  20. Mechanism of Arc Discharge in Vacuum Interrupter Based on PIC-MCC Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yun-dong; LI Jing; LIU Xiao-ming; HOU Chun-guang; WANG Er-zhi

    2011-01-01

    With the raise of voltage level in electric power grid, the phenomena of high voltage gas insulation has re- ceived extensive attention from all over the world. The research on the breakdown mechanism of vacuum which is the main insulation gas in high voltage level is one of the most important issues. It is also important to the study of vacu- um arc in vacuum switch. But for the limitations of available method used in analyzing the breakdown mechanism of vacuum, the main research on vacuum breakdown is macroscopic experiment. The experiments are greatly influenced by environmental factors and high vacuum degree is difficult to be ensured. So the data from the experiments are dis- persive and the complex physical change in vacuum breakdown can not be revealed. The purpose of this work is to an- alyze the mechanism of vacuum breakdown quantitatively by microscopic numerical simulation. The particle in cell and Monte Carlo methods are used here to solve microscopic dynamic equation of gas. Based on the field emission theory in vacuum, electrons produced by the cathode and ions produced by the collision between electron and metal vapor molecule are the objects of this study. The motions of microscopic particles which are at the functions of the applied and self-consistent electric filed are traced in time and two space dimensions. Mont Carlo method is used here to cope with the collisions between electrons and metal vapor molecules. The cross sections of the collision which is related with the energy are all from the experiments. The secondary electron emission, exciting, elastic and ionizing collisions between electrons and metal vapor molecules have been considered in this paper. By the simulation, the number densi- ties of electron and ion are acquired and the microscopic dynamic electric field produced by space charge is also calcu- lated. The effect of vacuum degree on discharge voltage is also discussed here. According to the simulation data, we draw the

  1. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A.; Trowbridge, Frank R.

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  2. Thermionic vacuum arc - a novel advanced technology for surface coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a new technology for high quality thin film deposition is presented. The film is condensing on the sample from the plasma state of the vapor phase of the anode material, generated by a Thermionic Vacuum Arc. This process is taking place in a vacuumated vessel at pressures less than 10-5 torr. The thin film is bombarded during its deposition by energetic ions from the plasma of anode material The value of the directed energy of the ions can be established at will in the range of 10 eV up to 500 eV. Due to the above mentioned conditions, the obtained thin films are very smooth. nanostructured, of high purity have a good adherence to the substrates, etc.Because of the high energy level which can be used by Thermionic Vacuum Arc.,this new coating technology is especially convenient for high melting point materials thin film deposition. One of the most convenient field of application of TVA thin film deposition technique, is the nanostructured carbon thin films generation. In fact, due to the high variety of the obtained structures of the carbon (not mentioning the huge number of applications) we are encountering a new field of science. Results on nanostructured thin films obtained using TVA technology is presented

  3. Filtered pulsed carbon cathodic arc: Plasma and amorphous carbon properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Benstetter, Günther; Lodermeier, Edgar; Zhang, Jialiang; Liu, Yanhong; Vancea, Johann

    2004-06-01

    The carbon plasma ion energies produced by the filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge method were measured as a function of filter inductance. The energy determination is based on the electro-optical time-of-flight method. The average ion energies of the pulsed ion beams were found to depend upon the rise time and duration of pulsed arc currents, which suggests that a gain of ion kinetic energy mainly arises from the electric plasma field from the ambipolar expansion of both electrons and ions, and an electron drag force because of the high expansion velocity of the electrons. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with a sp3 fraction of ˜70% were deposited on silicon substrates at the average ion energies of >6 eV in the highly ionized plasmas. The ta-C films were found to be covered with a few graphitelike atomic layers. The surface properties of ultrathin carbon films, such as nanoscale friction coefficients, surface layer thickness, and silicon contents were strongly dependent on the ion energies. The growth of amorphous carbon films was explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface carbon atoms. In terms of this model, the thermal spike provides the energy required to release surface atoms from their metastable positions and leads to the formation of the sp3 bonded carbon on a sp3 bonded matrix. The experimental results indicate that the low-energy (<3 eV) carbon ions have insufficient energies to cause the rearrangement reaction within the film and they form graphitelike structures at film surface.

  4. Filtered pulsed carbon cathodic arc: Plasma and amorphous carbon properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon plasma ion energies produced by the filtered pulsed cathodic arc discharge method were measured as a function of filter inductance. The energy determination is based on the electro-optical time-of-flight method. The average ion energies of the pulsed ion beams were found to depend upon the rise time and duration of pulsed arc currents, which suggests that a gain of ion kinetic energy mainly arises from the electric plasma field from the ambipolar expansion of both electrons and ions, and an electron drag force because of the high expansion velocity of the electrons. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films with a sp3 fraction of ∼70% were deposited on silicon substrates at the average ion energies of >6 eV in the highly ionized plasmas. The ta-C films were found to be covered with a few graphitelike atomic layers. The surface properties of ultrathin carbon films, such as nanoscale friction coefficients, surface layer thickness, and silicon contents were strongly dependent on the ion energies. The growth of amorphous carbon films was explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface carbon atoms. In terms of this model, the thermal spike provides the energy required to release surface atoms from their metastable positions and leads to the formation of the sp3 bonded carbon on a sp3 bonded matrix. The experimental results indicate that the low-energy (<3 eV) carbon ions have insufficient energies to cause the rearrangement reaction within the film and they form graphitelike structures at film surface

  5. Cathode erosion in a high-pressure high-current arc: calculations for tungsten cathode in a free-burning argon arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion of an evaporated atom of the cathode material in a near-cathode plasma is considered. It is shown that the evaporated atom is ionized almost instantly. The created ion, under the influence of a strong electric field existing in the cathode proximity, has a high probability of returning to the cathode. A small fraction of evaporated atoms are able to diffuse away from the cathode to the region where they are involved in plasma flow and lose their chance to return to the cathode. The fraction of the total evaporated atoms, which do not return to the cathode, the escape factor, determines the net erosion rate. In order to calculate this factor, the distributions of the plasma parameters in the near-cathode plasma were considered. Calculations showed that the escape factor is on the order of a few per cent. Using experimental data on the plasma and cathode temperatures, we calculated the net erosion rate for a free-burning 200 A argon arc with a thoriated tungsten cathode. The calculated erosion rate is close to 1 µg s-1, which is in agreement with available experimental data. (paper)

  6. Identification by force modulation microscopy of nanoparticles generated in vacuum arcs Identification by force modulation microscopy of nanoparticles generated in vacuum arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Arroyave Franco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method based on force modulation microscopy (FMM for identification of nanoparticles produced in the plasma generated by the cathode spots of vacuum arcs is presented. FMM technique is enabled for the detection of variations in the mechanical properties of a surface with high sensitiveness. Titanium nitride (TiN coatings deposited on oriented silicon by pulsed vacuum arc process have been analyzed. AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy and FMM images were simultaneously obtained, and in all cases it was possible to identify nanoparticle presence. Further X-ray Diffraction spectra of sample coating were taken. Existence of contaminant particles of 47 nanometers in diameter was reported.En este trabajo se presenta un método alternativo basado en microscopia de modulación de fuerza (FMM, para la identificación de nanogotas producidas en el plasma generado por los spots catódicos de los arcos en vacío. La técnica FMM esta habilitada para la detección de variaciones en las propiedades mecánicas de una superficie, con alta sensibilidad. Se han analizado recubrimientos de nitruro de titanio (TiN depositados sobre Silicio orientado por el proceso de arco en vacío pulsado. Se han obtenido simultáneamente imágenes de microscopia de fuerza atómica (AFM y de microscopia FMM mediante las cuales se ha podido identificar la presencia de nanogotas. Adicionalmente se han tomado espectros de difracción de rayos X (XRD de las muestras recubiertas. Se ha reportado la existencia de partículas contaminantes de 47 nanómetros de diámetro sobre los recubrimientos.

  7. Ion charge state distributions of vacuum arc plasmas: The origin of species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas are produced at micrometer-size, nonstationary cathode spots. Ion charge state distributions (CSD close-quote s) are experimentally known for 50 elements, but the theoretical understanding is unsatisfactory. In this paper, CSD close-quote s of vacuum arc plasmas are calculated under the assumption that the spot plasma experiences an instantaneous transition from equilibrium to nonequilibrium while expanding. Observable charge state distributions are the result of a freezing process at this transition. open-quotes Frozenclose quotes CSD close-quote s have been calculated using Saha equations in the Debye-Hueckel approximation of the nonideal plasma for all metals of the Periodic Table and for boron, carbon, silicon, and germanium. The results are presented in a open-quotes periodic table of CSD.close quotes The table contains also the mean ion charge state, the neutral vapor fraction, and the effective plasma temperature and density at the freezing point for each element. The validity of the concepts of open-quotes instantaneous freezingclose quotes and open-quotes effective temperature and densityclose quotes is discussed for low and high currents and for the presence of a magnetic field. Temperature fluctuations have been identified to cause broadening of CSD close-quote s. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  8. Macroparticles in Ti-Si-N-coatings deposited from vacuum-arc plasma with ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experiments on research of macroparticles hitting TiSiN-coatings during vacuum-arc deposition from direct plasma stream with PBII and D method are presented. Sintered titanium-silicon powder composite was applied as a cathode material. The effect associated with the depression of macroparticles capture by growing TiSiN-coating as a result of increase of negative bias pulse on substrate simultaneous with periodic high-voltage negative potential pulses was found out. The depression of macroparticles capture at the increase of bias pulse with PBII and D technique takes a place under two factors. The main factor is electrostatic reflection of a large share of the negatively charged macroparticles stream. The second factor is the dispersion of macroparticles, surmounting electrostatic repulsion and 'stuck' to the coating surface.

  9. Different modes of arc attachment at HID cathodes: simulation and comparison with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a model for the plasma boundary layer of high intensity discharge cathodes, simulations are performed and compared with experimental results. To solve the power balance of the cathode body different methods are used, namely a 1D integral solution as well as 1D, 2D and 3D finite-element calculations. The simulations are done for cylindrical tungsten cathodes operated in different pure noble gas discharges (0.1-1.0 MPa) and with currents between 0.5 and 10 A. Under these conditions different modes of arc attachment are found, both in simulations and experiments. For the diffuse mode of arc attachment an excellent quantitative agreement between measurements and the simulations is obtained, reflecting an improved accuracy of measurements and simulation. In addition, different spot modes are found. At least one of these modes is also observed in the experiment. Also for this spot mode the agreement between measurements and simulation for the integral quantities is good. There are still some open questions concerning the spot mode of cathodic arc attachment. Varying the geometric dimensions of the cathode, the proper simulation of the heat conduction problem of the cathode body is shown. Variations of the plasma properties, like gas type and pressure, prove the conceptional capability of the boundary layer model for the simulation of different modes of arc attachment. Evaluating the cathode fall characteristics, regions of existence for the different modes are found, which are similar to the experiments

  10. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Robert, E-mail: robert.franz@unileoben.ac.at; Mendez Martin, Francisca; Hawranek, Gerhard [Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Polcik, Peter [Plansee Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbürgerstrasse 23, 86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1−x} composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes.

  11. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D. [Departamento de Fisica, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  12. Structure and Properties of Cr-containing Hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon Films Deposited by DC Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc Technology%磁过滤直流真空阴极弧制备含铬类金刚石膜的结构及其性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝土富; 沈丽如; 徐桂东; 金凡亚

    2009-01-01

    采用磁过滤直流真空阴极弧沉积技术在单晶硅片、载玻片、不锈钢片基体上制备了含铬类金刚石(Cr-DLC)膜.用光学显微镜、椭偏仪、分光光度计、X射线光电子能谱(XPS)、X射线衍射能谱(XRD)、Raman光谱、纳米硬度计、摩擦磨损仪、洛氏硬度计检测了薄膜的组分结构、光学、力学等相关特性.结果表明,硅片上的薄膜厚度为47.6nm,碳含量为89%,s p~3键占碳含量的55.15%.不锈钢片上的薄膜具有典型的DLC膜Raman光谱特征,在空气中的摩擦系数约为0.1,耐磨性能优良,膜与基体的结合性能良好.%Cr-containing hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (Cr-DLC) films were deposited on stainless steel plate, monocrystalline silicon wafer and microscope slide glass by DC filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology. The composition, structure and properties of Cr-DLC films were investigated by spec-troscopic ellipsometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), powder X-ray diffraction(XRD), spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, nanoindenter, ball-on-disk tribometer, Rockwell apparatus and optical microscope. It was shown that the content of C is 89% in the film deposited on silicon wa-fer and the content of sp~3 bonding carbon atoms in the C element is 55.15%. The Raman spectra of the film deposited on stainless steel plate has the typical characteristics of DLC. The hardness and elastic modulus of the film deposited on stainless steel plate are 16.01 GPa and 142.72 GPa. The fric-tion coefficient of the film deposited on stainless steel plate is about 0.1, the film also exhibits excel-lent wear resistance and the adhesion to substrate is very well.

  13. Development of alloy-film coated dispenser cathode for terahertz vacuum electron devices application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High power terahertz vacuum electron devices demand high current density and uniform emission dispenser cathode. It was found that the coating of noble metals e.g., Os, Ir, and Re on the surface of tungsten dispenser cathodes enhances the emission capabilities and uniformity. Hence metal coated cathode might be the best candidate for terahertz devices applications. In this study, ternary-alloy-film cathode (2Os:2Re:1 W) and Os coated cathode have been developed and the results are presented. The cathodes made out of this alloy coating showed 1.5 times higher emission and 0.02 eV emission uniformity as compared to those of simply Os coated cathodes which can be used in terahertz devices application.

  14. Development of alloy-film coated dispenser cathode for terahertz vacuum electron devices application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, R. K.; Bera, A.; Raju, R. S.; Tanwar, A. K.; Baek, I. K.; Min, S. H.; Kwon, O. J.; Sattorov, M. A.; Lee, K. W.; Park, G.-S.

    2013-07-01

    High power terahertz vacuum electron devices demand high current density and uniform emission dispenser cathode. It was found that the coating of noble metals e.g., Os, Ir, and Re on the surface of tungsten dispenser cathodes enhances the emission capabilities and uniformity. Hence metal coated cathode might be the best candidate for terahertz devices applications. In this study, ternary-alloy-film cathode (2Os:2Re:1 W) and Os coated cathode have been developed and the results are presented. The cathodes made out of this alloy coating showed 1.5 times higher emission and 0.02 eV emission uniformity as compared to those of simply Os coated cathodes which can be used in terahertz devices application.

  15. Influence of residual plasma drift velocity on the post-arc sheath expansion of vacuum circuit breakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Bai, Zhibin; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun

    2016-05-01

    The residual plasma in the inter-contact region of a vacuum circuit breaker moves towards the post-arc cathode at current zero, because the residual plasma mainly comes from the cathode spots during the arc burning process. In the most previous theoretical researches on the post-arc sheath expansion process of vacuum circuit breakers, only the thermal motion of residual plasma was taken into consideration. Alternately, the residual plasma was even assumed to be static at the moment of current zero in some simplified models. However, the influence of residual plasma drift velocity at current zero on the post-arc sheath expansion process was rarely investigated. In this paper, this effect is investigated by a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model. Simulation results indicate that the sheath expands slower with higher residual plasma drift velocity in the initial sheath expansion stage. However, with the increase of residual plasma drift velocity, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region decreases faster, and the sheath expansion velocity increases earlier. Consequently, as a whole, it needs shorter time to expel the residual plasma from the inter-contact region. Furthermore, if the residual plasma drift velocity is high enough, the sheath expansion process ceases before it develops to the post-arc anode. Besides, the influence of the collisions between charges and neutrals is investigated as well in terms of the density of metal vapor. It shows that the residual plasma drift velocity takes remarkable effect only if the density of the metal vapor is relatively low, which corresponds to the circumstance of low-current interruptions.

  16. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  17. Vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge applied to stable isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the results of a vacuum-arc plasma centrifuge experiment. A plasma centrifuge is an apparatus where a plasma column is produced due to the interaction of an electric current with an externally applied magnetic field, sup(→)J x sup(→)B. Among the applications of a rotating plasma, this work deals particularly with its utilization in an isotope enrichment device. The main characteristics of the plasma produced in this experiment are presented, with special attention to the plasma column rotation and the isotope enrichment. The analysis of the results is performed using a fluid model for a completely ionized rigid body rotating plasma column in steady state equilibrium. The main results are: a) rotation frequency of the plasma column in the range 2 x 10 sup(4) to 3 x 10 sup(5) rad/s; b) enrichment of 10 to 30% for the magnesium isotopes, and of 290 to 490% for the carbon 13 isotope; c) rigid body rotation of the plasma column only for radii smaller than the characteristic radius of the plasma column. re; d) linear dependence of the rotation frequency upon the magnetic field strength only for r < re; e) existence of an optimum value of the magnetic field for maximum enrichment; and f) dependence of the rotation frequency upon the inverse of the atomic mass. (author)

  18. Study on a negative hydrogen ion source with hot cathode arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A negative hydrogen (H−) ion source with hot cathode arc discharge was designed and fabricated as a primary injector for a 10 MeV PET cyclotron at IMP. 1 mA dc H− beam with ε N,RMS = 0.08 π mm mrad was extracted at 25 kV. Halbach hexapole was adopted to confine the plasma. The state of arc discharge, the parameters including filament current, arc current, gas pressure, plasma electrode bias, and the ratio of Ie−/IH− were experimentally studied. The discussion on the result, and opinions to improve the source were given

  19. Advances in high voltage insulation and arc interruption in SF6 and vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Maller, V N

    1982-01-01

    Advances in High Voltage Insulation and Arc Interruption in SF6 and Vacuum deals with high voltage breakdown and arc extinction in sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and high vacuum, with special emphasis on the application of these insulating media in high voltage power apparatus and devices. The design and developmental aspects of various high voltage power apparatus using SF6 and high vacuum are highlighted. This book is comprised of eight chapters and opens with a discussion on electrical discharges in SF6 and high vacuum, along with the properties and handling of SF6 gas. The following chapters fo

  20. An ion source based on the cathodic arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, D.M.; Falabella, S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a cylindrically symmetric arc source to produce a ring of ions which leave the surface of the arc target radially and are reflected by electrostatic fields present in the source to a point of use, such as a part to be coated. An array of electrically isolated rings positioned in the source serves the duel purpose of minimizing bouncing of macroparticles and providing electrical insulation to maximize the electric field gradients within the source. The source also includes a series of baffles which function as a filtering or trapping mechanism for any macroparticles.

  1. Study of the feasibility of distributed cathodic arc as a plasma source for development of the technology for plasma separation of SNF and radioactive wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirov, R. Kh.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.

    2015-12-01

    One of the key problems in the development of plasma separation technology is designing a plasma source which uses condensed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear wastes as a raw material. This paper covers the experimental study of the evaporation and ionization of model materials (gadolinium, niobium oxide, and titanium oxide). For these purposes, a vacuum arc with a heated cathode on the studied material was initiated and its parameters in different regimes were studied. During the experiment, the cathode temperature, arc current, arc voltage, and plasma radiation spectra were measured, and also probe measurements were carried out. It was found that the increase in the cathode heating power leads to the decrease in the arc voltage (to 3 V). This fact makes it possible to reduce the electron energy and achieve singly ionized plasma with a high degree of ionization to fulfill one of the requirements for plasma separation of SNF. This finding is supported by the analysis of the plasma radiation spectrum and the results of the probe diagnostics.

  2. Study of the feasibility of distributed cathodic arc as a plasma source for development of the technology for plasma separation of SNF and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the key problems in the development of plasma separation technology is designing a plasma source which uses condensed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear wastes as a raw material. This paper covers the experimental study of the evaporation and ionization of model materials (gadolinium, niobium oxide, and titanium oxide). For these purposes, a vacuum arc with a heated cathode on the studied material was initiated and its parameters in different regimes were studied. During the experiment, the cathode temperature, arc current, arc voltage, and plasma radiation spectra were measured, and also probe measurements were carried out. It was found that the increase in the cathode heating power leads to the decrease in the arc voltage (to 3 V). This fact makes it possible to reduce the electron energy and achieve singly ionized plasma with a high degree of ionization to fulfill one of the requirements for plasma separation of SNF. This finding is supported by the analysis of the plasma radiation spectrum and the results of the probe diagnostics

  3. Study of the feasibility of distributed cathodic arc as a plasma source for development of the technology for plasma separation of SNF and radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirov, R. Kh.; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A., E-mail: ravus46@yandex.ru; Yartsev, I. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    One of the key problems in the development of plasma separation technology is designing a plasma source which uses condensed spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or nuclear wastes as a raw material. This paper covers the experimental study of the evaporation and ionization of model materials (gadolinium, niobium oxide, and titanium oxide). For these purposes, a vacuum arc with a heated cathode on the studied material was initiated and its parameters in different regimes were studied. During the experiment, the cathode temperature, arc current, arc voltage, and plasma radiation spectra were measured, and also probe measurements were carried out. It was found that the increase in the cathode heating power leads to the decrease in the arc voltage (to 3 V). This fact makes it possible to reduce the electron energy and achieve singly ionized plasma with a high degree of ionization to fulfill one of the requirements for plasma separation of SNF. This finding is supported by the analysis of the plasma radiation spectrum and the results of the probe diagnostics.

  4. Dynamic Mission Modeling and Simulation: Application of Micro-Vacuum Arc Thrusters and Frozen Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suaris, Therese

    The dynamic mission modeling and simulation of scenarios around the Earth, Moon, and libration points are used to explore the application of the Vacuum Arc Thruster and frozen orbits for future space exploration missions. The Micro-Vacuum Arc Thruster (microVAT) is a propulsion system that uses an arc to evaporate solid cathode material. The propulsion system is compatible for nano-satellite applications due to its low operating voltage, low mass, and its simplicity to be integrated into the spacecraft operating system. The microVAT experimental performance values were used to baseline the numerical thruster model for the space mission operational scenarios. The simulation results were used analyze and make recommendations on the performance parameters that are required for maneuvers and interplanetary trajectories for space exploration missions. In addition, the analytical derivation and numerical analysis of Earth-based frozen orbits are used to baseline the low-altitude, frozen orbits. A high resolution in order and degree lunar gravity model and third-body perturbations due to the Earth and Sun are included in the detailed simulation. The time evolution of the classical frozen orbital conditions is calculated by numerically propagating the orbits in an environment where all the perturbations are included. The behaviour and evolution pattern of the orbital elements are used to baseline a set of numerical quasi-frozen conditions for a series of low-altitude, polar orbits. The numerically integrated results for a family of polar frozen orbits provide insight into the predictive behaviour pattern and evolution of the orbital elements that can be extended to any given set of initial conditions and requirements. It is shown that these results are not a fixed point solution that is calculated for a selective set of perturbations, but rather the numerical model can be used to determine a set of conditions and orbital elements to satisfy a given set of mission

  5. Vacuum arcing behavior between transverse magnetic field contacts subjected to variable axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Zhenxing; Yan, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this work is to reveal the effects of an axial magnetic field (AMF) on the vacuum arc characteristics between transverse magnetic field (TMF) contacts. These vacuum arc characteristics include the vacuum arcing behavior and the arc voltage waveform. In the experiments, an external AMF was applied to a pair of TMF contacts. The external AMF flux density BAMF can be adjusted from 0 to 110 mT. The arc current in the tests varied over a range from 0 to 20 kA rms at 45 Hz. The contact material was CuCr25 (25% Cr). A high-speed charge-coupled device video camera was used to record the vacuum arc evolution. The experimental results show that the application of the AMF effectively reduces the TMF arc voltage noise component and reduces the formation of liquid metal drops between the contacts. The diffuse arc duration increases linearly with increasing AMF flux density, but it also decreases linearly with increasing arc current under application of the external AMF. The results also indicate that the diffuse arc duration before the current zero is usually more than 1 ms under the condition that the value of the AMF per kiloampere is more than 2.0 mT/kA. Finally, under application of the AMF, the arc column of the TMF contacts may constrict and remain in the center region without transverse rotation. Therefore, the combined TMF-AMF contacts should be designed such that they guarantee that the AMF is not so strong as to oppose transverse rotation of the arc column.

  6. Laser-assisted vacuum arc extreme ultraviolet source: a comparison of picosecond and nanosecond laser triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Girum A.; Tobin, Isaac; Juschkin, Larissa; Hayden, Patrick; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Sokell, Emma; Zakharov, Vassily S.; Zakharov, Sergey V.; O’Reilly, Fergal

    2016-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light generation by hybrid laser-assisted vacuum arc discharge plasmas, utilizing Sn-coated rotating-disc-electrodes, was investigated. The discharge was initiated by localized ablation of the liquid tin coating of the cathode disc by a laser pulse. The laser pulse, at 1064 nm, was generated by Nd:YAG lasers with variable energy from 1 to 100 mJ per pulse. The impact of shortening the laser pulse from 7 ns to 170 ps on the EUV generation has been investigated in detail. The use of ps pulses resulted in an increase in emission of EUV radiation. With a fixed discharge energy of ~4 J, the EUV conversion efficiency tends to plateau at ~2.4  ±  0.25% for the ps laser pulses, while for the ns pulses, it saturates at ~1.7  ±  0.3%. Under similar discharge and laser energy conditions, operating the EUV source with the ps-triggering resulted also in narrower spectral profiles of the emission in comparison to ns-triggering. The results indicate an advantage in using ps-triggering in laser-assisted discharges to produce brighter plasmas required for applications such as metrology.

  7. Study of W/WC films produced by plasma assisted vacuum arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W/WC films were grown by the PAPVD repetitive pulsed vacuum arc technique on 304 stainless steel substrates. To produce the coatings, a target of W with purity of 99.9999% was used. The system is composed by a reaction chamber with two opposite electrodes placed inside it. The target is located on the cathode and the samples on the anode. A pulsed power supply is used to generate the discharge. For the production of the W layer, the chamber was filled with Ar gas at a pressure of 3 mbar, and the voltage of the discharge was 270 V with 3 pulses. WC films were grown in an atmosphere of methane at 3 mbar and a voltage discharge of 275 V with 4 pulses. The active and passive times of the discharge were 1 s and 0.5 s, respectively. XRD technique was employed to study the coatings, to study the present phases and the crystallographic orientation of the films, the XRD analyses were carried out varying the temperature of the system-coating-substrate between room temperature and 600 C, when the WC coatings are degradated, leaving just the tungsten. XPS analyses present the apparition of WC, WO and WO2 compounds. AFM analyses allowed to measure the morphological properties and the thickness around 3 μm. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Study of W/WC films produced by plasma assisted vacuum arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, R.; Arango, P.; Arango, Y. C.; Restrepo, E.; Devia, A.

    2005-08-01

    W/WC films were grown by the PAPVD repetitive pulsed vacuum arc technique on 304 stainless steel substrates. To produce the coatings, a target of W with purity of 99.9999% was used. The system is composed by a reaction chamber with two opposite electrodes placed inside it. The target is located on the cathode and the samples on the anode. A pulsed power supply is used to generate the discharge. For the production of the W layer, the chamber was filled with Ar gas at a pressure of 3 mbar, and the voltage of the discharge was 270 V with 3 pulses. WC films were grown in an atmosphere of methane at 3 mbar and a voltage discharge of 275 V with 4 pulses. The active and passive times of the discharge were 1 s and 0.5 s, respectively.XRD technique was employed to study the coatings, to study the present phases and the crystallographic orientation of the films, the XRD analyses were carried out varying the temperature of the system-coating-substrate between room temperature and 600 °C, when the WC coatings are degradated, leaving just the tugsten. XPS analyses present the apparition of WC, WO and WO2 compounds. AFM analyses allowed to measure the morphological properties and the thickness around 3 μm.

  9. Study of W/WC films produced by plasma assisted vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina, R.; Arango, P.; Arango, Y.C.; Restrepo, E.; Devia, A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al aeropuerto Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia)

    2005-08-01

    W/WC films were grown by the PAPVD repetitive pulsed vacuum arc technique on 304 stainless steel substrates. To produce the coatings, a target of W with purity of 99.9999% was used. The system is composed by a reaction chamber with two opposite electrodes placed inside it. The target is located on the cathode and the samples on the anode. A pulsed power supply is used to generate the discharge. For the production of the W layer, the chamber was filled with Ar gas at a pressure of 3 mbar, and the voltage of the discharge was 270 V with 3 pulses. WC films were grown in an atmosphere of methane at 3 mbar and a voltage discharge of 275 V with 4 pulses. The active and passive times of the discharge were 1 s and 0.5 s, respectively. XRD technique was employed to study the coatings, to study the present phases and the crystallographic orientation of the films, the XRD analyses were carried out varying the temperature of the system-coating-substrate between room temperature and 600 C, when the WC coatings are degradated, leaving just the tungsten. XPS analyses present the apparition of WC, WO and WO{sub 2} compounds. AFM analyses allowed to measure the morphological properties and the thickness around 3 {mu}m. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. On the issue of reducing the effect of ionic bombardment of the cathode on the performance of microwave vacuum tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of reducing the effect of ionic bombardment on the operation of cathodes in vacuum electron tubes has been considered. The improvement can be reached by modifying the geometry of the cathode - emitting surface. Results of experimental investigations of millimeter and submillimeter wave clinotrons with such cathodes are presented. Such clinotrons show improved performance characteristics

  11. Motion and Splitting of Vacuum Arc Column in Transverse Magnetic Field Contacts at Intermediate-Frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc motion and splitting of vacuum arc at intermediate frequency (400-800 Hz) were investigated under transverse magnetic field (TMF). The experiment was performed on cup-type TMF contacts with contact diameter of 40 mm and a contact gap of 4 mm in a single-frequency circuit. With high-speed photography we characterized the arc appearance at different arc currents from 3.3 kA-rms to 10 kA-rms at intermediate frequencies. As arc current increases from 3.3 kA-rms to 10 kA-rms the arc appearance changes obviously. When current value is 3.3 kA-rms (current frequency 400-800 Hz), there is almost no splitting arc; when the current exceeds 5 kA-rms (current frequency 400-800 Hz), the arc rotates at a speed above 20 m/s, accompanied by an observable splitting arc. The splitting arc could be observed at different frequencies and the arc-voltage had no noises when splitting occurred. The motion direction and the velocity of arc column were studied. Finally, the formation of a split arc was discussed. (low temperature plasma)

  12. Technological plasma source equipped with combined system of vacuum-arc discharge initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction and the operation principle of erosion plasma source with a three-stage system of vacuum-arc discharge excitation is described. As first two step was used the modified contactless start system with plasma injector, which was widely used in standard plasma sources of the ''Bulat'' systems. The operation principle of the third stage was based on the transition of glow discharge to arc discharge. Coordinated operation of three stages during various stages of coating deposition provided significant increasing of service life and reliability of the system of vacuum-arc discharge initiation and extended the functionality of the plasma source

  13. Influence of steering magnetic field on the time-resolved plasma chemistry in cathodic arc discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiasarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh; New, R.; Valter, J.

    2004-08-01

    External magnetic fields are used extensively to steer the cathode spot of arc discharges in order to improve target utilization and minimize droplet generation. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and electrostatic probe measurements in a Cr arc discharge were used to characterize the effect of the external magnetic field on the ion flux to the substrates and on the composition and time evolution of the plasma. A combination of a permanent magnet array and an electromagnetic coil was used to vary the shape and strength of the magnetic field on the cathode surface. Finite element modelling of the magnetic field distribution identified two types of geometry—through-field, with lines normal to the cathode surface, and arched-field, with lines forming a magnetic 'tunnel'. The magnetic flux densities measured with a Hall probe were in the range from -15 to +15 mT. The particular shape and strength of the magnetic field determined the specific confinement regions and diffusion pathways for the plasma. The total ion saturation current density at the substrate position was in the range between 2 and 11.5 mA cm-2 depending on the magnetic field shape. The magnetic field strongly influenced the relative optical emission from Cr0, Cr1+ and Cr2+ metal species, and the resulting charge state distribution. Time-resolved OES and probe measurements of a particular position on the arc cathode revealed that an Ar plasma is trapped near the cathode and is sustained even when the cathode spot is a significant distance from the observation volume. The importance of this 'residual' Ar plasma for the charge state distribution of metal ions is discussed.

  14. Influence of steering magnetic field on the time-resolved plasma chemistry in cathodic arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehiasarian, A P [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Hovsepian, P Eh [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); New, R [Materials Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Valter, J [HVM Plasma Ltd, Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, 158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2004-08-07

    External magnetic fields are used extensively to steer the cathode spot of arc discharges in order to improve target utilization and minimize droplet generation. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and electrostatic probe measurements in a Cr arc discharge were used to characterize the effect of the external magnetic field on the ion flux to the substrates and on the composition and time evolution of the plasma. A combination of a permanent magnet array and an electromagnetic coil was used to vary the shape and strength of the magnetic field on the cathode surface. Finite element modelling of the magnetic field distribution identified two types of geometry-through-field, with lines normal to the cathode surface, and arched-field, with lines forming a magnetic 'tunnel'. The magnetic flux densities measured with a Hall probe were in the range from -15 to +15 mT. The particular shape and strength of the magnetic field determined the specific confinement regions and diffusion pathways for the plasma. The total ion saturation current density at the substrate position was in the range between 2 and 11.5 mA cm{sup -2} depending on the magnetic field shape. The magnetic field strongly influenced the relative optical emission from Cr{sup 0}, Cr{sup 1+} and Cr{sup 2+} metal species, and the resulting charge state distribution. Time-resolved OES and probe measurements of a particular position on the arc cathode revealed that an Ar plasma is trapped near the cathode and is sustained even when the cathode spot is a significant distance from the observation volume. The importance of this 'residual' Ar plasma for the charge state distribution of metal ions is discussed.

  15. Voltage Node Arcing in the ICRH Antenna Vacuum Transmission Lines at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observation of parasitic low-VSWR activity during operations of JET RF plant and the damage caused by arcing at the voltage-node in the vacuum transmission line (VTL) in 2004 highlight the importance of the problem of low-voltage breakdown in the ICRH systems. Simulations demonstrate little response of the RF circuit to the voltage-node arcing which explains why it remains largely unnoticed and complicates the design of protection systems. Analysis of the damage pattern produced by the voltage-node arcing suggests that multipactor-related phenomena occurring at elevated voltage thresholds in conditions of unfavorable VTL geometry are most plausible arc-provoking factors

  16. Voltage Node Arcing in the ICRH Antenna Vacuum Transmission Lines at JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monakhov, I.; Bobkov, V.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Nicholls, K.; Walden, A.

    2007-09-01

    The observation of parasitic low-VSWR activity during operations of JET RF plant and the damage caused by arcing at the voltage-node in the vacuum transmission line (VTL) in 2004 highlight the importance of the problem of low-voltage breakdown in the ICRH systems. Simulations demonstrate little response of the RF circuit to the voltage-node arcing which explains why it remains largely unnoticed and complicates the design of protection systems. Analysis of the damage pattern produced by the voltage-node arcing suggests that multipactor-related phenomena occurring at elevated voltage thresholds in conditions of unfavorable VTL geometry are most plausible arc-provoking factors.

  17. A cathodic arc enhanced middle-frequency magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cathode arc enhanced magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings is reported in this article. This system consists of eight targets: four outer targets are mounted on the wall of the chamber and four inner targets are placed around the center of the chamber. The outer and inner targets form four pair targets and are powered by four middle frequency power supplies. One of the outer targets can run either in the cathode arc mode or in the magnetron sputter mode. The Ti-containing diamond-like carbon nanocomposite coatings were deposited by using this system. The prepared coating exhibits high hardness (∼20 GPa), good adhesion (critical load is 50 N), very low friction coefficient (∼0.07); and excellent tribological performance with a wear rate of 1.4 x 10-16 m3·N-l·m-1. (authors)

  18. Composition Control of Alloy Coatings and Composition Designof Cathode Targets in Multi-Arc Ion Plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The composition from alloy cathode target to alloy coating generally changes to some extentin multi-arc ion plating. This demixing effect leads to the difficulties in the control of alloycomposition of coating and in the design of composition of alloy cathode target. A new simple formula,is proposed in present work to deal with the problem. According to this formula, the composition of alloy coating can be calculated bymeans of the degrees of ionization of alloy elements. The results of calculation agree with theexperimental ones within very limited error range. Modifying the formula into another form,the design for alloy composition of cathode target can be conveniently carried out, and the ideal composition of alloy coating can be obtained.

  19. Unique erosion features of hafnium cathode in atmospheric pressure arcs of air, nitrogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorui, S.; Meher, K. C.; Kar, R.; Tiwari, N.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation of cathode erosion in atmospheric pressure hafnium-electrode plasma torches is reported under different plasma environments along with the results of numerical simulation. Air, nitrogen and oxygen are the plasma gases considered. Distinct differences in the erosion features in different plasmas are brought out. Cathode images exhibiting a degree of erosion and measured erosion rates are presented in detail as a function of time of arc operation and arc current. Physical erosion rates are determined using high precision balance. The changes in the surface microstructures are investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Evolution of cathode chemistry is determined using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Numerical simulation with proper consideration of the plasma effects is performed for all the plasma gases. The important role of electromagnetic body forces in shaping the flow field and the distribution of pressure in the region is explored. It is shown that the mutual interaction between fluid dynamic and electromagnetic body forces may self-consistently evolve a situation of an extremely low cathode erosion rate.

  20. Account of near-cathode sheath in numerical models of high-pressure arc discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, M. S.; Almeida, N. A.; Baeva, M.; Cunha, M. D.; Benilova, L. G.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-06-01

    Three approaches to describing the separation of charges in near-cathode regions of high-pressure arc discharges are compared. The first approach employs a single set of equations, including the Poisson equation, in the whole interelectrode gap. The second approach employs a fully non-equilibrium description of the quasi-neutral bulk plasma, complemented with a newly developed description of the space-charge sheaths. The third, and the simplest, approach exploits the fact that significant power is deposited by the arc power supply into the near-cathode plasma layer, which allows one to simulate the plasma–cathode interaction to the first approximation independently of processes in the bulk plasma. It is found that results given by the different models are generally in good agreement, and in some cases the agreement is even surprisingly good. It follows that the predicted integral characteristics of the plasma–cathode interaction are not strongly affected by details of the model provided that the basic physics is right.

  1. Synthesis of aluminium nanoparticles by arc evaporation of an aluminium cathode surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Gazanfari; M Karimzadeh; S Ghorbani; M R Sadeghi; G Azizi; H Karimi; N Fattahi; Z Karimzadeh

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium nanoparticles (Al Nps) are synthesized using arc discharge method by applying direct current between aluminium electrodes in liquid environment without any use of vacuum equipment, heat exchangers, high temperatures furnaces and inert gases. After synthesis of Al Nps, in situ coating process on the nanoparticles was performed immediately. The effects of media on the yield and morphology of aluminium nanoparticles were investigated. Analysis result of the samples indicated that particle size was less than 30 nm, when 120 A/cm2 arc current was used. In addition, coating agent can affect arc velocity, arc stability, morphology and composition of the nanoparticles. Resultant nanoparticles were identified using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), also their surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and finally the accuracy of coating was assessed with infrared (IR) spectroscopy.

  2. Regularities of Structure Formation of Coatings CrN, Obtained by Vacuum Arc Evaporation in a Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sobol'

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The questions of structural engineering of Cr-N system coatings produced by vacuum arc evaporation of Cr cathode in a nitrogen atmosphere are considered. As the variable physical and technological parameters we have used the following ones: pressure of nitrogen atmosphere (3.5…48×10–4 Torr and negative bias potential applied to the substrate in constant (Ub = – 120 V and pulse (Uip = – 1200 V modes. Increase in the pressure without pulse action allows to transfer from Cr + Cr2N phase to phase of textured CrN crystallites with [111] axis. The transition from the metallic phase to the mechanical nitride is accompanied by a decrease in the average size of crystallites. Additional supply of impulse capacity allows to intensify the process of formation of nitrides and stimulates formation at high pressure of radiation-resistant texture units with the [110] axis.

  3. Physical and Mechanical Properties of (Ti-Zr-NbN Coatings, Fabricated by Vacuum-Arc Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksakova O.V.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The coatings based on (Ti-Zr-NbN were fabricated by vacuum-arc deposition of the Ti+Zr+Nb cathodes in the nitrogen atmosphere. Their physical and mechanical properties as well as tribological characteristics have been studied. The coatings are characterized by a columnar structure, their hardness reaches 44.57 GPa. The adhesion strength of coatings reaches 66.77 GPa, the friction coefficient of the «cover – Al2O3» is 1.1. It has been determined, that the hardness of the investigated coatings significantly depends on the pressure of the reaction gas. The coatings are promising as protective coatings for friction pairs and cutting tools.

  4. Nanostructured (Ti-Zr-NbN Coatings Obtained by Vacuum-arc Deposition Method: Structure and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.V. Maksakova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article discusses the results of the deposition of nanostructured coatings obtained by vacuum arc deposition of cathode (Ti-Zr-Nb, and analyzes their structure, morphology, elemental composition, and tribological properties (friction, wear and adhesion. The structural analysis showed the formation of an FCC phase and BCC phase in a small amount (at a chamber pressure Р = 4×10 – 3 Тоrr. The results of tribological tests showed that the friction coefficient varies from 0.61 to 0.491, and Vickers hardness from 37 to 44.57 GPa when changing (increasing the pressure in the chamber. The analysis of the elements in the tracks of friction was studied.

  5. Layer Formation by Resputtering in Ti-Si-C Hard Coatings during Large Scale Cathodic Arc Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anders; Zhu, Jianqiang; Ghafoor, Naureen; Johansson, Mats; Sjölen, Jacob; Jensen, Jens; Odén, Magnus; Hultman, Lars; Rosén, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the physical mechanism behind the phenomenon of self-layering in thin films made by industrial scale cathodic arc deposition systems using compound cathodes and rotating substrate fixture. For Ti-Si-C films, electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry reveals a trapezoid modulation in Si content in the substrate normal direction, with a period of 4 to 23 nm dependent on cathode configuration. This is caused by preferential resputtering of Si by the energet...

  6. A Micromachined Vacuum Triode Using a Carbon Nanotube Cold Cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Sungho

    2002-01-01

    A fully integrated on-chip vacuum microtriode using carbon nanotubes as field emitters was constructed laterally on a silicon surface using microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) design and fabrication principles. Each electrode in the triode was made of a hinged polycrystalline silicon panel that could be rotated and locked into an upright position. The device was operated at a current density as high as 16 A/cm2. Although the transconductance was measured only at 1.3 S, the dc output pow...

  7. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of JxB propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90 eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4x1021-6x1021 m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2x106 cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation

  8. Heat flux at the refractory cathode of a high-current, high-pressure arc (two modes of cathode spot attachment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian [ESAB Welding and Cutting Products and Francis Marion University, Florence SC 29501 (United States)

    2004-04-07

    Calorimetric measurements of a refractory (pure and thoriated tungsten) cathode in a high-current (100-500 A) high-pressure (1-5 atm) arc in nitrogen were performed. The measurements confirmed the existence of a 'high-current' mode of cathode spot (CS) operation-the mode we observed by a footprint method in our work (2003 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 3007). In this mode, the heat load of a cathode does not depend on the pressure and is directly proportional to the arc current as opposed to the 'low current' mode where it is inversely proportional to the square root of pressure and directly proportional to the square root of current. The current density at the cathode surface calculated from the measured heat flux to the cathode is approximately half of the current density obtained by a footprint method. Both densities exhibit the same current and pressure dependences. The radial distribution of the cathode temperature inside the CS is discussed. We hypothesize that the temperature has its maximum at the spot periphery. In the case of the thoriated tungsten cathode, this maximum may be so high that, at this location, the cathode is virtually thorium free.

  9. Main reaction process simulation of hydrogen gas discharge in a cold cathode electric vacuum device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing-Ye Liu; Yuan Gao; Gang Wang

    2012-07-01

    Based on the related theory of plasma discharge process and the COMSOL multiphysics software, and considering the corresponding boundary conditions, the related recation types in the hydrogen plasma discharge were simulated and analysed, and the main reactions of hydrogen discharge in small electric vacuum components at low pressure and weak ionization were confirmed. Among the 21 types of reactions in hydrogen discharge process, 11 of them play importnat roles under low pressure and weak ionization in cold cathode electric vacuum device. The simulated results are consistent with the test result.

  10. Nanosecond neutron pulse generation in diode acceleration tubes with vacuum arc discharge and laser deuteron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonsteady process of deuteron pulse formation and acceleration to neutron produced target at vacuum acceleration tubes is investigated. Deuterons are emitted from vacuum arc discharge or laser deuteron sources. This generation mechanism has been studied by numerical simulations using a relativistic electromagnetic PIC code. The results obtained shows essential dependence of deuteron plasma emission, forming and accelerating processes in diode from the final deuteron current. Neutron flow calculation can be done based on short pulse dynamic investigation.

  11. Spatial and temporal characteristics of a vacuum-arc rail-gun plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of a vacuum-arc operated rail-gun plasma were numerically simulated for the undercritically damped regime and confirmed in experiments. Analytical solutions of arc current, its velocity, and position also showed good agreement with the results. The spatial development of the arc is shown here to follow a linear behavior, even though the propulsion velocity followed an exponential-step function due to the sinusoidal nature of the arc current. Peak arc current ∼100kA, 15 μs period was propelled to ∼106cm/s as indicated in time-of-flight measurements and simulations. The voltage signal induced on a B probe by the dynamic sinusoidal arc was simulated, which compared well with the measured probe signal. A Gaussian current distribution inside the measured arc length ∼1 2cm, was established by unfolding the B probe signal. A peak magnetic field of the order 1 5 kG was also interpreted inside the arc. The emerging plasma contained ion current over tens of amperes in the pulse duration encompassing the arc envelope. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  12. Element- and charge-state-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Robert; Polcik, Peter; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consist...

  13. Multiple Ionization Of Metal Ions By ECR Heating Of Electrons In Vacuum Arc Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopyanov, A. V.; Golubev, S. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Razin, S. V.; Savkin, K. P.

    2005-03-01

    A joint research and development effort has been initiated, whose ultimate goal is the enhancement the mean ion charge states in vacuum arc metal plasmas by a combination of a vacuum arc discharge and an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating. Metal plasma was generated by a special vacuum arc mini-gun and injected into mirror magnetic trap. Plasma was pumped by high frequency gyrotron-generated microwave radiation (frequency 37.5 GHz, max power 100 kW, pulse duration 1.5 ms). Using of powerful microwaves makes it possible to sustain sufficient temperature of electrons needed for multiple ionizations at high plasma density (more then 1013 cm-3). Parameter of multiple ionization efficiency Neτi, where Ne is plasma density, τi, is ion lifetime, in such a case could reach rather high value ˜109 cm-3-s. In our situation τi = Ltrap/Vi, where Ltrap is trap length, Vi is plasma gun flow velocity. The results have demonstrated substantial multiple ionization of metal ions (including metals with high melting temperature). For a metal (lead, platinum) plasma, ECR heating shifted the average ion charge up to 5+. Further increase of the ion charge states will be attained by increasing the vacuum arc plasma density and optimizing the ECR heating conditions.

  14. Optimization of a DC Vacuum Arc to Obtain Anatase Phase TiO2 Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the characterization of TiO2 coatings obtained with a dc cathodic arc is presented. The arc was run with a current of 100 A. Glass samples placed in front of the cathode on the chamber axis were exposed to the discharge during 5 min. The samples were mounted on a heater that allows heating the sample up to 400 deg. C. The gas flow and the sample temperature were varied in order to find the optimum conditions for growing TiO2 in anatase phase. The coatings were analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results obtained by varying the gas flow in a range of 30-40 sccm and the sample temperature from 200 to 400 deg. C are presented

  15. Analysis of products of arc discharge plasma synthesis with a graphite cathode and a composite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgornyi, V. I.; Belashev, B. Z.; Kolodei, V. A.; Osaulenko, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    The composition, structure, and morphology of compounds formed in an argon arc discharge with a graphite cathode and a composite anode are studied by the methods of Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray microanalysis, and electron microscopy. Among the synthesis produces, graphite-like substances and metal carbides dominate; metal microcrystallites, fullerenes, and carbon nanotubes are present in some cases. It is found that carbides are not formed when anodes with a nickel admixture are used. The Raman spectra indicate the synthesis of single-wall carbon nanotubes in arcs with the C-Fe and C-Ni-V anodes. In the case of C-Ni and C-V anodes, electron microscopy data indicate the existence of micrometer-size carbon fiber structures in the synthesis products.

  16. Effect of metal vapor vacuum arc Cr-implanted interlayers on the microstructure of CrN film on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) Cr-implanted interlayers on the microstructure of CrN films on the silicon wafer was investigated. Two types of the CrN-coated specimens (CrN/Si and CrN/Cr/Si) by cathodic arc plasma deposition were prepared with and without a MEVVA Cr-implanted interlayer. The diffraction patterns of the coated specimens revealed the presence of CrN, and the (220) preferred orientation for both CrN/Si and CrN/CrN/Si. The CrN coating thicknesses for CrN/Si and for CrN/Cr/Si were 0.3 μm and 1.3 μm, respectively. Secondary ion mass spectrometry proved the high quality of the films on silicon substrates. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs and selective area diffractions revealed the presence of a large number of nano-scale Cr resulting from the interlayer of MEVVA Cr with a background of single crystal silicon spots. Furthermore, in situ stress measurement demonstrated that the presence of a Cr interlayer between CrN and Si could drastically reduce the residual stress in the CrN/Cr/Si assembly

  17. Plasma source ion implantation of metal ions: Synchronization of cathodic-arc plasma production and target bias pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An erbium cathodic-arc has been installed on a Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) experiment to allow the implantation of erbium metal and the growth of adherent erbia (erbium oxide) films on a variety of substrates. Operation of the PSII pulser and the cathodic-arc are synchronized to achieve pure implantation, rather than the hybrid implantation/deposition being investigated in other laboratories. The relative phase of the 20 μs PSII and cathodic-arc pulses can to adjusted to tailor the energy distribution of implanted ions and suppress the initial high-current drain on the pulse modulator. The authors present experimental data on this effect and make a comparison to results from particle-in-cell simulations

  18. Cross-sectional STEM study of cathodic arc deposited amorphous carbon and carbon-nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The VG601 high resolution dedicated Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) located at the University of Sydney has the capability of providing structural information with a spatial resolution of less than one nanometre. Compositional information can be obtained using either Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) or Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. Each characteristic absorption edge in EELS also exhibits structure which provides information on the atomic environment of the absorbing atom. The combination of EELS and STEM therefore provides a powerful tool for analysing structure at the nanometre scale. In this work we investigate the structure of cathodic arc deposited carbon and carbon-nitride films using this EELS/STEM combination. By preparing the films in cross-section and collecting a number of spectra in a line through the film thickness (line profile), it is possible to investigate the deposition process in great detail since variations in structure with depth in the film provide information on the 'history' of film growth. In the case of carbon based materials, this technique provides a direct measure of the variations in both density and proportion of diamond-like bonding. These measurements will be used to help understand the mechanisms of film growth by cathodic arc deposition

  19. Structure of MoCN films deposited by cathodic arc evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum carbonitride (MoCN) coatings were deposited onto HS6-5-2 steel substrate using pure Mo targets in mixed acetylene and nitrogen atmosphere by cathodic arc evaporation. The structural properties of MoCN coatings with different carbon contents (as an effect of the C2H2 flow rate) were investigated systematically. Phase and chemical composition evolution of the coatings were characterized both by the glancing angle of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, respectively. These analyses have been supplemented by estimates of grain sizes and stress in the coatings. The XRD results show that the increase in acetylene flow rate causes the formation of molybdenum carbide (MoC) hexagonal phase in the coatings, a reduction of grain size and an increase in internal stress. - Highlights: • MoN and MoCN coatings were deposited by cathodic arc evaporation in nitrogen atmosphere. • MoCN coatings were formed using different acetylene flow rates. • Phase composition evolution was observed. • Crystallite size and stress were calculated

  20. Structure of MoCN films deposited by cathodic arc evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilewicz, A., E-mail: adam.gilewicz@tu.koszalin.pl [Koszalin University of Technology, Faculty of Technology and Education, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland); Jedrzejewski, R.; Kochmanska, A.E. [West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics, 19 Piastów Ave., 70-313 Szczecin (Poland); Warcholinski, B. [Koszalin University of Technology, Faculty of Technology and Education, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland)

    2015-02-27

    Molybdenum carbonitride (MoCN) coatings were deposited onto HS6-5-2 steel substrate using pure Mo targets in mixed acetylene and nitrogen atmosphere by cathodic arc evaporation. The structural properties of MoCN coatings with different carbon contents (as an effect of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate) were investigated systematically. Phase and chemical composition evolution of the coatings were characterized both by the glancing angle of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and wavelength dispersive spectrometry, respectively. These analyses have been supplemented by estimates of grain sizes and stress in the coatings. The XRD results show that the increase in acetylene flow rate causes the formation of molybdenum carbide (MoC) hexagonal phase in the coatings, a reduction of grain size and an increase in internal stress. - Highlights: • MoN and MoCN coatings were deposited by cathodic arc evaporation in nitrogen atmosphere. • MoCN coatings were formed using different acetylene flow rates. • Phase composition evolution was observed. • Crystallite size and stress were calculated.

  1. Production of thin carbon stripper foils using heated-substrates in a cathodic arc deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime of carbon stripper foil can have a marked impact on the successful running of a beam line. Standard techniques for production of carbon stripper foils include evaporation of carbon (ec) and laser-pulsed ablation (Ipa). Recent work by a using Ipa has been successful in substantially increasing the lifetime of a very thin foil. The suspected mechanism for the increased lifetime of the foil is that the amorphous carbon foil is density-matched to that of graphite (around 2.26g/cc). In this work, we attempt to reproduce this result by producing carbon stripper foils with a mass-density similar to graphite using a cathodic arc deposition system. The cathodic arc is well known for the production of tetrahedral amorphous carbon: a high density, high stress form of carbon with over 90% sp3-like bonds; to reduce the density of the carbon and promote more graphitic structure, a high bias was initially attempted but this proved unsuccessful. Another method is to use a heated-substrate holder to reduce compressive stress within the deposited film. The performance of the density-matched carbon stripper foils and the implications for future production of high-quality carbon stripper foils in our laboratory will be discussed. (authors)

  2. Low pressure arc discharges with hollow cathodes and their using in plasma generators and charged particle sources

    CERN Document Server

    Vintizenko, L G; Koval, N N; Tolkachev, V S; Lopatin, I V; Shchanin, P M

    2001-01-01

    Paper presents the results of investigation into arc discharges with a hollow cathode generating 10 sup 1 sup 0 -10 sup 1 sup 2 concentration gas-discharge plasma in essential (approx 1 m sup 3) volumes at low (10 sup - sup 2 -1 Pa) pressures and up to 200 A discharge currents. One studied design of discharge systems with heated and cold cathodes their peculiar features, presented the parameters of plasma generators and of charged particle sources based on arc discharges and discussed, as well, the problems of more rational application of those systems in the processes for surface modification of solids

  3. Carbon Nanotube Bundle Array Cold Cathodes for THz Vacuum Tube Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish M.; Toda, Risaku; Lin, Robert H.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.; Siegel, Peter H.

    2009-12-01

    We present high performance cold cathodes composed of arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that routinely produce > 15 A/cm2 at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/µm without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10-6 to 10-4 Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. A new double-SOI process was developed to monolithically integrate a gate and additional beam tailoring electrodes. The ability to design the electrodes for specific requirements makes carbon nanotube field emission sources extremely flexible. The lifetime of these cathodes is found to be affected by two effects: a gradual decay of emission due to anode sputtering, and catastrophic failure because of dislodging of CNT bundles at high fields ( > 10 V/µm).

  4. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Yongpeng; Shi, Zongqian; Jia, Shenli; Wang, Lijun [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-02-15

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma.

  5. One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation on the influence of electron and ion temperature on the sheath expansion process in the post-arc stage of vacuum circuit breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inter-contact region of vacuum circuit breakers is filled with residual plasma at the moment when the current is zero after the burning of metal vapor arc. The residual plasma forms an ion sheath in front of the post-arc cathode. The sheath then expands towards the post-arc anode under the influence of a transient recovery voltage. In this study, a one-dimensional particle-in-cell model is developed to investigate the post-arc sheath expansion. The influence of ion and electron temperatures on the decrease in local plasma density at the post-arc cathode side and post-arc anode side is discussed. When the decay in the local plasma density develops from the cathode and anode sides into the high-density region and merges, the overall plasma density in the inter-contact region begins to decrease. Meanwhile, the ion sheath begins to expand faster. Furthermore, the theory of ion rarefaction wave only explains quantitatively the decrease in the overall plasma density at relatively low ion temperatures. With the increase of ion temperature to certain extent, another possible reason for the decrease in the overall plasma density is proposed and results from the more active thermal diffusion of plasma

  6. Investigation of Metal Puff Z pinch Based on Multichannel Vacuum Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Baksht, R. B.; Mitrofanov, K. N.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of a metal double puff Z-pinch system has been studied experimentally. In this type of system, the outer and inner cylindrical shells were produced by ten plasma guns. Each gun initiates a vacuum arc operating between aluminum electrodes. The net current of the guns was 80 kA. The arc-produced plasma shells were compressed by using a 450-kA, 450-ns driver, and as a result, a plasma column 0.2 cm in diameter was formed. The power of the Al K-line radiation emitted by the plasma for 7 ns was 800 MW/cm.

  7. Axial ion charge state distribution in the vacuum arc plasma jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on our experimental studies of the ion charge state distribution (CSD) of vacuum arc plasmas using a time-of-flight diagnostic method. The dependence of the CSD on the axial distance from the plasma source region was measured for a titanium vacuum arc. It was found that the axial CSD profile is nonuniform. Generally, the mean charge state increases approximately linearly with axial distance from about 1.7 at 12 cm up to 1.9 at 25 cm from the plasma source. A model for ion transport in the free boundary plasma jet is proposed which is based on the existence of an electric field in the quasineutral plasma. This model qualitatively explains the experimental results. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  8. Thin film synthesis using miniature pulsed metal vapor vacuum arc plasma guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic coatings can be fabricated using the intense plasma generated by the metal vapor vacuum arc. We have made and tested an embodiment of vacuum arc plasma source that operates in a pulsed mode, thereby acquiring precise control over the plasma flux and so also over the deposition rate, and that is in the form of a miniature plasma gun, thereby allowing deposition of metallic thin films to be carried out in confined spaces and also allowing a number of such guns to be clustered together. This paper describes the plasma guns and their operation in this application, and present examples of some of the thin film structures we have fabricated, including yttrium and platinum films of thicknesses from a few hundred Angstroms up to 1 micron and an yttrium-cobalt multilayer structure of layer thickness about 100 Angstroms

  9. Vacuum Arc Melting Processes for Biomedical Ni-Ti Shape Memory Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai De-Chang; Chiang Chen-Hsueh

    2015-01-01

    This study primarily involved using a vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process to prepare a nitinol shape-memory alloy with distinct ratios of alloy components (nitinol: 54.5 wt% to 57 wt%). An advantage of using the VAR process is the adoption of a water-cooled copper crucible, which effectively prevents crucible pollution and impurity infiltration. Optimising the melting production process enables control of the alloy component and facilitates a uniformly mixed compound during subsequent processi...

  10. Plasma arc cutting: Microstructural modifications of hafnium cathodes during first cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, the microstructural modifications of the Hf insert in plasma arc cutting (PAC) electrodes operating at 250 A were experimentally investigated during first cycles, in order to understand those phenomena occurring on and under the Hf emissive surface and involved in the electrode erosion process. Standard electrodes were subjected to an increasing number of cutting cycles (CCs) on mild steel plates in realistic operative conditions, with oxygen/air as plasma/shield gas. Microstructural analysis was performed for each electrode at different erosion stages by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and Raman spectroscopy. Electrodes cross sections were also observed by means of optical microscopy (both in bright field and in reflected polarised light) after chemical etching. In the insert, three typical zones were found after cutting: monoclinic HfO2 layer; thermally-modified transition zone with O2–Hf solid solution; unmodified Hf. The erosion cavity and the oxide layer thickness increase with the number of cutting cycles. Macrocracking was observed in the oxide layer, while microcracking and grain growth were detected in the remelted Hf. Moreover, detachment was found at the Hf/Cu interface. Based on thermodynamics and kinetics of the Hf high temperature oxidation, conclusions can be drawn on the erosion mechanism involved. - Highlights: ► Hf microstructural modifications in cathodes after plasma arc cutting cycles investigated. ► 3 zones identified after cutting: HfO2 layer; remelted zone with O2–Hf solid solution; unmodified Hf. ► Hf-based ejections both in arc-on and arc-off phases; erosion cavity deepens with cutting cycles. ► Detachment at the Hf/Cu interfaces, worsening heat dissipation and oxidation/erosion phenomena. ► The use of a different current ramp at subsequent erosion stages is suggested.

  11. Dynamics of vaporization and dissociation during transient surface heating, with application to vacuum arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a model of vaporization and dissociation occurring as a result of intense heating over a localized area of a material surface. The balance of heat between the input power and losses due to vaporization, as well as radiation and conduction in the material, are considered. The model includes the effect of binary mass diffusion and changes of surface stoichiometry for multiple component materials. Effects of vapor recondensation are included. The model is then applied to the description of spot heating on a vacuum arc anode through the use of a simple power feedback model. Comparison of surface temperature measurements to model predictions are used to parametrically describe the arc behavior. Finally, extensive parametric analyses showing the effect of material property variations on the arc behavior are described

  12. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A.G., E-mail: nik@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Yushkov, G.Yu.; Oks, E.M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oztarhan, A. [Izmir University, Izmir 35140 (Turkey); Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E.S. [Bioengineering Department, Ege University, Bornova 35100, Izmir (Turkey); Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94708 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  13. Recent advances in high current vacuum arc ion sources for heavy ion fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Qi Nian Sheng; Prasad, R R; Krishnan, M S; Anders, A; Kwan, J; Brown, I

    2001-01-01

    For a heavy ion fusion induction linac driver, a source of heavy ions with charge states 1+-3+, approx 0.5 A current beams, approx 20 mu s pulse widths and approx 10 Hz repetition rates is required. Thermionic sources have been the workhorse for the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) program to date, but suffer from heating problems for large areas and contamination. They are limited to low (contact) ionization potential elements and offer relatively low ion fluxes with a charge state limited to 1+. Gas injection sources suffer from partial ionization and deleterious neutral gas effects. The above shortcomings of the thermionic ion sources can be overcome by a vacuum arc ion source. The vacuum arc ion source is a good candidate for HIF applications. It is capable of providing ions of various elements and different charge states in short and long pulse bursts and high beam current density. Under a Phase-I STTR from DOE, the feasibility of the vacuum arc ion source for the HIF applications was investigated. We have modifie...

  14. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Ion implantation. • Anti-bacterial properties. • Textile polymer. • Vacuum arc ion source. - Abstract: Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal–gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the “inverse” concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material

  15. Influence of operating current on the stability of deuterium arcs and hydrogen hollow cathode lamps used as background correctors in atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The instability of deuterium arcs and hydrogen hollow cathode lamps influences significantly the reproducibility of atomic absorption measurements. The effect of current flowing through the lamp was studied as a factor influencing the stability of deuterium arcs and hydrogen lamps. Using longer integration times, it is possible to average the instability to some degree when working in the double beam mode. Considerable wavelength dependence of precision was found for both the deuterium arcs and the hydrogen hollow cathode lamps. (author)

  16. Fast ion generation in the cathode plasma jet of a multipicosecond laser-triggered vacuum discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion generation in the cathode plasma jet of a moderate-current (∼2.3 kA), low-energy (≤20 J) vacuum spark discharge triggered by ∼27 ps, 10 mJ laser pulses is studied using time of flight technique. Fastest ion velocity and velocity corresponding to the peak of the time of flight signals for Al cathode were measured to be ∼5.25x108 cm/s (energy of ∼143 keV/u) and ∼8.1x107 cm/s (energy of ∼3.4 keV/u), respectively. Corresponding velocities in the case of ions generated from laser-produced Al plasma (energy of ∼550 mJ, intensity of ∼1014 W/cm2) were found to be much smaller, viz., ∼1.05x108 cm/s (energy of ∼5.75 keV/u) and ∼2.63x107 cm/s (energy of ∼0.36 keV/u), respectively. Study shows efficient acceleration of ions in a current-carrying cathode plasma jet of a small-energy multipicosecond laser-triggered spark discharge as compared with that in a high-energy multipicosecond laser-produced plasma plume.

  17. CrAlN coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation at different substrate bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Gomez, M.A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Grupo de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Montala, F. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Carreras, L. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Grifol, M. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Lousa, A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)]. E-mail: alousa@ub.edu

    2006-09-25

    CrAlN is a good candidate as an alternative to conventional CrN coatings especially for high temperature oxidation-resistance applications. Different CrAlN coatings were deposited on hardened steel substrates by cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) from chromium-aluminum targets in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere at negative substrate bias between - 50 and - 400 V. The negative substrate bias has important effects on the deposition growth rate and crystalline structure. All our coatings presented hardness higher than conventional CrN coatings. The friction coefficient against alumina and tungsten carbide balls was around 0.6. The sliding wear coefficient of the CrAlN coatings was very low while an important wear was observed in the balls before a measurable wear were produced in the coatings. This effect was more pronounced as the negative substrate bias was increased.

  18. Improved control of TiN coating properties using cathodic arc evaporation with a pulsed bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined d.c. - pulse bias voltage was used in combination with a cathodic arc evaporation process for the deposition of TiN on planar plates and drilling tools at substrate temperatures T between 330 and 500degC. This new pulse technique appeared to be a powerful tool to achieve independent control of the substrate temperature, coating adhesion and uniformity of deposition. As a result, high coating adhesion can be obtained at low substrate temperatures. The adhesion uniformity across large-area samples is considerably improved. Unpolished rough substrate parts can be coated without cauliflower-like growth defects. Because of intensive ion bombardment in the pulse period, smoother TiN coatings with a reduced droplet size were obtained. (orig.)

  19. Cathodic arc deposition of nitrogen doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon for computer memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Much interest has been shown in the use of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) deposited by filtered cathodic arc as an inexpensive, easily produced, wide band-gap semiconductor in the fabrication of electronic devices. Around the world much of this interest has been in its potential use as a low electron-affinity field emitter for flat-screen displays. Recent observations of a nonvolatile memory effect in nitrogen doped ta-C at the University of Sydney suggest that new possibilities may exist for its use as a means of non-volatile digital information storage. Devices with switching times of 100 μs, read times of 100 ns, and effective memory retention times of the order of months have been fabricated. Nonvolatile memory phenomena observed in the electrical characteristics of nitrogen doped ta-C thin films suggests such traps may be useful as a means of digital information storage

  20. Modeling and experimental investigation of spot dynamics on graphite cathodes in dc plasma arcs at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a model recently developed for refractory cathodes [Munoz-Serrano et al., J. Appl. Phys.98, 093303 (2005)], the behavior of a graphite cathode spot in a dc plasma torch at atmospheric pressure was investigated. Furthermore, an experimental study of these cathodes was made guided by the results obtained from the model. The model includes the modeling of the cathode region, the solution of the heat conduction problem in the cathode, and the simulation of the cathode ablation process. As a result of the model, the values of the parameters which characterize the cathode region were obtained, and the evolution of the spot under different working conditions determined by the value of the initial voltage drop in the cathode region, U0, was investigated. The results obtained show that the maximum spot radius diminishes when U0 increases. Furthermore, two qualitatively different conditions for the spot dynamics were found. For U0≥31 V, the spot radius continually grows over time until reaching a maximum value rm, and the spot remains fixed on a point of the cathode surface. For values of U0 less than 31 V the spot radius continues growing over time until reaching a maximum value with which it is not possible to satisfy the energy balance equation. This leads to spot extinction and to its appearance at another point of the cathode surface. Several graphite cathodes were experimentally studied, each one using different interelectrode voltage drop values Ua-c. Before and after arcing, the cathode surface was explored by an electron microscope, and the roughness profile of that surface was determined by a perthometer. This allowed measuring the average size of the craters produced on the cathode surface by the arc. The movement of the spot attachment for different values of interelectrode voltage was observed by a digital video camera. It was experimentally found that the average crater radius diminished when the Ua-c potential increased. Furthermore, it was seen that

  1. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolong; Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2016-02-01

    A high-current vacuum arc subjected to an axial magnetic field is maintained in a diffuse status. With an increase in arc current, the energy carried by the arc column to the anode becomes larger and finally leads to the anode temperature exceeding the melting point of the anode material. When the anode melting pool is formed, and the rotational plasma of the arc column delivers its momentum to the melting pool, the anode melting pool starts to rotate and also flow outwards along the radial direction, which has been photographed by some researchers using high-speed cameras. In this paper, the anode temperature and melting status is calculated using the melting and solidification model. The swirl flow of the anode melting pool and deformation of the anode is calculated using the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model with the volume of fraction (VOF) method. All the models are transient 2D axial-rotational symmetric models. The influence of the impaction force of the arc plasma, electromagnetic force, viscosity force, and surface tension of the liquid metal are all considered in the model. The heat flux density injected into the anode and the arc pressure are obtained from the 3D numerical simulation of the high-current vacuum arc using the MHD model, which gives more realistic parameters for the anode simulation. Simulation results show that the depth of the anode melting pool increases with an increase in the arc current. Some droplets sputter out from the anode surface, which is caused by the inertial centrifugal force of the rotational melting pool and strong plasma pressure. Compared with the previous anode melting model without consideration of anode deformation, when the deformation and swirl flow of the anode melting pool are considered, the anode temperature is relatively lower, and just a little more than the melting point of Cu. This is because of liquid droplets sputtering out of the anode surface taking much of the energy away from the anode surface. The

  2. Modeling of the anode surface deformation in high-current vacuum arcs with AMF contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-current vacuum arc subjected to an axial magnetic field is maintained in a diffuse status. With an increase in arc current, the energy carried by the arc column to the anode becomes larger and finally leads to the anode temperature exceeding the melting point of the anode material. When the anode melting pool is formed, and the rotational plasma of the arc column delivers its momentum to the melting pool, the anode melting pool starts to rotate and also flow outwards along the radial direction, which has been photographed by some researchers using high-speed cameras. In this paper, the anode temperature and melting status is calculated using the melting and solidification model. The swirl flow of the anode melting pool and deformation of the anode is calculated using the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model with the volume of fraction (VOF) method. All the models are transient 2D axial-rotational symmetric models. The influence of the impaction force of the arc plasma, electromagnetic force, viscosity force, and surface tension of the liquid metal are all considered in the model. The heat flux density injected into the anode and the arc pressure are obtained from the 3D numerical simulation of the high-current vacuum arc using the MHD model, which gives more realistic parameters for the anode simulation. Simulation results show that the depth of the anode melting pool increases with an increase in the arc current. Some droplets sputter out from the anode surface, which is caused by the inertial centrifugal force of the rotational melting pool and strong plasma pressure. Compared with the previous anode melting model without consideration of anode deformation, when the deformation and swirl flow of the anode melting pool are considered, the anode temperature is relatively lower, and just a little more than the melting point of Cu. This is because of liquid droplets sputtering out of the anode surface taking much of the energy away from the anode surface. The

  3. Deposition of Functional Coatings Based on Intermetallic Systems TiAl on the Steel Surface by Vacuum Arc Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budilov, V.; Vardanyan, E.; Ramazanov, K.

    2015-11-01

    Laws governing the formation of intermetallic phase by sequential deposition of nano-sized layers coatings from vacuum arc plasma were studied. Mathematical modeling process of deposition by vacuum arc plasma was performed. In order to identify the structural and phase composition of coatings and to explain their physical and chemical behaviour XRD studies were carried out. Production tests of the hardened punching tools were performed.

  4. Carbon Nanotube-based Cold Cathode for High Power MicrowaveVacuum Electronic Devices: A Potential Field Emitter

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, P.; S Gautam; Pal, S.; Kumar, P.; Chaturvedi, P; J.S.B.S. Rawat; P. K. Chaudhary; Dr. Harsh; Basu, P K; P. K. Bhatanagar

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be grown in the form of small, sharp spikes capable of carrying very highcurrent densities which suggest great potential application of CNTs as cold cathode in high power microwavevacuum device applications. These cold cathode vacuum microwave devices are expected to be ideally suitedfor air-borne and space applications. This paper  reports the initial efforts made in the development of coldcathode using PECVD grown vertically-aligned matrix of CNTs with uniform he...

  5. Optimization of a PIII&D System Using a Cathodic Arc with Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, M.; Kleiman, A.; Lamas, D. G.; Grondona, D.; Marquez, A.

    2014-05-01

    A plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIII&D) system was recently built at INFIP. A dc cathodic arc with a Ti cathode of 5 cm in diameter and an annular anode of 8cm in diameter was employed as the plasma source. The substrate chamber was electrically insulated and connected with the main discharge chamber through a straight magnetic duct. The discharge current was run at 100 A. The substrate was biased with a pulsed generator (30 kV, 30 A, 0.05 - 3 kHz) based on a pulse transformer controlled by IGBT switches. In this work the optimization of the process as function of the pulse parameters is presented. The characteristics of Ti coatings on steel substrates obtained varying the pulse amplitude from 2 to 12 kV and the pulse frequency from 200 Hz to 400 Hz were analyzed and compared with films grown without biasing the substrate. The thickness was determined weighting the samples before and after the treatment. The morphology was observed with an atomic force microscope. The film structure was studied by x-ray diffraction.

  6. Multiple solutions in the theory of dc glow discharges and cathodic part of arc discharges. Application of these solutions to the modeling of cathode spots and patterns: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilov, M. S.

    2014-10-01

    A new class of stationary solutions in the theory of glow discharges and plasma-cathode interaction in ambient-gas arc discharges has been found over the past 15 years. These solutions exist simultaneously with the solution given in textbooks, which describes a discharge mode with a uniform or smooth distribution of current over the cathode surface, and describes modes with various configurations of cathode spots: normal spots on glow cathodes, patterns of multiple spots recently observed on cathodes of glow microdischarges and spots on arc cathodes. In particular, these solutions show that cathode spots represent a manifestation of self-organization caused by basic mechanisms of the near-cathode space-charge sheath; another illustration of the richness of the gas discharge science. As far as arc cathodes are concerned, the new solutions have proved relevant for industrial applications. This work is dedicated to reviewing the multiple solutions obtained to date, their systematization, and analysis of their properties and physical meaning. The treatment is performed in the context of general trends of self-organization in bistable nonlinear dissipative systems, which allows one to consider glow discharges or arc-cathode interaction within a single physically transparent framework without going into mathematical details and offers a possibility of systematic computation of the multiple solutions. Relevant computational aspects and experimental data are discussed.

  7. Vacuum induction melting and vacuum arc remelting of Co-Al-W-X gamma-prime superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McDevitt Erin T.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-Al-W alloys strengthened with the L12 gamma-prime phase have promise as next generation high temperature materials due to the ability to engineer a high gamma-prime content alloy with a higher gamma-prime solvus and higher melting point than many Ni-base gamma-prime strengthened alloys. Furthermore, these Co-Al-W gamma-prime alloys are interesting as potential cast-and-wrought alloys because they have a relatively narrow range of solidification temperature and large range of temperature between the gamma-prime solvus and the solidus, suggesting than manufacturing via an ingot metallurgy route would be feasible. However, since J. Sato et al discovered gamma-prime in the Co-Al-W alloy system in 2006, the focus in the literature has been on characterizing the structure and properties of these alloys and measuring and assessing the thermodynamics of the alloy system primarily for application as castings for turbine blade applications. To date the author is not aware of any publications describing the microstructure of vacuum induction melted, vacuum arc remelted ingots of a size more than about 2kg. Most work has been performed using small, laboratory-scale, cast-and-hot-rolled samples or samples cast as single crystals. This paper presents ATI's experience in assessing the feasibility of manufacturing a cast-and-wrought billet product in the Co-Al-W-X alloy system. Three 22 kg heats were produced to examine a small range of alloy compositions of potential commercial interest: Co-9Al-9W, Co-9Al-10W-2Ti, and Co-9Al-10W-2Ti-0.02B, respectively. Each heat was vacuum-induction-melted and vacuum-arc-remelted then open-die forged. The ingot microstructure has been characterized. Hot workability during billetizing will be described and microstructure and hardness of hot worked and heat treated product will be presented.

  8. High-RRR thin-films of NB produced using energetic condensation from a coaxial, rotating vacuum ARC plasma (CEDTM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have recently demonstrated unprecedentedly high values of RRR (up to 542) in thin-films of pure Nb deposited on a-plane sapphire and MgO crystal substrates. The Nb films were grown using a vacuum arc discharge struck between a reactor grade Nb cathode rod (RRR ∼ 30) and a coaxial, semi-transparent Mo mesh anode, with a heated substrate placed just outside it. The substrates were pre-heated for several hours prior to deposition at different temperatures. Low pre-heat temperatures (600 C) is correlated with better epitaxial crystal structure in both a-sapphire and MgO substrate grown films. However, the SIMS data reveal that the most important requirement for high-RRR Nb films on either substrate is the reduction of impurities in the film, especially hydrogen. The hydrogen content in the MgO grown films is 1000 times lower than in bulk Nb tested as a reference from SRF cavity grade Nb. This result has potential implications for SRF accelerators. Coating bulk Nb cavities with an MgO layer followed by our CEDTM deposited Nb films, might create superior SRF cavities that would avoid Q-slope and operate at higher peak fields.

  9. Current density at the refractory cathode of a high-current high-pressure arc (two modes of cathode spot attachment)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian [ESAB Welding and Cutting Products and Francis Marion University, Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2003-12-07

    The attachment of a high-pressure arc at a refractory cathode was investigated theoretically and experimentally. Simple model considerations showed that an isolated cathode spot (CS) could function in two different modes. At relatively low currents and pressures, the CS mode (first mode) corresponds to the existing model (Bade W L and Yos Y M 1963 Technical Documentary Report No ASD-TDR-62-729 vol 1 (part II); Neumann W 1969 Beitr Plasmaphysik 9 499-526; Benilov M S 1993 Phys. Rev. 48 506-15, 1994 IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 22 73-7, 1999 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32 257-62; Benilov M S and Marotta A 1995 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 28 1869-82; Benilov M S and Cunha M D 2002 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 35 1736-50, 2003 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 36 603-14). In this mode current density does not depend on the arc current and is directly proportional to the gas pressure. At higher currents and/or higher pressures the CS exists in a different mode (second mode). In this mode current density does not depend on pressure and decreases as the current increases. If the product of the arc current, I, and the gas pressure, p, is lower than some critical value, then the first mode is realized; at a higher Ip product, the second one is realized. For discharges in nitrogen, the critical value was estimated as {approx}7 x 10{sup 7} A Pa. In the experimental part of this work, we investigated the footprints that the arc left at the cathode after it was terminated. Cathodes were made of pure and thoriated tungsten and the gases were nitrogen and argon. We have observed both modes. At 3 x 10{sup 5} Pa, the second mode was observed at currents higher than {approx}300 A; at 200 A, it was observed at pressures higher than {approx}3 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The CS footprint appearances are quite different. In the first mode the footprint has a smooth central part and a heavily eroded periphery. We believe that the cathode temperature is maximal not at the CS centre but at its periphery in this mode. With a

  10. Influence of the cold cathode material on the operating mode of the pulse high-current vacuum diode in a microsecond range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is aimed at the description of experimental results on the drop fraction of high-power electrical vacuum discharge and analysis of processes,which take place in cold cathodes working in microsecond range of pulses,and also on the influence of the material of a cold cathode on the operating mode of the pulse high-current vacuum diode

  11. Analysing bifurcations encountered in numerical modelling of current transfer to cathodes of dc glow and arc discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, P G C; Benilov, M S; Cunha, M D; Faria, M J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2009-10-07

    Bifurcations and/or their consequences are frequently encountered in numerical modelling of current transfer to cathodes of gas discharges, also in apparently simple situations, and a failure to recognize and properly analyse a bifurcation may create difficulties in the modelling and hinder the understanding of numerical results and the underlying physics. This work is concerned with analysis of bifurcations that have been encountered in the modelling of steady-state current transfer to cathodes of glow and arc discharges. All basic types of steady-state bifurcations (fold, transcritical, pitchfork) have been identified and analysed. The analysis provides explanations to many results obtained in numerical modelling. In particular, it is shown that dramatic changes in patterns of current transfer to cathodes of both glow and arc discharges, described by numerical modelling, occur through perturbed transcritical bifurcations of first- and second-order contact. The analysis elucidates the reason why the mode of glow discharge associated with the falling section of the current-voltage characteristic in the solution of von Engel and Steenbeck seems not to appear in 2D numerical modelling and the subnormal and normal modes appear instead. A similar effect has been identified in numerical modelling of arc cathodes and explained.

  12. Cathodic micro-arc electrodeposition of yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings on FeCrAl alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The formation of ceramic coatings on metal substrate by cathodic electrolytic deposition (CELD) has received more attention in recent years. But only thin films can be prepared via CELD. Yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ) ceramic coatings were deposited on FeCrAl alloy by a novel technique--cathodic micro-arc electrodeposition (CMED). The result shows that, when a high pulse electric field is applied to the cathode which was pre-deposited with a thin YSZ film, dielectric breakdown occurs and micro-arc discharges appear. Coatings with reasonably thickness of ~300μm and crystalline structure can be deposited on the cathode by utilizing the energy of the micro-arc. The thickness of the as-deposited coating is dominated by the voltage and the frequency. Y2O3 is co-deposited with ZrO2 when Y(NO3)3 was added to the electrolyte, which stabilize t-phase, t′- phase and c-phase of ZrO2 at room temperature. The amount of the m-ZrO2 in the coating is diminished by increasing the concentration of Y(NO3)3 in the electrolyte. This report describes the processing of CMED and studies the microstructure of the deposited YSZ coatings.

  13. The vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of the vacuum-arc plasma from macro-particles in the curvilinear plasma filters allows obtaining coatings with especially high characteristics. However, inside such filters the significant plasma losses also have been occurred. At the same time, increasing in the filter's efficiency is a difficult task without an effective mathematical model that really would describe the vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field. The description based on the flax-tube model was in fact only the first approximation in the decision of this problem. According to detailed flax-tube analysis of ions passage through the quarter torus plasma guide, the efficiency of the filter should grow up to 85% as the positive potential U, applied to the body of the plasma guide, is on the increase. However, the experiment showed that maximum of transparency reach up to ∼ 12%, at potential about of +18 Volts, and comes down under the further increase in potential. Such big digression from experiment does not justify the use of flux-tube model for designing of curvilinear plasma filters. We offer the new approach to the description of the vacuum-arc plasma motion in a toroidal magnetic field based on the solutions of steady-state (∂/∂t=0) Vlasov-Maxwell equations for the long plasma column aligned parallel to a constant axial magnetic field. The relations for the self-consistent electric polarization fields, which appear due to displacement of the electron component from ionic one on the curvilinear part of motion, were derived within a framework of the drift approximation. The dynamics of the central part of the plasma flow in the electric polarization fields was considered in detail. The displacement of the plasma flow at the output of the plasma guide was calculated for the carbon and titanium plasmas. The good agreement with the experimental data was obtained. (author)

  14. Method of forming ultra thin film devices by vacuum arc vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for providing an ultra thin electrical circuit integral with a portion of a surface of an object, including using a focal Vacuum Arc Vapor Deposition device having a chamber, a nozzle and a nozzle seal, depressing the nozzle seal against the portion of the object surface to create an airtight compartment in the chamber and depositing one or more ultra thin film layer(s) only on the portion of the surface of the object, the layers being of distinct patterns such that they form the circuit.

  15. Development of a cascade arc discharge source for an atmosphere-vacuum interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, S.; Endo, T.; Fujino, S.; Suzuki, C.; Tamura, N.

    2016-08-01

    To realize a novel vacuum-atmosphere interface that does not require a large differential pumping system, a robust cascade arc discharge source called a plasma window is constructed and tested for long-term operation. By modifying a test plasma with a direct current discharge, a vacuum interface with a high gas pressure ratio of 1/407 between the discharge and expansion sections is demonstrated for currents as high as 20 A. No significant damage to the electrodes is observed during the operation. Analysis of the visible emission spectra reveals that a stationary, stable argon plasma having a temperature of 1 eV and a density of 1.5 × 1016 cm-3 is generated in the plasma channel.

  16. Development of a cascade arc discharge source for an atmosphere-vacuum interface device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, S; Endo, T; Fujino, S; Suzuki, C; Tamura, N

    2016-08-01

    To realize a novel vacuum-atmosphere interface that does not require a large differential pumping system, a robust cascade arc discharge source called a plasma window is constructed and tested for long-term operation. By modifying a test plasma with a direct current discharge, a vacuum interface with a high gas pressure ratio of 1/407 between the discharge and expansion sections is demonstrated for currents as high as 20 A. No significant damage to the electrodes is observed during the operation. Analysis of the visible emission spectra reveals that a stationary, stable argon plasma having a temperature of 1 eV and a density of 1.5 × 10(16) cm(-3) is generated in the plasma channel. PMID:27587119

  17. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lijun, E-mail: lijunwang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Deng, Jie; Wang, Haijing; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-10-15

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region.

  18. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Deng, Jie; Wang, Haijing; Jia, Shenli; Qin, Kang; Shi, Zongqian

    2015-10-01

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region.

  19. Vacuum arc behavior and its voltage characteristics in drawing process controlled by composite magnetic fields along axial and transverse directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, drawing vacuum arc (VA) experiments were conducted using composite contacts under currents ranging from 5 kA to 20 kA root mean square (rms). The new type of contact comprised an axial magnetic field (AMF) configuration and a transverse magnetic field (TMF) configuration. The TMF plate was in the center, surrounded by the AMF plate. The contact generated both AMFs and TMFs simultaneously. VA appearances and arc voltages were recorded, and the VA was modeled as a conductor for electromagnetic force analysis in ANSYS software. The results showed that the coaxiality of operating mechanisms significantly influenced arc behavior just as the arc was ignited. When arc brightness did not increase after ignition, there was a voltage drop accompanied with diffusion of the VA. As to VA development, when an arc was ignited on an AMF plate, it spread on the plate and rotated. Over time the arc current increased, the constricting arc forms, and the arc column rotated on the TMF plate under the action of Ampere's force. With regard to the influence of a magnetic field on a VA at different stages, in the initial drawing arc stage the TMF was dominant, and the arc started to rotate under the action of Ampere's force. Afterwards, the AMF was dominant, with a steadily burning arc. As for contact melting, in the initial arcing period, a contracted short arc caused severe melting and erosion of the contact plate. When the ignition spot or root was close to the slot of plate, the electromagnetic force pushed the arc toward slot and contact edge, resulting in local erosion of the slot region

  20. Charge-state and element-resolved ion energies in the cathodic arc plasma from composite AlCr cathodes in argon, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-01-01

    The energy distribution functions of ions in the cathodic arc plasma using composite AlCr cathodes were measured as a function of the background gas pressure in the range 0.5 to 3.5 Pa for different cathode compositions and gas atmospheres. The most abundant aluminium ions were Al$^{+}$ regardless of the background gas species, whereas Cr$^{2+}$ ions were dominating in Ar and N$_2$ and Cr$^{+}$ in O$_2$ atmospheres. The energy distributions of the aluminium and chromium ions typically consisted of a high energy fraction due to acceleration in the expanding plasma plume from the cathode spot and thermalised ions that were subjected to collisions in the plasma cloud. The fraction of the latter increased with increasing background gas pressure. Atomic nitrogen and oxygen ions showed similar energy distributions as the aluminium and chromium ions, whereas the argon and molecular nitrogen and oxygen ions were mainly thermalised. In addition to the positively charged metal and gas ions, negatively charged oxygen an...

  1. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Teel, George; O'Brien, Christopher M; Zhuang, Taisen; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium's osseointegration involves inducing bio-mimetic nanotopography to enhance cell-implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications. PMID:26677327

  2. Synthesis and characterization of CrCN-DLC composite coatings by cathodic arc ion-plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R. Y.; Wang, L. L.; Liu, H. D.; Yan, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Fu, D. J.; Yang, B.

    2013-07-01

    CrCN-DLC composite coatings were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and cemented carbides substrates using pure Cr targets under C2H2 ambient by cathodic arc ion plating system. The influence of C2H2 flow rate on the structure and mechanical properties of the coatings was investigated systemically. The coatings structure and bonding state were characterized by XRD, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical composition was measured by EDS. The mechanical performance and tribological behaviour of the coatings were studied by a hardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results showed that with increasing C2H2 flow rate from 50 to 100 sccm, the corresponding hardness of coatings increased firstly and then decreased with further addition of C2H2 flow rate. The coatings deposited at lower C2H2 flow rate (less than 200 sccm) exhibited a relatively higher hardness value (more than HV0.0252000) and then the hardness decrease with increasing C2H2 flow rate. The friction coefficient also exhibited similar variation trend, when the C2H2 flow rate was higher than 100 sccm, the friction coefficient decreased and then maintained in a relatively lower value from 0.18 to 0.24, which may be attribute to the increasing carbon content and the coating exhibited more diamond-like structure.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of CrCN–DLC composite coatings by cathodic arc ion-plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrCN–DLC composite coatings were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and cemented carbides substrates using pure Cr targets under C2H2 ambient by cathodic arc ion plating system. The influence of C2H2 flow rate on the structure and mechanical properties of the coatings was investigated systemically. The coatings structure and bonding state were characterized by XRD, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical composition was measured by EDS. The mechanical performance and tribological behaviour of the coatings were studied by a hardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results showed that with increasing C2H2 flow rate from 50 to 100 sccm, the corresponding hardness of coatings increased firstly and then decreased with further addition of C2H2 flow rate. The coatings deposited at lower C2H2 flow rate (less than 200 sccm) exhibited a relatively higher hardness value (more than HV0.0252000) and then the hardness decrease with increasing C2H2 flow rate. The friction coefficient also exhibited similar variation trend, when the C2H2 flow rate was higher than 100 sccm, the friction coefficient decreased and then maintained in a relatively lower value from 0.18 to 0.24, which may be attribute to the increasing carbon content and the coating exhibited more diamond-like structure

  4. Modification of a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    A new process for modifying a metallic surface in a vacuum arc discharge plasma using thermally stimulated ion diffusion is considered. The effect of the bias voltage (negative substrate potential) on the processes that occur on the surface of a treated part is studied when the substrate material interacts with an accelerated metallic-ion flow. The phase and elemental compositions of the modified layer are studied for substrates made of nickel-based superalloys, austenitic and martensitic steels, and titanium-based alloys. The heat resistance, the salt corrosion resistance, and the corrosion cracking resistance of steels and titanium-based alloys are investigated after their modification in vacuum arc plasmas of pure metals (Ti, Zr, Al, Cr, Y) and related alloys. The surface modification caused by the thermally stimulated ion saturation of the surfaces of parts made from structural materials is shown to change the structural-phase states of their surfaces and, correspondingly, the properties of these materials in relation to the state of the surface.

  5. XPS and RBS investigation of TiNxOy films prepared by vacuum arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We prepare three TiNxOy films by vacuum arc discharge technique with different temperatures. ► Increasing the temperature will improve titanium nitride components. ► Temperature plays a major role in the thickness of films. ► Crystalline and texture developments of the films depend on the temperature. - Abstract: Three titanium oxynitride films have been prepared by vacuum arc discharge technique at different chamber temperatures (50 °C, 150 °C and 300 °C). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to reveal the elemental and chemical compositions by analyzing high resolution spectra of Ti 2p3/2, N 1s and O 1s. Higher temperatures were found to promote the nitride components and to produce nitrogen-rich films. Homogeneity and thickness of the films have been estimated by means of Rutherford Back Scattering technique, which showed that the film thickness increased with the increasing of temperature. A significant improvement in the crystalline quality and texture when increasing the temperature was found by X-ray diffraction technique. Electrical resistivity of the films was measured at room temperature and was found to decrease from 46.6 μΩ cm down to 26.3 μΩ cm for the samples prepared at 50 °C and 300 °C, respectively.

  6. Argon-dominated plasma beam generated by filtered vacuum arc and its substrate etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique to etch a substrate as a pre-treatment prior to functional film deposition was developed using a filtered vacuum arc plasma. An Ar-dominated plasma beam was generated from filtered carbon arc plasma by introducing appropriate flow rate of Ar gas in a T-shape filtered arc deposition (T-FAD) system. The radiation spectra emitted from the filtered plasma beam in front of a substrate table were measured. The substrate was etched by the Ar-dominated plasma beam. The principal results are summarized as follows. At a high flow rate of Ar gas (50 ml/min), when the bias was applied to the substrate, the plasma was attracted toward the substrate table and the substrate was well etched without film formation on the substrate. Super hard alloy (WC), bearing steel (SUJ2), and Si wafer were etched by the Ar-dominated plasma beam. The etching rate was dependent on the kind of substrate. The roughness of the substrate increased, when the etching rate was high. A pulse bias etched the substrate without roughening the substrate surface excessively.

  7. High-RRR thin-films of NB produced using energetic condensation from a coaxial, rotating vacuum ARC plasma (CEDTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Enrique Francisco; James, Colt; Krishnan, Mahadevan; Zhao, Xin; Phillips, Larry; Reece, Charles; Seo, Kang

    2012-06-01

    We have recently demonstrated unprecedentedly high values of RRR (up to 542) in thin-films of pure Nb deposited on a-plane sapphire and MgO crystal substrates. The Nb films were grown using a vacuum arc discharge struck between a reactor grade Nb cathode rod (RRR 30) and a coaxial, semi-transparent Mo mesh anode, with a heated substrate placed just outside it. The substrates were pre-heated for several hours prior to deposition at different temperatures. Low pre-heat temperatures (RRR (RRR=214 on a-sapphire and RRR=542 on MgO. XRD (Bragg-Brentano scans and Pole Figures), EBSD and SIMS data reveal several features: (1) on asapphire, higher temperatures show better 3D registry for epitaxial growth of Nb; the crystal structure evolves from textured, polycrystalline (with twins) to single-crystal; (2) on MgO, there is a transition from {110} planes to {100} as the temperature is increased beyond 500°C. The dramatic increase in RRR (from 10 at 600°C) is correlated with better epitaxial crystal structure in both a-sapphire and MgO substrate grown films. However, the SIMS data reveal that the most important requirement for high-RRR Nb films on either substrate is the reduction of impurities in the film, especially hydrogen. The hydrogen content in the MgO grown films is 1000 times lower than in bulk Nb tested as a reference from SRF cavity grade Nb. This result has potential implications for SRF accelerators. Coating bulk Nb cavities with an MgO layer followed by our CEDTM deposited Nb films, might create superior SRF cavities that would avoid Q-slope and operate at higher peak fields. This research was supported by Department of Energy grants DE-SC0004994 and DE-FG02-08ER85162.

  8. Enhanced human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell functions on cathodic arc plasma-treated titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu W

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wei Zhu,1 George Teel,1 Christopher M O’Brien,1 Taisen Zhuang,1 Michael Keidar,1 Lijie Grace Zhang1–3 1Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, 3Department of Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Surface modification of titanium for use in orthopedics has been explored for years; however, an ideal method of integrating titanium with native bone is still required to this day. Since human bone cells directly interact with nanostructured extracellular matrices, one of the most promising methods of improving titanium’s osseointegration involves inducing biomimetic nanotopography to enhance cell–implant interaction. In this regard, we explored an approach to functionalize the surface of titanium by depositing a thin film of textured titanium nanoparticles via a cathodic arc discharge plasma. The aim is to improve human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC attachment and differentiation and to reduce deleterious effects of more complex surface modification methods. Surface functionalization was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, contact angle testing, and specific protein adsorption. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy examination demonstrate the deposition of titanium nanoparticles and the surface roughness change after coating. The specific fibronectin adsorption was enhanced on the modified titanium surface that associates with the improved hydrophilicity. MSC adhesion and proliferation were significantly promoted on the nanocoated surface. More importantly, compared to bare titanium, greater production of total protein, deposition of calcium mineral, and synthesis of alkaline phosphatase were observed from MSCs on nanocoated titanium after 21 days. The method described herein presents a promising alternative method for inducing more cell favorable nanosurface for improved orthopedic applications

  9. Synthesis and characterization of CrCN–DLC composite coatings by cathodic arc ion-plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, R.Y. [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang, L.L. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Nanomaterials and Nanostructure of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, H.D. [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yan, S.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Nanomaterials and Nanostructure of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Y.M. [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Fu, D.J. [Key Laboratory of Artificial Nanomaterials and Nanostructure of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yang, B., E-mail: toyangbing@163.com [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2013-07-15

    CrCN–DLC composite coatings were deposited onto silicon (1 0 0) and cemented carbides substrates using pure Cr targets under C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ambient by cathodic arc ion plating system. The influence of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate on the structure and mechanical properties of the coatings was investigated systemically. The coatings structure and bonding state were characterized by XRD, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The chemical composition was measured by EDS. The mechanical performance and tribological behaviour of the coatings were studied by a hardness tester and ball-on-disc wear tester. The results showed that with increasing C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate from 50 to 100 sccm, the corresponding hardness of coatings increased firstly and then decreased with further addition of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate. The coatings deposited at lower C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate (less than 200 sccm) exhibited a relatively higher hardness value (more than HV{sub 0.025}2000) and then the hardness decrease with increasing C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate. The friction coefficient also exhibited similar variation trend, when the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} flow rate was higher than 100 sccm, the friction coefficient decreased and then maintained in a relatively lower value from 0.18 to 0.24, which may be attribute to the increasing carbon content and the coating exhibited more diamond-like structure.

  10. Thermal conductivity of titanium aluminum silicon nitride coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of physical vapour deposition titanium aluminum silicon nitride nanocomposite coating with a different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, with a thickness of around 2.5 μm were deposited on stainless steel substrate by a lateral rotating cathode arc process in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy observation. The titanium nitride (TiN) coating shows a clear columnar structure with a predominant (111) preferential orientation. With the incorporation of Al and Si, the crystallite size in the coatings decreased gradually, and the columnar structure and (111) preferred orientation disappeared. Thermal conductivity of the as-deposited coating samples at room temperature was measured by using pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. Thermal conductivity of the pure TiN coating is about 11.9 W/mK. With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, the coatings' thermal conductivity decreased monotonously. This reduction of thermal conductivity could be ascribed to the variation of coatings' microstructure, including the decrease of grain size and the resultant increase of grain boundaries, the disruption of columnar structure, and the reduced preferential orientation. - Highlights: • A series of titanium aluminum silicon nitride with different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio were deposited on Fe304. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the samples was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, thermal conductivity decreased. • Reduction of thermal conductivity is ascribed to the variation of its microstructure

  11. Magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite formation on (Ti,Mg)N coatings produced by cathodic arc PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, formation of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca10−xMgx(PO4)6(OH)2) on (Ti,Mg)N and TiN coating surfaces were investigated. The (Ti1−x,Mgx)N (x = 0.064) coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. TiN coated grade 2 titanium substrates were used as reference to understand the role of magnesium on hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The HA formation experiments was carried out in simulated body fluids (SBF) with three different concentrations (1X SBF, 5X SBF and 5X SBF without magnesium ions) at 37 °C. The coatings and hydroxyapatite films formed were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR Spectroscopy techniques. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses and XRD investigations of the coatings indicated that magnesium was incorporated in the TiN structure rather than forming a separate phase. The comparison between the TiN and (Ti, Mg)N coatings showed that the presence of magnesium in TiN structure facilitated magnesium substituted HA formation on the surface. The (Ti,Mg)N coatings can potentially be used to accelerate the HA formation in vivo conditions without any prior hydroxyapatite coating procedure. - Highlights: • Mg incorporated in (Ti,Mg)N coating structure and did not form a separate phase • Mg dissolution in SBF solution facilitated Mg-substituted hydroxyapatite formation • (Ti,Mg)N acted as Mg-source for Mg-substituted hydroxyapatite formation in SBF

  12. Vacuum-free processed bulk heterojunction solar cells with E-GaIn cathode as an alternative to Al electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the photovoltaic characteristics of bulk heterojunction solar cells employing an eutectic gallium–indium (EGaIn) alloy as a top metal contact which was coated by a simple and inexpensive brush-painting was investigated. The overall solar cell fabrication procedure was vacuum-free. As references, regular organic bulk heterojunction solar cells employing thermally evaporated Aluminum as a top metal contact were also fabricated. Inserting the ZnO layer between the active layer and the cathode electrodes (Al and EGaIn) improved the photovoltaic performance of the herein investigated devices. The power conversion efficiencies with and without EGaIn top electrodes were rather comparable. Hence, we have shown that the EGaIn, which is liquid at room temperature, can be used as a cathode. It allows an easy and rapid device fabrication that can be implemented through a vacuum free process. (paper)

  13. Interaction between computational modelling and experiments for vacuum consumable arc remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined computational-experimental modelling effort is currently underway to characterize the vacuum consumable arc remelt process. This effort involves the coupling of experimental results with a magnetohydrodynamic flow model which is capable of time accurate solutions of the interdependent fluid flow-solidification process in the ingot. Models such as this are driven by boundary conditions. Considerable data have been compiled from direct observation of the electrode tip and molten pool surface by means of high speed photography in order to gain an understanding of the processes at the pool surface and the appropriate corresponding boundary conditions. The crucible wall/molten metal miniscus conditions are less well understood. Pool volumes are computed at different melting currents and show reasonable agreement with experimentally determined values. Current flow through the ingot is evaluated numerically and the results indicate that a significant portion of the melt current does not reach the interior of the ingot. U-6 wt. % Nb alloy was used

  14. Three-dimensional Ion Distribution in a Filtered Vacuum Arc Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional measurements of the ion flux along the filter of a magnetically filtered d-c vacuum arc are presented. The device includes a metallic plasma-generating chamber with cooper electrodes coupled to a substrate chamber through a quarter-torus magnetic filter. The filtering magnetic field was high enough to magnetize the electrons but not the ions. The ion current distribution was studied using a multi-element Cu probes, placed at three different positions along the filter. The ion saturation current of each probe was measured by biasing the probe at -70V with respect the grounded anode. Preliminary results of the three dimensional ion flux distribution and the floating potential of the plasma as functions of the bias filter voltage and magnetic field intensity are reported

  15. Interaction between computational modelling and experiments for vacuum consumable arc remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, L. A.; Zanner, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    A combined computational-experimental modelling effort is currently underway to characterize the vacuum consumable arc remelt process. This effort involves the coupling of experimental results with a magnetohydrodynamic flow model which is capable of time accurate solutions of the interdependent fluid flow-solidification process in the ingot. Models such as this are driven by boundary conditions. Considerable data have been compiled from direct observation of the electrode tip and molten pool surface by means of high speed photography in order to gain an understanding of the processes at the pool surface and the appropriate corresponding boundary conditions. The crucible wall/molten metal miniscus conditions are less well understood. Pool volumes are computed at different melting currents and show reasonable agreement with experimentally determined values. Current flow through the ingot is evaluated numerically and the results indicate that a significant portion of the melt current does not reach the interior of the ingot. U-6 wt. % Nb alloy was used.

  16. On the anode potential fall in a vacuum arc: PIC simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of plasma generated by a vacuum arc with the anode surface was numerically simulated by using a particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It has been found that the anode potential fall remains negative even at high electron drift velocities. The plasma–anode-surface interaction has been analyzed for a ‘steady-state’ regime and for a ‘turbulent’ regime with microinstabilities developing in the plasma. For the steady-state regime, approximate formulas for the anode potential fall and energy flux have been derived from the simulation results. For the turbulent regime, naturally associated with high electron drift velocities, the negative anode fall voltage and the effective plasma electron temperature have been found to be larger than that for the steady-state regime. (fast track communication)

  17. Properties of SnO2 coatings fabricated on polymer substrates using filtered vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transparent conducting SnO2 coatings of 0.16-1.2 μm thickness were deposited on polymer substrates using filtered vacuum arc deposition. Mechanical and electro-optical properties of the coatings were investigated. Surface topography, nano-indentation hardness and nano-scratch resistance were studied using an atomic force microscope equipped with a diamond pyramid tip. Electrical sheet conductivity and optical transmission were studied as a function of the coating thickness. The surface nanohardness of SnO2 coated polymer samples was larger by at least an order of magnitude than that of the bare polymer surfaces. Transparent and conducting SnO2 coatings reduced the light-load scratch wear rate of the polymer substrates by two to three orders of magnitude, while providing optical transmission and electrical conductivity. This combination of properties would be useful for fabricating transparent scratch resistant coatings for vehicle and aircraft windows

  18. Substrate temperature influence on W/WCNx bilayers grown by pulsed vacuum arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W/WCNx coatings were produced by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc discharge on stainless-steel 304 substrates, varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for determining W, C and N concentrations dependence on the substrate temperature. A competition between C and N can be observed. Atomic force microscopy was employed for obtaining the thickness and grain size that present similar tendencies as a function of the temperature. X-ray diffraction characterization showed phases of W and α-WCN (hexagonal). Raman spectra for all substrate temperatures were obtained, presenting two peaks corresponding to D (disorder) and G (graphite) bands in the region of 1100-1700 cm-1 due to the amorphous carbon. As an important conclusion, it was stated that substrate temperature has strong influence on the structure, chemical composition and morphology of W/WCNx bilayers, caused by the competition between carbon and nitrogen.

  19. Substrate temperature influence on W/WCNx bilayers grown by pulsed vacuum arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina, R.; Escobar, D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P. J.; Jurado, J. F.

    2012-04-01

    W/WCNx coatings were produced by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc discharge on stainless-steel 304 substrates, varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for determining W, C and N concentrations dependence on the substrate temperature. A competition between C and N can be observed. Atomic force microscopy was employed for obtaining the thickness and grain size that present similar tendencies as a function of the temperature. X-ray diffraction characterization showed phases of W and α-WCN (hexagonal). Raman spectra for all substrate temperatures were obtained, presenting two peaks corresponding to D (disorder) and G (graphite) bands in the region of 1100-1700 cm-1 due to the amorphous carbon. As an important conclusion, it was stated that substrate temperature has strong influence on the structure, chemical composition and morphology of W/WCNx bilayers, caused by the competition between carbon and nitrogen.

  20. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Shunailov, S. A.; Kolomiets, M. D.; Mesyats, G. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  1. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Avenue, 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shunailov, S. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Ulmaskulov, M. R. [Institute of Electrophysics UB RAS, 106 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kolomiets, M. D. [Ural Federal University, 19 Mira Str., 620002 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Mesyats, G. A. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Lenin Avenue, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Yalandin, M. I. [Institute of Electrophysics UB RAS, 106 Amundsen Str., 620016 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, 53 Lenin Avenue, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-14

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  2. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators

  3. THE EFFECT OF NITROGEN GAS FLOW RATE ON THE PROPERTIES OF TiN-COATED HIGH-SPEED STEEL (HSS) USING CATHODIC ARC EVAPORATION PHYSICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION (PVD) TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    ALI MUBARAK; ESAH BINTI HAMZAH; MOHD RADZI HJ. MOHD TOFF; ABDUL HAKIM BIN HASHIM

    2005-01-01

    Cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) is a widely-used technique for generating highly ionized plasma from which hard and wear resistant physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings can be deposited. A major drawback of this technique is the emission of micrometer-sized droplets of cathode material from the arc spot, which are commonly referred to as "macroparticles." In present study, titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on high-speed steel (HSS) coupons were produced with a cathodic arc evaporation techniq...

  4. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  5. Analytical electron microscopy of interface layers between Ti(6% Al, 4% V) and a CrN cathodic arc coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the applications of analytical electron microscopy to the study of cathodic arc deposited CrN coating on a Ti(6% Al, 4% V) substrate. Particular attention is given to analysis of the coating/substrate interface. Electron energy loss spectroscopy is used to show that the Cr sputter cleaning of the Ti(6% Al, 4% V) results in penetration of Cr into the substrate giving a bcc alloy layer whose composition varies from Ti(6% Al, 4% V) at the substrate interface to almost pure Cr at the coating interface. Subsequent deposition of CrN results in an initial deposition of sub-stoichiometric Cr2N followed by sub-stoichiometric CrN with a } 022{ texture and a columnar structure. The degree of sub-stoichiometry of the nitrides depends on the substrate bias and the substrate orientation relative to the cathode. (author)

  6. Multi-Seconds Diagnostic Neutral Beam Injector Based on Arc-Discharge with LaB6 Hollow Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic neutral beam injector based on arc-discharge plasma source with LaB6 hollow cathode is described.The ion source of the diagnostic injector provides a proton beam with a current up to 2.5A, the particle energy up to 50 keV, the beam divergence is ∼0.5 deg. The beam species at the 2 A ion current are: H+-83%, H2+-5%, H3+-12%. The injector was tested at pulse duration up to 2 seconds

  7. Synthesis of Ti-Si-N nanocomposite coatings by a novel cathodic arc assisted middle-frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-Si-N nanocomposite coatings were synthesized by using a cathodic arc assisted middle-frequency magnetron sputtering system in an industrial scale. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate the chemical bonding and microstructure of the coatings. Atomic force microscope and scanning electron microscope were used to characterize the surface and cross-sectional morphologies of the samples. The coating was found to be nc-TiN/a-Si3N4 structure and exhibit a high hardness of 40 GPa when the Si content was 6.3 at.%.

  8. Structure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-N coatings deposited by combined cathodic arc middle frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited on Si and WC substrates by combined cathodic arc middle-frequency magnetron (MF) sputtering under a Ti arc power of 10 kW with different Al MF targets currents. The hardness of the Ti-Al-N coatings was in the range of 23-32 GPa, whereas the Young modulus values were in the range of 420-540 GPa. - Abstract: Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited on Si (1 1 1) and WC substrates by combined cathodic arc middle-frequency magnetron (MF) sputtering under a Ti arc power of 10 kW and with different Al MF targets currents. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) showed that the Ti-Al-N coatings were polycrystallize with a preferred (1 1 1) orientation at 2θ = 43.7o. The (1 1 1) diffraction showed a decrease in peak intensity but a increase in FWHM values with the increasing of Al contents. Nano-meter sized TiN crystal grains distinguished by the lattice fringe contrast were verified by plan-view transmission electron (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) images. With the increasing of MF sputter currents from 5 to 20 A, the Al contents in the Ti-Al-N coatings monotonically increased from 4.8 to 10.8 at.%, whereas the N and O contents were nearly constant. The hardness of the Ti-Al-N coatings was in the range of 23-32 GPa, and the Young modulus values were in the range of 420-540 GPa.

  9. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams. PMID:22380156

  10. Carbon Nanotube-based Cold Cathode for High Power MicrowaveVacuum Electronic Devices: A Potential Field Emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Verma

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can be grown in the form of small, sharp spikes capable of carrying very highcurrent densities which suggest great potential application of CNTs as cold cathode in high power microwavevacuum device applications. These cold cathode vacuum microwave devices are expected to be ideally suitedfor air-borne and space applications. This paper  reports the initial efforts made in the development of coldcathode using PECVD grown vertically-aligned matrix of CNTs with uniform height and optimum tip densityon silicon substrate. The high aspect ratio (of the order of 10,000 and novel electrical, mechanical, and thermalproperties of the CNT are found to be very attractive characteristics for emission of large and stable currentdensities at reasonably low field. The field emission current voltage characteristics of a typical cathode gaveemission current density in excess of 35 mA/cm2 at reasonably low field. The emission current in most of thesamples is found to be stable over long period of time but is greatly effected by the vacuum condition duringmeasurement. The initial measured data suggests great promise for achieving high current densities at practicalelectric fields.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.650-654, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1688

  11. Investigations of the cathode region of an argon arc plasma by degenerate four-wave mixing laser spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) laser spectroscopy was used in local studies of atmospheric pressure argon plasma generated in a free-burning arc. The results of plasma diagnostics using the DFWM method were compared to the results obtained with optical emission measurements. In the cathode region of the arc the maxima of both the DFWM signal and the emission coefficient for the 696.5 nm Ar I line depend on the distance from the cathode tip. This effect proves the departure of the plasma state from local thermal equilibrium (LTE) as it has been reported by many authors. On the other hand the Stark shifts of the 696.5 nm Ar I line determined by the DFWM method in relation to plasma diagnostic results show no deviations from LTE on the arc axis down to 1.0 mm from the cathode tip

  12. Cr{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc for high speed machining applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Xingzhao [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore)], E-mail: xzding@SIMTech.a-star.edu.sg; Zeng, X.T.; Liu, Y.C.; Fang, F.Z.; Lim, G.C. [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore)

    2008-02-29

    In this work, a series of Cr{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}N (0 {<=} x {<=} 0.7) coatings were deposited on high speed steel substrates by a vacuum arc reactive deposition process from two lateral rotating elemental chromium and aluminum cathodes in a flowing pure nitrogen atmosphere. The composition, structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of the as-deposited coatings were systematically characterized by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays, X-ray diffraction, nanoindentation, and ball-on-disc tribometer experiments. All of the as-deposited CrAlN coatings exhibited a higher hardness than CrN, showing a maximum hardness of about 40 GPa (at around X = 0.63) which is twice higher than that of the CrN. The wear performance under ambient conditions of the CrAlN coatings was found much better, with both lower friction coefficient and wear rate, than TiAlN coatings deposited by the same technique. The wear rate of the CrAlN coatings against alumina counterpart was about 2-3 orders in magnitude lower than that of the TiAlN coatings. Selected CrAlN coatings with the highest hardness were also deposited on some WC-based end-mills. An evident better performance of the CrAlN-coated end-mills was observed than the TiAlN-coated ones for cutting a hardened tool steel material under high speed machining conditions.

  13. Effect of N2 and Ar gas on DC arc plasma generation and film composition from Ti-Al compound cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DC arc plasma from Ti, Al, and Ti1−xAlx (x = 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.70) compound cathodes has been characterized with respect to plasma chemistry (charged particles) and charge-state-resolved ion energy for Ar and N2 pressures in the range 10−6 to 3 × 10−2 Torr. Scanning electron microscopy was used for exploring the correlation between the cathode and film composition, which in turn was correlated with the plasma properties. In an Ar atmosphere, the plasma ion composition showed a reduction of Al of approximately 5 at. % compared to the cathode composition, while deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Introducing N2 above ∼5 × 10−3 Torr, lead to a reduced Al content in the plasma as well as in the film, and hence a 1:1 correlation between the cathode and film composition cannot be expected in a reactive environment. This may be explained by an influence of the reactive gas on the arc mode and type of erosion of Ti and Al rich contaminations, as well as on the plasma transport. Throughout the investigated pressure range, a higher deposition rate was obtained from cathodes with higher Al content. The origin of generated gas ions was investigated through the velocity rule, stating that the most likely ion velocities of all cathode elements from a compound cathode are equal. The results suggest that the major part of the gas ions in Ar is generated from electron impact ionization, while gas ions in a N2 atmosphere primarily originate from a nitrogen contaminated layer on the cathode surface. The presented results provide a contribution to the understanding processes of plasma generation from compound cathodes. It also allows for a more reasonable approach to the selection of composite cathode and experimental conditions for thin film depositions

  14. Investigation on the Tribology of Co Implanted Stainless Steel Using Metal Vapor Vacuum Arc Ion Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junxia GUO; Xun CAI; Qiulong CHEN

    2004-01-01

    AISI 304 stainless steel was ion implanted with Co, and the tribological property on the surface of the stainless steel was investigated. The Co ion implantation was carried out using a metal vapor vacuum arc (Mevva) broad-beam ion source with an extraction voltage of 40 kV, implantation doses of 3×1017/cm2 and 5×1017/cm2, and ion current densities of 13, 22 and 32 μA/cm2. The results showed that the near-surface hardness of Co-implanted stainless steel sample was increased by 50% or more, and it increased with increasing ion current density at first and then declined. The friction coefficient decreased from 0.74 to 0.20 after Co implantation. The wear rate after Co implantation reduced by 25% or more as compared to the unimplanted sample. The wear rate initially decreased with increasing ion current density and then an increase was observed. Within the range of experimental parameters, there exists a critical ion current density for the Co-implanted stainless steel, at which the wear rate decreased with increasing retained dose, going through a minimum and then increased. The critical ion current density in this paper is about 22 μA/cm2.

  15. Functional properties of multilayer vacuum-arc TiN/ZrN coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, S. V.; Pogrebnyak, A. D.; Tleukenov, Y. O.; Erdybaeva, N. K.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured multilayer Ti/ZrN coatings were synthesized by vacuum-arc deposition with a number of layers 134-533 and an average thickness 20-125nm of layers. A good planarity was revealed resulting in a range of nanometer layer from plasma streams in a reactive environment. Phase-structural changes mechanisms were established as a model of critical operating coatings’ conditions of in the surface layers under the action of an aggressive oxygen atmosphere at high temperature (700°C). The thickness parameter effect on its hardness of the multilayer system was shown. It was found that the maximum hardness of 42 GPa and the lowest abrasion of coating 1,3×10-5 mm3×H-1×mm-and counterbody 1,9×10-6 mm3×H-1×mm-1 inherent in TiN/ZrN system with the smallest layer thickness of 20 nm in the period. The results are explained by the influence of the size factor interphase boundaries magnified in a multilayer system with a nanometer thick layers.

  16. Substrate temperature influence on W/WCN{sub x} bilayers grown by pulsed vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ospina, R.; Escobar, D. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J.; Jurado, J.F. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2012-04-01

    W/WCN{sub x} coatings were produced by using a repetitive pulsed vacuum arc discharge on stainless-steel 304 substrates, varying the substrate temperature from room temperature to 200 Degree-Sign C. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used for determining W, C and N concentrations dependence on the substrate temperature. A competition between C and N can be observed. Atomic force microscopy was employed for obtaining the thickness and grain size that present similar tendencies as a function of the temperature. X-ray diffraction characterization showed phases of W and {alpha}-WCN (hexagonal). Raman spectra for all substrate temperatures were obtained, presenting two peaks corresponding to D (disorder) and G (graphite) bands in the region of 1100-1700 cm{sup -1} due to the amorphous carbon. As an important conclusion, it was stated that substrate temperature has strong influence on the structure, chemical composition and morphology of W/WCN{sub x} bilayers, caused by the competition between carbon and nitrogen.

  17. Ion charge state distributions of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas with discharge currents of 300 A and duration 250 μs have been produced in strong magnetic fields up to 4 T. Ion charge state distributions have been measured for C, Al, Ag, Ta, Pt, Ho, and Er with a time-of-flight charge-mass spectrometer. Our previous measurements have been confirmed which show that ion charge states can be considerably enhanced when increasing the magnetic field up to about 1 T. The new measurements address the question of whether or not the additional increase continues at even higher magnetic field strength. It has been found that the increase becomes insignificant for field strengths greater than 1 T. Ion charge state distributions are almost constant for magnetic field strengths between 2 and 4 T. The results are explained by comparing the free expansion length with the freezing length. The most significant changes of charge state distributions are observed when these lengths are similar. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Ion charge state distributions of pulsed vacuum arc plasmas in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum arc plasmas with discharge currents of 300 A and duration 250 μs have been produced in strong magnetic fields up to 4 T. Ion charge state distributions have been measured for C, Al, Ag, Ta, Pt, Ho, and Er with a time-of-flight charge-mass-spectrometer. Our previous measurements have been confirmed which show that ion charge states can be considerably enhanced when increasing the magnetic field up to about 1 T. The new measurements address the question of whether or not the additional increase continues at even higher magnetic field strength. It has been found that the increase becomes insignificant for field strengths greater than 1 T. Ion charge state distributions are almost constant for magnetic field strengths between 2 and 4 T. The results are explained by comparing the free expansion length with the freezing length. The most significant changes of charge state distributions are observed when these lengths are similar. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  19. Structural Engineering of the Vacuum Arc ZrN/CrN Multilayer Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sobol´

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For multilayer system ZrN/CrN with a large difference in the atomic weights and radiation-induced defect formation of metal components, analyzed the influence of the layer thickness (in the nanometer range and supplied during the deposition negative bias potential (– Us on the structure and hardness of the composite vacuum arc coating. It was established that at the layer thickness less than 50 nm supply – Us leads to an increase of microstrain in the CrN layers under bombardment by ions of Zr with a large atomic radius and the mass, and the strain relaxation is observed in layers of ZrN. The observed effects are explained by an increase in energy deposited ionized particles when applying – Us, which determines the radiation-induced mixing at interphase boundaries of layers and leads to a fall hardness. The highest hardness 42 GPa in the ZrN/CrN system is achieved upon deposition of thin (20 nm layers in the absence of – Us.

  20. Impedance analysis of nano thickness layered AlGaN acoustic sensor deposited by thermionic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Soner; Bilgiç, Eyüp; Gülmez, Gülay; Şenay, Volkan; Pat, Suat; Korkmaz, Şadan; Mohammadigharehbagh, Reza

    2016-03-01

    In this study, AlGaN acoustic sensor was deposited on aluminum metal substrate by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method for the first time. Gallium materials are used in many applications for optoelectronic device and semiconductor technology. Thermionic vacuum arc is the deposition technology for the variously materials and applications field. The thickness of the acoustic sensor is in deposited as nano layer. Impedance analyses were realized. Also, TVA production parameters and some properties of the deposited layers were investigated. TVA is a fast deposition technology for the gallium compounds and doped gallium compounds. Obtained results show that AlGaN materials are very promising materials. Moreover, these acoustic sensors have been produced by TVA technology.

  1. Regularities in the effect of model ion irradiation on the structure and properties of vacuum-arc nitride coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of irradiation with ions Ar+ (energy of 1 and 1.8 MeV) and He+ (energy of 0.6 MeV) on the structure, microhardness and elastic modulus of the vacuum-arc nitride coatings. It is shown that the level of exposure to radiation vacuum-arc nitride coatings can be divided into 3 classes: 1) the most structure persistent- significant changes occur only on the substructure level (as an example - multi-element system Ti-Zr-V-Hf-Nb-Ta-N); 2) ''the medium resistance- significant changes occur in the macro stress-strained state (as an example - the system Ti-N); 3) structural variable- significant changes in the macro-level and phase composition (as an example - the system Mo-N)

  2. METALLIC CATHODE SURFACE MODIFICATION BY USING LOW-PRESSURE PULSED VACUUM ARC DISCHARGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUIS ALPIDIO GARCIA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Se produjeron descargas eléctricas en un sistema de arco pulsado a baja presión, con una corriente máxima de 100 A con pulsos de 30 ms. Las descargas se llevaron a cabo aplicando un voltaje de 104 V entre los electrodos. Los materiales utilizados como cátodo fueron Ti, Zr, Ni, Cu, Mo y W. La morfología de cátodos después de la descarga fue estudiada mediante la técnica de microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM. Los cátodos de Ti y Zr presentaron la mayor erosión. Por otra parte, se observaron cráteres circulares sobre cátodos de Ni y Mo y se analizó una región del cátodo Zr, con alta erosión y gran cantidad de cráteres. Se midió el voltaje de descarga para cada material, obteniendo valores de voltaje del arco. Finalmente, se observaron las relaciones entre los voltajes de arco y algunas características del material como punto de fusión y de ebullición, presentando una tendencia exponencial.

  3. On the effect of ion irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of vacuum-arc TiN coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure and mechanical properties of vacuum-arc TiN coatings irradiated with argon, helium and hydrogen ions are studied. Phase composition and structural state were investigated by X-ray diffraction. Determination of residual macrostresses with a cubic crystal lattice were carried out by X-ray tensiometry. Hardness measurement was performed using a Berkovich pyramid mikroindentor 'Micron-Gamma with a load of around 50 G.

  4. Al-Co Alloys Prepared by Vacuum Arc Melting: Correlating Microstructure Evolution and Aqueous Corrosion Behavior with Co Content

    OpenAIRE

    Angeliki Lekatou; Athanasios K. Sfikas; Christina Petsa; Alexandros E. Karantzalis

    2016-01-01

    Hypereutectic Al-Co alloys of various Co contents (7–20 weight % (wt.%) Co) were prepared by vacuum arc melting, aiming at investigating the influence of the cobalt content on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. Quite uniform and directional microstructures were attained. The obtained microstructures depended on the Co content, ranging from fully eutectic growth (7 wt.% and 10 wt.% Co) to coarse primary Al9Co2 predominance (20 wt.% Co). Co dissolution in Al far exceeded the negligible ...

  5. Phase determination of filtered vacuum arc deposited TiO2 thin films by optical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of TiO2 were produced using filtered vacuum arc deposition. Arc currents were 275, 300, 325 A, and the oxygen pressure during deposition was 0.93 Pa. The substrates were glass microscope slides, at temperatures of 25 oC (RT), 200 oC, and 400 oC. Film thickness was in the range 100 to 250 nm, depending on the deposition conditions. Film structure and chemical composition were determined using XRD and XPS analyses, respectively. As-deposited films were amorphous, except to two samples that were found to be crystalline (deposited with 300 A, 325 A at 400 oC), and the crystalline phase was close to that of anatase. All of the films were partially crystallized by annealing in air at 450 oC for 1 h. The O:Ti atomic concentration ratio was in the range 1.6:1-2:1, independent of deposition conditions. The optical parameters, refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the films were determined using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry. In addition, the optical transmission of the films were determined in the UV-VIS and IR regions. The average optical transmission in the VIS spectrum was 70-85%, affected by the interference in the film with 90% maxima and 60% minima. The refractive index at λ = 550 nm was in the range 2.4 to 2.7, depending on the deposition conditions and annealing. Using the semi-empirical model of Wemple and DiDomenico for the dielectric function below the interband absorption edge of ionic and covalent solids, the dispersion energy parameters of TiO2 (Eo, Ed) were calculated. The underlying structural order of the amorphous films was inferred by comparing the dispersion energy parameters of the amorphous films with those of crystalline TiO2. As expected, the refractive index of the amorphous films depended on the underlying phase of the film. The optical analyses indicated that the underlying phase of the amorphous films deposited on RT substrates was close to anatase, whereas the underlying phase of the amorphous films deposited

  6. Corrosion behavior of Zr modified CrN coatings using metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, attention has focused on the use of alternative metal nitride coatings as replacements for TiN for not only improved wear resistance and surface hardness but also for increased corrosion resistance in selected environments. While these coatings display excellent wear resistance and surface hardness, like many nitride coatings, their corrosion behavior is determined to a large extent by the presence of defects such as pinholes within the coating. Improved corrosion resistance is expected through minimizing the porosity/number of pinholes within the coating, through postdeposition surface modification. The aim of this study was to modify the surface of CrN coatings using metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation. CrN coatings were deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel and AISI 1020 mild steel substrates using physical vapor deposition technology, followed by implantation of Zr ions into the coating at doses varying from 6x1016 to 2x1017 ions/cm2. The corrosion behavior was assessed in saline environments using linear polarization techniques and the corroded surface of the coatings was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results of the study showed that implantation of Zr ions into CrN resulted in a lowering of the corrosion current density, suggesting improved corrosion resistance. This was though to be associated with two factors. Firstly, partial closure of the pinholes as a result of the implantation process and secondly, the formation of ZrN, CrZrN, and various oxynitrides/oxides at the surface

  7. GaN thin film deposition on glass and PET substrates by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pat, Suat, E-mail: suatpat@ogu.edu.tr [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Physics Department, 26480 (Turkey); Korkmaz, Şadan; Özen, Soner [Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Physics Department, 26480 (Turkey); Şenay, Volkan [Bayburt University, Primary Science Education Department, 69000 (Turkey)

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, GaN thin film production was realized by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA), a plasma deposition technique, for the first time. We present a new deposition mechanism for GaN thin films with a very short production time. Microstructure properties of samples were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry. The peak at 2θ = 72.88° corresponding to GaN (0004) was detected in XRD spectra. The surface morphology of the deposited GaN films was analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The surface properties of the produced samples are quite different. The average roughness values were determined to be 0.48 nm for GaN/PET and 1.17 nm for GaN/glass. The optical properties (i.e., refractive index and reflection) were determined using an interferometer. Moreover, the obtained optical data were compared with bulk GaN materials. The refractive indexes were measured as 2.2, 3,0 and 2,5 for the GaN/glass, GaN/PET and bulk GaN, respectively. The transparencies of the different GaN-coated substrates are nearly the same. The obtained band gap values were measured in the energy range of 3.3–3.5 eV. TVA is a novel non-reactive plasma technique for the generation of metal organic thin films. The main advantage of this method is its fast deposition rate without any loss in the quality of the films. - Highlights: • A new GaN thin film growth method is introduced. • Microstructure, surface and optical properties were characterized. • GaN/glass and GaN/PET were produced by a different plasma deposition method.

  8. GaN thin film deposition on glass and PET substrates by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, GaN thin film production was realized by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA), a plasma deposition technique, for the first time. We present a new deposition mechanism for GaN thin films with a very short production time. Microstructure properties of samples were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry. The peak at 2θ = 72.88° corresponding to GaN (0004) was detected in XRD spectra. The surface morphology of the deposited GaN films was analyzed using field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The surface properties of the produced samples are quite different. The average roughness values were determined to be 0.48 nm for GaN/PET and 1.17 nm for GaN/glass. The optical properties (i.e., refractive index and reflection) were determined using an interferometer. Moreover, the obtained optical data were compared with bulk GaN materials. The refractive indexes were measured as 2.2, 3,0 and 2,5 for the GaN/glass, GaN/PET and bulk GaN, respectively. The transparencies of the different GaN-coated substrates are nearly the same. The obtained band gap values were measured in the energy range of 3.3–3.5 eV. TVA is a novel non-reactive plasma technique for the generation of metal organic thin films. The main advantage of this method is its fast deposition rate without any loss in the quality of the films. - Highlights: • A new GaN thin film growth method is introduced. • Microstructure, surface and optical properties were characterized. • GaN/glass and GaN/PET were produced by a different plasma deposition method

  9. Structure and Properties of Ti-Si-N Coatings Synthesized by Combining Cathode Arc and Middle-frequency Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhongtian; ZHU Liya; YANG Bing; GUO Liping; FU Dejun

    2009-01-01

    Ti-Si-N composite coatings were synthesized on a novel combining cathode and middle-frequency magnetron sputtering system,designed on an industrial scale.Ti was produced from the arc target and Si from magnetron target during deposition.The influences of negative bias voltage and Si content on the hardness and microstructure of the coatings were investigated.The composite coatings prepared under optimized conditions were characterized to be nc-TiN/a-Si_3N_4 structure with grain sizes of TiN ranging from 8-15 nm and exhibited a high hardness of 40 GPa.The enhancement of the hardness is suggested to be caused by the nanograin-amorphous structure effects.

  10. Experimental Investigation on the Influence of Axial Magnetic Field Distribution on Resisting the Constriction of a High-Current Vacuum Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zongqian; LIU Zhigang; JIA Shenli; SONG Xiaochuan; WANG Lijun

    2009-01-01

    Effect of the axial magnetic field (AMF) on resisting the constriction of a high-current vacuum arc is studied in this paper. Two typical AMF distributions were investigated, i.e., the traditional bell-shaped AMF, and the saddle-shaped AMF. Experiments were conducted in a detachable vacuum chamber with a rms arc current in the range of 10 kA to 25 kA. The arc column was photographed by a high-speed digital camera with an exposure time of 2 microseconds. The constriction of the vacuum arc was compared by processing the images of the arc column under the two different field configurations and numerically determining the dimensions of the arc column near the electrodes. It was also confirmed that the AMF distribution had a signifcant influence on its effectiveness in resisting arc constriction, Furthermore, the AMF strength near the periphery of the arc is more influential than that at the centre of the electrodes in resisting arc constriction.

  11. Influence of Cathode and Nozzle Wear on Distributions of Fluctuations in Cutting Arc

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gruber, Jan; Šonský, Jiří; Hlína, Jan

    Brno : Brno university of Technology, 2013, s. 163-166. ISBN 978-80-214-4753-0. [Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc /20./. Nové Město na Moravě (CZ), 02.09.2013-06.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : plasma cutting * nozzle lifecycle * fluctuations Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  12. Observation of HF Cathode and ARC Root Inside Cutting Plasma Torch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šonský, Jiří; Gruber, Jan

    Brno : Brno university of Technology, 2013, s. 297-300. ISBN 978-80-214-4753-0. [Symposium on Physics of Switching Arc /20./. Nové Město na Moravě (CZ), 02.09.2013-06.09.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : plasma torch * fluctuations * FFT Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  13. Tribological property enhancement of CrN films by metal vapor vacuum arc implantation of Vanadium and Carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CrN films have been extensively used in precision forming and molding applications because of their excellent tribological properties and oxidation-resisting characteristics. Vanadium and carbon ions are introduced into the near surface layer of deposited CrN films via metal vapor vacuum arc implantation to improve the wear performance of CrN films. Dense and smooth CrN film was deposited using a filtered arc deposition system, which provides fully ionized Cr plasma on the substrate surface. Subsequently, surface bombardment of the deposited CrN film with vanadium and carbon ions densifies the film and forms an alloy near the surface. These CrN-based films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron electron and Auger electron spectroscopies. Examinations of the tribological and mechanical film properties, including wear resistance, corrosion resistance and fracture toughness were performed and correlated with respect to the implantation parameters

  14. Effects of virtual anode formation on the beam optics of grid-controlled vacuum arc ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New concepts are proposed for intense long pulse ion injectors of several A (ampere) level. In order to control space charge effects on the emitting surface, a vacuum arc ion source which has double grid structure is tested. For ion injection of higher current level, a plasma gun type injector is also developed. It utilizes an electromagnetic injection of the source plasma and post-acceleration of it by a plasma filled diode gap. With this configuration, we can expect to get stable, high flux ion beams without forming a virtual anode in the extraction gap. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  15. Re-Cr-Ni high-temperature resistant coatings on Cu substrates prepared by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Re-Cr-Ni composite metallic films were prepared using an original plasma deposition method developed at INFLPR, Bucharest, called thermionic vacuum arc (TVA). The method is based on the evaporation of a metal followed by ignition of a plasma in the vapours. These three-component films/alloy films were deposited using three simultaneous TVA plasma sources in the same vacuum chamber. Surface corrosion at temperatures up to 1000 deg. C was found not to take place in these Re-Cr-Ni alloy films as shown by thermogravimetric analysis. The current results demonstrate that the TVA method is a promising candidate tool for the synthesis of multiple compound films. Films of uniform and controlled composition can be simultaneously obtained using this method. Moreover, high melting point metals can be involved in these superalloy films, thus leading to applications in extremely hot conditions such as turbine blades and aircraft parts. (fast track communication)

  16. Self-forming TiBN Nanocomposite Multilayer Coating Prepared by Pulse Cathode Arc Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongzhi; Hu, Zhenjiang; Yan, Leilei; Yu, Fuli; Tu, Wendi

    2016-12-01

    Novel multilayer structured TiBN coatings were deposited on Si (100) substrate using TiBN complex cathode plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition technique (PIIID). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and ball-on-disk test. XRD results reveal that both samples of TiBN coatings have the main diffraction peak of TiN (200) and (220). Cross-section TEM images reveal that these coatings have the character of self-forming multilayer and consists of face-centered cubic TiN and hexagonal BN nanocrystalline embedded in amorphous matrix. Because of the existence of hexagonal BN, the friction coefficient of the new TiBN coating in room temperature is obviously lower than that of the monolithic TiN nanocrystalline coating. PMID:27460597

  17. Self-forming TiBN Nanocomposite Multilayer Coating Prepared by Pulse Cathode Arc Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongzhi; Hu, Zhenjiang; Yan, Leilei; Yu, Fuli; Tu, Wendi

    2016-07-01

    Novel multilayer structured TiBN coatings were deposited on Si (100) substrate using TiBN complex cathode plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition technique (PIIID). The coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) and ball-on-disk test. XRD results reveal that both samples of TiBN coatings have the main diffraction peak of TiN (200) and (220). Cross-section TEM images reveal that these coatings have the character of self-forming multilayer and consists of face-centered cubic TiN and hexagonal BN nanocrystalline embedded in amorphous matrix. Because of the existence of hexagonal BN, the friction coefficient of the new TiBN coating in room temperature is obviously lower than that of the monolithic TiN nanocrystalline coating.

  18. Deposition of TiN Films by Novel Filter Cathodic Arc Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Er-Wu; FAN Song-Hua; LI Li; L(U) Guo-Hua; FENG Wen-Ran; ZHANG Gu-Ling; YANG Si-Ze

    2006-01-01

    A straight magnetic filtering arc source is used to deposit thin films of titanium nitride.The properties of thefilms depend strongly on the deposition process.TiN films can be deposited directly onto heated substrates in anitrogen atmosphere or onto unbiased substrates by condensing the Ti+ ion beam in about 300 eV N2+ nitrogen ionbombardment.In the latter case.the film stoichiometry is varied from an N:Ti ratio of 0.6-1.1 by controlling thearrival rates of Ti and nitrogen ions.Meanwhile,simple models are used to describe the evolution of compressivestress as function of the arrival ratio and the composition of the ion-assisted TiN films.

  19. The electrochemical behavior of thermally oxidized CrN coatings deposited on steel by cathodic arc plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition of the CrN coating has been applied to an industrial scale to improve the corrosion resistance of the AISI 304 stainless steel. Thermal oxidation in air was carried out at the temperature of 500 and 800 deg. C for 1 h. The effect of the thermal oxidation on the aqueous corrosion behavior of the CrN/304s assembly was investigated in this study. The composition and structure of the CrN coatings were studied by the grazing X-ray diffraction (GXRD), electron probe X-ray microanalyzer (EPMA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The polarization resistance (Rp) of all samples was measured and compared in terms of a polarization resistance resulting from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in a mixture of 0.5 M H2SO4 + 1 M NaCl solution. The results indicated that the corrosion resistance of the CrN coated steel oxidized at 500 deg. C is significantly reduced. On the contrary, the electrochemical behavior of the CrN coated steel oxidized at 800 deg. C shows better corrosion resistance than the one oxidized at 500 deg. C and as-deposited steel. After thermal oxidation at 800 deg. C, the oxide layer formed on top of CrN coating enhances the corrosion protection of the CrN coated steel

  20. The electronic structure of tungsten oxide thin films prepared by pulsed cathodic arc deposition and plasma-assisted pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed cathodic arc and pulsed magnetron sputtered WO3 thin films were investigated using electron microscopy. It was found that the cathodic arc deposited material consisted of the α-WO3 phase with a high degree of crystallinity. In contrast, the magnetron sputtered material was highly disordered making it difficult to determine its phase. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy was used to study the oxygen K edge of the films and it was found that the near-edge fine structures of films produced by the two deposition methods differed. The oxygen K-edge near-edge structures for various phases of WO3 were calculated using two different self-consistent methods. Each phase was found to exhibit a unique oxygen K edge, which would allow different phases of WO3 to be identified using x-ray absorption spectroscopy or electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Both calculation methods predicted an oxygen K edge for the γ-WO3 phase which compared well to previous x-ray absorption spectra. In addition, a close match was found between the oxygen K edges obtained experimentally from the cathodic arc deposited material and that calculated for the α-WO3 phase

  1. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  2. Deposition of chromium nitride coatings from vacuum arc plasma in increased nitrogen pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of protective coatings on metal materials is the effective way to improve their durability. Chromium nitride coatings are applied mainly on tools due to good resistivity to oxidation compared to other metal nitride coatings and good wear resistance. Some characteristics of the coatings deposited in fixed position in regard of chromium cathode on the samples parallel directed to it and the other arranged opposite in the nitrogen pressure ranged from 0.5 to 3.0 Pa are investigated.

  3. Multi-layer Ti-based Coating Obtained by Arc PVD Method

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlov, Konstantin; Gorchakov, Konstantin; Gorchakova, Svetlana; Salojoki, Kari; Barchenko, Vladimir; Sokolov, Aleksandr

    2013-01-01

    We report the obtaining and primary studies of ~ 250microns thick multi-layer Ti-based protective coating deposited at high cooling rate from substance generated by cathode arc discharge in vacuum. High adhesion to steel substrate was attained through prior Arc plasma generator cleaning and successive Ion Bombardment method. All three arc-generated fractions including mainly droplet, vapour and ions have been utilised to form the coating. Obtained coating features pore-free, least defects and...

  4. Refusion of zircaloy scraps by VAR (vacuum arc remelting): preliminary results; Fusao de cavacos de zircaloy por VAR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.A.T.; Mucsi, C.S.; Sato, I.M.; Rossi, J.L.; Martinez, L.G., E-mail: lgallego@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, H.P.S. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Orlando, M.T.D. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel elements and structural components of the core of PWR nuclear reactors are made in zirconium alloys known as Zircaloy. Machining chips and shavings resulting from the manufacturing of these components can not be discarded as scrap, once these alloys are strategic materials for the nuclear area, have high costs and are not produced in Brazil on an industrial bases and, consequently, are imported for the manufacture of nuclear fuel. The reuse of Zircaloy chips has economic, strategic and environmental aspects. In this work is proposed a process for recycling Zircaloy scraps using a VAR (vacuum arc remelting) furnace in order to obtain ingots suitable for the manufacture of components of the reactors. The ingots obtained are being studied in order to verify the influence of processing on composition and microstructure of the remelted material. In this work are presented preliminary results of the composition of obtained ingots compared to start material and the resulting microstructure. (author)

  5. Structural Engineering of Multilayer TiN / CrN System Obtained by the Vacuum Arc Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sobol’

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available By the X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and microindentation methods we have investigated the phase composition, structure, substructure and hardness of vacuum arc multilayer coatings of TiN / CrN system obtained in the range of nitrogen pressure of 1×10–5 ... 5×10–3 Torr when applying continuous and pulsed negative bias potential. Formation of two-phase state with a preferred orientation of the crystallite growth was established at high pressure of (1 ... 5×10–3 Torr and feeding of negative DC bias potential: Ub = – 20 V – texture axis [100], at – 230 V – texture axis [111]. Based on the studies of substructural state, connection of the transition to the superhard (57 GPa state with decrease in the crystallite size and microstrain in TiN layers was established.

  6. Effect of metal vapour vacuum arc ion implantation of aluminium on sliding wear characteristics of Ti-6Al-4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metal vapour vacuum arc ion source is introduced and its more important features and system characteristics are described. Specific reference is made to applications in the field of metallurgical surface treatment by metal ion implantation and some recent developments are reviewed. The effects of aluminium ion implantation (doses up to 1.3 x 1017 ions/cm2) on the sliding wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V forms the emphasis of the ensuing investigation. Damage induced in sliding wear tests was reduced by about 50% after aluminium implantation, owing to a higher surface hardness. Several techniques of surface analysis including glancing angle X-ray diffraction and glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy indicated that subsurface precipitates were primarily responsible for the observed wear mechanism. The strengthening of subsurface material delayed the onset of superficial plastic deformation and resulted in enhanced tribological properties. (Author)

  7. Interface control of atomic layer deposited oxide coatings by filtered cathodic arc deposited sublayers for improved corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, Emma, E-mail: emma.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka [DIARC-Technology Inc., Espoo (Finland); Díaz, Belén; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS (UMR 7075) – Chimie ParisTech (ENSCP), F-75005 Paris (France); Fenker, Martin [FEM Research Institute, Precious Metals and Metals Chemistry, D-73525 Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany); Tóth, Lajos; Radnóczi, György [Research Centre for Natural Sciences HAS, (MTA TKK), Budapest (Hungary); Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Sublayers grown with filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) were added under atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide coatings for interface control and improved corrosion protection of low alloy steel. The FCAD sublayer was either Ta:O or Cr:O–Ta:O nanolaminate, and the ALD layer was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanolaminate, Al{sub x}Ta{sub y}O{sub z} mixture or graded mixture. The total thicknesses of the FCAD/ALD duplex coatings were between 65 and 120 nm. Thorough analysis of the coatings was conducted to gain insight into the influence of the FCAD sublayer on the overall coating performance. Similar characteristics as with single FCAD and ALD coatings on steel were found in the morphology and composition of the duplex coatings. However, the FCAD process allowed better control of the interface with the steel by reducing the native oxide and preventing its regrowth during the initial stages of the ALD process. Residual hydrocarbon impurities were buried in the interface between the FCAD layer and steel. This enabled growth of ALD layers with improved electrochemical sealing properties, inhibiting the development of localized corrosion by pitting during immersion in acidic NaCl and enhancing durability in neutral salt spray testing. - Highlights: • Corrosion protection properties of ALD coatings were improved by FCAD sublayers. • The FCAD sublayer enabled control of the coating-substrate interface. • The duplex coatings offered improved sealing properties and durability in NSS. • The protective properties were maintained during immersion in a corrosive solution. • The improvements were due to a more ideal ALD growth on the homogeneous FCAD oxide.

  8. Thermal conductivity of titanium nitride/titanium aluminum nitride multilayer coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of [TiN/TiAlN]n multilayer coatings with different bilayer numbers n = 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 were deposited on stainless steel substrate AISI 304 by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the coatings have been analyzed by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the preferential orientation growth along the (111) direction is reduced in the multilayer coatings. TEM analysis reveals that the grain size of the coatings decreases with increasing bilayer number. HRTEM imaging of the multilayer coatings shows a high density misfit dislocation between the TiN and TiAlN layers. The cross-plane thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by a pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. With increasing bilayer number, the multilayer coatings' thermal conductivity decreases gradually. This reduction of thermal conductivity can be ascribed to increased phonon scattering due to the disruption of columnar structure, reduced preferential orientation, decreased grain size of the coatings and present misfit dislocations at the interfaces. - Highlights: • TiN/TiAlN multilayer coatings with different bilayer number were deposited on SS. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • Thermal conductivity depends on the coatings' microstructure and number of layers. • With increasing the bilayer number, thermal conductivity decreased

  9. Thermal conductivity of titanium nitride/titanium aluminum nitride multilayer coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samani, M.K., E-mail: majid1@e.ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Ding, X.Z. [Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Khosravian, N. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Amin-Ahmadi, B. [Electron Microscopy for materials Science (EMAT), Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Yi, Yang [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 117608 (Singapore); Chen, G. [BC Photonics Technological Company, 5255 Woodwards Rd., Richmond, BC V7E 1G9 (Canada); Neyts, E.C.; Bogaerts, A. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Tay, B.K. [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    A series of [TiN/TiAlN]{sub n} multilayer coatings with different bilayer numbers n = 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 were deposited on stainless steel substrate AISI 304 by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the coatings have been analyzed by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the preferential orientation growth along the (111) direction is reduced in the multilayer coatings. TEM analysis reveals that the grain size of the coatings decreases with increasing bilayer number. HRTEM imaging of the multilayer coatings shows a high density misfit dislocation between the TiN and TiAlN layers. The cross-plane thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by a pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. With increasing bilayer number, the multilayer coatings' thermal conductivity decreases gradually. This reduction of thermal conductivity can be ascribed to increased phonon scattering due to the disruption of columnar structure, reduced preferential orientation, decreased grain size of the coatings and present misfit dislocations at the interfaces. - Highlights: • TiN/TiAlN multilayer coatings with different bilayer number were deposited on SS. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • Thermal conductivity depends on the coatings' microstructure and number of layers. • With increasing the bilayer number, thermal conductivity decreased.

  10. Al-Co Alloys Prepared by Vacuum Arc Melting: Correlating Microstructure Evolution and Aqueous Corrosion Behavior with Co Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Lekatou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypereutectic Al-Co alloys of various Co contents (7–20 weight % (wt.% Co were prepared by vacuum arc melting, aiming at investigating the influence of the cobalt content on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. Quite uniform and directional microstructures were attained. The obtained microstructures depended on the Co content, ranging from fully eutectic growth (7 wt.% and 10 wt.% Co to coarse primary Al9Co2 predominance (20 wt.% Co. Co dissolution in Al far exceeded the negligible equilibrium solubility of Co in Al; however, it was hardly uniform. By increasing the cobalt content, the fraction and coarseness of Al9Co2, the content of Co dissolved in the Al matrix, and the hardness and porosity of the alloy increased. All alloys exhibited similar corrosion behavior in 3.5 wt.% NaCl with high resistance to localized corrosion. Al-7 wt.% Co showed slightly superior corrosion resistance than the other compositions in terms of relatively low corrosion rate, relatively low passivation current density and scarcity of stress corrosion cracking indications. All Al-Co compositions demonstrated substantially higher resistance to localized corrosion than commercially pure Al produced by casting, cold rolling and arc melting. A corrosion mechanism was formulated. Surface films were identified.

  11. Adding high time resolution to charge-state-specific ion energy measurements for pulsed copper vacuum arc plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Koichi; Zhou, Xue; Anders, André

    2015-01-01

    Charge-state-resolved ion energy-time-distributions of pulsed Cu arc plasma were obtained by using direct (time dependent) acquisition of the ion detection signal from a commercial ion mass-per-charge and energy-per-charge analyzer. We find a shift of energies of Cu2+, Cu3+ and Cu4+ ions to lower values during the first few hundred microseconds after arc ignition, which is evidence for particle collisions in the plasma. The generation of Cu1+ ions in the later part of the pulse, measured by the increase of Cu1+ signal intensity and an associated slight reduction of the mean charge state point to charge exchange reactions between ions and neutrals. At the very beginning of the pulse, when the plasma expands into vacuum and the plasma potential strongly fluctuates, ions with much higher energy (over 200 eV) were observed. Early in the pulse, the ion energies observed are approximately proportional to the ion charge state, and we conclude that the acceleration mechanism is primarily based on acceleration in an e...

  12. Investigation of micro-structure and micro-hardness properties of 304L stainless steel treated in a hot cathode arc discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have established a hot cathode arc discharge plasma system, where different stainless steel samples can be treated by monitoring the plasma parameters and nitriding parameters independently. In the present work, a mixture of 70% N2 and 30% H2 gases was fed into the plasma chamber and the treatment time and substrate temperature were optimized for treating 304L Stainless Steel samples. Various physical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micro-vickers hardness tester were employed to determine the structural, surface composition and surface hardness of the treated samples

  13. Investigation of micro-structure and micro-hardness properties of 304L stainless steel treated in a hot cathode arc discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Hitendra K., E-mail: hkmalik@physics.iitd.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Singh, Omveer [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Dahiya, Raj P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal–131039 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We have established a hot cathode arc discharge plasma system, where different stainless steel samples can be treated by monitoring the plasma parameters and nitriding parameters independently. In the present work, a mixture of 70% N{sub 2} and 30% H{sub 2} gases was fed into the plasma chamber and the treatment time and substrate temperature were optimized for treating 304L Stainless Steel samples. Various physical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micro-vickers hardness tester were employed to determine the structural, surface composition and surface hardness of the treated samples.

  14. Arc-Discharge Ion Sources for Heavy Ion Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A miniature multiple beamlet approach to an injector system was recently proposed in order to reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of the injector. The beamlets of very high current density are needed to meet the brightness requirement. Besides vacuum arc ion sources, cold-cathode gas ion sources are candidates for this application. Vacuum-arc metal ion sources and vacuum-arc-like gas ion sources are discussed. Experiments are presented that focus on the short-pulse plasma composition and ion charge state distribution. Mg and Sr have been identified as the most promising metals leading to mono-species beams when 20 μs arc pulses are used. It is shown that the efficient production of gas ions requires the presence of a magnetic field

  15. Characteristics of CrAlSiN + DLC coating deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc PVD and PACVD process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukaszkowicz, Krzysztof, E-mail: krzysztof.lukaszkowicz@polsl.pl [Institute of Engineering Materials and Biomaterials, Silesian University of Technology, Konarskiego St. 18A, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Sondor, Jozef, E-mail: j.sondor@liss.cz [LISS, a.s., Dopravni 2603, 756 61 Roznov p.R. (Czech Republic); Balin, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.balin@us.edu.pl [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physic, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Kubacki, Jerzy, E-mail: jerzy.kubacki@us.edu.pl [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physic, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • The chemical composition of the CrAlSiN + DLC coatings was studied. • The coatings have nanostructural character with fine crystallites. • Their average size grain is less than 10 nm. • The coatings demonstrate friction coefficient within the range 0.05–0.07. • The coating demonstrated a dense cross-sectional morphology as well as good adhesion to the substrate. - Abstract: Coating system composed of CrAlSiN film covered by diamond-like carbon (DLC)-based lubricant, deposited on hot work tool steel substrate was the subject of the research. The CrAlSiN and DLC layers were deposited by PVD lateral rotating ARC-cathodes (LARC) and PACVD technology on the X40CrMoV5-1 respectively. HRTEM investigation shows an amorphous character of DLC layer. It was found that the tested CrAlSiN layer has a nanostructural character with fine crystallites while their average size is less than 10 nm. Based on the XRD pattern of the CrAlSiN, the occurrence of fcc phase was only observed in the coating, the texture direction 〈3 1 1〉 is perpendicular to the sample surface. Combined SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS studies confirmed assumed chemical composition and layered structure of the coating. The chemical distribution of the elements inside the layers and at the interfaces was analyzed by SEM and AES methods. It was shown that additional CrN layer is present between substrate and CrAlSiN coating. The atomic concentration of the particular elements of DLC and CrAlSiN layer was calculated from the XPS measurements. In sliding dry friction conditions the friction coefficient for the investigated elements is set in the range between 0.05 and 0.07. The investigated coating reveals high wear resistance. The coating demonstrated a dense cross-sectional morphology as well as good adhesion to the substrate.

  16. Plasma distribution prop erties of vacuum ribb on-like catho dic arc plasma fliter and Raman studies of diamond-like carb on films p erpared by it%带状真空电弧磁过滤器等离子体分布特性及制备类金刚石膜研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刘合; 刘红涛; 罗辑; 许亿

    2016-01-01

    As is well known, most filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition technology adopts filters with various geometries to remove macro particles in the last three decades, but almost all of them have a circular cross-section. Compared with the traditional toroidal duct filters, the rectangular graphite cathodic arc source can have a larger area which can be an arc source of a ribbon-like cathodic arc plasma filter, which has a higher coating efficiency due to its larger area arc source and may be more suitable for a larger scale industrial production. Thus, the research on the plasma distribution properties within the vacuum ribbon-like cathodic arc plasma filter is of great significance. In this paper, a rectangular graphite cathodic arc source is used to produce the ribbon-like cathodic arc plasma. Within the filter, a 90◦ curved magnetic duct with a rectangular cross-section is used as the arc filter. The ribbon-like cathodic arc plasma is transmitted from cathode to the deposition area along the magnetic line produced by external coils. A Faraday cup ion energy analyzer and a Langmuir probe are used to characterize the distribution properties of the filtered plasma at 15 places on the exit plane. Ion energies and ion density at these positions are obtained. For the special “retrograde”motion of the cathode spot on the rectangular target surface, the ion energies and ion density data are not stable. In order to obtain representative values, the net results are the average value of 3 measurements. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited by the ribbon-like cathodic arc plasma filter at the same exit plane and their structures are characterized by Raman shift. To compare the distinctness of the 15 Raman spectrums, each Raman spectrum of the DLC films is normalized and shown in a figure. Meanwhile, the thicknesses of all the DLC films are measured by step profiler. Results show that the ion energies are of Maxwell distributions at all the 15 places on the exit

  17. Structure and properties of Mo-containing diamond-like carbon films produced by ion source assisted cathodic arc ion-plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion source assisted cathodic arc ion-plating was used to synthesize molybdenum containing diamond-like carbon films. The element of molybdenum is uniformly distributed in our sample as analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The surface morphology of the films was analyzed by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope. The structure and bond state of the molybdenum containing diamond-like carbon films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Mo content in the films was controlled by varying of the acetylene gas flow rates. The root-mean square roughness of the as-deposited sample was found in the range of 1.5 nm. The hardness of 35 GPa has been achieved at the optimum conditions of synthesis. This can be attributed to formation multilayer structure during deposition process and the formation of hard molybdenum carbide phase with C=Mo bonding. The results show that ion source assisted cathodic arc ion-plating is an effective technique to fabricate metal-containing carbon films with controlled metal contents.

  18. Unified model to the Tungsten inert Gas welding process including the cathode, the plasma and the anode; Modele couple cathode-plasma-piece en vue de la simulation du procede de soudage a l'arc TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochard, M.

    2009-06-15

    During this work, a 2D axially symmetric model of a TIG arc welding process had been developed in order to predict for given welding parameters, the needed variables for a designer of welded assembly: the heat input on the work piece, the weld pool geometry,... The developed model, using the Cast3M finite elements software, deals with the physical phenomena acting in each part of the process: the cathode, the plasma, the work piece with a weld pool, and the interfaces between these parts. To solve this model, the thermohydraulics equations are coupled with the electromagnetic equations that are calculated in part using the least squares finite element method. The beginning of the model validation consisted in comparing the results obtained with the ones available in the scientific literature. Thus, this step points out the action of each force in the weld pool, the contribution of each heat flux in the energy balance. Finally, to validate the model predictiveness, experimental and numerical sensitivity analyses were conducted using a design of experiments approach. The effects of the process current, the arc gap and the electrode tip angle on the weld pool geometry and the energy transferred to the work piece and the arc efficiency were studied. The good agreement obtained by the developed model for these outputs shows the good reproduction of the process physics. (author)

  19. Surface modification of compressor steels using thermally assisted ionic diffusion in the titanium plasma of a vacuum arc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Azarovskii, E. N.

    2015-11-01

    The thermally stimulated ionic diffusion (ionic modification) of titanium ions at the surfaces of EP866 and EI961 compressor steels is considered in the plasma of the high-current vacuum-arc discharge (VAD) in an ion-plasma MAP-3 plant. The dependences of the sample temperature in the sputtering chamber of the ion-plasma MAP-3 plant and the rate of specific change of the sample mass on the bias voltage at a VAD current of 300 A are obtained. The elemental composition of the surface layers of the samples subjected to ion treatment is studied. It is shown that, at a VAD current of 300 A and a bias voltage up to 400 V, the compressor steel sample temperature does not exceed 440°C and the inversion voltage, which determines the transition from coating condensation to ion etching of a substrate, is ~360 V for EP866 steel and ~390 V for EI961 steel. The corrosion resistance of the compressor steels modified at a VAD current of 300 A is investigated.

  20. InGaN thin film deposition on Si(100) and glass substrates by termionic vacuum arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdoğan, E.; Kundakçı, M.; Mantarcı, A.

    2016-04-01

    Group-III nitride semiconductors covering infrared, visible and ultraviolet spectral range has direct band gaps changing from 0,7 eV (InN) to 3,4 eV (GaN). LEDs emit red, blue, green light, ultraviolet (UV) laser diodes (LD), UV light detectors and high power electronic devices are obtained and commercialized based on group-III nitride materials. InGaN semiconductor can be deposited by different techniques such as molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). In this study, InGaN thin films were prepared on Si and glass substrates as well as on GaN layer by termionic vacuum arc (TVA) which is a plasma asisted thin film deposition technique. The film was deposited at 10-6 torr working pressure, 18A filament current. Plasma was produced at 200 V with 0,6A plasma current. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of InGaN thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrophotometer was used to analyze microstructure of the deposited films. Scanning electon microscopy (SEM) were used for surface morphology characterizations. Compositional analysis was done by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX).

  1. Photon reflectivity distributions from the LHC beam screen and their implications on the arc beam vacuum system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahne, N.; Baglin, V.; Collins, I. R.; Giglia, A.; Pasquali, L.; Pedio, M.; Nannarone, S.; Cimino, R.

    2004-07-01

    In particle accelerators with intense positively charged bunched beams, an electron cloud may induce beam instabilities and the related beam induced electron multipacting (BIEM) can result in an undesired pressure rise. In a cryogenic machine such as the large hadron collider (LHC), the BIEM will introduce additional heat load. When present, synchrotron radiation (SR) may generate a significant number of photoelectrons, that may play a role in determining the onset and the detailed properties of the electron cloud related instability. Since electrons are constrained to move along field lines, those created on the accelerator equator in a strong vertical (dipole) field cannot participate in the e-cloud build-up. Therefore, for the LHC there has been a continuous effort to find solutions to absorb the photons on the equator. The solution adopted for the LHC dipole beam screens is a saw-tooth structure on the illuminated equator. SR from a bending magnet beamline at ELETTRA, Italy (BEAR) has been used to measure the reflectivities (forward, back-scattered and diffuse), for a flat and a saw-tooth structured Cu co-laminated surface using both white light SR, similar to the one emitted by LHC, and monochromatic light. Our data show that the saw-tooth structure does reduce the total reflectivity and modifies the photon energy distribution of the reflected photons. The implications of these results on the LHC arc vacuum system are discussed.

  2. Characterization of surface enhancement of carbon ion-implanted TiN coatings by metal vapor vacuum arc ion implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, C L

    2002-01-01

    The modification of the surfaces of energetic carbon-implanted TiN films using metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion implantation was investigated, by varying ion energy and dose. The microhardness, microstructure and chemical states of carbon, implanted on the surface layer of TiN films, were examined, as functions of ion energy and dose, by nanoindenter, transmission electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Results revealed that the microhardness increased from 16.8 up to 25.3 GPa and the friction coefficient decreased to approximately 0.2, depending on the implanted ion energy and dose. The result is attributed to the new microcrystalline phases of TiCN and TiC formed, and carbon concentration saturation of the implanted matrix can enhance the partial mechanical property of TiN films after MEVVA treatment. The concentration distribution, implantation depth and chemical states of carbon-implanted TiN coatings depended strongly on the ion dose and...

  3. Tribological characteristics and mechanical properties of multilayer vacuum arc covered with a bearing TiN/ZrN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured multilayered coatings TiN/ZrN with 134...533 layers and the average thickness of layers of 20...125 nm have been synthesized by means of vacuum-arc deposition method. Good planarity of the layers obtained in nanometer scale from plasma flows in reaction medium has been revealed. As a model of critical working conditions of the coatings, the mechanisms of structural and phase changes in surface layers at conditions of influence of aggressive oxygen atmosphere at high temperature (700 deg C) have been determined. The influence of thickness parameter of multilayered system on its hardness has been shown. It has been determined, that the highest hardness of 42 GPa and the lowest abrasive wear of the coating 1.3·10-5 mm3·N-1·mm-1 and the counter body 1.9·10-6 mm3·N-1·mm-1 are inherent to the system TiN/ZrN with the minimal thickness of the layers of 20 nm in a period. The obtained results have been explained by the influence of dimensional factor of interphase borders, which is multiply enhanced in multilayered system with the nanometer scale thickness of the coatings

  4. Vacuum-arc chromium coatings for Zr-1%Nb alloy protection against high-temperature oxidation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of vacuum-arc Cr coatings on the alloy E110 resistance to the oxidation in air at temperatures 1020 and 1100 deg C for 3600 s has been investigated. The methods of scanning electron microscope, X-ray analysis and nanoindentation were used to determine the thickness, phase, mechanical properties of coatings and oxide layers. The results show that the chromium coating can effectively protect fuel tubes against high-temperature oxidation in air for one hour. In the coating during oxidation at T = 1100 deg C a Cr2O3 oxide layer of 5 μm thickness is formed preventing further oxygen penetration into the coating, and thus the tube shape is conserved. Under similar test conditions the oxidation of uncoated tubes with formation of a porous monocline oxide of ZrO2 of a thickness more than ≥ 250 μm is observed, then the deformation and cracking of samples occur and the oxide layer breaks away

  5. The double sheath on cathodes of discharges burning in cathode vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2010-09-01

    The model of a collisionless near-cathode space-charge sheath with ionization of atoms emitted by the cathode surface is considered. Numerical calculations showed that the mathematical problem is solvable and its solution is unique. In the framework of this model, the sheath represents a double layer with a potential maximum, with the ions which are produced before the maximum returning to the cathode surface and those produced after the maximum escaping into the plasma. Numerical results are given in a form to be readily applicable in analysis of discharges burning in cathode vapour, such as vacuum arcs. In particular, the results indicate that the ion backflow coefficient in such discharges exceeds 0.5, in agreement with values extracted from the experiment.

  6. Ion energy distribution and basic characteristics of plasma flows of nonself-sustained arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results on study of the nonself-sustained arc discharge basic characteristics at currents up to 35 A are presented. The ion energy distributions and dynamics of the directed motion average energy of plasma flow ions are studied. Floating potentials in the plasma flows are measured. Ionization coefficients of the generated plasma flows and their dependence on the discharge current are studied. It is shown that at the discharge currents equal 20...30 A the vacuum arc discharge in anode material vapors can effectively create dropless and highly ionized plasma flows of different metals and provides films deposition rates, which are comparable to possibilities of the cathode vacuum arc discharge

  7. Potential effects of bias and nitrogen pressure on structural-stress state and properties of nitride coatings, obtained by evaporation of high-entropy alloys by vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the influence of the negative bias potential and pressure of the atmosphere of nitrogen on the structural properties of the stress state and vacuum-arc nitride coatings. The comparison data for the three groups of coatings: 1 - (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf) N, 2 - (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta) N , and 3 - TiN. Excluding the drop component, multielement nitride coatings deposited in nitrogen are single phase with cubic fcc lattice (structural type NaCl). At the level of substructure in these coatings increase the nitrogen pressure leads to an increase in the crystallite size and micro strain relaxation , and increase the capacity of displacement - the opposite effect. The absolute value of micro deformation in such coatings is higher and the size of crystallites - less than mononitrides. Maximum hardness of 70 GPa achieved nitride coatings deposited by vacuum arc evaporation (Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Hf) alloy at a nitrogen pressure of 0.35 Pa

  8. The influence of nitrogen pressure on the structure of condensates, obtained at vacuum-arc deposition from high entropy alloy AlCrTiZrNbY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of structural engineering of vacuum-arc coatings based on the high entropy alloy AlCrTiZrNbY have been studied by means of electron microscopy with energy dispersion element analysis, X-ray diffractometry and microidentation methods. It was found, that the coatings formed by means of vacuum-arc method are two-phase objects. The change of nitrogen pressure from 2.0 centre dot 10-4 to 5.0 centre dot 10-4 Torr during the deposition increases the contents of its atoms in the condensate from 2.7 to 21.62%, and this is accompanied by the transfer from nanocrystallic and claster to nanocrystallic two phase state (combination of bcc and fcc structures) and leads to hardness increase from 6.7 to 7.6 GPa. The observed structure changes are explained by the formation of defects of packaging in fcc crystal lattice at low nitrogen content.

  9. Overview spectra and axial distribution of spectral line intensities in a high-current vacuum arc with CuCr electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisnyak, M.; Pipa, A. V.; Gorchakov, S.; Iseni, S.; Franke, St.; Khapour, A.; Methling, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2015-09-01

    Spectroscopic investigations of free-burning vacuum arcs in diffuse mode with CuCr electrodes are presented. The experimental conditions of the investigated arc correspond to the typical system for vacuum circuit breakers. Spectra of six species Cu I, Cu II, Cu III, Cr I, Cr II, and Cr III have been analyzed in the wavelength range 350-810 nm. The axial intensity distributions were found to be strongly dependent on the ionization stage of radiating species. Emission distributions of Cr II and Cu II can be distinguished as well as the distributions of Cr III and Cu III. Information on the axial distribution was used to identify the spectra and for identification of overlapping spectral lines. The overview spectra and some spectral windows recorded with high resolution are presented. Analysis of axial distributions of emitted light, which originates from different ionization states, is presented and discussed.

  10. Determination of work functions near melting points of refractory metals by using a direct-current arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, W. A.; Chapman, G. B., II

    1972-01-01

    Effective work functions of refractory metals at temperatures near their melting points were determined by using a direct-current arc. A metal wire connected as the cathode was melted by striking an arc discharge in an argon atmosphere. A melted sphere was formed with a definite emitting area which was calculated from the sphere diameter measured after terminating the arc. Effective work functions were calculated from the Richardson-Dushman equation by using this emission area. The procedure is experimentally advantageous because surface cleanliness of the specimen is not critical, high vacuum is not required, and the anode-cathode spacing is not critical.

  11. Influences of deposition parameters on the microstructure and properties of nanostructural TiN films synthesized by filtered cathodic arc plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yujuan; YAN Pengxun; WU Zhiguo; ZHANG Pingyu

    2005-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) films with nanostructure were prepared at ambient temperature on a (111) silicon substrate by the filtered cathodic arc plasma (FCAP) technology with an in-plane "S" filter. The effects of deposition parameters on the grain size, texture and nano-hardness of the films were systematically investigated. The grain size was obtained through calculation using the Scherrer formula and observed by TEM. The results of X-ray diffraction and electon diffraction indicated that increasing either negative subs~ate bias or argon flow promoted the formation of (111) preferred orientation. High argon flow leads to biaxial texture. The micro-hardness of the TiN films as a function of grain size showed a behavior according to the Hall-Petch relation under high argon flow.

  12. Characterization of SiC in DLC/a-Si films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc using Raman spectroscopy and XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DLC/a-Si films were deposited on germanium substrates. a-Si film was initially deposited as a seed layer on the substrate using DC magnetron sputtering. DLC film was then deposited on the a-Si layer via a pulsed filtered cathodic arc (PFCA) system. In situ ellipsometry was used to monitor the thicknesses of the growth films, allowing a precise control over the a-Si and DLC thicknesses of 6 and 9 nm, respectively. It was found that carbon atoms implanting on a-Si layer act not only as a carbon source for DLC formation, but also as a source for SiC formation. The Raman peak positions at 796 cm-1 and 972 cm-1 corresponded to the LO and TO phonon modes of SiC, respectively, were observed. The results were also confirmed using TEM, XPS binding energy and XPS depth profile analysis.

  13. Structure and Performance of TiC-containing Diamond-like Carbon Nanocomposite Coatings Deposited by Rectangular Cathodic Arc Ion-plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Guosheng; YIN Zhimin; DING Hui; LI Xiaohong; YANG Bing

    2009-01-01

    TiC-containing diamond-like carbon(TiC-DLC)nanocomposite coatings were deposited by a rectangular cathodic arc ion-plating system using C_2H_2 as reacting gas.Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis show that with increasing flow rate of C_2H_2,the structure of nanocomposite coatings changes from TiC nanograin-containing to graphite nanograin-containing DLC.The hardness measurements show that the hardness decreases from 28 GPa to 18 GPa with increasing C_2H_2 flow rate.The scratch test show that a high critical load(>40 N)was obtained and exhibited a good adhesion between the coating and the substrate.Wear experiment shows that the friction coefficient of TiC-DLC nanocomposite coatings decreases with increasing C_2H_2.A low friction coefficient of 0.07 was obtained at 480 sccm C_2H_2.

  14. Electrical, optical, and structural properties of thin films with tri-layers of AZO/ZnMgO/AZO grown by filtered vacuum arc deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► AZO/ZnMgO/AZO tri-layered films were grown by FCAD filtered cathodic arc deposition. ► The films were highly transparent and presented excellent electrical resistivity. ► The films presented optical transmittance in the visible light higher than 80%. - Abstract: Transparent conductive oxides (TCO) are indispensable as front electrode for most of thin film electronic devices such as transparent electrodes for flat panel displays, photovoltaic cells, windshield defrosters, transparent thin film transistors, and low emissivity windows. Thin films of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) have shown to be one of the most promising TCOs. In this study, three layered Al-doped ZnO (AZO)/ZnMgO/AZO heterostructures were prepared by filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) on glass substrates. The objective is to find a set of parameters that will allow for improved optical and electrical properties of the films such as low resistivity, high mobility, high number of charge carriers, and high transmittance. We have investigated the effect of modifications in thickness and doping of the ZnMgO inner layer on the structural, electrical, and optical characteristics of the stacked heterostructures.

  15. Bias voltage effect on the structure and property of chromium copper-diamond-like carbon multilayer films fabricated by cathodic arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium copper-diamond-like carbon (Cr:Cu)-DLC films were deposited onto silicon and by cathodic arc evaporation process using chromium (Cr) and copper (Cu) target arc sources to provide Cr and Cu in the Me-DLC. Acetylene reactive gases were the carbon source and activated at 180 deg. C at 13 mTorr, and a substrate bias voltage was varied from -50 V to -200 V to provide the (Cr:Cu)-DLC structure. The structure, interface, and chemical bonding state of the produced film were analyzed by transmission electron microscope (TEM), IR Fourier transform (FTIR) spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the Cr-containing a-C:H/Cu coatings exhibited an amorphous layer of DLC:Cr layer and a crystalline layer of Cu multilayer structure. The profiles of sp3/sp2 (XPS) ratios corresponded to the change of microhardness profile by varying the pressure of the negative DC bias voltage. These (Cr:Cu)-DLC coatings are promising materials for soft substrate protective coatings.

  16. The optimization of molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by the cathodic arc ion plating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells have been deposited using DC magnetron sputtering methods. The electronic pathway properties of the molybdenum film have been highly dependent on the working gas pressure in magnetron sputtering, which should be carefully controlled to obtain high conductivity and adhesion. A coating method, cathodic arc ion plating, was used for molybdenum back contact electrode fabrication. The aim of this work was to find a metallization method for CIGS solar cells, which has less sensitivity on the working pressure. The resistivity, grain size, growth structures, stress, and efficiency of the films in CIGS solar cells were investigated. The results reveal that the growth structures of the molybdenum films mainly affect the conductivity. The lowest electrical resistivity of the ion-plated molybdenum films was 6.9 μΩ-cm at a pressure of 0.7 Pa. The electrical resistivity variation showed a gently increasing slope with linearity under a working gas pressure of 13.3 Pa. However, a high value of the residual stress of over 1.3 GPa was measured. In order to reduce stress, titanium film was selected as the buffer layer material, and the back contact films were optimized by double-layer coating of two kinds of hetero-materials with arc ion plating. CIGS solar cells prepared molybdenum films to measure the efficiency and to examine the effects of the back contact electrode. The resistivity, grain size, and surface morphology of molybdenum films were measured by four-point probe, X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. The residual stress of the films was calculated from differences in bending curvatures measured using a laser beam. - Highlights: • Molybdenum back contact films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells were prepared by the cathodic arc ion plating. • The lowest electrical resistivity of molybdenum film was 6.9 μΩ-cm. • Titanium buffer layer reduced the compressive residual stress of ion

  17. Structural and optical characteristics of filtered vacuum arc deposited N:TiO{sub x} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çetinörgü-Goldenberg, E., E-mail: edacetinorgu@gmail.com [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Tel Aviv University, POB 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Burstein, L. [Wolfson Applied Materials Research Center, Tel Aviv University, POB 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chayun-Zucker, I.; Avni, R.; Boxman, R.L. [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, Tel Aviv University, POB 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-06-30

    Nitrogen doped titanium oxide (N:TiO{sub x}) thin films were deposited using filtered vacuum arc deposition. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited in a pure oxygen environment indicated that films were polycrystalline in the anatase phase, while films deposited in an atmosphere in which the N{sub 2} fraction was greater than 9% were amorphous, for substrate temperatures up to 500 °C. Annealing at 400 °C in N{sub 2} for 1 h generated polycrystalline films with anatase phase, independent of %N{sub 2} during deposition. Film surface roughness increased from 0.5 up to 3.2 nm when the substrate temperature was increased from room temperature to 500 °C for films deposited in a 41%N{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that all films deposited in pure oxygen were stoichiometric TiO{sub 2}. N content in the films increased with %N{sub 2} in the deposition atmosphere, however the N-content in the film, 1-5 at.% N, was much less than that in the gas mixture (9–69%N{sub 2}). Annealing decreased the N-content in these films to < 1 at.%. In addition, the data revealed that all N:TiO{sub x} films had two main N 1s components, at 396–397 eV and at 399–400 eV, associated with substitutional and interstitial nitrogen, respectively. Transmission data indicated that the average transmission of films deposited at lower N{sub 2} partial pressures (< 41%) was approximately 80%, and it decreased to ∼ 50% for higher %N{sub 2}. The absorption edge of the films shifted to longer wavelengths with increased substrate temperature and %N{sub 2}, from ∼ 380 nm up to ∼ 485 nm for films deposited with 41%N{sub 2} and a substrate temperature of 500 °C. - Highlights: • Amorphous films were deposited in N{sub 2} atmosphere (> 9%). • Film surface roughness decreased with %N{sub 2} in the total deposition pressure. • Two main N 1s peaks associated with substitutional and interstitial nitrogen. • Absorption edge shifted to

  18. Possibilities of structural engineering in multilayer vacuum-arc ZrN/CrN coatings by varying the nanolayer thickness and application of a bias potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol', O. V.; Andreev, A. A.; Gorban', V. F.; Stolbovoy, V. A.; Melekhov, A. A.; Postelnyk, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of attaining an superhard state in multilayer vacuum-arc ZrN/CrN coatings with a layer thickness of about 20 nm has been established. It has been shown that the application of a constant negative potential for structural engineering during deposition leads to the formation of solid solutions due to mixing of interfaces. The hardness of these systems exceeds 30 GPa. The application of a pulsed high-voltage bias potential at which the ordering of atoms stimulated by elevated mobility is observed makes it possible to suppress the mixing of the interfaces and to attain elevated hardness (up to 42 GPa) for nanometer layer thicknesses.

  19. Surface Morphology and Properties of CrN Coating Deposited by Superimposed Pulse Bias Cathodic Arc Ion Deposition%脉冲偏压电弧离子镀CrN薄膜的表面形貌和性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨娟; 文晓霞; 卢春灿; 陈志谦; 聂朝胤

    2008-01-01

    采用脉冲偏压电孤离子镀技术沉积了CrN薄膜,并考察了在不同偏压下薄膜的表面形貌、相结构、显微硬度和耐磨性.随着偏压的增加,CrN薄膜表面颗粒运渐变少,表面粗糙度降低,结晶度增大,偏压为-100 V的CrN薄膜具有致密的表面结构,较高的硬度,最佳的抗磨性能.%In this study, the cathodic arc ion plating technique was used to deposit CrN films on stainless steel sub-strates. The mechanical properties of the cathodic arc ion deposited CrN films were correlated to the microstructure of the films, which in turn was determined by the vacuum arc deposition parameters. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of bias voltage on the surface morphology, phase structure, microhardness and wear resistance of CrN films. Various standard characterization techniques and equipment, such as X-ray diffraction, ball-on-disc friction tester, surface profilometer, scanning electronic microscopy, microindention system and optical microscopy, were used to analyze and qualify the surface morphology, the mechanical and tribological properties. With increasing e substrate bias voltages, the number of macroparticles decreased. The CrN coatings prepared at -100 V showed smooth surfaces, fine crystalline grains and high hardness and wear resistance.

  20. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  1. Is this an arc or a glow discharge?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A well known criterion for distinguishing an arc discharge from a glow discharge is a low voltage drop (10--30 V) and a high current density that varies from a few tens to 106 A/cm2 depending on arc type. The high current density is an attribute of arcs with cathode spots. The authors report here a study of the mechanism of emission in cathode spot arc where they realized a spotless discharge with a low voltage drop (30--50 V) and a high mean current density (104--106 A/cm2). The discharge was initiated between a broad cathode and point anode. The cathode was a smooth tungsten sphere electrode of about 100 μm in diameter. The point anode was made of various materials (Mo, Cu, Cd) with initial radius 1 μm. Before the experiment the cathode was cleaned by heating at 2,000 K at high vacuum (10-8 Torr). The discharge was initiated by self-breakdown when electrodes under the voltage 200--500 V were brought to close proximity with each other. The cathode-anode spacing d at the moment of breakdown was estimated to be < 1 μm. The discharge current was varied within 1--3 A by changing the applied voltage and impedance of coaxial cable generator. The discharge burned during 100--1,000 ns. After the single discharge the cathode and anode were examined with a scanning electron microscope. The cathode surface exposed to the discharge was smooth, i.e. no erosion pits similar to arc craters were found on the cathode surface. The anode was shortened after discharge by 5--50 μm depending on current, material and cone angle. A high current density and low voltage drop implies that this is an arc discharge, while the cold cathode and the absence f cathode spot trace are pertinent to a dense glow discharge. The mechanism of emission involving secondary electron emission is to be discussed

  2. Experimental test of whether electrostatically charged micro-organisms and their spores contribute to the onset of arcs across vacuum gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisham, L. R.; von Halle, A.; Carpe, A. F.; Gilton, K. R.; Rossi, Guy; Stevenson, T. N.

    2013-12-01

    Recently it was proposed [L. R. Grisham et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between conducting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which then become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. This note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maximum operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each case preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance.

  3. Experimental test of whether electrostatically charged micro-organisms and their spores contribute to the onset of arcs across vacuum gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L. R.; Halle, A. von; Carpe, A. F.; Gilton, K. R.; Rossi, Guy; Stevenson, T. N. [Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Recently it was proposed [L. R. Grisham et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between conducting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which then become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. This note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maximum operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each case preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance.

  4. Experimental Test Of Whether Electrostatically Charged Micro-organisms And Their Spores Contribute To The Onset Of Arcs Across Vacuum Gaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,; Grisham, Larry R.

    2014-02-24

    Recently it was proposed [L.R. Grisham, A. vonHalle, A.F. Carpe, Guy Rossi, K.R. Gilton, E.D. McBride, E.P. Gilson, A. Stepanov, T.N. Stevenson, Physics of Plasma 19 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between condu cting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which tnen become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. The note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maxium operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance

  5. Simulation of Magnetically Dispersed Arc Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白冰; 查俊; 张晓宁; 王城; 夏维东

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically dispersed arc plasma exhibits typically dispersed uniform arc column as well as diffusive cathode root and diffusive anode root. In this paper magnetically dispersed arc plasma coupled with solid cathode is numerically simulated by the simplified cathode sheath model of LOWKE . The numerical simulation results in argon show that the maximum value of arc root current density on the cathode surface is 3.5×10^7 A/m^2), and the maximum value of energy flux on the cathode surface is 3× 10^7 J/m^2, both values are less than the average values of a contracted arc, respectively.

  6. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  7. Production and characterization of multilayer coatings of Ti/TiN on AISI 316L stainless steel by the PVD technique of cathodic arc ion plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayer coatings were produced from bi-layers (compound layers) of Ti/TiN in a PVD reactor of cathodic arc ion plating. The process was carried out at an Argon gas pressure of 5x10-3 Torr for the interlayer of Ti and a nitrogen + argon pressure of 2x10-2 Torr for the deposit of TiN and a Bias voltage of -500V for the Ti layer and -100V for the TiN layer. The arc current held constant at 80 amp. The samples were kept at high temperatures ≥ 300oC, mounted on a rotating system that held the test piece 15-25 cm from the Ti electrode. Certified composition AISI 316L and AISI 410 stainless steel were used for the substrate. Coatings with one or two compound layers with similar thicknesses were made. The coatings were characterized mechanically by adherence, thickness and microhardness by Vickers indentation with 25g loads. The texture was studied by X-ray diffraction and present phases and residual tensions were determined. The results of the X-ray diffraction show the presence of the mostly TiN phase, with fcc structure in the mono-layer and the bi-layer. Residual tensions are compressive and elevated due to the expansion of the TiN network during the deposition process. Measurements of the bi-layers at different angles showed a relaxing of the tensions close to the surface, which could be due to the effect of the second interlayer of Ti. Preferential orientations associated with the growth process of the layers and the developed microstructure were detected in the TiN (CW)

  8. Effect of Silane Flow Rate on Structure and Corrosion Resistance of Ti–Si—N Thin Films Deposited by a Hybrid Cathodic Arc and Chemical Vapour Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti–Si–N thin films with different silicon contents are deposited by a cathodic arc technique in an Ar+N2 +SiH4 mixture atmosphere. With the increase of silane Bow rate, the content of silicon in the Ti–Si–N films varies from 2.0 at. % to 12.2 at. %. Meanwhile, the cross-sectional morphology of these films changes from an apparent columnar microstructure to a dense fine-grained structure. The x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the Ti–Si–N film consists of TiN crystallites and SiNx amorphous phase. The corrosion resistance is improved with the increase of silane Bow rate. Growth defects in the films produced play a key role in the corrosion process, especially for the local corrosion. The porosity of the films decreases from 0.13% to 0.00032% by introducing silane at the Bow rate of 14sccm. (gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  9. Effect of silane flow rate on structure and corrosion resistance of Ti-Si-N thin films deposited by a hybrid cathodic arc and chemical vapour process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-Si-N thin films with different silicon contents are deposited by a cathodic arc technique in an Ar+N2+SiH4 mixture atmosphere. With the increase of silane flow rate, the content of silicon in the Ti-Si-N films varies from 2.0 at.% to 12.2 at.%. Meanwhile, the cross-sectional morphology of these films changes from an apparent columnar microstructure to a dense fine-grained structure. The x-ray diffractometer (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that the Ti-Si-N film consists of TiN crystallites and SiNx amorphous phase. The corrosion resistance is improved with the increase of silane flow rate. Growth defects in the films produced play a key role in the corrosion process, especially for the local corrosion. The porosity of the films decreases from 0.13% to 0.00032% by introducing silane at the flow rate of 14 sccm. (authors)

  10. A comparison study between atomic and ionic nitrogen doped carbon films prepared by ion beam assisted cathode arc deposition at various pulse frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison study of microstructure and bonds composition of carbon nitride (CNx) films fabricated at atomic and ionic nitrogen source by pulse cathode arc method was presented. The relative fractions of CN/CC bonds, N-sp3C/N-sp2C and graphite-like/pyridine-like N bonding configurations in the CN films were evaluated by combining C1s and N1s X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the hardness and optical band gap measurement. The dependence of microstructure (quantity, size and disordering degree of Csp2 clusters) of CNx films on the nitrogen source and pulse frequency was determined by Raman spectroscopy. Films with high atomic ratio of nitrogen/carbon (0.17) and high hardness were produced at ionic nitrogen source and low pulse frequency. The results showed that ionic nitrogen source facilitated the formation of CN bonds and N-sp2C bonding configurations (mainly in graphite-like N form). Moreover presenting an optimum pulse frequency (∼10 Hz) leaded to the most nitrogen coordinated with sp3-C and the highest ratio of CN/CC bonds in the CNx films. An equilibrium action mechanism might exist between the quantity and energy of carbon and nitrogen ions/atoms, giving more nitrogen-incorporated carbon materials. These allow us to obtain the high content of N-Csp3 bonding and expected bonding structure by optimizing pulse frequency and nitrogen source.

  11. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans, M., E-mail: hans@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H. [Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein)

    2014-09-07

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  12. Deposition of silicon-carbon coatings from the plasma of a non-self-sustained arc discharge with a heated cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenadyorov, A. S.; Oskomov, K. V.; Solov'ev, A. A.; Rabotkin, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon doped with silicon oxide ( a-C:H:Si:O), which is referred to as silicon-carbon coatings in this work, consists of thin amorphous films, which are used as commercial solid lubricants due to their higher stability under extreme environmental conditions as compared to amorphous hydrogenated carbon. The deposition of silicon-carbon coatings from the plasma of a non-self-sustained arc discharge with a heated cathode is considered. Silicon-carbon coatings are deposited using polyphenul methylsiloxane as a precursor at a flow rate of 0.05 mL/min in an argon atmosphere at a pressure of 0.1 Pa. A high-frequency power supply is used to apply a high-frequency bias voltage to a substrate during deposition. After deposition, the mechanical properties of the coatings are studied. The maximum hardness of the coating is 20 GPa at a minimum friction coefficient of 0.16 and a wear rate of 1.3 × 10-5 mm3 N-1 m-1. Energy dispersive analysis shows that the coatings contain a significant content of carbon and oxygen (about 80 and 15%, respectively) and a low content of silicon (about 5%).

  13. Effect of pressure on the deposition of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon and carbon nitride films by the pulsed cathodic arc discharge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen-free amorphous carbon (a-C) and carbon nitride (a-C:N) films were deposited using the pulsed cathodic arc discharge at different argon and nitrogen pressures. The surface and mechanical properties of these films were found to strongly depend on the gas pressure. The tetrahedral amorphous carbon and hard a-C:N films with smooth surfaces (rms roughness: 0.15 nm) were prepared at lower gas pressures (-2 Pa). Incorporation of an increasing amount of nitrogen in a-C:N films caused a decrease in film hardness. All the films were covered with the thin (0.3-2 nm) graphite-like surface layers. The film hardness was correlated to the soft surface layer thickness, and the films with thinner surface layers exhibit higher hardness. The mean energies of pulsed plasma beams were measured as the functions of argon and nitrogen pressures. The mean energies of plasma beams decrease in an exponential fashion with increasing gas pressure due to the carbon ion collisions with the neutral gas species. The effects of mean energies of deposited species on the film deposition were explained in terms of the thermal spike migration of surface atoms. The formation of graphite-like surface layers is associated with the low-energy deposition process. The low-energy (10 eV) species may produce the strong thermal spike at film surface, and contribute to the formation of sp3 bonded structure at a sp3 bonded matrix

  14. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds

  15. Synthesis method for ultrananocrystalline diamond in powder employing a coaxial arc plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method that enables us to synthesize ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) in powder is proposed. Highly energetic carbon species ejected from a graphite cathode of a coaxial arc plasma gun were provided on a quartz plate at a high density by repeated arc discharge in a compact vacuum chamber, and resultant films automatically peeled from the plate were aggregated and powdered. The grain size was easily controlled from 2.4 to 15.0 nm by changing the arc discharge energy. It was experimentally demonstrated that the proposed method is a new and promising method that enables us to synthesize UNCD in powder easily and controllably. (author)

  16. Synthesis method for ultrananocrystalline diamond in powder employing a coaxial arc plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Aki; Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2015-07-01

    A new method that enables us to synthesize ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) in powder is proposed. Highly energetic carbon species ejected from a graphite cathode of a coaxial arc plasma gun were provided on a quartz plate at a high density by repeated arc discharge in a compact vacuum chamber, and resultant films automatically peeled from the plate were aggregated and powdered. The grain size was easily controlled from 2.4 to 15.0 nm by changing the arc discharge energy. It was experimentally demonstrated that the proposed method is a new and promising method that enables us to synthesize UNCD in powder easily and controllably.

  17. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  18. Study of the phase composition of silicide coatings, based on layered Nb-Mo structures, obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Lenkovets, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    A multilayer composite ∼1000 μm in thickness, formed by niobium and molybdenum layers (number of layers n = 230), is obtained by vacuum-arc deposition with subsequent siliconization of the surface layers at a temperature of 1200 °C. Layer-by-layer phase analysis is performed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that in the surface layers ∼130 μm in thickness, single-phase silicides (Nb x Mo1- x )Si2 are formed with the hexagonal C40 structure (Strukturbericht designations). Alternating layers of solid solutions based on niobium and molybdenum with a body-centered cubic (BCC) lattice are observed within the composite. The formation of solid solutions caused by heating of the coating leads to convergence of the values of the linear thermal expansion coefficient and Young's modulus at the interface between the layers.

  19. Formation of Biphasic State in Vacuum-Arc Coatings Obtained by Evaporation of Ti-Al-Zr-Nb-Y Alloy in the Atmosphere of Nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Beresnev

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By means of X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and indentation methods, the effect of nitrogen atmosphere pressure on composition, structure and hardness of vacuum-arc (Ti-Al-Zr-Nb-YN coatings during the deposition process has been studied. The two-phase state of the coating with solid-solution metal component (bcc lattice and nitride phase (fcc lattice have been formed. Increasing the pressure of nitrogen atmosphere leads to the increase of nitrogen component in the coating as well as to increase of the ordering regions size, allowing to achieve the hardness of H = 49 GPa at a pressure of P = 0.5 Pa.

  20. Computational and experimental analysis of a U-6w/oNb vacuum consumable arc remelted ingot. A progress report for the Sandia macrosegregation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer code (ZAP) has been developed to simulate the thermodynamic, magnetohydrodynamic, and fluid flow conditions in the liquid and solid-liquid regions of a solidifying ingot during vacuum consumable arc remelting. The code is coupled and constrained with experimentally determined measurements of boundary conditions and melt parameters such as melt rate, melt current, and melt time. The work reported presents one preliminary step in the coupled experimental-numerical process. A 538 kg U-6w/oNb ingot was remelted to obtain regions of constant melting current of 2 through 6 kA in 1 kA increments. The melt was simulated numerically using inputs for the code that were obtained from this experiment. Results of this numerical simulation are compared to experimental results obtained from ingot radiography and chemical analysis

  1. Computational and experimental analysis of a U-6w/oNb vacuum consumable arc remelted ingot. A progress report for the Sandia macrosegregation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanner, F. J.; Bertram, L. A.

    1981-04-01

    A computer code (ZAP) has been developed to simulate the thermodynamic, magnetohydrodynamic, and fluid flow conditions in the liquid and solid-liquid regions of a solidifying ingot during vacuum consumable arc remelting. The code is coupled and constrained with experimentally determined measurements of boundary conditions and melt parameters such as melt rate, melt current, and melt time. The work reported presents one preliminary step in the coupled experimental-numerical process. A 538 kg U-6w/oNb ingot was remelted to obtain regions of constant melting current of 2 through 6 kA in 1 kA increments. The melt was simulated numerically using inputs for the code that were obtained from this experiment. Results of this numerical simulation are compared to experimental results obtained from ingot radiography and chemical analysis.

  2. Physical characteristics, structure and stress state of vacuum-arc TiN coating, deposition on the substrate when applying high-voltage pulse during the deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Method of vacuum-arc deposition with ion implantation, (mode PBIID) obtained by coating of titanium nitride with a hardness of 62 GPa and reaches a high resistance to wear during the cutting. Submission of high-voltage pulses results in the formation of a stable structural state of titanium with cubic mononitride (structural type NaCl) crystal lattice. Comparison of the structure and stress state of titanium nitride coatings obtained in the usual way without additional supply of high-voltage pulses to the substrate during the deposition and the imposition of such pulses, shows that the influence of the pulse characteristics are a significant decrease in crystallite size and undirected growth at low significance of potential bias on substrate (from the 'floating' around -5 to -40 V), and a significant reduction of internal stresses.

  3. Fracture behaviour of As fabricated and hydrogen charged Zr-2.5 wt % Nb pressure tubes made from double and quadruple vacuum arc melted ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article discusses the fracture behaviour of pressure tubes fabricated from quadruple vacuum arc remelted (QM) and double arc remelted (DM) Zr-2.5 wt % Nb ingots. The fracture behaviour of these alloys have been characterized using J-R curves over the temperature range of 27 to 300 deg C using single specimen test techniques and load normalization method. Effect of hydrogen ingress on the fracture properties have also been investigated. The acoustic emission (AE) activity was monitored during the tensile pull of precracked compact tension specimen to observe differences during the fracture process. Significant enhancement in the initiation and crack growth fracture toughness was found for quadruple melted alloys over the entire range of test temperature (ambient to 300 deg C). As fabricated pressure tubes when charged with different levels of hydrogen show sharp reduction in fracture toughness values at ambient temperature. The fracture toughness of hydrided material slowly increases with the increase in the test temperature and above 150 to 170 deg C a sharp increase in the toughness values are observed in the DM alloy. Hydrided QM alloy showed marginally better fracture properties than DM alloys, at low hydrogen levels (25 ppm), which is attributed to the inherently higher toughness of QM matrix. (author)

  4. Vacuum ultra-violet emission of plasma discharges with high Xe partial pressure using a cathode protective layer with high secondary electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the mechanism of the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) emission of plasma discharges, with high Xe partial pressure and high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer, is studied by measuring the VUV light emission directly and comparing it with two-dimensional simulations. From the panel measurement, we find that the high intensity of excimer VUV mainly contributes to the high luminous efficacy of SrCaO-plasma display panels (PDP) at a low sustain voltage. The unchanged Xe excitation efficiency indicates that the electron temperature is not decreased by the high secondary electrons emission protective layer, even though the sustain voltage is much lower. From the two-dimensional simulations, we can find that the ratio of excimer VUV to resonant VUV, which is determined by the collision rate in the discharge, is only significantly affected by the Xe partial pressure, while it is independent of the sustain voltage and the secondary-electrons-emission capability of protective layer. The unchanged average electron energy at the moment when the electric field becomes maximum confirms that the improvement of the VUV production efficiency mainly is attributed to the increase in electron heating efficiency of a PDP with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission protective layer. Combining the experimental and the simulation results, we conclude about the mechanism by which the VUV production is improved for the plasma display panel with a high Xe partial pressure and a cold cathode with high ion-induced secondary electrons emission

  5. Spectroscopic investigations of Cr, CrN and TiCr anti-multipactor coatings grown by cathodic-arc reactive evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cr, CrN, TiCr coatings have been investigated as potential anti-multipactor coatings. The coatings were synthesized by cathodic-arc reactive evaporation in Ar-N2 atmosphere where the ion energy is controlled by substrate biasing. Chemical state analysis and surface composition were studied by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), whereas bulk composition and depth profile were studied by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). The surface morphology was studied by optical profilometry (OP) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compositions of the coatings were CrN and Ti40Cr60 and they were homogeneous in depth. Surface oxidation was higher in Ti40Cr60 than in CrN. Coatings deposited at high negative bias show lower deposition rate and had lower surface roughness than those obtained at low bias. Secondary electron emission yield (SEY) was higher for CrN than for Ti40Cr60, both before and after low-energy Ar+ ion bombardment. The SEY of Ti40Cr60 (1.17 maximum) was clearly smaller than the others. The maximum yield, σ m, and the first crossover electron energy, E 1, are the most important parameters, and (E 1/σ m)1/2 is a good figure of merit. This quantity was approximately 3 eV1/2 for Cr and CrN and 4 eV1/2 for Ti40Cr. After Ar+ ion bombardment, the average value improved significantly to 8.9 eV1/2 for Cr and CrN and 10.2 eV1/2 for Ti40Cr60. The radio-frequency multipactor performance of these materials was simulated using the experimentally determined SEY parameters

  6. Tantalum oxide nanocoatings prepared by atomic layer and filtered cathodic arc deposition for corrosion protection of steel: Comparative surface and electrochemical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► 50 nm Ta2O5 coatings grown by ALD at 160 °C and FCAD for protection of steel. ► Combined analysis by ToF-SIMS, XPS, polarization curves and EIS. ► Relation between chemical architecture and corrosion protection properties studied. ► Localized corrosion by pitting with absence of coating dissolution demonstrated. ► Origin and role of spurious interfacial oxide promoting coating breakdown emphasized. -- Abstract: A comparative study by Time-of-Flight Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, i–E polarization curves and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy of the corrosion protection of low alloy steel by 50 nm thick tantalum oxide coatings prepared by low temperature Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) and Filtered Cathodic Arc Deposition (FCAD) is reported. The data evidence the presence of a spurious oxide layer mostly consisting of iron grown by transient thermal oxidation at the ALD film/substrate interface in the initial stages of deposition and its suppression by pre-treatment in the FCAD process. Carbonaceous contamination (organic and carbidic) resulting from incomplete removal of the organic precursor is the major cause of the poorer sealing properties of the ALD film. No coating dissolution is demonstrated in neutral or acid 0.2 M NaCl solutions. In acid solution localized corrosion by pitting proceeds faster with the ALD than with the FCAD coating. The roles of the pre-existing channel defects exposing the substrate surface and of the spurious interfacial oxide promoting coating breakdown and/or delamination are emphasized

  7. Structure, phase composition and microhardness of vacuum-arc multilayered Ti/Al, Ti/Cu, Ti/Fe, Ti/Zr nano-structures with different periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Multilayer coatings of Ti/Fe, Ti/Al, Ti/Cu and Ti/Zr are generated. • Microstructure and morphology of the different systems are investigated. • XR diffraction analysis was performed to investigate phases composition. • Effects of inter metallic phases on microhardess are investigated. • Correlations between parameters and layer thickness are outlined. - Abstract: The microstructure, phase composition and microhardness of multilayered Ti/Al, Ti/Cu, Ti/Fe and Ti/Zr condensates produced on stainless steel substrates via vacuum-arc evaporation of pure metals were studied. The sublayer periods (Λ) were regulated in the range 80–850 nm by varying the vacuum discharge current and the duration of the successive depositions of metallic plasma onto the substrates while maintaining the total deposition time constant. The regularity of the obtained nanostructures was investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy while phase compositions were identified with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis in order to evidence the presence of interdiffusion and the amount of intermetallics. Condensates cross sections were mechanically characterized by means of microhardness tests. Measurements were correlated to the periods and to the presence of intermetallics

  8. 'Legenda' vacuum-plasma complex for technological surface treatment of metalware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a vacuum-plasma complex for highly efficient technological ion-plasma metalware surface treatment that includes cleaning, etching, polishing, nitriding, doping and implantation with gas ions, and deposition of thin hydrocarbon films. The technological vacuum-plasma complex is based on a high-efficiency low-temperature gas discharge plasma generator with a hollow cathode in which the latter is the inner surface a large-volume cylindrical vacuum chamber. Uniformly distributed high-density gas discharge plasma is generated due to a steady-state non-self-sustained low-pressure arc gas discharge with a cathode consisting of two combined (thermionic and hollow) units located on diametrically opposite flanges of the vacuum chamber. (authors)

  9. Use of a Low-Pressure Non-Self-Sustained Arc Discharge for Plasma Ion Treatment of Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient method for producing low-temperature gas plasmas in large vacuum volumes is based on the initiation and operation of a low-pressure non-self-sustained arc discharge with a combined cathode including a hot cathode and a hollow cathode. For this type of a discharge, the inner walls of the working vacuum chamber play the role of a hollow anode. In the range from 10-1 to 1 Pa, this method makes it possible to produce plasmas of both inert and reactive gases of density 109 - 1010 cm-3 uniform within 20% with respect to the average value in volumes of about 1 m3. This paper describes major applications of this type of plasma in technological processes, such as: finish surface cleaning of materials and articles in vacuum; plasma ion nitriding of steels and alloys; plasma-assisted deposition of functional coatings on materials and articles. (author)

  10. The Effect of Nitrogen Gas Flow Rate on the Properties of TiN-COATED High-Speed Steel (hss) Using Cathodic Arc Evaporation Physical Vapor Deposition (pvd) Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Ali; Hamzah, Esah Binti; Mohd Toff, Mohd Radzi Hj.; Hashim, Abdul Hakim Bin

    Cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) is a widely-used technique for generating highly ionized plasma from which hard and wear resistant physical vapor deposition (PVD) coatings can be deposited. A major drawback of this technique is the emission of micrometer-sized droplets of cathode material from the arc spot, which are commonly referred to as "macroparticles." In present study, titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on high-speed steel (HSS) coupons were produced with a cathodic arc evaporation technique. We studied and discussed the effect of various nitrogen gas flow rates on microstructural and mechanical properties of TiN-coated HSS coupons. The coating properties investigated in this work included the surface morphology, thickness of deposited coating, adhesion between the coating and substrate, coating composition, coating crystallography, hardness and surface characterization using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) with glazing incidence angle (GIA) technique, scratch tester, hardness testing machine, surface roughness tester, and atomic force microscope (AFM). An increase in the nitrogen gas flow rate showed decrease in the formation of macro-droplets in CAE PVD technique. During XRD-GIA studies, it was observed that by increasing the nitrogen gas flow rate, the main peak [1,1,1] shifted toward the lower angular position. Surface roughness decreased with an increase in nitrogen gas flow rate but was higher than the uncoated polished sample. Microhardness of TiN-coated HSS coupons showed more than two times increase in hardness than the uncoated one. Scratch tester results showed good adhesion between the coating material and substrate. Considerable improvement in the properties of TiN-deposited thin films was achieved by the strict control of all operational steps.

  11. Oxidation resistance of TiN, CrN, TiAlN and CrAlN coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, four kinds of hard coatings, TiN, CrN, TiAlN and CrAlN (with Al/Ti or Al/Cr atomic ratio around 1:1), were deposited on stainless steel substrates by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique. The as-deposited coatings were annealed in ambient atmosphere at different temperatures (500-1000 oC) for 1 h. The evolution of chemical composition, microstructure, and microhardness of these coatings after annealing at different temperatures was systematically analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and nanoindentation experiments. The oxidation behaviour and its influence on overall hardness of these four coatings were compared. It was found that the ternary TiAlN and CrAlN coatings have better oxidation resistance than their binary counterparts, TiN and CrN coatings. The Cr-based coatings (CrN and CrAlN) exhibited evidently better oxidation resistance than the Ti-based coatings (TiN and TiAlN). TiN coating started to oxidize at 500 oC. After annealing at 700 oC no N could be detected by EDX, indicating that the coating was almost fully oxidized. After annealed at 800 oC, the coating completely delaminated from the substrate. TiAlN started to oxidize at 600 oC. It was nearly fully oxidized (with little residual nitrogen detected in the coating by EDX) and partially delaminated at 1000 oC. Both CrN and CrAlN started to oxidize at 700 oC. CrN was almost fully oxidized (with little residual nitrogen detected in the coating by EDX) and partially delaminated at 900 oC. The oxidation rate of the CrAlN coating is quite slow. After annealing at 1000 oC, only about 19 at.% oxygen was detected and the coating showed no delamination. The Ti-based (TiN and TiAlN) coatings were not able to retain their hardness at higher temperatures (≥ 700 oC). On the other hand, the hardness of CrAlN was stable at a high level between 33 and 35 GPa up to an annealing temperature of 800 oC and still kept at a comparative high value of 18.7 GPa

  12. Deposition and current conduction of mixed hexagonal and cubic phases of AlN/p-Si films prepared by vacuum arc discharge: Effect of deposition temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic and hexagonal AlN films have been prepared by vacuum arc discharge technique at different deposition temperatures 100, 200 and 300 °C. The depositions were carried out from pure aluminum targets under nitrogen gas on p-type Si substrates, with Al forming the gate in a metal–insulator–semiconductor configuration. Preferential orientations (111) and (002) of the cubic and hexagonal phases have been affirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectra revealed the manifestation of the two phases as well. The effect of deposition temperature on the crystalline quality and texture of the films has been also investigated and the grain size of which, has been evaluated as a function of temperature. The best crystalline quality i.e., largest grain size was found to be at 200 °C. The composition and stoichiometry of the films have been determined by the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis (TOF-ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering techniques. The Al/N ratio was found to be around 1, while the O content was less than 1.8%. Scanning electron microscopy and TOF-ERDA measurements demonstrated films thickness of 260 nm. Current density versus electric field and capacitance–voltage (C–V) measurements were also investigated to reveal the field emission and conduction mechanism of the Al/AlN/p-Si devices. Schottky, Pool–Frenkel and Fowler–Nordheim conduction have been found to contribute to the electron transport, and the best emission properties were manifested at 200 °C with a highest current density 525 μA/cm2 at a field 71 V/μm. From C–V curves, the density of traps has been estimated to be 18 × 109 cm−2 eV−1 indicating a good quality of the deposited films. - Highlights: • AlN films containing its cubic phase were deposited by vacuum arc discharge. • MIS capacitors of these films of (111) preferential orientation were fabricated. • The best crystalline quality was found to be at 200 °C deposition

  13. Synthesis of graphene-like transparent conductive films on dielectric substrates using a modified filtered vacuum arc system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Helge; Siemroth, Peter; Sgarlata, Anna; Prosposito, Paolo; Schubert, Markus Andreas; Casalboni, Mauro; Schrader, Sigurd

    2015-05-01

    Here, we present a reliable process to deposit transparent conductive films on silicon oxide, quartz, and sapphire using a solid carbon source. This layer consists of partially ordered graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of about 5 nm. The process does not require any catalytic metal and exploits a high current arc evaporation (Φ-HCA) to homogeneously deposit a layer of carbon on heated substrates. A gas atmosphere consisting of Argon or Argon/Hydrogen blend acting as a buffer influences the morphology of the growing film. scanning tunneling microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectra were used for a thorough characterization of the samples in order to optimize the growth parameters. The best carbon layers have a surface resistance of 5.7 × 103 Ω◻ whereas the optical transparency of the coatings is 88% with an excellent homogeneity over areas of several cm2. Such results are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes and make this method very promising for various industrial applications.

  14. Synthesis of graphene-like transparent conductive films on dielectric substrates using a modified filtered vacuum arc system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, Helge, E-mail: lux@th-wildau.de; Schrader, Sigurd [Technical University of Applied Sciences Wildau, Hochschulring 1, Wildau 15745 (Germany); Siemroth, Peter [Arc Precision GmbH, Schwartzkopffstraße 2, Wildau 15745 (Germany); Sgarlata, Anna [Department of Physics, University of Roma - Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Roma - Tor Vergata, and Italian Interuniversity Consortium on Materials Science and Technology (INSTM), Research Unit Roma Tor Vergata Via del Politecnico 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Schubert, Markus Andreas [IHP Innovations for High Performance Microelectronics, Im Technologiepark 25, Frankfurt (Oder) 15236 (Germany)

    2015-05-21

    Here, we present a reliable process to deposit transparent conductive films on silicon oxide, quartz, and sapphire using a solid carbon source. This layer consists of partially ordered graphene flakes with a lateral dimension of about 5 nm. The process does not require any catalytic metal and exploits a high current arc evaporation (Φ-HCA) to homogeneously deposit a layer of carbon on heated substrates. A gas atmosphere consisting of Argon or Argon/Hydrogen blend acting as a buffer influences the morphology of the growing film. scanning tunneling microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectra were used for a thorough characterization of the samples in order to optimize the growth parameters. The best carbon layers have a surface resistance of 5.7 × 10{sup 3} Ω{sub ◻} whereas the optical transparency of the coatings is 88% with an excellent homogeneity over areas of several cm{sup 2}. Such results are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes and make this method very promising for various industrial applications.

  15. Summary on Titanium Nitride Coating of SNS Ring Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Robert J; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Weiss, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with ~100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 100 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5 m in length and 36 cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering using a cylindrical magnetron with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arc, injection, extraction, collimation and RF regions. Chamber types, quantities and the cathode configurations used to coat them are presented herein. A brief summary of the salient co...

  16. Modeling Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Insepov, Zeke; Veitzer, Seth; Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Although vacuum arcs were first identified over 110 years ago, they are not yet well understood. We have since developed a model of breakdown and gradient limits that tries to explain, in a self-consistent way: arc triggering, plasma initiation, plasma evolution, surface damage and gra- dient limits. We use simple PIC codes for modeling plasmas, molecular dynamics for modeling surface breakdown, and surface damage, and mesoscale surface thermodynamics and finite element electrostatic codes for to evaluate surface properties. Since any given experiment seems to have more variables than data points, we have tried to consider a wide variety of arcing (rf structures, e beam welding, laser ablation, etc.) to help constrain the problem, and concentrate on common mechanisms. While the mechanisms can be comparatively simple, modeling can be challenging.

  17. The Effect of High-voltage Pulse Potential Applied to the Substrate on the Phase Composition and Structure of the Vacuum-arc TiN Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Sobol

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the high-voltage supply capacity in the form of different pulse duration on the formation of preferentially oriented crystallites and the stress-strain state of the vacuum-arc TiN coatings was analyzed. It is shown that the deposition of coatings in a high-voltage cascade forming exposure leads to the growth of the crystallites with axis texture [110] and the change in the stress-strain state: strengthening of a strain in a group of crystallites with the axis [110] and reduction of the strain in a group of crystallites with axis [111]. The results are explained by the increase in mobility of atoms and streamlining processes in the field of displacement cascades, formed under the influence of high-energy bombarding ions accelerated in the field of high-voltage pulse potential. A generalized graph of the texture type on the pulse potential and influence of the pulse duration, applied to the substrate, on the total deposition time are plotted.

  18. 真空电弧炉升降机构的ANSYS优化设计%ANSYS optimization design of lifting mechanism of the vacuum arc furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张以忱; 王德志; 王永杰; 魏永秋

    2011-01-01

    A mechanical model was developed for the lifting mechanism of a prototype of the VCF -3t cantilevered vacuum arc furnace, the position and value of maximum stress of the column was obtained through force analysis of the main bearing parts ( such as column). Then the actual equipment model was simplified to establish finite element model and the stress cloud chart was compared with actual calculated value in order to test the correctness of the finite element model. On this base, combined with the relationships among actual structure sizes of the furnace, the parametric finite element model was established. If the model meet conditions of intensity and stiffness etc. , the radius and thickness of the column and furnace body was optimized with the optimizer of ANSYS to make the mass of mechanical structure to be the lightest and make full use of the material's property. At the same time, VB language was used in the call analysis interface in ANSYS to provide an intuitive man - machine system in order to decrease duplication of workload in series design of product. The parameter optimization method used in this paper is an important development of structural optimization design method and has important practical value in the structural design.

  19. The effect of nitrogen pressure during vacuum-arc tin coatings deposition on the erosion resistance in plasma of magnetron type discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The erosion process was investigated of TiN coatings which were made with the vacuum-arc sputtering of Ti at the different nitrogen pressures (10-4...5X10-3 Torr). The erosion rates were measured by the weighting on analytical balance before and after treatment by plasmas of magnetron type, axial symmetrical discharges in nitrogen atmosphere, at the temperatures of 500...1100 C. It was shown that an erosion rate of TiN coatings deposited at low pressures (approx 1X10-4 Torr) is essentially (up to 1.5 times) lower than that for coatings produced at the more high pressures (5X10-3 Torr). For samples produced in the regime with high voltage pulses supply on substrate the erosion is lower than for coatings deposited in the regime without pulses supply. Taking into account the results of X-ray diffraction measurements, the physical mechanisms are suggested to explain such character of erosion behavior.

  20. Parametric Study on Arc Behavior of Magnetically Diffused Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tang; Li, Hui; Bai, Bing; Liao, Mengran; Xia, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    A model coupling the plasma with a cathode body is applied in the simulation of the diffuse state of a magnetically rotating arc. Four parametric studies are performed: on the external axial magnetic field (AMF), on the cathode shape, on the total current and on the inlet gas velocity. The numerical results show that: the cathode attachment focuses in the center of the cathode tip with zero AMF and gradually shifts off the axis with the increase of AMF; a larger cathode conical angle corresponds to a cathode arc attachment farther away off axis; the maximum values of plasma temperature increase with the total current; the plasma column in front of the cathode tip expands more severely in the axial direction, with a higher inlet speed; the cathode arc attachment shrinks towards the tip as the inlet speed increases. The various results are supposed to be explained by the joint effect of coupled cathode surface heating and plasma rotating flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475174, 11035005 and 50876101)

  1. Baking of tandem accelerator tube by low voltage arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In designing the accelerating tube for a static tandem accelerator in Kyushu University, the basic policy was as described below: individual unit composing the accelerating tube should fully withstand the electric field of 2 MV/m, and electric discharge must not be propagated from one unit to the adjacent unit when these are assembled to the accelerating tube. The accelerating tube units are each 25 cm in length, and both high and low energy sides are composed of 20 units, respectively. Although about 10-9 Torr vacuum was obtained at the both ends of the accelerating tube by baking the tube at 300 to 350 deg C with electric heaters wound outside the tube in the conventional method, vast outgas was generated, which decreased vacuum by two or three figures if breakdown occurred through the intermediary of outgas. As a method of positively outgassing and cleaning the electrodes inside the accelerating tube, it was attempted to directly bake all the electrodes in the accelerating tube by causing strong arc discharge flowing H2 gas in the tube. As a result of considering the conditions for this method, the low voltage arc discharge was employed using oxide cathodes. Thus, after implementing 10A arc discharge for several hours, the voltage was able to be raised to 10 MV almost immediately after the vacuum recovery, and further, after another conditioning for several hours, it was successful to raise voltage up to 11 MV. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Beam conditioning in the CESR arc and IR regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large amount of pressure data from over 60 cold cathode gauges at various sections of CESR has provided important information on beam conditioning of the vacuum chambers since the commissioning of CESR Phase II operation in November 1995. The arc regions and the interaction region employ distinctly different pumping systems and are exposed to significantly different synchrotron radiation (SR) flux. Relatively rapid beam conditioning was observed in the DIP-dominated arc region vacuum chambers, where most vacuum chambers have experienced multiple controlled ventings for upgrade and maintenance. The beam-induced pressure rise normally reached a minimum (typically 2-5x10-9 torr/Amp) after a beam exposure of ∼400 Amp·Hr for the normal bend chambers and ∼200 Amp·Hr for the 'hard bend' chambers, with no further beam conditioning after that. On the other hand, the vacuum chambers in the IR region have experienced no venting, and continuous beam conditioning has been observed throughout the entire CESR Phase II operation. After extensive beam exposure, the average pressure in the IR region remains below 3x10-9 torr during HEP running, requiring only 2-3 TiSP 'flashings' per year. (author)

  3. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  4. Process of commutation of a vacuum electric-discharge gap by laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, S. G., E-mail: asvi@mail.ru; Dolgov, A. N.; Kozlovskaya, T. I.; Revazov, V. O.; Seleznev, V. P.; Yakubov, R. Kh. [Dukhov All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The temporal parameters of a process of vacuum gap commutation under exposure to a nanosecond pulse of laser radiation incident on the cathode has been studied depending on the radiation energy. Based on the experiment data, it is suggested that a glow discharge is initially ignited in electrode erosion products under exposure to the laser pulse, which due to development of the ionization-overheating instability undergoes the contraction of current channel and transits to an arc discharge. With the radiation energy exceeding a threshold value, the radiation (incident on the cathode) accelerates directly the instability development and the glow discharge transition to the arc discharge due to the radiation absorption in the discharge plasma.

  5. Gas poisoning investigations of scandate and M-type dispenser cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wensheng; Zhang, Ke; Li, Ji; Yan, Suqiu; Chen, Qilue

    2003-06-01

    Gas poisoning tests of cathode emission were carried out with four kinds of thermal cathodes: W+Sc 2O 3 mixed matrix cathode, impregnated scandate cathode, Ir-coated cathode, Os-coated cathode. As a result, M-type cathodes are more sensitive to O 2, but can recover absolutely in a short time; scandate-type cathodes react slowly and recover partly after a long time. Compared to O 2, ambient air leaked into the vacuum chamber has a smaller influence on the cathode emission; H 2 has a little effect of activation on the four cathodes, especially on the Os-coated cathode.

  6. Exploration of arc spot motion in the presence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since arcing phenomena are observed in controlled fusion devices, the interest in a better understanding of the spot behavior of low pressure arcs gained a new impetus. The classical vacuum arc and the unipolar arc produce the same erosion tracks on the metallic electrodes and the surface walls, respectively. One observes that the cathode attachment on cold metal surfaces of vacuum arcs is represented by one or several bright spots which jump seemingly statistically over the surface. In the presence of a transverse magnetic field, these spots jump preferably contrary to the Lorentzian rule. This paper represents a new theoretical approach to explain these phenomena. It is based on a rigorous stability theory of a current-carrying plasma channel, one end of which is fixed to the metal surface. The derived stability criterion requires that the vapor pressure of the evaporated electrode material (psub(D)) must be larger than twice the average magnetic pressure (psub(m) = (μ0/4π)Ianti j). (orig.)

  7. Magneto-plasma-dynamic arc thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, J. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The performance of a magnetoplasmadynamic arc thruster, in the 600 to 2,100 seconds specific impulse range, was improved by locating its cathode in the exhaust beam downstream of the anode and main propellant injection point.

  8. Research on the use of UHV arc discharges for deposition of superconducting layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-field superconducting cavities, as used in charged particle accelerators, are at present based mostly on the Nb-bulk technology, but Nb-coated Cu-cavities might offer several advantages. In order to study possibilities of the vacuum arc technique to form high-quality superconducting thin films for the coating RF copper cavities, special efforts have been undertaken within a framework of the scientific collaboration between the 'Tor Vergata' University of Rome and the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies at Swierk. During recent years several experimental arc-based devices have been designed and constructed in the both research centers. In particular, cathodic-arc sources with planar- and cylindrical-cathodes made of pure Nb have been constructed and investigated. Arc discharges with magnetic filters (for the elimination of micro-droplets) have also been investigated. All these systems have been exploited under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The paper describes the status of research on the deposition of superconducting Nb-films, and particularly the recent progress in these investigations. It has been shown that high-quality Nb-films can be deposited with the described UHV arc technique. The critical temperature of film samples, which were coated in planar geometry, is very close to the Nb-bulk value. The very narrow transitions as well as X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the obtained films are less stressed and more homogeneous than standard ones produced by means of the sputtering technique. The deposited Nb-films have higher RRR (up to 80) and larger grain sizes in a comparison with sputtered ones, which were deposited at the same temperature. The RF measurements have also demonstrated good RF properties of the produced Nb-films. (author)

  9. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  10. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  11. Arc Plasma Torch Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Trelles, J P; Vardelle, A; Heberlein, J V R

    2013-01-01

    Arc plasma torches are the primary components of various industrial thermal plasma processes involving plasma spraying, metal cutting and welding, thermal plasma CVD, metal melting and remelting, waste treatment and gas production. They are relatively simple devices whose operation implies intricate thermal, chemical, electrical, and fluid dynamics phenomena. Modeling may be used as a means to better understand the physical processes involved in their operation. This paper presents an overview of the main aspects involved in the modeling of DC arc plasma torches: the mathematical models including thermodynamic and chemical non-equilibrium models, turbulent and radiative transport, thermodynamic and transport property calculation, boundary conditions and arc reattachment models. It focuses on the conventional plasma torches used for plasma spraying that include a hot-cathode and a nozzle anode.

  12. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included

  13. Arcing phenomena in fusion devices workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    The workshop on arcing phenomena in fusion devices was organized (1) to review the pesent status of our understanding of arcing as it relates to confinement devices, (2) to determine what informaion is needed to suppress arcing and (3) to define both laboratory and in-situ experiments which can ultimately lead to reduction of impurities in the plasma caused by arcing. The workshop was attended by experts in the area of vacuum arc electrode phenomena and ion source technology, materials scientists, and both theoreticians and experimentalists engaged in assessing the importance of unipolar arcing in today's tokamaks. Abstracts for papers presented at the workshop are included.

  14. On the influence of a TiN interlayer on DLC coatings produced by pulsed vacuum arc discharge: Compositional and morphological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura-Giraldo, B. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia); Grupo de Desarrollo de Nuevos Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia); Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia); Arango-Arango, P.J. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia); Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Campus La Nubia, Km. via al aeropuerto, Manizales (Colombia)

    2009-10-15

    The influence of a TiN interlayer on DLC coatings grown on silicon (1 0 0), 316 stainless steel and KCl by using the PAPVD pulsed arc discharge technique is presented in this paper. The structure of the coatings was determined by means of FTIR through observation of the absorption band modes of CH{sub 2} between 3100 and 2800 cm{sup -1} and representation of the sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} carbon bonds, respectively. The sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} bonds ratio was calculated by using the base line method and producing a value greater than 1 which was a good prediction of high hardness. XPS analysis of the films was made; the wide spectrum showed the elemental composition of the films (Ti, N, C). A narrow spectrum of C1s at binding energy of 284.48 eV was obtained, and its deconvolution showed peaks of sp{sup 3}, sp{sup 2} and Ti-C. Ti-C bonds were formed due to diffusion of carbon atoms into a TiN matrix. The concentration for the XPS spectra was calculated by using the area under the curve of sp{sup 3} and sp{sup 2} peaks. The morphology of the bilayer, including roughness, grain size and thickness was studied through SPM techniques.

  15. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Nikolaev, A. G.; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control System and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  16. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described

  17. A vacuum spark ion source: High charge state metal ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, G. Yu.; Nikolaev, A. G.; Oks, E. M.; Frolova, V. P.

    2016-02-01

    High ion charge state is often important in ion beam physics, among other reasons for the very practical purpose that it leads to proportionately higher ion beam energy for fixed accelerating voltage. The ion charge state of metal ion beams can be increased by replacing a vacuum arc ion source by a vacuum spark ion source. Since the voltage between anode and cathode remains high in a spark discharge compared to the vacuum arc, higher metal ion charge states are generated which can then be extracted as an ion beam. The use of a spark of pulse duration less than 10 μs and with current up to 10 kA allows the production of ion beams with current of several amperes at a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pps. We have demonstrated the formation of high charge state heavy ions (bismuth) of up to 15 + and a mean ion charge state of more than 10 +. The physics and techniques of our vacuum spark ion source are described.

  18. Atmospheric pressure arc discharge with ablating graphite anode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, V. A. [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale Campus, FL, 33309, USA; Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-18

    The anodic carbon arc discharge is used to produce carbon nanoparticles. Recent experiments with the carbon arc at atmospheric pressure helium demonstrated the enhanced ablation rate for narrow graphite anodes resulting in high deposition rates of carbonaceous products on the copper cathode (Fetterman et al 2008 Carbon 46 1322–6). The proposed model explains these results with interconnected steady-state models of the cathode and the anode processes. When considering cathode functioning, the model predicts circulation of the particles in the near-cathode region: evaporation of the cathode material, ionization of evaporated atoms and molecules in the near-cathode plasma, return of the resulting ions to the cathode, surface recombination of ions and electrons followed again by cathode evaporation etc. In the case of the low anode ablation rate, the ion acceleration in the cathode sheath provides the major cathode heating mechanism. In the case of an intensive anode ablation, an additional cathode heating is due to latent fusion heat of the atomic species evaporated from the anode and depositing at the cathode. Using the experimental arc voltage as the only input discharge parameter, the model allows us to calculate the anode ablation rate. A comparison of the results of calculations with the available experimental data shows reasonable agreement.

  19. Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Capece, Angela M.; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O_2 partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before ...

  20. Vacuum welding of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This new welding process has been developed by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) in France. The edges of the work-pieces are melted by the impact of an electron beam produced by an electron gun. Welding is carried out in a vacuum of 10-4 to 10-8 mm of mercury. The welding machine consists, diagrammatically, of: a) a metal enclosure in which a vacuum is produced; b) a cathode for electron emission, a high-voltage generator for accelerating these electrons, a focusing device; c) a mechanical device for moving (rotating) the work-piece. Advantages of the process: 1) possible welding of highly oxidizable metals (e.g. zirconium); 2) fabrication of high-vacuum-sealed metal containers; 3) production of very deeply penetrated welds. Therefore, this new process is particularly advantageous for atomic power applications, the fabrication of electron tubes and, more generally, for all industries in which very special metals are used. (author)

  1. Physical model and experimental results of cathode erosion related to power supply ripple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, W. J.; O'Hair, E. A.; Hatfield, L. L.; Kristiansen, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the physical effects of power supply ripple on cathode erosion and cathode arc attachment in a water-cooled, 30 kW nitrogen arcjet. Experimental results are presented for 2 percent thoriated tungsten, which show that the long-term cathode erosion rate is a decreasing function of current ripple over the range 1-13 percent. Above this range, the cathode discharge becomes unstable, and the erosion rate rapidly increases. A qualitative model of this effect is given in terms of a magnetically induced radial motion of the arc column, and an overall increase in the cathode spot radius due to the higher peak current associated with higher ripple. The most important effect of power supply ripple is therefore shown to be its ability to collectively drive the cathode attachment away from the cathode center. This leads to an increase in the cathode attachment area, and a subsequent decrease in the cathode erosion rate.

  2. Vacuum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Eichmeier, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Nineteen experts from the electronics industry, research institutes and universities have joined forces to prepare this book. ""Vacuum Electronics"" covers the electrophysical fundamentals, the present state of the art and applications, as well as the future prospects of microwave tubes and systems, optoelectronics vacuum devices, electron and ion beam devices, light and X-ray emitters, particle accelerators and vacuum interrupters. These topics are supplemented by useful information about the materials and technologies of vacuum electronics and vacuum technology.

  3. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  4. Structure of propagating arc in a magneto-hydrodynamic rail plasma actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Miles D.; Choi, Young-Joon; Sirohi, Jayant; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-01-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of a magnetically driven arc in a rail plasma flow actuator has been characterized with high-speed imaging, electrical measurements, and spectroscopy. The arc draws a peak current of ~1 kA. High-speed framing cameras were used to observe the complex arc propagation phenomenon. In particular, the anode and cathode roots were observed to have different modes of transit, which resulted in distinct types of electrode degradation on the anode and cathode surfaces. Observations of the arc electrical properties and induced magnetic fields are used to explain the transit mechanism of the arc. Emission spectroscopy revealed the arc temperature and species composition as a function of transit distance of the arc. The results obtained offer significant insights into the electromagnetic properties of the arc-rail system as well as arc-surface interaction phenomena in a propagating arc.

  5. Effect of electron extraction from a grid plasma cathode on the generation of emission plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the operating mode of a plasma electron source based on a low- pressure arc discharge with grid stabilization of the plasma emission boundary which provides a considerable (up to twofold) increase in discharge and beam currents at an Ar pressure in the vacuum chamber p = 0.02-0.05 Pa, accelerating voltages of up to U = 10 kV, and longitudinal magnetic field of up to Bz = 0.1 T. The discharge and beam currents are increased on electron extraction from the emission plasma through meshes of a fine metal grid due to the energy of a high-voltage power supply which ensures electron emission and acceleration. The electron emission from the plasma cathode and arrival of ions from the acceleration gap in the discharge changes the discharge plasma parameters near the emission grid, thus changing the potential of the emission grid electrode with respect to the discharge cathode. The load is not typical and changes the voltage polarity of the electrode gap connected to the discharge power supply, which is to be taken into account in its calculation and design. The effect of electron emission from the plasma cathode on the discharge system can not only change the discharge and beam current pulse shapes but can also lead to a breakdown of the acceleration gap and failure of semiconductor elements in the discharge power supply unit

  6. Vacuum arc ion source development at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaedtke, P.; Emig, H.; Wolf, B.H. [GSI Darmstadt (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Ion beams produced by the Mevva ion source are well suited for the injection into a synchrotron accelerator due to the low repetition rate (0.2 ... 5 Hz, the higher repetition rate is for the optimization of the linear accelerator only) and the short pulse length (up to 0.5ms). From the beginning of the authors experience with the Mevva ion source at GSI they tried to improve the reliability of pulse-to-pulse reproducibility and to minimize the noise on the extracted ion beam. For accelerator application this is highly necessary, otherwise the accelerator tuning and optimization becomes very difficult or even impossible. Already the beam transport becomes difficult for a noisy beam, because space charge compensation can be destroyed (at least partially). Furthermore a noisy dc-beam results in some rf-buckets which might be even empty.

  7. Improved cathodes for a dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of modified cathodes have been tested in our ultra-high vacuum dense plasma focus (DPF) device in an effort to improve both neutron output and shot-to-shot reproducibility. Inspiration for these modifications originated from time resolved photographs of the initial current sheet as it approaches the cathode. In particular, the current sheet develops a slight annular protrusion, or ''bump'', that contacts the inside wall of the cathode at a distance from the breach approximately coincident with the end of the insulator. In an attempt to take advantage of this protrusion, a series of modified cathodes was provided with a decreased waist diameter in the vicinity of the end of the insulator. As previously discussed, this DPF device is constructed from high vacuum components using metal-to-metal and ceramic (Al2O3)-to-metal seals; the entire assembly is given a vacuum bake at 2500C resulting in a pre-fill vacuum of approx. =5 x 10-9 Torr. The DPF is powered by a 7 μf capacitor bank. The short circuit ringing frequency is 412 kHz corresponding to a free circuit inductance of 21 nH. With the DPF in operation at 20 kV, a current peak of 200 kA occurs at 0.8 μs. Neutron output was measured side on with a silver activation counter, and end on with an arsenic activation counter

  8. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes

  9. Driven Motion and Instability of an Atmospheric Pressure Arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max Karasik

    1999-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure arcs are used extensively in applications such as welding and metallurgy. However, comparatively little is known of the physics of such arcs in external magnetic fields and the mechanisms of the instabilities present. In order to address questions of equilibrium and stability of such arcs, an experimental arc furnace is constructed and operated in air with graphite cathode and steel anode at currents 100-250 A. The arc is diagnosed with a gated intensified camera and a collimated photodiode array, as well as fast voltage and current probes.

  10. Poisoning studies of an osmium-coated dispenser cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of our studies on the reduction of the emission current from an osmium-alloy-coated dispenser cathode (derivative of the M cathode) due to exposure to various gases or vapors are reported. The primary interest of these studies is poisoning by chemical agents that might be encountered in the vacuum system of an induction linear accelerator. Of the constituents normally found in a tight unbaked vacuum chamber, the cathode is most sensitive to partial pressures of water vapor. Of the vapors studied which might be encountered in an induction accelerator, Freon was the most virulent poison

  11. Modeling Multi-Arc Spraying Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.

    2016-06-01

    The use of plasma as energy source in thermal spraying enables among others the processing of feed stock materials with very high melting temperatures as coating materials. New generation multi-arc plasma spraying systems are widely spread and promise several advantages in comparison to the conventional single-arc systems. Numerical modeling of multi-arc plasma spraying offers the possibility to increase the understanding about this process. This study focuses on the numerical modeling of three-cathode spraying systems, introducing the recent activities in this field and discussing the numerical aspects which influence the prediction power of the models.

  12. Secondary arc description on satellite solar generators

    OpenAIRE

    Crispel, Pierre; Degond, Pierre; Vignal, Marie-Helene; Roussel, Jean-Francois; Amorim, Emmanuel; Payan, Denis; Cho, Mengu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a quasi-neutral model with non-vanishing current describing the expansion of a plasma in an inter-cellular gap on a satellite solar array. Moreover, an electric arc cathode spot model is proposed in order to give suitable boundary conditions for the expansion model.

  13. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  14. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  15. Sheath expansion and plasma dynamics in the presence of electrode evaporation: Application to a vacuum circuit breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the postarc dielectric recovery phase in a vacuum circuit breaker, a cathode sheath forms and expels the plasma from the electrode gap. The success or failure of current breaking depends on how efficiently the plasma is expelled from the electrode gap. The sheath expansion in the postarc phase can be compared to sheath expansion in plasma immersion ion implantation except that collisions between charged particles and atoms generated by electrode evaporation may become important in a vacuum circuit breaker. In this paper, we show that electrode evaporation plays a significant role in the dynamics of the sheath expansion in this context not only because charged particle transport is no longer collisionless but also because the neutral flow due to evaporation and temperature gradients may push the plasma toward one of the electrodes. Using a hybrid model of the nonequilibrium postarc plasma and cathode sheath coupled with a direct simulation Monte Carlo method to describe collisions between heavy species, we present a parametric study of the sheath and plasma dynamics and of the time needed for the sheath to expel the plasma from the gap for different values of plasma density and electrode temperatures at the beginning of the postarc phase. This work constitutes a preliminary step toward understanding and quantifying the risk of current breaking failure of a vacuum arc.

  16. R&D ERL: Vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mapes, M.; Smart, L.; Weiss, D.; Steszyn, A.; Todd, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL Vacuum systems are depicted in a figure. ERL has eight vacuum volumes with various sets of requirements. A summary of vacuum related requirements is provided in a table. Five of the eight volumes comprise the electron beamline. They are the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity, Superconducting e-gun, injection, loop and beam dump. Two vacuum regions are the individual cryostats insulating the 5-cell Superconducting RF Cavity and the Superconducting e-gun structures. The last ERL vacuum volume not shown in the schematic is the laser transport line. The beamline vacuum regions are separated by electropneumatic gate valves. The beam dump is common with loop beamline but is considered a separate volume due to geometry and requirements. Vacuum in the 5-cell SRF cavity is maintained in the {approx}10{sup -9} torr range at room temperature by two 20 l/s ion pumps and in the e-gun SRF cavity by one 60 l/s ion pump. Vacuum in the SRF cavities operated at 2{sup o}K is reduced to low 10{sup -11} torr via cryopumping of the cavity walls. The cathode of the e-gun must be protected from poisoning, which can occur if vacuum adjacent to the e-gun in the injection line exceeds 10-11 torr range in the injection warm beamline near the e-gun exit. The vacuum requirements for beam operation in the loop and beam dump are 10-9 torr range. The beamlines are evacuated from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum level with a particulate free, oil free turbomolecular pumping cart. 25 l/s shielded ion pumps distributed throughout the beamlines maintain the vacuum requirement. Due to the more demanding vacuum requirement of the injection beamline proximate to the e-gun, a vacuum bakeout of the injection beamline is required. In addition, two 200 l/s diode ion pumps and supplemental pumping provided by titanium sublimation pumps are installed in the injection line just beyond the exit of the e-gun. Due to expected gas load a similar pumping arrangement is planned for the beam dump. The

  17. Apparatuses for making cathodes for high-temperature, rechargeable batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Coffey, Gregory W.

    2016-09-13

    The approaches and apparatuses for fabricating cathodes can be adapted to improve control over cathode composition and to better accommodate batteries of any shape and their assembly. For example, a first solid having an alkali metal halide, a second solid having a transition metal, and a third solid having an alkali metal aluminum halide are combined into a mixture. The mixture can be heated in a vacuum to a temperature that is greater than or equal to the melting point of the third solid. When the third solid is substantially molten liquid, the mixture is compressed into a desired cathode shape and then cooled to solidify the mixture in the desired cathode shape.

  18. Energetic high-voltage breakdowns in vacuum over a large gap for ITER neutral beam accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We performed energetic high voltage breakdowns up to 370 kV with a stored energy of 1 kJ. ► No breakdowns at 200 kV could be produced over a gap of 85 mm using 100 cm2 copper electrodes. ► Electrodes damage was visible after the experiment. ► The number of arcs impacts is orders of magnitude above the number of breakdowns. -- Abstract: CEA has undertaken tests to study the resilience of copper electrodes in vacuum against energetic high-voltage breakdowns using external capacitors to provide the energy. Earlier tests succeeded in dissipating a maximum of 150 J in a 30 mm gap, limited by the equivalent series resistance (ESR) in the external capacitors. Using new ones with an ESR that is a factor of 10 lower it was unsuccessfully tried to produce breakdowns at 200 kV over the 85 mm gap, despite the use of a UV flash lamp and a “field enhancement ring” (FER) that locally increased the electric field on the cathode by 50%. Consequently, the breakdowns had to be produced by raising the voltage to 300–350 kV while maintaining the gap at 85 mm. During these tests, single breakdowns dissipated up to 1140 J in the 85 mm vacuum gap. Inspection of the electrodes revealed that substantial amounts of copper appear have been evaporated from the anode and deposited on to the cathode. Also electrode deconditioning occurred

  19. Explosive emission cathodes for high power microwave devices: gas evolution studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schlise, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Present-day high power microwave devices suffer from a lack of reliable, reproducible cathodes for generating the requisite GW-level electron beam in a vacuum. Standard explosive emission cathode pulse durations have been limited to 10's or 100's of ns due to the expansion of cathode-generated plasma and the ensuing impedance collapse that debilitates microwave output. Traditional thermionic cathodes do not suffer from this drawback of...

  20. Dual Torch Plasma Arc Furnace for Medical Waste Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin; M.KIKUCHI; LI Heping; T.IWAO; T.INABA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,characteristics of a dual torch plasma arc used for hazardous waste treatment and operated at atmospheric pressure are studied,and also compared with those of the multi-torch plasma arc and the single torch plasma arc.The dual torch plasma arc is generated between the cathode and anode with argon as the working gas.The temperature distributions of the plasma arc are measured using a spectroscope and line pair method with the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) for the DC arc current I = 100 A and argon flow rate Q = 15 slpm.The measurements show that the temperatures of the dual torch arc plasma in the regions near the cathode,the anode and the center point are 10,000 K,11,000 K and 9,000 K,respectively.And the high temperature region of the multi torch plasma arc is of double or much wider size than that of a conventional dual torch plasma arc and single plasma torch.Based on the preceding studies,a dual torch plasma arc furnace is developed in this study.The measured gas temperature at the center region of the argon arc is about 11,000 K for the case of I = 200 A and Q = 30 slpm operated in atmosphere.

  1. Arc Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Meneghetti, M; Dahle, H; Limousin, M

    2013-01-01

    The existence of an arc statistics problem was at the center of a strong debate in the last fifteen years. With the aim to clarify if the optical depth for giant gravitational arcs by galaxy clusters in the so called concordance model is compatible with observations, several studies were carried out which helped to significantly improve our knowledge of strong lensing clusters, unveiling their extremely complex internal structure. In particular, the abundance and the frequency of strong lensing events like gravitational arcs turned out to be a potentially very powerful tool to trace the structure formation. However, given the limited size of observational and theoretical data-sets, the power of arc statistics as a cosmological tool has been only minimally exploited so far. On the other hand, the last years were characterized by significant advancements in the field, and several cluster surveys that are ongoing or planned for the near future seem to have the potential to make arc statistics a competitive cosmo...

  2. Auxiliary-Arc Electrodes for MHD Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important role of electrode phenomena in the operation of magneto aerodynamic machines is well known. In particular, the voltage drops which occur in the boundary layer in the immediate neighbourhood of the electrode may reduce the output of the apparatus. These voltage drops are caused partly by the increased resistance presented by the boundary layer in the neighbourhood of the electrode when the latter is appreciably colder than the gas, and partly by the fact that the electrode is not at a temperature sufficient to be emissive. Auxiliary-arc electrodes that have been constructed and tested seem to provide a solution both of the cold boundary layer problem and of the cathode emissivity problem. For this purpose an arc is established between a refractory metal cathode placed behind and clear of the generator wall and an anode forming part of the wall. The arc column can be activated by a rotational movement under the effect of a magnetic field, which may be that of the machine itself. The mechanical arrangement of the electrodes is such that, with a weak flow of gas (argon for example), it is possible to maintain a protective atmosphere around the arc cathode, while the arc anode is strongly cooled by the wall. The gas flow also has the effect of forcing the arc column towards the stream, thus increasing the conductivity of the boundary layer. Furthermore, the arc column behaves as a virtual cathode, from which a sizeable electron current can be extracted. Electrodes constructed on this principle have been tested on gas streams composed of fuel-oil combustion products. By using them as cathodes it has been possible to extract a current of 5 A without the voltage drop between the electrode and the gas exceeding 10 V. Comparative tests have been carried out with cooled metal electrodes, in which case the voltage drop is of the order of 120 V. The arc electrodes tested have operated for several hours without any apparent damage. In spite of the energy which has

  3. Ti Coating on Magnesium Alloy by Arc-Added Glow Discharge Plasma Penetrating Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUICai-e; MIAOQiang; PANJun-de; ZHANGPing-ze; ZHANGGao-hui

    2004-01-01

    Arc-added glow discharge plasma penetrating technique is a new surface coating method. With the help of vacuum arc discharge, a cold cathode arc source continually emits ion beams of coating elements with high currency density and high ionizing ratio. As the ion bombard and diffusion working on, the surface of the parts form deposited layer, penetrated layer and hybrid layer. Under lab condition, a commercial magnesium alloy Az91 had been coated with Ti film layer with the aim of improving its' anti-corrosion performance. This paper mainly summarized our studies on the testing and analyzing of the coating layer. The composition and microstructure of the coating layer had been analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and glow discharge spectrum (GDS), and the surface appearance had been surveyed by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The adhesion strength between film and matrix had been evaluated by experiments of sticking-tearing. The results indicated that the coated layer on magnesium alloy were homogeneous, dense and robustly adhered.

  4. Vacuum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  5. The electrical resistance of vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuier, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper deals with the physics of electrical conduction in vacuum between two parallel conducting planes (planar vacuum diode). After reviewing known features of conduction in the high-voltage range, we turn to the low-voltage range. An ohmic current-voltage characteristic is calculated in the case of identical cathodic and anodic electrodes, whence an electrical resistance of the vacuum gap can be defined. The inverse resistance involves the elemental conductance 2e 2/h and the number of conductance channels between the two electrodes. The channels are thermally populated from the electrodes and the population is analytically calculable from the Poisson equation of electrostatics and the Boltzmann law of thermal equilibrium. The observed resistance of a real vacuum diode (Mullard's EB 91) is accounted for without adjusting parameters. The paper also examines the link-up between Joule's law, involving dissipation, and Ohm's law, with vacuum being contrasted with a material conducting medium; the origin of dissipation in vacuum is understood. Quantum and statistical physics are kept at the undergraduate level. Finally, the results obtained for the vacuum diode shed light upon the quantized conductance of nanoscale semiconductor wires, a topic usually handled only in graduate courses.

  6. Vacuum mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackwood, Susan; Belinski, Steven E.; Beni, Gerardo

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of vacuum mechatronics is defined as the design and development of vacuum-compatible computer-controlled mechanisms for manipulating, sensing and testing in a vacuum environment. The importance of vacuum mechatronics is growing with an increased application of vacuum in space studies and in manufacturing for material processing, medicine, microelectronics, emission studies, lyophylisation, freeze drying and packaging. The quickly developing field of vacuum mechatronics will also be the driving force for the realization of an advanced era of totally enclosed clean manufacturing cells. High technology manufacturing has increasingly demanding requirements for precision manipulation, in situ process monitoring and contamination-free environments. To remove the contamination problems associated with human workers, the tendency in many manufacturing processes is to move towards total automation. This will become a requirement in the near future for e.g., microelectronics manufacturing. Automation in ultra-clean manufacturing environments is evolving into the concept of self-contained and fully enclosed manufacturing. A Self Contained Automated Robotic Factory (SCARF) is being developed as a flexible research facility for totally enclosed manufacturing. The construction and successful operation of a SCARF will provide a novel, flexible, self-contained, clean, vacuum manufacturing environment. SCARF also requires very high reliability and intelligent control. The trends in vacuum mechatronics and some of the key research issues are reviewed.

  7. Vacuum Virtues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathey, Allen

    2007-01-01

    Upright vacuums, like cars, vary in quality, features and performance. Like automobiles, some uprights are reliable, others may be problematic, and some become a problem as a result of neglect or improper use. So, how do education institutions make an informed choice and, having done so, ensure that an upright vacuum goes the distance? In this…

  8. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  9. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode

  10. Simulating different modes of current transfer to thermionic cathodes in a wide range of conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S; Cunha, M D; Faria, M J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2009-07-21

    Changes in the pattern of steady-state modes of current transfer to thermionic cathodes induced by variations of the cathode geometry and temperature of the cooling fluid are studied numerically. For some combinations of control parameters, only one stable mode in a wide current range exists, which combines features of spot and diffuse modes. This mode, when attached to an elongated protrusion on the cathode surface, may be identified with the so-called super spot mode observed in experiments on low-current arcs. There is also reasonable agreement between the modelling and the experiment on cathodes of high-current arcs operating in the diffuse mode. The conclusions on existence under certain conditions of only one stable mode in a wide current range and of a minimum of the dependence of the temperature of the hottest point of the cathode on the arc current, manifested by this mode, may have industrial importance and admit a straightforward experimental verification.

  11. Electrode voltage fall and total voltage of a transient arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensi, F.; Ratovoson, L.; Razafinimanana, M.; Masquère, M.; Freton, P.; Gleizes, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with an experimental study of the components of a transient arc total voltage with duration of a few tens of ms and a current peak close to 1000 A. The cathode tip is made of graphite whereas the flat anode is made either of copper or of graphite; the electrodes gap is a few mm. The analysis of the electrical parameters is supported and validated by fast imaging and by two models: the first one is a 2D physical model of the arc allowing to calculate both the plasma temperature field and the arc voltage; the second model is able to estimate the transient heating of the graphite electrode. The main aim of the study was to detect the possible change of the cathode voltage fall (CVF) during the first instants of the arc. Indeed it is expected that during the first ms the graphite cathode is rather cool and the main mechanism of the electron emission should be the field effect emission, whereas after several tens of ms the cathode is strongly heated and thermionic emission should be predominant. We have observed some change in the apparent CVF but we have shown that this apparent change can be attributed to the variation of the solid cathode resistance. On the other hand, the possible change of CVF corresponding to the transition between a ‘cold’ and a ‘hot’ cathode should be weak and could not be characterized considering our measurement uncertainty of about 2 V. The arc column voltage (ACV) was estimated by subtracting the electrode voltage fall from the total arc voltage. The experimental transient evolution of the ACV is in very good agreement with the theoretical variation predicted by the model, showing the good ability of the model to study this kind of transient arc.

  12. Life-limiting mechanisms in Ba-oxide, Ba-dispenser and Ba-Scandate cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, G.; Barratt, D.

    2005-09-01

    Ba-oxide, Ba-dispenser and Ba-Scandate cathodes have been continuously improved in their emission performance in the past decades. Ba-oxide and Ba-dispenser cathodes are also the dominant types of thermionic cathodes used in most vacuum tube applications. When improvements in emissive properties are introduced, their impact on cathode life - where several years in a vacuum tube environment are typically required - also needs to be known. Hence, the investigation of cathode life-limiting effects is the basis of accelerated life predictions and of further cathode improvement. In this contribution, the main effects limiting the operating life of Ba/BaO-based thermionic cathodes are discussed, especially related to intrinsic dispensation and resupply to the emissive surface. Emission poisoning induced by adsorption of poisonous gases will not be addressed here. We will stress common points and point out the differences between the three types.

  13. Discharge Characteristics of DC Arc Water Plasma for Environmental Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tianming; Sooseok CHOI; Takayuki WATANABE

    2012-01-01

    A water plasma was generated by DC arc discharge with a hafnium embedded rodtype cathode and a nozzle-type anode. The discharge characteristics were examined by changing the operation parameter of the arc current. The dynamic behavior of the arc discharge led to significant fluctuations in the arc voltage and its frequency. Analyses of the high speed image and the arc voltage waveform showed that the arc discharge was in the restrike mode and its frequency varied within several tens of kilohertz according to the operating conditions. The larger thermal plasma volume was generated by the higher flow from the forming steam with a higher restrike frequency in the higher arc current conditions. In addition, the characteristics of the water plasma jet were investigated by means of optical emission spectroscopy to identify the abundant radicals required in an efficient waste treatment process.

  14. Cosmic vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernin, Artur D [P.K. Shternberg State Astronomical Institute at the M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2001-11-30

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  15. Cosmic vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observational studies of distant supernovae have suggested the existence of cosmic vacuum whose energy density exceeds the total density of all the other energy components in the Universe. The vacuum produces the field of antigravity that causes the cosmological expansion to accelerate. It is this accelerated expansion that has been discovered in the observations. The discovery of cosmic vacuum radically changes our current understanding of the present state of the Universe. It also poses new challenges to both cosmology and fundamental physics. Why is the density of vacuum what it is? Why do the densities of the cosmic energy components differ in exact value but agree in order of magnitude? On the other hand, the discovery made at large cosmological distances of hundreds and thousands Mpc provides new insights into the dynamics of the nearby Universe, the motions of galaxies in the local volume of 10 - 20 Mpc where the cosmological expansion was originally discovered. (reviews of topical problems)

  16. Vacuum chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed description is given of the vacuum chamber of the so-called experimental equipment DEMAS (double-arm-time-of-flight spectrometer) at the heavy ion accelerator U-400 at the JINR-Dubna. (author)

  17. Progress in vacuum metal extraction, refining and consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unique achievements in the process metallurgy of rare metals in the past quarter century should largely be attributed to advances in vacuum technology. New standards for high purity, increasing demand for pure metals and alloys for established applications, and steady improvement in sophistication and capacity of vacuum furnaces have provided the stimulus for developing and expanding vacuum metal extraction processes, and also exploring totally new processes. The paper discusses the thermochemistry of vacuum metallurgy, carbothermic and metallothermic reduction reactions, consolidation and refining by vacuum arc melting, electron beam melting and high temperature high vacuum sintering, and ultrapurification, with special reference to the reactive and refractory metals of Group IV to VI. (author)

  18. Vacuum II

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G

    2013-01-01

    This paper continues the presentation of pumps begun in ‘Vacuum I’. The main topic here is gauges and partial-pressure measurements. Starting from the kinetics of gases, the various strategies for measuring vacuum pressures are presented at an introductory level, with some reference to hardware devices. Partial-pressure measurement techniques are introduced, showing that the principles of ion selection have a direct similarity to particle dynamics in accelerators.

  19. Preparation of (BixSb1-x)2Te3Nanopowders by Vacuum Arc Plasma%真空电弧等离子体合成(BixSb1-x)2Te3纳米粉末材料

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段兴凯; 江跃珍

    2011-01-01

    With bismuth, antimony and tellurium as raw materials, ( BixSb1-x )2Te3 thermoelectric nanopowders were prepared by vacuum arc plasma evaporation technique.Microstructure and morphology of the aamples were characterized via X-ray diffraction ( XRD) , field emission scanning electron microscope ( FE-SEM) , transmission electron microscopy ( TEM) and selected area electron diffraction ( SAED).Compositional analysis was carried out by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays ( EDS) .It was observed that the (015) , (1010) and (110) planes became the most intense peak.The XRD pattem of ( BixSb1-x)2Te3 nanopowders could be well indexed to the standard reference code (49-1713).The broadening of the diffraction peaks indicated that the samples were nanosized.The atomic percentage of the elements Bi and Sb were 18.1% and 20.3% respectively.The atomic percentage of both was 38.4% .The atomic percentage of the elements Te was 61.6% .FE-SEM results showed that the nanopowders particle sizes were uniform.The nanopowders showed aggregation and spherical morphology.TEM results showed that average particle size of as-synthesized ( BixSb1-x)2Te3 nanopowders was about 50 nm.Irregular polyhedrons, flake and rod-like structure were consistent with high anisotropy of Bi2Te3-based semiconductor compound.Electron diffraction revealed that each particle was composed of many small crystal nuclei, which was convincing proof that the particles grew in nano-scale.Tropism of the particles at random and small particles caused the widening of diffraction rings that were made up of many diffraction spots, which indicated that ( BixSb1-x)2Te3 nanopowders were polycrystalline structure.%以单质Bi,Sb和Te粉末为原材料,通过真空电弧等离子体蒸发法合成了(BiSb)Te热电粉末材料.采用X射线衍射(XRD)、能谱分析(EDS),场发射扫描电子显微术(FE-SEM),透射电子显微术(TEM)和选区电子衍射(SAED)分析方法对(BiSb)Te粉末材料的物相结构、成分

  20. Field emission of electrons from cathodes made of carbon fibers with a nanostructured emitting surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupekhin, S. M.; Ibragimov, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Field electron emission from cathodes made of a bunch of carbon fibers under the condition of technical vacuum is studied experimentally. A model to optimize the field emission properties of the cathode by optimizing its macrogeometry with regard to the emitting surface structure is suggested. The current-voltage characteristics of the cathode are taken in the working voltage range 1-3 kV and for anode-cathode spacings varying from 1 to 10 mm. The current density from the cathode may reach 10 A/cm2 or more.

  1. Vacuum Incalescence

    CERN Document Server

    Intravaia, F

    2016-01-01

    In quantum theory the vacuum is defined as a state of minimum energy that is devoid of particles but still not completely empty. It is perhaps more surprising that its definition depends on the geometry of the system and on the trajectory of an observer through space-time. Along these lines we investigate the case of an atom flying at constant velocity near a planar surface. Using general concepts of statistical mechanics it is shown that the motion-modified interaction with the electromagnetic vacuum is formally equivalent to the interaction with a thermal field having an effective temperature determined by the atom's velocity and distance from the surface. This result suggests new ways to experimentally investigate the properties of the quantum vacuum in non-equilibrium systems and effects such as quantum friction.

  2. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm2 of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm2. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10-8 Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined all

  3. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  4. Cathode Ray Research Leading to J.J. Thomson's Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    This paper reviews the research on the properties and nature of cathode rays that led to the discovery of the electron by J. J. Thomson in the years 1897 - 1899. During the period from about 1870 to 1897 important research on cathode rays was carried out by William Crookes and Arthur Schuster in England, by Eugen Goldstein, Heinrich Hertz, Philipp Lenard, Emil Wiechert and Walter Kaufman in Germany, and by Jean Perrin in France. This research was always tedious and often inexact because fast vacuum pumps and convenient vacuum gauges did not yet exist. Still a few of these earlier researchers narrowly missed beating J. J. Thomson to the discover of the electron.

  5. Vacuum extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maagaard, Mathilde; Oestergaard, Jeanett; Johansen, Marianne;

    2012-01-01

    physicians with daily work in the obstetric field were tested. Methods. The Delphi method was used for development of the scale. In a simulated vacuum extraction scenario, first-year residents and obstetric chief physicians were rated using the developed OSATS scale for vacuum extraction to test construct...... validity of the scale. Main outcome measures. Consensus for the content of the scale. To test the scale of Cronbach's alpha, interclass correlation and differential item function was calculated in the prospective study. Results. 89% completed the first and 61% completed the second Delphi round. Hereafter...

  6. The cathode test stand for the DARHT second-axis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The injector for the DARHT second-axis injector will use an 8-in. thermionic dispenser cathode. Because the cathode is relatively large and requires a large amount of heat (5 kW) there are certain engineering issues that need to be addressed, before the DARHT injector reaches the final design stage. The Cathode Test Stand (CTS) will be used to address those concerns. The CTS is a new facility, presently under construction. The CTS will consist of a high-voltage pulse modulator, a high-vacuum diode test-chamber, and a short beam-transport section with diagnostics. This paper discusses the status of the project

  7. Investigation of Endurance Performance of Carbon Nanotube Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nanako; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Ohkawa, Yasushi; Nishida, Shin-Ichiro; Kitamura, Shoji

    The Aerospace Research and Development Directorate of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is considering a demonstration of electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems in low Earth orbit (LEO). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have some advantages as electron sources compared to conventional Spindt type emitters, and so are expected to be useful in EDT systems. Experiments to investigate the durability of CNT cathodes in a space environment had been conducted in a diode mode, but it was found that electron extraction tests, in which the cathode with a gate electrode is used, are necessary to evaluate the endurance of CNTs more accurately. In this paper, we conducted long duration operating tests of a cathode with a gate. It was found that there was almost no change in cathode performance at current densities below 100 A/m2 even after the cathode was operated for over 500 hours in the high vacuum environment.

  8. Phenomenology of plasma engine cathodes at high current rates and low pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huegel, H.; Kruelle, G.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of low surrounding pressures on cathodes of arc jet engines with electromagnetic acceleration are investigated for pressure and current energies of 20 to 100 Torr. and 400 to 1000 A. Experiments with 50 mm long and 8 mm diameter tungsten-thorium cathode in a coaxial gas flow show that pre-heating of the cathode reduces the duration of the instable arc discharge and thus material loss. The use of lighter gases also reduces instability effects, as well as the use of increased pressures and a massive gas influx.

  9. Effect of cathode structure on neutron yield performance of a miniature plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we report the effect of two different cathode structures - tubular and squirrel cage, on neutron output from a miniature plasma focus device. The squirrel cage cathode is typical of most DPF sources, with an outer, tubular envelope that serves as a vacuum housing, but does not carry current. The tubular cathode carries the return current and also serves as the vacuum envelope, thereby minimizing the size of the DPF head. The maximum average neutron yield of (1.82±0.52)x105 n/shot for the tubular cathode at 4 mbar was enhanced to (1.15±0.2)x106 n/shot with squirrel cage cathode at 6 mbar operation. These results are explained on the basis of a current sheath loading/mass choking effect. The penalty for using a non-transparent cathode negates the advantage of the smaller size of the DPF head.

  10. A mechanism that triggers double arcing during plasma arc cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian, E-mail: nemchinsky@bellsouth.ne [Keiser University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 (United States)

    2009-10-21

    Double arcing (DA) is a phenomenon when a transferred arc, flowing inside an electrically insulated nozzle, breaks into two separate arcs: one that connects the cathode and the nozzle and another that connects the nozzle and a work-piece. It is a commonly accepted opinion that the reason for DA is high voltage drop in the plasma inside the nozzle. However, the specific mechanism that triggers the DA development is not clear. In this paper, we propose such a mechanism. Dielectric films deposited inside the nozzle's orifice play the key role in this mechanism. These films are charged by ion current from plasma. A strong electric field is created inside the film and at the boundary of the film and clean metal of the nozzle. This gives rise to a thermo-field electron emission from the clean metal that borders the film. Emitted electrons are accelerated at the voltage drop between the nozzle and plasma. These electrons produce extra ions, which in turn move back to the film and additionally charge it. This sequence of events leads to explosive instability if the voltage drop inside the nozzle is high enough. Experiments to check the proposed mechanism are suggested.

  11. Arc saw development report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arc saw is one of the key components of the Contaminated Equipment Volume Reduction (CEVR) Program. This report describes the progress of the arc saw from its inception to its current developmental status. History of the arc saw and early contributors are discussed. Particular features of the arc saw and their advantages for CEVR are detailed. Development of the arc saw including theory of operation, pertinent experimental results, plans for the large arc saw and advanced control systems are covered. Associated topics such as potential applications for the arc saw and other arc saw installations in the world is also touched upon

  12. Mechanical properties and scratch resistance of filtered-arc-deposited titanium oxide thin films on glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrero-Lopez, Oscar, E-mail: oborlop@unex.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Hoffman, Mark [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil J. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2011-09-01

    The mechanical properties and the scratch resistance of titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) thin films on a glass substrate have been investigated. Three films, with crystalline (rutile and anatase) and amorphous structures, were deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition technique on glass, and characterized by means of nanoindentation and scratch tests. The different damage modes (arc-like, longitudinal and channel cracks in the crystalline films; Hertzian cracks in the amorphous film) were assessed by means of optical and focused ion beam microscopy. In all cases, the deposition of the TiO{sub 2} film improved the contact-mechanical properties of uncoated glass. Crystalline films were found to possess a better combination of mechanical properties (i.e. elastic modulus up to 221 GPa, hardness up to 21 GPa, and fracture strength up to 3.6 GPa) than the amorphous film. However, under cyclic sliding contact above the critical fracture load, the amorphous film was found to withstand a higher number of cycles. The results are expected to provide useful insight for the design of optical coatings with improved contact-damage resistance.

  13. Mechanical properties and scratch resistance of filtered-arc-deposited titanium oxide thin films on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanical properties and the scratch resistance of titanium oxide (TiO2) thin films on a glass substrate have been investigated. Three films, with crystalline (rutile and anatase) and amorphous structures, were deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition technique on glass, and characterized by means of nanoindentation and scratch tests. The different damage modes (arc-like, longitudinal and channel cracks in the crystalline films; Hertzian cracks in the amorphous film) were assessed by means of optical and focused ion beam microscopy. In all cases, the deposition of the TiO2 film improved the contact-mechanical properties of uncoated glass. Crystalline films were found to possess a better combination of mechanical properties (i.e. elastic modulus up to 221 GPa, hardness up to 21 GPa, and fracture strength up to 3.6 GPa) than the amorphous film. However, under cyclic sliding contact above the critical fracture load, the amorphous film was found to withstand a higher number of cycles. The results are expected to provide useful insight for the design of optical coatings with improved contact-damage resistance.

  14. Edison's vacuum coating patents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the over one thousand patents bearing Thomas A. Edison's name are several for vacuum coating processes including chemical vapor deposition, evaporation, and sputter deposition. Beginning in 1880 Edison applied for patents that described carbon deposition processes that would now be called pyrolytic chemical vapor deposition. In 1884 Edison applied for a patent (granted in 1894) that described coating by evaporation in a vacuum by direct resistance heating or arc heating using a continuous current. Edison called the process 'electro vacuous deposition'. He prophetically wrote, 'the uses of the invention are almost infinite'. Edison also employed sputter deposition and in 1900 applied for a patent on a 'Process of Coating Phonograph Records'. Issued in 1902, the patent describes using a 'silent or brush electrical discharge' produced by an induction coil. The National Phonograph Company, one of Edison's many enterprises, used the sputtering process to deposit a thin layer of gold on wax phonograph cylinder masters that could then be electroplated to form molds to mass produce celluloid duplicates. The method was used for 20 years, from 1901 to 1921. It enabled the reproduction of cylinder grooves less than 0.001 in. deep at a density of 200 grooves per in. From 1913 to 1921, 10-in.-diameter Edison Diamond Disc phonograph records were made using the same method. Sputtering was abandoned in 1927, as it could not be scaled up to produce the 12 in. disks that were then introduced

  15. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  16. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-06-01

    deposited at the emitter surface by returning electrons is found to be twice that deposited by ions. A previous study suggested that the computed particle flux and energy of ions to the emitter of the 1.5cm cathode were not high enough to change the barium evaporation rate compared to thermally induced evaporation. The same suggestion is made here for the 0.635cm cathode. The peak ion flux to the emitter is found to be 1.2A/cm2 (7.6×1018/scm2), and the corresponding peak sheath drop is 2.9V. Consequently, once the emitter operating temperature is known it is possible to determine directly the barium depletion-limited life of these cathodes using existing vacuum-cathode data.

  17. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    power deposited at the emitter surface by returning electrons is found to be twice that deposited by ions. A previous study suggested that the computed particle flux and energy of ions to the emitter of the 1.5 cm cathode were not high enough to change the barium evaporation rate compared to thermally induced evaporation. The same suggestion is made here for the 0.635 cm cathode. The peak ion flux to the emitter is found to be 1.2 A/cm2 (7.6x1018/s cm2), and the corresponding peak sheath drop is 2.9 V. Consequently, once the emitter operating temperature is known it is possible to determine directly the barium depletion-limited life of these cathodes using existing vacuum-cathode data

  18. Improved Dispenser Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Lou

    2006-01-01

    Variations in emission current from dispenser cathodes can be caused by variations in temperature and work function over the surface. This paper described research to reduce these variations using improved mechanical designs and controlled porosity cathodes made from sintered tungsten wires. The program goal is to reduce current emission variations to less than 5% over the surface of magnetron injection guns operating temperature limited.

  19. Frozen Vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Bousso, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Modes just outside the horizon of a typical old black hole are thermally entangled with distant Hawking radiation. This precludes their entangled purity with interior modes, leading to a firewall. Identifying the interior with the distant radiation ("A=R_B", "ER=EPR") can resolve the entanglement conflict. But the map must adjust for any interactions, or else the firewall will reappear if the Hawking radiation scatters off the CMB. With a self-correcting map, an infalling observer is unable to excite the vacuum near the horizon. This allows the horizon to be locally detected and so violates the equivalence principle.

  20. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  1. Two-dimensional model of evolution in the DC arc plasma generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A time dependent, two-dimensional model for simulating the plasma evolution in the DC arc plasma generator is conducted. The governing equations of a set of electrostatic magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) equations are solved by employing an efficient finite difference method. Up-wind schemes and uniform meshes in space are used in numerical simulation. the distributions and evolution of the density, velocity, temperature, electric potential, current density, etc. of the arc plasmas of two kinds of cathode model are computed. The influence of the cathode shape in are plasma generator is investigated. The results show that the conical cathode produces bigger current density and ionizes more efficiently than rod cathode in same geometry and operating conditions. But the former easily bring on the computing instability. The simulating results can be used to address designing the device for big current arc plasma generator. (authors)

  2. The Arc Model in SiO2 Current-limiting Fuse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王念春; 季幼章

    2001-01-01

    An arc model in SiO2 current-limiting fuse has been put forward. Through taking into account the comprehensive effects such as: fundamental action process among particles of arc column, geometrical and external circuit characteristics of arc column, physical procedure in arc column and in cathode and anode, and power equilibrium in arc column plasma et al., parameters such as the temperature, length, volumn, pressure, arc voltage, arc current et al. in the arc column can be obtained by the model. In view of the serious nonlinearity and huge difference among parameters in the equation set of the model, via analysis on these equations, two solution methods for the equations of the model have been presented with a basic accordance between calculated results and test results.``

  3. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μ thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionizatin released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaenous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces. (orig.)

  4. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and

  5. Methods and apparatuses for making cathodes for high-temperature, rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D; Sprenkle, Vincent L; Coffey, Gregory W

    2014-05-20

    The approaches for fabricating cathodes can be adapted to improve control over cathode composition and to better accommodate batteries of any shape and their assembly. For example, a first solid having an alkali metal halide, a second solid having a transition metal, and a third solid having an alkali metal aluminum halide are combined into a mixture. The mixture can be heated in a vacuum to a temperature that is greater than or equal to the melting point of the third solid. When the third solid is substantially molten liquid, the mixture is compressed into a desired cathode shape and then cooled to solidify the mixture in the desired cathode shape.

  6. Simulation of Electron Beam Dynamics in a Nonmagnetized High-Current Vacuum Diode

    CERN Document Server

    Anishchenko, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    The electron beam dynamics in a nonmagnetized high-current vacuum diode is analyzed for different cathode-anode gap geometries. The conditions enabling to achieve the minimal {initial} momentum spread in the electron beam are found out. A drastic rise of current density in a vacuum diode with a ring-type cathode is described. The effect is shown to be caused by electrostatic repulsion.

  7. Re-circulating linac vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum system for a proposed 2.5 GeV, 10ΜA recirculating linac synchrotron light source [1] is readily achievable with conventional vacuum hardware and established fabrication processes. Some of the difficult technical challenges associated with synchrotron light source storage rings are sidestepped by the relatively low beam current and short beam lifetime requirements of a re-circulating linac. This minimal lifetime requirement leads directly to relatively high limits on the background gas pressure through much of the facility. The 10ΜA average beam current produces very little synchrotron radiation induced gas desorption and thus the need for an ante-chamber in the vacuum chamber is eliminated. In the arc bend magnets, and the insertion devices, the vacuum chamber dimensions can be selected to balance the coherent synchrotron radiation and resistive wall wakefield effects, while maintaining the modest limits on the gas pressure and minimal outgassing

  8. The use of hollow cathodes in deposition processes: A critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first report of a discharge in a hollow cathode was by F. Paschen in 1916. That study showed that such a system was capable of producing a high electron flux and relatively low ion and neutral temperatures. About 40 years later, the work of Lidsky and others showed that hollow cathode arc discharges were one of the best plasma sources available at that time. The term “hollow cathode discharges” has commonly been used in reference to almost any discharge in a cathode with a cavity-like geometry, such that the plasma was enclosed or partially bound by the electrode walls that were at the cathode potential. Just as the magnetic field trapping of the electrons in a magnetron cathode results in an increase in the plasma density, in the hollow cathode, the reduced electron loss due to the geometry of the cathode also results in a higher plasma density. At least three types of discharge can be established in a hollow cathode. At low power and/or at relatively low gas pressures, the plasma is a “conventional” discharge characterized by low currents and medium to high voltages (we will call this a discharge in a hollow cathode or D-HC). Even this type of plasma has a higher density than a normal planar parallel-plate or magnetron system because the hollow geometry strongly reduces the loss of electrons. Using an adequate combination of gas pressure and applied power with a given hollow cathode diameter, or separation of the cathode surface, the negative glow of the plasma can expand to occupy the majority of the interior volume of the cathode. Under this condition the plasma current can, for the same voltage, be 100 to 1000 times the value of the “simple” D-HC discharge, and the plasma density is correspondingly larger (we call this a hollow cathode discharge or HCD). If the cathode is not cooled, the discharge can transform into a dispersed arc as the electrode temperature increases and thermal-field electron emission becomes an important additional source

  9. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancinelli, B. R., E-mail: bmancinelli@frvt.utn.edu.ar [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651 (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Minotti, F. O.; Kelly, H. [Grupo de Descargas Eléctricas, Departamento Ingeniería Electromecánica, Facultad Regional Venado Tuerto (UTN), Laprida 651 (2600) Venado Tuerto, Santa Fe (Argentina); Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Prevosto, L. [Instituto de Física del Plasma (CONICET), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (UBA) Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-07-14

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 10{sup 4} A/s.

  10. Numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A numerical investigation of the double-arcing phenomenon in a cutting arc torch is reported. The dynamics of the double-arcing were simulated by using a two-dimensional model of the gas breakdown development in the space-charge layer contiguous to the nozzle of a cutting arc torch operated with oxygen. The kinetic scheme includes ionization of heavy particles by electron impact, electron attachment, electron detachment, electron–ion recombination, and ion–ion recombination. Complementary measurements during double-arcing phenomena were also conducted. A marked rise of the nozzle voltage was found. The numerical results showed that the dynamics of a cathode spot at the exit of the nozzle inner surface play a key role in the raising of the nozzle voltage, which in turn allows more electrons to return to the wall at the nozzle inlet. The return flow of electrons thus closes the current loop of the double-arcing. The increase in the (floating) nozzle voltage is due to the fact that the increased electron emission at the spot is mainly compensated by the displacement current (the ions do not play a relevant role due to its low-mobility) until that the stationary state is achieved and the electron return flow fully-compensates the electron emission at the spot. A fairly good agreement was found between the model and the experiment for a spot emission current growth rate of the order of 7 × 104 A/s.

  11. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Cathodes - Technological review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented

  13. Rotating arc spark plug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H.; Tsai, Chin-Chi

    2003-05-27

    A spark plug device includes a structure for modification of an arc, the modification including arc rotation. The spark plug can be used in a combustion engine to reduce emissions and/or improve fuel economy. A method for operating a spark plug and a combustion engine having the spark plug device includes the step of modifying an arc, the modifying including rotating the arc.

  14. ERDA characterization of carbon nitride films deposited by hollow cathode discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in carbon nitride (CN) thin films stems from the theoretical work of Liu and Cohen predicting the extreme hardness of this material, comparable to or greater than that of diamond. The growth of CN thin films employing various deposition techniques such as plasma chemical vapor deposition, sputtering, laser ablation, ion assisted dynamic mixing and low energy ion implantation has been reported. This contribution presents some results about the characterization of CNx films using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) technique. CN films were deposited on silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation of pure graphite in a nitrogen environment. A hollow cathode discharge in arc regime was used both for evaporating a graphite target and for generating a high density plasma in the vicinity of the substrate. The main deposition parameters were as follows: gas (N2) pressure, 10-2 - 5.10-2 mbar; hollow cathode discharge power, 2.5 - 5 kW; substrate negative bias voltage, 0-150 V; graphite evaporation rate, 0.08 - 0.2 g/min; deposition duration, 15-60 min. The ERDA measurements were carried out at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH using a 63Cu10+ beam at 80 MeV. The samples were mounted in a scattering target chamber with a vacuum higher than 5 x 10-5 Torr. The detector consisted in a compact ΔE(gas)-E(solid) telescope, placed at 30 angle with respect to the beam. The elements of the main interests were C and N. The measured Δ E -E spectra for two samples prepared in different conditions are presented. A quantitative analysis of the C and N energy spectra using our program SURFAN have been carried out for the these samples. It shows that the nitrogen to carbon atomic concentration ratio is close to 0.3. The nitrogen content is lower than that expected for the ideal β - C3N4 solid. (authors)

  15. Leybold vacuum handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, K; Diels, Kurt

    1966-01-01

    Leybold Vacuum Handbook presents a collection of data sets that are essential for numerical calculation of vacuum plants and vacuum processes. The title first covers vacuum physics, which includes gas kinetics, flow phenomena, vacuum gauges, and vapor removal. Next, the selection presents data on vacuum, high vacuum process technology, and gas desorption and gettering. The text also deals with materials, vapor pressure, boiling and melting points, and gas permeability. The book will be of great interest to engineers and technicians that deals with vacuum related technologies.

  16. An RF excited plasma cathode electron beam gun design

    OpenAIRE

    Del Pozo, S.; Ribton, C; Smith, DR

    2014-01-01

    A plasma cathode electron beam (EB) gun is presented in this work. A radio frequency (RF) excited plasma at 84 MHz was used as the electron source to produce a beam power of up to 3.2 kW at -60 kV accelerating voltage. The pressure in the plasma chamber is approximately 1 mbar. The electrons are extracted from the plasma chamber to the vacuum chamber (at 10-5 mbar) through a diaphragm with a 0.5 mm diameter nozzle. Advantages over thermionic cathode guns were demonstrated empirically. Mainten...

  17. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  18. High efficiency infrared antireflection coatings (ARCs) for space optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, C. L.; Thutupalli, G. K. M.; Mohan, S.

    1989-05-01

    The development of non-quarter-wave IR ARCs for the Ge optics of space electrooptic hardware is described. A novel design-optimization method is applied in which the geometrical thicknesses of the ARC layers are calculated analytically (as explained by Nagendra, 1987). Two ARCs are developed: a three-layer system (ThF4/Ge/ThF4) for use at 7-12 microns and a two-layer system (CdTe/CdSe) for 14-16 microns. The ARCs are deposited in a vacuum-evaporation facility and subjected to optical and durability testing. The results are presented in graphs, and it is demonstrated that the ARCs are durable and transparent over the desired wavelength range and have spectral transmittance characteristics in good agreement with the theoretically predicted values.

  19. The effect of arc velocity on cold electrode erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experimental investigations of copper cathode erosion in a magnetically driven arc versus arc rotation velocity v are presented. The erosion rate measurements were carried out with the arc burning in air, for magnetic induction values B in the range of 0.005-0.386 T, axial air gas velocity of 7.65 ms-1, and current of 292 A. It is shown that in the range of small values of v and B, the mass erosion rate diminishes with v and B. Then, the erosion remains constant for a certain range of v and B, and, subsequently, begins to grow. This information is very important for the correct use of magnetic fields to decrease erosion in arc heaters

  20. Gas-discharge sources with charged particle emission from the plasma of glow discharge with a hollow cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, A P

    2001-01-01

    One studied properties of a magnetron discharge with a cold hollow and uncooled rod cathodes. One demonstrated the dominant effect of thermoelectron emission of a rod cathode heated in a discharge on characteristics of discharge and on emission properties of a gas-discharge plasma and the possibility pf a smooth transition of glow discharge to diffusion mode of arc discharge combustion. Paper describes sources of ions and electrons with improved physical and generalized design and engineering parameters. One shows the promise of the electrode structure of a hollow cathode magnetron discharge to be used as a source, in particular, of the atomic hydrogen and of atom flow of a working rod cathode

  1. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  2. MEA vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes construction and operation of the MEA vacuum system of NIKHEF (Netherlands). First, the klystron vacuum system, beam transport system, diode pump and a triode pump are described. Next, the isolation valve and the fast valves of the vacuum system are considered. Measuring instruments, vacuum system commands and messages of failures are treated in the last chapter. (G.J.P.)

  3. Suppression of shunting current in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Real-time investigations of the dynamics of explosive electron emission from a high-voltage cathode holder made of nonmagnetic stainless steel in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode have been performed. It has been shown that aging the cathode with several tens of voltage pulses at a field of 1–2 MV/cm provides a stray emission delay ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a nanosecond or more. In addition, the magnetic field must be configured so that the magnetic lines would not cross the vacuum gap between the diode case and the cathode holder in the region behind the emitting edge of the cathode. These efforts provide conditions for stable emission of the working beam from a graphite cathode with a sharp emitting edge

  4. Suppression of shunting current in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalandin, M. I.; Mesyats, G. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Real-time investigations of the dynamics of explosive electron emission from a high-voltage cathode holder made of nonmagnetic stainless steel in a magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode have been performed. It has been shown that aging the cathode with several tens of voltage pulses at a field of 1-2 MV/cm provides a stray emission delay ranging from hundreds of picoseconds to a nanosecond or more. In addition, the magnetic field must be configured so that the magnetic lines would not cross the vacuum gap between the diode case and the cathode holder in the region behind the emitting edge of the cathode. These efforts provide conditions for stable emission of the working beam from a graphite cathode with a sharp emitting edge.

  5. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-01

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H-) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H- current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  6. Simulation and Experimental Study of Arc Column Expansion After Ignition in Low-Voltage Circuit Breakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qiang; RONG Mingzhe; WU Yi; XU Tiejun; SUN Zhiqiang

    2008-01-01

    The dynamicprocess of arc pressure and corresponding arc column expansion, which is the main feature after arc ignition and has a significant effect on the breaking behaviour of low -voltage circuit breakers, is studied. By constructing a three dimensional mathematical model of air arc plasma and adopting the Control Volume Method, the parameters of arc plasma including temperature and pressure axe obtained. The variations of pressure field and temperature field with time are simulated. The result indicates that there are six stages for the process of arc column expansion according to the variation of pressure in arc chamber. In the first stage, the maximal pressure locates in the region close to cathode, and in the second stage the maximal pressure shifts to the region close to the anode. In the third stage, the pressure difference between the middle of arc column and the ambient gas is very large, so the arc column begins to expand apparently. In the fourth stage, the pressure wave propagates towards both ends and the maximal pressure appears at the two ends when the pressure wave reaches both sidewalls. In the fifth stage, the pressure wave is reflected and collides in the middle of the arc chamber. In the last stage, the propagation and reflection of pressure wave will repeat several times until a steady burning state is reached. In addition, the experimental results of arc column expansion, corresponding to the arc pressure variation, are presented to verify the simulation results.

  7. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  8. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  9. Observation of the glow-to-arc transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Saito, Shigeki; Takahashi, Kunio; Onzawa, Tadao

    2002-10-01

    Researches of the glow-to-arc transitions have been required for a new development of the welding technology in low current. It is important to clarify the characteristics of plasma in the transitions because there have been few reports investigated the transitions in detail. The glow-to-arc transitions were observed in argon at atmospheric pressure. The Th-W electrodes of 1 mm in a diameter are used. Both of the electrodes are needle-shaped and set in a quartz tube coaxially. Plasma is generated between the electrodes with the gap spacing of 1 mm. A DC power supply has been applying constant voltage of 600 V during the discharge. A high-speed camera is used to record the images of plasma in the transitions with the measurement of voltage and current between the electrodes. As a result, two things were confirmed for the behavior of the glow-to-arc transition. First, plasma extended over the cathode surface in the transition from the glow to the arc. Second, temperature in the tip of the cathode would increase gradually during the glow and decrease during the arc.

  10. Plasma chemistry fluctuations in a reactive arc plasma in the presence of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of a magnetic field on the plasma chemistry and pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of cathodic arc ion charge state distributions in a reactive environment were investigated. The plasma composition was measured by time-of-flight charge-to-mass spectrometry. The fluctuation of the concentrations of Al+, Al2+, and Al3+ was found to increase with an increasing magnetic field strength. We suggest that this is caused by magnetic field dependent fluctuations of the energy input into cathode spots as seen through fluctuations of the cathode potential. These results are qualitatively consistent with the model of partial local Saha equilibrium and are of fundamental importance for the evolution of the structure of films deposited by reactive cathodic arc deposition

  11. Investigation of the flickering of La2O3 and ThO2 doped tungsten cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load during operation. Nominal currents of more than one hundred amperes lead to a cathode tip temperature near the melting point of tungsten. To reduce the electrode temperature and, thereby, to increase the maintenance of such lamps, ThO2 or tentatively La2O3 are added to the electrode material. They generate a reduced work function by establishing a monolayer of emitter atoms on the tungsten surface. Emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of doped cathodes are formed. They are traced back to transport mechanisms of emitter oxides in the interior of the electrode and on the electrode surface in dependence of the electrode temperature and to the redeposition of vaporized and ionized emitter atoms onto the cathode tip by the electric field in front. The investigation is undertaken by means of glow discharge mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscope images, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and through measurements of the optical surface emissivity. The effect of emitter enrichments on the stability of the arc attachment is presented by means of temporally resolved electrode temperature measurements and by measurements of the luminous flux from the cathode-near plasma. They show that the emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of the cathode are attractive for the arc attachment if the emitter at the cathode tip is depleted. In this case, it moves along the lateral surface from the cathode tip to sections of the cathode with a reduced work function. It induces a temporary variation of the cathode tip temperature and of the light intensity from the cathode-near plasma, a so-called flickering. In particular, in case of lanthanated cathodes, strong flickering is observed

  12. Investigation of the flickering of La2O3 and ThO2 doped tungsten cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebing, T.; Hermanns, P.; Bergner, A.; Ruhrmann, C.; Traxler, H.; Wesemann, I.; Knabl, W.; Mentel, J.; Awakowicz, P.

    2015-07-01

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load during operation. Nominal currents of more than one hundred amperes lead to a cathode tip temperature near the melting point of tungsten. To reduce the electrode temperature and, thereby, to increase the maintenance of such lamps, ThO2 or tentatively La2O3 are added to the electrode material. They generate a reduced work function by establishing a monolayer of emitter atoms on the tungsten surface. Emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of doped cathodes are formed. They are traced back to transport mechanisms of emitter oxides in the interior of the electrode and on the electrode surface in dependence of the electrode temperature and to the redeposition of vaporized and ionized emitter atoms onto the cathode tip by the electric field in front. The investigation is undertaken by means of glow discharge mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscope images, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and through measurements of the optical surface emissivity. The effect of emitter enrichments on the stability of the arc attachment is presented by means of temporally resolved electrode temperature measurements and by measurements of the luminous flux from the cathode-near plasma. They show that the emitter enrichments on the lateral surface of the cathode are attractive for the arc attachment if the emitter at the cathode tip is depleted. In this case, it moves along the lateral surface from the cathode tip to sections of the cathode with a reduced work function. It induces a temporary variation of the cathode tip temperature and of the light intensity from the cathode-near plasma, a so-called flickering. In particular, in case of lanthanated cathodes, strong flickering is observed.

  13. Peek Arc Consistency

    CERN Document Server

    Bodirsky, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies peek arc consistency, a reasoning technique that extends the well-known arc consistency technique for constraint satisfaction. In contrast to other more costly extensions of arc consistency that have been studied in the literature, peek arc consistency requires only linear space and quadratic time and can be parallelized in a straightforward way such that it runs in linear time with a linear number of processors. We demonstrate that for various constraint languages, peek arc consistency gives a polynomial-time decision procedure for the constraint satisfaction problem. We also present an algebraic characterization of those constraint languages that can be solved by peek arc consistency, and study the robustness of the algorithm.

  14. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  15. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  16. Electric arc hydrogen heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the electric arc burning in hydrogen are presented. Empirical and semiempirical dependences for calculating the arc characteristics are derived. An engineering method of calculating plasma torches for hydrogen heating is proposed. A model of interaction of a hydrogen arc with a gas flow is outlined. The characteristics of plasma torches for heating hydrogen and hydrogen-bearing gases are described. (author)

  17. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  18. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  19. Development and Experimental Operation of a Flashboard Plasma Cathode Test Stand

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Ali I.

    2012-01-01

    Flashboard Plasma Cathodes (FBPCs) are potential rugged electron sources for generating high-current beams needed for future High Power Microwave Weapons. In FBPCs, dielectric material is in contact with electrodes in a vacuum. Plasma is generated by a surface flashover discharge on the surface of the dielectric between the electrodes and an electron beam is extracted from the plasma by applying an electric field between the anode and cathode. While FBPCs have been successfully used in a numb...

  20. The RHIC vacuum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.; Hseuh, H. C.; Lee, R. C.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Smart, L.; Sondericker, J.; Weiss, D.; Welch, K.

    2003-03-01

    There are three vacuum systems in RHIC: the insulating vacuum vessels housing the superconducting magnets, the cold beam tubes surrounded by the superconducting magnets, and the warm beam tube sections at the insertion regions and the experimental regions. These systems have a cumulative length over 10 km and a total volume over 3000 m 3. Conventional ultrahigh vacuum technology was used in the design and construction of the cold and warm beam vacuum systems with great success. The long and large insulating vacuum volumes without vacuum barriers require careful management of the welding and leak checking of the numerous helium line joints. There are about 1500 vacuum gauges and pumps serial-linked to eight PLCs distributed around RHIC, which allow the monitoring and control of these devices through Ethernet networks to remote control consoles. With the exception of helium leaks through the cryogenic valve boxes into the insulating vacuum volumes, the RHIC vacuum systems have performed well beyond expectations.