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Sample records for cathode strip chamber

  1. ME1/1 Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Erchov, Yu V; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Khabarov, Serguei; Moissenz, P V; Moissenz, K P; Movchan, Sergey; Perelygin, Victor; Vassiliev, S E; Zarubin, Anatoli; Tchekhovski, V A

    2008-01-01

    The 76 innermost ME1/1 cathode strip chambers (CSC) of the CMS Experiment were designed and produced in Dubna. The chambers have been installed in the detector and commissioning has been completed. This paper describes the design of the CSCs, their main mechanical parameters and read-out electronics, and the results of tests with cosmic-ray muons.

  2. Synchronization of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Raknessa, G; Wang, D

    2007-01-01

    The synchronization of the trigger and data acquisition systems for the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at CERN is described. The CSC trigger system is designed to trigger CMS on muons with high efficiency (~99% per chamber) and is able to accurately identify its 25ns proton bunch crossing. To date, asynchronous cosmic ray data have been used to define the protocol and to refine timing algorithms, allowing synchronization to be realized within and between chambers to within ±10 ns. Final synchronization of the CSCs requires timing parameters to be accurate to 2 ns. This goal will be readily achieved from the cosmic ray baseline using data taken with the synchronous beam structure of the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Installation of some Cathode Strip Chambers on March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    2004-01-01

    Installation on the Disk of some Cathode Strip Chambers, type ME3/1, produced in the US. The installation has been performed on March 2004 at the CMS experimental site SX5 (P5) in Cessy, neighbouring France.

  4. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mitselmakher, G. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Gordeev, A. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnson, C.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States); Polychronakos, V.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Golutvin, I.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  5. Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) Sag Measurements and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Kriesel, K; Loveless, D

    1997-01-01

    We describe the measurements of sag on P1A 2 layer prototype Cathode Strip Chamber and compare the results with calculated values. Using this information we predict the sag of P1 6-layer chamber with the present design for the aluminium frame, and compare this value to measured sag.

  6. Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Muon Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Gough Eschrich, I

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer employs cathode strip chambers (CSC) to measure high momentum muons in the forward regions (2.0 < | | < 2.7). Due to the severe radiation levels expected in this environment, the on-detector electronics are limited to amplifying and digitizing the signal while sparsification, event building and other tasks are performed off-detector.

  7. Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Muon Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Gough Eschrich, I

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer employs cathode strip chambers (CSC) to measure high momentum muons in the forward regions $(2.0 < |eta| < 2.7)$. Due to the severe radiation levels expected in this environment, the on-detector electronics are limited to amplifying and digitizing the signal while sparsification, event building and other tasks are performed off-detector.

  8. Performance Testing of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Breedon, Richard; Andreev, M. Tripathi V; Arisaka, Katsushi; Cline, David; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Lisowsky, B; Matthey, Christina; Rakness, Gregory; Wenman, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The production, installation, and testing of 468 cathode strip chambers for the endcap muon system of the CMS experiment played a critical role in the preparation of the endcap muon system for the final commissioning. Common testing procedures and sets of standard equipment were used at 5 international assembly centers. The chambers were then thoroughly retested after shipment to CERN. Final testing was performed after chamber installation on the steel disks in the CMS detector assembly building. The structure of the detector quality control procedure is presented along with the results of chamber performance validation tests.

  9. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  10. The Cathode Strip Chamber Data Acquisition System for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bylsma, B G; Gilmore, J R; Gu, J H; Ling, T Y

    2007-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) [1] Data Acquisition (DAQ) system for the CMS [2] experiment at the LHC [3] will be described. The CSC system is large, consisting of 218K cathode channels and 183K anode channels. This leads to a substantial data rate of ~1.5GByte/s at LHC design luminosity (1034cm-2s-1) and the CMS first level trigger (L1A) rate of 100KHz. The DAQ system consists of three parts. The first part is on-chamber Cathode Front End Boards (CFEB)[4], which amplify, shape, store, and digitise chamber cathode signals, and Anode Front End Boards (AFEB)[5], which amplify, shape and discriminate chamber anode signals. The second part is the Peripheral Crate Data Acquisition Motherboards (DAQMB), which control the onchamber electronics and the readout of the chamber. The third part is the off-detector DAQ interface boards, which perform real time error checking, electronics reset requests and data concentration. It passes the resulting data to a CSC local DAQ farm, as well as CMS main DAQ [6]. All electron...

  11. Central tracking chamber with inflated cathode-strip foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackmore, E.W.; Bryman, D.A.; Kuno, Y.; Lim, C.; Numao, T.; Padley, P.; Redlinger, G.; Soluk, R. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McPherson, R.A. [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    1998-02-21

    A new cylindrical low-mass central drift chamber has been constructed for the K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{nu} anti {nu} experiment at BNL (E787). The chamber consists of twelve layers of axial wire cells and six layers of thin cathode-strip foils, four of which are supported by differential gas pressure. The momentum resolution (RMS) for muons and pions in the range 150-250 MeV/c is found to be about 0.9%. (orig.). 16 refs.

  12. Performance of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; 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Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) constitute the primary muon tracking device in the CMS endcaps. Their performance has been evaluated using data taken during a cosmic ray run in fall 2008. Measured noise levels are low, with the number of noisy channels well below 1%. Coordinate resolution was measured for all types of chambers, and fall in the range 47 microns to 243 microns. The efficiencies for local charged track triggers, for hit and for segments reconstruction were measured, and are above 99%. The timing resolution per layer is approximately 5 ns.

  13. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Document Server

    Firmansyah, Muhammad; CERN. Geneva. PH Department

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) are gas detectors in Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment that can determine paths of muons accurately. The data taken from the chambers are digital data and usually saved to files. Sometimes we need graphical representation of the data to analyze some files. A software had been developed to comply the needs, but it had limitations, didn't meet some specifications, and few major drawbacks. Hence, a new version of the software is developed to overcome its limitations, drawbacks, and also to meet the all specifications. Besides that, there are also additional features added to the new version software to help users analyze data. The new version software is a web-based application, which is different from the desktop-based application of the old version software. In the end, response in CSC Online Systems weekly meeting (12/08/13) for this application was positive, so this application should be maintained and developed in future.

  14. Calibration of cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berdnikov, V. V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, L.; Somov, A.

    2016-07-01

    A technique for calibrating cathode strip gains in multiwire drift chambers of the GlueX experiment is described. The accuracy of the technique is estimated based on Monte Carlo generated data with known gain coefficients in the strip signal channels. One of the four detector sections has been calibrated using cosmic rays. Results of drift chamber calibration on the accelerator beam upon inclusion in the GlueX experimental setup are presented.

  15. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzinger, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Willis, N.

    1996-04-01

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of {sigma} < 100 {mu}m in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author). 44 refs.

  16. Completion of cathode strip chamber (CSC) installation on the "plus" endcap of CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon, UC Davis

    2006-01-01

    A set of 16 pictures of the completion of installation of the cathode strip chambers (CSC) on the "plus" side endcap. Here a CSC destined for placement under the "nose" on the front of the innermost endcap disk ("YE+1") is being lifted over the endcap hadron calorimeter (HCAL, within the black section). The CSC to be installed is attached to the installation fixture using the special extension arm required to reach chamber locations beneath the nose.

  17. Aging tests of full-scale CMS muon cathode strip chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Arisaka, K; Bondar, N; Breedon, R; Bujak, A; Bylsma, B; Chester, N; Clare, R; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Cox, T; Dolinski, S I; Durkin, S; Eartly, D; Ivanov, Yu; Ferguson, T; Gavrilov, G; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Gutay, L; Hann, F; Hartmut, R; Hauser, J; He, K; Ignatenko, M A; Ilie, S; Jiang, C; Ko, W; Korytov, A; Krivshich, A G; Kuznetsova, K; Layter, J; Lee, R; Levchenko, P M; Ling, T Y; Loveless, D; Lusin, S; Maeshima, K; Madorsky, A; Matthey, C; Matveev, M; Von der Mey, M; Mitselmakher, G; Otwinowski, S; Padley, P; Pal, I; Pischalnikov, Y; Prokofiev, O E; Razmyslovich, B V; Reeder, D; Roberts, J; Schipunov, L; Smirnov, I; Souvorov, V; Stasko, J T; Sun, H; Sytnik, V V; Terentyev, N K; Tripathi, M; Vavilov, S; Volkov, S; Vorobyov, A; Vorobyov, I A; Wang, L; Yarba, V A; Zhou, L; Zhu, Z

    2003-01-01

    Two CMS production Cathode Strip Chambers were tested for aging effects in a high-radiation environment at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The chambers were irradiated over a large area: in total, about 2.1m**2 or 700m of wire in each chamber. The 40% Ar+50% CO//2+10% CF//4 gas mixture was provided by an open-loop gas system for one of the chambers and by a closed-loop re-circulating gas system for the other. After an accumulation of 0.3-0.4C/cm of a wire, equivalent to about 30-50 years of operation at peak LHC luminosity, no significant changes in gas gain, chamber efficiency and wire signal noise were observed for either of the two chambers. The only consistent signs of aging were a small increase in dark current from 2 to 10nA per plane of 600 wires and a decrease of strip-to-strip resistance from 1000 to 10-100GOmega. Disassembly of the chambers revealed deposits on the cathode planes, while the anode wires remained fairly clean.

  18. A New Segment Building Algorithm for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the CMS Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golutvin I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new segment building algorithm for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the CMS experiment is presented. A detailed description of the new algorithm is given along with a comparison with the algorithm used in the CMS software. The new segment builder was tested with different Monte-Carlo data samples. The new algorithm is meant to be robust and effective for hard muons and the higher luminosity that is expected in the future at the LHC.

  19. Upgrades to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers for 2017 and the High Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, David; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An overview will be given of upgrades to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) during the extended technical stop 2016-2017 and plans for future upgrades targeting the HL-LHC. HL-LHC conditions will surpass the physical capabilities of the present detector, and require novel hardware to cope with increased rates and maintain the high performance of the CSC achieved up to now.

  20. The new segment building algorithm for the cathode strip chambers in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, Igor; Pal'Chik, Vladimir; Voytishin, Nikolay; Zarubin, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    A new segment building algorithm for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the CMS experiment is presented. A detailed description of the new algorithm is given along with a comparison with the standard algorithm. The new segment builder was tested with different Monte-Carlo data samples. The new algorithm is meant to be robust and effective fot the higher luminosity and hard muons that are expected in the future at LHC.

  1. Upgrades to the CSC Cathode Strip Chamber Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Bravo, Cameron Bily

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity, latency, and trigger rate foreseen at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) present challenges to efficient readout of the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) of the CMS end cap muon detector. Upgrades to the electronics are targeted for the inner rings of CSCs in each station, which have the highest flux of particles. The upgrades comprise digital cathode front end boards for nearly deadtimeless and long trigger latency operating capability, new DAQ boards that transmit data from the detectors with higher-bandwidth links, and a new data concentrator/interface to the central DAQ system that can receive the higher input rates.

  2. Upgrades to the CSC Cathode Strip Chamber electronics for HL-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, C.

    2017-01-01

    The luminosity, latency, and trigger rate foreseen at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) present challenges to efficient readout of the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs, [1]) of the CMS end cap muon detector. Upgrades to the electronics are targeted for the inner rings of CSCs in each station, which have the highest flux of particles. The upgrades comprise digital cathode front end boards for nearly deadtimeless and long trigger latency operating capability, new DAQ boards that transmit data from the detectors with higher-bandwidth links, and a new data concentrator/interface to the central DAQ system that can receive the higher input rates.

  3. Performance of the CMS Cathode Strip Chamber endcap muon detectors in Run 2 and first results with 2015 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC's) are located in the CMS endcap and record muons in the region of absolute pseudorapidity between 0.9 and 2.4. The first performance results of the CSC's in Run 2 are shown.

  4. Performance of the Cathode Strip Chamber endcap muon detectors in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wulsin, H Wells

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of Run 1 of the LHC in 2012, the outermost ring has been added to the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) endcap muon detector, and the readout electronics of the innermost ring of CSCs have been upgraded to accommodate the larger luminosity and collision energy anticipated in Run 2. A major effort was required to build, install, and commission these new chambers and electronics. This talk summarizes the improvements made during this upgrade and presents the performance of the CSC detector during the early stages of Run 2.

  5. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas; Juska, Evaldas

    2014-02-01

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  6. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas, E-mail: valdas.rapsevicius@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vilnius University, Didlaukio g. 47-325, LT-08303 Vilnius (Lithuania); Juska, Evaldas, E-mail: evaldas.juska@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  7. Misura delle caratteristiche del rivelatore a Cathode Strip Chambers per l’esperimento Totem

    CERN Document Server

    Boccone, Vittorio

    2004-01-01

    The aim of my thesis was to characterize the Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) detector of the T1 inelastic detector of the TOTEM experiment. In the first two chapters I briefly introduce the TOTEM physics and the TOTEM experiment. In the third chapter I describe the basic principles of the ionizing detectors relevant to the TOTEM CSCs. Here I show also the results of few simulations done to determine the construction and operating parameters of the detector. The last two chapter are dedicated to the description of the experimental apparatus I build and the discussion of the TOTEM test beam results.

  8. Completion of cathode strip chamber (CSC) installation on the so-called YE+2 wheel of CMS on March 2005.

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee

    2005-01-01

    The pictures have been taken in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5, in March 2005 and show the status of cathode strip chamber (CSC) assembly on the yoke disk YE+2. The chambers are labelled ME+3 and their installation has been completed on March 16th, 2005.

  9. Hough Transform Track Reconstruction in the Cathode Strip Chambers in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Amram, Nir

    2008-01-01

    The world's largest and highest energy particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will collide two highly energetic proton beams in an attempt to discover a wide range of new physics. Among which, the primary ambitions are the discovery of the Higgs boson and suppersymmetric particles. ATLAS, one of its primary particle detectors, was designed as a general-purpose detector covering a broad range of energies and physical processes. A special emphasis on accurate muon tracking has led the ATLAS collaboration to design a stand-alone Muon Spectrometer, an extremely large tracking system extending all the way around the detector. Due to its immense size and range, parts of the spectrometer were designed to withstand a high rate of radiation, sifting the muon signals from the rest of the signals (primarily neutrons and photons). The Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) are special multiwire proportional chambers placed in the high $\\eta$ region on of the Muon Spectrometer, where flux of background particles is...

  10. Efficiency of Finding Muon Track Trigger Primitives in CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, Darin; Andreev, Valeri; Apollinari, Giorgio; Baek, Yong Wook; Banicz, Karoly; Barashko, Victor; Barberis, Emanuela; Bartalini, Paolo; Bloch, Ingo; Boeriu, Oana; Bondar, Nikolai; Breedon, Richard; Bujak, Adam; Bylsma, Ben; Chen, Mingshui; Clare, Robert; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Cox, Peter Timothy; Denisov, Alexander; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Durkin, S; Eartly, David P; Ershov, Yuri; Ferguson, Thomas; Fortin, Dominique; Geurts, Frank J M; Gilmore, Jason; Golovtsov, Victor; Golutvin, Igor; Golyash, Alexander; Gu, Jianhui; Gutay, Laszlo; Hauser, Jay; He, Kang-Lin; Holbrook, Britt; Holmes, Daniel; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Ippolito, Nicole; Ivanov, Yasen; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Karjavin, Vladimir; Khabarov, Serguei; Killewald, Phillip; Ko, Winston; Kotov, Khristian; Korytov, Andrey; Kozhevnikov, Yuri; Lanaro, Armando; Levchenko, Petr; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Jie; Loveless, Richard; Lusin, Sergei; Madorsky, Alexander; Matveev, Mikhail; Medved, Serguei; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Moisenz, Petr; Padley, Brian Paul; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Pal, Imre; Perelygin, Victor; Petrunin, Anatoly; Pischalnikov, Yuriy; Pivarsky, J; Prokofiev, O; Rakness, Gregory; Roberts, Jay; Roe, Adam; Safonov, Alexei; Schetkovsky, A; Schipunov, L; Schmitt, Michael; Sknar, Vladimir; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sulimov, Valentin; Sun, Han-Sheng; Sytnik, Valeri; Tchekhovski, V; Terentyev, Nikolay; Tripathi, Mani; Tucker, Jordan; Tumanov, Alexander; Uvarov, Lev; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Vasilev, S; Vavilov, Sergey; Velichko, Georgy; Volkov, Serguei; Von der Mey, Martin; Vorobev, I; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Wang, Dayong; Williams, Grayson; Yatsura, V; Zarubin, Anatoli; Zhao, Wei-Ren; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhmakin, G; Zhu, Zian; Zilizi, Gyula

    2007-01-01

    In the CMS Experiment, muon detection in the forward direction is accomplished by cathode strip chambers~(CSC). These detectors identify muons, provide a fast muon trigger, and give a precise measurement of the muon trajectory. There are 468 six-plane CSCs in the system. The efficiency of finding muon trigger primitives (muon track segments) was studied using~36 CMS CSCs and cosmic ray muons during the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge~(MTCC) exercise conducted by the~CMS experiment in~2006. In contrast to earlier studies that used muon beams to illuminate a very small chamber area ($< \\! 0.01$~m$^2$), results presented in this paper were obtained by many installed CSCs operating {\\em in situ} over an area of $\\approx \\! 23$~m$^2$ as a part of the~CMS experiment. The efficiency of finding 2-dimensional trigger primitives within 6-layer chambers was found to be~$99.93 \\pm 0.03\\%$. These segments, found by the CSC electronics within $800$~ns after the passing of a muon through the chambers, are the input info...

  11. Upgrades to the CMS Cathode Strip Chamber Electronics for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Morse, David Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cathode strip chambers (CSCs) are used to detect muons in theend cap region of the CMS detector. The chambers are arrangedin rings in four planes on each end of the detector. The innerrings of CSCs in each station have the highest flux ofparticles and this presents challenges to efficient readout atthe luminosity, latency, and trigger rate foreseen at theHL-LHC.The existing front end electronics in Stations 2, 3, and 4 arebased on switched capacitor arrays with limited bufferingcapability. Queuing models have shown that significantsaturation of the buffers would occur for the luminosity, Level1 trigger rates, and required Level 1 latency for running atthe HL-LHC. In addition, the expected output rate of data isexpected to exceed the 1 Gbps bandwidth of the optical linksthat carry data to the back end, resulting in loss of eventsynchronization.The upgrade of the inner ring of CSCs addresses these problemsby replacing some types of electronics boards in these ringswith upgraded boards. In particular, the existi...

  12. Distribution of the Timing, Trigger and Control Signals in the Endcap Cathode Strip Chamber System at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Geurts, F; Padley, P

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of the Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signal distribution tree in the Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) sub-detector of the CMS Experiment at CERN. The key electronic component, the Clock and Control Board (CCB) is described in detail, as well as the transmission of TTC signals from the top of the system down to the front-end boards.

  13. Study of a multi-wire proportional chamber with a cathode strip and delay-line readout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Li-Ying; LI Qi-Te; Q. Faisal; GE Yu-Cheng; IU Hong-Tao; YE Yan-Lin

    2009-01-01

    The design principle for a multi-wire proportional chamber with a cathode strip and delay-line readout is described. A prototype chamber of a size of 10 cm ~ l0 cm was made together with the readout electronics circuit. A very clean signal with very low background noise was obtained by applying a transformer between the delay-line and the pre-amplifier in order to match the resistance. Along the anode wire direction a position resolution of less than 0.5 mm was achieved with a 55Fe-5.9 keV X ray source. The simple structure, large effective area and high position resolution allow the application of a gas chamber of this kind to many purposes.

  14. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  15. Effect of Gas Composition on the Performance of Cathode Strip Chambers for the CMS Endcap Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, C; Korenblit, S; Korytov, Andrey; Mitselmakher, Guenakh

    2004-01-01

    The composition of the gas inside the cathode strip chambers (CSCs) defines many important performance parameters, including the gas gain and operational voltage range. Differences in these parameters were examined under variations in concentration of argon, carbon dioxide, and carbon tetrafluoride around the baseline mixture of Ar+CO2+CF4 = 40+50+10. The gas gain was found to be dependent primarily on the Ar concentration and nearly insensitive of the CF4/CO2 relative concentrations. The operational voltage range of ~370V had only a weak dependence on Ar concentration in the range of 40%-60% (-30 V for +20% change) at fixed amount of CF4, but showed about 3 times stronger dependence on the concentration of CF4 (+90 V for the concentration change from 0% to 20%) at fixed amount of Ar. We discuss 2 alternative gas mixtures Ar+CO2+CF4 = 60+30+10 and 60+35+5, which both offer performance (gas gain and plateau) very similar to that of the baseline mixture, but at 400 V lower absolute voltages.

  16. Studies with cathode drift chambers for the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentchev, L.; Barbosa, F.; Berdnikov, V.; Butler, D.; Furletov, S.; Robison, L.; Zihlmann, B.

    2017-02-01

    A drift chamber system consisting of 24 1 m-diameter chambers with both cathode and wire readout (total of 12,672 channels) is operational in Hall D at Jefferson Lab (Virginia). Two cathode strip planes and one wire plane in each chamber register the same avalanche allowing the study of avalanche development, charge induction process, and strip resolution. We demonstrate a method for reconstructing the two-dimensional distribution of the avalanche ;center-of-gravity; position around the wire from an 55Fe source with resolutions down to 30 μm. We estimate the azimuthal extent of the avalanche around the wire as a function of the total charge for an Ar/CO2 gas mixture. By means of cluster counting using a modified 3 cm-gap chamber, we observe significant space charge effects within the same track, resulting in an extent of the avalanche along the wire.

  17. A new multi-strip ionization chamber used as online beam monitor for heavy ion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhiguo [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Mao, Ruishi [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); Duan, Limin, E-mail: lmduan@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China); She, Qianshun; Hu, Zhengguo; Li, He; Lu, Ziwei; Zhao, Qiecheng; Yang, Herun; Su, Hong; Lu, Chengui; Hu, Rongjiang; Zhang, Junwei [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Rd., Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2013-11-21

    A multi-strip ionization chamber has been built for precise and fast monitoring of the carbon beam spatial distribution at Heavy Ion Researched Facility of Lanzhou Cooling Storing Ring (HIRFL-CSR). All the detector's anode, cathode and sealed windows are made by 2μm aluminized Mylar film in order to minimize the beam lateral deflection. The sensitive area of the detector is (100×100)mm{sup 2}, with the anode segmented in 100 strips, and specialized front-end electronics has been developed for simplifying the data acquisition and quick feedback of the relevant parameters to beam control system. It can complete one single beam profile in 200μs.

  18. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the forthcoming Phase-I upgrade to the LHC (2018/19), the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system, Small Wheel, needs to be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have to operate in a high background radiation region while reconstructing muon tracks with high precision and providing information for the Level-1 trigger. In particular, the precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm, and the Level-1 trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The NSWs consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities. The single sTGC planes of a quadruplet consists of an anode layer of 50μm gold plated tungsten wire sandwiched between two resistive cathode layers. Behind one of the resistive cathode layers, a PCB with precise machined strips (thus the name sTGC) spaced every 3.2mm allows to achieve a position resolution that ranges from 70...

  19. Determination of selenium in nuts by cathodic stripping potentiometry (CSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Giacomo; La Pera, Lara; Lo Turco, Vincenzo; Mavrogeni, Ekaterini; Alfa, Maria

    2003-06-18

    The aim of this work was to determine the selenium content in nut samples by cathodic stripping potentiometry. Dry-powdered nuts were digested by HNO(3) and dissolved with concentrated hydrochloric acid. To avoid the interference of natural oxygen, the potentiometric determination of selenium was carried out in an electrolyte solution consisting of 2 M CaCl(2) and 4 M HCl. The analysis was executed applying an electrolysis potential of -150 mV for 60 s and a constant current of -30 microA. Under these conditions, detection limits lower than 1.0 ng g(-)(1) were obtained for selenium analysis in nuts. The relative standard deviation of these measurements (expressed as rsd %) ranged from 0.44 to 0.88% while recoveries ranged from 90.2 to 95.3%. The results obtained with the proposed method were compared with those obtained via hydride vapor generation atomic absorption spectroscopy, a common method for determining selenium. The results of the two methods agreed within 5% for almond, hazelnut, and pistachio samples. The mean concentrations of selenium determined in Sicilian samples of almond, hazelnut, and pistachio were 531 +/- 1, 865 +/- 1, and 893 +/- 4 microg/kg, respectively.

  20. Detector with a profile-based cathode and a two-coordinate pad-strip readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchinskiy, N A; Kravchuk, N P; Korenchenko, A S; Khomutov, N V; Smirnov, V S; Chekhovskii, V A; Movchan, S A; Zyazyulya, F E

    2011-01-01

    A detector with a profile-based cathode and a pad-strip cathode readout system is experimentally investigated. Cathode pads arranged along each anode wire are diagonally interconnected and form strips that cross the detector at an angle with respect to the anode wire. Two coordinates from the cathodes and one from the anode wire allow identification of tracks in high multiplicity events with a single detector plane.

  1. Note: Design and development of improved indirectly heated cathode based strip electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, Namita; Patil, D. S.; Dasgupta, K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Bade, Abhijeet; Tembhare, G. U. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)

    2015-02-15

    An improved design of indirectly heated solid cathode based electron gun (200 kW, 45 kV, 270° bent strip type electron gun) has been presented. The solid cathode is made of thoriated tungsten, which acts as an improved source of electron at lower temperature. So, high power operation is possible without affecting structural integrity of the electron gun. The design issues are addressed based on the uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode and the single long filament based design. The design approach consists of simulation followed by extensive experimentation. In the design, the effort has been put to tailor the non-uniformity of the heat flux from the filament to the solid cathode to obtain better uniformity of temperature on the solid cathode. Trial beam experiments have been carried out and it is seen that the modified design achieves one to one correspondence of the solid cathode length and the electron beam length.

  2. Voltammetric characteristics of miconazole and its cathodic stripping voltammetric determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO C. PEREIRA

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Miconazole is reduced at mercury electrode above pH 6 involving organometallic compound formation, responsible for an anomalous polarographic behavior. The electrodic process presents a large contribution of the adsorption effects. The drug can be determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry from 8.0 x 10-8 to 1, 5 x 10-6 molL-1 in Britton-Robinson buffer pH 8.0, when pre-accumulated for 30s at an accumulation potential of 0V. A relative standard deviation of 3.8% was obtained for ten measurements of 1.0 x 10-7 molL-1 miconazole in B-R buffer pH 8.0 and a limit detection of 1, 7 x 10-8 molL-1 was determined using 60s of deposition time and scan rate of 100 mVs-1. The proposed method is simple, precise and it was applied successfully for the determination of the miconazole in pure form and in commercial formulations, showing mean recoveries of 99.7-98.4%.Miconazol é reduzido no eletrodo de mercúrio em valor de pH acima de 6,0 envolvendo formação de composto organometálico, responsável por um comportamento polarográfico anômalo. O processo eletródico apresenta uma larga contribuição de efeitos de adsorção. A droga pode ser determinada por voltametria de redissolução catódica de 8, 0 x 10-8 a 1, 5 x 10-6 mol L-1 em tampão Britton-Robinson pH 8,0 quando pré-acumulada por 30s em potencial de acúmulo de 0V. Um desvio padrão relativo de 3,8% foi obtido de 10 medidas de 1, 0 x 10-7 mol L-1 de miconazol em tampão B-R pH 8,0 e um limite de detecção de 1, 7 x 10-8 mol L-1 foi determinado usando 60s de tempo de deposição e velocidade de varredura de 100 mV s-1. O método proposto é simples, preciso e foi aplicado com sucesso para a determinação de miconazol na forma pura e em formulações comerciais, mostrando médias de recuperação de 99, 7 - 98, 4%.

  3. Anode and cathode readout electronics for cylindrical multiwire proportional chambers of the PIBETA detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinnikov, V A; Khomutov, N V; Korenchenko, A S; Korenchenko, S M; Kuchinskij, N A; Sidorkin, V V

    2002-01-01

    The cathode amplifier is intended to amplify the positive current pulses from the cathode strips of proportional chambers and drive the 50 Ohm coaxial cable. The amplifier gain and the output voltage swing are matched for operation with the LeCroy 1882F ADC. The special feature of the anode system is the integration of the amplifying section, signal delay unit and digital section for the data outputting to computer in the common ADD-32 module (CAMAC). The 1M-wide ADD-32 module contains the electronics for 32 wires that makes it possible to place up to 672 data channels in the CAMAC crate with a standard bus. To amplify signals, Amp1 8.3 8-channel microcircuits are used. The output logic signals are delayed by 9-channel IDT72421 FIFO microcircuits that enables one to obtain a total signal delay of up to hundreds of microseconds and longer. The digital section of the system is based on ALTERA programmable logic arrays. This system with a total of 576 channels is used in the PIBETA experiment to study rare pion ...

  4. Manganese Detection with a Metal Catalyst Free Carbon Nanotube Electrode: Anodic versus Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wei; Bange, Adam; Riehl, Bill L; Riehl, Bonnie D; Johnson, Jay M; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2012-10-01

    Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) were used to determine Mn concentration using metal catalyst free carbon nanotube (MCFCNT) electrodes and square wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV). The MCFCNTs are synthesized using a Carbo Thermal Carbide Conversion method which results in a material that does not contain residual transition metals. Detection limits of 120 nM and 93 nM were achieved for ASV and CSV, respectively, with a deposition time of 60 s. CSV was found to be better than ASV in Mn detection in many aspects, such as limit of detection and sensitivity. The CSV method was used in pond water matrix addition measurements.

  5. Manganese Detection with a Metal Catalyst Free Carbon Nanotube Electrode: Anodic versus Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Wei; Bange, Adam; Riehl, Bill L.; Riehl, Bonnie D.; Johnson, Jay M.; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) were used to determine Mn concentration using metal catalyst free carbon nanotube (MCFCNT) electrodes and square wave stripping voltammetry (SWSV). The MCFCNTs are synthesized using a Carbo Thermal Carbide Conversion method which results in a material that does not contain residual transition metals. Detection limits of 120 nM and 93 nM were achieved for ASV and CSV, respectively, with a deposition time of 60 s. CSV was found to be better than ASV in Mn detection in many aspects, such as limit of detection and sensitivity. The CSV method was used in pond water matrix addition measurements. PMID:24235806

  6. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  7. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of trace Mn(II) at carbon film electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe, Olga M. S.; Brett,Christopher M.A.

    2003-01-01

    A sensitive voltammetric method is presented for the determination of tract levels of Mn (II) using carbon film electrodes fabricated from carbon resistors of 2 [Omega]. Determination of manganese was made by square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), with deposition of manganese as manganese dioxide. Chronoamperometric experiments were made to study MnO2 nucleation and growth. As a result, it was found to be necessary to perform electrode conditioning at a more positive potential to i...

  8. Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-12-01

    An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 μm pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

  9. Determination of water in room temperature ionic liquids by cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chuan; Bond, Alan M; Lu, Xunyu

    2012-03-20

    An electrochemical method based on cathodic stripping voltammetry at a gold electrode has been developed for the determination of water in ionic liquids. The technique has been applied to two aprotic ionic liquids, (1-butyl-3-ethylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate), and two protic ionic liquids, (bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ammonium acetate and triethylammonium acetate). When water is present in an ionic liquid, electrooxidation of a gold electrode forms gold oxides. Thus, application of an anodic potential scan or holding the potential of the electrode at a very positive value leads to accumulation of an oxide film. On applying a cathodic potential scan, a sensitive stripping peak is produced as a result of the reduction of gold oxide back to gold. The magnitude of the peak current generated from the stripping process is a function of the water concentration in an ionic liquid. The method requires no addition of reagents and can be used for the sensitive and in situ determination of water present in small volumes of ionic liquids. Importantly, the method allows the determination of water in the carboxylic acid-based ionic liquids, such as acetate-based protic ionic liquids, where the widely used Karl Fischer titration method suffering from an esterification side reaction which generates water as a side product.

  10. Circulating cathodic antigen cassette test versus haematuria strip test in diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghareeb, Azza S; Abd El Motaleb, Ghada S; Waked, Nevien Maher; Osman Hany Kamel, Nancy; Aly, Nagwa Shaban

    2016-12-01

    Urinary schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma haematobium constitutes a major public health problem in many tropical and sub-tropical countries. This study was conducted to evaluate circulating cathodic antigen cassette test and haematuria strip test for detection of S. haematobium in urine samples and to evaluate their screening performance among the study population. Microscopy was used as a gold standard. A total of 600 urine samples were examined by microscopy for detection of S. haematobium eggs, screened for microhaematuria using Self-Stik reagent strips and screened for circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) using the urine-CCA cassette test. The specificity of CCA, microhaematuria and macrohaematuria was 96.4, 40.6 and 31.2 % respectively while the sensitivity was 88.2, 99.3 and 100 % respectively which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that using of urine-CCA cassette test in diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis is highly specific (96.4 %) compared with the highly sensitive haematuria strip test (100 %). The degree of agreement between microscopic examination and CCA detection was 99.3 % with highly statistically significant difference (P < 0.001). The combination of two techniques could potentially use for screening and mapping of S. haematobium infection.

  11. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Cefoperazone in Bulk Powder, Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, and Human Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Vu Dang; Huyen, Dao Thi; Phuc, Phan Hong

    2013-01-01

    The electroreduction behaviour and determination of cefoperazone using a hanging mercury drop electrode were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms of cefoperazone recorded in universal Britton-Robinson buffers pH 3–6 exhibited a single irreversible cathodic peak. The process was adsorption-controlled. Britton-Robinson buffer 0.04 M pH 4.0 was selected as a supporting electrolyte for quantitative purposes by differential pulse and square wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. The experimental voltammetric conditions were optimized using Central Composite Face design. A reduction wave was seen in the range from −0.7 to −0.8 V. These voltammetric techniques were successfully validated as per ICH guidelines and applied for the determination of cefoperazone in its single and sulbactam containing powders for injection and statistically comparable to USP-HPLC. They were further extended to determine cefoperazone in spiked human urine with no matrix effect. PMID:24109542

  12. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Cefoperazone in Bulk Powder, Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, and Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dang Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroreduction behaviour and determination of cefoperazone using a hanging mercury drop electrode were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms of cefoperazone recorded in universal Britton-Robinson buffers pH 3–6 exhibited a single irreversible cathodic peak. The process was adsorption-controlled. Britton-Robinson buffer 0.04 M pH 4.0 was selected as a supporting electrolyte for quantitative purposes by differential pulse and square wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. The experimental voltammetric conditions were optimized using Central Composite Face design. A reduction wave was seen in the range from −0.7 to −0.8 V. These voltammetric techniques were successfully validated as per ICH guidelines and applied for the determination of cefoperazone in its single and sulbactam containing powders for injection and statistically comparable to USP-HPLC. They were further extended to determine cefoperazone in spiked human urine with no matrix effect.

  13. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River.

  14. Hydrogen production in single chamber microbial electrolysis cells with stainless steel fiber felt cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Min; Wei, Liling; Qiu, Zhaozheng; Wang, Gang; Shen, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) is a promising technology for sustainable production of hydrogen from biodegradable carbon sources. Employing a low-cost and high efficient cathode to replace platinum catalyzed cathode (Pt/C) for hydrogen generation is a challenge for commercialization of MEC. Here we show that a 3D macroporous stainless steel fiber felt (SSFF) with high electrochemical active surface area has an excellent catalytic activity for hydrogen generation, which is comparable to Pt/C cathode and superior to stainless steel mesh (SSM) cathode in the single-chamber MEC. The SSFF cathode (mean filter rating 100 μm) produces hydrogen at a rate of 3.66 ± 0.43 m3 H2 m-3d-1 (current density of 17.29 ± 1.68 A m-2), with a hydrogen recovery of 76.37 ± 15.04% and overall energy efficiency of 79.61 ± 13.07% at an applied voltage of 0.9 V. The performance of SSFF cathode improves over time due to a decrease in overpotential which caused by corrosion. These results demonstrate that SSFF can be a promising alternative for Pt catalytic cathode in MEC for hydrogen production.

  15. Cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structure using discrete anode strips -- case history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulikers, J. [Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Cathodic protection of reinforcing steel suffering from chloride-induced corrosion has been used for at least the last decade. It has been demonstrated to be the most appropriate, cost-effective and reliable repair option when compared to conventional repair methods. This case study describes the actions taken on a bridge substructure in the Netherlands, built in 1938 as the major structural support for a balance bridge, where a condition assessment revealed that reinforcement corrosion had been initiated by chloride penetration and carbonation. Cathodic protection with impressed current was proposed to protect the reinforcing steel. The system was based on discrete titanium anode strips, inserted perpendicular to the concrete surface. In order to achieve a uniform distribution of protective current, a system of an average of 10 strips per square meter of concrete surface was placed in holes drilled to a depth of 35 cm. In view of the innovative nature of the design and the heightened risk of non-uniform current distribution, provisions were made for additional monitoring of the performance of the cathodic system. Measurements included concrete resistance, current distribution over the concrete surface and frequent depolarization. Monitoring results revealed a pronounced non-uniform current distribution over the concrete surface and a high current demand in one particular zone. The pronounced differences encountered in this instance were attributed to delaminations and macroscopic cracks in the concrete cover, severely limiting the flow of protective current to the reinforcement. It is suggested that repair of the delaminations by injecting a low resistivity cementitious grout, thereby allowing the use of a more cost-effective surface-mounted anode system might have been a more appropriate option than the one chosen. The principal lesson learned from this particular case is the strong need for quantitative information regarding anodic and cathodic current

  16. Strip Ionization Chamber as Beam Monitor in the Proton Therapy Eye Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, F.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Boriano, A.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Peroni, C.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Pitta', G.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-04-01

    Since spring 2002, ocular pathologies have been treated in Catania at the Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate (CATANA) within a collaboration between INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS), Physics Department, Ophthalmology Institute, Radiology Institute of the Catania University and CSFNSM Catania. A beam line from a 62 MeV Superconducting Cyclotron is used to treat shallow tumors. The beam is conformed to the tumor shape with a passive delivery system. A detector system has been developed in collaboration with INFN-Torino to be used as real time beam monitor. The detector, placed upstream of the patient collimator, consists of two parallel plate ionization chambers with the anode segmented in strips. Each anode is made of 0.5 mm-wide 256 strips corresponding to (12.8 × 12.8) cm2 sensitive area. With the two strip ionization chambers one can measure the relevant beam parameters during treatment to probe both asymmetry and flatness. In the test carried out at CATANA the detector has been used under different and extreme beam conditions. Preliminary results are given for profiles and skewness, together with a comparison with reference detectors.

  17. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of trace Mn(II) at carbon film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipe, Olga M S; Brett, Christopher M A

    2003-12-04

    A sensitive voltammetric method is presented for the determination of tract levels of Mn (II) using carbon film electrodes fabricated from carbon resistors of 2 Omega. Determination of manganese was made by square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), with deposition of manganese as manganese dioxide. Chronoamperometric experiments were made to study MnO(2) nucleation and growth. As a result, it was found to be necessary to perform electrode conditioning at a more positive potential to initiate MnO(2) nucleation. Under optimised conditions the detection limit obtained was 4 nM and the relative standard deviation for eight measurements of 0.22 nM was 5.3%. Interferences from various metal ions on the response CSV of Mn(II) were investigated, namely Cd(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Cr(VI), Pb(II), Zn(II) and Fe(II). Application to environmental samples was demonstrated.

  18. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of arsenic in sugarcane brandy at a modified carbon nanotube paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Meryene C; Tavares, Elisângela de F L; Saczk, Adelir A; Okumura, Leonardo L; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Magriotis, Zuy M; de Oliveira, Marcelo F

    2014-07-01

    We have developed an eletroanalytical method that employs Cu(2+) solutions to determine arsenic in sugarcane brandy using an electrode consisting of carbon paste modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTPE) and polymeric resins. We used linear sweep (LSV) and differential-pulse (DPV) voltammetry with cathodic stripping for CNTPE containing mineral oil or silicone as binder. The analytical curves were linear from 30 to 110μgL(-1) and from 10 to 110μgL(-1) for LSV and DPV, respectively. The limits of detection (L.O.D.) and quantification (L.O.Q.) of CNTPE were 10.3 and 34.5μgL(-1) for mineral oil and 3.4 and 11.2μgL(-1) for silicone. We applied this method to determine arsenic in five commercial sugarcane brandy samples. The results agreed well with those obtained by hydride generation combined with atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS).

  19. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased by up to seven times its design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019-2020. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55\\% of CO$_{2}$ and 45\\% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a 10~mCi~$^{90}$Sr source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height o...

  20. Studies of ageing effects of Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gignac, Matthew; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The largest upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs), to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2019/20. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) detectors are one chosen technology to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. The basic sTGC structure consists of a grid of gold-plated tungsten wires sandwiched between two resistive cathode planes at a small distance from the wire plane. We study ageing effects of sTGC detectors with a gas mixture of 55% of CO_2 and 45% of n-pentane. A sTGC detector was irradiated with beta-rays from a Sr-90 source. Three different gas flow rates were tested. We observed no deterioration on pulse height of...

  1. Effects of hydraulic pressure on the performance of single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaoan; Liu, Weifeng; Guo, Jian; Sun, Dan; Pan, Bin; Ye, Yaoli; Ding, Weijun; Huang, Haobin; Li, Fujian

    2014-06-15

    Scaling up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) without losing power density requires a thorough understanding of the effect of hydraulic pressure on MFC performance. In this work, the performance of an activated carbon air-cathode MFC was evaluated under different hydraulic pressures. The MFC under 100 mmH2O hydraulic pressure produced a maximum power density of 1260 ± 24 mW m(-2), while the power density decreased by 24.4% and 44.7% as the hydraulic pressure increased to 500 mmH2O and 2000 mmH2O, respectively. Notably, the performance of both the anode and the cathode had decreased under high hydraulic pressures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests of the cathode indicated that both charge transfer resistance and diffusion transfer resistance increased with the increase in hydraulic pressure. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that the similarity among anodic biofilm communities under different hydraulic pressures was ≥ 90%, and the communities of all MFCs were dominated by Geobacter sp. These results suggested that the reduction in power output of the single chamber air-cathode MFC under high hydraulic pressures can be attributed to water flooding of the cathode and suppression the metabolism of anodic exoelectrogenic bacteria.

  2. Development of Gas Micro-Strip Chambers for Radiation Detection and Tracking at High Rates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD28 \\\\ \\\\ Micro-Strip Gas Chambers (GMSC) are a promising high rate, high resolution position detector suited for use in high luminosity hadron collider experiments, as general purpose tracker or to improve the performances of preshower counters, transition radiation and inner muon detectors. Large GMSC arrays have been included in proposed LHC and SSC experimental setups. The operating characteristics of GMSC make their use very attractive also for detectors at tau/beauty/charm factories, as well as for synchrotron radiation facilities and medical applications. At the present state of the art, some problems limiting the usefulness of microstrip chambers are the observed gain changes due to charging up of the support, possible long-term degradation due to ageing, limited sizes imposed by fabrication technologies and unavailability of dedicated high-speed, high-density readout electronics. Limited experience exists of operation of GMSC in real experimental conditions, and little if anything is known about p...

  3. Particle tracking in kaon electroproduction with cathode-charge sampling in multi-wire proportional chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Achenbach, P; Bernauer, J C; Böhm, R; Bosnar, D; Bösz, M; Debenjak, L; Distler, M O; Esser, A; Friščić, I; de la Paz, M Gómez Rodríguez; Makek, M; Merkel, H; Müller, U; Nungesser, L; Pochodzalla, J; Potokar, M; Majos, S Sánchez; Schlimme, B S; Širca, S; Weinriefer, M; 10.1016/j.nima.2011.03.039

    2011-01-01

    Wire chambers are routinely operated as tracking detectors in magnetic spectrometers at high-intensity continuous electron beams. Especially in experiments studying reactions with small cross-sections the reaction yield is limited by the background rate in the chambers. One way to determine the track of a charged particle through a multi-wire proportional chamber (MWPC) is the measurement of the charge distribution induced on its cathodes. In practical applications of this read-out method, the algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position is an important factor for the achievable position resolution and for the track reconstruction efficiency. An algorithm was developed for operating two large-sized MWPCs in a strong background environment with multiple-particle tracks. Resulting efficiencies were determined as a function of the electron beam current and on the signal amplitudes. Because of the different energy-losses of pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range of the s...

  4. Response of Multi-strip Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Ushasi; Rahaman, A; Basu, P; Basu, J; Bemmerer, D; Boretzky, K; Elekes, Z; Kempe, M; Munzenberg, G; Simon, H; Sobiella, M; Stach, D; Wagner, A; Yakorev, D

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of Multi-strip Multi-gap Resistive Plate chamber (MMRPC) with active area 40 cm $\\times$ 20 cm has been developed at SINP, Kolkata. Detailed response of the developed detector was studied with the pulsed electron beam from ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. In this report the response of SINP developed MMRPC with different controlling parameters is described in details. The obtained time resolution ($\\sigma_t$) of the detector after slew correction was 91.5$ \\pm $3 ps. Position resolution measured along ($\\sigma_x$) and across ($\\sigma_y$) the strip was 2.8$\\pm$0.6 cm and 0.58 cm, respectively. The measured absolute efficiency of the detector for minimum ionizing particle like electron was 95.8$\\pm$1.3 $\\%$. Better timing resolution of the detector can be achieved by restricting the events to a single strip. The response of the detector was mainly in avalanche mode but a few percentage of streamer mode response was also observed. A comparison of the response of these two modes with trig...

  5. Bare and Polymer-Coated Indium Tin Oxide as Working Electrodes for Manganese Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinek, Cory A; Bange, Adam; Warren, Mercedes; Kang, Wenjing; Nahan, Keaton; Papautsky, Ian; Heineman, William R

    2016-04-19

    Though an essential metal in the body, manganese (Mn) has a number of health implications when found in excess that are magnified by chronic exposure. These health complications include neurotoxicity, memory loss, infertility in males, and development of a neurologic psychiatric disorder, manganism. Thus, trace detection in environmental samples is increasingly important. Few electrode materials are able to reach the negative reductive potential of Mn required for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV), so cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) has been shown to be a viable alternative. We demonstrate Mn CSV using an indium tin oxide (ITO) working electrode both bare and coated with a sulfonated charge selective polymer film, polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene-sulfonate (SSEBS). ITO itself proved to be an excellent electrode material for Mn CSV, achieving a calculated detection limit of 5 nM (0.3 ppb) with a deposition time of 3 min. Coating the ITO with the SSEBS polymer was found to increase the sensitivity and lower the detection limit to 1 nM (0.06 ppb). This polymer modified electrode offers excellent selectivity for Mn as no interferences were observed from other metal ions tested (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), In(3+), Sb(3+), Al(3+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(3+), Bi(3+), and Sn(2+)) except Fe(2+), which was found to interfere with the analytical signal for Mn(2+) at a ratio 20:1 (Fe(2+)/Mn(2+)). The applicability of this procedure to the analysis of tap, river, and pond water samples was demonstrated. This simple, sensitive analytical method using ITO and SSEBS-ITO could be applied to a number of electroactive transition metals detectable by CSV.

  6. Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2015-01-25

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm.

  7. Modeling and validation of single-chamber microbial fuel cell cathode biofilm growth and response to oxidant gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shiqi; Zhao, Yi; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-10-01

    This work describes experiments and computational simulations to analyze single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance and cathodic limitations in terms of current generation, power output, mass transport, biomass competition, and biofilm growth. Steady-state and transient cathode models were developed and experimentally validated. Two cathode gas mixtures were used to explore oxygen transport in the cathode: the MFCs exposed to a helium-oxygen mixture (heliox) produced higher current and power output than the group of MFCs exposed to air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture (nitrox), indicating a dependence on gas-phase transport in the cathode. Multi-substance transport, biological reactions, and electrochemical reactions in a multi-layer and multi-biomass cathode biofilm were also simulated in a transient model. The transient model described biofilm growth over 15 days while providing insight into mass transport and cathodic dissolved species concentration profiles during biofilm growth. Simulation results predict that the dissolved oxygen content and diffusion in the cathode are key parameters affecting the power output of the air-cathode MFC system, with greater oxygen content in the cathode resulting in increased power output and fully-matured biomass.

  8. Characterizations of Cathode pad chamber as tracking detector for MUON Spectrometer of ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Sanjoy

    The present thesis gives an overview of A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN with particular emphasis on the contribution of the Indian Collaboration to the Muon Spectrometer. The two major activities of the Indian Collaboration namely, the 2$^{nd}$ Tracking Station and MANAS chip, have been covered in detail. A full scale prototype chamber (0$^{th}$ chamber) for the 2$^{nd}$ station was tested at CERN with beams from PS and SPS. Detail analysis of his data was carried out by me to validate the design and fabrication procedure for these large area Cathode Pad Chambers. This analysis also determined the production specifications of the MANAS chip. The thesis present every step which led to timely production of the ten chambers (two spare) of the 2$^{nd}$ station. At every stage strict quality control measures were adopted and various tests were carried out to validate every production step. I have been closely associated with the chamber production and all the validation...

  9. Performance testing of a long-strip two-end readout multi-gap resistive plate chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Bin; WANG Yi; LUO Ming; LI Yuan-Jing; CHENG Jian-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) is a new generation of gas detector with good tim-ing and spacial resolution, whose technique is widely applied in some recent high energy (nuclear) physics experiments. In this letter, we report a long-strip two-end readout MRPC and its test beam performance. The measurements show that the long-strip performs a transmission line characteristic and the impedance is independent of the length of strip. The MRPC module we developed is presented to gain a timing resolution of~80 ps and a spacial resolution of ~6.4 mm. The possible application of the MRPC is also discussed.

  10. Copper-mercury film electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of Se(IV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladkov, Vladimir; David, François; Fourest, Blandine

    2003-01-01

    The copper-mercury film electrode has been suggested for the determination of Se(IV) in a wide range of concentration from 1x10(-9) to 1x10(-6) mol L(-1)by square-wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Insufficient reproducibility and sensitivity of the mercury film electrode have been overcome by using copper(II) ions during the plating procedure. Copper(II) has been found to be reduced and form a reproducible copper-mercury film on a glassy carbon electrode surface. The plating potential and time, the concentration of copper(II) and the concentration of the supporting electrolyte have been optimised. Microscopy has been used for a study of the morphology of the copper-mercury film. It has been found that it is the same as for the mercury one. The preconcentration step consists in electrodeposition of copper selenide on the copper-mercury film. The relative standard deviation is 4.3% for 1x10(-6) mol L(-1) of Se(IV). The limit of detection is 8x10(-10) mol L(-1) for 5 min of accumulation.

  11. Detecting Naturally-Produced Sulfide Nanoparticles by Adsorptive, Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helz, G. R.; Krznaric, D.; Bura-Nakic, E.; Ciglenecki, I.

    2007-12-01

    Growing evidence implies that metal sulfide nanoparticles of natural origin exist in some aquatic environments. These nanoparticles could play important roles as mediators of trace metal nutrition and toxicity. Thermodynamics suggests that in sulfidic environments (total transition metaltotal sulfide) the most insoluble metal sulfide (usually Hg or Cu) will form the predominant sulfide nanoparticle. New experimental methods for detecting and distinguishing between such nanoparticles are needed. We report that mercury electrodes effectively preconcentrate a number of different metal sulfide nanoparticles, enabling their detection by adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. Voltammetrically, nanoparticulate analytes differ fundamentally from dissolved analytes; e.g. analyte accumulation is very sensitive to electrolyte composition and concentration in accord with the Schulze-Hardy Rule. EDTA or acid treatment of samples is useful for distinguishing highly insoluble nanoparticles (HgS, CuS) from FeS. Nanoparticulate sulfur potentially interferes. Supersaturated solutions can generate artifactual analyte on Hg electrode surfaces. Despite such potential pitfalls, progress is encouraging. Preliminary, qualitative results from natural waters will be reported.

  12. Determination of Selenium in infant formula by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Oveisi MR

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Selenium as a nonmetallic chemical element has received high attention of biologists because of its dual role as an essential trace nutrient and a toxic element. This interest has created a need for reliable analytical methods for determination of selenium. In this investigation determination of selenium by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry and the influence of various parameters such as deposition potentials, deposition time. Cu concentration pH, etc. on selenium peak in voltammogram are described. Determination of selenium was accomplished in mixture of acetic acid, hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride buffer (pH=1 with a scan rate of 60 mv/s and a pulse height of 100 my by hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE as working electrode. The solution was stirred during pre-electrolysis at - 350 mv (vs SCE for 30 s and the potential was scanned between - 350 mv and - 800 mv. The determination limit of the method was 0.005 mg/kg for the sample. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0-30 μg/L (R2=0.996, p<0.001. Repeatability of the method at concentrations of 30 and 0.5 μg/L were 2.5 and 10.5% respectively.

  13. Optimization of micro-strip gas chamber as two-dimensional neutron detector using gadolinium converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaoka, Sei; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Hideshi; Soyama, Kazuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    A micro-strip gas chamber (MSGC) has been developing as a two-dimensional position sensitive neutron detector for neutron scattering experiments using high-intensity pulsed-neutron source in a high-intensity proton accelerator facility. MSGC is required for the high count rate, high detective efficiency, high positional resolution, stabilization and covering large area. Our purpose in this paper is to verify the proper of Gadolinium as MSGC converter. First, the basic property of Gadolinium converter was examined by simple experiments using a zero-dimensional neutron detector on the purpose of deriving the detective efficiency. Second, the optimization of the arrangement of a capillary plate in MSGC has been done by simulation on the MSGC using Gadolinium converter. As a result of that, it has been proved that Gadolinium can be theoretically used as a converter of MSGC. (author)

  14. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS muon system upgrade to be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW), is designed to cope with the increased instantaneous luminosity in LHC Run 3. The small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) will provide the NSW with fast trigger and high precision tracking. The construction protocol has been validated by test beam experiments on a full-size prototype sTGC detector, showing the performance requirements are met. The intrinsic spatial resolution for a single layer has been found to be about 50$\\mu$m at perpendicular incident angle, and the pads transition region has been measured to be about 4mm.

  15. Signal coupling and signal integrity in multi-strip Resistive Plate Chambers used for timing applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Diego; Wang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    We have systematically studied the transmission of electrical signals along several 2-strip Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) in the frequency range $f=0.1-3.5$GHz. Such a range was chosen to fully cover the bandwidth associated to the very short rise-times of signals originated in RPCs used for sub-100ps timing applications. This work conveys experimental evidence of the dominant role of modal dispersion in counters built at the 1 meter scale, a fact that results in large cross-talk levels and strong signal shaping. It is shown that modal dispersion appears in RPCs due to the intrinsic unbalance between the capacitive and the inductive coupling $C_m/C_o \

  16. A high dynamic Micro Strips Ionization Chamber featuring Embedded Multi DSP Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Voltolina, Francesco; Carrato, Sergio; 10.1109/NSSMIC.2004.1466924

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray detector will be presented that is the combination of a segmented ionization chamber featuring one-dimensional spatial resolution integrated with an intelligent ADC front-end, multi DSP processing and embedded PC platform. This detector is optimized to fan beam geometry with an active area of 192 mm (horizontal) and a vertical acceptance of 6 mm. Spatial resolution is obtained by subdividing the anode into readout strips, having pitch of 150 micrometers, which are connected to 20 custom made integrating VLSI chips (each capable of 64-channel read-out and multiplexing) and read out by 14 bits 10 MHz ADCs and fast adaptive PGAs into DSP boards. A bandwidth reaching 3.2Gbit/s of raw data, generated from the real time sampling of the 1280 micro strips, is cascaded processed with FPGA and DSP to allow data compression resulting in several days of uninterrupted acquisition capability. Fast acquisition rates reaching 10 kHz are allowed due to the MicroCAT structure utilized not only as a shielding grid in i...

  17. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolsma, H.P.T.

    1996-04-19

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 {mu}m rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.).

  18. Determination of selenium content in different types of seed oils by cathodic stripping potentiometry (CSP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Giacomo; La Pera, Lara; Pollicino, Donatella; Saitta, Marcello

    2003-09-10

    Seed oils are consumed worldwide; moreover, they are used in the alimentary, cosmetic, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Due to their diffusion, it is interesting to investigate the presence of important micronutrients such as selenium in seed oils. The aim of this work was to develop a rapid, precise, and sensitive cathodic stripping potentiometry (CSP) method to determine the concentration of selenium in different types of seed oils. Selenium was extracted from the oily matrix by concentrated hydrochloric acid treatment at 90 degrees C. The analysis was executed by applying an electrolysis potential of -150 mV for 60 s and a constant current of -30 microA. Under these conditions, detection limits of <0.5 ng g(-1) were obtained. The method reproducibility (expressed as total RSD %) spanned from 0.2 to 0.8%. Recoveries ranged from 92.1 to 97.5%, providing evidence that selenium quantification remained unaffected by the extraction procedure described. The results obtained with the proposed method were compared with those obtained via graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS), a common method for determining selenium. The results of the two methods agreed within 93.5-107.7%. The mean amounts of selenium found were 313.0 +/- 2.0, 458.3 +/- 1.3, 224.6 +/- 0.9, 99.5 +/- 0.8, 332.2 +/- 0.5, 144.0 +/- 0.7, and 295.5 +/- 1.2 ng g(-1), respectively, in peanut, soybean, sunflower, rice, corn, grapestone, and seed oils.

  19. Olive mill wastewater treatment in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermek, Hakan; Catal, Tunc; Akan, S Süha; Ulutaş, Mehmet Sefa; Kumru, Mert; Özgüven, Mine; Liu, Hong; Özçelik, Beraat; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2014-04-01

    Olive mill wastewaters create significant environmental issues in olive-processing countries. One of the most hazardous groups of pollutants in these wastewaters is phenolic compounds. Here, olive mill wastewater was used as substrate and treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells. Olive mill wastewater yielded a maximum voltage of 381 mV on an external resistance of 1 kΩ. Notable decreases in the contents of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, tyrosol, gallic acid and p-coumaric acid were detected. Chemical oxygen demand removal rates were 65 % while removal of total phenolics by the process was lower (49 %). Microbial community analysis during the olive mill wastewater treating MFC has shown that both exoelectrogenic and phenol-degrading microorganisms have been enriched during the operation. Brevundimonas-, Sphingomonas- and Novosphingobium-related phylotypes were enriched on the anode biofilm, while Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominated the cathode biofilm. As one of the novel studies, it has been demonstrated that recalcitrant olive mill wastewaters could be treated and utilized for power generation in microbial fuel cells.

  20. A single-chamber microbial fuel cell without an air cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Yen; Tseng, Min-Jen; Cheng, Kai-Chien; Shih, Ruey-Chyuan; Chang, Young-Fo

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel technology for wastewater treatment with electricity production. Electricity generation with simultaneous nitrate reduction in a single-chamber MFC without air cathode was studied, using glucose (1 mM) as the carbon source and nitrate (1 mM) as the final electron acceptor employed by Bacillus subtilis under anaerobic conditions. Increasing current as a function of decreased nitrate concentration and an increase in biomass were observed with a maximum current of 0.4 mA obtained at an external resistance (R(ext)) of 1 KΩ without a platinum catalyst of air cathode. A decreased current with complete nitrate reduction, with further recovery of the current immediately after nitrate addition, indicated the dependence of B. subtilis on nitrate as an electron acceptor to efficiently produce electricity. A power density of 0.0019 mW/cm(2) was achieved at an R(ext) of 220 Ω. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) showed direct electron transfer with the involvement of mediators in the MFC. The low coulombic efficiency (CE) of 11% was mainly attributed to glucose fermentation. These results demonstrated that electricity generation is possible from wastewater containing nitrate, and this represents an alternative technology for the cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment of wastewater.

  1. A Single-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell without an Air Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Chyuan Shih

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel technology for wastewater treatment with electricity production. Electricity generation with simultaneous nitrate reduction in a single-chamber MFC without air cathode was studied, using glucose (1 mM as the carbon source and nitrate (1 mM as the final electron acceptor employed by Bacillus subtilis under anaerobic conditions. Increasing current as a function of decreased nitrate concentration and an increase in biomass were observed with a maximum current of 0.4 mA obtained at an external resistance (Rext of 1 KΩ without a platinum catalyst of air cathode. A decreased current with complete nitrate reduction, with further recovery of the current immediately after nitrate addition, indicated the dependence of B. subtilis on nitrate as an electron acceptor to efficiently produce electricity. A power density of 0.0019 mW/cm2 was achieved at an Rext of 220 Ω. Cyclic voltammograms (CV showed direct electron transfer with the involvement of mediators in the MFC. The low coulombic efficiency (CE of 11% was mainly attributed to glucose fermentation. These results demonstrated that electricity generation is possible from wastewater containing nitrate, and this represents an alternative technology for the cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment of wastewater.

  2. The control system of the multi-strip ionization chamber for the HIMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Yuan, Y. J.; Mao, R. S.; Xu, Z. G.; Li, Peng; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Z. L.; Zhang, Nong

    2015-03-01

    Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) is a carbon ion cancer treatment facility which is being built by the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in China. In this facility, transverse profile and intensity of the beam at the treatment terminals will be measured by the multi-strip ionization chamber. In order to fulfill the requirement of the beam position feedback to accomplish the beam automatic commissioning, less than 1 ms reaction time of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) of this detector must be achieved. Therefore, the control system and software framework for DAQ have been redesigned and developed with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (CompactRIO) instead of PXI 6133. The software is Labview-based and developed following the producer-consumer pattern with message mechanism and queue technology. The newly designed control system has been tested with carbon beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) and it has provided one single beam profile measurement in less than 1 ms with 1 mm beam position resolution. The fast reaction time and high precision data processing during the beam test have verified the usability and maintainability of the software framework. Furthermore, such software architecture is easy-fitting to applications with different detectors such as wire scanner detector.

  3. The control system of the multi-strip ionization chamber for the HIMM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Min, E-mail: limin@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan, Y.J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Mao, R.S., E-mail: Maorsh@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xu, Z.G.; Li, Peng; Zhao, T.C.; Zhao, Z.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhang, Nong [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-03-11

    Heavy Ion Medical Machine (HIMM) is a carbon ion cancer treatment facility which is being built by the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) in China. In this facility, transverse profile and intensity of the beam at the treatment terminals will be measured by the multi-strip ionization chamber. In order to fulfill the requirement of the beam position feedback to accomplish the beam automatic commissioning, less than 1 ms reaction time of the Data Acquisition (DAQ) of this detector must be achieved. Therefore, the control system and software framework for DAQ have been redesigned and developed with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (CompactRIO) instead of PXI 6133. The software is Labview-based and developed following the producer–consumer pattern with message mechanism and queue technology. The newly designed control system has been tested with carbon beam at the Heavy Ion Research Facility at Lanzhou-Cooler Storage Ring (HIRFL-CSR) and it has provided one single beam profile measurement in less than 1 ms with 1 mm beam position resolution. The fast reaction time and high precision data processing during the beam test have verified the usability and maintainability of the software framework. Furthermore, such software architecture is easy-fitting to applications with different detectors such as wire scanner detector.

  4. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Luparia, A.; Marchette, F.; Peroni, C.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other dosimeters normally used for treatment. The skewness of the beam profile has been measured and shown to be suitable to on-line check variations of the beam shape.

  5. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs.

  6. Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis by reagent strip test for detection of circulating cathodic antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van G.J.; Wichers, J.H.; Falcao Ferreira, T.M.; Ghati, D.; Amerongen, van A.; Deelder, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed reagent strip assay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis based on parasite antigen detection in urine of infected individuals was evaluated. The test uses the principle of lateral flow through a nitrocellulose strip of the sample mixed with a colloidal carbon conjugate of a monoclo

  7. Simultaneous selection of soil electroactive bacterial communities associated to anode and cathode in a two-chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiellini, Carolina; Bacci, Giovanni; Fani, Renato; Mocali, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Different bacteria have evolved strategies to transfer electrons over their cell surface to (or from) their extracellular environment. This electron transfer enables the use of these bacteria in bioelectrochemical systems (BES) such as Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). In MFC research the biological reactions at the cathode have long been a secondary point of interest. However, bacterial biocathodes in MFCs represent a potential advantage compared to traditional cathodes, for both their low costs and their low impact on the environment. The main challenge in biocathode set-up is represented by the selection of a bacterial community able to efficiently accept electrons from the electrode, starting from an environmental matrix. In this work, a constant voltage was supplied on a two-chamber MFC filled up with soil over three weeks in order to simultaneously select an electron donor bacterial biomass on the anode and an electron acceptor biomass on the cathode, starting from the same soil. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis was performed to characterize the bacterial community of the initial soil, in the anode, in the cathode and in the control chamber not supplied with any voltage. Results highlighted that both the MFC conditions and the voltage supply affected the soil bacterial communities, providing a selection of different bacterial groups preferentially associated to the anode (Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Clostridia) and to the cathode (Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria). These results confirmed that several electroactive bacteria are naturally present within a top soil and, moreover, different soil bacterial genera could provide different electrical properties.

  8. Application of graphene-based nanomaterials as novel cathode catalysts for improving power generation in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valipour, Alireza; Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Ahn, Youngho

    2016-09-01

    The low catalytic activity, limited resources, complexity and costs, and non-environmentally friendly nature are key factors limiting the application of non-precious metals and their composites at the cathode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study evaluated the feasibility of graphene-based nanomaterials (RGOHI-AcOH vs. RGO/Ni nanoparticle composite) as novel cathode catalysts in single chamber air-cathode MFCs. A series of MFCs with different catalyst loadings were produced. The electrochemical behavior of the MFCs were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). As a result, the MFCs with the RGOHI-AcOH cathodes showed greater maximum power densities (>37%) than those with the RGO/Ni nanoparticle cathodes. In the MFCs, the highest maximum power density of 1683 ± 23 mW/m2 (CE = 72 ± 3%), which covers 77% of that estimated for Pt/C (2201 ± 45 mW/m2, CE = 81 ± 4%), was obtained from the double loading RGOHI-AcOH cathodes. Among the MFCs with the RGO/Ni nanoparticle composite cathodes, those loaded with a double catalyst (1015 ± 28 mW/m2, CE = 70 ± 2%) showed better power performance than the others. Both CV and EIS showed good agreement with the MFC results. This study suggests that the RGOHI-AcOH cathode, particularly with a double catalyst loading, is promising for sustainable low-cost green materials, stable power generation and the long-term operation of MFCs.

  9. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30°C, 9days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5.7-4.5), and increased conductivity (2.4-4.7mS/cm), soluble COD (2.66-15.5g/L), and volatile fatty acids (1.9-10.1g/L). To lower the COD and increase pH, fermentation supernatant was diluted with primary effluent before being used in the MFCs. The maximum power density was 0.32±0.01W/m2, compared to 0.24±0.03W/m2 with only primary effluent. Power densities were higher with phosphate buffer added to the supernatant (1.03±0.06W/m2) or the solution (0.87±0.05W/m2). Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 18% to 57%, and sCOD removals from 84% to 94%. These results demonstrated that sludge can effectively be used for power generation when fermented and then diluted with only primary effluent. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-03-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Nitrogen removal and electricity production at a double-chamber microbial fuel cell with cathode nitrite denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yangyang; Zhao, Jianqiang; Wang, Sha; Zhao, Huimin; Ding, Xiaoqian; Gao, Kun

    2017-02-17

    Double-chamber microbial fuel cell was applied to investigate the performance of the electricity production and nitrite denitrification through feeding nitrite into the cathode. Factors influencing denitrification performance and power production, such as external resistance, influent nitrite concentration and Nitrite Oxygen Bacteria inhibitors, were studied. The results show that when the concentration of nitrite nitrogen and external resistance were 100 mg L(-1) and 10 Ω, respectively, the nitrite denitrification reached the best state. The NaN3 can inhibit nitrite oxidation effectively; meanwhile, the nitrite denitrification with N2O as the final products was largely improved. The [Formula: see text] was reduced to [Formula: see text], causing the cathode denitrification coulombic efficiency to exceed 100%. In chemoautotrophic bio-nitrification, microorganisms may utilize H2O to oxidize nitrite under anaerobic conditions. Proteobacteria might play a major role in the process of denitrification in MFC.

  12. Effect of formation of biofilms and chemical scale on the cathode electrode on the performance of a continuous two-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kyungmi; Fujiki, Itto; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    A two-chamber MFC system was operated continuously for more than 500 days to evaluate effects of biofilm and chemical scale formation on the cathode electrode on power generation. A stable power density of 0.57 W/m(2) was attained after 200 days operation. However, the power density decreased drastically to 0.2 W/m(2) after the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale were removed. As the cathodic biofilm and chemical scale partially accumulated on the cathode, the power density gradually recovered with time. Microbial community structure of the cathodic biofilm was analyzed based on 16S rRNA clone libraries. The clones closely related to Xanthomonadaceae bacterium and Xanthomonas sp. in the Gammaproteobacteria subdivision were most frequently retrieved from the cathodic biofilm. Results of the SEM-EDX analysis revealed that the cation species (Na(+) and Ca(2+)) were main constituents of chemical scale, indicating that these cations diffused from the anode chamber through the Nafion membrane. However, an excess accumulation of the biofilm and chemical scale on the cathode exhibited adverse effects on the power generation due to a decrease in the active cathode surface area and an increase in diffusion resistance for oxygen. Thus, it is important to properly control the formation of chemical scale and biofilm on the cathode during long-term operation.

  13. Nitrogen removal in a single-chamber microbial fuel cell with nitrifying biofilm enriched at the air cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Hengjing

    2012-05-01

    Nitrogen removal is needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the treatment of most waste streams. Current designs couple biological denitrification with side-stream or combined nitrification sustained by upstream or direct aeration, which negates some of the energy-saving benefits of MFC technology. To achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, without extra energy input for aeration, the air cathode of a single-chamber MFC was pre-enriched with a nitrifying biofilm. Diethylamine-functionalized polymer (DEA) was used as the Pt catalyst binder on the cathode to improve the differential nitrifying biofilm establishment. With pre-enriched nitrifying biofilm, MFCs with the DEA binder had an ammonia removal efficiency of up to 96.8% and a maximum power density of 900 ± 25 mW/m 2, compared to 90.7% and 945 ± 42 mW/m 2 with a Nafion binder. A control with Nafion that lacked nitrifier pre-enrichment removed less ammonia and had lower power production (54.5% initially, 750 mW/m 2). The nitrifying biofilm MFCs had lower Coulombic efficiencies (up to 27%) than the control reactor (up to 36%). The maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 93.9% for MFCs with the DEA binder. The DEA binder accelerated nitrifier biofilm enrichment on the cathode, and enhanced system stability. These results demonstrated that with proper cathode pre-enrichment it is possible to simultaneously remove organics and ammonia in a single-chamber MFC without supplemental aeration. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Method with Alizarin for the Simultaneous Determination of Cadmium, and Zinc in Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deswati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the development of adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetric (AdCSV method with 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone or Alizarin (AZ as a complexing agent used in the simultaneous determination of ultra trace of Cd and Zn because it has a good sensitivity, and selectivity. The influence of several parameters was studied: the effects of 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone or Alizarin (AZ concentration, pH, accumulation potential, and accumulation time. The relative standard deviation (RSD, and recovery is determined to get the accuracy and precision method. It also determined the limit of detection (LOD of the method to get the sensitivity. In this case, the optimum conditions were AZ concentration of 0.5 mM, pH 5, step deposition (70 s, -0.5 V. This method has been applied in water samples successfully, was obtained (Cd 23, and Zn 124 µg/L, LOD (Cd 0.006, and Zn 0.004 µg/L, RSD (Cd 0.4, and Zn 1.4 % (n = 10, recovery (Cd 99.36, and Zn 99.28%. The Atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS method is used as a comparison AdCSV optimum, was obtained (Cd 16, and Zn 115 µg/L.

  15. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  16. Use of a MicroStrip Gas Chamber conductive capillary plate for time-resolved X-ray area detection

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, A; Nishi, Y; Nishi, Y; Nagayoshi, T; Ohashi, Y; Uekusa, H; Toyokawa, H

    2002-01-01

    The stable operation of MicroStrip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was successfully performed using glass capillary plate as an intermediate gas multiplier. Detection area of 95 mm sup 2 was available and fine position resolution of 90 mu m using digital readout was attained. A charge-up problem of capillary plate under intense radiation source was perfectly removed by surface conductivity inside of capillaries. The quantitative measurements using MSGC is now available in X-ray imaging. This paper also presents novel applications of X-ray diffraction studies and their preliminary results using an MSGC. Rapid measurements for X-ray crystallography of the order of a few tens of seconds were attained successfully.

  17. Field-based evaluation of a reagent strip test for diagnosis of Schistosomiasis mansoni by detecting circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in urine in low endemic area in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legesse M.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of a reagent strip test for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni by detecting circulating cathodic antigen (CCA in urine were evaluated using 184 stool and urine samples collected from schoolchildren living in relatively low endemic area of schistosomiasis mansoni in Ethiopia. A combined result of stool samples processed by Kato and formol-ether concentration methods was used as gold standard. The results showed that detection of CCA in urine using reagent strip test was slightly higher than the combined results of the stool techniques (65.2% vs 42.4%, p > 0.05 in suggesting the prevalence of the disease. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the reagent strip test were 76.9%, 43.4%, 50% and 71.9%, respectively. The result of egg counts using Kato method suggested that detection of urine CCA could be used to indicate the intensity of infection. Nevertheless, like that of stool examination, the reagent strip test was found to be less sensitive in case of light to moderate infections. About 23.1% of the study children who were excreting the eggs of the parasite were found negative by the reagent strip test. The relative insensitivity of a reagent strip test in low intensity of infection necessitates for the development of more sensitive assay that can truly discriminate schistosome-infected from non-infected individuals.

  18. Electrochemical analysis of separators used in single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Bin

    2013-02-01

    Polarization, solution-separator, charge transfer, and diffusion resistances of clean and used separator electrode assemblies were examined in microbial fuel cells using current-voltage curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Current-voltage curves showed the total resistance was reduced at low cathode potentials. EIS results revealed that at a set cathode potential of 0.3 V diffusion resistance was predominant, and it substantially increased when adding separators. However, at a lower cathode potential of 0.1 V all resistances showed only slight differences with and without separators. Used separator electrode assemblies with biofilms had increased charge transfer and diffusion resistances (0.1 V) when one separator was used; however, charge transfer resistance increased, and diffusion resistance did not appreciably change with four separators. Adding a plastic mesh to compress the separators improved maximum power densities. These results show the importance of pressing separators against the cathode, and the adverse impacts of biofilm formation on electrochemical performance. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Determination of para-arsanilic acid with improved diazotization reaction using differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry in aqueous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misni, Marpongahtun; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ahamad, Rahmalan; MohdYusoff, Abdull Rahim

    2015-01-01

    Para-arsanilic acid (p-ASA) has been widely used in the poultry industry to promote growth and prevent dysentery. It is excreted unchanged in the manure and released into non-target sites causing organoarsenic pollution risk to the environment and living system. Therefore, simple and effective analytical strategies are demanded for determining the samples that contain p-ASA. However, direct determination of both p-ASA and ortho-arsanilic acid (o-ASA) using differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DPCSV) gives the similar voltammograms that directly hamper the analysis used by the DPCSV technique. In this study, a method to determine and differentiate p-ASA from o-ASA via diazotization and coupling reaction of the amine groups followed by the direct DPCSV determination of diazo compounds is presented. The diazotization reaction carried out at pH 1.5 and 0 ± 1°C for 10 min showed two reduction peaks in DPCSV at-70 mV and -440 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (KCl 3 M). However, when the diazotization reaction was performed at pH 12.5 and 0 ± 1°C for 40 min, a coloured azo compound was produced and the DPCSV showed only one reduction peak that appeared at -600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (3 M of KCl). The results of this study show that only p-ASA compound gave a reduction peak, whereas o-ASA compound did not give any peak. The detection limit of p-ASA was found to be 4 × 10(-8 )M. As a result, the proposed electro-analytical technique might be a good candidate to determine and differentiate the p-ASA present in the poultry and environmental samples.

  20. FePO4 based single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell for online monitoring levofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Libin; Li, Xinyong; Shi, Yueran; Qi, Yefei; Huang, Daqiong; Tadé, Moses; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Shaomin

    2017-05-15

    A bio-electrochemical strategy was developed for constructing a simple and sensitive levofloxacin (LEV) sensor based on a single chamber microbial fuel cell (SC-MFC) using FePO4 nanoparticles (NPs) as the cathode catalyst instead of traditional Pt/C. In this assembled sensor device, FePO4 NPs dramatically promoted the electrooxidation of oxygen on the cathode, which helps to accelerate the voltage output from SC-MFC and can provide a powerful guarantee for LEV detection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to fully characterize the FePO4 NPs. Under the optimized COD condition (3mM), the LEV with a concentration range of 0.1-1000µg/L could be detected successfully, and exhibited the excellent linear interval in the concentration range of 0.1-100µg/L. During this range of concentrations of LEV, a temporary effect on the anode of exoelectrogenic bacterial in less than 10min could occur, and then came back to the normal. It exhibited a long-term stability, maintaining the stable electricity production for 14 months of continuous running. Besides, the detection mechanism was investigated by quantum chemical calculation using density functional theory (DFT).

  1. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes as anode and air-cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amade, R.; Moreno, H. A.; Hussain, S.; Vila-Costa, M.; Bertran, E.

    2016-10-01

    Electrode optimization in microbial fuel cells is a key issue to improve the power output and cell performance. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on low cost stainless-steel mesh present an attractive approach to increase the cell performance while avoiding the use of expensive Pt-based materials. In comparison with non-aligned carbon nanotubes (NACNTs), VACNTs increase the oxygen reduction reaction taking place at the cathode by a factor of two. In addition, vertical alignment also increases the power density up to 2.5 times with respect to NACNTs. VACNTs grown at the anode can further improve the cell performance by increasing the electrode surface area and thus the electron transfer between bacteria and the electrode. The maximum power density obtained using VACNTs was 14 mW/m2 and 160 mV output voltage.

  2. Evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA strip for diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis in Hassoba school children, Afar, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayele B.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 206 urine samples collected from Hassoba Elementary schoolchildren, Afar, Ethiopia, a low Schistosoma haematobium endemic setting, was diagnosed to evaluate the performance of CCA strip using double references, urine filtration technique and urinalysis dipstick (Combur 10 Test® that detect schistosome eggs and blood in urine, respectively. The former was used as a gold standard reference method. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the CCA were 52%, 63.8%, 56.7% and 59% respectively, with reference to urine filtration technique whereas these parameters were 50.4%, 62.4%, 55.6% and 57.5% respectively, with reference to Combur 10 Test®. 47 S. haematobium egg-positive children were found negative by CCA strip while 38 egg-negative children were found positive by CCA strip. Moreover, among the pre-tests done in duplicate, inconsistent results were also recorded. Assays were also compared with regard to the cost of equipment and reagents, speed and simplicity of use. Though CCA strip was found to be rapid and could be performed with minimal training, it was found to be expensive (US $ 4.95 per test to use it for large-scale field use even if its diagnostic value would have been satisfactory. Further development and standardization of the CCA strip are required for its applicability for field use. It is also recommended that its cost per strip should be substantially cut down if it is to be used in poor schistosomiasis endemic countries.

  3. Simultaneous determination of textile dyes by Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i2.16595

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Brizola Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (ACSV - differential pulse proved to be an efficient method in the separation and quantification of two reactive textile dyes, Procion Yellow (PY and Procion Red (PR, each containing two azo groups as chromophores and two monochlorotriazine reactive groups, at nanomolar level. The linearity of the method obtained for each reactive dye was 30.15 – 633.15 nmol L-1 for PY in B-R buffer pH 8.0, and 62.56 – 982.291 nmol L-1 for PR in B-R buffer pH 8.0, using preconcentration at -0.1 V during 60 s.   

  4. Trace and selective determination of cobalt(II in water and salt samples using cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry in the presence of pyrogallol red

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasanpour Foroozan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive and selective procedure is presented for voltammetric determination of cobalt. The procedure involves an adsorptive accumulation of cobalt pyrogallol red (PGR complex on stationary mercury drop electrode, followed by cathodic stripping voltammetry measurement of reduction current of adsorbed complex at -1.17 V (vs. Ag/AgCl. The optimum conditions for determination of cobalt include pH 11.0, 35 μM pyrogallol red, an accumulation potential of -0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl and scan rate 80 mVs-1. The peak current is proportional to the concentration of cobalt over the concentration range of 5.0 to 280 ng mL-1 with a detection limit of 1 ng mL-1 with an accumulation time of 140 s. The method was applied for the determination of cobalt in analytical grade NaCl and water samples.

  5. Single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) with a cathodic microalgal biofilm: A preliminary assessment of the generation of bioelectricity and biodegradation of real dye textile wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logroño, Washington; Pérez, Mario; Urquizo, Gladys; Kadier, Abudukeremu; Echeverría, Magdy; Recalde, Celso; Rákhely, Gábor

    2017-06-01

    An air exposed single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using microalgal biocathodes was designed. The reactors were tested for the simultaneous biodegradation of real dye textile wastewater (RTW) and the generation of bioelectricity. The results of digital image processing revealed a maximum coverage area on the biocathodes by microalgal cells of 42%. The atmospheric and diffused CO2 could enable good algal growth and its immobilized operation on the cathode electrode. The biocathode-SCMFCs outperformed an open circuit voltage (OCV), which was 18%-43% higher than the control. Furthermore, the maximum volumetric power density achieved was 123.2 ± 27.5 mW m(-3). The system was suitable for the treatment of RTW and the removal/decrease of COD, colour and heavy metals. High removal efficiencies were observed in the SCMFCs for Zn (98%) and COD (92-98%), but the removal efficiencies were considerably lower for Cr (54-80%). We observed that this single chamber MFC simplifies a double chamber system. The bioelectrochemical performance was relatively low, but the treatment capacity of the system seems encouraging in contrast to previous studies. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that the microalgal biocathode could operate in air exposed conditions, seems to be a promising alternative to a Pt cathode and is an efficient and cost-effective approach to improve the performance of single chamber MFCs.

  6. Sensitive Bioanalysis Based on in-Situ Droplet Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of CdS Quantum Dots Label after Enhanced Cathodic Preconcentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaoli; Wang, Linchun; Xie, Qingji

    2016-08-23

    We report a protocol of CdS-labeled sandwich-type amperometric bioanalysis with high sensitivity, on the basis of simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-enrichment of the CdS quantum dot biolabel and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) detection of Cd directly on the bioelectrode. We added a microliter droplet of 0.1 M aqueous HNO₃ to dissolve CdS on the bioelectrode and simultaneously achieved the potentiostatic cathodic preconcentration of Cd by starting the potentiostatic operation before HNO₃ addition, which can largely increase the ASV signal. Our protocol was used for immunoanalysis and aptamer-based bioanalysis of several proteins, giving limits of detection of 4.5 fg·mL(-1) for human immunoglobulin G, 3.0 fg·mL(-1) for human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), 4.9 fg·mL(-1) for human α-fetoprotein (AFP), and 0.9 fM for thrombin, which are better than many reported results. The simultaneous and sensitive analysis of CEA and AFP at two screen-printed carbon electrodes was also conducted by our protocol.

  7. Sensitive Bioanalysis Based on in-Situ Droplet Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of CdS Quantum Dots Label after Enhanced Cathodic Preconcentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Qin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a protocol of CdS-labeled sandwich-type amperometric bioanalysis with high sensitivity, on the basis of simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-enrichment of the CdS quantum dot biolabel and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV detection of Cd directly on the bioelectrode. We added a microliter droplet of 0.1 M aqueous HNO3 to dissolve CdS on the bioelectrode and simultaneously achieved the potentiostatic cathodic preconcentration of Cd by starting the potentiostatic operation before HNO3 addition, which can largely increase the ASV signal. Our protocol was used for immunoanalysis and aptamer-based bioanalysis of several proteins, giving limits of detection of 4.5 fg·mL−1 for human immunoglobulin G, 3.0 fg·mL−1 for human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 4.9 fg·mL−1 for human α-fetoprotein (AFP, and 0.9 fM for thrombin, which are better than many reported results. The simultaneous and sensitive analysis of CEA and AFP at two screen-printed carbon electrodes was also conducted by our protocol.

  8. Determination of Total Germanium in Chinese Herbal Remedies by Square-Wave Catalytic Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry at an Improved Bismuth Film Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangwei Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A catalytic adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetric method on an improved bismuth film electrode (BiFE for the determination of trace germanium in the presence of pyrogallol has been investigated. A well-defined and sensitive stripping peak of Ge(IV-pyrogallol complex was observed at −0.79 V (versus SCE in a 0.1 M acetate buffer solution (pH 4.8 at a deposition potential of −0.34 V. The reduction current is catalytically enhanced by adding KBrO3. The experimental variables and potential interference were studied. Compared with the BiFE plated in the solution prepared based on HAc-NaAc without trisodium citrate, the improved BiFE electrodeposited in the solution of HAc-NaAc containing trisodium citrate displayed a better electroanalytical performance for the determination of germanium(IV. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of Ge(IV was 60 ng L−1, and the relative standard deviation (RSD was 3.73% at 5 μg L−1 level (n=9. This method was successfully applied to determine the total germanium in several Chinese herbal remedies.

  9. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry of drotaverine hydrochloride and its determination in tablets and human urine by differential pulse voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, S I M; Issa, Y M

    2009-04-01

    The stripping voltammetric behaviour of drotaverine hydrochloride (DvCl) was studied using a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The adsorptive stripping response has been evaluated with respect to pH, accumulation time, accumulation potential, scan rate and other variables. Differential pulse DP mode; over the potential range -400 to -1200 mV, is used in the presence of 0.04 M Britton-Robinson buffer pH 2. Cyclic voltammetric study indicates that the reduction process is irreversible and controlled by adsorption. The response of DP technique is linear over the concentration range 21.70-257.34 ng/ml. Limit of detection and limit of quantification were 3.15 and 10.50 ng/ml, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the drug in commercial tablets and spiked human urine samples.

  10. Effect of chemically modified Vulcan XC-72R on the performance of air-breathing cathode in a single-chamber microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duteanu, N; Erable, B; Senthil Kumar, S M; Ghangrekar, M M; Scott, K

    2010-07-01

    The catalytic activity of modified carbon powder (Vulcan XC-72R) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an air-breathing cathode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been investigated. Chemical modification was carried out by using various chemicals, namely 5% nitric acid, 0.2N phosphoric acid, 0.2N potassium hydroxide and 10% hydrogen peroxide. Electrochemical study was performed for ORR of these modified carbon materials in the buffer solution pH range of 6-7.5 in the anodic compartment. Although, these treatments influenced the surface properties of the carbon material, as evident from the SEM-EDX analysis, treatment with H(2)PO(4), KOH, and H(2)O(2) did not show significant activity during the electrochemical test. The HNO(3) treated Vulcan demonstrated significant ORR activity and when used in the single-chamber MFC cathode, current densities (1115mA/m(2), at 5.6mV) greater than those for a Pt-supported un-treated carbon cathode were achieved. However, the power density for the latter was higher. Such chemically modified carbon material can be a cheaper alternative for expensive platinum catalyst used in MFC cathode construction.

  11. Nano Copper Oxide-Modified Carbon Cloth as Cathode for a Two-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Dong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Cu2O nanoparticles were deposited on a carbon cloth cathode using a facile electrochemical method. The morphology of the modified cathode, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET tests, showed that the porosity and specific surface area of the cathode improved with longer deposition times. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and cyclic voltammetry (CV results showed that cupric oxide and cuprous oxide coexisted on the carbon cloth, which improved the electrochemical activity of cathode. The cathode with a deposition time of 100 s showed the best performance, with a power density twice that of bare carbon cloth. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS results revealed that moderate deposition of nano copper oxide on carbon cloth could dramatically reduce the charge transfer resistance, which contributed to the enhanced electrochemical performance. The mediation mechanism of copper oxide nanocatalyst was illustrated by the fact that the recycled conversion between cupric oxide and cuprous oxide accelerated the electron transfer efficiency on the cathode.

  12. Nano Copper Oxide-Modified Carbon Cloth as Cathode for a Two-Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Kexun; Liu, Xianhua; Zhang, Pingping

    2016-01-01

    In this work, Cu2O nanoparticles were deposited on a carbon cloth cathode using a facile electrochemical method. The morphology of the modified cathode, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) tests, showed that the porosity and specific surface area of the cathode improved with longer deposition times. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) results showed that cupric oxide and cuprous oxide coexisted on the carbon cloth, which improved the electrochemical activity of cathode. The cathode with a deposition time of 100 s showed the best performance, with a power density twice that of bare carbon cloth. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results revealed that moderate deposition of nano copper oxide on carbon cloth could dramatically reduce the charge transfer resistance, which contributed to the enhanced electrochemical performance. The mediation mechanism of copper oxide nanocatalyst was illustrated by the fact that the recycled conversion between cupric oxide and cuprous oxide accelerated the electron transfer efficiency on the cathode.

  13. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry of an anti-emetic agent Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation and biological matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajeev Jain; Ramkishor Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Granisetron showed one well-defined reduction peak at Hanging Mercury Drop Electrode (HMDE) in the potential range from -1.3 to -1.5 V due to reduction of C=N bond. Solid-phase extraction technique was employed for extraction of Granisetron from spiked human plasma. Granisetron showed peak current enhancement of 4.45% at square-wave voltammetry and 5.33% at cyclic voltammetry as compared with the non stripping techniques. The proposed voltammetric method allowed quantification of Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation over the target concentration range of 5-200 ng/mL with detection limit 13.63 ng/mL, whereas in human plasma 50-225 ng/mL with detection limit 11.75 ng/mL.

  14. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  15. spark chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    A few cosmic rays pass through your body every second of every day, no matter where you are. Look at the spark chamber to your right – every flash is the track made by a cosmic ray from outer space. The spark chamber is filled with a special gas mixture. Cosmic rays knock electrons out of the atoms in the gas. These electrons accelerate towards high voltage metal strips layered throughout the chamber, creating sparks like little bolts of lightning.

  16. Efficient removal of nitrobenzene and concomitant electricity production by single-chamber microbial fuel cells with activated carbon air-cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enren; Wang, Feng; Zhai, Wenjing; Scott, Keith; Wang, Xu; Diao, Guowang

    2017-04-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (S-MFCs) with bio-anodes and activated carbon (AC) air-cathodes showed high nitrobenzene (NB) tolerance and NB removal with concomitant electricity production. The maximum power over 25Wm(-3) could be obtained when S-MFCs were operated in the NB loading range of 1.2-6.2molm(-3)d(-1), and stable electricity production over 13.7Wm(-3) could be produced in a NB loading range of 1.2-14.7molm(-3)d(-1). The present S-MFCs exhibited high NB removal performance with NB removal efficiency over 97% even when the NB loading rate was increased to 17.2molm(-3)d(-1). The potential NB reduced product (i.e. aniline) could also be effectively removed from influents. The findings in this study means that single-chamber MFCs assembled with pre-enriched bio-anodes and AC air-cathodes could be developed as effective bio-electrochemical systems to remove NB from wastewaters and to harvest energy instead of consuming energy.

  17. Performance of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber for event wise, high rate thermal neutron detection with accurate 2D position determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindur, B.; Alimov, S.; Fiutowski, T.; Schulz, C.; Wilpert, T.

    2014-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) position sensitive detector for neutron scattering applications based on low-pressure gas amplification and micro-strip technology was built and tested with an innovative readout electronics and data acquisition system. This detector contains a thin solid neutron converter and was developed for time- and thus wavelength-resolved neutron detection in single-event counting mode, which improves the image contrast in comparison with integrating detectors. The prototype detector of a Micro-Strip Gas Chamber (MSGC) was built with a solid natGd/CsI thermal neutron converter for spatial resolutions of about 100 μm and counting rates up to 107 neutrons/s. For attaining very high spatial resolutions and counting rates via micro-strip readout with centre-of-gravity evaluation of the signal amplitude distributions, a fast, channel-wise, self-triggering ASIC was developed. The front-end chips (MSGCROCs), which are very first signal processing components, are read out into powerful ADC-FPGA boards for on-line data processing and thereafter via Gigabit Ethernet link into the data receiving PC. The workstation PC is controlled by a modular, high performance dedicated software suite. Such a fast and accurate system is crucial for efficient radiography/tomography, diffraction or imaging applications based on high flux thermal neutron beam. In this paper a brief description of the detector concept with its operation principles, readout electronics requirements and design together with the signals processing stages performed in hardware and software are presented. In more detail the neutron test beam conditions and measurement results are reported. The focus of this paper is on the system integration, two dimensional spatial resolution, the time resolution of the readout system and the imaging capabilities of the overall setup. The detection efficiency of the detector prototype is estimated as well.

  18. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ATLAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Abusleme, Angel; Bellerive, A.; Benhammou, Y.; Botte, J.; Cohen, H.; Davies, M.; Du, Y.; Gauthier, L.; Koffas, T.; Kuleshov, S.; Lefebvre, B.; Li, C.; Lupu, N.; Mikenberg, G.; Mori, D.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J.P.; Perez Codina, E.; Rettie, S.; Robichaud-Véronneau, A.; Rojas, R.; Shoa, M.; Smakhtin, V.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Toro, A.; Torres, H.; Ulloa, P.; Vachon, B.; Vasquez, G.; Vdovin, A.; Viel, S.; Walker, P.; Weber, S.; Zhu, C.

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 $\\times$ $1.0\\, \\mathrm{m}^2$ consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a $32\\, \\mathrm{GeV}$ pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about $50\\,\\mathrm{\\mu m...

  19. Performance of a Full-Size Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber Prototype for the ALTAS New Small Wheel Muon Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Stephen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The instantaneous luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN will be increased up to a factor of five with respect to the present design value by undergoing an extensive upgrade program over the coming decade. The most important upgrade project for the ATLAS Muon System is the replacement of the present first station in the forward regions with the so-called New Small Wheels (NSWs). The NSWs will be installed during the LHC long shutdown in 2018/19. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chamber (sTGC) detectors are designed to provide fast trigger and high precision muon tracking under the high luminosity LHC conditions. To validate the design, a full-size prototype sTGC detector of approximately 1.2 × 1.0 m^2 consisting of four gaps has been constructed. Each gap provides pad, strip and wire readouts. The sTGC intrinsic spatial resolution has been measured in a 32 GeV pion beam test at Fermilab. At perpendicular incidence angle, single gap position resolutions of about 50 μm have been obtained, uniform along the sTGC ...

  20. The challenge of building large area, high precision small-strip Thin Gap Trigger Chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maleev, Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap system must be upgraded in 2018 and 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Large area small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) up to 2 m2 in size and totaling an active area of 1200 m2 will be employed for fast and precise triggering. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm to allow the Level-1 trigger track segments to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of 1mrad. The upgraded detector will consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and sTGC’s detectors together forming the ATLAS New Small Wheels. The position of each strip must be known with an accuracy of 30 µm along the precision coordinate and 80 µm along the beam. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and then must be controlled and monitored all along the process of construction and integrati...

  1. The Challenge of Building Large Area, High Precision Small-Strip Thin Gap Trigger Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maleev, Victor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon end-cap system must be upgraded in 2018 and 2019 to retain the good precision tracking and trigger capabilities in the high background environment expected with the upcoming luminosity increase of the LHC. Large area small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC) up to 2 $m^2$ in size and totaling an active area of 1200 $m^2$ will be employed for fast and precise triggering. The precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 $\\mu m$ while the Level-1 trigger track segments need to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of 1 mrad. The upgraded detector will consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and sTGC’s detectors together forming the ATLAS New Small Wheels. The position of each strip must be known with an accuracy of 40 $\\mu m$ along the precision coordinate and 80 $\\mu m$ along the beam. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision is a key point and then must be controlled and monitored all along the process of cons...

  2. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Smith, Graham (Port Jefferson, NY); Mahler, George J. (Rocky Point, NY); Vanier, Peter E. (Setauket, NY)

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  3. Direct determination of tellurium and its redox speciation at the low nanogram level in natural waters by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Marc; Quentel, François; Filella, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Tellurium is one of the elements recently identified as technologically critical and is becoming a new emergent contaminant. No reliable method exists for its determination in environmental samples such as natural waters. This gap is filled by the method described here; it allows the rapid detection of trace concentrations of Te(IV) and Te(VI) in surface waters by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. It is based on the proton reduction catalysed by the absorption of Te(IV) on the mercury electrode. Under our conditions (0.1 mol L(-1) HCl) a detection limit of about 5 ng L(-1) for a deposition time of 300 s is achieved. Organic matter does not represent a problem at low concentrations; higher concentrations are eliminated by adsorptive purification. Tellurium occurs primarily as Te(IV) and Te(VI) in natural waters. Thus, determining total Te requires the reduction of Te(VI) that it is not electroactive. A number of reduction procedures have been carefully evaluated and a method based on the addition of TiCl3 to the acidified samples has been proven to reduce Te(VI) at the trace level to Te(IV) reliably and quantitatively. Therefore, the procedure described allows the direct determination of total Te and its redox speciation. It is flexible, reliable and cost effective compared to any possible alternative method based on the common preconcentration-ICPMS approach. It is readily implementable as a routine method and can be deployed in the field with relative ease.

  4. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators with different pore sizes in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Separators are needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to reduce electrode spacing and preventing electrode short circuiting. The use of nylon and glass fiber filter separators in single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs was examined for their effect on performance. Larger pore nylon mesh were used that had regular mesh weaves with pores ranging from 10 to 160 μm, while smaller pore-size nylon filters (0.2-0.45 μm) and glass fiber filters (0.7-2.0 μm) had a more random structure. The pore size of both types of nylon filters had a direct and predictable effect on power production, with power increasing from 443 ± 27 to 650 ± 7 mW m-2 for pore sizes of 0.2 and 0.45 μm, and from 769 ± 65 to 941 ± 47 mW m-2 for 10 to 160 μm. In contrast, changes in pore sizes of the glass fiber filters resulted in a relatively narrow change in power (732 ± 48 to 779 ± 43 mW m-2) for pore sizes of 0.7 to 2 μm. An ideal separator should increase both power density and Coulombic efficiency (CE). However, CEs measured for the different separators were inversely correlated with power production, demonstrating that materials which reduced the oxygen diffusion into the reactor also hindered proton transport to the cathode, reducing power production through increased internal resistance. Our results highlight the need to develop separators that control oxygen transfer and facilitate proton transfer to the cathode. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Nitrate as an oxidant in the cathode chamber of a microbial fuel cell for both power generation and nutrient removal purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-06-01

    Nitrate ions were used as the oxidant in the cathode chamber of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to generate electricity from organic compounds with simultaneous nitrate removal. The MFC using nitrate as oxidant could generate a voltage of 111 mV (1,000 Ω) with a plain carbon cathode. The maximum power density achieved was 7.2 mW m(-2) with a 470 Ω resistor. Nitrate was reduced from an initial concentration of 49 to 25 mg (NO (3) (-) -N) L(-1) during 42-day operation. The daily removal rate was 0.57 mg (NO (3) (-) -N) L(-1) day(-1) with a voltage generation of 96 mV. In the presence of Pt catalyst dispersed on cathode, the cell voltage was significantly increased up to 450 mV and the power density was 117.7 mW m(-2), which was 16 times higher than the value without Pt catalyst. Significant nitrate removal was also observed with a daily removal rate of 2 mg (NO (3) (-) -N) L(-1) day(-1), which was 3.5 times higher compared with the operation without catalyst. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite and ammonia in the liquid phase at a ratio of 0.6% and 51.8% of the total nitrate amount. These results suggest that nitrate can be successfully used as an oxidant for power generation without aeration and also nitrate removal from water in MFC. However, control of the process would be needed to reduce nitrate to only nitrogen gas, and avoid further reduction to ammonia.

  6. Improved performance of air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using microfiltration membranes and multiple sludge inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Hu, Yongyou; Bi, Zhe; Cao, Yunqing

    Substantial optimization and cost reduction are required before microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be practically applied. We show here the performance improvement of an air-cathode single-chamber MFC by using a microfiltration membrane (MFM) on the water-facing side of the cathode and using multiple aerobic sludge (AES), anaerobic sludge (ANS), and wetland sediment (WLS) as anodic inoculums. Batch test results show that the MFC with an MFM resulted in an approximately two-fold increase in maximum power density compared to the MFC with a proton exchange membrane (PEM). The Coulombic efficiency increased from 4.17% to 5.16% in comparison with the membrane-less MFC, without a significant negative effect on power generation and internal resistance. Overall performance of the MFC was also improved by using multiple sludge inoculums in the anode. The MFC inoculated with ANS + WLS produced the greatest maximal power density of 373 mW m -2 with a substantially low internal resistance of 38 Ω. Higher power density with a decreased internal resistance was also achieved in MFC inoculated with ANS + AES and ANS + AES + WLS in comparison with those inoculated with only one sludge. The MFCs inoculated with AES + ANS achieved the highest Coulombic efficiency. Over 92% COD was removed from confectionery wastewater in all tested MFCs, regardless of the membrane or inoculum used.

  7. Improved performance of air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell for wastewater treatment using microfiltration membranes and multiple sludge inoculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jian; Hu, Yongyou; Bi, Zhe; Cao, Yunqing [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2009-02-15

    Substantial optimization and cost reduction are required before microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can be practically applied. We show here the performance improvement of an air-cathode single-chamber MFC by using a microfiltration membrane (MFM) on the water-facing side of the cathode and using multiple aerobic sludge (AES), anaerobic sludge (ANS), and wetland sediment (WLS) as anodic inoculums. Batch test results show that the MFC with an MFM resulted in an approximately two-fold increase in maximum power density compared to the MFC with a proton exchange membrane (PEM). The Coulombic efficiency increased from 4.17% to 5.16% in comparison with the membrane-less MFC, without a significant negative effect on power generation and internal resistance. Overall performance of the MFC was also improved by using multiple sludge inoculums in the anode. The MFC inoculated with ANS + WLS produced the greatest maximal power density of 373 mW m{sup -2} with a substantially low internal resistance of 38 {omega}. Higher power density with a decreased internal resistance was also achieved in MFC inoculated with ANS + AES and ANS + AES + WLS in comparison with those inoculated with only one sludge. The MFCs inoculated with AES + ANS achieved the highest Coulombic efficiency. Over 92% COD was removed from confectionery wastewater in all tested MFCs, regardless of the membrane or inoculum used. (author)

  8. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vargas, Ignacio T.

    2013-05-29

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected associated with the distance between anode location and the air cathode. As expected, the stable operational voltage and the coulombic efficiency (CE) were higher for the volumetric anode than the planar anode (0.57V and CE=22% vs. 0.51V and CE=12%). The genus Geobacter was the only known exoelectrogen among the observed dominant groups, comprising 57±4% of recovered sequences for the brush and 27±5% for the carbon-cloth anode. While the bacterial communities differed between the two anode materials, results showed that Geobacter spp. and other dominant bacterial groups were homogenously distributed across both planar and volumetric anodes. This lends support to previous community analysis interpretations based on a single biofilm sampling location in these systems. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  10. Simultaneous Congo red decolorization and electricity generation in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell with different microfiltration, ultrafiltration and proton exchange membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Bin; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yong-you

    2011-03-01

    Different microfiltration membrane (MFM), proton exchange membrane (PEM) and ultrafiltration membranes (UFMs) with different molecular cutoff weights of 1K (UFM-1K), 5K (UFM-5K) and 10K (UFM-10K) were incorporated into air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) which were explored for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and electricity generation to investigate the effect of membrane on the performance of the MFC. Batch test results showed that the MFC with an UFM-1K produced the highest power density of 324 mW/m(2) coupled with an enhanced coulombic efficiency compared to MFM. The MFC with UMF-10K achieved the fastest decolorization rate (4.77 mg/L h), followed by MFM (3.61 mg/L h), UFM-5K (2.38 mg/L h), UFM-1K (2.02 mg/Lh) and PEM (1.72 mg/Lh). These results demonstrated the possibility of using various membranes in the system described here, and showed that UFM-1K was the best one based on the consideration of both cost and performance.

  11. Electrochemical characteriztion of the bioanode during simultaneous azo dye decolorization and bioelectricity generation in an air-cathode single chambered microbial fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Jian, E-mail: sunjian472@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China) and State Key Lab of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Hu Yongyou, E-mail: ppyyhu@scut.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); State Key Lab of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Science, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Hou Bin, E-mail: houbin566@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Ecological Remediation for Industrial Agglomeration Area, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2011-07-30

    To achieve high power output based on simultaneously azo dye decolorization using microbial fuel cell (MFC), the bioanode responses during decolorization of a representative azo dye, Congo red, were investigated in an air-cathode single chambered MFC using representative electrochemical techniques. It has been found that the maximum stable voltage output was delayed due to slowly developed anode potential during Congo red decolorization, indicating that the electrons recovered from co-substrate are preferentially transferred to Congo red rather than the bioanode of the MFC and Congo red decolorization is prior to electricity generation. Addition of Congo red had a negligible effect on the Ohmic resistance (R{sub ohm}) of the bioanode, but the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub c}) and the diffusion resistance (R{sub d}) were significantly influenced. The R{sub c} and R{sub d} firstly decreased then increased with increase of Congo red concentration, probably due to the fact that the Congo red and its decolorization products can act as electron shuttle for conveniently electrons transfer from bacteria to the anode at low concentration, but result in accelerated consumption of electrons at high concentration. Cyclic voltammetry results suggested that Congo red was a more favorable electron acceptor than the bioanode of the MFC. Congo red decolorization did not result in a noticeable decrease in peak catalytic current until Congo red concentration up to 900 mg l{sup -1}. Long-term decolorization of Congo red resulted in change in catalytic active site of anode biofilm.

  12. Study of micro-strip gas ionisation chambers substrates for CMS experiment at LHC; Etude de substrats pour chambres gazeuses a micropistes dans le cadre de l`experience CMS au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallares, A.

    1996-06-14

    High luminosity, expected interaction and dose rates of the future LHC collider require the development of micro-strips gas chambers. In addition to optimization of this new detector, this work is concerned with understanding of gain loss phenomena. Influence of the gas substrate is carefully analysed, as well as theoretical concepts concerning glasses and their behaviour under polarization and irradiation, and the consequence on detection operations.Electron spin resonance is used to study, in standard glass, creation of radiation induced defects which may be charged. (D.L.). 14 refs.

  13. A Latent Markov Modelling approach to the evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen strips for Schistosomiasis diagnosis pre- and post-praziquantel treatment in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koukounari, Artemis; Donnelly, Christl A.; Moustaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Markov Models (LMMs). The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) and of double Kato-Katz (KK) faecal slides over three consecutive days for Schistosoma mansoni infection simultaneously by age group at baseline and at two follow-up times post treatment...

  14. Design features and test results of the CMS endcap muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, D; Arisaka, K; Blomqvist, J M; Breedon, R; Bondar, N; Bonushkin, Yu; Borissov, E; Bujak, A; Bylsma, B; Chester, N S; Chrisman, D; Clare, R; Cline, D; Cousins, R D

    2002-01-01

    Presented are the main design features and performance results of the Cathode Strip Chambers for the CMS Endcap Muon system. Although the strips are unusually wide (up to 16 mm) for the cathode-to-anode wire distance of 5 mm, the six-plane structure of these chambers yields a spatial resolution of about 80 mum, essentially uniform and independent of the strip width. In addition, the net spatial resolution of about one-tenth of the strip width at the hardware trigger level (300 ns) is obtained using a simple network of comparators. Time resolution achieved at the trigger level is similar to 4 ns (rms) that allows unambiguous tagging of bunch crossings which occur every 25 ns. Aging test results, including those obtained with a recirculating gas system, are discussed; only minor aging affects were observed. The aging studies were performed with large- scale chambers; 700 m of wire were irradiated for a dose up to 0.4 C /cm of the total accumulated charge.

  15. Development of electrolyte-supported intermediate-temperature single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells using Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ (Ln = Pr, La, Gd) cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Larramendi, I.; Lamas, D. G.; Cabezas, M. D.; Ruiz de Larramendi, J. I.; Walsöe de Reca, N. E.; Rojo, T.

    Iron-cobalt-based perovskite oxides with general formula Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ (where Ln = La, Pr and Gd) have been investigated for their application as intermediate-temperature cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Powdered samples of these materials were synthesized by a novel gel combustion process and then characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPD patterns were satisfactorily indexed with an orthorhombic GdFeO 3-type structure and, for all samples, a mean particle size of less than 1 μm was estimated from the SEM data. Experimental single-chamber SOFCs using with these materials as cathodes and NiO-SDC (samaria-doped ceria) and SDC as anode and electrolyte, respectively, were evaluated at 600 °C in a methane/oxygen mixtures. Peak power densities of 65.4, 48.7 and 46.2 mW cm -2 were obtained for Ag|Ln 0.7Sr 0.3Fe 0.8Co 0.2O 3- δ|SDC|NiO-SDC|Pt cells with Ln = Pr, La and Gd, respectively. The relatively high power density obtained for the Pr compound shows that it could be an interesting material for cathode of single-chamber SOFCs.

  16. LEP vacuum chamber, prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Final prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, see 8305170 for more details. Here we see the strips of the NEG pump, providing "distributed pumping". The strips are made from a Zr-Ti-Fe alloy. By passing an electrical current, they were heated to 700 deg C.

  17. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  18. CATS, a low pressure multiwire proportional chamber for secondary beam tracking at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Ottini-Hustache, S; Auger, F; Musumarra, A; Alamanos, N; Cahan, B; Gillibert, A; Lagoyannis, A; Maillard, O; Pollacco, E; Sida, J L; Riallot, M

    1999-01-01

    A beam detector system, CATS (Chambre A Trajectoires de Saclay), was designed to provide event-by-event particle tracking in experiments with radioactive beams at GANIL. It consists of two low pressure multiwire proportional chambers with one plane of anode wires placed between two cathode planes (active area: 70x70 mm sup 2), respectively segmented into 28 vertical or horizontal strips (2.54 mm wide). The anode wires deliver a time signal allowing a time of flight measurement with an accuracy between 440 ps and 1.2 ns, depending on the energy loss of incident particles in the detector. The cathode strips are individually read out and the position of incoming particles is reconstructed using a charge centroid finding algorithm. A spatial resolution of 400 mu m (700 mu m) was achieved during in beam experiment, with a counting rate of 1.5x10 sup 5 (10 sup 6) particles per second. (author)

  19. Performance of Resistive Plate Chambers installed during the first long shutdown of the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Shopova, M; Hadjiiska, R; Iaydjiev, P; Sultanov, G; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Assran, Y; Sayed, A; Radi, A; Aly, S; Singh, G; Abbrescia, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, M; Pugliese, G; Verwilligen, P; Van Doninck, W; Colafranceschi, S; Sharma, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Piccolo, D; Primavera, F; Cimmino, A; Crucy, S; Rios, A A O; Tytgat, M; Zaganidis, N; Gul, M; Fagot, A; Bhatnagar, V; Singh, J; Kumari, R; Mehta, A; Ahmad, A; Awan, I M; Shahzad, H; Hoorani, H; Asghar, M I; Muhammad, S; Ahmed, W; Shah, M A; Cho, S W; Choi, S Y; Hong, B; Kang, M H; Lee, K S; Lim, J H; Park, S K; Kim, M S; Laktineh, I B; Lagarde, F; Gouzevitch, M; Grenier, G; Pedraza, I; Bernardino, S Carpinteyro; Estrada, C Uribe; Moreno, S Carrillo; Valencia, F Vazquez; Pant, L M; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Orso, I; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Thyssen, F; Lanza, G; Esposito, M; Braghieri, A; Magnani, A; Riccardi, C; Salvini, P; Vai, I; Vitulo, P; Montagna, P; Ban, Y; Qian, S J; Choi, M; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Kim, D; Dimitrov, A; Litov, L; Petkov, P; Pavlov, B; Bagaturia, I; Lomidze, D; Avila, C; Cabrera, A; Sanabria, J C; Crotty, I; Vaitkus, J

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment, located at the CERN Large Hadron Collider, has a redundant muon system composed by three different detector technologies: Cathode Strip Chambers (in the forward regions), Drift Tubes (in the central region) and Resistive Plate Chambers (both its central and forward regions). All three are used for muon reconstruction and triggering. During the first long shutdown (LS1) of the LHC (2013-2014) the CMS muon system has been upgraded with 144 newly installed RPCs on the forth forward stations. The new chambers ensure and enhance the muon trigger efficiency in the high luminosity conditions of the LHC Run2. The chambers have been successfully installed and commissioned. The system has been run successfully and experimental data has been collected and analyzed. The performance results of the newly installed RPCs will be presented.

  20. Nanogold-penetrated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer for enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay of cardiac biomarker using cathodic stripping voltammetric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Wenbin; Cui, Bin; Li, Jiabei; Yu, Xuejun; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-21

    Methods based on immunoassays have been developed for cardiac biomarkers, but most involve the low sensitivity and are unsuitable for early disease diagnosis. Herein we design an electrochemical immunoassay for sensitive detection of myoglobin (a cardiac biomarker for acute myocardial infarction) by using nanogold-penetrated poly(amidoamine) dendrimer (AuNP-PAMAM) for signal amplification without the need of natural enzymes. The assay was carried out on the monoclonal mouse anti-myoglobin (capture) antibody-anchored glassy carbon electrode using polyclonal rabbit anti-myoglobin (detection) antibody-labeled AuNP-PAMAM as the signal tag. In the presence of target myoglobin, the sandwiched immunocomplex could be formed between capture antibody and detection antibody. Accompanying AuNP-PAMAM, the carried gold nanoparticles could be directly determined via stripping voltammetric method under acidic conditions. Under optimal conditions, the detectable electrochemical signal increased with the increasing target myoglobin in the sample within a dynamic working range from 0.01 to 500 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 3.8 pg mL(-1). The electrochemical immunoassay also exhibited high specificity and good precision toward target myoglobin. Importantly, our strategy could be applied for quantitative monitoring of myoglobin in human serum specimens, giving well matched results with those obtained from commercialized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method.

  1. A Latent Markov Modelling Approach to the Evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen Strips for Schistosomiasis Diagnosis Pre- and Post-Praziquantel Treatment in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukounari, Artemis; Donnelly, Christl A.; Moustaki, Irini; Tukahebwa, Edridah M.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Wilson, Shona; Webster, Joanne P.; Deelder, André M.; Vennervald, Birgitte J.; van Dam, Govert J.

    2013-01-01

    Regular treatment with praziquantel (PZQ) is the strategy for human schistosomiasis control aiming to prevent morbidity in later life. With the recent resolution on schistosomiasis elimination by the 65th World Health Assembly, appropriate diagnostic tools to inform interventions are keys to their success. We present a discrete Markov chains modelling framework that deals with the longitudinal study design and the measurement error in the diagnostic methods under study. A longitudinal detailed dataset from Uganda, in which one or two doses of PZQ treatment were provided, was analyzed through Latent Markov Models (LMMs). The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) and of double Kato-Katz (KK) faecal slides over three consecutive days for Schistosoma mansoni infection simultaneously by age group at baseline and at two follow-up times post treatment. Diagnostic test sensitivities and specificities and the true underlying infection prevalence over time as well as the probabilities of transitions between infected and uninfected states are provided. The estimated transition probability matrices provide parsimonious yet important insights into the re-infection and cure rates in the two age groups. We show that the CCA diagnostic performance remained constant after PZQ treatment and that this test was overall more sensitive but less specific than single-day double KK for the diagnosis of S. mansoni infection. The probability of clearing infection from baseline to 9 weeks was higher among those who received two PZQ doses compared to one PZQ dose for both age groups, with much higher re-infection rates among children compared to adolescents and adults. We recommend LMMs as a useful methodology for monitoring and evaluation and treatment decision research as well as CCA for mapping surveys of S. mansoni infection, although additional diagnostic tools should be incorporated in schistosomiasis elimination programs. PMID:24367250

  2. A latent Markov modelling approach to the evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen strips for schistosomiasis diagnosis pre- and post-praziquantel treatment in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artemis Koukounari

    Full Text Available Regular treatment with praziquantel (PZQ is the strategy for human schistosomiasis control aiming to prevent morbidity in later life. With the recent resolution on schistosomiasis elimination by the 65th World Health Assembly, appropriate diagnostic tools to inform interventions are keys to their success. We present a discrete Markov chains modelling framework that deals with the longitudinal study design and the measurement error in the diagnostic methods under study. A longitudinal detailed dataset from Uganda, in which one or two doses of PZQ treatment were provided, was analyzed through Latent Markov Models (LMMs. The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA and of double Kato-Katz (KK faecal slides over three consecutive days for Schistosoma mansoni infection simultaneously by age group at baseline and at two follow-up times post treatment. Diagnostic test sensitivities and specificities and the true underlying infection prevalence over time as well as the probabilities of transitions between infected and uninfected states are provided. The estimated transition probability matrices provide parsimonious yet important insights into the re-infection and cure rates in the two age groups. We show that the CCA diagnostic performance remained constant after PZQ treatment and that this test was overall more sensitive but less specific than single-day double KK for the diagnosis of S. mansoni infection. The probability of clearing infection from baseline to 9 weeks was higher among those who received two PZQ doses compared to one PZQ dose for both age groups, with much higher re-infection rates among children compared to adolescents and adults. We recommend LMMs as a useful methodology for monitoring and evaluation and treatment decision research as well as CCA for mapping surveys of S. mansoni infection, although additional diagnostic tools should be incorporated in schistosomiasis elimination programs.

  3. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  4. Promoting the bio-cathode formation of a constructed wetland-microbial fuel cell by using powder activated carbon modified alum sludge in anode chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Zhao, Yaqian; Doherty, Liam; Hu, Yuansheng; Hao, Xiaodi

    2016-05-01

    MFC centered hybrid technologies have attracted attention during the last few years due to their compatibility and dual advantages of energy recovery and wastewater treatment. In this study, a MFC was integrated into a dewatered alum sludge (DAS)- based vertical upflow constructed wetland (CW). Powder activate carbon (PAC) was used in the anode area in varied percentage with DAS to explore its influences on the performance of the CW-MFC system. The trial has demonstrated that the inclusion of PAC improved the removal efficiencies of COD, TN and RP. More significantly, increasing the proportion of PAC from 2% to 10% can significantly enhance the maximum power densities from 36.58 mW/m2 to 87.79 mW/m2. The induced favorable environment for bio-cathode formation might be the main reason for this improvement since the content of total extracellular polymeric substances (TEPS) of the substrate in the cathode area almost doubled (from 44.59 μg/g wet sludge to 87.70 μg/g wet sludge) as the percentage of PAC increased to 10%. This work provides another potential usage of PAC in CW-MFCs with a higher wastewater treatment efficiency and energy recovery.

  5. Intermediate temperature single-chamber methane fed SOFC based on Gd doped ceria electrolyte and La 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3- δ as cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, M.; Piñol, S.; Segarra, M.

    Single-chamber fuel cells with electrodes supported on an electrolyte of gadolinium doped ceria Ce 1- xGd xO 2- y with x = 0.2 (CGO) 200 μm thickness has been successfully prepared and characterized. The cells were fed directly with a mixture of methane and air. Doped ceria electrolyte supports were prepared from powders obtained by the acetyl-acetonate sol-gel related method. Inks prepared from mixtures of precursor powders of NiO and CGO with different particle sizes and compositions were prepared, analysed and used to obtain optimal porous anodes thick films. Cathodes based on La 0.5Sr 0.5CoO 3 perovskites (LSCO) were also prepared and deposited on the other side of the electrolyte by inks prepared with a mixture of powders of LSCO, CGO and AgO obtained also by sol-gel related techniques. Both electrodes were deposited by dip coating at different thicknesses (20-30 μm) using a commercial resin where the electrode powders were dispersed. Finally, electrical properties were determined in a single-chamber reactor where methane, as fuel, was mixed with synthetic air below the direct combustion limit. Stable density currents were obtained in these experimental conditions. Temperature, composition and flux rate values of the carrier gas were determinants for the optimization of the electrical properties of the fuel cells.

  6. LEP Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This is a cut-out of a LEP vacuum chamber for dipole magnets showing the beam channel and the pumping channel with the getter (NEG) strip and its insulating supports. A water pipe connected to the cooling channel can also be seen at the back.The lead radiation shield lining is also shown. See also 8305563X.

  7. Nitrate as an Oxidant in the Cathode Chamber of a Microbial Fuel Cell for Both Power Generation and Nutrient Removal Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Cheng; Min, Booki; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    density achieved was 7.2 mW m−2 with a 470 Ω resistor. Nitrate was reduced from an initial concentration of 49 to 25 mg (NO3−−N) L−1 during 42-day operation. The daily removal rate was 0.57 mg (NO3−–N) L−1 day−1 with a voltage generation of 96 mV. In the presence of Pt catalyst dispersed on cathode......, the cell voltage was significantly increased up to 450 mV and the power density was 117.7 mW m−2, which was 16 times higher than the value without Pt catalyst. Significant nitrate removal was also observed with a daily removal rate of 2 mg (NO3−–N) L−1 day−1, which was 3.5 times higher compared...... with the operation without catalyst. Nitrate was reduced to nitrite and ammonia in the liquid phase at a ratio of 0.6% and 51.8% of the total nitrate amount. These results suggest that nitrate can be successfully used as an oxidant for power generation without aeration and also nitrate removal from water in MFC...

  8. Cathodic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bia...

  9. Construction and Test of Muon Drift Tube Chambers for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp; Dubbert, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Since the start of operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN on 20 November 2009, the instantaneous luminosity is steadily increasing. The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the LHC is instrumented with trigger and precision tracking chambers in a toroidal magnetic field. Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers are employed as precision tracking chambers, complemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the very forward region where the background counting rate due to neutrons and γ's produced in shielding material and detector components is too high for the MDT chambers. After several upgrades of the CERN accelerator system over the coming decade, the instantaneous luminosity is expected to be raised to about five times the LHC design luminosity. This necessitates replacement of the muon chambers in the regions with the highest background radiation rates in the so-called Small Wheels, which constitute the innermost layers of the muon spectrometer end-caps, by new detectors with higher rate cap...

  10. Gas proportional detectors with interpolating cathode pad readout for high track multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo

    1991-12-01

    New techniques for position encoding in very high rate particle and photon detectors will be required in experiments planned for future particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider and new, high intensity, synchrotron sources. Studies of two interpolating cathode ``pad`` readout systems are described in this thesis. They are well suited for high multiplicity, two dimensional unambiguous position sensitive detection of minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions as well as detection of x-rays at high counting rates. One of the readout systems uses subdivided rows of pads interconnected by resistive strips as the cathode of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC). A position resolution of less than 100 {mu}m rms, for 5.4 keV x-rays, and differential non-linearity of 12% have been achieved. Low mass ({approximately}0.6% of a radiation length) detector construction techniques have been developed. The second readout system uses rows of chevron shaped cathode pads to perform geometrical charge division. Position resolution (FWHM) of about 1% of the readout spacing and differential non-linearity of 10% for 5.4 keV x-rays have been achieved. A review of other interpolating methods is included. Low mass cathode construction techniques are described. In conclusion, applications and future developments are discussed. 54 refs.

  11. Gas proportional detectors with interpolating cathode pad readout for high track multiplicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo.

    1991-12-01

    New techniques for position encoding in very high rate particle and photon detectors will be required in experiments planned for future particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider and new, high intensity, synchrotron sources. Studies of two interpolating cathode pad'' readout systems are described in this thesis. They are well suited for high multiplicity, two dimensional unambiguous position sensitive detection of minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions as well as detection of x-rays at high counting rates. One of the readout systems uses subdivided rows of pads interconnected by resistive strips as the cathode of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC). A position resolution of less than 100 {mu}m rms, for 5.4 keV x-rays, and differential non-linearity of 12% have been achieved. Low mass ({approximately}0.6% of a radiation length) detector construction techniques have been developed. The second readout system uses rows of chevron shaped cathode pads to perform geometrical charge division. Position resolution (FWHM) of about 1% of the readout spacing and differential non-linearity of 10% for 5.4 keV x-rays have been achieved. A review of other interpolating methods is included. Low mass cathode construction techniques are described. In conclusion, applications and future developments are discussed. 54 refs.

  12. Cathodic arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  13. slice of LEP beamtube with getter strip

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    A section of the LEP beam pipe. This is the chamber in which LEP's counter-rotating electron and positron beams travel. It is made of lead-clad aluminium. The beams circulate in the oval cross-section part of the chamber. In the rectangular cross-section part, LEP's innovative getter-strip vacuum pump is installed. After heating to purify the surface of the getter, the strip acts like molecular sticky tape, trapping any stray molecules left behind after the accelerator's traditional vacuum pumps have done their job.

  14. Free-Flow Open-Chamber Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Free-flow open-chamber electrophoresis variant of free-flow electrophoresis performed in chamber with open ends and in which velocity of electro-osmotic flow adjusted equal to and opposite mean electrophoretic velocity of sample. Particles having electrophoretic mobilities greater than mean mobility of sample particles move toward cathode, those with mobilities less move toward anode. Technique applied to separation of components of mixtures of biologically important substances. Sensitivity enhanced by use of tapered chamber.

  15. A study of an optimal technological solution for the electronics of particle position sensitive gas detectors (multiwire proportional chambers); Etude d`une solution technologique optimale pour l`electronique de localisation des particules avec des detecteurs a gaz (chambre proportionelle multifils)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zojceski, Z. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, CNRS - IN2P3 Universite Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work aims at optimizing the electronics for position sensitive gas detectors. The first part is a review of proportional chamber operation principles and presents the different possibilities for the architecture of the electronics. The second part involves electronic signal processing for best signal-to-noise ratio. We present a time-variant filter based on a second order base line restorer.It allows a simple pole-zero and tail cancellation at high counting rates. Also, various interpolating algorithms for cathode strip chambers have been studied. The last part reports the development of a complete electronic system, from the preamplifiers up to the readout and control interface, for the cathode strip chambers in the focal plane of the BBS Spectrometer at KVI, Holland. The system is based on application specific D-size VXI modules. In all modules, the 16-bit ADCs and FIFO memory are followed by a Digital Signal Processor, which performs data filtering and cathode induced charge interpolation. Very good analog noise performance is obtained in a multi-processor environment. (author). 127 refs.

  16. Development of electrolyte-supported intermediate-temperature single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells using Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (Ln = Pr, La, Gd) cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz de Larramendi, I.; Ruiz de Larramendi, J.I.; Rojo, T. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apdo.644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Lamas, D.G.; Cabezas, M.D.; Walsoee de Reca, N.E. [CINSO, CONICET-CITEFA, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO) Villa Martelli, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-09-05

    Iron-cobalt-based perovskite oxides with general formula Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (where Ln = La, Pr and Gd) have been investigated for their application as intermediate-temperature cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Powdered samples of these materials were synthesized by a novel gel combustion process and then characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPD patterns were satisfactorily indexed with an orthorhombic GdFeO{sub 3}-type structure and, for all samples, a mean particle size of less than 1 {mu}m was estimated from the SEM data. Experimental single-chamber SOFCs using with these materials as cathodes and NiO-SDC (samaria-doped ceria) and SDC as anode and electrolyte, respectively, were evaluated at 600 C in a methane/oxygen mixtures. Peak power densities of 65.4, 48.7 and 46.2 mW cm{sup -2} were obtained for Ag vertical stroke Ln{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}Fe{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} vertical stroke SDC vertical stroke NiO-SDC vertical stroke Pt cells with Ln = Pr, La and Gd, respectively. The relatively high power density obtained for the Pr compound shows that it could be an interesting material for cathode of single-chamber SOFCs. (author)

  17. Use of a modified, high-sensitivity, anodic stripping voltammetry method for determination of zinc speciation in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakuba, Rachel Wisniewski; Moffett, James W; Saito, Mak A

    2008-05-05

    Zinc speciation is considered to be an important determinant of the biological availability of zinc. Yet in oceanic surface waters, characterization of zinc speciation is difficult due to the low concentrations of this essential micronutrient. In this study, an anodic stripping voltammetry method previously developed for the total determination of cadmium and lead was successfully adapted to the measurement of zinc speciation. The method differs from previous zinc speciation anodic stripping voltammetry methods in that a fresh mercury film is plated with each sample aliquot. The fresh film anodic stripping voltammetry method was compared to competitive ligand exchange cathodic stripping voltammetry in a profile from the North Atlantic Ocean. Results using the fresh film anodic stripping voltammetry method were similar to those determined using the cathodic stripping voltammetry method, though ligand concentrations determined by fresh film anodic stripping voltammetry were generally slightly higher than those determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry. There did not seem to be a systematic difference between methods for the estimates of conditional stability constants. The ligand concentration in the North Atlantic profile ranged from 0.9 to 1.5 nmol L(-1) as determined by fresh film anodic stripping voltammetry and 0.6 to 1.3 nmol L(-1) as determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The conditional stability constants determined by fresh film anodic stripping voltammetry were 10(9.8)-10(10.5) and by cathodic stripping voltammetry were 10(9.8)-10(11.3).

  18. Segmented ionization chambers for beam monitoring in hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, Saverio; Cirio, Roberto; Donetti, Marco; Marchetto, Flavio; Pittà, Giuseppe; Lavagno, Marco; La Rosa, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    Segmented ionization chambers represent a good solution to monitor the position, the intensity and the shape of ion beams in hadrontherapy. Pixel and strip chambers have been developed for both passive scattering and active scanning dose delivery systems. In particular, strip chambers are optimal for pencil beam scanning, allowing for spatial and time resolutions below 0.1 mm and 1 ms, respectively. The MATRIX pixel and the Strip Accurate Monitor for Beam Applications (SAMBA) detectors are described in this paper together with the results of several beam tests and industrial developments based on these prototypes.

  19. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  20. Varicose vein stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vein stripping; Venous reflux - vein stripping; Venous ulcer - veins Images Circulatory system References American Family Physician. Management of varicose veins. www.aafp.org/afp/2008/1201/p1289.html . ...

  1. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  2. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  3. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1986-01-01

    Two wire chambers made originally for the R807 Experiment at CERN's Intersecting Storage Rings. In 1986 they were used for the PS 201 experiment (Obelix Experiment) at LEAR, the Low Energy Antiproton Ring. The group of researchers from Turin, using the chambers at that time, changed the acquisition system using for the first time 8 bit (10 bit non linear) analog to digital conversion for incoming signals from the chambers. The acquisition system was controlled by 54 CPU and 80 digital signal processors. The power required for all the electronics was 40 kW. For the period, this system was one of the most powerful on-line apparatus in the world. The Obelix Experiment was closed in 1996. To find more about how a wire chamber works, see the description for object CERN-OBJ-DE-038.

  4. Ion-stimulated Gas Desorption Yields of Electropolished, Chemically Etched, and Coated (Au, Ag, Pd, TiZrV) Stainless Steel Vacuum Chambers and St707 Getter Strips Irradiated with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Malabaila, M; Taborelli, M

    2005-01-01

    The ion-induced desorption experiment, installed in the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator LINAC 3, has been used to measure molecular desorption yields for 4.2 MeV/u lead ions impacting under grazing incidence on different accelerator-type vacuum chambers. Desorption yields for H2, CH4, CO, and CO2, which are of fundamental interest for future accelerator applications, are reported for different stainless steel surface treatments. In order to study the effect of the surface oxide layer on the gas desorption, gold-, silver-, palladium-, and getter-coated 316 LN stainless steel chambers and similarly prepared samples were tested for desorption at LINAC 3 and analysed for chemical composition by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The large effective desorption yield of 2 x 104 molecules/Pb53+ ion, previously measured for uncoated, vacuum fired stainless steel, was reduced after noble-metal coating by up to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, pressure rise measurements, the effectiveness of beam scrubbing with le...

  5. Calibration and Performance of the precision chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer.

    CERN Document Server

    Rauscher, F; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of a system of precision tracking and trigger chambers embedded in a 2T magnetic field generated by three large air‐core superconducting toroids. The precision Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers measure the track sagitta up to a pseudo‐rapidity of 2.7 with a 50 μm uncertainty yielding a design muon transverse momentum resolution of 10% at 1 TeV. Muon tracking is augmented in the very forward region by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC). The calibration program, essential to achieve the spectrometer design performance and physics reach, is conducted at three worldwide computing centers. These centers each receive a dedicated High Level Trigger data stream that enables high statistics based determination of T0's and drift‐time to drift‐space relations. During the first year of data taking a system of periodic calibration updates has been established. The calibration algorithms, methods and tools and performance results for this first year of LHC collision data collected ...

  6. Calibration and Performance of the precision chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer.

    CERN Document Server

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of a system of precision tracking and trigger chambers embedded in a 2T magnetic field generated by three large air‐core superconducting toroids. The precision Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers measure the track sagitta up to a pseudo‐rapidity of 2.7 with a 50 μm uncertainty yielding a design muon transverse momentum resolution of 10% at 1 TeV. Muon tracking is augmented in the very forward region by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC). The calibration program, essential to achieve the spectrometer design performance and physics reach, is conducted at three worldwide computing centers. These centers each receive a dedicated High Level Trigger data stream that enables high statistics based determination of T0ʹs and drift‐time to drift‐space relations. During the first year of data taking a system of periodic calibration updates has been established. The calibration algorithms, methods and tools and performance results for this first year of LHC collision data collected...

  7. Calibration and Performance of the precision chambers of the ATLAS muon spectrometer.

    CERN Document Server

    Solfaroli Camillocci, E; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of a system of precision tracking and trigger chambers embedded in a 2T magnetic field generated by three large air‐core superconducting toroids. The precision Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers measure the track sagitta up to a pseudo‐rapidity of 2.7 with a 50 μm uncertainty yielding a design muon transverse momentum resolution of 10% at 1 TeV. Muon tracking is augmented in the very forward region by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC). The calibration program, essential to achieve the spectrometer design performance and physics reach, is conducted at three worldwide computing centers. These centers each receive a dedicated High Level Trigger data stream that enables high statistics based determination of T0ʹs and drift‐time to drift‐space relations. During the first year of data taking a system of periodic calibration updates has been established. The calibration methods and performance results for this first year of LHC collision data collected by the muon spectrome...

  8. Calibration and Performance of the Precision Chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, Mauro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer consists of a system of precision tracking and trigger chambers embedded in a 2T magnetic field generated by three large air-core superconducting toroids. The precision Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers measure the track sagitta up to a pseudorapidity of 2.7 with a 40$mu$m uncertainty yielding a design muon transverse momentum resolution of 10% at 1 TeV. Muon tracking is augmented in the very forward region by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC). The calibration program, essential to achieve the spectrometer design performance and physics reach, is conducted at three worldwide computing centers. These centers each receive a dedicated High Level Trigger dedicated data stream that enables high statistics based determination of timing offset constants and drift-time to drift-space relationship. During the data taking periods in 2010 and 2011, a system of periodic calibration updates has been established. The calibration algorithms, methods and tools and performance results for this first p...

  9. Calibrations and Performance of the Precision Chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Iodice, Mauro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer consists of a system of precision tracking and trigger chambers embedded in a 2T magnetic field generated by three large air‐core superconducting toroids. The precision Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers measure the track sagitta up to a pseudorapidity of 2.7 with a 50μm uncertainty yielding a design muon transverse momentum resolution of 10% at 1 TeV. Muon tracking is augmented in the innermost layer, in the very forward region by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC). The calibration program, essential to achieve the spectrometer design performance and physics reach, is conducted at three worldwide computing centers. These centers each receive a dedicated muon calibration data stream that enables high statistics based determination of T0ʹs and drift‐time to drift‐space relation for the MDT system. The calibration algorithms, methods and tools and performance results from LHC collision data collected by the muon spectrometer will be presented.

  10. "Flat-Fish" Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The picture shows a "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber being prepared in the ISR workshop for testing prior to installation in the Split Field Magnet (SFM) at intersection I4. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of thin stainless steel sheets to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the vertical component of the atmospheric pressure force. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber ever made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature. In this picture the thin sheets transferring the vertical component of the atmosferic pressure force are attached to a support frame for testing. See also 7712182, 7712179.

  11. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Was used in ISR (Intersecting Storage Ring) split field magnet experiment. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  14. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1985-01-01

    Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  15. Anatomy Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  16. Science Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Sun-Ja; Yoo, Chang Young; Chung, Min Suk

    2012-01-01

    Science comic strips entitled Dr. Scifun were planned to promote science jobs and studies among professionals (scientists, graduate and undergraduate students) and children. To this end, the authors collected intriguing science stories as the basis of scenarios, and drew four-cut comic strips, first on paper and subsequently as computer files.…

  17. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  18. Drift chambers for a precision measurement of the Michel parameters in muon decay

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Y; Comyn, M; Depommier, P; Doornbos, J; Faszer, W; Gagliardi, C A; Gill, D R; Green, P; Gumplinger, P; Hardy, J C; Hasinoff, M D; Helmer, R; Henderson, R; Khruchinsky, A; Kitching, P; Koetke, D D; Korkmaz, E J; Lachin, Yu Yu; Maas, D; MacDonald, J A; MacDonald, R; Manweiler, R; Marshall, G; Mathie, E L; Miassoedov, L; Musser, J R; Nord, P M; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Ottewell, D; Porcelli, T; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Price, G; Quraan, M A; Rodning, N L; Schaapman, J; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Sobratee, F; Soukup, J; Stanislaus, T D S; Stinson, G M; Tacik, R; Torokhov, V D; Tribble, R E; Vasilev, M A; Walter, H C; Wright, D

    2001-01-01

    Planar drift chambers will be used in a solenoidal magnetic field to measure the Michel parameters in muon decay. The chamber manufacture procedure uses flat glass tables and precise ceramic glass spacers to provide precise anode-cathode spacing. Results of bench and beam tests of the prototype chambers are discussed.

  19. The Strip Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tommy

    1996-01-01

    When the behaviour of a ship in waves is to be predicted it is convenient to have a tool which includes different approaches to the problem.The aim of this project is to develop such a tool named the strip theory module. The strip theory module will consist of submodules dependent on the I....... At last a postprocessor will be included with facilities for statistical calculations and for plots and prints of the results.The project is divided into 7 tasks where the third is to be completed.This report has two aims. To give an introduction to the project of developing a strip theory module...

  20. Stripping with dry ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    Mechanical-type stripping using dry ice (solid CO2) consists in blasting particles of dry ice onto the painted surface. This surface can be used alone or in duplex according to type of substrate to be treated. According to operating conditions, three physical mechanisms may be involved when blasting dry ice particles onto a paint system: thermal shock, differential thermal contraction, and mechanical shock. The blast nozzle, nozzle travel speed, blast angle, stripping distance, and compressed air pressure and media flow rate influence the stripping quality and the uniformity and efficiency obtained.

  1. LEP vacuum chamber, early prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    1978-01-01

    The structure of LEP, with long bending magnets and little access to the vacuum chamber between them, required distributed pumping. This is an early prototype for the LEP vacuum chamber, made from extruded aluminium. The main opening is for the beam. The small channel to the right is for cooling water, to carry away the heat deposited by the synchroton radiation from the beam. The 4 slots in the channel to the left house the strip-shaped ion-getter pumps (see 7810255). The ion-getter pumps depended on the magnetic field of the bending magnets, too low at injection energy for the pumps to function well. Also, a different design was required outside the bending magnets. This design was therefore abandoned, in favour of a thermal getter pump (see 8301153 and 8305170).

  2. Electrochemical reduction and cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of clotrimazole

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Francisco C.; Stradiotto,Nelson R.; Zanoni,Maria Valnice B.

    2001-01-01

    Clotrimazol é reduzido em eletrodo de mercúrio em tampão fosfato pH > 6 através de um processo reversível de um elétron. O processo eletródico apresenta forte efeito de adsorção, o qual pode ser minimizado na presença de Triton X-100. Clotrimazol pode ser determinado em níveis de 50 ng mL-1 quando pré-acumulado durante 3 min à -0,20 V. O método proposto foi aplicado para determinação do fármaco em formulação comercial. The reduction of clotrimazole at a mercury electrode, in phosphate buff...

  3. The cathode test stand for the DARHT second-axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortgang, C.; Monroe, M.; Prono, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hudson, C.; Macy, D.; Moy, K. [Bechtel Nevada, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The injector for the DARHT second-axis injector will use an 8-in. thermionic dispenser cathode. Because the cathode is relatively large and requires a large amount of heat (5 kW) there are certain engineering issues that need to be addressed, before the DARHT injector reaches the final design stage. The Cathode Test Stand (CTS) will be used to address those concerns. The CTS is a new facility, presently under construction. The CTS will consist of a high-voltage pulse modulator, a high-vacuum diode test-chamber, and a short beam-transport section with diagnostics. This paper discusses the status of the project.

  4. Anodic stripping voltammetry enhancement by redox magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emily A; Fritsch, Ingrid

    2004-04-15

    The effect of an external magnetic field on linear scan anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) in solutions of 10(-6)-10(-7) M concentrations of lead, cadmium, and copper at mercury films on glassy carbon electrodes has been investigated. A high concentration of Hg(2+) was added to the analyte solution to induce a large cathodic current during the deposition step. Therefore, a large Lorentz force from the net flux of charge through the magnetic field resulted in convection due to magnetohydrodynamics. The faster delivery of analytes to the mercury film electrode during deposition caused an increase in the anodic stripping peaks. The effect of varying Hg(2+) concentrations (0-60 mM) and magnetic field strengths (0-1.77 T) on the enhancement of the stripping peaks was investigated. Enhancements as large as 129% for peak currents and 167% for peak areas were observed. An enhancement of approximately 100% was observed when 60 mM Fe(3+) replaced high concentrations of Hg(2+). This method of convection exhibits promise for small-volume ASV analysis with possible improved limits of detection and decreased preconcentration times.

  5. Chamber transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  6. Technical updates to basic proteins focalization using IPG strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dépagne Jordane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gel-based proteomic is a popular and versatile method of global protein separation and quantification. However, separation of basic protein still represents technical challenges with recurrent problems of resolution and reproducibility. Results Three different protocols of protein loading were compared using MCF7 cells proteins. In-gel rehydration, cup-loading and paper-bridge loading were first compared using 6–11 IPG strips, as attempted, in-gel rehydration gave large horizontal steaking; paper-bridge loading displayed an interesting spot resolution, but with a predominant loss of material; cup-loading was selected as the most relevant method, but still needing improvement. Twelve cup-loading protocols were compared with various strip rehydration, and cathodic wick solutions. Destreak appeared as better than DTT for strip rehydration; the use of isopropanol gave no improvement. The best 2DE separation was observed with cathodic wicks filled with rehydration solution complemented with DTT. Paper-bridge loading was finally analyzed using non-limited samples, such as bovine milk. In this case, new spots of basic milk proteins were observed, with or without paper wicks. Conclusion According to this technical study of basic protein focalization with IPG strips, the cup-loading protocol clearly displayed the best resolution and reproducibility: strips were first rehydrated with standard solution, then proteins were cup-loaded with destreak reagent, and focalisation was performed with cathodic wicks filled with rehydration solution and DTT. Paper-bridge loading could be as well used, but preferentially with non-limited samples.

  7. Planar-Focusing Cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lewellen, J W

    2005-01-01

    Conventional pi-mode rf photoinjectors typically use magnetic solenoids for emittance compensation. This provides independent focusing strength, but can complicate rf power feed placement, introduce asymmetries (due to coil crossovers), and greatly increase the cost of the photoinjector. Cathode-region focusing can also provide for a form of emittance compensation. Typically this method strongly couples focusing strength to the field gradient on the cathode, however, and also requires altering the longitudinal position of the cathode to change the focusing. We propose a new method for achieving cathode-region variable-strength focusing for emittance compensation. The new method reduces the coupling to the gradient on the cathode, and does not require a change in the longitudinal position of the cathode. Expected performance for an S-band system is similar to conventional solenoid-based designs. This paper presents the results of rf cavity and beam dynamics simulations of the new design.

  8. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  9. Study of electron current extraction from a radio frequency plasma cathode designed as a neutralizer for ion source applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahanbakhsh, Sina, E-mail: sinajahanbakhsh@gmail.com; Satir, Mert; Celik, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Bogazici University, Istanbul 34342 (Turkey)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma cathodes are insert free devices that are developed to be employed as electron sources in electric propulsion and ion source applications as practical alternatives to more commonly used hollow cathodes. Inductively coupled plasma cathodes, or Radio Frequency (RF) plasma cathodes, are introduced in recent years. Because of its compact geometry, and simple and efficient plasma generation, RF plasma source is considered to be suitable for plasma cathode applications. In this study, numerous RF plasma cathodes have been designed and manufactured. Experimental measurements have been conducted to study the effects of geometric and operational parameters. Experimental results of this study show that the plasma generation and electron extraction characteristics of the RF plasma cathode device strongly depend on the geometric parameters such as chamber diameter, chamber length, orifice diameter, orifice length, as well as the operational parameters such as RF power and gas mass flow rate.

  10. [Post-stripping telangiectasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutinel, B; Maraval, M

    1985-01-01

    These telangiectasia appear between one and six months after the operation, especially in cases of capillary fragility. The most common localizations are the antero-internal and external sides of the thighs and knees. Unnecessary strippings, of continent saphenous veins, are the most frequent cause of these. Their prevention consists of the least possible traumatising stripping, using a fine stripper, a very rigorous post-operative support, and the wearing of light varicose stockings or tights for between one and three months. The treatment using microsclerosis, often delicate, should not be undertaken before six months.

  11. Cosmic ray tests of large area Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    An, S; Kim, J; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, A; Zuyeuski, R

    2007-01-01

    We have built Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) with six gas gaps and an active area of . The signals are generated on 2.5 cm wide copper pickup strips; these are read out at each end thus allowing the position of the hit along the strip to be obtained from the time difference. Using three of these chambers we have set up a cosmic tracking system in a similar manner as planned for the Extreme Energy Events (EEE) project. The details of the set-up are presented in this paper. In addition we discuss the time and position resolution of these MRPCs measured using cosmic rays.

  12. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  13. Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Directed Energy Anechoic Chamber comprises a power anechoic chamber and one transverse electromagnetic cell for characterizing radiofrequency (RF) responses of...

  14. Experience in construction and testing of plastic limited streamer chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, A.H.; Bard, R.L.; Bensen, D.; Cates, C.; Colmer, J.D.; Floros, P.; Fritz, D.J.; Goldey, P.R.; Miller, W.W.; Norkin, D.T.; Rapp, P.; Rozmarynowski, P.; Lee, J.R.; San Sebastian, M.; Schultz, J.; Skuja, A.; Springer, R.W.; Subramanyam, J.; Zawistowski, T.; Zorn, G.T. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the manufacture and testing of multi-cell limited streamer chambers destined for use in the hadron calorimeter of the OPAL detector at LEP. All operations, from chamber cathode coating to the testing of completed sub-assemblies, have been performed under the same roof. The experience gained is useful in highlighting procedures crucial to the successful construction of this type of detector.

  15. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters.

  16. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  17. Parabolic Strip Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chadzitaskos, Goce

    2013-01-01

    We present a proposal of a new type of telescopes using a rotating parabolic strip as the primary mirror. It is the most principal modification of the design of telescopes from the times of Galileo and Newton. In order to demonstrate the basic idea, the image of an artificial constellation observed by this kind of telescope was reconstructed using the techniques described in this article. As a working model of this new telescope, we have used an assembly of the primary mirror---a strip of acrylic glass parabolic mirror 40 cm long and 10 cm wid shaped as a parabolic cylinder of focal length 1 m---and an artificial constellation, a set of 5 apertures in a distance of 5 m illuminated from behind. In order to reconstruct the image, we made a series of snaps, each after a rotation of the constellation by 15 degrees. Using Matlab we reconstructed the image of the artificial constellation.

  18. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Weßling; Hans J. Schäfer

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation...

  20. Neutron and gamma detector using an ionization chamber with an integrated body and moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Lestone, John Paul

    2006-07-18

    A detector for detecting neutrons and gamma radiation includes a cathode that defines an interior surface and an interior volume. A conductive neutron-capturing layer is disposed on the interior surface of the cathode and a plastic housing surrounds the cathode. A plastic lid is attached to the housing and encloses the interior volume of the cathode forming an ionization chamber, into the center of which an anode extends from the plastic lid. A working gas is disposed within the ionization chamber and a high biasing voltage is connected to the cathode. Processing electronics are coupled to the anode and process current pulses which are converted into Gaussian pulses, which are either counted as neutrons or integrated as gammas, in response to whether pulse amplitude crosses a neutron threshold. The detector according to the invention may be readily fabricated into single or multilayer detector arrays.

  1. Cathodic pseudopolarography: a new tool for the identification and quantification of cysteine, cystine and other low molecular weight thiols in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laglera, Luis M; Downes, Javier; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio; Monticelli, Damiano

    2014-07-11

    Thiols are compounds of paramount importance in the cellular metabolism due to their double detoxifying role as radical scavengers and trace metal ligands. However, we have scarce information about their extracellular cycling as limited data are available about their concentration, stability and speciation in the aquatic medium. In natural waters, they form part of the pool of reduced sulfur substance (RSS) whose presence has been documented by voltammetric and chromatographic methods. Traditional use of cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) for the analysis of RSS could only give an overall concentration due to the coalescence of their CSV peaks. Recently, it has been shown that the use of multiple deposition potentials could take voltammetry of RSS to a higher level, permitting the identification and quantification of the mixtures of RSS despite showing as a single coalescent peak. Here, due to its similarity with classical pseudopolarography, we propose to rename this analytical strategy as cathodic pseudopolarography (CP) and we present for the first time its use for the analysis of mixes of low molecular weight thiols (LMWT) at the nanomolar level. Despite limitations caused by the identical behavior of some LMWT, the CP allowed to isolate the contribution of cysteine and cystine from a coalescent signal in LMWT mixtures. Sample handling with clean protocols allowed the direct determination of the cystine:cysteine ratio without sample modification. Finally, we show the application of CP to identify LMWT in seawater samples extracted from benthic chambers and suggest future applications in other areas of environmental electroanalysis.

  2. Large aluminium wire spark chambers with magnetostrictive read-out

    CERN Document Server

    Bradamante, Franco; Daum, C; Dechelette, Paul; Fidecaro, Giuseppe; Fidecaro, Maria; Giorgi, M; Penzo, Aldo L; Piemontese, L; Renevey, Max; Schiavon, Paolo; Vascotto, Alessandro

    1974-01-01

    A set of 1 cm gap wire spark chambers with a sensitive surface of 300 * 100 cm/sup 2/ was constructed for an experiment at the CERN proton synchrotron. The Coulomb scattering was limited by using aluminium wires and by adopting a crossed-wire configuration, which allowed us to minimize the number of chambers for a given number of pairs of coordinates. The wire planes were pulsed by feeding the high voltage from strip-lines along the whole boundary of the chambers. (7 refs).

  3. A new design of the gaseous imaging detector: Micro Pixel Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, A; Koishi, S; Tanimori, T; Nagae, T; Nakamura, M

    2001-01-01

    The novel gaseous detector 'Micro Pixel Chamber (Micro PIC)' has been developed for X-ray, gamma-ray and charged particle imaging. This detector consists of double sided printing circuit board (PCB). The stable operation of Micro PIC is realized by thick substrate and wide anode strips. One of the most outstanding feature is the process of production and the cost. The base technology of producing Micro PIC is same as producing PCB, then detector with large detection area (more than 10 cmx10 cm) can be made by present technology. Our first tests were performed using a 3 cmx3 cm detection area with a readout of 0.4 mm pitch. The gas gain and stability were measured in these tests. The gas gain of 10 sup 4 was obtained using argon ethane (8:2) gas mixture. Also, there was no discharge between anodes and cathodes in the gain of 10 sup 3 during two days of continuous operation. Although some discharges occurred in the higher gain (approximately 10 sup 4), no critical damage on the detector was found.

  4. Cosmic ray test system for the ATLAS thin gap chamber modules at KOBE

    CERN Document Server

    Suigmoto, T; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ichimiya, R; Ikeno, M; Ishii, K; Ishino, M; Iwasaki, H; Kurashige, H; Mima, T; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nakaune, Y; Nozaki, M; Ohshita, H; Okumura, K; Sasaki, O; Suzuki, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Tanaka, S; Uda, J; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    Thin gap chamber modules giving function of forward muon trigger to the ATLAS detector in the LHC experiment have been constructed at High Energy Research Organization (KEK) in Japan and their performances have been checked at Kobe University. A large-scale test system specially designed for measuring uniformity of the detection efficiencies and the timing resolution of 8 TGC modules at the same time was successfully operated. Each TGC module had 72 anode wire channels and 64 cathode strip channels (in total 1088 readout channels for 8 modules). Drift tubes consisted of 12 layers (total 428 tubes), between which the TGC modules are put, determined trajectories of cosmic rays. Hit pattern and timing of all detector signals (Trigger counter. Drift tubes and TGCs) were measured by using VME modules. In regular data acquisition situation, i.e. about effective 19 Hz trigger rate from scintillation counters and 73% tracking efficiency by the drift tubes, the detection efficiency of each layer by 5 mm * 5 mm region ...

  5. Cationic fluorinated polymer binders for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Fluorinated quaternary ammonium-containing polymers were used as catalyst binders in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. The performance of the cathodes was examined and compared to NAFION ® and other sulfonated aromatic cathode catalyst binders using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), impedance spectroscopy, and performance tests in single chamber air-cathode MFCs. The cathodes with quaternary ammonium functionalized fluorinated poly(arylene ether) (Q-FPAE) binders showed similar current density and charge transfer resistance (R ct) to cathodes with NAFION ® binders. Cathodes containing either of these fluorinated binders exhibited better electrochemical responses than cathodes with sulfonated or quaternary ammonium-functionalized RADEL ® poly(sulfone) (S-Radel or Q-Radel) binders. After 19 cycles (19 d), the power densities of all the MFCs declined compared to the initial cycles due to biofouling at the cathode. MFC cathodes with fluorinated polymer binders (1445 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-H; 1397 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-Cl; 1277 mW m -2, NAFION ®; and 1256 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) had better performance than those with non-fluorinated polymer binders (880 mW m -2, S-Radel; 670 mW m -2, Q-Radel). There was a 15% increase in the power density using the Q-FPAE binder with a 40% higher ion exchange capacity (Q-FPAE-1.4-H compared to Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) after 19 cycles of operation, but there was no effect on the power production due to counter ions in the binder (Cl -vs. HCO 3 -). The highest-performance cathodes (NAFION ® and Q-FPAE binders) had the lowest charge transfer resistances (R ct) in fresh and in fouled cathodes despite the presence of thick biofilms on the surface of the electrodes. These results show that fluorinated binders may decrease the penetration of the biofilm and associated biopolymers into the cathode structure, which helps to combat MFC performance loss over time. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  7. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  8. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  9. Results from a large sample of MRPC-strip prototypes for ALICE TOF detector

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Anselmo, F; Antonioli, P; Basile, M; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; De Caro, A; De Pasquale, S; Di Bartolomeo, A; Fusco-Girard, M; Golovine, V; Guida, M; Hatzifotiadou, D; Kaidalov, A B; Kim, D H; Kiselev, S M; Laurenti, G; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Lioublev, E; Luvisetto, M L; Margotti, A; Martemyanov, A N; Nania, R; Otiougova, P; Pesci, A; Polozov, P A; Scapparone, E; Scioli, G; Sellito, S; Smirnitsky, A V; Tchoumakov, M M; Usenko, E; Valenti, G; Voloshin, K G; Williams, M C S; Zampolli, C; Zgreev, B V; Zichichi, Antonino

    2004-01-01

    The MRPC (multi resistive plate chamber) strip is the basic element of the ALICE time-of-flight detector. A test of a large sample of MRPC-strip prototypes corresponding to 1.2% of the full detector was carried out during the autumn of 2002 at the CERN proton synchrotron facility. This paper summarizes the main results obtained in terms of uniformity of response for all the tested channels.

  10. Test and characterization of multigap resistive plate chambers for the EEE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossini, E.; EEE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Extreme Energy Events project is based on the deployment of cosmic-ray telescopes in Italian high schools with the active contribution of students and teachers. Each telescope is made by three Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers readout by strips. With around 50 telescopes already built and others under construction, specific systems to test and characterize the chambers are needed. In this article I will present a flexible and software-configurable solution to perform chamber efficiency studies with a set of scintillators and hardware to automatically scan detector strips to identify electrical issues. Both systems can provide accurate information but at the same time they can be easily operated by students.

  11. ISR Intersection Vacuum Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This special vacuum chamber presenting a lateral opening at the beam crossing point is one of the many chambers specifically designed for a particular experiment. Here it is shown during assembly at the ISR mechanical worshop.

  12. Cr(VI) reduction at rutile-catalyzed cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Ding, Hongrui; Yan, Yunhua; Wang, Changqiu; Zen, Cuiping; Wang, Xin [The Key Laboratory of Orogenic Belts and Crustal Evolution, School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin, Song [MWH Americas, 3665 JFK Parkway, Suite 206, Fort Collins, CO 80525 (United States); Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Cathodic reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) and simultaneous power generation were successfully achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) containing a novel rutile-coated cathode. The selected rutile was previously characterized to be sensitive to visible light and capable of both non-photo- and photocatalysis. In the MFCs containing rutile-coated cathode, Cr(VI) was rapidly reduced in the cathode chamber in presence and absence of light irradiation; and the rate of Cr(VI) reduction under light irradiation was substantially higher than that in the dark. Under light irradiation, 97% of Cr(VI) (initial concentration 26 mg/L) was reduced within 26 h, which was 1.6 x faster than that in the dark controls in which only background non-photocatalysis occurred. The maximal potential generated under light irradiation was 0.80 vs. 0.55 V in the dark controls. These results indicate that photocatalysis at the rutile-coated cathode in the MFCs might have lowered the cathodic overpotential, and enhanced electron transfer from the cathode to Cr(VI) for its reduction. In addition, photoexcited electrons generated during the cathode photocatalysis might also have contributed to the higher Cr(VI) reduction rates when under light irradiation. This work assessed natural rutile as a novel cathodic catalyst for MFCs in power generation; particularly it extended the practical merits of conventional MFCs to cathodic reduction of environmental contaminants such as Cr(VI). (author)

  13. Pre-acclimation of a wastewater inoculum to cellulose in an aqueous–cathode MEC improves power generation in air–cathode MFCs

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Shaoan

    2011-01-01

    Cellulose has been used in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but power densities were low. Higher power densities can be achieved in air-cathode MFCs using an inoculum from a two-chamber, aqueous-cathode microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Air-cathode MFCs with this inoculum produced maximum power densities of 1070mWm-2 (cathode surface area) in single-chamber and 880mWm-2 in two-chamber MFCs. Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 25% to 50%, and COD removals were 50-70% based on total cellulose removals of 60-80%. Decreasing the reactor volume from 26 to 14mL (while maintaining constant electrode spacing) decreased power output by 66% (from 526 to 180mWm-2) due to a reduction in total mass of cellulose added. These results demonstrate that air-cathode MFCs can produce high power densities with cellulose following proper acclimation of the inoculum, and that organic loading rates are important for maximizing power densities from particulate substrates. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Strip shape control capability of hot wide strip rolling mills

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renzhong Wang; Quan Yang; Anrui He; Jian Shao; Haitao Bian

    2008-01-01

    The elasticity deformation of rolls was analyzed by means of two-dimensional f'mite element method (FEM) with vari-able thickness. Three typical mills were used as objects for analysis. A thorough study was done on the control capabilities of these mills on the strip shape. Then the strip shape control capabilities of the three mills was compared synthetically.

  15. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    value). We reexamined all the components in the cathode region and eliminated those parts that were suspected to be potential sources of contamination, e.g., feed-throughs with zinc coating. Finally, we considered a change in the cathode type, by using a different combination of impregnation and coating. Since the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL used a 12.5 cm diameter 311XW (barium oxide doped with scandium and coated with a osmium-tungsten thin film) cathode and emitted 2200A of beam current (i.e. 18 A/cm{sup 2}), it was reasonable to assume that DARHT can adopt this type of cathode to produce 2 kA (i.e., 10A/cm{sup 2}). However, it was later found that the 311XW has a higher radiation heat loss than the 612M and therefore resulted in a maximum operating temperature (as limited by filament damage) below that required to produce the high current. With the evidence provided by systematic emission tests using quarter-inch size cathodes, we confirmed that the 311XM (doped with scandium and has a osmium-ruthenium (M) coating) had the best combination of low work function and low radiation heat loss. Subsequently a 6.5-inch diameter 311XM cathode was installed in DARHT and 2 kA beam current was obtained on June 14, 2007. In testing the quarter-inch size cathode, we found that the beam current was sensitive to the partial pressure of various gases in the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, there was a hysteresis effect on the emission as a function of temperature. The phenomenon suggested that the work function of the cathode was dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between the diffusion of the impregnated material to the surface and the contamination rate from the surrounding gas. Water vapor was found to be the worst contaminant amongst the various gases that we have tested. Our data showed that the required vacuum for emitting at 10 A/cm{sup 2} is in the low 10{sup -8} Torr range.

  16. Filtered cathodic arc source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  17. First thin AC-coupled silicon strip sensors on 8-inch wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; König, A.; Hacker, J.; Bartl, U.

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) in Vienna and the semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies Austria AG developed a production process for planar AC-coupled silicon strip sensors manufactured on 200 μm thick 8-inch p-type wafers. In late 2015, the first wafers were delivered featuring the world's largest AC-coupled silicon strip sensors. Detailed electrical measurements were carried out at HEPHY, where single strip and global parameters were measured. Mechanical studies were conducted and the long-term behavior was investigated using a climate chamber. Furthermore, the electrical properties of various test structures were investigated to validate the quality of the manufacturing process.

  18. First thin AC-coupled silicon strip sensors on 8-inch wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergauer, T., E-mail: thomas.bergauer@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Vienna) (Austria); Dragicevic, M.; König, A. [Institute of High Energy Physics of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Vienna) (Austria); Hacker, J.; Bartl, U. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrasse 2, 9500 Villach (Austria)

    2016-09-11

    The Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) in Vienna and the semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies Austria AG developed a production process for planar AC-coupled silicon strip sensors manufactured on 200 μm thick 8-inch p-type wafers. In late 2015, the first wafers were delivered featuring the world's largest AC-coupled silicon strip sensors. Detailed electrical measurements were carried out at HEPHY, where single strip and global parameters were measured. Mechanical studies were conducted and the long-term behavior was investigated using a climate chamber. Furthermore, the electrical properties of various test structures were investigated to validate the quality of the manufacturing process.

  19. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  20. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  1. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  2. Ionization Chamber for Prompt Fission Neutron Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    ZEYNALOV Sh.; ZEYNALOVA O. V.; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Sedyshev, P.; SHVETSOV V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report recent achievements in design of twin back-to-back ionization chamber (TIC) for fission fragment (FF) mass and kinetic energy measurement. Correlated FF kinetic energies, their masses and the angle of FF in respect to the axes in 3D Cartesian coordinates can be determined from analysis of the heights and shapes of the pulses induced by the fission fragments on the anodes of TIC. Anodes of TIC were designed as consisting of isolated strips each having independent electro...

  3. Simulation of the CMS Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Hadjiiska, R; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Dimitrov, A; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Ocampo, A; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Verwilligen, P; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Aleksandrov, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M; Sultanov, G; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Xue, Z; Ge, Y; Li, Q; Qian, S; Avila, C; Chaparro, L F; Gomez, J P; Moreno, B Gomez; Oliveros, A F Osorio; Sanabria, J C; Assran, Y; Sharma, A; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Pugliese, G; Loddo, F; Calabria, C; Maggi, M; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Piccolo, D; Carrillo, C; Iorio, O; Buontempo, S; Paolucci, P; Vitulo, P; Berzano, U; Gabusi, M; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Shin, S; Kim, M S; Seo, H; Goh, J; Choi, Y; Shoaib, M

    2013-01-01

    The Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon subsystem contributes significantly to the formation of the trigger decision and reconstruction of the muon trajectory parameters. Simulation of the RPC response is a crucial part of the entire CMS Monte Carlo software and directly influences the final physical results. An algorithm based on the parametrization of RPC efficiency, noise, cluster size and timing for every strip has been developed. Experimental data obtained from cosmic and proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV have been used for determination of the parameters. A dedicated validation procedure has been developed. A good agreement between the simulated and experimental data has been achieved.

  4. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  5. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  6. SOFC Cathode Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Bay, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    The transient response of SOFC oxygen cathodes shows a characteristic inductive hysteresis and correspondingly the impedance diagram combines one or two capacitive arcs with a low frequency inductive arc. These features are discussed on the basis of a three step reaction sequence taken from...

  7. Modeling Chamber Transport for Heavy-Ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W M; Niller, D A C; Tabak, M; Yu, S S; Peterson, P F; Welch, D R; Rose, D V; Olson, C L

    2002-08-02

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  8. Modeling chamber transport for heavy-ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, W.M.; Callahan, D.A.; Tabak, M.; Yu, S.S.; Peterson, P.F.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Olson, C.L.

    2002-10-01

    In a typical thick-liquid-wall scenario for heavy-ion fusion (HIF), between seventy and two hundred high-current beams enter the target chamber through ports and propagate about three meters to the target. Since molten-salt jets are planned to protect the chamber wall, the beams move through vapor from the jets, and collisions between beam ions and this background gas both strip the ions and ionize the gas molecules. Radiation from the preheated target causes further beam stripping and gas ionization. Due to this stripping, beams for heavy-ion fusion are expected to require substantial neutralization in a target chamber. Much recent research has, therefore, focused on beam neutralization by electron sources that were neglected in earlier simulations, including emission from walls and the target, photoionization by the target radiation, and pre-neutralization by a plasma generated along the beam path. When these effects are included in simulations with practicable beam and chamber parameters, the resulting focal spot is approximately the size required by a distributed radiator target.

  9. Multi-variable mathematical models for the air-cathode microbial fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shiqi; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    This research adopted the version control system into the model construction for the single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) system, to understand the interrelation of biological, chemical, and electrochemical reactions. The anodic steady state model was used to consider the chemical species diffusion and electric migration influence to the MFC performance. In the cathodic steady state model, the mass transport and reactions in a multi-layer, abiotic cathode and multi-bacteria cathode biofilm were simulated. Transport of hydroxide was assumed for cathodic pH change. This assumption is an alternative to the typical notion of proton consumption during oxygen reduction to explain elevated cathode pH. The cathodic steady state model provided the power density and polarization curve performance results that can be compared to an experimental MFC system. Another aspect considered was the relative contributions of platinum catalyst and microbes on the cathode to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Simulation results showed that the biocatalyst in a cathode that includes a Pt/C catalyst likely plays a minor role in ORR, contributing up to 8% of the total power calculated by the models.

  10. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites (strip hybrids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics were applied to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends to illustrate the use of these methods for the a priori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-glass random composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  11. Analysis/design of strip reinforced random composites /strip hybrids/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Results are described which were obtained by applying advanced analysis methods and composite mechanics to a strip-reinforced random composite square panel with fixed ends. This was done in order to illustrate the use of these methods for the apriori assessment of the composite panel when subjected to complex loading conditions. The panel was assumed to be of E-Glass/Random Composite. The strips were assumed to be of three advanced unidirectional composites to cover a range of low, intermediate, and high modulus stiffness. The panels were assumed to be subjected to complex loadings to assess their adequacy as load-carrying members in auto body, aircraft engine nacelle, and windmill blade applications. The results show that strip hybrid panels can be several times more structurally efficient than the random composite base materials. Some of the results are presented in graphical form and procedures are described for use of these graphs as guides for preliminary design of strip hybrids.

  12. Vacuum encapsulated hermetically sealed diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, John; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2014-12-30

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first cold-weld ring disposed between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and a second cold-weld ring disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the diamond window element. The cathode capsule is formed by a vacuum cold-weld process such that the first cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the cathode element and the annular insulating spacer and the second cold-weld ring forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the diamond window element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  13. Vacuum encapsulated, high temperature diamond amplified cathode capsule and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Triveni; Walsh, Josh; Gangone, Elizabeth

    2015-12-29

    A vacuum encapsulated, hermetically sealed cathode capsule for generating an electron beam of secondary electrons, which generally includes a cathode element having a primary emission surface adapted to emit primary electrons, an annular insulating spacer, a diamond window element comprising a diamond material and having a secondary emission surface adapted to emit secondary electrons in response to primary electrons impinging on the diamond window element, a first high-temperature solder weld disposed between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and a second high-temperature solder weld disposed between the annular insulating spacer and the cathode element. The cathode capsule is formed by a high temperature weld process under vacuum such that the first solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the diamond window element and the annular insulating spacer and the second solder weld forms a hermetical seal between the annular spacer and the cathode element whereby a vacuum encapsulated chamber is formed within the capsule.

  14. Aptasensors Based on Stripping Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Qi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptasensors based on stripping voltammetry exhibit several advantages, such as high sensitivity and multi-target detection from stripping voltammetric technology, and high selectivity from the specific binding of apamers with targets. This review comprehensively discusses the recent accomplishments in signal amplification strategies based on nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles, semiconductor nanoparticles, and nanocomposite materials, which are detected by stripping voltammetry after suitable dissolution. Focus will be put in discussing multiple amplification strategies that are widely applied in aptasensors for small biomolecules, proteins, disease markers, and cancer cells.

  15. Prototype multiwire proportional chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    Chambers of this type were initially developed within the Alpha project (finally not approved). They were designed such to minimize the radiation length with a view to a mass spectrometer of high resolution meant to replace the Omega detector. The chambers were clearly forerunners for the (drift) chambers later built for R606 with the novel technique of crimping the wires. See also photo 7510039X.

  16. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  17. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  18. Investigation of electric field distribution on FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2016-07-01

    One of the important parameters for establishing charge particle equilibrium (CPE) conditions of free-air ionization chamber is an electric field distribution. In this paper, electric field distribution inside the ionization chamber was investigated by finite element method. For this purpose, the effects of adding guard plate and guard strips on the electric field distribution in the ionization chamber were studied. it is necessary to apply a lead box around the ionization chamber body to avoid of scattered radiation effects on the ionization chamber operation, but the lead box changes the electric field distribution. In the following, the effect of lead box on the electric field distribution was studied. Finally, electric field distribution factor (kfield) was calculated by the simulation. The results of the simulation showed that presence of the guard plate and guard strips, and applying a suitable potential to lead box, a convergence of kfield to 1 was achieved.

  19. Continuous extrusion and rolling forming of copper strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous extrusion and rolling technology was proposed as a new strip production technology. It conducts a hot rolling process using waste heat after continuous extrusion. The continuous extrusion and rolling forming was simulated with DEFORM-3DT. Influences of extrusion wheel velocity and rolling reduction on the continuous extrusion and rolling forming were analyzed. It was shown that as extrusion wheel velocity increases, torque of extrusion wheel, chamber force and rolling force, will drop; temperature of the billet in the area of abutment which is highest will increase. As the rolling reduction is increased, torque of the extrusion wheel and force acting on the chamber decrease, while torque and force of the rolls increase. The experimental results showed that a homogeneously distributed and equiaxed grains microstructure can be formed in copper strip billets with an average grain size of about 80 μm, after continuous extrusion. Grains of the copper strips are stretched clearly, during rolling, along the rolling direction, to form a stable orientation. Nevertheless, the grain boundaries are still relatively clear to see.

  20. Refrigeration Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The enclosed and environmentally controlled chamber is able to test four units (single-phase) simultaneously at conditions ranging from tundra to desert temperatures...

  1. DORIOT CLIMATIC CHAMBERS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers reproduce environmental conditions occurring anywhere around the world. They provide an invaluable service by significantly reducing the...

  2. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeltcheva, T. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: nedel@uctm.edu; Atanassova, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dimitrov, J. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stanislavova, L. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-01-10

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary.

  3. Microtube strip heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. D.

    1991-04-01

    During the last quarter, Doty Scientific, Inc. (DSI) continued to make progress on the microtube strip (MTS) heat exchangers. The team has begun a heat exchanger stress analysis; however, they have been concentrating the bulk of their analytical energies on a computational fluid dynmaics (CFD) model to determine the location and magnitude of shell-side flow maldistribution which decreases heat exchanger effectiveness. DSI received 120 fineblanked tubestrips from Southern Fineblanking (SFB) for manufacturing process development. Both SFB and NIST provided inspection reports of the tubestrips. DSI completed the tooling required to encapsulate a tube array and press tubestrips on the array. Pressing the tubestrips on tube arrays showed design deficiencies both in the tubestrip design and the tooling design. DSI has a number of revisions in process to correct these deficiencies. The research effort has identified a more economical fusible alloy for encapsulating the tube array, and determined the parameters required to successfully encapsulate the tube array with the new alloy. A more compact MTS heat exchanger bank was designed.

  4. The versatility of salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone in the determination of copper in blood using adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar; Walia, T P S; Sumanjit; Lobana, T S

    2005-10-15

    The adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry technique (AdCSV) is used to determine copper(II) using salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (N, S- donor) as a complexing agent on hanging mercury drop electrode at pH 9.3. Variable factors affecting the response, i.e. the concentration of ligand, pH, adsorption potential and adsorption time are assessed and optimized. The adsorbed complex of copper(II) and salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone gives a well defined cathodic stripping peak current at -0.35 V, which has been used for the determination of copper in the concentration range of 7.85 x 10(-9) to 8.00 x 10(-6)M with accumulation time of 360 s at -0.1 V versus Ag/AgCl. This technique has been applied for the determination of copper in various digested samples of whole blood at trace levels.

  5. Charge production in thin gap multi-wire chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Mincer, A I; Goldberg, J J; Gernitzky, Y; Lazic, D; Lupu, N Z; Robins, S; Rozen, Y; Tarem, S

    2000-01-01

    Resistive cathode thin gap chambers (TGCs) have been used as particle detectors in high-energy physics experiments for more than a decade. A quantitative understanding of charge production mechanisms in TGCs has been developed and a simulation program produced to accurately describe the expected response from a chamber as a function of its design and operating parameters. This simulation is based upon a description of the processes of electron cluster production, drift and avalanche effects and space charge contributions from residual ions. Improved measurements of chamber performance are presented, and the parameters of the simulation have been fitted to these data yielding values consistent with estimates based on the physical mechanisms involved. Sensitivity of chamber timing and amplification properties to operating parameters is discussed.

  6. Air-cathode structure optimization in separator-coupled microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2011-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) with 30% wet-proofed air cathodes have previously been optimized to have 4 diffusion layers (DLs) in order to limit oxygen transfer into the anode chamber and optimize performance. Newer MFC designs that allow close electrode spacing have a separator that can also reduce oxygen transfer into the anode chamber, and there are many types of carbon wet-proofed materials available. Additional analysis of conditions that optimize performance is therefore needed for separator-coupled MFCs in terms of the number of DLs and the percent of wet proofing used for the cathode. The number of DLs on a 50% wet-proofed carbon cloth cathode significantly affected MFC performance, with the maximum power density decreasing from 1427 to 855mW/m 2 for 1-4 DLs. A commonly used cathode (30% wet-proofed, 4 DLs) produced a maximum power density (988mW/m 2) that was 31% less than that produced by the 50% wet-proofed cathode (1 DL). It was shown that the cathode performance with different materials and numbers of DLs was directly related to conditions that increased oxygen transfer. The coulombic efficiency (CE) was more affected by the current density than the oxygen transfer coefficient for the cathode. MFCs with the 50% wet-proofed cathode (2 DLs) had a CE of >84% (6.8A/m 2), which was substantially larger than that previously obtained using carbon cloth air-cathodes lacking separators. These results demonstrate that MFCs constructed with separators should have the minimum number of DLs that prevent water leakage and maximize oxygen transfer to the cathode. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Magnetic stripping studies for SPL

    CERN Document Server

    Posocco, P; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic stripping of H- can seriously enhance the beam losses along the SPL machine. These losses depend on the beam energy, on the beam transverse distribution and on the intensity of the magnetic field. For radioprotection issues the losses must be limited to 1 W/m. In this paper we will concentrate on the stripping phenomena inside the quadrupole magnets with the aim of defining the quadrupole range for the design phase of SPL.

  8. CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INFORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Experience Japan The Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry will further promote its Japan-experience program and seek cooperation with various Chinese institutions.Between early May and June 2007,the chamber organized a Chinese college student delegation to Japan with the support from its members in China.

  9. Target chambers for gammashpere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  10. BEBC bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Looking up into the interior of BEBC bubble chamber from the expansion cylinder. At the top of the chamber two fish-eye lenses are installed and three other fish-eye ports are blanked off. In the centre is a heat exchanger.

  11. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  12. Fluidized bed combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kullendorff, A.; Wikner, J.

    1985-03-25

    The chamber is confined in a pressure vessel. The lower part of the chamber has tilted parallel gutters up to the height of the fluidized bed. The slope of the gutter walls is 5 degrees-15 degrees and the top area of the gutters is 1.3 to 3 times larger than their bottom.

  13. DELPHI time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The time projection chamber is inserted inside the central detector of the DELPHI experiment. Gas is ionised in the chamber as a charged particle passes through, producing an electric signal from which the path of the particle can be found. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  14. Evaluation of low-cost cathode catalysts for high yield biohydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chen, Y; Ye, Y; Lu, B; Zhu, S; Shen, S

    2011-01-01

    As an ideal fuel due to the advantages of no pollution, high combustion heat and abundant sources, hydrogen gas can be produced from organic matter through the electrohydrogenesis process in microbial electrolysis cells. But in many MECs, platinum is often used as catalyst, which limits the practical applications of MECs. To reduce the cost of the MECs, Ni-based alloy cathodes were developed by electrodepositing. In this paper hydrogen production using Ni-W-P cathode was studied for the first time in a single-chamber membrane-free MEC. At an applied voltage of 0.9 V, MECs with Ni-W-P cathodes obtained a hydrogen production rate of 1.09 m3/m3/day with an cathodic hydrogen recovery of 74%, a Coulombic efficiency of 56% and an electrical energy efficiency relative to electrical input of 139%, which was the best result of reports in this study. The Ni-W-P cathode demonstrated a better electrocatalytic activity than the Ni-Ce-P cathode and achieved a comparable performance to the Pt cathode in terms of hydrogen production rate, Coulombic efficiency, cathodic hydrogen recovery and electrical energy efficiency at 0.9 V.

  15. Effectiveness of Bench Top Non-Vacuum Autoclaves on Dental Turbine Chamber Sterilization Effectiveness of Bench Top Non-Vacuum Autoclaves on Dental Turbine Chamber Sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraneh Movahhed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental turbine chamber is a suitable reservoir for living microorganisms, so chamber sterilization is necessary for reducing cross contamination risk. On the other hand, in non-vacuum autoclaves, steam penetration into turbine chamber is doubtful, while they are still in use in dental clinics. In this study, performance of small non-vacuum autoclave in turbine chamber sterilization was evaluated. Methods: A total of 48 dental turbines were sterilized by large vacuum autoclaves. The turbin chamber cap was opened in aseptic enviroment and a strip contaminated with bacillus stearothermophilus endospores was placed into chamber and chamber cap was closed. Twelve dental turbines were loaded in each of four autoclaves (2 large pre-vacuum autoclaves, 2 bench top non-vacuum autoclaves and sterilization process preformed according to the manufacturer's instructions. After the sterilization cycle, the strips were transferred to culture medium and incubated at 56°C for 48 Hours. As control sample, a biologic indicator that had not been autoclaved was used for each group. Results: Being loaded in different autoclaves, All 48 turbines were sterilized properly and all the cultures were negative. The culture results of four control indicators which were not sterilized, were positive. Conclusion: There was no difference between performance of vacuum and non-vacuum autoclaves in dental turbine chamber sterilization. Both types performed sterilization properly.

  16. OPAL Jet Chamber Prototype

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. OPAL's central tracking system consists of (in order of increasing radius) a silicon microvertex detector, a vertex detector, a jet chamber, and z-chambers. All the tracking detectors work by observing the ionization of atoms by charged particles passing by: when the atoms are ionized, electrons are knocked out of their atomic orbitals, and are then able to move freely in the detector. These ionization electrons are detected in the dirfferent parts of the tracking system. This piece is a prototype of the jet chambers

  17. PS wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A wire chamber used at CERN's Proton Synchrotron accelerator in the 1970s. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  18. ALICE Time Projection Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Lippmann, C

    2013-01-01

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the main device in the ALICE 'central barrel' for the tracking and identification (PID) of charged particles. It has to cope with unprecedented densities of charges particles.

  19. Vacuum chamber 'bicone'

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This chamber is now in the National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA, where it was exposed in an exhibit on the History of High Energy Accelerators (1977).

  20. High rate drift chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, D.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Berisso, M.C. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Gutierrez, G. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Holmes, S.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Wehmann, A. (Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)); Avilez, C. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Felix, J. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Moreno, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Romero, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Sosa, M. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)); Forbush, M. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Huson, F.R. (Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)); Wightman, J.A. (Department of Physi

    1994-06-01

    Fermilab experiment 690, a study of target dissociation reactions pp[yields]pX using an 800 GeV/c proton beam and a liquid hydrogen target, collected data in late 1991. The incident beam and 600-800 GeV/c scattered protons were measured using a system of six 6 in.x4 in. and two 15 in.x8 in. pressurized drift chambers spaced over 260 m. These chambers provided precise measurements at rates above 10 MHz (2 MHz per cm of sense wire). The measurement resolution of the smaller chambers was 90 [mu]m, and the resolution of the larger chambers was 125 [mu]m. Construction details and performance results, including radiation damage, are presented. ((orig.))

  1. Toxic Test Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Hazardous material test facility Both facilities have 16,000 cubic foot chambers, equipped with 5000 CFM CBR filter systems with an air change...

  2. Bubble chamber: antiproton annihilation

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    These images show real particle tracks from the annihilation of an antiproton in the 80 cm Saclay liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. A negative kaon and a neutral kaon are produced in this process, as well as a positive pion. The invention of bubble chambers in 1952 revolutionized the field of particle physics, allowing real tracks left by particles to be seen and photographed by expanding liquid that had been heated to boiling point.

  3. Restitution of enamel after interdental stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, T; Milleding, P; Mohlin, B; Nannmark, U

    1993-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of interdental stripping on the enamel surface and evaluates methods to restitute the treated surface. Extracted teeth mounted in a semielastic material were subjected to stripping by different kinds of steel strips. The treated enamel surfaces were then polished in several different ways. The effects were studied by SEM and profilometry. It was concluded that the coarsest strips produced irregularities of such a magnitude that polishing had very limited effect. Polishing starting with coarse polishing strips followed by gradually finer gave the best result. An increase in number of strokes and use of all grades of polishing strips slightly improved the result.

  4. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weßling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  5. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weßling, Michael; Schäfer, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C-C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  6. Measurement of characteristic impedance of silicon fiber sheet based readout strip panel for RPC detector in INO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. K.; Kumar, A.; Marimuthu, N.; Singh, V.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a mega science project of India, which is going to use about 30,000 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) as active detector elements for the study of atmoshpheric neutrino oscillations. Each RPC detector will consist of two orthogonally placed readout strip panel for picking the signals generated in the gas chamber. The area of RPC detector in INO-ICAL (Iron Calorimeter) experiment will be 2 m × 2 m, therefore the dimensions of readout strip panel should also be 2 m × 2 m. To get undistorted signals pass through the readout strip panel to front-end electronics, their characteristic impedance should be matched with each other. In the present paper, we describe the need and search of new dielectric material for the fabrication of flame resistant, waterproof and flexible readout strip panel. We will also describe the measurement of characteristic impedance of Plastic Honeycomb (PH) based readout strip panel and Silicon Fiber Sheet (SFS) based readout strip panel in a comparative way, and its variation under loading and with time. Based on this study, we found that a 5 mm thick SFS-based readout strip panel has a minimum signal reflection at 49.5 ohm characteristic impedance value. Our study shows that SFS is a good dielectric material for the purpose.

  7. High surface area stainless steel brushes as cathodes in microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Douglas F; Merrill, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-15

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) are an efficient technology for generating hydrogen gas from organic matter, but alternatives to precious metals are needed for cathode catalysts. We show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates and efficiencies similar to those achieved with platinum-catalyzed carbon cloth cathodes in single-chamber MECs. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2/m3, hydrogen was produced at a rate of 1.7 +/- 0.1 m3-H2/m3-d (current density of 188 +/- 10 A/m3) at an applied voltage of 0.6 V. The energy efficiency relative to the electrical energy input was 221 +/- 8%, and the overall energy efficiency was 78 +/- 5% based on both electrical energy and substrate utilization. These values compare well to previous results obtained using platinum on flat carbon cathodes in a similar system. Reducing the cathode surface area by 75% decreased performance from 91 +/- 3 A/m3 to 78 +/- 4 A/m3. A brush cathode with graphite instead of stainless steel and a specific surface area of 4600 m2/m3 generated substantially less current (1.7 +/- 0.0 A/m3), and a flat stainless steel cathode (25 m2/m3) produced 64 +/- 1 A/m3, demonstrating that both the stainless steel and the large surface area contributed to high current densities. Linear sweep voltammetry showed that the stainless steel brush cathodes both reduced the overpotential needed for hydrogen evolution and exhibited a decrease in overpotential over time as a result of activation. These results demonstrate for the first time that hydrogen production can be achieved at rates comparable to those with precious metal catalysts in MECs without the need for expensive cathodes.

  8. Intraply Hybrid Composites Would Contain Control Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Chi-Yu

    1996-01-01

    "Smart" structural components with sensors and/or actuators distributed throughout their volumes made of intraply hybrid composite materials, according to proposal. Strips of hybrid control material interspersed with strips of ordinary (passive) composite material in some layers, providing distributed control capability. For example, near and far edges of plate bent upward by commanding bottom control strips to expand and simultaneously commanding upper control strips to contract.

  9. Innovative ammonia stripping with an electrolyzed water system as pretreatment of thermally hydrolyzed wasted sludge for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyong; Kim, Moonil

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the anaerobic digestion of thermally hydrolyzed wasted sludge (THWS) with a high concentration of ammonia was carried out through combining with an ammonia stripping and an electrolyzed water system (EWS). The EWS produced acidic water (pH 2-3) at the anode and alkaline water (pH 11-12) at the cathode with an electro-diaphragm between the electrodes that could be applied to ammonia stripping. The ammonia stripping efficiency was strongly dependent on the pH and aeration rate, and the ammonium ion removal rate followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. From the BMP test, the methane yield of THWS after ammonia stripping using the EWS was 2.8 times higher than that of the control process (raw THWS without ammonia stripping). Furthermore, both methane yield and ammonium removal efficiency were higher in this study than in previous studies. Since ammonia stripping with the EWS does not require any chemicals for pH control, no precipitated sludge is produced and anaerobic microorganisms are not inhibited by cations. Therefore, ammonia stripping using the EWS could be an effective method for digestion of wastewater with a high concentration of ammonium nitrogen.

  10. The Control Circuit Design for the Stripping Foil of CYCIAE-100

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN; Li-peng; YIN; Zhi-guo; AN; Shi-zhong; LI; Peng-zhan

    2012-01-01

    <正>For the compact cyclotron CYCIAE-100, two proton beams are extracted in dual directions by stripping foil. For the high vacuum condition, the foil changer with a plate carrying 12 stripping foil is placed in the vacuum chamber. The movement of the foil changer is divided into four parts: the rotation of the plate, the transverse movement of the pole, and the radial movement of the pole which includes coarse movement and fine regulating. The whole system should be highly accurate and reliable, and meanwhile it is required that the design should be as simple as possible.

  11. Commissioning and Performance of the CMS Silicon Strip Tracker with Cosmic Ray Muons

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M Jr; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; 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Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    During autumn 2008, the Silicon Strip Tracker was operated with the full CMS experiment in a comprehensive test, in the presence of the 3.8 T magnetic field produced by the CMS superconducting solenoid. Cosmic ray muons were detected in the muon chambers and used to trigger the readout of all CMS sub-detectors. About 15 million events with a muon in the tracker were collected. The efficiency of hit and track reconstruction were measured to be higher than 99% and consistent with expectations from Monte Carlo simulation. This article details the commissioning and performance of the Silicon Strip Tracker with cosmic ray muons.

  12. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  13. Using Comic Strips in Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csabay, Noémi

    2006-01-01

    The author believes that using comic strips in language-learning classes has three main benefits. First, comic strips motivate younger learners. Second, they provide a context and logically connected sentences to help language learning. Third, their visual information is helpful for comprehension. The author argues that comic strips can be used in…

  14. Nitrification and denitrification in two-chamber microbial fuel cells for treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng; Yu, Zaiji; Feng, Chunhua; Li, Wenhan

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in the aerated cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with nitrifying bacteria were investigated using two-chamber MFCs. Based on the variations of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber of four MFCs added with different concentrations of [Formula: see text] (50, 65, 130 and 230 mg/L), the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification leading to effective removal of nitrogen was confirmed. Electrochemical reaction with electrons transferred from the anode chamber was found to be the major mechanism responsible for the removal of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber. The estimated values of the first-order rate constant for nitrification and denitrification varied in the range of 0.3-1.7 day(-1) and 0.2-0.9 day(-1), revealing a decreasing trend with increases in the initial [Formula: see text] concentrations and the detected maximum concentration of the nitrification product of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber, respectively.

  15. Induced signals in resistive plate chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Riegler, W

    2002-01-01

    We derive theorems for induced signals on electrodes embedded in a medium with a position and frequency dependent permittivity $\\vep(\\vx,s)$ and conductivity $\\sigma(\\vx,s)$ that are connected with arbitrary discrete elements. The problem is treated using the quasi-static approximation of Maxwell's equations for weakly conducting media \\cite{melcher}\\cite{quasi}. The induced signals can be derived by time dependent weighting fields and potentials and the result is the same as the one given in \\cite{gatti}. We also show how these time dependent weighting fields can be derived from electrostatic solutions. Finally we will apply the results to Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) where we discuss the effects of the resistive plates and thin resistive layers on the signals induced on plane electrodes and strips.

  16. The KLOE drift chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adinolfi, M.; Aloisio, A.; Ambrosino, F.; Andryakov, A.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Anulli, F.; Bacci, C.; Bankamp, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellini, F.; Bencivenni, G.; Bertolucci, S.; Bini, C.; Bloise, C.; Bocci, V.; Bossi, F.; Branchini, P.; Bulychjov, S.A.; Cabibbo, G.; Calcaterra, A.; Caloi, R.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Casarsa, M.; Cataldi, G.; Ceradini, F.; Cervelli, F.; Cevenini, F.; Chiefari, G.; Ciambrone, P.; Conetti, S.; Conticelli, S.; Lucia, E. De; Robertis, G. De; Sangro, R. De; Simone, P. De; Zorzi, G. De; Dell' Agnello, S.; Denig, A.; Domenico, A. Di; Donato, C. Di; Falco, S. Di; Doria, A.; Drago, E.; Elia, V.; Erriquez, O.; Farilla, A.; Felici, G.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Forti, C.; Franceschi, A.; Franzini, P.; Gao, M.L.; Gatti, C.; Gauzzi, P.; Giovannella, S.; Golovatyuk, V.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grandegger, W.; Graziani, E.; Guarnaccia, P.; Hagel, U.V.; Han, H.G.; Han, S.W.; Huang, X.; Incagli, M.; Ingrosso, L.; Jang, Y.Y.; Kim, W.; Kluge, W.; Kulikov, V.; Lacava, F.; Lanfranchi, G.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Lomtadze, F.; Luisi, C.; Mao, C.S.; Martemianov, M.; Matsyuk, M.; Mei, W.; Merola, L.; Messi, R.; Miscetti, S.; Moalem, A.; Moccia, S.; Moulson, M.; Mueller, S.; Murtas, F.; Napolitano, M.; Nedosekin, A.; Panareo, M.; Pacciani, L.; Pages, P.; Palutan, M.; Paoluzi, L.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passalacqua, L.; Passaseo, M.; Passeri, A.; Patera, V.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, G.; Picca, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Pistillo, C.; Pollack, M.; Pontecorvo, L.; Primavera, M.; Ruggieri, F.; Santangelo, P.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schwick, C.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Scuri, F.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shan, J.; Silano, P.; Spadaro, T.; Spagnolo, S.; Spiriti, E.; Stanescu, C.; Tong, G.L.; Tortora, L.; Valente, E.; Valente, P. E-mail: paolo.valente@lnf.infn.it; Valeriani, B.; Venanzoni, G.; Veneziano, S.; Wu, Y.; Xie, Y.G.; Zhao, P.P.; Zhou, Y

    2001-04-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K{sub L} produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm{sup 2} in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm{sup 2} in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  17. The KLOE drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Adinolfi, M; Ambrosino, F; Andryakov, A; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Anulli, F; Bacci, C; Bankamp, A; Barbiellini, G; Bellini, F; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Bulychjov, S A; Cabibbo, G; Calcaterra, A; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Carboni, G; Cardini, A; Casarsa, M; Cataldi, G; Ceradini, F; Cervelli, F; Cevenini, F; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; Conticelli, S; Lucia, E D; Robertis, G D; Sangro, R D; Simone, P D; Zorzi, G D; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Domenico, A D; Donato, C D; Falco, S D; Doria, A; Drago, E; Elia, V; Erriquez, O; Farilla, A; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Forti, C; Franceschi, A; Franzini, P; Gao, M L; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Golovatyuk, V; Gorini, E; Grancagnolo, F; Grandegger, W; Graziani, E; Guarnaccia, P; Von Hagel, U; Han, H G; Han, S W; Huang, X; Incagli, M; Ingrosso, L; Jang, Y Y; Kim, W; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Lomtadze, F; Luisi, C; Mao Chen Sheng; Martemyanov, M; Matsyuk, M; Mei, W; Merola, L; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Moalem, A; Moccia, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nedosekin, A; Panareo, M; Pacciani, L; Pagès, P; Palutan, M; Paoluzi, L; Pasqualucci, E; Passalacqua, L; Passaseo, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Petrolo, E; Petrucci, Guido; Picca, D; Pirozzi, G; Pistillo, C; Pollack, M; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Ruggieri, F; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Schamberger, R D; Schwick, C; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Shan, J; Silano, P; Spadaro, T; Spagnolo, S; Spiriti, E; Stanescu, C; Tong, G L; Tortora, L; Valente, E; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Wu, Y; Xie, Y G; Zhao, P P; Zhou, Y

    2001-01-01

    The tracking detector of the KLOE experiment is 4 m diameter, 3.3 m length drift chamber, designed to contain a large fraction of the decays of low-energy K sub L produced at the Frascati DAPHINE phi-factory. The chamber is made by a thin carbon fiber structure and operated with a helium-based gas mixture in order to minimise conversion of low-energy photons and multiple scattering inside the sensitive volume. The tracking information is provided by 58 layers of stereo wires defing 12,582 cells, 2x2 cm sup 2 in size in the 12 innermost layers and 3x3 cm sup 2 in the outer ones. Details of the chamber design, calibration procedure and tracking performances are presented.

  18. Charpak hemispherical wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    pieces. Mesures are of the largest one. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  19. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  20. A VLSI analog pipeline read-out for electrode segmented ionization chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Bonazzola, G C; Cirio, R; Donetti, M; Figus, M; Marchetto, F; Peroni, C; Pernigotti, E; Thénard, J M; Zampieri, A

    1999-01-01

    We report on the design and test of a 32-channel VLSI chip based on the analog pipeline memory concept. The charge from a strip of a ionization chamber, is stored as a function of time in a switched capacitor array. The cell reading can be done in parallel with the writing.

  1. A VLSI analog pipeline read-out for electrode segmented ionization chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazzola, G. C.; Bouvier, S.; Cirio, R.; Donetti, M.; Figus, M.; Marchetto, F.; Peroni, C.; Pernigotti, E.; Thenard, J. M.; Zampieri, A.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the design and test of a 32-channel VLSI chip based on the analog pipeline memory concept. The charge from a strip of a ionization chamber, is stored as a function of time in a switched capacitor array. The cell reading can be done in parallel with the writing.

  2. Performance of Cassava Starch as a Proton Exchange Membrane in a Dual Chambered Microbial Fuel Cell.

    OpenAIRE

    Livinus A. Obasi; Charles C. Opara; Akuma Oji

    2012-01-01

    This research work shows the feasibility of power generation in a mediatorless dual chambered microbial fuel cell, utilizing cassava starch as the proton exchange membrane (PEM). The study employed swine house effluent (a serious environmental threat) as the substrate (fuel) (pH, 7.2, BOD: 1200mg/l, COD: 3800mg/l) in the anode chamber prepared with a phosphate buffer solution (K2HPO4+KH2PO4), potassium ferry cyanide solution served as the oxygen acceptor in the cathode chamber using graphite ...

  3. Fast variation method for elastic strip calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biryukov, Sergey V

    2002-05-01

    A new, fast, variation method (FVM) for determining an elastic strip response to stresses arbitrarily distributed on the flat side of the strip is proposed. The remaining surface of the strip may have an arbitrary form, and it is free of stresses. The FVM, as well as the well-known finite element method (FEM), starts with the variational principle. However, it does not use the meshing of the strip. A comparison of FVM results with the exact analytical solution in the special case of shear stresses and a rectangular strip demonstrates an excellent agreement.

  4. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  5. OPAL Muon Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the 4 experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 to 2000. This is a slice of the outermost layer of OPAL : the muon chambers. This outside layer detects particles which are not stopped by the previous layers. These are mostly muons.

  6. Scanning bubble chamber pictures

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    These were taken at the 2 m hydrogen bubble chamber. The photo shows an early Shiva system where the pre-measurements needed to qualify the event were done manually (cf photo 7408136X). The scanning tables were located in bld. 12. Gilberte Saulmier sits on foreground, Inge Arents at centre.

  7. Heavy liquid bubble chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    The CERN Heavy liquid bubble chamber being installed in the north experimental hall at the PS. On the left, the 1180 litre body; in the centre the magnet, which can produce a field of 26 800 gauss; on the right the expansion mechanism.

  8. Secondary emission gas chamber

    CERN Document Server

    In'shakov, V; Skvortsov, V

    2014-01-01

    For a hadron calorimeter active element there is considered a gaseous secondary emis-sion detector (150 micron gap, 50 kV/cm). Such one-stage parallel plate chamber must be a radiation hard, fast and simple. A model of such detector has been produced, tested and some characteristics are presented.

  9. Antenna structure with distributed strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.

    2008-03-18

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element is in proximity to a ground conductor. The folded line and the distributed strip can be electrically interconnected and substantially coplanar. The ground conductor can be spaced from, and coplanar to, the radiating element, or can alternatively lie in a plane set at an angle to the radiating element. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise a ground plane and radiating element on opposed sides of a printed wiring board. Other embodiments of the antenna comprise conductors that can be arranged as free standing "foils". Other embodiments include antennas that are encapsulated into a package containing the antenna.

  10. Boron Particle Ignition in Secondary Chamber of Ducted Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. X. Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the secondary chamber of ducted rocket, there exists a relative speed between boron particles and air stream. Hence, the ignition laws under static conditions cannot be simply applied to represent the actual ignition process of boron particles, and it is required to study the effect of forced convective on the ignition of boron particles. Preheating of boron particles in gas generator makes it possible to utilize the velocity difference between gas and particles in secondary chamber for removal of the liquid oxide layer with the aid of Stoke's forces. An ignition model of boron particles is formulated for the oxide layer removal by considering that it results from a boundary layer stripping mechanism. The shearing action exerted by the high-speed flow causes a boundary layer to be formed in the surface of the liquid oxide layer, and the stripping away of this layer accounts for the accelerated ignition of boron particles. Compared with the King model, as the ignition model of boron particles is formulated for the oxide layer removal by considering that it results from a boundary layer stripping mechanism, the oxide layer thickness thins at all times during the particle ignition and lower the ignition time.

  11. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    1985-03-01

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150 °C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. he lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0 °C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60 °C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  12. Microhollow cathode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Bentley, R.

    2003-07-01

    By reducing the dimensions of hollow cathodes into the hundred micrometer range, stable, direct current, high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharges in rare gases, rare gas-halide mixtures and in air could be generated. The electron energy distribution in these microdischarges is non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high-energy tail. The high electron energy together with the high gas density, which favors three-body collisions, is the reason for an efficient excimer generation in these microplasmas. Excimer efficiencies from 1% to 9% have been measured for argon, xenon, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride direct current excimer emitters, with a radiant excimer emittance of up to 2 W/cm2 for xenon. Adding small amounts of oxygen to argon has allowed us to generate vacuum ultraviolet line radiation at 130.5 nm with an efficiency approaching 1%. Pulsing xenon discharges with nanosecond electrical pulses has led to an increase in intensity to 15 W/cm2 and to a simultaneous increase in efficiency to more than 20%. Operating the discharges in an abnormal glow mode has allowed us to generate microdischarge arrays without individual ballast. Applications of these plasma arrays are excimer lamps and plasma reactors.

  13. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaikjer, C.R.

    1985-01-15

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150/sup 0/C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. The lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0/sup 0/C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60/sup 0/C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  14. Impact of salinity on cathode catalyst performance in microbial fuel cells (MFCs)

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xi

    2011-10-01

    Several alternative cathode catalysts have been proposed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but effects of salinity (sodium chloride) on catalyst performance, separate from those of conductivity on internal resistance, have not been previously examined. Three different types of cathode materials were tested here with increasingly saline solutions using single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs. The best MFC performance was obtained using a Co catalyst (cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin; CoTMPP), with power increasing by 24 ± 1% to 1062 ± 9 mW/m2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) when 250 mM NaCl (final conductivity of 31.3 mS/cm) was added (initial conductivity of 7.5 mS/cm). This power density was 25 ± 1% higher than that achieved with Pt on carbon cloth, and 27 ± 1% more than that produced using an activated carbon/nickel mesh (AC) cathode in the highest salinity solution. Linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) was used to separate changes in performance due to solution conductivity from those produced by reductions in ohmic resistance with the higher conductivity solutions. The potential of the cathode with CoTMPP increased by 17-20 mV in LSVs when the NaCl addition was increased from 0 to 250 mM independent of solution conductivity changes. Increases in current were observed with salinity increases in LSVs for AC, but not for Pt cathodes. Cathodes with CoTMPP had increased catalytic activity at higher salt concentrations in cyclic voltammograms compared to Pt and AC. These results suggest that special consideration should be given to the type of catalyst used with more saline wastewaters. While Pt oxygen reduction activity is reduced, CoTMPP cathode performance will be improved at higher salt concentrations expected for wastewaters containing seawater. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Single-Chamber Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology—From Its Origins to Today’s State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teko W. Napporn

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs, both anode and cathode are situated in a common gas chamber and are exposed to a mixture of fuel and oxidant. The working principle is based on the difference in catalytic activity of the electrodes for the respective anodic and cathodic reactions. The resulting difference in oxygen partial pressure between the electrodes leads to the generation of an open circuit voltage. Progress in SC-SOFC technology has enabled the generation of power outputs comparable to those of conventional SOFCs. This paper provides a detailed review of the development of SC-SOFC technology.

  16. Single-chamber solid oxide fuel cell technology - From its origins to today's state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khun, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, H3T 1J4 (Canada); Napporn, T. W. [Equipe Electrocatalyse, Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique, UMR CNRS 6503, Universite de Poitiers, Poitiers (France)

    2010-07-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFCs), both anode and cathode are situated in a common gas chamber and are exposed to a mixture of fuel and oxidant. The working principle is based on the difference in catalytic activity of the electrodes for the respective anodic and cathodic reactions. The resulting difference in oxygen partial pressure between the electrodes leads to the generation of an open circuit voltage. Progress in SC-SOFC technology has enabled the generation of power outputs comparable to those of conventional SOFCs. This paper provides a detailed review of the development of SC-SOFC technology. (author)

  17. Anechoic Radio Frequency Test Chamber

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This chamber is used for characterization test of such systems as communications gear, tanks, radar, missiles, and helicopters. The dimensions of the chamber are 114...

  18. Study of readout and cross-talks for multi-strip RPC with PSpice simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-Ping; HE Xiao-Chun; CAI Xu

    2008-01-01

    An electrical model for multi-strip resistive plate chamber (RPC) is presented,and a comparison between simulation results and test data is carried on.Based on the model,the influences of the RPC's design parameters on the readout are studied with PSpice simulation.Cross-talk (CT) phenomenon is observed and the relative amplitudes of the CT are studied for different design parameters.

  19. Buffer strips in composites at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    The composite material 'buffer strip' concept is presently investigated at elevated temperatures for the case of graphite/polyimide buffer strip panels using a (45/0/45/90)2S layup, where the buffer strip material was 0-deg S-glass/polyimide. Each panel was loaded in tension until it failed, and radiographs and crack opening displacements were recorded during the tests to determine fracture onset, fracture arrest, and the extent of damage in the buffer strip after crack arrest. At 177 + or - 3 C, the buffer strips increased the panel strength by at least 40 percent in comparison with panels without buffer strips. Compared to similar panels tested at room temperature, those tested at elevated temperature had lower residual strengths, but higher failure strains.

  20. Improving phosphate buffer-free cathode performance of microbial fuel cell based on biological nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Shi-Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi; Zhao, Qing-Liang; Kiely, Patrick D; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Yang, Feng-Lin; Fu, Lei; Peng, Luo

    2009-08-15

    To reduce the amount of phosphate buffer currently used in Microbial Fuel Cell's (MFC's), we investigated the role of biological nitrification at the cathode in the absence of phosphate buffer. The addition of a nitrifying mixed consortia (NMC) to the cathode compartment and increasing ammonium concentration in the catholyte resulted in an increase of cell voltage from 0.3 V to 0.567 V (external resistance of 100 Omega) and a decrease of catholyte pH from 8.8 to 7.05. A large fraction of ammonium was oxidized to nitrite, as indicated by an increase of nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3)(-)-N). An MFC inoculated with an NMC and supplied with 94.2 mgN/l ammonium to the catholyte could generate a maximum power of 2.1+/-0.14 mW (10.94+/-0.73 W/m(3)). This compared favorably to an MFC supplied with either buffered or non-buffered solution. The buffer-free NMC inoculated cathodic chamber showed the smallest polarization resistance, suggesting that nitrification resulted in improved cathode performance. The improved performances of the phosphate buffer-free cathode and cell are positively related to biological nitrification, in which we suggest additional protons produced from ammonium oxidation facilitated electrochemical reduction of oxygen at cathode.

  1. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested.

  2. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  3. Stripping, Sex, and Popular Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Roach, Catherine M.

    2007-01-01

    At the heart of Stripping, Sex, and Popular Culture lies a very personal story, of author Catherine Roach's response to the decision of her life-long best friend to become an exotic dancer. Catherine and Marie grew up together in Canada and moved to the USA to enroll in PhD programs at prestigious universities. For various reasons, Marie left her program and instead chose to work as a stripper. The author, at first troubled and yet fascinated by her friend's decision, follows Marie's journey ...

  4. Optimisation of low-mass drift chambers for HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabatos, C.; Karig, W.; Muentz, C.; Steigerwald, A.; Stroth, J.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Zentek, A.; Bethge, K. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Glonti, L.; Smykov, L.; Zanewsky, Yu. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (JINR), 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Bokemeyer, H.; Koenig, W.; Stelzer, H.; Zumbruch, P. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-07-21

    A set of low-mass drift chambers designed for the tracking of di-electrons in the HADES spectrometer is presented. Short radiation length is ensured by using a Helium-based gas mixture and aluminium cathode wires, whereas the acceptance is maximised by limiting the width of the side frames of the detectors. The measured performance of these devices, which improves with increasing concentration of quencher gas, is shown and discussed. Position resolutions down to 70 {mu}m have been obtained under stable operation. Long-term gain stability is also reported. (orig.)

  5. Optimisation of low-mass drift chambers for HADES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garabatos, C.; Karig, W.; Müntz, C.; Steigerwald, A.; Stroth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zentek, A.; Bethge, K.; Chernenko, S.; Fateev, O.; Glonti, L.; Smykov, L.; Zanewsky, Yu; Bokemeyer, H.; Koenig, W.; Stelzer, H.; Zumbruch, P.

    A set of low-mass drift chambers designed for the tracking of di-electrons in the HADES spectrometer is presented. Short radiation length is ensured by using a Helium-based gas mixture and aluminium cathode wires, whereas the acceptance is maximised by limiting the width of the side frames of the detectors. The measured performance of these devices, which improves with increasing concentration of quencher gas, is shown and discussed. Position resolutions down to 70 μm have been obtained under stable operation. Long-term gain stability is also reported.

  6. Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2011-11-01

    High rates of hydrogen gas production were achieved in a two chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) without a catholyte phosphate buffer by using a saline catholyte solution and a cathode constructed around a stainless steel mesh current collector. Using the non-buffered salt solution (68 mM NaCl) produced the highest current density of 131 ± 12 A/m3, hydrogen yield of 3.2 ± 0.3 mol H2/mol acetate, and gas production rate of 1.6 ± 0.2 m3 H2/m 3·d, compared to MECs with catholytes externally sparged with CO2 or containing a phosphate buffer. The salinity of the catholyte achieved a high solution conductivity, and therefore the electrode spacing did not appreciably affect performance. The coulombic efficiency with the cathode placed near the membrane separating the chambers was 83 ± 4%, similar to that obtained with the cathode placed more distant from the membrane (84 ± 4%). Using a carbon cloth cathode instead of the stainless steel mesh cathode did not significantly affect performance, with all reactor configurations producing similar performance in terms of total gas volume, COD removal, rcat and overall energy recovery. These results show MEC performance can be improved by using a saline catholyte without pH control. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased sensitivity of anodic stripping voltammetry at the hanging mercury drop electrode by ultracathodic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jose A.; Rodrigues, Carlos M.; Almeida, Paulo J.; Valente, Ines M.; Goncalves, Luis M. [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Compton, Richard G. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Barros, Aquiles A., E-mail: ajbarros@fc.up.pt [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} At very cathodic accumulation potentials (overpotential deposition) the voltammetric signals of Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} increase. {yields} 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. {yields} This effect is likely due to mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials. {yields} This effect is also likely due to added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles. - Abstract: An improved approach to the anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of heavy metals, using the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), is reported. It was discovered that using very cathodic accumulation potentials, at which the solvent reduction occurs (overpotential deposition), the voltammetric signals of zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) increase. When compared with the classical methodology a 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. This effect is likely due to both mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials and added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles.

  8. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    Anode-supported cells were fabricated with optimized cathodes showing high power density of 1.2 W/cm(2) at 800 C under a cell voltage of 0.7 V and an active area of 4 x 4 cm. A microstructure study was performed on such cell using a field-emission gun scanning electron microscope, which revealed...... that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  9. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  10. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  11. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  12. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  13. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  14. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  15. Solidification Structure of Low Carbon Steel Strips with Different Phosphorus Contents Produced by Strip Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na LI; Zhenyu LIU; Yiqing QIU; Zhaosen LIN; Xianghua LIU; Guodong WANG

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, low carbon steel strips with different phosphorus contents were produced using a twin roll strip casting process. The solidification structure was studied and its features were analyzed in detail. It was found that the strips possessed a fine microstructure compared with the mould cast steels. With increasing phosphorus content more ferrite has been formed with finer grains.

  16. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  17. Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    To complete the revamp of CERN’s Council Chamber, a new exhibition is being installed just in time for the June Council meetings.   Panels will showcase highlights of CERN’s history, using some of the content prepared for the exhibitions marking 50 years of the PS, which were displayed in the main building last November. The previous photo exhibition in the Council Chamber stopped at the 1970s. To avoid the new panels becoming quickly out of date, photos are grouped together around specific infrastructures, rather than following a classic time-line. “We have put the focus on the accelerators – the world-class facilities that CERN has been offering researchers over the years, from the well-known large colliders to the lesser-known smaller facilities,” says Emma Sanders, who worked on the content. The new exhibition will be featured in a future issue of the Bulletin with photos and an interview with Fabienne Marcastel, designer of the exhibit...

  18. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs.

  19. The effect of cinnamon extract on isolated rat uterine strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed

    2016-03-01

    Cinnamon is a spice used by some populations as a traditional remedy to control blood pressure and thus hypertension. Cinnamon extract decreases contractility in some smooth muscles, but its effect on uterine smooth muscle is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the physiological and pharmacological effects of cinnamon extract (CE) on the contractions of isolated rat uterine strips and to investigate its possible mechanism of action. Isolated longitudinal uterine strips were dissected from non-pregnant rats, mounted vertically in an organ bath chamber, and exposed to different concentrations of CE (10-20mg/mL). The effect of CE was investigated in the presence of each of the following solutions: 60mM KCl, 5nM oxytocin, and 1μM Bay K8644. CE significantly decreased the force of uterine contraction in a concentration-dependent manner and significantly attenuated the uterine contractions elicited by KCl and oxytocin. In addition, CE significantly decreased the contractile force elicited when L-type Ca(2+) channels were activated by Bay K8644. CE's major mechanism may be inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels, which limits calcium influx. These data demonstrate that CE can be a potent tocolytic that can decrease uterine activity regardless of how the force was produced, even when the uterus was stimulated by agonists. As a result, cinnamon may be used to alleviate menstrual pain associated with dysmenorrhoea or prevent unwanted uterine activity in early pregnancy.

  20. 7 CFR 29.6041 - Strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strips. 29.6041 Section 29.6041 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6041 Strips. The sides of a tobacco leaf from which the stem has...

  1. 33 CFR 157.128 - Stripping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of the following devices for stripping oil from each cargo tank: (1) A positive displacement pump. (2) A self-priming centrifugal pump. (3) An eductor (4) Any other device accepted by the Commandant. (d... positive displacement pump or a self-priming centrifugal pump, the stripping system must have the...

  2. Hardy inequalities in strips on ruled surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in infinite two-dimensional strips defined as uniform tubular neighbourhoods of curves on ruled surfaces. We show that the negative Gauss curvature of the ambient surface gives rise to a Hardy inequality and we use this to prove certain stability of spectrum in the case of asymptotically straight strips about mildly perturbed geodesics.

  3. Water problems in Gaza Strip,Palestine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ismail ALGHALBAN

    2001-01-01

    The only source for water in Gaza strip, southern Palestine, is the groundwater aquifer. The Pliocene - Pleistocene aquifer has two serious problems: quantity and quality. This study is an attempt to identify the problems and to suggest solutions for water problems in Gaza strip. In addition, some rules for rehabilitation of the aquifers were suggested.

  4. Tactual Strip Maps as Navigational Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golledge, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the history and use of tactual maps by blind and visually impaired travelers. It discusses textual patterns, symbols, and graphics; differences between conventional geographic-cartographic maps and strip maps used as navigational aids; and current advances, including disposable, quick-to-produce, and easy-to-update strip maps.…

  5. Suppression of Cross Contamination in Multi-Layer Thin Film Prepared by Using Rotating Hexagonal Sputtering Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, single- and multi-layered thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using a newly developed rotating hexagonal sputtering cathode in a single chamber. The rotatinghexagonal sputtering cathode can install up to six different sputtering targets or six single targets in a cathode. Using the rotating hexagonal cathode, we prepared a single-layered AZO film and a multi-layer film to evaluate the performance of hexagonal gun. Cross-contamination, which is often observed in multi-layer thin film preparation, was suppressed to nearly zero by controlling process parameters and revising hardware. Energy-saving effects of five-layered glass were also verified by measuring the temperature.

  6. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract

  7. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2mA/m2), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2Wh/L, 7.5Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12mM) from digestate amended with 1g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Electrochemical struvite precipitation from digestate with a fluidized bed cathode microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Ullery, Mark L; Dempsey, Brian A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-05-01

    Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can be used to simultaneously convert wastewater organics to hydrogen and precipitate struvite, but scale formation at the cathode surface can block catalytic active sites and limit extended operation. To promote bulk phase struvite precipitation and minimize cathode scaling, a two-chamber MEC was designed with a fluidized bed to produce suspended particles and inhibit scale formation on the cathode surface. MEC operation elevated the cathode pH to between 8.3 and 8.7 under continuous flow conditions. Soluble phosphorus removal using digester effluent ranged from 70 to 85% with current generation, compared to 10-20% for the control (open circuit conditions). At low current densities (≤2 mA/m(2)), scouring of the cathode by fluidized particles prevented scale accumulation over a period of 8 days. There was nearly identical removal of soluble phosphorus and magnesium from solution, and an equimolar composition in the collected solids, supporting phosphorus removal by struvite formation. At an applied voltage of 1.0 V, energy consumption from the power supply and pumping (0.2 Wh/L, 7.5 Wh/g-P) was significantly less than that needed by other struvite formation methods based on pH adjustment such as aeration and NaOH addition. In the anode chamber, current generation led to COD oxidation (1.1-2.1 g-COD/L-d) and ammonium removal (7-12 mM) from digestate amended with 1 g/L of sodium acetate. These results indicate that a fluidized bed cathode MEC is a promising method of sustainable electrochemical nutrient and energy recovery method for nutrient rich wastewaters.

  9. Two-dimensional position sensitive ionization chamber with GEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Noritaka; Noro, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Takao, Hideaki; Nishio, Yasutaka

    2014-09-01

    We have been developing a multi-anode ionization chamber for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) at Kyushu University. Furthermore, we are planning to construct a neutron detector with high position resolution by combining the chamber with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) and a neutron converter. One of purposes is the measurement of p-> , pn knockout reaction from unstable nuclei. The multi-anode ionization chamber is composed of subdivided multiple anodes, a cathode to produce an uniform electric field, and a Frisch grid. The chamber must have position sensitivity because obtaining a beam profile is required for AMS measurements, where counting loss should be avoided. Also in the case of the neutron detector, it is necessary to measure the position to deduce the scattering angles. We have recently established a two-dimensional position readout system by the following methods: the measurement of horizontal position is enabled by trimming some anodes into wedge-like shape, and vertical position can be determined by the ratio of induced charge on the grid to the total charge on anodes. In addition, improvement of S/N ratio is important for isotope separation and position resolution. We installed a rectangular-shaped GEM and tried improving S/N ratio by electron amplification.

  10. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  11. The ALICE time projection chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    This time projection chamber is part of the ALICE detector on the new LHC accelerator at CERN. Particles produced in collisions at the core of the detector will follow paths outward through the various sub-detector layers. If these particles carry a charge, they will ionise the gas contained within this chamber producing an electric signal as the ions drift in the chamber's electric field.

  12. Circuit realization microwave antennas-oscillator on strip antennas

    OpenAIRE

    Golynskyy, V. D.; Prudyus, I. N.

    2009-01-01

    Showing special feature of development circuitries microwave transistors antennasoscillator on strip dielectric-resonator-antennas. Showing circuitries and technical characteristics of developed microwave antennasoscillator on strip.

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  14. Enhanced electricity generation by triclosan and iron anodes in the three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing; Liu, Lifen; Yang, Fenglin; Ren, Nanqi; Crittenden, John

    2013-11-01

    A three-chambered membrane bio-chemical reactor (TC-MBCR) was developed. The stainless steel membrane modules were used as cathodes and iron plates in the middle chamber served as the anode. The TC-MBCR was able to reduce fouling, remove triclosan (TCS) from a synthetic wastewater treatment and enhance electricity generation by ~60% compared with the cell voltage before TCS addition. The TC-MBCR system generated a relatively stable power output (cell voltage ~0.2V) and the corrosion of iron plates contributed to electricity generation together with microbes on iron anode. The permeation flow from anode to cathode chamber was considered important in electricity generation. In addition, the negatively charged cathode membrane and Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) released by iron plates mitigated membrane fouling by approximately 30%, as compared with the control. The removal of COD and total phosphorus was approximately 99% and 90%. The highest triclosan removal rate reached 97.9%.

  15. Imaging with high Dynamic using an Ionization Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Menk, Ralf-Hendrik; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bernstorff, Sigrid; Besch, Hans Juergen; Voltolina, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    In this work a combination of an ionization chamber with one-dimensional spatial resolution and a MicroCAT structure will be presented. The combination between gas gain operations and integrating front-end electronics yields a dynamic range as high as eight to nine orders of magnitude. Therefore this device is well suitable for medical imaging or applications such as small angle x-ray scattering, where the requirements on the dynamic of the detector are exceptional high. Basically the described detector is an ionization chamber adapted to fan beam geometry with an active area of 192 cm and a pitch of the anode strips of 150 micrometer. In the vertical direction beams as high as 10 mm can be accepted. Every read-out strip is connected to an analogue integrating electronics channel realized in a custom made VLSI chip. A MicroCAT structure utilized as a shielding grid enables frame rates as high as 10kHz. The high dynamic range observed stems from the fact that the MicroCAT enables active electron amplification ...

  16. Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Thioamides on a Rotating Silver Disk Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    MAR 2 1 ൒34 18 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Prepared for publication in the Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry and Interfacial Electrochemistry 19 KEY...Publication in Journal Electroanalytical Chemistry And Interfacial Electrochemistry Department of Chemistry State University of New York at Buffalo

  17. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shen Siao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively.

  18. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears.

  19. Determination of copper in whole blood by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Attar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A selective and sensitive method for determination of copper in blood by adsorptive differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry is presented. The method is based on adsorptive accumulation of the complexes of Cu (II ions with benzenesulfonyl hydrazide onto hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE, followed by the reduction of the adsorbed species by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. The effect of various parameters such as supporting electrolyte, concentration of benzenesulfonyl hydrazide, accumulation potential, accumulation time and stirring rate on the selectivity and sensitivity were studied. The optimum conditions for determination of copper include perchloric acid 0.03 M, concentration of benzenesulfonyl hydrazide 7.5×10-5 M, the accumulation potential of -350 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl, the accumulation time of 50 s, and the scan rate of 50 mV s-1. Under optimized conditions, linear calibration curves were established for the concentration of Cu (II in the range of 0.62-275 ng mL-1, with detection limit of 0.186 ng mL-1 for Cu (II. The procedure was successfully applied to the determination of copper ion in whole blood samples.

  20. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  1. Study of the effect of water vapor on a resistive plate chamber with glass electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Sakai, H H; Teramoto, Y; Nakano, E E; Takahashi, T T

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects of water vapor on the efficiencies of resistive plate chambers with glass electrodes, operated in the streamer mode. With moisture in the chamber gas that has freon as a component (water vapor approx 1000 ppm), a decrease in the efficiency (approx 20%) has been observed after operating for a period of several weeks to a few months. From our study, the cause of the efficiency decrease was identified as a change on the cathode surface. In addition, a recovery method was found: flushing for 1 day with argon bubbled through water containing >=3% ammonia, followed by a few weeks of training with dry gas.

  2. Characterization of multicapillary dielectric cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Hadas, Y.; Yarmolich, D.; Felsteiner, J.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2007-04-01

    Parameters of the plasma and electron beam produced by a multicapillary cathode in a diode powered by a ˜200kV, ˜300ns pulse are presented. It was found that the source of electrons is the plasma ejected from the capillaries. Inside the capillaries this plasma obtains electron density and temperature of ˜8×1015cm-3 and ˜5eV, respectively. In the vicinity of the cathode, the density and temperature of the plasma electrons were found to be 2×1014cm-3 and 4.5eV, respectively, for electron current density of ˜40A/cm2. It was shown that the plasma expansion velocity is in the range of (1-2)×106cm/s for current density of >12A/cm2.

  3. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 μm range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  4. Saving Energy Through Advanced Power Strips (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, D.

    2013-10-01

    Advanced Power Strips (APS) look just like ordinary power strips, except that they have built-in features that are designed to reduce the amount of energy used by many consumer electronics. There are several different types of APSs on the market, but they all operate on the same basic principle of shutting off the supply power to devices that are not in use. By replacing your standard power strip with an APS, you can signifcantly cut the amount of electricity used by your home office and entertainment center devices, and save money on your electric bill. This illustration summarizes the different options.

  5. High energy H- ion transport and stripping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    During the Proton Driver design study based on an 8 GeV superconducting RF H{sup -} linac, a major concern is the feasibility of transport and injection of high energy H{sup -} ions because the energy of H{sup -} beam would be an order of magnitude higher than the existing ones. This paper will focus on two key technical issues: (1) stripping losses during transport (including stripping by blackbody radiation, magnetic field and residual gases); (2) stripping efficiency of carbon foil during injection.

  6. THE DEVELOPMENT OF FCC STRIPPING TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGZhen-qian

    2003-01-01

    This article briefly describes the major patents domestic and the abroad,and the current situation and achievements of FCC stripping technology in China.The develping trend of FCC stripping technology is presented,including further developments of FCC stripper to improve unit performance,combination of the stripper and pre-stripper within disengager to from a complete high-efficiency FCC stripping system.In addition to high efficiency,simple structure and easiness of installation and maintenance for a new FCC stripper are all of consideration.

  7. Characteristics of Single Cathode Cascaded Bias Voltage Arc Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Wei; Deng, Baiquan; Zeng, Xianjun; Gou, Fujun; Xue, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weiwei; Cao, Xiaogang; Yang, Dangxiao; Cao, Zhi

    2016-06-01

    A single cathode with a cascaded bias voltage arc plasma source has been developed with a new quartz cathode chamber, instead of the previous copper chambers, to provide better diagnostic observation and access to the plasma optical emission. The cathode chamber cooling scheme is also modified to be naturally cooled only by light emission without cooling water to improve the optical thin performance in the optical path. A single-parameter physical model has been developed to describe the power dissipated in the cascaded bias voltage arc discharge argon plasmas, which have been investigated by utilizing optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and Langmuir probe. In the experiments, discharge currents from 50 A to 100 A, argon flow rates from 800 sccm to 2000 sccm and magnetic fields of 0.1 T and 0.2 T were chosen. The results show: (a) the relationship between the averaged resistivity and the averaged current density exhibits an empirical scaling law as \\barη \\propto \\bar {j}-0.63369 and the power dissipated in the arc has a strong relation with the filling factor; (b) through the quartz, the argon ions optical emission lines have been easily observed and are dominating with wavelengths between 340 nm and 520 nm, which are the emissions of Ar+-434.81 nm and Ar+-442.60 nm line, and the intensities are increasing with the arc current and decreasing with the inlet argon flow rate; and (c) the electron density and temperature can reach 2.0 × 1019 m-3 and 0.48 eV, respectively, under the conditions of an arc current of 90 A and a magnetic field of 0.2 T. The half-width of the ne radial profile is approximatively equal to a few Larmor radii of electrons and can be regarded as the diameter of the plasma jet in the experiments. supported by the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Program Special of Ministry of Science and Technology (No. 2013GB114003), and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275135, 11475122)

  8. Development of Fission Chamber Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGJinwei; ZHANGWei; SONGXianying; LIXu

    2003-01-01

    The fission chambers which are gas counters with fissile material inside chamber,provide essential information for plasma opcharacteristics. In conjunction with the neutron flux monitor system these provide time-resolved measurements of the global neutron source strength and fusion power from thermal nuclear fusion reactor as ITER for all plasma conditions for which neutrons are produced.

  9. The Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The 3.70 metre Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC), dismantled on 9 August 1984. During operation it was one of the biggest detectors in the world, producing direct visual recordings of particle tracks. 6.3 million photos of interactions were taken with the chamber in the course of its existence.

  10. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This

  11. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  12. The CLEO III drift chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, D; Briere, R A; Chen, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S; Dickson, M; Dombrowski, S V; Ecklund, K M; Lyon, A; Marka, S; Meyer, T O; Patterson, J R; Sadoff, A; Thies, P; Thorndike, E H; Urner, D

    2002-01-01

    The CLEO group at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring has constructed and commissioned a new central drift chamber. With 9796 cells arranged in 47 layers ranging in radius from 13.2 to 79 cm, the new drift chamber has a smaller outer radius and fewer wires than the drift chamber it replaces, but allows the CLEO tracking system to have improved momentum resolution. Reduced scattering material in the chamber gas and in the inner skin separating the drift chamber from the silicon vertex detector provides a reduction of the multiple scattering component of the momentum resolution and an extension of the usable measurement length into the silicon. Momentum resolution is further improved through quality control in wire positioning and symmetry of the electric fields in the drift cells which have provided a reduction in the spatial resolution to 88 mu m (averaged over the full drift range).

  13. Simulation of ionization-front-forming process at injection of relativistic electron beam with a gas chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolya, S.N.; Zhidkov, E.P.; Rubin, S.B.; Semerdzhiev, Kh.I.

    1982-01-01

    The methodical work on creation of computer program for numerical study of the processes of forming and motion of a virtual cathode at the injection of relativistic electron beam into a short cylindrical chamber, filled with gas, has been carried out. The obtained plots of the distributions of fields, potential and density appearing out of ion and electron gas of the beam itself are presented. The dependence of cross-section ionization on the electron velocity has been taken into account at the calculation; the resonance contribution into summarized cross-section of ionization was simulated. It is shown that the injection into the chamber without gas, some oscillations of the virtual cathode are observed. At the presence of the final front of the beam, the fields level at the initial stage is smaller than for the beam with a sharp front. However, in some time the field amplitudes are compared. The motion of simulated probe ions in the chamber is analyzed.

  14. Inapproximability of maximal strip recovery

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Minghui

    2009-01-01

    In comparative genomic, the first step of sequence analysis is usually to decompose two or more genomes into syntenic blocks that are segments of homologous chromosomes. For the reliable recovery of syntenic blocks, noise and ambiguities in the genomic maps need to be removed first. Maximal Strip Recovery (MSR) is an optimization problem proposed by Zheng, Zhu, and Sankoff for reliably recovering syntenic blocks from genomic maps in the midst of noise and ambiguities. Given $d$ genomic maps as sequences of gene markers, the objective of \\msr{d} is to find $d$ subsequences, one subsequence of each genomic map, such that the total length of syntenic blocks in these subsequences is maximized. For any constant $d \\ge 2$, a polynomial-time 2d-approximation for \\msr{d} was previously known. In this paper, we show that for any $d \\ge 2$, \\msr{d} is APX-hard, even for the most basic version of the problem in which all gene markers are distinct and appear in positive orientation in each genomic map. Moreover, we provi...

  15. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in gallium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palrecha, M M; Mathur, P K

    1997-12-19

    The electroanalytical chemistry of trace metals has progressed strongly with the development of cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) preceded by adsorption collection of organic metal complexes. A sensitive method for the determination of trace amount of chromium in gallium is described. Gallium is dissolved in sodium hydroxide containing hydrogen peroxide. The method is based on the catalytic activity of nitrate ions on the reduction of Cr(III)TTHA (triethylene tetramine-N,N,N',N'',N''',N'''-hexaacetic acid) complex. The sensitivity of this method is further improved by adsorption preconcentration of Cr(III)TTHA complex at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). The Cr(III) formed at the electrode surface by the reduction of Cr(VI), which is present in the bulk solution, is immediately complexed by TTHA. The adsorbed complex is then reduced at a peak potential of - 1.26 V, and the peak height of Cr(III) reduction is measured. The determination limit was restricted by the amount of chromium present in the reagent blank solution. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium at level as low as 0.2 mug g(-1) (with about 50 mg of sample) and a relative standard deviation of 15%.

  16. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of the antidepressant drug sulpiride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghaly, O A

    2000-10-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of the antidepressant drug sulpiride (SP) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is investigated. Linear sweep cathodic stripping voltammetry (LSCSV) was used to determine sulpiride in the presence of 0.01 M sodium acetate medium pH 10.5 and 25 +/- 1 degrees C. Different parameters such as, supporting electrolyte, pH, accumulation potential, scan rate, accumulation time and ionic strength, were tested to optimize the conditions for the determination of SP. The adsorbed form is reduced irreversibly. The linear concentration range is from 2 x 10(-9) to 5 x 10(-8) M SP. Experimentally, 2 x 10(-9) M (0.68 ppb) with accumulation time 60 s can be determined successfully. Furthermore, a theoretical detection limit of 2 x 10(-10) M (0.068 ppb) Sp was calculated. The interferences of some metal ions, ascorbic acid and some amino acids were studied. The method was applied to the analysis of tablets and spiked urine, with recoveries of 104 +/- 3 and 101 + 3, and the relative standard deviation of 3.3 and 3.4%, respectively.

  17. Plaque accumulations caused by interdental stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radlanski, R J; Jäger, A; Schwestka, R; Bertzbach, F

    1988-11-01

    Human enamel surfaces were stripped with orthodontic grinding and finishing materials, and evaluated with the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Even under in vitro conditions with the finest finishing strips, it was not possible to produce an enamel surface free of the furrows that result from the initial abrasion caused by the coarse strip. Enamel surfaces stripped gradually from coarse to superfine were left in the mouths of patients for 12 weeks and evaluated with the SEM. The edges of the furrows were found to be smoother but the furrows remained wide and deep enough to facilitate more plaque accumulations than those on untreated surfaces. The use of dental floss did not result in prevention of plaque accumulations along the bottom of the furrows.

  18. A pulsed cathodic arc spacecraft propulsion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, P R C; Bilek, M M M; Tarrant, R N; McKenzie, D R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the use of a centre-triggered cathodic arc as a spacecraft propulsion system that uses an inert solid as a source of plasma. The cathodic vacuum arc produces almost fully ionized plasma with a high exhaust velocity (>10{sup 4} m s{sup -1}), giving a specific impulse competitive with other plasma or ion thrusters. A centre trigger design is employed that enables efficient use of cathode material and a high pulse-to-pulse repeatability. We compare three anode geometries, two pulse current profiles and two pulse durations for their effects on impulse generation, energy and cathode material usage efficiency. Impulse measurement is achieved through the use of a free-swinging pendulum target constructed from a polymer material. Measurements show that impulse is accurately controlled by varying cathode current. The cylindrical anode gave the highest energy efficiency. Cathode usage is optimized by choosing a sawtooth current profile. There is no requirement for an exhaust charge neutralization system.

  19. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  20. Strip Casting of High Performance Structural Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S S Park; J G Lee; Nack J Kim

    2004-01-01

    There exists a great need for the development of high performance alloys due to increasing demands for energy conservation and environmental protection. Application of strip casting shows a strong potential for the improvement of properties of existing alloys and also for the development of novel alloy systems with superior properties. The present paper reviews our Center's activities in the development of high performance alloys by strip casting. Examples include (1) Al alloys, (2) wrought Mg alloys, and (3) bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys.

  1. Studies on fast timing and high precision tracking performance of Resistive Plate Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Han, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC), produced in large scales, are widely used as trigger detectors with O(ns) time resolution in high energy and high intensity experiments. To confront the future high experimental frontiers, such as the super-LHC, RPCs equipped with fine-pitch readout strips were tested with 180GeV/c muon at CERN SPS H8 beam line, to assess the viability of using RPCs for both fast timing and high precision tracking trigger.

  2. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...dominate the metal’s cathodic behavior. Within an alkaline environment, we expect the following reduction reactions to be catalyzed on the oxide

  3. Speed Control and Coiling Temperature Control of Strip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Xiao-hui; ZHANG Dian-hua; WANG Guo-dong; LIU Xiang-hua; FAN Lei

    2004-01-01

    Considering the strip speed during controlled laminar cooling on Baosteel 1580 hot strip mill in China, the influence of strip speed fluctuation on coiling temperature control for the tail and "neck" of the strip was analyzed. The optimization strategies were put forward and proved effective in operation.

  4. Excess Production Capacity Squeezes Profits of Brass Strip Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Between 2003 and 2006,under the backdrop of rapid growth of domestic demand for brass strip and soaring copper price,brass strip manufacturers made a fortune.And brass strip manufacturers mushroomed in Zhejiang,Anhui and Jiangsu.Large brass strip manufacturers

  5. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the ATLAS Upgrade of the Muon Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneau, Fabien; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about 150 m2 of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each module extends over a surface from 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15% transverse momentum resolution for 1 TeV muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as 30 μm along the precision coordinate and 80 μm perpendicular to the chamber. All readout planes are segmented into strips with a pitch of 400 μm for a total of 4096 strips. In two of the four planes the strips are inclined by 1.5 ◦ and provide a measurement of the...

  6. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  7. Impact of Fast Shaping at the Front-end on Signals from Micro Strip Gas Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Sciacca, G F

    1997-01-01

    The ballistic deficit due to fast shaping time constants at the front-end amplifier is evaluated using Monte Carlo generated events simulating isolated hits in MSGCs of CMS performance. The effect of the track incidence angle is also investigated up to 45 degrees.

  8. Techniques developed for the ATLAS Thin Gap Chambers mass production in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half-chambers together, we sandwich them between a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel to keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Due to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 µm. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. So far we have tested 300 TGCs. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5mm-by-5mm. The average efficiency...

  9. Development of mass-production technique of the ATLAS thin gap chamber in Japan

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, S; Ishii, K; Iwasaki, H; Arataki, Y; Bando, T; Homma, Y; Ishino, M; Kondo, T; Kobayashi, T; Kurashige, H; Mikenberg, G; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, Y; Nanjo, H; Ikeno, M; Nozaki, M; Ochi, A; Sasaki, O; Shoa, M; Sugimoto, T; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Yokoyama, C

    2004-01-01

    The thin gap chambers (TGCs) are used for the muon trigger system in the end-cap regions of the ATLAS detector. As the anode-cathode distance is small, 1.4 mm, chamber flatness is essential to achieve a uniform gas gain over the chamber. The TGC mass production phase at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) started in January 2001. In order to perform a stable production with high quality we developed a chamber closing system. When we glue two half- chambers together, we sandwich them with a granite table and an aluminum honeycomb panel that keep the chamber flat from both sides. By using silk screens, we also control the quantity of epoxy adhesive that affects the chamber thickness. Owing to these developments, we can achieve the flatness of less than 100 mu m. Uniformity of detection efficiency of the TGC is measured with a cosmic-ray test bench at Kobe University. We have tested 300 TGCs so far. Position dependence of the efficiency is measured with a granularity of 5 mm- by-5 mm. The average...

  10. Free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, designed for medium energy X-ray dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, S. M.; Tavakoli-Anbaran, H.; Zeinali, H. Z.

    2017-01-01

    The primary standard for X-ray photons is based on parallel-plate free-air ionization chamber (FAC). Therefore, the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) is tried to design and build the free-air ionization chamber, FAC-IR-300, for low and medium energy X-ray dosimetry. The main aim of the present work is to investigate specification of the FAC-IR-300 ionization chamber and design it. FAC-IR-300 dosimeter is composed of two parallel plates, a high voltage (HV) plate and a collector plate, along with a guard electrode that surrounds the collector plate. The guard plate and the collector were separated by an air gap. For obtaining uniformity in the electric field distribution, a group of guard strips was used around the ionization chamber. These characterizations involve determining the exact dimensions of the ionization chamber by using Monte Carlo simulation and introducing correction factors.

  11. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Roland D; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-03-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH(4)PO(4)·6H(2)O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite-precipitation cell (MESC). The MESC cathodes were either stainless steel 304 mesh or flat plates. Phosphate removal ranged from 20% to 40%, with higher removals obtained using mesh cathodes than with flat plates. Cathode accumulated crystals were verified as struvite using a scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Crystal accumulation did not affect the rate of hydrogen production in struvite reactors. The rate of struvite crystallization (g/m(2)-h) and hydrogen production (m(3)/m(3)-d) were shown to be dependent on applied voltage and cathode material. Overall energy efficiencies (substrate and electricity) were high (73 ± 4%) and not dependent on applied voltage. These results show that MESCs may be useful both as a method for hydrogen gas and struvite production.

  12. Phosphate recovery as struvite within a single chamber microbial electrolysis cell

    KAUST Repository

    Cusick, Roland D.

    2012-03-01

    An energy efficient method of concurrent hydrogen gas and struvite (MgNH 4PO 4·6H 2O) production was investigated based on bioelectrochemically driven struvite crystallization at the cathode of a single chamber microbial electrolysis struvite-precipitation cell (MESC). The MESC cathodes were either stainless steel 304 mesh or flat plates. Phosphate removal ranged from 20% to 40%, with higher removals obtained using mesh cathodes than with flat plates. Cathode accumulated crystals were verified as struvite using a scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS). Crystal accumulation did not affect the rate of hydrogen production in struvite reactors. The rate of struvite crystallization (g/m 2-h) and hydrogen production (m 3/m 3-d) were shown to be dependent on applied voltage and cathode material. Overall energy efficiencies (substrate and electricity) were high (73±4%) and not dependent on applied voltage. These results show that MESCs may be useful both as a method for hydrogen gas and struvite production. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Novel photoresist stripping technology using steam-water mixture*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lei; Hui Yu; Gao Chaoqun; Jing Yupeng

    2011-01-01

    A novel wet vapor photoresist stripping technology is developed as an alternative to dry plasma ashing and wet stripping. Experiments using this technology to strip hard baked SU-8 photoresist, aurum and chromium film are carried out. Then the images of stripping results are shown and the mechanism is analyzed and discussed.The most striking result of this experiment is that the spraying mixture of steam and water droplets can strip photoresist and even metal film with ease.

  14. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  15. Cyclically controlled welding purge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An arrangement for butt-welding cylindrical sections of large, thin-wall tanks includes a rotatable mandrel with side-by-side sets of radial position adjusters. Each set of adjusters bears on one of the tank sections adjacent the seam, to prevent the sections from sagging out-of-round. The mandrel rotates relative to the welder, so that a continuous seam is formed. A purge chamber is fixed in position behind the seam at the weld head, and is flushed with inert gas. The purge chamber includes a two-sided structure which is contiguous with the cylindrical sections and a circumferential vane to form an open-ended tube-like structure, through which the radial position adjusters pass as the mandrel and cylindrical workpiece sections rotate. The tube-like structure is formed into a chamber by a plurality of movable gates which are controlled to maintain a seal while allowing adjusters to progress through the purge chamber.

  16. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeballos, E. Cerron [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Crotty, I. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Valverde, J. Lamas [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Univ. Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France); Neupane, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); World Lab., Lausanne (Switzerland); Williams, M. C. S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Zichichi, A. [Univ. of Bologna, Bologna (Italy)

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  17. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosati, M.; Barish, K.; Botelho, S.; Chang, W.C.; Gogoi, A.L. de; Dietzsch, O.; Ferdousi, T.; Franz, A.; Fung, S.Y.; Gannon, J.; Harder, J.; Kandasamy, A.; Khomutnikov, A.; Kotchekov, D.; Lebedev, A.; Li, X.H.; Mahon, J.; Munirassimann, M.; Negrin, J.; O' Brien, E.; O' Connor, P.; Pisani, R.; Rankowitz, S.; Seto, R.; Takagui, E.M.; Wang, H.Q

    1999-12-27

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  18. The PHENIX Time Expansion Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Rosati, M; Botelho, S; Chang, W C; Gogoi, A L D; Dietzsch, O; Ferdousi, T; Franz, A; Fung, S Y; Gannon, J; Harder, J; Kandasamy, A; Khomutnikov, A; Kotchekov, D; Lebedev, A; Li, X H; Mahon, J; Munirassimann, M; Negrin, J; O'Brien, E; O'Connor, P; Pisani, R; Rankowitz, S; Seto, R; Takagui, E M; Wang, H Q

    1999-01-01

    The TEC/TRD subsystem will track all charged particles and contribute to the particle identification by the measurement of energy loss. The design, construction and testing of the TEC chambers are described.

  19. Vaporization chambers and associated methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.; McKellar, Michael G.; Shunn, Lee P.

    2017-02-21

    A vaporization chamber may include at least one conduit and a shell. The at least one conduit may have an inlet at a first end, an outlet at a second end and a flow path therebetween. The shell may surround a portion of each conduit and define a chamber surrounding the portion of each conduit. Additionally, a plurality of discrete apertures may be positioned at longitudinal intervals in a wall of each conduit, each discrete aperture of the plurality of discrete apertures sized and configured to direct a jet of fluid into each conduit from the chamber. A liquid may be vaporized by directing a first fluid comprising a liquid into the inlet at the first end of each conduit, directing jets of a second fluid into each conduit from the chamber through discrete apertures in a wall of each conduit and transferring heat from the second fluid to the first fluid.

  20. Vacuum chambers for LHC LSS

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Pinto, P

    2004-01-01

    The approximately 6 km total length of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) warm sections consist of about 1000 chambers. Most of these chambers, of various length and cross sections, are made of copper, but different lengths in stainless steel, mumetal, aluminium and beryllium will also be used. All the chambers will be internally coated with a thin film of TiZrV, to reduce both the secondary electron yield and the photon and electron stimulated desorption, with the further advantage of providing a huge additional pumping speed. In order to cope with the tight production schedule, a new dedicated coating facility was created, which allows four chambers to be coated per working day. This coating facility and its operating mode are described, together with the TiZrV film characteristics (structure, morphology) and performance (pumping speed, ultimate pressure, discharge gas outgassing).

  1. Full cell simulation and the evaluation of the buffer system on air-cathode microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Shiqi; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a computational model of a single chamber, air-cathode MFC. The model considers losses due to mass transport, as well as biological and electrochemical reactions, in both the anode and cathode half-cells. Computational fluid dynamics and Monod-Nernst analysis are incorporated into the reactions for the anode biofilm and cathode Pt catalyst and biofilm. The integrated model provides a macro-perspective of the interrelation between the anode and cathode during power production, while incorporating microscale contributions of mass transport within the anode and cathode layers. Model considerations include the effects of pH (H+/OH- transport) and electric field-driven migration on concentration overpotential, effects of various buffers and various amounts of buffer on the pH in the whole reactor, and overall impacts on the power output of the MFC. The simulation results fit the experimental polarization and power density curves well. Further, this model provides insight regarding mass transport at varying current density regimes and quantitative delineation of overpotentials at the anode and cathode. Overall, this comprehensive simulation is designed to accurately predict MFC performance based on fundamental fluid and kinetic relations and guide optimization of the MFC system.

  2. Measurement of Characteristic Impedance of Silicon Fiber Sheet based readout strips panel for RPC detector in INO

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, M K; Marimuthu, N; Singh, V; Subrahmanyam, V S

    2016-01-01

    The India based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is a mega science project of India, which is going to use near about 30, 000 Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) as active detector elements for the study of atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Each RPC detector will consist of two orthogonally placed readout strips panel for picking the signals generated in the gas chamber. The area of RPC detector in INO-ICAL (Iron Calorimeter) experiment will be 2m x 2m, therefore the dimension of readout strips panel will also be of 2m x 2m. To get undistorted signals pass through the readout strips panel to frontend electronics, their Characteristic Impedance should be matched with each other. For the matching of Characteristic Impedance we have used the principle of termination. In the present paper we will describe the need and search of new dielectric material for the fabrication of flame resistant, waterproof and flexible readout pickup strips panel. We will also describe the measurement of Characteristic Impedance of plastic hone...

  3. BEBC Big European Bubble Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    A view of the dismantling of the magnet of BEBC, the 3.7 m European Bubble Chamber : iron magnetic shielding ; lower and upper parts of the vacuum enclosure of the magnet; turbo-molecular vacuum pumps for the "fish-eye" windows; the two superconducting coils; a handling platform; the two cryostats suspended from the bar of the travelling crane which has a 170 ton carrying capacity. The chamber proper, not dismantled, is inside the shielding.

  4. Depletive stripping chronopotentiometry : a major step forward in electrochemical stripping techniques for metal ion speciation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the utility of the various modes of stripping chronopotentiometry (SCP) for trace metal speciation analysis is presented in the broad context of stripping voltammetric techniques. The remarkable fundamental advantages of depletive SCP at scanned deposition potential (SSCP

  5. Anterior chamber depth during hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracitelli CPB

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Carolina Pelegrini Barbosa Gracitelli,1 Francisco Rosa Stefanini,1 Fernando Penha,1 Miguel Ângelo Góes,2 Sérgio Antonio Draibe,2 Maria Eugênia Canziani,2 Augusto Paranhos Junior1 1Ophthalmology Department, 2Division of Nephrology, Federal University of São Paulo – UNIFESP, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Exacerbation of chronic glaucoma or acute glaucoma is occasionally observed in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD because of anterior chamber depth changes during this therapy. Purpose: To evaluate anterior chamber depth and axial length in patients during HD sessions. Methods: A total of 67 eyes of 35 patients were prospectively enrolled. Axial length and anterior chamber depth were measured using ultrasonic biometry, and these measures were evaluated at three different times during HD sessions. Body weight and blood pressure pre- and post-HD were also measured. Results: There was no difference in the axial length between the three measurements (P = 0.241. We observed a significantly decreased anterior chamber depth (P = 0.002 during HD sessions. Conclusion: Our results support the idea that there is a change in anterior chamber depth in HD sessions. Keywords: anterior chamber, hemodialysis, axial length, acute angle-closure glaucoma

  6. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsubaşi, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation.

  7. Action of progesterone on contractile activity of isolated gastric strips in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Wang; Tian-Zhen Zheng; Wei Li; Song-Yi Qu; Di-Ying He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of progesterone on contractile activity of isolated gastric strips in rats.METHODS: Wistar rats were sacrificed to remove whole stomach. Then, the stomach was opened and the mucosal layer was removed. Parellel to either the circular or the longitudial fibers, muscle strips were cut from fundus, body,antrum and pylorus. Each muscle strip was suspended in a tissue chamber containing 5 mL Krebs solution. Then the motility of gastric strips in tissue chambers was simultaneously recorded. The preparations were subjected to 1 g load tension and washed with 5 ml Krebs solution every 20 min. After 1 h equilibration, progesterone or antagonists were added in the tissue chamber separately. The antagonists were added 3 min before using progesterone (50 μmol. L-1).RESULTS: Progesterone decreased the resting tension of fundus and body longitudinal muscle (LM) (P<0.05). It inhibited the mean contractile amplitude of body and antrum LM and circular muscle (CM), and the motility index of pyloric CM (P<0.05). The inhibition of progesterone on the mean contractile amplitude could be partially blocked by phentolamine in LM of the stomach body (the mean contractile amplitude of body LM decreased from -7.5±5.5to -5.2±4.5 P<0.01), and by phentolamine or indomethacin in CM of body (The inhibition of progesterone on the mean contractile amplitude of body CM decreased from -5.6±3.0to -3.6±2.7 by phentolamine and from -5.6±3.0 to -3.5±2.5by indomethacin, P<0.01). Hexamethonium, propranolol and L-NNA (inhibitor of NO synthetase) didn′t affect the action of progesterone (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: The study suggested that progesterone can inhibit the contractile activity of isolated gastric strips in rats and the mechanism seems to be a direct one except that the action on gastric body is mediated through prostaglandin and adrenergic α receptor partly.

  8. Anodic stripping voltammetry of silver nanoparticles: aggregation leads to incomplete stripping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloake, Samantha J; Toh, Her Shuang; Lee, Patricia T; Salter, Chris; Johnston, Colin; Compton, Richard G

    2015-02-01

    The influence of nanoparticle aggregation on anodic stripping voltammetry is reported. Dopamine-capped silver nanoparticles were chosen as a model system, and melamine was used to induce aggregation in the nanoparticles. Through the anodic stripping of the silver nanoparticles that were aggregated to different extents, it was found that the peak area of the oxidative signal corresponding to the stripping of silver to silver(I) ions decreases with increasing aggregation. Aggregation causes incomplete stripping of the silver nanoparticles. Two possible mechanisms of 'partial oxidation' and 'inactivation' of the nanoparticles are proposed to account for this finding. Aggregation effects must be considered when anodic stripping voltammetry is used for nanoparticle detection and quantification. Hence, drop casting, which is known to lead to aggregation, is not encouraged for preparing electrodes for analytical purposes.

  9. Effect of Load Distribution on Strip Crown in Hot Strip Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongshuang DI; Jianzhong XU; Dianyao GONG; Xianghua LIU; Guodong WANG; Xiaoming HE; Liying BA

    2004-01-01

    In order to establish precision model, a software to calculate the strip crown of four-high hot rolling mill was developed by using affecting function method according to the strip crown calculation theory. The effect of work roll diameter, unit width rolling load, roll bending force, work roll crown, initial strip crown and reduction, etc, on load distribution effect rate was simulated by using the software. The results show that the load distribution effect rate increases with the increase of strip width, work roll diameter, unit width rolling load, roll bending force, work roll crown, initial strip crown and reduction. Based on the simulation results, base value of load distribution effect rate and fitting coefficients of six power polynomial of load distribution effect rate modification coefficient were determined considering all of the above parameters. A simplified mathematical model for calculating load distribution effect rate was established.

  10. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  11. Development of floating strip micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan

    2014-04-28

    Micromegas are high-rate capable, high-resolution micro-pattern gaseous detectors. Square meter sized resistive strip Micromegas are foreseen as replacement of the currently used precision tracking detectors in the Small Wheel, which is part of the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The replacement is necessary to ensure tracking and triggering performance of the muon spectrometer after the luminosity increase of the Large Hadron Collider beyond its design value of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} around 2020. In this thesis a novel discharge tolerant floating strip Micromegas detector is presented and described. By individually powering copper anode strips, the effects of a discharge are confined to a small region of the detector. This reduces the impact of discharges on the efficiency by three orders of magnitude, compared to a standard Micromegas. The physics of the detector is studied and discussed in detail. Several detectors are developed: A 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas with exchangeable SMD capacitors and resistors allows for an optimization of the floating strip principle. The discharge behavior is investigated on this device in depth. The microscopic structure of discharges is quantitatively explained by a detailed detector simulation. A 48 x 50 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas is studied in high energy pion beams. Its homogeneity with respect to pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution is investigated. The good performance in high-rate background environments is demonstrated in cosmic muon tracking measurements with a 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas under lateral irradiation with 550 kHz 20 MeV proton beams. A floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is developed for ion tracking without limitations from multiple scattering in imaging applications during medical ion therapy. Highly efficient tracking of 20 MeV protons at particle rates of 550 kHz is possible. The reconstruction of the

  12. Determination of trace amounts of Ga(III) by adsorptive stripping voltammetry with in situ plated bismuth film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarczyk, Malgorzata; Wasąg, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    The determination of trace gallium using adsorptive stripping voltammetry at an in situ plated bismuth film electrode was described. The method was based on simultaneous film formation and the Ga(III)-cupferron complex preconcentration at -0.65 V and its cathodic stripping during the potential scan. The effect of Bi(III) and cupferron concentration, the influence of deposition potential and time, and the scan rate on the determination of Ga(III) were studied. A linear response in the concentration range of 3×10(-10) to 3×10(-7) mol L(-1) (r=0.998) was obtained with detection limit of 1.05×10(-10) mol L(-1) using accumulation time of 180 s. Finally, the bismuth film electrode was successfully applied for the determination of Ga(III) in certified reference material seawater NASS-5 with satisfactory results.

  13. Preparation of TiOx Films by Cathode Multi Arc Ion and Its Performance%TiO薄膜的多弧离子制备及表征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范多进; 范多旺; 王成龙; 刘红忠

    2007-01-01

    @@ Experimental Procedure Fig. 1 shows the custom-made Cathode Multi Arc Ion equipment, which is made up of three pars:CCS(computer contral system, Fig. 1's left part), Vacuum Chamber (Fig. 1's middle part) and Air Pump parts(Fig. 1's right part).

  14. Area specific stripping factors for AGS. A method for extracting stripping factors from survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U. [Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)

    2006-04-15

    In order to use Airborne Gamma-ray Spectrometry (AGS) for contamination mapping, for source search etc. one must to be able to eliminate the contribution to the spectra from natural radioactivity. This in general is done by a stripping technique. The parameters for performing a stripping have until recently been measured by recording gamma spectra at special calibration sites (pads). This may be cumbersome and the parameters may not be correct when used at low gamma energies for environmental spectra. During 2000-2001 DTU tested with success a new technique for Carborne Gamma-ray Spectrometry (CGS) where the spectra from the surveyed area (or from a similar area) were used for calculating the stripping parameters. It was possible to calculate usable stripping ratios for a number of low energy windows - and weak source signals not detectable by other means were discovered with the ASS technique. In this report it is shown that the ASS technique also works for AGS data, and it has been used for recent Danish AGS tests with point sources. (Check of calibration of AGS parameters.) By using the ASS technique with the Boden data (Barents Rescue) an exercise source was detected that has not been detected by any of the teams during the exercise. The ASS technique therefore seems to be better for search for radiation anomalies than any other method known presently. The experiences also tell that although the stripping can be performed correctly at any altitude there is a variation of the stripping parameters with altitude that has not yet been quite understood. However, even with the oddly variations the stripping worked as expected. It was also observed that one might calculate a single common set of usable stripping factors for all altitudes from the entire data set i.e. some average a, b and c values. When those stripping factors were used the stripping technique still worked well. (au)

  15. Beam stripping extraction from the VINCY cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Đurović Jasna L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction system of a cyclotron guides an ion beam from a spiral acceleration orbit, through an extraction trajectory, into a high energy transport line. The two methods commonly used to direct an ion into the extraction path are deflection, by the electric field of an electrostatic deflector, and ion stripping, by a thin carbon foil. Compared to the electrostatic deflector system, the stripping extraction provides a fast and easy change of the extracted ion energy and is easier to manufacture operate, and maintain. However, the extraction trajectory and dynamics of an ion beam after stripping are highly dependant on the ion energy and specific charge. Thus, when a multipurpose machine such as the VINCY Cyclotron is concerned, it is far from easy to deliver a variety of ion beams into the same high energy transport line and at the same time preserve a reasonable compactness of the extraction system. The front side stripping extraction system of the VINCY Cyclotron provides high (~70 MeV and mid (~30 MeV energy protons, as well as a number of heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The back side stripping extraction system extracts low energy protons (~18 MeV and enables their simultaneous use with high energy protons at the front side of the machine.

  16. Modeling of continuous strip production by rheocasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, T.; Flemings, M. C.

    1981-03-01

    A process was experimentally and mathematically modeled for continuous and direct production of metal strip from its molten state by the use of Rheocasting. The process comprises 1) continuous production of a Rheocast semisolid alloy, and 2) direct shaping of the semisolid into strip. Sn-15 pct Pb was used as the modeling alloy. Crack formation and surface quality of the strip produced depend on fraction solid and deformation force. Continuous, sound strip could be obtained with good surface quality when fraction solid was between 0.50 and 0.70 and deformation force did not exceed a given maximum. Sheet thickness depends on deformation force, fraction solid, rotor rate of Rheocaster and production line speed. At constant deformation force, sheet thickness increases as fraction solid increases, rotor rate decreases and line speed is reduced. Sheet thickness is larger in the center than in the edge, but the difference is reduced by applying edgers. Some segregation of lead toward the edges is observed, and the segregation increases as amount of deformation is increased. A mathematical model for heat flow, solidification and deformation was constructed. The model predicts the point of completion of solidification in the strip and sheet thickness as a function of deformation force and line speed. Calculations are in good agreement with experimental results.

  17. Modeling of continuous strip production by rheocasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumiya, T.; Flemings, M.C.

    1981-03-01

    A process was experimentally and mathematically modeled for continuous and direct production of metal strip from its molten state by the use of Rheocasting. The process comprises 1) continuous production of a Rheocast semisolid alloy, and 2) direct shaping of the semisolid into strip. Sn-15 pct Pb was used as the modeling alloy. Crack formation and surface quality of the strip produced depend on fraction solid and deformation force. Continuous, sound strip could be obtained with good surface quality when fraction solid was between 0.50 and 0.70 and deformation force did not exceed a given maximum. Sheet thickness depends on deformation force, fraction solid, rotor rate of Rheocaster and production line speed. At constant deformation force, sheet thickness increases as fraction solid increases, rotor rate decreases and line speed is reduced. Sheet thickness is larger in the center than in the edge, but the difference is reduced by applying edgers. Some segregation of lead toward the edges is observed, ad the segregation increases as amount of deformation is increased. A mathematical model for heat flow, solidification and deformation was constructed. The model predicts the point of completion of solidification in the strip and sheet thickness as a function of deformation force and line speed. Calculations are in good agreement with experimental results.

  18. Effect of rhubarb on contractile response of gallbladder smooth muscle strips isolated from guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Li Luo; Jun-Wei Zeng; Mei Yu; Yu-Ling Wei; Song-Yi Qu; Wei Li; Tian Zhen Zheng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of rhubarb on contractile response of isolated gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pigs and its mechanism.METHODS: Guinea pigs were killed to remove the whole gallbladder. Two or three smooth muscle strips (8 mm×3mm) were cut along the longitudinal direction. The mucosa on each strip was carefully removed. Each longitudinal muscle strip was suspended in a tissue chamber containing 5 mL Krebs solution (37 ℃), bubbled continuously with 950 mL/L O2 and 50 mL/L CO2. The resting tension (g), mean contractile amplitude (mm),and contractile frequency (waves/min) were simultaneously recorded on recorders. After 2-h equilibration, rhubarb (10, 20, 70, 200, 700, 1 000 g/L) was added cumulatively to the tissue chamber in turns every 2 min to observe their effects on gallbladder.Antagonists were given 3 min before administration of rhubarb to investigate the possible mechanism.RESULTS: Rhubarb increased the resting tension (from 0 to 0.40±0.02, P<0.001), and decreased the mean contractile amplitude (from 5.22±0.71 to 2.73±0.41,P<0.001). It also increased the contractile frequency of the gallbladder muscle strips in guinea pigs (from 4.09±0.46to 6.08±0.35, P<0.001). The stimulation of rhubarb on the resting tension decreased from 3.98±0.22 to 1.58±0.12by atropine (P<0.001), from3.98±0.22 to 2.09±0.19 by verapamil (P<0.001) and from 3.98±0.22 to 2.67±0.43by phentolamine (P<0.005). But the effect was not inhibited by hexamethonium (P>0.05). In addition, the action of mean amplitude and frequency was not inhibited by the above antagonists.CONCLUSION: Rhubarb can stimulate the motility of isolated gallbladder muscle strips from guinea pigs. The stimulation of rhubarb might be relevant with M receptor,Ca2+ channel and α receptor partly.

  19. Effect of Initial Crown on Shape of Hot Rolled Strip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yu; GONG Dian-yao; JIANG Zheng-yi; XU Jian-zhong; ZHANG Dian-hua; LIU Xiang-hua

    2009-01-01

    Based on the influence coefficient method, the effect of entry strip crown on the shape of hot rolled strip was analyzed using the software of roll elastic deformation simulation. According to the practical condition of a domestic hot roiled strip plant, the unit strip crown change from the first stand to the last stand was calculated when the entry crown of hot strip varies. The calculated result shows that the entry strip crown does not significantly affect the target strip crown at the exit of the last finishing stand in respect to a fixed strip shape control reference (such as bending force). The calculation was analyzed, and the research is helpful in modeling strip shape setup and shape control.

  20. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontsinis S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS collaboration has chosen the Micromegas technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of Micromegas and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers per wheel. The New Small Wheel project requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of 15 kHz/cm2 featuring single plane spatial resolution better than 100 μm. The Micromegas detectors will cover a total active area of ~ 1200 m2 and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field (≤ 0.3 T. Moreover, together with their precise tracking capability the New Small Wheel Micromegas chambers will contribute to the ATLAS Level-1 trigger system. Several studies have been performed on small (10 × 10 cm2 and medium (1 × 0.5 m2 size prototypes using medium (1 − 5 GeV/c and high momentum (120 – 150 GeV/c hadron beams at CERN. A brief overview of the results obtained is presented.

  1. Performance Studies of Micromegas Chambers for the New Small Wheel Upgrade Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontsinis, S.; Ntekas, K.

    2016-11-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has chosen the Micromegas technology along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers for the upgrade of the inner muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel upgrade project. It will employ eight layers of Micromegas and eight layers of small-strip Thin Gap Chambers per wheel. The New Small Wheel project requires fully efficient Micromegas chambers, able to cope with the maximum expected rate of 15 kHz/cm2 featuring single plane spatial resolution better than 100 μm. The Micromegas detectors will cover a total active area of 1200 m2 and will be operated in a moderate magnetic field (≤ 0.3 T). Moreover, together with their precise tracking capability the New Small Wheel Micromegas chambers will contribute to the ATLAS Level-1 trigger system. Several studies have been performed on small (10 × 10 cm2) and medium (1 × 0.5 m2) size prototypes using medium (1 - 5 GeV/c) and high momentum (120 - 150 GeV/c) hadron beams at CERN. A brief overview of the results obtained is presented.

  2. Ram pressure stripping of tilted galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Jachym, P; Palous, J; Combes, F

    2009-01-01

    Ram pressure stripping of galaxies in clusters can yield gas deficient disks. Previous numerical simulations based on various approaches suggested that, except for near edge-on disk orientations, the amount of stripping depends very little on the inclination angle. Following our previous study of face-on stripping, we extend the set of parameters with the disk tilt angle and explore in detail the effects of the ram pressure on the interstellar content (ISM) of tilted galaxies that orbit in various environments of clusters, with compact or extended distributions of the intra-cluster medium (ICM). We further study how results of numerical simulations could be estimated analytically. A grid of numerical simulations with varying parameters is produced using the tree/SPH code GADGET with a modified method for calculating the ISM-ICM interaction. These SPH calculations extend the set of existing results obtained from different codes using various numerical techniques. The simulations confirm the general trend of le...

  3. Rapid diagnosis of meningitis using reagent strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmar Ramesh

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Identification of causative agent with estimation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF glucose, protein, cells is necessary for accurate diagnosis of meningitis. Unfortunately, even these facilities are not available in many areas. Reagent strips that measure glucose and protein in blood and urine can serve this task but have been used with varying results in the past. This study was carried out to evaluate the utility and efficacy of Combur 10 strips in the diagnosis of meningitis. DESIGN, SETTINGS AND METHODS: A prospective clinical single blinded study of 63 children suspected to have meningitis undergoing CSF analysis. Each CSF sample was divided in to two and was utilised for reagent strip analysis in addition to standard laboratory evaluation and a correlation analysis were made. Statistical Method used: Results were analysed using standard statistical tests. Accuracy of the reagent strips as a screening tool was established using Godyn′s test. RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity of the reagent strips for the diagnosis of meningitis was 97.14%, 96.42%. The sensitivity, specificity for tuberculous meningitis and bacterial meningitis were 100%, and 96.55%. That for the aseptic meningitis was 70% and 96.55%. Accuracy for the diagnosis of meningitis as a whole, bacterial meningitis, tuberculous meningitis, and aseptic meningitis were 96.78%, 98.2%, 98.27% and 83.0% respectively. CONCLUSION: Combur10 strips thus can be used for the rapid CSF analysis and screening with good accuracy. In situations where facilities of routine laboratory testing are not available this can be of an immense help.

  4. Electricity generation by two types of microbial fuel cells using nitrobenzene as the anodic or cathodic reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Luo, Yong; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Mingchen

    2010-06-01

    The effect of nitrobenzene (NB) on electricity generation and simultaneous biodegradation of NB were studied with two types of microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a ferricyanide-cathode MFC with NB as the anodic reactant and a NB-cathode MFC. Compared to controls without NB, the presence of NB in the anode of the first MFC decreased maximum voltage outputs, maximum power densities and Coulombic efficiencies. No electricity was generated from the first MFC using NB as the sole fuel; however, the second MFC using NB as the electron acceptor generated electricity successfully with a maximum voltage of 400mV. NB was degraded completely within 24h in both anode and cathode chambers. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profiles demonstrated that the presence of NB caused changes in relative abundance of the dominant bacterial species and emergence of new bacteria on the anodes.

  5. Commercial materials as cathode for hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangi, Sara; Ebrahimi, Sirous; Niasar, Mojtaba Shariati

    2014-10-01

    The use of commercial electrodes as cathodes in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell has been investigated. The cell was operated in sequencing batch mode and the performance of the electrodes was compared with carbon cloth containing 0.5 mg Pt cm(-2). Overall H2 recovery [Formula: see text] was 66.7 ± 1.4, 58.7 ± 1.1 and 55.5 ± 1.5 % for Pt/CC, Ni and Ti mesh electrodes, respectively. Columbic efficiencies of the three cathodes were in the same range (74.8 ± 1.5, 77.6 ± 1.7 and 75.7 ± 1.2 % for Pt/CC, Ni and Ti mesh electrodes, respectively). A similar performance for the three cathodes under near-neutral pH and ambient temperature was obtained. The commercial electrodes are much cheaper than carbon cloth containing Pt. Low cost and good performance of these electrodes suggest they are suitable cathode materials for large scale application.

  6. High-current-density gun with a LaB6 cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, K.; Hiramatsu, S.

    1996-08-01

    To develop a high-current electron gun for an induction linac, a prototype of a Pierce-type electron gun using planar 12-mm-diam lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) is studied as a thermionic emitter at high current densities. The cathode is heated up to temperatures of 1750 °C by electron bombardment and thermal radiation from a tungsten heater. The heater that has the highest temperature in the gun is thermally isolated from the outer vacuum chamber with heat shields. The bombardment voltage of ˜1 kV is typically applied to a gap between the cathode and the heater. The gun has been operated up to voltages of 55 kV, obtaining a maximum current density of 20 A/cm2 with a pulse width of 250 ns at a cathode temperature of 1600 °C. High-voltage pulsing results show that the gun, with applied voltages of over 40 kV, is operated in space-charge-limited region at temperatures of over 1600 °C; also it is operated in a temperature-limited region at temperatures of less than 1500 °C. An effective work function of 2.68 eV is obtained. The cathode, when heated up to 1600 °C, emits over 7 A of electrons with a ˜20% reduction after 850 h of continuous operation. These measurements were made between vacuum pressures of 10-6 and 10-7 Torr.

  7. The Use of an Electron Microchannel as a Self-Extracting and Focusing Plasma Cathode Electron Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, S.; Khachan, J.

    2016-02-01

    A new and simple type of electron gun is presented. Unlike conventional electron guns, which require a heated filament or extractor, accelerator and focusing electrodes, this gun uses the collimated electron microchannels of an inertial electrostatic confinement (IEC) discharge to achieve the same outcome. A cylindrical cathode is placed coaxially within a cylindrical anode to create the discharge. Collimated beams of electrons and fast neutrals emerge along the axis of the cylindrical cathode. This geometry isolates one of the microchannels that emerge in a negatively biased IEC grid. The internal operating pressure range of the gun is 35-190 mTorr. A small aperture separates the gun from the main vacuum chamber in order to achieve a pressure differential. The chamber was operated at pressures of 4-12 mTorr. The measured current produced by the gun was 0.1-3 mA (0.2-14 mA corrected measurement) for discharge currents of 1-45 mA and discharge voltages of 0.5-12 kV. The collimated electron beam emerges from the aperture into the vacuum chamber. The performance of the gun is unaffected by the pressure differential between the vacuum chamber and the gun. This allows the aperture to be removed and the chamber pressure to be equal to the gun pressure if required.

  8. Validation of the Hot Strip Mill Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Shulkosky; David Rosberg; Jerrud Chapman

    2005-03-30

    The Hot Strip Mill Model (HSMM) is an off-line, PC based software originally developed by the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) under the AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program. The HSMM was developed to predict the temperatures, deformations, microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip or plate rolled in a hot mill. INTEG process group inc. undertook the current task of enhancing and validating the technology. With the support of 5 North American steel producers, INTEG process group tested and validated the model using actual operating data from the steel plants and enhanced the model to improve prediction results.

  9. Potential profile in a conducting polymer strip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Vlachopoulos, Nikolaos

    2002-01-01

    and complicate measurements on free-standing films. A model of the potential profile in a free-standing strip is derived. It is found that the active length (the length with a given potential change) of the polymer will scale as square root (d sigma /i/sub d/). (d is the thickness, sigma the conductivity...... of the film, and i/sub d/ the diffusion limited current density for oxygen reduction). The active length is typically of the order of millimeters. The model is compared with measurements on a strip of polypyrrole doped with dodecylbenzene sulfonate...

  10. Multi-twist optical Mobius strips

    CERN Document Server

    Freund, Isaac

    2009-01-01

    Circularly polarized Gauss-Laguerre GL(0,0) and GL(0,1) laser beams that cross at their waists at a small angle are shown to generate a quasi-paraxial field that contains an axial line of circular polarization, a C line, surrounded by polarization ellipses whose major and minor axes generate multi-twist Mobius strips with twist numbers that increase with distance from the C point. These Mobius strips are interpreted in terms of Berry's phase for parallel transport of the ellipse axes around the C point.

  11. Lubrication in strip cold rolling process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianlin Sun; Yonglin Kang; Tianguo Xiao; Jianze Wang

    2004-01-01

    A lubrication model was developed for explaining how to form an oil film in the deformation zone, predicting the film thickness and determining the characteristics of lubrication in the strip rolling process, combined with the knowledge of hydrodythicknesses in the strip cold rolling. Results from the experiment and calculation show that the oil film forming in hydrodynamic lubrication is up to the bit angle and a higher rolling speed or a higher rolling oil viscosity. The mechanism of mechanical entrainment always affects the film thickness that increases with the rolling oil viscosity increasing or the reduction rate decreasing in rolling.

  12. Second generation "Flat-Fish" vacuum chamber for an ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    The picture shows the part of the "Flat-Fish" chamber covering one side of the beam intersection region. The other side is covered by an equal part and both are welded toghether at their small end. The two shells of each part were hydroformed from 0.15 mm thick inconel 718 sheet (with end parts in inconel 600 for easier manual welding to the arms) and welded toghether with two strips which were attached by means of stainless steel strings to the Split Field Magnet poles in order to take the atmospheric pressure forces. This was the thinnest vacuum chamber made for the ISR. Inconel material was chosen for its high elastic modulus and strenght at chamber bake-out temperature.

  13. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  14. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  15. Micro Pixel Chamber with resistive electrodes for spark reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ochi, Atsuhiko; Homma, Yasuhiro; Komai, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The Micro Pixel Chamber (mu-PIC) using resistive electrodes has been developed and tested. The surface cathodes are made from resistive material, by which the electrical field is reduced when large current is flowed. Two-dimensional readouts are achieved by anodes and pickup electrodes, on which signals are induced. High gas gain (> 60000) was measured using 55Fe (5.9 keV) source, and very intensive spark reduction was attained under fast neutron. The spark rate of resistive mu-PIC was only 10^-4 times less than that of conventional mu-PIC at the gain of 10^4. With these developments, a new MPGD with no floating structure is achieved, with enough properties of both high gain and good stability to detect MIP particles. In addition, mu-PIC can be operated with no HV applied on anodes by using resistive cathodes. Neither AC coupling capacitors nor HV pull up resisters are needed for any anode electrode. Signal readout is drastically simplified by that configuration.

  16. The CLAS drift chamber system

    CERN Document Server

    Mestayer, M D; Asavapibhop, B; Barbosa, F J; Bonneau, P; Christo, S B; Dodge, G E; Dooling, T; Duncan, W S; Dytman, S A; Feuerbach, R; Gilfoyle, G P; Gyurjyan, V; Hicks, K H; Hicks, R S; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jacobs, G; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Magahiz, R A; Major, R W; Martin, C; McGuckin, T; McNabb, J; Miskimen, R A; Müller, J A; Niczyporuk, B B; O'Meara, J E; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Robb, J; Roudot, F; Schumacher, R A; Tedeschi, D J; Thompson, R A; Tilles, D; Tuzel, W; Vansyoc, K; Vineyard, M F; Weinstein, L B; Wilkin, G R; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2000-01-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on the toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  17. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  18. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  19. High catalytic activity and pollutants resistivity using Fe-AAPyr cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell application

    OpenAIRE

    Carlo Santoro; Alexey Serov; Claudia W. Narvaez Villarrubia; Sarah Stariha; Sofia Babanova; Kateryna Artyushkova; Schuler, Andrew J.; Plamen Atanassov

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a new generation of innovative non-platinum group metal catalysts based on iron and aminoantipyrine as precursor (Fe-AAPyr) has been utilized in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) running on wastewater. Fe-AAPyr was used as an oxygen reduction catalyst in a passive gas-diffusion cathode and implemented in SCMFC design. This catalyst demonstrated better performance than platinum (Pt) during screening in “clean” conditions (PBS), and no degradation in ...

  20. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  1. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  2. Ionization chambers for LET determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Franz-Joachim; Bassler, Niels; Tölli, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    resolution and high sensitivity are necessary. For exact dosimetry which is done using ionization chambers (ICs), the recombination taking place in the IC has to be known. Up to now, recombination is corrected phenomenologically and more practical approaches are currently used. Nevertheless, Jaff´e's theory...... of columnar recombination was designed to model the detector efficiency of an ionization chamber. Here, we have shown that despite the approximations and simplification made, the theory is correct for the LETs typically found in clinical radiotherapy employing particles from protons to carbon ions...

  3. Ionization Chamber Measures Extreme Ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Robert W.

    1987-01-01

    Ionization chamber operates in nearly total photon absorption as stable, self-calibrating detector of ionizing extreme ultraviolet radiation. Working gas of instrument is neon; photoionization properties well known and readily applicable to absolute measurements. Designed for measurements of solar ultraviolet flux aboard sounding rocket, instrument used on Earth to measure ultraviolet radiation in vacuum systems. Ionization chamber collects positive neon ions and electrons produced by irradiation of neon gas by ultraviolet photons. Approximately one ion produced by each photon; consequently, photoionization current nearly proportional to photon flux.

  4. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  5. Electrochemical Impedance Studies of SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Johan; Søgaard, Martin; Wandel, Marie

    2007-01-01

    impedance of the cathode at intermediate operating temperatures. The perovskite is of the La-Sr-Co-Fe type. The EIS response of symmetrical cells with a thick (similar to 200 mu m) gadolinia doped ceria electrolyte was compared with the impedance contribution of the cathode of a full anode supported cell....... The full cells had a Ni-YSZ anode and anode support, a thin YSZ electrolyte, and a CGO barrier layer. The symmetric and full cell cathode responses were compared at open-circuit voltage. Humidified hydrogen was used as the fuel in the full cell measurements. Differential analysis of the impedance data...

  6. Results of radiation test of the cathode front-end board for CMS endcap muon chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedon, R.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Hauser, J.; Holbrook, B.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; von der Mey, M.; Murray, P.; Rush, C. J.; Santiard, J. C.; Tripathi, M.

    2001-10-01

    After a brief overview of the CMS EMU electronics system, results on radiation induced single event effects, total ionization dose and displacement effects will be reported. These results are obtained by irradiating the components on electronics boards with 63 MeV protons and 1 MeV neutrons. During the proton irradiation, the electronics board was fully under power, all components on the board were active and the data were read out in the same way as designed for CMS. No deterioration of analog performance for each of the three CMOS ASICs on the tested board was observed, up to a dose of 10 krad. Each of the tested FPGAs survived beyond the dose of 30 krad. No single event latch-up was detected for the CMOS ASICs up to a proton fluence of 2×10 12 cm-2. Single Event Upsets (SEU) in FPGAs were detected and their cross-sections measured. SEU mitigation with triple module redundancy and voting was implemented and tested.

  7. Results of radiation test of the cathode front-end board for CMS endcap muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Breedon, R; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Hauser, J; Holbrook, B; Kim, C L; Ling, T; Mey, M; Murray, P; Rush, C J; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Tripathi, M

    2001-01-01

    After a brief overview of the CMS EMU electronics system, results on radiation induced single event effects, total ionization dose and displacement effects will be reported. These results are obtained by irradiating the components on electronics boards with 63 MeV protons and 1 MeV neutrons. During the proton irradiation, the electronics board was fully under power, all components on the board were active and the data were read out in the same way as designed for CMS. No deterioration of analog performance for each of the three CMOS ASICs on the tested board was observed, up to a dose of 10 krad. Each of the tested FPGAs survived beyond the dose of 30 krad. No single event latch-up was detected for the CMOS ASICs up to a proton fluence of 2x10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2. Single Event Upsets (SEU) in FPGAs were detected and their cross-sections measured. SEU mitigation with triple module redundancy and voting was implemented and tested.

  8. Anodic Stripping Voltammetry: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joseph

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to acquaint students with the theory and applications of anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) as well as such ASV problems as contamination associated with trace analysis. The experimental procedure, instrumentation, and materials discussed are designed to minimize cost and keep procedures as simple as possible. (JM)

  9. Improved lower bound for online strip packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harren, Rolf; Kern, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We study the online strip packing problem and derive an improved lower bound of ρ ≥ 2.589... for the competitive ratio of this problem. The construction is based on modified “Brown-Baker-Katseff sequences” (Brown et al. in Acta Inform. 18:207–225, 1982) using only two types of rectangles. In additio

  10. Cardiac Muscle Studies with Rat Ventricular Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Bert K.; Faleschini, Richard J.

    1977-01-01

    Details undergraduate physiology laboratory experiments that demonstrate mechanical properties of cardiac muscle, using strips from the ventricle of a rat heart. Includes procedures for obtaining length-tension curves, demonstrating the role of calcium in excitation-contraction coupling, and showing effects of several cardiovascular drugs…

  11. Asset Stripping in a Mature Market Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim; Møller, Ulrik Gorm

    2011-01-01

    indicates that asset stripping may take place in mature market economies to the extent that perpetrators are able to circumvent the corporate governance system by giving lawyers, public accountants and banks incentives to act less critically towards dubious business transactions. Research limitations...

  12. Propulsion by Helical Strips in Circular Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesilyurt, Serhat; Demir, Ebru

    2016-11-01

    Progress in manufacturing techniques avails the production of artificial micro swimmers (AMS) in various shapes and sizes. There are numerous studies on the generation of efficient locomotion by means of helical tails with circular cross-sections. This work focuses on locomotion with helical strips in circular channels. A CFD model is used to analyze the effects of geometric parameters and the radius of the channel on swimming velocity of infinite helical-strips in circular channels. Results show that there is an optimum wavelength that depends on thickness to channel radius ratio, suggesting that these parameters need to be optimized simultaneously. With constant torque, thinner strips swim faster, whereas under constant angular velocity application, thicker strips (in radial direction) prevail. As width approaches the wavelength, velocity decreases under both conditions, unless a magnetically coated tail is simulated, for which width has an optimum value. Increasing channel radius to helix amplitude ratio increases the velocity up to a maximum and after a slight drop, saturation occurs as bulk swimming conditions are approached.

  13. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  14. Nanoscale Test Strips for Multiplexed Blood Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A critical component of the DNA Medicine Institute's Reusable Handheld Electrolyte and Lab Technology for Humans (rHEALTH) sensor are nanoscale test strips, or nanostrips, that enable multiplexed blood analysis. Nanostrips are conceptually similar to the standard urinalysis test strip, but the strips are shrunk down a billionfold to the microscale. Each nanostrip can have several sensor pads that fluoresce in response to different targets in a sample. The strips carry identification tags that permit differentiation of a specific panel from hundreds of other nanostrip panels during a single measurement session. In Phase I of the project, the company fabricated, tested, and demonstrated functional parathyroid hormone and vitamin D nanostrips for bone metabolism, and thrombin aptamer and immunoglobulin G antibody nanostrips. In Phase II, numerous nanostrips were developed to address key space flight-based medical needs: assessment of bone metabolism, immune response, cardiac status, liver metabolism, and lipid profiles. This unique approach holds genuine promise for space-based portable biodiagnostics and for point-of-care (POC) health monitoring and diagnostics here on Earth.

  15. Topics in Chemical Instrumentation: CII. Automated Anodic Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, John T.; Ewing, Galen W., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Presents details of anodic stripping analysis (ASV) in college chemistry laboratory experiments. Provides block diagrams of the analyzer system, circuitry and power supplies of the automated stripping analyzer, and instructions for implementing microcomputer control of the ASV. (CS)

  16. Comparative evaluation of scanned stripping techniques: SSCP vs. SSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2006-01-01

    The characteristic features of scanned deposition potential curves constructed from stripping chronopotentiometry (SSCP) and various modes of stripping voltammetry (SSV) are critically evaluated. The strengths and weaknesses of each method for identification of metal ion speciation features and susc

  17. Refuges, flower strips, biodiversity and agronomic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Grégory; Wateau, Karine; Legrand, Mickaël; Oste, Sandrine

    2008-01-01

    Several arthropods are natural predators of pests, and they are able to reduce and control their population development. FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais (Federation Regionate de Defense contre les Organismes Nuisibles = Regional Federation for Pest Control) has begun for a long time to form farmers to the recognition of beneficial arthropods and to show them their usefulness. These beneficial insects or arachnids are present everywhere, in orchards and even in fields which are areas relatively poor in biodiversity. Adults feed in the flower strips instead larvae and some adults feed on preys such as aphids or caterpillars. Most of the time, beneficial insects can regulate pest but sometimes, in agricultural area, they can't make it early enough and efficiently. Their action begin too late and there biodiversity and number are too low. It's possible to enhance their action by manipulating the ecological infrastructures, like sewing flower strips or installing refuges. Flower strips increase the density of natural enemies and make them be present earlier in the field in order to control pests. Refuges permit beneficial's to spend winter on the spot. So they're able to be active and to grow in number earlier. From 2004 to 2007, on the one hand, FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais has developed a research program. Its purpose was to inventory practices and also tools and means available and to judge the advisability of using such or such beneficial refuge in orchards. On the second hand, it studied the impact in orchard of refuges on population of beneficial's and the difference there were between manufactured refuges and homemade refuges. Interesting prospects were obtained with some of them. Otherwise, since 2003, FREDON has studied flower strips influence on beneficial population and their impact on pest control. In cabbage fields, results of trials have shown that flower strips lead to a reduction of aphid number under acceptable economic level, up to 50 meters from flower strips

  18. Dual Strip-Excited Dielectric Resonator Antenna with Parasitic Strips for Radiation Pattern Reconfigurability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamran Saleem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel pattern reconfigurable antenna concept utilizing rectangular dielectric resonator antenna (DRA placed over dielectric substrate backed by a ground plane is presented. A dual strip excitation scheme is utilized and both excitation strips are connected together by means of a 50 Ω microstrip feed network placed over the substrate. The four vertical metallic parasitic strips are placed at corner of DRA each having a corresponding ground pad to provide a short/open circuit between the parasitic strip and antenna ground plane, through which a shift of 90° in antenna radiation pattern in elevation plane is achieved. A fractional bandwidth of approximately 40% at center frequency of 1.6 GHz is achieved. The DRA peak realized gain in whole frequency band of operation is found to be above 4 dB. The antenna configuration along with simulation and measured results are presented.

  19. Advances in Thermionic Cathode of Tungsten and Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several kinds of tungsten thermonic cathodes have been introduced. As a promising alternative for thoriated tungsten, rare earth doped molybdenum cathode has been studied. Compared with the traditional thoriated tungsten, La-Mo cathode has higher emission current density at lower temperature, but it has poor emission stability. In order to improve the emission stability, systematical study on the emission mechanism of La-Mo cathode has been carried out. The life of La-Mo cathode has been improved and has achieved 1400 h, which exceeds the minimum life for practical uses (1000 h). As another alternative for thoriated tungsten cathode, Y-Mo cathode has shown better performance. The thermionic emission capability of Y-Mo cathode is between that of La-Mo cathode and Th-W cathode.

  20. Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazvoda, S.; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam

    Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project. Experiments were conducted with the strip reduction test [1] in order to classify experimental lubricants, developed during concerned project. One reference lubricant was used during testing.......Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project. Experiments were conducted with the strip reduction test [1] in order to classify experimental lubricants, developed during concerned project. One reference lubricant was used during testing....

  1. Testing an hydrogen streamer chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    A 2x10 cm gap streamer chamber, 35x55 cm2 in surface, was built and tested at CERN. Good tracks of cosmic rays were obtained up to atmospheric pressure, see F. Rohrbach et al, CERN-LAL (Orsay) Collaboration, Nucl. Instr. Methods 141 (1977) 229. Michel Cathenoz stand on the center.

  2. A dual deformable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank

    2010-01-01

    There is disclosed an arrangement for measuring the effectiveness of a shielding material against electromagnetic fields. The arrangement comprises a first and a second reverberation chamber sharing a common wall. The common wall is partly made of the shielding material. A first antenna is arranged

  3. Bubble chamber: colour enhanced tracks

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    This artistically-enhanced image of real particle tracks was produced in the Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC). Liquid hydrogen is used to create bubbles along the paths of the particles as a piston expands the medium. A magnetic field is produced in the detector causing the particles to travel in spirals, allowing charge and momentum to be measured.

  4. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  5. Non-Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty for bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minezaki T

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Teruumi Minezaki, Takaaki Hattori, Hayate Nakagawa, Shigeto Kumakura, Hiroshi GotoDepartment of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjukuku, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To report a case of bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis treated by non-Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (nDSAEK.Case report: A 79-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with loss of vision in the left eye. Slit lamp examination of her left eye showed a shallow anterior chamber with cataract and schisis in the inferior quadrant of iris stroma. Bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis was diagnosed. Cataract surgery with iridectomy succeeded to deepen the anterior chamber and remove the floating iris leaf, although corneal edema remained. Four days later, nDSAEK was performed, which resolved corneal edema and restored visual acuity.Conclusion: The two-step surgery of cataract surgery plus iridectomy followed by nDSAEK may be an effective strategy for treating bullous keratopathy secondary to iridoschisis.Keywords: iridoschisis, bullous keratopathy, non-Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

  6. Modelling and simulation of double chamber microbial fuel cell. Cell voltage, power density and temperature variation with process parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Ravi; Mondal, Prasenjit; Chand, Shri [Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Uttaranchal (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In the present paper steady state models of a double chamber glucose glutamic acid microbial fuel cell (GGA-MFC) under continuous operation have been developed and solved using Matlab 2007 software. The experimental data reported in a recent literature has been used for the validation of the models. The present models give prediction on the cell voltage and cell power density with 19-44% errors, which is less (up to 20%) than the errors on the prediction of cell voltage made in some recent literature for the same MFC where the effects of the difference in pH and ionic conductivity between anodic and cathodic solutions on cell voltage were not incorporated in model equations. It also describes the changes in anodic and cathodic chamber temperature due to the increase in substrate concentration and cell current density. Temperature profile across the membrane thickness has also been studied. (orig.)

  7. TOMOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF LONGITUDINAL EMITTANCE GROWTH DUE TO STRIPPING FOILS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; AHRENS, L.; THIEBERGER, P.

    2005-05-16

    During beam acceleration in the Brookhaven accelerator complex, heavy ions are stripped of their electrons in several steps. Depending on the properties of the stripping foils, this process results in an increased energy spread and longitudinal emittance growth. A tomographic phase space reconstruction technique has been applied to measure the associated emittance growth for different stripping foil materials.

  8. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  9. Reservoir Scandate Cathode for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to combine two revolutionary cathode technologies into a single device for use in electric space propulsion. This will overcome problems that both...

  10. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  11. Enhanced nitrogen removal in single-chamber microbial fuel cells with increased gas diffusion areas

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Hengjing

    2012-11-23

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with nitrifiers pre-enriched at the air cathodes have previously been demonstrated as a passive strategy for integrating nitrogen removal into current-generating bioelectrochemical systems. To further define system design parameters for this strategy, we investigated in this study the effects of oxygen diffusion area and COD/N ratio in continuous-flow reactors. Doubling the gas diffusion area by adding an additional air cathode or a diffusion cloth significantly increased the ammonia and COD removal rates (by up to 115% and 39%), ammonia removal efficiency (by up to 134%), the cell voltage and cathode potentials, and the power densities (by a factor of approximately 2). When the COD/N ratio was lowered from 13 to 3, we found up to 244% higher ammonia removal rate but at least 19% lower ammonia removal efficiency. An increase of COD removal rate by up to 27% was also found when the COD/N ratio was lowered from 11 to 3. The Coulombic efficiency was not affected by the additional air cathode, but decreased by an average of 11% with the addition of a diffusion cloth. Ammonia removal by assimilation was also estimated to understand the ammonia removal mechanism in these systems. These results showed that the doubling of gas diffusion area enhanced N and COD removal rates without compromising electrochemical performance. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure and Thermochemistry of Alkaline-Earth Oxide-Coated Thermionic Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikari, E. K.; Bassey, E.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1998-01-01

    NASA LeRC has a broad, active cathode technology development program in which both experimental and theoretical studies are being employed to further development of thermionic cathodes for use as electron sources in vacuum devices for communications and other space applications. One important type of thermionic cathode under development is the alkaline-earth oxide-coated (BaO, SrO, CaO) cathode. Significant improvements in the emission characteristics of this cathode have been obtained through modification of the chemical composition and morphology of the oxide coating, with the best result thus far coming from the addition of In2O3 and Sc2O3. Whereas the In2O3 produces a finer, more uniform particle structure, the exact chemical state and role of the Sc2O3 in the emission enhancement is unknown. The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to combine the studies of the surface chemistry and electron emission at NASA LeRC of chemically modified oxide coatings with a study of the thermochemistry and crystal structure using X-ray diffraction equipment and expertise at Clark Atlanta University (CAU). The study at CAU is intended to provide the description and understanding of the structure and thermochemistry needed for further improvement and optimization of the modified coatings. A description of the experimental procedure, preliminary X-ray diffraction test results, together with the design of an ultrahigh vacuum chamber necessary for high temperature thermochemistry studies will be presented.

  13. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cathode discharge excimer lamps , Phys. Plasmas 7, 286 (2000). [3] RH Stark and KH Schoenbach, Direct high pressure glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys...temperature profiles in argon glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys. 88, 2234 (2000) [8] M. Moselhy, W. Shi, R. Stark, A flat glow discharge excimer radiation...MHCD acts as a plasma cathode for a third electrode (anode). Some experimental results in this geometry are available for argon and for air from the

  14. Distribution of Cathode Spots in Vacuum Arc Under Nonuniform Axial Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zong-qian; JIA Shen-li; WANG Li-jun; LI Xing-wen; WANG Zheng

    2007-01-01

    Recent results on the distribution of vacuum arc cathode spots (CSs) in nonuniform axial magnetic field (AMF) are presented.Based on previous studies,we deem that two contrary influences of AMF,inward effect and outward effect,are attributed to CSs distribution.With this notion,we have analyzed the controlling effectiveness of nonuniform AMF on CSs distribution. Experiments were conducted in a detachable vacuum chamber with iron-style AMF electrodes.Images of vacuum arc column and the distribution of CSs were photographed with a high-speed charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Experimental results agreed well with the theoretical analysis.

  15. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  16. Growing and Analyzing Biofilms in Flow Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  17. Growing and analyzing biofilms in flow chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Sternberg, Claus

    2011-01-01

    This unit describes the setup of flow chamber systems for the study of microbial biofilms, and methods for the analysis of structural biofilm formation. Use of flow chambers allows direct microscopic investigation of biofilm formation. The biofilms in flow chambers develop under hydrodynamic...... conditions, and the environment can be carefully controlled and easily changed. The protocols in this unit include construction of the flow chamber and the bubble trap, assembly and sterilization of the flow chamber system, inoculation of the flow chambers, running of the system, image capture and analysis...

  18. Bird community response to filter strips in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, P.J.; Dively, G.P.; Gill, D.E.; Rewa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Filter strips are strips of herbaceous vegetation planted along agricultural field margins adjacent to streams or wetlands and are designed to intercept sediment, nutrients, and agrichemicals. Roughly 16,000 ha of filter strips have been established in Maryland through the United States Department of Agriculture's Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program. Filter strips often represent the only uncultivated herbaceous areas on farmland in Maryland and therefore may be important habitat for early-successional bird species. Most filter strips in Maryland are planted to either native warm-season grasses or cool-season grasses and range in width from 10.7 m to 91.4 m. From 2004 to 2007 we studied the breeding and wintering bird communities in filter strips adjacent to wooded edges and non-buffered field edges and the effect that grass type and width of filter strips had on bird community composition. We used 5 bird community metrics (total bird density, species richness, scrub-shrub bird density, grassland bird density, and total avian conservation value), species-specific densities, nest densities, and nest survival estimates to assess the habitat value of filter strips for birds. Breeding and wintering bird community metrics were greater in filter strips than in non-buffered field edges but did not differ between cool-season and warm-season grass filter strips. Most breeding bird community metrics were negatively related to the percent cover of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) in ???1 yr. Breeding bird density was greater in narrow (60 m) filter strips. Our results suggest that narrow filter strips adjacent to wooded edges can provide habitat for many bird species but that wide filter strips provide better habitat for grassland birds, particularly obligate grassland species. If bird conservation is an objective, avoid planting orchardgrass in filter strips and reduce or eliminate orchardgrass from filter strips through management practices. Copyright ?? 2011 The

  19. Improving Thin Strip Profile Using Work Roll Cross and Work Roll Shifting Methods in Cold Strip Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Tibar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of rolling parameters in order to achieve better strip shape and to reduce rolling force is a challenge in rolling practice. In this paper, thin strip asymmetrical rolling of aluminum at various speed ratios under lubricated condition has been investigated at various combinations of work rolls cross (WRC angles and work rolls shifting (WRS values. The effects of strip width, reduction, and rolling speed on strip shape taking WRC and WRS into consideration are discussed. Results show that strip profile improves significantly when the WRC angle is increased from 0° to 1°, with an associated reduction in rolling force. Increasing WRS value from 0 to 8 mm improves the strip profile as well but not as significantly as when WRC angle is increased. No significant improvement was found in strip shape when the strip width was increased. At higher reduction, the strip shape was improved; a decrease in the rolling force was also observed. A higher speed ratio was found to be effective only at a higher WRC angle. The effect of lubrication on the strip profile was significant. Results indicate that an optimum combination of WRC, WRS, reduction, width, and speed ratio under lubricated conditions can ensure an improved exit strip profile, reduce rolling force, and obtain a better quality strip.

  20. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  1. The Formation and Evolution of Stripped Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jessica; Tuan, Austin Zong; Lee, Christoph; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    We implement a model to describe the density profiles of stripped dark matter halos. Our model generalizes the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) distribution to allow for more flexibility in the slope of the outer halo. We find that the density distributions of stripped halos tend to have outer slopes steeper than assumed by the NFW distribution. We also examine the relationship between severity of stripping and halo shape, spin parameter and concentration, and find that highly stripped halos are more spheroidal, have lower spin parameters, and have higher concentrations compared to less stripped halos.

  2. Shape Setup System for 1700 Hot Strip Mill

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhong-feng; XU Jian-zhong; LI Chang-sheng; LIU Xiang-hua

    2007-01-01

    Shape setup (SSU) system is the core technology for hot strip mill (HSM). A precise SSU system was used to improve the strip quality for HSM. The function of SSU, setup, and feedback was introduced. The main mathematical models of roll gap profile and longitudinal strain difference are set up. Strip profile allocation strategy was researched according to the SSU system of a domestic 1 700 mm HSM. The SSU system was put into practical use and the measurement results showed that strip flatness variation and strip profile variation could be controlled in target scope.

  3. Demonstration/Validation of the TC-60 Controlled Detonation Chamber, Porton Down, UK: Final Demonstration Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    chamber junction box, was diagnosed the following day (3 March, a scheduled maintenance day). The wire was reattached to the terminal strip, restoring...destroyed in the threshold system: (a) Chemical agents: Blister agent (mustard), Nonpersistent nerve agent (GB) and Industrial chemical (phosgene) (b) In...addition to the munitions fill material listed above; the systems objective capability is to destroy: Chemical agents: Lewisite, Persistent nerve agent

  4. Physical and Electromagnetic Properties of Customized Coatings for SNS Injection Ceramic Chambers and Extraction Ferrite Kickers

    CERN Document Server

    Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; He, Ping; Henderson, Stuart; Pai, Chien; Raparia, Deepak; Todd, Robert J; Wang, Lanfa; Wei, Jie; Weiss, Daniel; Yung Lee, Yong

    2005-01-01

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m SNS accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with ~100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. All the ring inner surfaces are made of stainless or inconel, except those of the injection and extraction kickers. Ceramic vacuum chambers are used for the 8 injection kickers to avoid shielding of a fast-changing kicker field and to reduce eddy current heating. The internal diameter was coated with Cu to reduce the beam coupling impedance and provide passage for beam image current, and a TiN overlayer to reduce SEY. The ferrite surfaces of the 14 extraction kicker modules were coated with TiN to reduce SEY. Customized masks were used to produce coating strips of 1 cm x 5 cm with 1 to 1.5 mm separation among the strips. The masks maximized the coated area to more than 80%, while minimizing the eddy current effect to the kicker rise time. The coating method, as well as the physical and electromagnetic properties of the coating...

  5. Multi-chamber microbial desalination cell for improved organic matter and dissolved solids removal from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Ghangrekar, M M

    2014-01-01

    A five-chamber microbial desalination cell (MDC) with anode, cathode, one central desalination chamber and two concentrate chambers separated by ion exchange membranes was operated in batch mode for more than 60 days. The performance of the MDC was evaluated for chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, total dissolved solids (TDS) removal and energy production. An average COD removal of 81 ± 2.1% was obtained using acetate-fed wastewater as substrate in the anodic chamber inoculated with mixed anaerobic sludge. TDS removals of 58, 70 and 78% were observed with salt concentration of 8, 20 and 30 g/L, respectively, in the middle desalination chamber. The MDC produced a maximum power output of 16.87 mW/m(2) during polarization. The highest Coulombic efficiency of 12 ± 2.4% was observed in this system using mixed anaerobic sludge as inoculum. The system effectively demonstrated capability for simultaneous organic matter removal and desalination along with power generation.

  6. A portable miniature anechoic chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorthioir, Jack; Gavin, Paul

    The portable miniature anechoic chamber (PMAC), a low-cost alternative to a full-size anechoic chamber, is presented. The PMAC is a miniature, enclosed, RF-tight microwave antenna range, which approximates the performance of an indoor range over the C through Ku (G through J)-band frequencies. The small footprint, four by six feet, allows for ease of movement by one person to a test site, indoors or outdoors. The PMAC can be used at I (intermediate)-level to support the operational readiness (OR) requirements of the U.S. Army, Navy or Air Force. In conjunction with the antenna test equipment (ATE), and under TPS control, it can be used for performance verification, fault detection and fault isolation. A typical application using the PMAC in this operating mode is described.

  7. Development of multiwire proportional chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    Charpak, G

    1969-01-01

    It has happened quite often in the history of science that theoreticians, confronted with some major difficulty, have successfully gone back thirty years to look at ideas that had then been thrown overboard. But it is rare that experimentalists go back thirty years to look again at equipment which had become out-dated. This is what Charpak and his colleagues did to emerge with the 'multiwire proportional chamber' which has several new features making it a very useful addition to the armoury of particle detectors. In the 1930s, ion-chambers, Geiger- Muller counters and proportional counters, were vital pieces of equipment in nuclear physics research. Other types of detectors have since largely replaced them but now the proportional counter, in new array, is making a comeback.

  8. Actuator System with Dual Chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (8), the lid having a shaft opening (17) for a shaft (6) coupled to the magnetic rotor (5), wherein the magnetic rotor (5), when inserted in the translator cylinder (2), is arranged to translate a linear movement of the translator cylinder (2) into a rotational movement of the magnetic rotor by using...... magnetic flux (82) interacting between the magnetic stator and the magnetic rotor, said rotational movements is being transferred through a shaft (6), the lid (8) with a shaft opening (17) arranged for receiving the shaft (6), wherein the shaft is arranged to make both the linear and the rotational...... movement in the shaft opening (17), the lid (8) being arranged for confining the second end (15) of the translator cylinder (2), the translator cylinder confined by the lid (8) forms,when divided by the magnetic rotor (5), a first chamber (TC) with a first volume and a second chamber(BC) with a second...

  9. ITCS Test Strip Development and Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Caitlin; Adam, Niklas; Pickering, Karen; Gazda, Daniel; Piowaty, Hailey

    2011-01-01

    Internal coolant loops used for International Space Station thermal control must be periodically monitored for system health, including pH, biocide levels and any indication of ammonia. The presence of ammonia, possible via a microleak in the interface between the internal and external thermal control systems, could be a danger to the crew. The Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Sampling Kit uses test strips as a colorimetric indicator of pH and concentrations of biocide and free ammonia. This paper describes the challenges in designing an ammonia colorimetric indicator in a variable pH environment, as well as lessons learned, ultimately resulting in a robust test strip to indicate a hazardous ammonia leak.

  10. The Extent of the Stop Coannihilation Strip

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Zheng, Jiaming

    2014-01-01

    Many supersymmetric models such as the CMSSM feature a strip in parameter space where the lightest neutralino \\chi is identified as the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), the lighter stop squark \\tilde t_1 is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), and the relic \\chi cold dark matter density is brought into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology by coannihilation with the lighter stop squark \\tilde t_1 NLSP. We calculate the stop coannihilation strip in the CMSSM, incorporating Sommerfeld enhancement effects, and explore the relevant phenomenological constraints and phenomenological signatures. In particular, we show that the \\tilde t_1 may weigh several TeV, and its lifetime may be in the nanosecond range, features that are more general than the specific CMSSM scenarios that we study in this paper.

  11. Operation of a Batch Stripping Distillation Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A stripping batch distillation column is preferred when the amount of the light component in the feed is small and the products are to be recovered at high purity. The operation modes of a batch stripping are believed to be the same as those of a rectifier. However, the control system of a stripper is different. In this paper, we explore three different control methods with Hysys (Hyprotech Ltd. 1997) for a batch stripper. The main difference is the control scheme for reboiler liquid level: (a) controlled by reflux flow; (b) controlled by reboiler heat duty; (c) controlled by bottom product flow. The main characteristics of operating a batch stripper with different control scheme are presented in this paper. Guidelines are provided for the startup of a batch stripper, the effects of somecontrol tuning parameters on the column performance are discussed.

  12. L-strip proximity fed ga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of dualband L-strip fed compact semi-circular disk microstrip patch antenna has been presented using circuit theory concept. The antenna parameters such as return loss, VSWR and radiation pattern are calculated. The effect of geometric dimensions of the proposed antenna such as length of vertical and horizontal portion of L-strip is investigated. It is found that antenna resonate at two distinct modes i.e. 1.3 GHz and 6.13 GHz for lower and upper resonance frequencies respectively. The bandwidth of the proposed antenna at lower resonance frequency is 6.61% (simulated and 10.64% (theoretical whereas at upper resonance frequency, it is 6.02% (simulated and 9.06 % (theoretical. The theoretical results are compared with IE3D simulation results as well as experimental results and they are in close agreement.

  13. Coiling Temperature Control in Hot Strip Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanari, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Hiroaki

    Coiling temperature is one of the most significant factors in products of hot strip mill to determine material properties such as strength, toughness of steel, so it is very important to achieve accurate coiling temperature control (CTC). Usually there are a few pyrometers on the run out table in hot strip mill, therefore temperature model and its adapting system have large influences on the accuracy of CTC. Also unscheduled change of rolling speed has a bad effect to keep coiling temperature as its target. Newly developed CTC system is able to get very accurate coiling temperature against uncertain factors and disturbances by adopting easily identified temperature model, learning method and dynamic set up function. The features of the CTC system are discussed with actual data, and the effectiveness of the system is shown by actual control results.

  14. Frequency dependent magnetization of superconductor strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Kailash Prasad [Landcare Research, Palmerston North (New Zealand); Raj, Ashish [Computer Science in Radiology, Weill Medical College, Cornell University, NY (United States); Brandt, Ernst Helmut [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, POB 800665, D-70506 Stuttgart (Germany); Sastry, Pamidi V P S S, E-mail: thakurk@landcareresearch.co.nz, E-mail: asr2004@med.cornell.edu, E-mail: ehb@mf.mpg.de, E-mail: pamidi@caps.fsu.edu [Center for Advanced Power Systems, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The frequency dependence of magnetic ac loss of thin superconductor strip subjected to an ac magnetic field perpendicular to the surface of the strip is investigated by incorporating a flux creep model into the critical state model of Brandt and Indenbom. It is found that the reduced ac loss exhibits a maximum value at a frequency f{sub m}, which is a rapidly varying function of the applied ac magnetic field. At low magnetic field, f{sub m} becomes zero, and ac loss decreases with frequency as a power law ({approx}f{sup -2/n}). Whereas at high magnetic field f{sub m} becomes infinite and ac loss increases with frequency, still following the power law ({approx}f{sup 1/n}). The analytical results are substantiated with experimental data and the results of a 2D finite element simulation.

  15. PRESUPPOSITIONS AND IMPLICATURES IN COMIC STRIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ienneke Indra Dewi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Article aimed to find out the role of presuppositions, implicatures, as well as to see the maxims violated or flouted in the comic strips i.e. to whether there is a miscommunication among the characters in the comic strips. Data were taken from the three comics, those are Peanuts, Andy, and Tintin, and were analysed based on the pattern that the sender made a presupposition before transferring information and the receiver would try to get the implied message. The results show that presuppositions and implicatures are much influenced by the background knowledge. The more the speaker and hearer know each other’s background, the better presuppositions and implicatures they make and finally, the less miscommunication occurred.

  16. Stage- vs. Channel-strip Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Korsgaard, Dannie Michael; Büchert, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the stage metaphor and the channel strip metaphor in terms of performance. Traditionally, music mixing consoles employ a channels strip control metaphor for adjusting parameters such as volume and panning of each track. An alternative control metaphor, the so-called stage...... metaphor lets the user adjust volume and panning by positioning tracks relative to a virtual listening position. In this study test participants are given the task to adjust volume and panning of one channel (in mixes consisting of three channels) in order to replicate a series of simple pre-rendered mixes....... They do this using (1) a small physical mixing controller and (2) using an iPad app, which implements a simple stage metaphor interface. We measure how accurately they are able to replicate mixes in terms of volume and panning and how fast they are at doing so. Results reveal that performance...

  17. Mechanics of Thin Strip Steering in Hot Rolling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhengyi; Tieu, Kiet A.

    2004-06-01

    The hot rolling of thin strip can result in several problems in hot rolling, for instance, the control of strip steering, strip shape and flatness and surface roughness etc. Therefore, the hot rolling of thin strip brings out a requirement of innovative technologies such as the extended control of shape and flatness, steering control and reduction of load by roll gap lubrication. In this paper, the authors focus on the analysis of thin strip snaking movement, as well as solve the related problems such as the shape and flatness due to a larger reduction applied when the strip is thinner. A finite element method was used to simulate this nonsymmetricity rolling considering the non-uniform reduction along the strip width. The calculated spread is compared with the measured values obtained from the rolling mill in laboratory and the friction effect is also discussed.

  18. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Payne, Jason A.; Ottesen, Cory W.

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  19. NRAO RF Anechoic Chamber & Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A shielded anechoic chamber measuring 15 by 15 by 37 feet is located in the Jansky Laboratory at Green Bank. This chamber has been outfitted as a far-field antenna...

  20. MPS II drift chamber system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  1. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  2. Development of Silicon Multi-strip Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TanJilian; JinGenming; WangHongwei; YuanXiaohua; DuanLiming; LiSonglin; LuZiwei; XuHushan; NingBaojun; TianDayu; WangWei; ZhangLu

    2003-01-01

    Position sensitive detector is very important for nuclear physics experiment. There several techniques can be used to fabricate position sensitive detector, for example, Si-surface barrier method, diffusion method, ion implantation and planar process etc. Among all the techniques mentioned above planar process is the best one. We have developed batch of position sensitive detector -- silicon multi-strip detector by using planar process.

  3. A Spinning Particle in a Mobius Strip

    CERN Document Server

    Nieto, J A

    2011-01-01

    We develop the classical and quantum theory of a spinning particle moving in a Mobius strip. We first propose a Lagrangian for such a system and then we proceed to quantize the system via the constraint Hamiltonian system formalism. Our results may be of particular interest in several physical scenarios, including solid state physics and optics. In fact, the present work may shed some new light on the recent discoveries on condensed matter concerning topological insulators.

  4. Multitwist optical Möbius strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Isaac

    2010-01-15

    Circularly polarized Gauss-Laguerre GL00 and GL01 laser beams that cross at their waists at a small angle are shown to generate a quasi-paraxial field that contains a line of circular polarization, a C line, surrounded by polarization ellipses whose major and minor axes generate multitwist Möbius strips with twist numbers that increase with the distance from the C point.

  5. Hot Strip Laminar Cooling Control Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; WANG Guo-dong; LIU Xiang-hua

    2004-01-01

    The control model of laminar cooling system for hot strip, including air-cooling model, water-cooling model, temperature distribution model along thickness direction, feedforward control model, feedback control model and self-learning model, was introduced. PID arithmetic and Smith predictor controller were applied to feedback control. The sample of model parameter classification was given. The calculation process was shown by flow chart. The model has been proved to be simple, effective and of high precision.

  6. Mastering Interproximal Stripping: With Innovations in Slenderization

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Narendra Shriram; Shrivastav, Sunita S; Hazarey, Pushpa V

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Crowding and irregularity remain a consistent problem for children. Management of space problems continues to play an important role in a dental practice. It also represents an area of major interaction between the primary provider and the specialists. Proximal stripping is routinely carried out to avoid extraction in borderline cases where space discrepancy is less and in cases where there is a discrepancy between the mesio- distal width of maxillary and mandibular teeth to satisfy ...

  7. Performance of a large forward resistive plate chamber for the CMS /LHC under high radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, S H; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kim, K H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Nam, S K; Park, S; Rhee, J T; Seo, S W; Sim, K S

    2001-01-01

    We present the first beam test results of a real size prototype RPC for the endcap region of the CMS, one of large detectors at CERN LHC. The chamber was built with relatively low resistivity bakelite made in Korea and was operated successfully at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN under the highest photon flux available, which corresponds to an effective cluster rate up to about 800 Hz/cm/sup 2 /. The cross-talk effects between strips and sectors have been studied extensively. The high voltage plateau, which satisfies the CMS requirements for efficiency and the number of strips fired per cluster, extends to at least 300 V. The time resolution has been measured to be better than 1.3 ns in this HV plateau region. These results demonstrate that the current design of the device can be used as a muon trigger detector for the CMS forward region. (13 refs).

  8. A two-dimensional position sensitive gas chamber with scanned charge transfer readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pardo, J.; Pena, J.; Pazos, A.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.

    2003-10-01

    We have constructed and tested a two-dimensional position sensitive parallel-plate gas ionization chamber with scanned charge transfer readout. The scan readout method described here is based on the development of a new position-dependent charge transfer technique. It has been implemented by using gate strips perpendicularly oriented to the collector strips. This solution reduces considerably the number of electronic readout channels needed to cover large detector areas. The use of a 25 μm thick kapton etched circuit allows high charge transfer efficiency with a low gating voltage, consequently needing a very simple commutating circuit. The present prototype covers 8×8 cm2 with a pixel size of 1.27×1.27 mm2. Depending on the intended use and beam characteristics a smaller effective pixel is feasible and larger active areas are possible. This detector can be used for X-ray or other continuous beam intensity profile monitoring.

  9. Wakes of ram pressure stripped disc galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Roediger, E; Hoeft, M

    2006-01-01

    Spiral galaxies that move through the intracluster medium lose a substantial amount of their gas discs due to ram pressure stripping. The recent observations of NGC 4388 by Oosterloo & van Gorkom 2005 reveal a tail of stripped gas of ~ 100 kpc behind the source galaxy. We present first 3D hydrodynamical simulations of the evolution of such ram pressure stripped tails. We find that if the ICM wind does not vary significantly over a period of a few 100 Myr, subsonic galaxies produce a tail with regular features similar to a von-Karman vortex street. In this case, the tail widens systematically by about 45 kpc per 100 kpc distance behind the source galaxy. The widening rate is independent of the galaxy's inclination for a large range of inclinations. For supersonic galaxies, the tail is more irregular than for subsonic ones. The tail observed for NGC 4388 is narrower than the tails in our simulations. Reasons for this difference may be additional physical processes such as heat conduction or viscosity. In ad...

  10. Sustainable Water and Energy in Gaza Strip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, L.; Zarei, M.; Chianelli, R.; Gardner, E.

    2007-12-01

    Shortage of fresh water is a common problem in different areas of the world including the Middle East. Desalination of seawater and brackish water is the cheapest way to obtain fresh water in many regions. This research focuses on the situation in Gaza Strip where there is a severe shortage in the energy and water supply. The depletion of fresh water supplies and lack of wastewater treatments result in environmental problems. A solar powered cogeneration plant producing water and energy is proposed to be a suitable solution for Gaza Strip. Solar energy, using Concentrating Solar thermal Power (CSP) technologies, is used to produce electricity by a steam cycle power plant. Then the steam is directed to a desalination plant where it is used to heat the seawater to obtain freshwater. The main objective of this research is to outline a solution for the water problems in Gaza Strip, which includes a cogeneration (power and water) solar powered plant. The research includes four specific objectives: 1- an environmental and economic comparison between solar and fossil fuel energies; 2- technical details for the cogeneration plant; 3- cost and funding, 4- the benefits.

  11. High-Rate Capable Floating Strip Micromegas

    CERN Document Server

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Biebel, Otmar; Danger, Helge; Flierl, Bernhard; Hertenberger, Ralf; Lösel, Philipp; Moll, Samuel; Parodi, Katia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, André

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optimization of discharge insensitive floating strip Micromegas (MICRO-MEsh GASeous) detectors, fit for use in high-energy muon spectrometers. The suitability of these detectors for particle tracking is shown in high-background environments and at very high particle fluxes up to 60MHz/cm$^2$. Measurement and simulation of the microscopic discharge behavior have demonstrated the excellent discharge tolerance. A floating strip Micromegas with an active area of 48cm$\\times$50cm with 1920 copper anode strips exhibits in 120GeV pion beams a spatial resolution of 50$\\mu$m at detection efficiencies above 95%. Pulse height, spatial resolution and detection efficiency are homogeneous over the detector. Reconstruction of particle track inclination in a single detector plane is discussed, optimum angular resolutions below $5^\\circ$ are observed. Systematic deviations of this $\\mu$TPC-method are fully understood. The reconstruction capabilities for minimum ionizing muons are investigated in a 6.4cm$\\time...

  12. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  13. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  14. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results.

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Precision Muon Chambers under LHC Operating Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067746; Dubbert, J; Horvat, S; Kortner, O; Kroha, H; Manz, A; Mohrdieck, S; Rauscher, F; Richter, R; Staude, A

    2004-01-01

    For the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider (LHC), large drift chambers consisting of 6 to 8 layers of pressurized drift tubes are used for precision tracking covering an active area of 5000 m2 in the toroidal ?eld of superconducting air core magnets. The chambers have to provide a spatial resolution of 41 microns with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at an absolute pressure of 3 bar and gas gain of 2?104. The environment in which the chambers will be operated is characterized by high neutron and background with counting rates of up to 100 per square cm and second. The resolution and efficiency of a chamber from the serial production for ATLAS has been investigated in a 100 GeV muon beam at photon irradiation rates as expected during LHC operation. A silicon strip detector telescope was used as external reference in the beam. The spatial resolution of a chamber is degraded by 4 ?m at the highest background rate. The detection e?ciency of the drift tubes is unchanged under irradiation...

  16. Wire chamber degradation at the Argonne ZGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberichter, W.; Spinka, H.

    1986-01-01

    Experience with multiwire proportional chambers at high rates at the Argonne Zero Gradient Synchrotron is described. A buildup of silicon on the sense wires was observed where the beam passed through the chamber. Analysis of the chamber gas indicated that the density of silicon was probably less than 10 ppM.

  17. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification. A hyperbaric chamber is a device that is intended to increase the environmental oxygen pressure to promote...

  18. Vacuum chamber at intersection I-6

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The vacuum chamber at intersection region I-6, one of these where experiments in colliding-beam physics will be taking place. The "wheels" prevent the thin wall (1.5 mm) of the chamber from collapsing. The chamber is equipped with heating tapes and its wrapped in thermal insulation. Residual gas pressure at this and other similar regions is around 10_11.

  19. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  20. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.