WorldWideScience

Sample records for cathode ray tube

  1. Cyclotron resonance in a cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of the RF energy by the electron beam in a cathode ray tube due to the cyclotron resonance is described. The cathode ray tube is placed within a Helmholtz coils system supplied by a sawtooth current generator. In order to generate RF field and to detect RF absorption a gate dip-meter equipped with a FET transistor is used. The bias voltage variations of the FET transistors as a function of the magnetic field are recorded. The operating point of the cathode ray tube has been chosen so that the relaxation oscillations of the detection system can be observed. (authors)

  2. Single crystalline film screens for cathode-ray tubes: New life of television scanning optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advantages of television scanning optical microscopy are discussed in comparison with cameral microscopy. Peculiarities of new types of cathode-ray tubes with single crystalline film screens, as a source of scanning beam, are described

  3. X-ray Tube Using a Graphene Flower Cloth Field Emission Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Kazuo; Tsuboi, Shougo; Jyouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated a filament-less X-ray tube using a graphene flower cloth (GFC) field emission cathode. The GFC has numerous nanoprotrusions formed by self-standing graphene structures. The field emission current and the field enhancement factor β were 500 µA and 5600, respectively. The stability of voltage defined as a variance coefficient (σ/mean) of voltage was calculated to be 0.04% while maintaining the X-ray tube current of 300 µA. We applied our X-ray tube with the GFC field emitter to the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis of stainless steel.

  4. Foaming of waste cathode ray tube panel glass via CaCO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    The disposal of obsolete electrical and electronic equipment has become a global environmental problem. However, with responsible collecting, dismantling and materials separation, majority of materials can be recycled. Cathode ray tube (CRT) glass represents as much as two-thirds of the weight of a...

  5. Calculating the spectral distribution of radiation from X-ray tubes with grounded cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In implementing current versions of X-ray fluorescence analysis (the method of functional parameters, the method of fundamental coefficients, etc.), it is necessary to have information about the spectral composition of primary X- ray radiation whose source is usually provided by X-ray tubes. The radiation of tubes with grounded anode is well understood. However, state-of-the-art X-ray spectral equipment normally incorporates X-ray tubes with grounded cathode. In this case a high positive potential returns backscattered electrons to the anode surface, which leads to an enhancement of both the braking and characteristic components of primary radiation. This process appears to play an important role because backscattered electrons account for tens of percent of the number of those incident on anode, and a maximum in their energy distribution with increasing atomic number of anode approaches the energy of primary electrons. We have obtained the expression for spectral intensity of primary radiation from X-ray tubes with grounded cathode which takes into account the return of backscattered electrons to the anode surface and their energy distribution. Calculations of spectral distributions were performed for different anode materials. Results were compared with those obtained at high voltage on the X- ray tube's cathode. As would be expected, the contribution of the effect under consideration increases with increasing atomic number of anode material, and for some spectral intensities at high Z it is as high as ten percent or more. Furthermore, the spectral distribution of braking radiation is markedly distorted when compared to the case of grounded anode, and characteristic lines increase in intensity. Further investigation involves assessing the influence of the detected distortions on the accuracy of X-ray fluorescence determination of element contents in materials of complex composition. (author)

  6. Management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tube glass: Review of advances in recycling and best available technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniaghe, Paschal O; Adie, Gilbert U

    2015-11-01

    Cathode ray tubes are image display units found in computer monitors and televisions. In recent years, cathode ray tubes have been generated as waste owing to the introduction of newer and advanced technologies in image displays, such as liquid crystal displays and high definition televisions, among others. Generation and subsequent disposal of end-of-life cathode ray tubes presents a challenge owing to increasing volumes and high lead content embedded in the funnel and neck sections of the glass. Disposal in landfills and open dumping are anti-environmental practices considering the large-scale contamination of environmental media by the potential of toxic metals leaching from glass. Mitigating such environmental contamination will require sound management strategies that are environmentally friendly and economically feasible. This review covers existing and emerging management practices for end-of-life cathode ray tubes. An in-depth analysis of available technologies (glass smelting, detoxification of cathode ray tube glass, lead extraction from cathode ray tube glass) revealed that most of the techniques are environmentally friendly, but are largely confined to either laboratory scale, or are often limited owing to high cost to mount, or generate secondary pollutants, while a closed-looped method is antiquated. However, recycling in cementitious systems (cement mortar and concrete) gives an added advantage in terms of quantity of recyclable cathode ray tube glass at a given time, with minimal environmental and economic implications. With significant quantity of waste cathode ray tube glass being generated globally, cementitious systems could be economically and environmentally acceptable as a sound management practice for cathode ray tube glass, where other technologies may not be applicable. PMID:26463115

  7. Thermogravimetric Investigation of the Lead Volatilization from Waste Cathode-Ray Tube Glass

    OpenAIRE

    Grause, Guido; Takahashi, Kenshi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of lead-containing cathode-ray tube (CRT) glass is an important environmental issue. One approach is the removal of lead by chloride volatilization. In the present work, the reaction of CRT glass with PVC as the chlorinating agent and Ca(OH)2 as the chlorine absorber was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in air. Seven reaction steps occurring at different temperatures were identified as dehydrochlorination of PVC/HCl absorption, CO2 absorption, Ca(OH)2 dehydration...

  8. Calibration of medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tube displays for the purpose of board examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Evanoff, Michael G.; Roehrig, Hans; Giffords, Robert S.; Capp, M. Paul; Rovinelli, Richard J.; Hartmann, William H.; Merritt, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses calibration and set-up procedures for medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tubes (CRTs) taken in preparation of the oral portion of the board examination of the American Board of Radiology (ABR). The board examinations took place in more than 100 rooms of a hotel. There was one display-station (a computer and the associated CRT display) in each of the hotel rooms used for the examinations. The examinations covered the radiologic specialties cardiopulmonary, musculosk...

  9. New cathode-ray tube (CRT) gun interconnection assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, David M.

    1992-07-01

    A novel interconnection assembly method was developed for the electron gun of airborne CRTs, which makes it possible for the connectors to be connected and disconnected repeatedly (as opposed to soldering as in the conventional method) to provide access to the tube and its interconnecting cable harness. Environmental tests were conducted on one series of CRTs, which included electrical and environmental conditions which would be experienced in a worst-case aircraft cabin environment, including the altitude, humidity, thermal shock, vibration, and mechanical shock.

  10. Compact monochromatic flash x-ray generator utilizing a disk-cathode molybdenum tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-voltage condensers in a polarity-inversion two-stage Marx surge generator are charged from -50 to -70 kV by a power supply, and the electric charges in the condensers are discharged to an x-ray tube after closing gap switches in the surge generator with a trigger device. The x-ray tube is a demountable diode, and the turbo molecular pump evacuates air from the tube with a pressure of approximately 1 mPa. Clean molybdenum Kα lines are produced using a 20 μm-thick zirconium filter, since the tube utilizes a disk cathode and a rod target, and bremsstrahlung rays are not emitted in the opposite direction to that of electron acceleration. At a charging voltage of -70 kV, the instantaneous tube voltage and current were 120 kV and 1.0 kA, respectively. The x-ray pulse widths were approximately 70 ns, and the generator produced instantaneous number of Kα photons was approximately 3x107 photons/cm2 per pulse at 0.5 m from the source of 3.0 mm in diameter

  11. The chemistry of artificial lighting devices lamps, phosphors and cathode ray tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Ropp, Richard C

    1993-01-01

    Both the early use of artificial lighting and current manufacturing methods concerning incandescent and fluorescent lamps are covered in this book. The protocols for manufacture of fluorescent lamp phosphors and those used in cathode ray tubes are also treated in some detail. This text surveys the amazing, vast array of artificial lighting devices known to date in terms of how they arose and are, or have been used by mankind. A complete description of the formulations and methodology for manufacturing all known phosphors is given. The book will serve as a repository of such phosphor manufactur

  12. Novel Low-Cost, Low-Power Miniature Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave/Millimeter Wave Tube and Cathode Ray Tube Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    A low cost, small size and mass, low heater power, durable high-performance barium dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers significant advancements in the design, manufacture, and performance of the electron sources used in vacuum electronic devices--such as microwave (and millimeter wave) traveling-wave tubes (TWT's)--and in display devices such as high-brightness, high-resolution cathode ray tubes (CRT's). The lower cathode heater power and the reduced size and mass of the new cathode are expected to be especially beneficial in TWT's for deep space communications, where future missions are requiring smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. Also expected to benefit are TWT's for commercial and government communication satellites, for both low and geosynchronous Earth orbit, with additional benefits offered by lower cost and potentially higher cathode current loading. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (MPM), which is a hybrid microwave (or millimeter wave) amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid state driver, a vacuum power booster (small TWT), and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package. The attributes of compactness and potentially high electrical efficiency make the MPM very attractive for many commercial and government (civilian and defense) applications in communication and radar systems. The MPM is already finding application in defense electronic systems and is under development by NASA for deep space communications. However, for the MPM to become competitive and commercially successful, a major reduction in cost must be achieved.

  13. Physical Characteristics and Technology of Glass Foam from Waste Cathode Ray Tube Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mucsi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the laboratory investigation of cathode-ray-tube- (CRT- glass-based glass foam, the so-called “Geofil-Bubbles” which can be applied in many fields, mainly in the construction industry (lightweight concrete aggregate, thermal and sound insulation, etc.. In this study, the main process engineering material properties of raw materials, such as particle size distribution, moisture content, density, and specific surface area, are shown. Then, the preparation of raw cathode ray tube glass waste is presented including the following steps: crushing, grinding, mixing, heat curing, coating, and sintering. Experiments were carried out to optimize process circumstances. Effects of sintering conditions—such as temperature, residence time, and particle size fraction of green pellet—on the mechanical stability and particle density of glass foam particles were investigated. The mechanical stability (abrasion resistance was tested by abrasion test in a Deval drum. Furthermore, the cell structure was examined with optical microscopy and SEM. We found that it was possible to produce foam glass (with proper mechanical stability and particle density from CRT glass. The material characteristics of the final product strongly depend on the sintering conditions. Optimum conditions were determined: particle size fraction was found to be 4–6 mm, temperature 800°C, and residence time 7.5 min.

  14. Evaluation Of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) And Veiling Glare Characteristics For Cathode Ray Tube Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banbury, J. R.

    1981-10-01

    Cathode-ray tube evaluation is becoming increasingly important in connection with the prediction of overall performance for systems incorporating an imaging display. Modulation transfer function has been measured by a method which takes account of the basic non-linearities of the crt and also offers improved accuracy by reducing the effects of phosphor screen noise. Two tests for crt internal veiling glare are discussed. Standard test conditions, which have been successfully used for a wide range of displays are described for both mtf and veiling glare. A contrast index is employed to indicate the extent of nonlinearity in the display transfer characteristic, and the paper also discusses briefly the use of generalised drive characteristics and limiting contrast curves as a supplement or alternative to modulation transfer function for definition of display performance.

  15. Evaluation of Cathode-Ray Tube protection for the electronic tabular display subsystem (ETABS) engineering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A. R.

    1981-09-01

    This report describes the safety evaluation of the 25-inch (diagonal) rectangular cathode-ray tube (CRT) that is used in the engineering model of the Electronic Tabular Display Subsystem (ETABS). An evaluation of ETABS will be performed at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Technical Center for possible application in FAA Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCC). The safety evaluation included standard industry pressure testing and special implosion testing on 12 CRT samples. Eleven of the twelve CRT samples satisfactorily met the safety requirements for both the pressure and implosion testing. One CRT cracked when subjected to 45 pounds per square inch (psi) of air pressure; however, the CRT did not implode. The 25-inch rectangular CRT will therefore provide a high degree of safety for use in each of the two tabular displays of the ETABS engineering model.

  16. 40 CFR 261.39 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Broken Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. 261.39 Section 261.39 Protection of... (CRTs) and Processed CRT Glass Undergoing Recycling. Used, broken CRTs are not solid wastes if they meet... complete until any such claim is resolved in accordance with 40 CFR 260.2. (v) The export of CRTs...

  17. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet...

  18. Exposure to hazardous substances in Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) recycling sites in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecler, Marie-Thérèse, E-mail: marie-therese.lecler@inrs.fr; Zimmermann, François; Silvente, Eric; Clerc, Frédéric; Chollot, Alain; Grosjean, Jérôme

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Chemical risks were assessed in the nine cathode ray tube screens recycling facilities. • The main hazardous agents are dust containing lead, cadmium, barium and yttrium. • Exposure and pollutant levels are described for different operations and processes. • All the operations and processes are concerned by significant levels of pollutants. • We suggest recommendations to reduce chemical risk. - Abstract: The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) or e-waste recycling sector has grown considerably in the last fifteen years due to the ever shorter life cycles of consumables and an increasingly restrictive policy context. Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) from used television and computer screens represent one of the main sources of e-waste. CRTs contain toxic materials such as lead, cadmium, barium, and fluorescent powders which can be released if recycling of CRTs is not appropriate. Exposure to these harmful substances was assessed in nine workshops where CRT screens are treated. Particulate exposure levels were measured using a gravimetric method and metals were analysed by plasma emission spectrometry. The maximum levels of worker exposure were 8.8 mg/m{sup 3}, 1504.3 μg/m{sup 3}, 434.9 μg/m{sup 3}, 576.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 2894.3 μg/m{sup 3} respectively for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The maximum levels of airborne pollutants in static samples were 39.0 mg/m{sup 3}, 848.2 μg/m{sup 3}, 698.4 μg/m{sup 3}, 549.3 μg/m{sup 3} and 3437.9 μg/m{sup 3} for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The most harmful operations were identified, and preventive measures for reducing the chemical risk associated with screen recycling were proposed. Workplace measurements were used to define recommendations for reducing the chemical risks in CRT screens recycling facilities and for promoting the design and development of “clean and safe” processes in emerging recycling channels.

  19. Exposure to hazardous substances in Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) recycling sites in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Chemical risks were assessed in the nine cathode ray tube screens recycling facilities. • The main hazardous agents are dust containing lead, cadmium, barium and yttrium. • Exposure and pollutant levels are described for different operations and processes. • All the operations and processes are concerned by significant levels of pollutants. • We suggest recommendations to reduce chemical risk. - Abstract: The Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) or e-waste recycling sector has grown considerably in the last fifteen years due to the ever shorter life cycles of consumables and an increasingly restrictive policy context. Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) from used television and computer screens represent one of the main sources of e-waste. CRTs contain toxic materials such as lead, cadmium, barium, and fluorescent powders which can be released if recycling of CRTs is not appropriate. Exposure to these harmful substances was assessed in nine workshops where CRT screens are treated. Particulate exposure levels were measured using a gravimetric method and metals were analysed by plasma emission spectrometry. The maximum levels of worker exposure were 8.8 mg/m3, 1504.3 μg/m3, 434.9 μg/m3, 576.3 μg/m3 and 2894.3 μg/m3 respectively for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The maximum levels of airborne pollutants in static samples were 39.0 mg/m3, 848.2 μg/m3, 698.4 μg/m3, 549.3 μg/m3 and 3437.9 μg/m3 for inhalable dust, barium, cadmium, lead and yttrium. The most harmful operations were identified, and preventive measures for reducing the chemical risk associated with screen recycling were proposed. Workplace measurements were used to define recommendations for reducing the chemical risks in CRT screens recycling facilities and for promoting the design and development of “clean and safe” processes in emerging recycling channels

  20. Water-soluble lead in cathode ray tube funnel glass melted in a reductive atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    In the reduction-melting process, lead can be recovered from cathode ray tube funnel glass (PbO=25wt%); however, resulting glass residues still contain approximately 1-2wt% of unrecovered lead. For environmental protection in the residue disposal or recycling, it is important to evaluate the quantities of water-soluble species among the unrecovered lead. This study examined water-soluble lead species generated in the reduction-melting process of the funnel glass and factors determining their generation. In the reduction-melting, metallic lead was generated by reducing lead oxides in the glass, and a part of the metallic lead remained in the glass residue. Such unrecovered metallic lead can dissolve in water depending on its pH level and was regarded as water-soluble lead. When 10g Na2CO3 was added to 20g funnel glass during reduction-melting, the resulting glass contained high concentrations of sodium. In a water leaching of the glass, the obtained leachate was alkalized by the sodium-rich glass (pH=12.7-13.0). The unrecovered metallic lead in the glass was extracted in the alkalized leachate. The quantity of the unrecovered metallic lead (water-soluble lead) in the glass decreased when the melting time, melting temperature, and carbon dosage were controlled during reduction-melting. PMID:27209518

  1. Visual Evoked Potential Using Head-Mounted Display Versus Cathode Ray Tube: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyo Seon; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present a new stimulation method based on the use of a head-mounted display (HMD) during pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PR-VEP) testing and to compare variables of HMD to those of conventional cathode ray tube (CRT). Methods Twenty-three normal subjects without visual problems were recruited. PR-VEPs were generated using CRT or HMD stimuli. VEP outcome measures included latencies (N75, P100, and N145) and peak-to-peak amplitudes (N75–P100 and P100–N145). Subjective discomfort associated with HMD was determined using a self-administered questionnaire. Results PR-VEPs generated by HMD stimuli showed typical triphasic waveforms, the components of which were found to be correlated with those obtained using conventional CRT stimuli. Self-administered discomfort questionnaires revealed that HMD was more comfortable in some aspects. It allowed subjects to concentrate better than CRT. Conclusion The described HMD stimulation can be used as an alternative to the standard CRT stimulation for PR-VEPs. PR-VEP testing using HMD has potential applications in clinical practice and visual system research because HMD can be used on a wider range of subjects compared to CRT. PMID:27152285

  2. Comparison of liquid crystal versus cathode ray tube display for the detection of simulated chest lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to compare the detection performance of a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor versus a liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor for simulated subtle pulmonary lesions. Ten templates containing simulated lung lesions were superimposed on an anthropomorphic chest phantom. Posteroanterior radiographs were obtained using flat panel technology and were displayed on a CRT and an LCD monitor. Image processing and reading conditions were equivalent for both softcopy displays. Five observers assessed lesion detectability using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) methodology. A multivariate test (Pillai trace) was used to test the significance of differences (P<0.05). The multivariate test revealed significantly different detection rates for the lesion types, but no significant difference between the two display modes. Detection performance for both monitors was higher for nodules and micro-nodules and lower for lines and patchy opacities. Analysis of lesion subgroups according to their location in lucent/obscured lung areas was also not statistically significant. Under ideal reading conditions, CRT and LCD displays perform equivalently for the detection of simulated subtle pulmonary lesions. (orig.)

  3. Calibration of medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tube displays for the purpose of board examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanoff, M G; Roehrig, H; Giffords, R S; Capp, M P; Rovinelli, R J; Hartmann, W H; Merritt, C

    2001-06-01

    This report discusses calibration and set-up procedures for medium-resolution monochrome cathode ray tubes (CRTs) taken in preparation of the oral portion of the board examination of the American Board of Radiology (ABR). The board examinations took place in more than 100 rooms of a hotel. There was one display-station (a computer and the associated CRT display) in each of the hotel rooms used for the examinations. The examinations covered the radiologic specialties cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, vascular, pediatric, and genitourinary. The software used for set-up and calibration was the VeriLUM 4.0 package from Image Smiths in Germantown, MD. The set-up included setting minimum luminance and maximum luminance, as well as positioning of the CRT in each examination room with respect to reflections of roomlights. The calibration for the grey scale rendition was done meeting the Digital Imaging and communication in Medicine (DICOM) 14 Standard Display Function. We describe these procedures, and present the calibration data in. tables and graphs, listing initial values of minimum luminance, maximum luminance, and grey scale rendition (DICOM 14 standard display function). Changes of these parameters over the duration of the examination were observed and recorded on 11 monitors in a particular room. These changes strongly suggest that all calibrated CRTs be monitored over the duration of the examination. In addition, other CRT performance data affecting image quality such as spatial resolution should be included in set-up and image quality-control procedures. PMID:11442114

  4. Increased micronucleated cell frequency related to exposure to radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Carbonari; Luciane Gonçalves; Daniela Roth; Patrick Moreira; Ricardo Fernández; Maria da Graça Martino-Roth

    2005-01-01

    It is well recognized that electromagnetic fields can affect the biological functions of living organisms at both cellular and molecular level. The potential damaging effects of electromagnetic fields and very low frequency and extremely low frequency radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors (VDMs) has become a concern within the scientific community. We studied the effects of occupational exposure to VDMs in 10 males and 10 females occupationally exposed to VDMs ...

  5. Removal of lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass by combined thermal treatment and leaching processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    The reduction melting process is useful to recover toxic lead from cathode ray tube funnel glass; however, this process generates SiO2-containing residues that are disposed in landfill sites. To reduce the volume of landfill waste, it is desirable to recycle the SiO2-containing residues. In this study, SiO2 powder was recovered from the residue generated by reduction melting. The funnel glass was treated by a process combining reduction melting at 1000°C and annealing at 700°C to recover a large quantity of lead from the glass. The oxide phase generated by the thermal treatment was subjected to water leaching and acid leaching with 1M hydrochloric acid to wash out unwanted non-SiO2 elements for SiO2 purification. In the water washing, the oxide phase was microparticulated, and porous structures formed on the oxide surfaces. This increased the surface area of the oxide phase, and the unwanted elements were effectively washed out during the subsequent acid leaching. By controlling the acid leaching time and the amount of added acid, porous and amorphous SiO2 (purity >95 wt%) was recovered. In the obtained SiO2-concentrated product, unrecovered lead remained at concentrations of 0.25-0.79 wt%. When the Na2CO3 dosage in the thermal treatment was increased, the lead removal by acid leaching was enhanced, and the lead concentration in the obtained product decreased to 0.016 wt%. PMID:26022339

  6. Factors influencing leaching of PBDEs from waste cathode ray tube plastic housings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbings, William A; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Samples of waste cathode ray tube (CRT) plastic housings were exposed to Milli-Q® water containing dissolved humic matter at concentrations of 0, 100 and 1000mgL(-1) as leaching fluid under laboratory conditions, and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) determined in the resulting leachate. Despite the relatively hydrophobic physicochemical properties of PBDEs, concentrations of ƩPBDEs in the leachate from the leaching experiments in this study ranged from 14,000 to 200,000ngL(-1). PBDE leaching appears to be a second order process, whereby a period of initially intense dissolution of more labile PBDEs is followed by a slower stage corresponding to external diffusion of the soluble residue in the material. The bulk of transfer of PBDEs to the leaching fluid occurs within the first 6h of contact, during which time we suggest that the most labile PBDEs are "washed" off the surface of the CRT plastics. The predominant congeners in the chips were BDE-209 (2600mgkg(-1)) and BDE 183 (220mgkg(-1)). The impacts on PBDE leaching of leachate pH and temperature were also examined. Increasing the temperature of leaching fluids from 20 to 80°C, enhances the leachability of BDE-209 and BDE-99 from plastics. In all cases, the alkaline pH8.5 examined, resulted in the greatest PBDE concentrations in leachate. Agitation of the waste/leachate mixture enhances PBDE leaching from CRT plastics. Potential evidence for debromination of heavy congeners to the lower brominated and more bioavailable BDEs was observed. Specifically, BDEs-47, -85 and -100 were detected in the leachates, but were absent from the CRT plastics themselves. PMID:27436776

  7. Hydrometallurgical Processing and Recovery of Nickel from Spent Cathode Ray Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coman V.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technological progress required for more and more advanced electrical and electronic equipment (EEE. Therefore, EEE manufacturing became one of the most important world activities, generating at the same time huge amounts of waste. In the last decades the accumulation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE has become a global problem (Widmer et al., 2005; Babu et al., 2007; Robinson, 2009. These wastes are a threat for the environment due to their high content of toxic materials and, at the same time, they are an important source of recyclable materials, and especially valuable metals (e.g. Au, Ag, Pd, Cu, Ni, Zn. Nowadays there are various approaches for the treatment and recycling of WEEE, involving pyro-, hydro- and bio-metallurgical processes (Cui and Zhang, 2008. Among WEEE, cathode ray tubes (CRT displays, used mainly in computer monitors and television sets, are regarded as the most polluting fraction of all WEEE (Nnorom et al., 2011. CRT recycling represents a challenge due to their high accumulation rate, proportional to the evolution of modern technologies (flat panel displays, their high content of toxic and noxious substances (heavy metals and organic compounds, improper storage, and the lack of a complete, pollution-free recycling solution. Previous studies have shown that some CRT metallic components (electron gun - EG, shadow mask contain important amounts of Ni (25 – 45% and Fe (50 – 70%, and small quantities of Mn, Co and Cr (Robotin et al., 2011. Ni and Ni alloys play an important role in modern technology, especially due to their magnetic and anticorrosion properties. Unfortunately, when exposed inappropriately, Ni can have negative environmental effects and can be harmful to human health (Denkhaus and Salnikow, 2002. In this context, Ni recycling from electronic waste is important for environmental and health reasons, and, at the same time, Ni recycling could be financially sustainable due to an

  8. Use of limestone powder during incorporation of Pb-containing cathode ray tube waste in self-compacting concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sua-iam, Gritsada; Makul, Natt

    2013-10-15

    For several decades, cathode ray tubes (CRTs) were the primary display component of televisions and computers. The CRT glass envelope contains sufficient levels of lead oxide (PbO) to be considered hazardous, and there is a need for effective methods of permanently encapsulating this material during waste disposal. We examined the effect of adding limestone powder (LS) on the fresh and cured properties of self-compacting concrete (SCC) mixtures containing waste CRT glass. The SCC mixtures were prepared using Type 1 Portland cement at a constant cement content of 600 kg/m(3) and a water-to-cement ratio (w/c) of 0.38. CRT glass waste cullet was blended with river sand in proportions of 20 or 40% by weight. To suppress potential viscosity effects limestone powder was added at levels of 5, 10, or 15% by weight. The slump flow time, slump flow diameter, V-funnel flow time, Marsh cone flow time, and setting time of the fresh concrete were tested, as well as the compressive strength and ultrasonic pulse velocity of the hardened concrete. Addition of limestone powder improved the fresh and hardened properties. Pb leaching levels from the cured concrete were within US EPA allowable limits. PMID:23892134

  9. Increased micronucleated cell frequency related to exposure to radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Carbonari

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that electromagnetic fields can affect the biological functions of living organisms at both cellular and molecular level. The potential damaging effects of electromagnetic fields and very low frequency and extremely low frequency radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors (VDMs has become a concern within the scientific community. We studied the effects of occupational exposure to VDMs in 10 males and 10 females occupationally exposed to VDMs and 20 unexposed control subjects matched for age and sex. Genetic damage was assessed by examining the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells and the frequency of other nuclear abnormalities such as binucleated and broken egg cells. Although there were no differences regarding binucleated cells between exposed and control individuals our analysis revealed a significantly higher frequency of micronuclei (p < 0.001 and broken egg cells (p < 0.05 in individuals exposed to VDMs as compared to unexposed. We also found that the differences between individuals exposed to VDMs were significantly related to the sex of the individuals and that there was an increase in skin, central nervous system and ocular disease in the exposed individuals. These preliminary results indicate that microcomputer workers exposed to VDMs are at risk of significant cytogenetic damage and should periodically undergo biological monitoring.

  10. Characterization of lead, barium and strontium leachability from foam glasses elaborated using waste cathode ray-tube glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foam glass manufacture is a promising mode for re-using cathode ray tube (CRT) glasses. Nevertheless, because CRTs employ glasses containing heavy metals such as lead, barium and strontium, the leaching behaviour of foam glasses fabricated from CRTs must be understood. Using the AFNOR X 31-210 leaching assessment procedure, the degree of element inertization in foam glasses synthesized from waste CRT glasses (funnel and panel glasses, containing lead and barium/strontium respectively) were determined. The amount of leached lead from foam glasses prepared from funnel glass depends on the nature and concentration of the reducing agent. The effects of the reducing agents on the generation of cellular structure in the fabrication of foam glass were studied. The fraction of lead released from foam glass was less than those extracted from funnel glass and was lower than the statutory limit. Leached concentrations of barium and strontium were found to be approximately constant in various tests and were also below regulatory limits.

  11. Characterization of lead, barium and strontium leachability from foam glasses elaborated using waste cathode ray-tube glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yot, Pascal G; Méar, François O

    2011-01-15

    Foam glass manufacture is a promising mode for re-using cathode ray tube (CRT) glasses. Nevertheless, because CRTs employ glasses containing heavy metals such as lead, barium and strontium, the leaching behaviour of foam glasses fabricated from CRTs must be understood. Using the AFNOR X 31-210 leaching assessment procedure, the degree of element inertization in foam glasses synthesized from waste CRT glasses (funnel and panel glasses, containing lead and barium/strontium respectively) were determined. The amount of leached lead from foam glasses prepared from funnel glass depends on the nature and concentration of the reducing agent. The effects of the reducing agents on the generation of cellular structure in the fabrication of foam glass were studied. The fraction of lead released from foam glass was less than those extracted from funnel glass and was lower than the statutory limit. Leached concentrations of barium and strontium were found to be approximately constant in various tests and were also below regulatory limits. PMID:20940082

  12. Lead removal from cathode ray tube glass by the action of calcium hydroxide and poly(vinyl chloride)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • About 99.9% of lead is removed from CRT glass by PbCl2 volatilization. • PVC is used as chlorination agent with the aid of Ca(OH)2 as HCl absorbing material. • The residual calcium silicate has a lead content as low as 140 mg kg−1. • Lead leaching from the residue was below the detection limit. - Abstract: With the development of flat screen technology, the cathode ray tubes (CRTs) used in TV sets became obsolete, leaving huge amounts of lead-containing CRT glass for disposal. We developed a novel lead volatilization process in which PbCl2 was generated in the presence of poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) as a chlorination agent and Ca(OH)2 as an HCl absorber. PVC was incinerated in air atmosphere and the resulting HCl was captured by Ca(OH)2 before exiting the reactor with the air flow. CaCl2 and Ca(OH)2 reacted with the lead glass forming volatile PbCl2 and crystalline Ca-silicates. Since the reactivity of lead glass with gaseous HCl is negligible, the presence of Ca(OH)2 was essential for the success of this method. At a temperature of 1000 °C, a molar Cl/Pb ratio of 16, and a molar Ca/Si ratio of about 2, approximately 99.9% of the lead was volatilized, leaving a residue with a lead content of 140 mg kg−1. The residual calcium silicate, with its low lead level, has the potential to be repurposed for other uses

  13. Reduction-melting combined with a Na₂CO₃ flux recycling process for lead recovery from cathode ray tube funnel glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    With large quantity of flux (Na2CO3), lead can be recovered from the funnel glass of waste cathode-ray tubes via reduction-melting at 1000°C. To reduce flux cost, a technique to recover added flux from the generated oxide phase is also important in order to recycle the flux recovered from the reduction-melting process. In this study, the phase separation of sodium and the crystallization of water-soluble sodium silicates were induced after the reduction-melting process to enhance the leachability of sodium in the oxide phase and to extract the sodium from the phase for the recovery of Na2CO3 as flux. A reductive atmosphere promoted the phase separation and crystallization, and the leachability of sodium from the oxide phase was enhanced. The optimum temperature and treatment time for increasing the leachability were 700°C and 2h, respectively. After treatment, more than 90% of the sodium in the oxide phase was extracted in water. NaHCO3 can be recovered by carbonization of the solution containing sodium ions using carbon dioxide gas, decomposed to Na2CO3 at 50°C and recycled for use in the reduction-melting process. PMID:24816522

  14. Comparison of observer performance on soft-copy reading of digital chest radiographs: High resolution liquid-crystal display monitors versus cathode-ray tube monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to compare observer performance for detection of abnormalities on chest radiographs with 5-megapixel resolution liquid-crystal displays (LCD) and 5-megapixel resolution cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors under bright and subdued ambient light conditions. Six radiologists reviewed a total of 254 digital chest radiographs under four different conditions with a combination of two types of monitors (a 5-megapixel resolution LCD and a 5-megapixel resolution CRT monitor) and with two types of ambient light (460 and 50 lux). The abnormalities analyzed were nodules, pneumothorax and interstitial lung disease. For each reader, the detection performance using 5-megapixel LCD and 5-megapixel CRT monitors under bright and subdued ambient light conditions were compared using multi-case and multi-modality ROC analysis. For each type of ambient light, the average detection performance with the two types of monitors was also compared. For each reader, the observer performance of 5-megapixel LCD and 5-megapixel CRT monitors, under both bright and subdued ambient light conditions, showed no significant statistical differences for detecting nodules, pneumothorax and interstitial lung disease. In addition, there was no significant statistical difference in the average performance when the two monitor displays, under both bright and subdued ambient light conditions, were compared

  15. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved form of x-ray tube is described which consists of a rotatable anode disc and an electron beam source enclosed in an envelope. The beam of electrons strikes the edge of the anode disc at an acute angle, producing x-rays which are transmitted through a window in the envelope. To improve performance and life of the anode disc it is additionally reciprocated back and forth along its axis of rotation. Dimensions are specified. (U.K.)

  16. X-ray tubes study and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis contain both theoretical and experimental works. Theoretical aspect includes X-Ray tubes case study and design principles, in the introduced design process, anode-cathode distance, vacuum needed, filament size, anode face angle and shape and size of focusing electrodes can be found. A method for specification of tungsten lager thickness on anode is also introduced. Using computer simulation, electron trajectory between cathode-anode is obtained, This work is presented in the first International Conference on Control and Modeling, Tehran, 1990. Experimental work contains manufacturing more than 10 tubes and test each of them. One of these tubes can with stand up to 50 KV. Filament can be heated by passing a 2.1 A current. In these conditions anode current is 1.2 m A. Using this tube, some radiographs have been taken

  17. CRL X-RAY TUBE

    OpenAIRE

    Kolchevsky, N. N.; Petrov, P. V.

    2015-01-01

    A novel types of X-ray tubes with refractive lenses are proposed. CRL-R X-ray tube consists of Compound Refractive Lens- CRL and Reflection X-ray tube. CRL acts as X-ray window. CRL-T X-ray consists of CRL and Transmission X-ray tube. CRL acts as target for electron beam. CRL refractive lens acts as filter, collimator, waveguide and focusing lens. Properties and construction of the CRL X-ray tube are discussed.

  18. The emission carbonate crystallite and oxide cathode performance in electron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Don; Turnbull, John

    Emission from an oxide cathode is dependent upon the ratio of alkaline earth carbonates present at the cathodes surface. The method by which each carbonate is made plays a key role in its function in a cathode. Other factors effecting the performance of the oxide cathode are the type of constituents in the base metal. These constituents play key roles in barium diffusion and evaporation. It has been found that the crystalline structure of the alkaline earth carbonates affects the life of oxide cathode tubes. The rates of diffusion and evaporation of alkaline earth oxides, were studied with the use of the SEM-electron beam probe and energy dispersive X-ray Edax. Cathode surfaces to the depths of 1000 Å (approximately 200 atomic layers) were scanned. Many cathodes were studied after conversion from carbonates to oxides. It was found that barium oxide evaporated to 1/3 of the original formulation at oxide conversion. This diffusion and evaporation reaction took place throughout tube life. This work has shown that the crystal size, structure, and composition may be modified to lengthen the BaO half life and therefore lengthen the overall life of the electron tube.

  19. Development of suitable potting material for dispenser cathodes of a high power microwave tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Potting material. ► Doped alumina. ► Non-shrinkable. ► Dispenser cathode. ► Microwave tube. - Abstract: The present study aims to develop suitable advanced potting material for modern high performance dispenser cathodes for high power microwave tube through refinement of the alumina microstructure by using suitable dopant. Calcium oxide was selected as a dopant material and the resultant materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction studies and the microstructure monitored by SEM study and EDX analysis. The shrinkage, thermal and electrical properties of the resultant material was evaluated to establish its suitability to function as an advanced potting material.

  20. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La2O3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  1. Spatial distribution of air kerma rate and impact of accelerating voltage on the quality of an ultra soft X-ray beam generated by a cold cathode tube in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasoft X-ray characteristic aluminum K alpha line (Al Kα with energy of 1.5 keV) is used in radiobiological experiments to study the effect of radiation on biological matter. A simple method to generate a continuous beam of those X-ray radiations is to bombarding an aluminum target with accelerated electrons using high voltage (HV). In this work, by varying the HV we study the characteristics of a photon beam generated by means of a cold cathode transmission X-ray tube. The anode is a thin (16 μm) aluminum foil supported by a copper grid. The spatial distribution of air kerma is measured using gafchromic films of HD-810 calibrated with a parallel plate free-air ionization chamber. We show that HV strongly modifies the energetic spectrum and air kerma rate as well as its uniformity and intensity in air. - Highlights: • We measured energy spectrum of X-ray beam. • We calibrate the Gafchromic films to measure air kerma of X-ray beam. • Spatial air kerma rate is determined and interpreted. • We define dimensions and position of future biological sample irradiation using Al Kα X-ray

  2. X-ray tube having an adjustable focal spot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-ray tube with an adjustable focal spot is provided wherein the focal-spot position can be moved along the anode and the focal-spot width can be changed by applying a small voltage to the cathode-bias cup. The cathode includes means integral with the cathode for deflecting the flow of electrons to selectable focal-spot areas on the anode in response to an external drive circuit. The cathode includes a filament for emitting electrons to impinge on the anode, and a cathode cup having first and second parts electrically insulated from each other. The device includes biasing means for applying a voltage between the filament and the cathode to control the size and position of the region of impingement of the electron beam on the anode. The anode can be rotatable with respect to the cathode. (Auth.)

  3. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  4. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A.; Trowbridge, Frank R.

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  5. X-ray tube arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An x-ray tube is described incorporating an elongated target/ anode over which the electron beam is deflected and from which x-rays are emitted. Improved methods of monitoring and controlling the amplitude of the beam deflection are presented. (U.K.)

  6. Development of suitable potting material for dispenser cathodes of a high power microwave tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Kalyan S.; Ghosh, Sumana; Dandapat, Nandadulal [Bio-Ceramics and Coating Division, CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Datta, Someswar, E-mail: sdatta@cgcri.res.in [Bio-Ceramics and Coating Division, CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Basu, Debabrata [Bio-Ceramics and Coating Division, CSIR - Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S.C. Mullick Road, Kolkata 700 032, West Bengal (India); Raju, R.S. [Microwave Tubes Division, CSIR - Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute, Pilani 333031, Rajasthan (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potting material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Doped alumina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-shrinkable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dispenser cathode. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave tube. - Abstract: The present study aims to develop suitable advanced potting material for modern high performance dispenser cathodes for high power microwave tube through refinement of the alumina microstructure by using suitable dopant. Calcium oxide was selected as a dopant material and the resultant materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction studies and the microstructure monitored by SEM study and EDX analysis. The shrinkage, thermal and electrical properties of the resultant material was evaluated to establish its suitability to function as an advanced potting material.

  7. Effect of Cathode Ray Tubes Glass Sand as Fine Aggregate on Properties of Mortar%废弃阴极射线管玻璃砂对砂浆性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖; 孙伟

    2012-01-01

    The discarded cathode ray tubes glass represents an environmental problem due to the high content of lead. In this paper, fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag were used as mineral admixtures, the fresh, mechanical properties, the drying shrinkage, alkali-silica reaction (ASR) expansion and lead leaching properties of mortar with ground cathode ray tube glass sand (MG) fine aggregate at replacement levels of 0, 30%, 60% and 100% were investigated. The results show that the initial slump flow diame- ter and wet density of fresh mortar increase with the MG glass replacement level from 0 to 100%, the compressive strength, the flex- ural strength and static modulus of elasticity and the drying shrinkage values of mortar increase at the initial stages and trend towards the gradual decrease. The mortar with MG glass sand of 60% had higher mechanical properties and larger drying shrinkage values. The ASR expansion and the leaching value of lead in mortar increased with MG replacement levels from 0% to 100%. However, the ASR expansion and the leaching value of lead were on the safety range. The mortar with MG glass by adding mineral admixture could be used as a recycled material for the construction material in dry environments.%废弃阴极射线管(cathoderaytubes,CRT)玻璃因其含有有害物质铅而导致严重环境问题,为此,使用粉煤灰、磨细矿渣作为矿物掺合料,研究了磨细阴极射线管玻璃(groundcathoderaytubeglass,MG)取代0、30%、60%、100%(质量分数,下同)河砂细骨料时砂浆新拌性能、力学性能、干缩性能、碱骨料反应(alkali-silicareaction,ASR)膨胀性能、金属铅浸出值。结果表明:随着MG取代比例从0变化到100%,砂浆初始流动度与容重不段增加,硬化砂浆抗压强度、抗折强度和静弹性模量、干缩性能先增加后逐渐减小;MG取代比例为60%时,砂浆具有较高力学性能和

  8. Fabrication and Simulation of Self-Focusing Field Emission X-ray Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A self-focusing field emission (FE X-ray tube with a large-area cathode design was simulated and fabricated. The designed X-ray tube had a cylindrically symmetric geometry; the diameter of the cathode and the anode was 15 mm, and the cathode-anode distance was 20 mm. Owing to the unique cup-shaped design of the cathode, the electron beam emitted from the large-area cathode was focused onto the anode without using magnetic lenses or extra biased electrodes. Carbon nanocoils, which were grown on the bottom of the circular cup-shaped cathode, were used as electron emitters because of their excellent FE properties. A simulation of the electron trajectories for various cup heights revealed that the optimal focal spot size (0.1 mm was obtained at a cup height of 5 mm when a voltage of 50 kV was applied. To verify this result, an X-ray tube was fabricated and tested. An X-ray photograph of the tested tooth and electric circuits showed good resolution and X-ray intensity. The large cathode area effectively reduces the current density and thereby improves the lifetime of the cathode.

  9. Lighting sources with a cold cathode electron tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lighting sources with a cold cathode are widely used in electronics. The lamps with a cold cathode are used primarily as sources of white light in optical scanners, digital indicators, display panels and signalling devices. In the paper the advantages of carbonaceous materials as emitters of cold electrons and the possibilities of using them to create a cathode in an electron lamp are discussed. (authors)

  10. Study of the three-step photoionization of uranium using a hollow cathode discharge tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hollow cathode discharge (HCD) tube as a spectral light source has been developed. Because any element including refractory metals can be atomized by the cathode sputtering effect in HCD, a simple and reliable atomic vapor source produced by HCD has been widely used in laser spectroscopy. To the authors' knowledge, there is no previous work on the photoionization processes of metal atoms using an HCD tube. Here the authors report their study of the resonant three-step ionization of U in a homemade HCD tube

  11. Modular Low-Heater-Power Cathode/Electron Gun Assembly for Microwave and Millimeter Wave Traveling Wave Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2000-01-01

    A low-cost, low-mass, electrically efficient, modular cathode/electron gun assembly has been developed by FDE Inc. of Beaverton, Oregon, under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This new assembly offers significant improvements in the design and manufacture of microwave and millimeter wave traveling-wave tubes (TWT's) used for radar and communications. It incorporates a novel, low-heater-power, reduced size and mass, high-performance barium dispenser type thermionic cathode and provides for easy integration of the cathode into a large variety of conventional TWT circuits. Among the applications are TWT's for Earth-orbiting communication satellites and for deep space communications, where future missions will require smaller spacecraft, higher data transfer rates (higher frequencies and radiofrequency output power), and greater electrical efficiency. A particularly important TWT application is in the microwave power module (a hybrid microwave/millimeter wave amplifier consisting of a low-noise solid-state driver, a small TWT, and an electronic power conditioner integrated into a single compact package), where electrical efficiency and thermal loading are critical factors and lower cost is needed for successful commercialization. The design and fabrication are based on practices used in producing cathode ray tubes (CRT's), which is one of the most competitive and efficient manufacturing operations in the world today. The approach used in the design and manufacture of thermionic cathodes and electron guns for CRT's has been optimized for fully automated production, standardization of parts, and minimization of costs. It is applicable to the production of similar components for microwave tubes, with the additional benefits of low mass and significantly lower cathode heater power (less than half that of dispenser cathodes presently used in TWT s). Modular cathode/electron gun assembly. The modular

  12. Rotatable target for x-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distorsion of the focal trace results in reduction of X-ray intensity, which may stop the desired use of the X-ray tube early. This distorsion can be avoided almost by use of molybdenum alloys for base body and substrate. Different alloys together with belonging measured values are described. (J.K.)

  13. Sealed drift tube cosmic ray veto counters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple drift tube counter that has been used as a cosmic ray veto for the UCNA experiment, a first-ever measurement of the neutron beta-asymmetry using ultra-cold neutrons. These detectors provide an inexpensive alternative to more conventional scintillation detectors for large area cosmic ray anticoincidence detectors.

  14. On the issue of reducing the effect of ionic bombardment of the cathode on the performance of microwave vacuum tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A possibility of reducing the effect of ionic bombardment on the operation of cathodes in vacuum electron tubes has been considered. The improvement can be reached by modifying the geometry of the cathode - emitting surface. Results of experimental investigations of millimeter and submillimeter wave clinotrons with such cathodes are presented. Such clinotrons show improved performance characteristics

  15. Cathode Ray Research Leading to J.J. Thomson's Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Joseph

    1997-04-01

    This paper reviews the research on the properties and nature of cathode rays that led to the discovery of the electron by J. J. Thomson in the years 1897 - 1899. During the period from about 1870 to 1897 important research on cathode rays was carried out by William Crookes and Arthur Schuster in England, by Eugen Goldstein, Heinrich Hertz, Philipp Lenard, Emil Wiechert and Walter Kaufman in Germany, and by Jean Perrin in France. This research was always tedious and often inexact because fast vacuum pumps and convenient vacuum gauges did not yet exist. Still a few of these earlier researchers narrowly missed beating J. J. Thomson to the discover of the electron.

  16. X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique for ensuring the rapid correction of both amplitude and offset errors in the deflectional movement of an electron beam along an X-ray emissive target is described. The movement is monitored at at least two positions during a sweep and differences, between the two movements and a desired movement, at these positions are combined in different proportions to produce a corrective servo signal. Such arrangements find application, for example, in computerised tomographic scanners. (author)

  17. Field emission digital display tube with nano-graphite film cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jicai Deng; Zhanling Lu; Binglin Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The field emission digital display tube with a nano-crystalline graphite cold cathode is designed and fabricated. Under the control of the driving circuits, a dynamic digital display with uniform luminance distribution is realized. The luminance of the character segments is 190 cd/m2 at the operating voltage of 900 V. And the stable emission is attained with a fluctuation of about 3% at an average segment current of 75 μA. The results demonstrate that nano-crystalline graphite film is a promising material for cold cathode.

  18. Development of an X-ray tube for irradiation experiments using a field emission electron gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hidetoshi; O`Rourke, Brian E.; Suzuki, Ryoichi; Wang, Jiayu; Ooi, Takashi; Nakajima, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    A new X-ray tube using a ring-shaped emitter as a field emission electron source has been developed. By using a ring shaped cathode, X-rays can be extracted along the axial direction through the central hole. This cylindrically symmetrical design allows for the tube to be arranged in the axial direction with the high voltage target at one end and the X-ray beam at the other. The newly developed X-ray tube can operate at a tube voltage of more than 100 kV and at a tube current of more than 4 mA, and can be used for irradiation experiments with an irradiation dose range from mGy up to kGy. The X-ray tube can be used immediately after turning on (i.e. there is no stand-by time). In the experimental model, we demonstrated stable electron emission at a tube voltage of 100 kV and at a tube current of 4 mA during a 560 h continuous test.

  19. Construction and characterization of a hollow cathode tube for high sensibility laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new hollow cathode tube argon-iron design was developed to be used in laser atomic spectroscopy experiments, were high sensibility is required. This tube was employed in order to allow laser absorption and optogalvanic signal measurements. The tube also included fused-quartz Brewster angle windows aligned with the optical axis in each ending of the tube. Therefore, in this configuration a minimum laser intensity losses through the windows can be attained for the appropriate light polarization. The optogalvanic signal detection was accomplished using a tunable dye laser resonant with the Ar, 3p5 4p (3S1)--> 3p5 4d (3D10) transition, that corresponds to 591.2 nm in air. It was also possible to determine the gas temperature by measuring the Doppler line broadening and the results were compared to those obtained from a theoretical model for gas heat conduction. To measure the temperature of the cathode external surface a thermocouple was used inside the tube. The analysis of results showed that a high signal to noise ratio can be obtained with this tube configuration, that permits experimental investigation of electronic transitions presenting low light absorption cross sections. (author)

  20. High power X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray tube is suitable for angiography. It has an X-ray beam generator in a casing that ends on the outlet side for the quasi-monochromatic X-radiation with a zone plate. The generator consists of an electron source and elctron-optical devices, which lead the electrons to a cone. The cone top is directed towards the electron beam away from the zone plate. The cone has a Mo and Ce coating that can be excited to emit fluorescent X-radiation even in deeper layers. (DG)

  1. The study of neutron burst shape of a neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishnyaev, Evgeny; Polosatkin, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    A slim-shaped portable DD-neutron generator is developed at Budker institute of Nuclear Physics. The generator is a combination of Cockcroft-Walton voltage multiplier and a sealed gas-filled neutron tube driven by dispenser cathode. Neutron burst shape in pulsed mode of neutron tube operation is measured with stroboscopic time spectrometry, implemented on scintillation detector, and modeled with Comsol Script 1.3 and Comsol Multiphysics 3.5. Modeling appears to be in good agreement with experimental results. Measured pulse rise and fall times are 110 ns and 100 ns respectively.

  2. Design, construction and long life endurance testing of cathode assemblies for use in microwave high-power transmitting tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, R.; Marino, D.

    1986-01-01

    The cathode life test program sponsored by NASA Lewis Research Center at Watkins-Johnson Company has been in continuous operation since 1972. Its primary objective has been to evaluate the long life capability of barium dispenser cathodes to produce emission current densities of 2 A sq. cm. or more in an operational environment simulating that of a highpower microwave tube. The life test vehicles were equipped with convergent flow electron guns, drift space tubes with solenoid magnets for electron beam confinement and water-cooled depressed collectors. A variety of cathode types has been tested, including GE Tungstate, Litton Impregnated, Philips Type B and M, Semicon types S and M, and Spectra-Mat Type M. Recent emphasis has been on monitoring the performance of Philips Type M cathodes at 2 A sq. cm. and Sprectra-Mat and Semicon Type M cathodes at 4 A sq. cm. These cathodes have been operated at a constant current of 616 mA and a cathode anode voltage on the order of 10 kV. Cathode temperatures were maintained at 1010 C true as measured from black body holes in the backs of the cathodes. This report presents results of the cathode life test program from July l982 through April l986. The results include hours of operation and performance data in the form of normalized emission current density versus temperature curves (Miram plots).

  3. Reference factor F(CT)Q and X ray tube ionization yield R(TUBE)Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operational facility procedures in diagnostic radiology standardization and calibration, through the relation between the X ray tube current and the ionization chamber current in a radiation quality Q, shown the reference factor F(CT)Q as the reality estimate to the X ray tube ionization yield, R(TUBE)Q . (author)

  4. The parallax calculation method and coordinate corrections for X-ray beams in the detectors based on straw drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we propose a model for solving X-structural analysis-like problems, connected with small angle scattering, which calculates the angle and specifies the coordinate of incoming thin X-ray beam while working with detectors based on straw drift tubes with cathode read-out of information

  5. Performance of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; 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Olesen, G; Onnela, A; Orimoto, T; Orsini, L; Perez, E; Perinic, G; Pernot, J F; Petagna, P; Petiot, P; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Pintus, R; Pirollet, B; Postema, H; Racz, A; Ravat, S; Rew, S B; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Rolandi, G; Rovere, M; Ryjov, V; Sakulin, H; Samyn, D; Sauce, H; Schäfer, C; Schlatter, W D; Schröder, M; Schwick, C; Sciaba, A; Segoni, I; Sharma, A; Siegrist, N; Siegrist, P; Sinanis, N; Sobrier, T; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Spiropulu, M; Stöckli, F; Traczyk, P; Tropea, P; Troska, J; Tsirou, A; Veillet, L; Veres, G I; Voutilainen, M; Wertelaers, P; Zanetti, M; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Meier, F; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Sibille, J; Starodumov, A; Betev, B; Caminada, L; Chen, Z; Cittolin, S; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D R; Dambach, S; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Eggel, C; Eugster, J; Faber, G; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hervé, A; Hintz, W; Lecomte, P; Luckey, P D; Lustermann, W; Marchica, C; Milenovic, P; Moortgat, F; Nardulli, A; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Punz, T; Rizzi, A; Ronga, F J; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Sawley, M C; Sordini, V; Stieger, B; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Trüb, P; Weber, M; Wehrli, L; Weng, J; Zelepoukine, S; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; De Visscher, S; Regenfus, C; Robmann, P; Rommerskirchen, T; Schmidt, A; Tsirigkas, D; Wilke, L; Chang, Y H; Chen, E A; Chen, W T; Go, A; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y; Lei, Y J; Lin, S W; Lu, R S; Schümann, J; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Ueno, K; Velikzhanin, Y; Wang, C C; Wang, M; Adiguzel, A; Ayhan, A; Azman Gokce, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Karaman, T; Karaman, T; Kayis Topaksu, A; Kurt, P; Önengüt, G; Önengüt Gökbulut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatöz, A; Sogut, K; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Uzun, D; Vergili, L N; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilmis, S; 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Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; 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Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) constitute the primary muon tracking device in the CMS endcaps. Their performance has been evaluated using data taken during a cosmic ray run in fall 2008. Measured noise levels are low, with the number of noisy channels well below 1%. Coordinate resolution was measured for all types of chambers, and fall in the range 47 microns to 243 microns. The efficiencies for local charged track triggers, for hit and for segments reconstruction were measured, and are above 99%. The timing resolution per layer is approximately 5 ns.

  6. Studies on the hyperfine structure of La I in a hollow-cathode discharge tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperfine structures (HFS) of La I are reported using Doppler-free intermodulated fluorescence, Doppler-limited laser-induced fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy in a homemade hollow-cathode discharge tube. The A and B constants for the levels at 20197.34, 21447.86 cm-1 and A constants for the levels at 19379.40, 18156.97, 24910.38 and 24409.68 cm-1 are, to our knowledge, reported for the first time. A linewidth less than 40 MHz and the different resolutions of fluorescence and optogalvanic spectroscopy are observed. (author)

  7. Noise electron tube with hollow cathode in injection and continuos excitation regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The noise characteristics of the opticoelectronic channel of the pulse atomic absorption spectrometer intended for operation with two electrothermal atomizers - spiral and graphite ones - are studied. The studies are carried out in the process of the glow discharge development in the tube with a hollow cathode (HCT) by the current pulse duration of 50 and 500 μm and porosity of 2-20. It is established that with the increase in the pulses duration of the HCT current the root-mean-square value of the opticoelectron channel noise decreases

  8. Development of a microfocus x-ray tube with multiple excitation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microfocus x-ray tube with multiple targets and an electron gun with a focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter has been developed. The electron gun contains a LaB6 cathode and an Einzel lens. The x-ray tube can be operated at 50 W (50 kV, 1 mA) and has three targets, namely, Cr, W, and Rh on the anode that can be selected completely by moving the anode position. A focal spot size of 10 μm in diameter can be achieved at 0.5 mA current. As demonstration of the usability of a multiexcitation x-ray tube, the fluorescence x-rays have been measured using a powder specimen mixed of TiO2, Co, and Zr of the same quantity. The differences of excitation efficiency have clearly appeared according to the change in excitation source. From the results discussed here, it can be expected that the presented x-ray tube will be a powerful tool in microx-ray fluorescence spectrometers and various x-ray instruments.

  9. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lian-Sheng; Yang, An-Min; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xing-Guang; Li, Jin; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Lin-Wen

    2010-11-01

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process.

  10. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process. (authors)

  11. Improvements in or relating to X-ray tube arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements to x-ray tubes for use, primarily, for computerized tomography are described. The tube incorporates an elongated x-ray emissive target/anode and a system for scanning the electron beam over this target/anode so that the radiation produced by the tube shifts its point of origin. By this means the electron beam deflection can be accurately monitored. (U.K.)

  12. Correlation of cathode parameters of high power grid tubes with material characteristics of cathode-grid units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One way to increase the longevity of dispenser cathodes is based on reducing the Barium evaporation. This can be achieved by the decrease of the reaction 'activity' of the emitter impregnant with the porous tungsten (W) body, which supplies free Barium from the interior of the porous cathode to its surface

  13. Correlation of cathode parameters of high power grid tubes with material characteristics of cathode-grid units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikova, Irina P.; Polyakov, Igor V.; Usanov, Dmitry A.

    2005-09-01

    One way to increase the longevity of dispenser cathodes is based on reducing the Barium evaporation. This can be achieved by the decrease of the reaction "activity" of the emitter impregnant with the porous tungsten (W) body, which supplies free Barium from the interior of the porous cathode to its surface.

  14. In situ X-ray studies of film cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Synchrotron X-rays are used to study in operando the structural and chemical changes of LSM and LSCF film cathodes during half-cell operations. •A-site and B-site cations actively segregate or desegregate on the changes of temperature, pO2, and electrochemical potential. •Chemical lattice expansions show that oxygen-cathode interface is the primary source of rate-limiting processes. •The surface and subsurface of the LSM and LSCF films have different oxidation-states due to vacancy concentration changes. •Liquid-phase infiltration and coarsening processes of cathode materials into porous YSZ electrolyte backbone were monitored by USAXS. -- Abstract: Synchrotron-based X-ray techniques have been used to study in situ the structural and chemical changes of film cathodes during half-cell operations. The X-ray techniques used include X-ray reflectivity (XR), total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), high-resolution diffraction (HRD), ultra-small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS). The epitaxial thin film model cathodes for XR, TXRF, and HRD measurements are made by pulse laser deposition and porous film cathodes for USAX measurements are made by screen printing technique. The experimental results reviewed here include A-site and B-site segregations, lattice expansion, oxidation-state changes during cell operations and liquid-phase infiltration and coarsening of cathode to electrolyte backbone

  15. Electron beam focussing in X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this invention is to provide satisfactory focussing in conical x-ray tubes where the electron beam extends from gun to target over a distance typically of 1.5 metres. Such tubes are used in computerised tomographic apparatus. (U.K.)

  16. High speed electrostatic photomultiplier tube for the 1.06 micrometer wavelength. Cup and slat dynode chain combined with flat cathode and coax output produces 0.25 nsec rise time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, S. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Varian cup and slat dynode chain was modified to have a flat cathode. These modifications were incorporated in an all-electrostatic photomultiplier tube having a rise time of 0.25 n sec. The tube delivered under the contract had a flat S-20 opaque cathode with a useful diameter of 5 mm. The design of the tube is such that a III to V cathode support is mounted in place of the existing cathode substrate. This cathode support is designed to accept a transferred III to V cathode and maintain the cathode surface in the same position as the S-20 photocathode.

  17. A high efficiency irradiation device provided with an X-ray tube generator with a window anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns an irradiation device by high efficiency X rays, comprising an X ray generator tube provided with a high voltage cathode and a window anode and used, inter alia, for X ray spectrometry. The anode window tubes provide excellent transmission of X rays through the window towards the sample, whilst a significant background of the continuous spectrum remains since the backscattering of the electrons from the surface of the anode occurs freely. This invention enables this drawback to be offset by giving the possibility to most of the backscattered electrons to meet the anode and thus cause a secondary emission, not to say a tertiary emission of X rays. However a tube under the invention irradiates a plane surface on a sample with low efficiency at the X ray transmission level. In order to use the intrinsic advantages of the tube, under the invention, whilst reserving a good efficiency in the transmission of the X rays, it is essential to associate the tube, under the invention with an irradiation surface in the shape of an oblong dome, the dome shaped anode entering the dome shaped cavity of the sample

  18. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10(-6) Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. PMID:23376878

  19. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10−6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. (paper)

  20. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-03-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10-6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system.

  1. Chaos and Formation of Structures in an Electron Flow with a Virtual Cathode in the Bounded Drift Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Hramov, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam with a virtual cathode (VC) in the drift tube is investigated with the help of a 1.5-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic code. The existence of complex modes, including chaotic modes,is demonstrated. The dynamic nature of chaos in the considered system is revealed. Physical processes in the flow are investigated, and it is found that the initiation of chaotic dynamics of the electron beam with VC isrelated to the nonlinear interaction of structures formed in the system.

  2. Building lab-scale x-ray tube based irradiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haff, Ron; Jackson, Eric; Gomez, Joseph; Light, Doug; Follett, Peter; Simmons, Greg; Higbee, Brad

    2016-04-01

    Here we report the use of x-ray tube based irradiators as alternatives to gamma sources for laboratory scale irradiation. Irradiators were designed with sample placement in closest possible proximity to the source, allowing high dose rates for small samples. Designs using 1000 W x-ray tubes in single tube, double tube, and four tube configurations are described, as well as various cabinet construction techniques. Relatively high dose rates were achieved for small samples, demonstrating feasibility for laboratory based irradiators for research purposes. Dose rates of 9.76, 5.45, and 1.7 Gy/min/tube were measured at the center of a 12.7 cm container of instant rice at 100 keV, 70 keV, and 40 keV, respectively. Dose uniformity varies dramatically as the distance from source to container. For 2.54 cm diameter sample containers containing adult Navel Orangeworm, dose rates of 50-60 Gy/min were measured in the four tube system.

  3. Determination of tube voltage in X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next to filtration, tube voltage or tube potential difference is one of the most significant parameters for the quality of X-rays, especially with a view to its absolute value, its variation during exposure and its long-term constancy. Voltage control is major component pf quality assurance in diagnostic radiography. Various non-invasive methods are available for voltage measurements. The article reports the experience gained with the kV-indicating cassette, the X-ray analyses (NERO system) and the multi-channel analyser. (orig./HP)

  4. Impulse through-target x-ray tube spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitov, B. I.; Mukhachyov, Yu. S.

    2002-07-01

    At present x-ray compact tubes with pass-through anodes operating either in the pulse mode or in the direct voltage one are applied to the equipment for the shady microscopy, and the local XRF analysis. The report presents the calculated spectral intensity distributions of the bremsstrahlung versus the pass-through anode thickness. The spectral function of the bremsstrahlung Mo tube with the anode thickness over 100 microns is demosntrated to contract to the narrow energy interval lying near the characteristic anode radiation range. However under the same conditions the spectrum of the pulse Cu-anode tube tends to be dichromatic. The spectral distributions of the tube bremsstrahlung operating at the direct current and pulse voltage are compared.

  5. A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin; Ha, Jun Mok; Cho, Sung Oh

    2012-05-01

    A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon nanotube field-emission electron source has been demonstrated. The diameter of the X-ray tube is 10 mm; the total length of the tube is 50 mm, and no external vacuum pump is required for the operation. The maximum tube voltage reaches up to 70 kV, and the X-ray tube generates intense X-rays with the air kerma strength of 108 Gy·cm2 min-1. In addition, X-rays produced from the miniature X-ray tube have a comparatively uniform spatial dose distribution.

  6. X- or gamma ray converter and manufacturing method for its cathode system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray converter serves for application in medical diagnostics. For the cathode system of the converter a system based on low-pressure ionography is suited making use of the X-ray photoelectric emission. The electrodes of the cathode system consist of double-layer films with two external conduction layers and an insulator in between. As an auxiliary voltage can be applied between the individual layers the field gradient in the holes may be adjusted, thus increasing the quantum yield. (orig./HP)

  7. X- or gamma ray converter and manufacturing method for its cathode system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray converter serves for application in medical diagnostics. For cathode system of the converter a system based on low-pressure ionography is suited making use of the X-ray photoelectric emission. The electrodes of the cathode system consist of double-layer films with two external conduction layers and an insulator in between. As an auxiliary voltage can be applied between the individual layers the field gradient in the holes may be adjusted, thus increasing the quantum yield. (DG)

  8. Adjustable off-focal aperture for x-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an x-ray tube assembly for radiographic scanners. It comprises: an evacuated envelope; an anode rotatably mounted within the envelope; a housing surrounding the envelope to define a cooling fluid reservoir therebetween, the housing defining an aperture therein and having a collar surrounding the aperture; an x-ray permeable, fluid impermeable window mounted to the housing to seal the aperture; an x-ray beam defining means, an off-focal radiation attenuating means, a flexible cable means, and a first stop means

  9. 21 CFR 892.5930 - Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.5930 Section 892.5930 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... assembly. (a) Identification. A therapeutic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  10. 21 CFR 892.1760 - Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly. 892.1760 Section 892.1760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... assembly. (a) Identification. A diagnostic x-ray tube housing assembly is an x-ray generating tube...

  11. Improvements in or relating to X-ray generating tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a novel X-ray generating tube for use in computerised tomography is described in detail. It consists of a rotating anode which can translate along the axis of rotation thereby producing a scan in a direction parallel to the axis of rotation of the anode. Rotation and translation of the anode are achieved by induction between a stator and a rotor. In a development of the anode, a ''helter-skelter'' form is used for the anode surface; rotation of this anode will cause the generated X-ray beam to scan in a direction parallel to the axis of rotation. (U.K.)

  12. Measurements and comparison of focal spot sizes of two types of x-ray tubes installed in simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of such that there is 15 deg angle between the anode-cathode axis and the long side of rectangle, while for Ximatron tube that angle is 45 deg. A comparison of both shape and dimension of the focal spot of the tube are made between these two simulators of similar working load. After considering the difference in the initial manufacturer's specification of the focal spot size, it is clear that there is a aging effect on the effective focal spot of the X-ray tubes. However, the relationship between the size of focal spot and the age of the X-ray tube is complex and non-linear. Limitations of a average Life-time of these two types of X-ray tubes are derived respectively according to the requirements on spatial resolution of X-ray diagnostic equipment set by the national standards

  13. X-ray flat panel detectors and X-ray tubes contributing to development of X-ray diagnostic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray flat panel detectors (FPDs) and X-ray tubes are key devices allowing X-ray diagnostic systems to support more sophisticated medical care. FPDs provide valuable information for the diagnosis of various diseases through the conversion of X-ray images of the human body into electronic signals, while X-ray tubes are used in a wide range of applications such as computed tomography (CT), angiography, fluoroscopy, mammography, and dental systems. Toshiba Electron Tubes and Devices Co., Ltd. has developed and commercialized FPDs providing high-quality diagnostic X-ray images with low dose exposure through the development of cutting-edge technologies including a fine crystal formation technology for cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators, thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays with photodiodes, and so on. In the field of X-ray tubes that can generate a high output of X-rays, we have developed a liquid metal hydrodynamic bearing (LM bearing) technology for various diagnostic systems including medical CT systems with a long lifetime and high rotation speed, and cardiovascular imaging systems with quiet operation. Furthermore, LM bearing technology reduces the burden on the environment by replacing insulating oil with water coolant for the cooling system and making the X-ray tubes more compact. (author)

  14. Performance of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; 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Dagenhart, W; Demarteau, M; Derylo, G; Dykstra, D; Eartly, D P; Elias, J E; Elvira, V D; Evans, D; Feng, L; Fischler, M; Fisk, I; Foulkes, S; Freeman, J; Gartung, P; Gottschalk, E; Grassi, T; Green, D; Guo, Y; Gutsche, O; Hahn, A; Hanlon, J; Harris, R M; Holzman, B; Howell, J; Hufnagel, D; James, E; Jensen, H; Johnson, M; Jones, C D; Joshi, U; Juska, E; Kaiser, J; Klima, B; Kossiakov, S; Kousouris, K; Kwan, S; Lei, C M; Limon, P; Lopez Perez, J A; Los, S; Lueking, L; Lukhanin, G; Lusin, S; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Mason, D; McBride, P; Miao, T; Mishra, K; Moccia, S; Mommsen, R; Mrenna, S; Muhammad, A S; Newman-Holmes, C; Noeding, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Rivera, R; Rivetta, C H; Ronzhin, A; Rossman, P; Ryu, S; Sekhri, V; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sfiligoi, I; Sharma, S; Shaw, T M; Shpakov, D; Skup, E; Smith, R P; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Suzuki, I; Tan, P; Tanenbaum, W; Tkaczyk, S; Trentadue, R; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wicklund, E; Wu, W; Yarba, J; Yumiceva, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Barashko, V; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Gartner, J; Holmes, D; Kim, B; Klimenko, S; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Madorsky, A; Matchev, K; Mitselmakher, G; Pakhotin, Y; Piedra Gomez, J; Prescott, C; Rapsevicius, V; Remington, R; Schmitt, M; Scurlock, B; Wang, D; Yelton, J; Ceron, C; Gaultney, V; Kramer, L; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Baer, H; Bertoldi, M; Chen, J; Dharmaratna, W G D; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Jenkins, M; Johnson, K F; Prettner, E; Prosper, H; Sekmen, S; Baarmand, M M; Guragain, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Mermerkaya, H; Ralich, R; Vodopiyanov, I; Abelev, B; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Callner, J; Castro, M A; Cavanaugh, R; Dragoiu, C; Garcia-Solis, E J; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatian, S; Mironov, C; Shabalina, E; Smoron, A; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Ayan, A S; Bilki, B; Briggs, R; Cankocak, K; Chung, K; Clarida, W; Debbins, P; Duru, F; Ingram, F D; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J P; Mestvirishvili, A; Miller, M J; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Parsons, J; Schmidt, I; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Chien, C Y; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Zhang, Y; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Grachov, O; Murray, M; Radicci, V; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Bandurin, D; Bolton, T; Kaadze, K; Liu, A; Maravin, Y; Onoprienko, D; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Hollar, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, D; Bard, R; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kunori, S; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Toole, T; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    Studies of the performance of the CMS drift tube barrel muon system are described, with results based on data collected during the CMS Cosmic Run at Four Tesla. For most of these data, the solenoidal magnet was operated with a central field of 3.8 T. The analysis of data from 246 out of a total of 250 chambers indicates a very good muon reconstruction capability, with a coordinate resolution for a single hit of about 260 microns, and a nearly 100% efficiency for the drift tube cells. The resolution of the track direction measured in the bending plane is about 1.8 mrad, and the efficiency to reconstruct a segment in a single chamber is higher than 99%. The CMS simulation of cosmic rays reproduces well the performance of the barrel muon detector.

  15. Characteristics of Transmission-type Microfocus X-ray Tube based-on Carbon Nanotube Field Emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution microfocus x-ray source is widely applied to noninvasive detection for industrial demands, material science and engineering, and to diagnostic study of microbiology and micro-tomography. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is regarded as an excellent electron emitter, which outperforms conventional electron sources in point of brightness. It has been suggested that CNT is used as an electron source of a high resolution x-ray tube according to their low threshold field with atomically sharp geometry, chemically robust structure, and electric conductivity. Several researchers have reported miniaturized x-ray tube based on diode structure and micro x-ray radiography and computed tomography systems using triode types with precise emission control and electrostatic focusing. Especially, a microfocus x-ray source of 30 μm resolution has been demonstrated recently using an elliptical CNT cathode and asymmetrical Eingel lens. However, to increase the spatial resolution of x-ray source, a smaller CNT emitter is desired. Electron focusing optics must be corrected to reduce aberrations. A thin wire tip end can provide a micro-area of CNT substrate, and a magnetic lens and transmission x-ray target are proper to reduce the lens aberration and a focal length. Until now, CNT based microfocus x-ray source with less than 10 um resolution has not been shown. Here we report a microfocus x-ray source with 4.7 μm x-ray focal spot consisted of a conical CNT tip, a single solenoid lens, and a transmission type x-ray target. A magnified x-ray image larger than 230 times was resolved with advantage of microfocused focal spot and transmission x-ray target

  16. Carbon Nanotube Bundle Array Cold Cathodes for THz Vacuum Tube Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish M.; Toda, Risaku; Lin, Robert H.; Liao, Anna; Bronikowski, Michael J.; Siegel, Peter H.

    2009-12-01

    We present high performance cold cathodes composed of arrays of carbon nanotube bundles that routinely produce > 15 A/cm2 at applied fields of 5 to 8 V/µm without any beam focusing. They have exhibited robust operation in poor vacuums of 10-6 to 10-4 Torr- a typically achievable range inside hermetically sealed microcavities. A new double-SOI process was developed to monolithically integrate a gate and additional beam tailoring electrodes. The ability to design the electrodes for specific requirements makes carbon nanotube field emission sources extremely flexible. The lifetime of these cathodes is found to be affected by two effects: a gradual decay of emission due to anode sputtering, and catastrophic failure because of dislodging of CNT bundles at high fields ( > 10 V/µm).

  17. Thermionic noise measurements for on-line dispenser cathode diagnostics for linear beam microwave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, C.; Brodie, I.

    1985-01-01

    A test stand has been set up to measure the current fluctuation noise properties of B- and M-type dispenser cathodes in a typical TWT gun structure. Noise techniques were used to determine the work function distribution on the cathode surfaces. Significant differences between the B and M types and significant changes in the work function distribution during activation and life are found. In turn, knowledge of the expected work function can be used to accurately determine the cathode-operating temperatures in a TWT structure. Noise measurements also demonstrate more sensitivity to space charge effects than the Miram method. Full automation of the measurements and computations is now required to speed up data acquisition and reduction. The complete set of equations for the space charge limited diode were programmed so that given four of the five measurable variables (J, J sub O, T, D, and V) the fifth could be computed. Using this program, we estimated that an rms fluctuation in the diode spacing d in the frequency range of 145 Hz about 20 kHz of only about 10 to the -5 power A would account for the observed noise in a space charge limited diode with 1 mm spacing.

  18. Application of space technology to X-ray tube bearings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ring, P.J. [Advanced Methods and Materials Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Virshup, G.F. [Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes work done to transfer technology, developed during the SP100 Space Reactor program, to commercial applications. The SP100 program was intended to develop a high temperature nuclear reactor power source for space applications. The specific area described in this paper is the use of high temperature bearings and lubricants under vacuum conditions. At the instigation of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a joint program was initiated between Varian Corporation and Advanced Methods and Materials Co. (AMM); with AMM providing the technical expertise in high temperature bearing technology, acquired during the Sp100 program, and Varian providing the testing and performance evaluation of the completed bearing assemblies. The Varian bearing application is X-ray tubes. The tungsten target is required to rotate within the vacuum tube with the bearings operating at temperatures in the region of 300 C. The high temperature vacuum conditions preclude the use of any organic lubricants. The desired improvements in bearing performance were in the areas of noise reduction and extended lifetime. The SP100 program had required low friction ball bearings for the Control Drive Assembly motors, clutches and brakes. These assemblies were required to operate at 540 C in hard vacuum. For the SP100 program silver coated tool steel bearings were tested along with molybdenum disulfide coated Stellite L605 races and balls with molybdenum disulfide coated Stellite L605 races with silicon nitride balls. The work described in this paper covers the results from the SP100 tests and describes the application of this technology to the Varian X-ray tubes using optimized MoS{sub 2} deposition parameters. The results of this work to date and the conclusions resulting from the endurance testing are described in detail.

  19. Implications of X-ray tube parameter deviations in X-ray reference fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, B; Hupe, O; Ambrosi, P

    2016-02-01

    For the purpose of radiation protection, ICRU Report 57/ICRP Publication 74 provides a list of monoenergetic conversion coefficients to be used with, among others, photon reference fields generated with X-ray tubes. A comprehensive definition of these photon reference fields can be found in international standard ISO 4037; however, it lacks thorough indication of the allowed deviations of essential parameters that influence these X-ray reference fields. These parameters are the high-voltage tube potential, the thickness of the beryllium window and the purity and thickness of the filter materials used to create different radiation qualities. Small variations of these parameters can lead to significant changes in the created X-ray spectra and, hence, the spectra-dependent conversion coefficients for phantom-related radiation-protection quantities. This can lead to situations in which the conversion coefficients listed in ISO 4037 cannot be used, resulting in time-consuming spectrometry measurements. In this work, the impact on the resulting conversion coefficients is investigated using a simplified mathematical approximation model. The findings are validated with an independent X-ray spectra calculation programme. As a result, well-founded upper limit values on the allowed deviations of the essential X-ray tube parameters are proposed to be used in a future revision of ISO 4037. PMID:25889609

  20. Implications of X-ray tube parameter deviations in X-ray reference fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of radiation protection, ICRU Report 57/ICRP Publication 74 provides a list of monoenergetic conversion coefficients to be used with, among others, photon reference fields generated with X-ray tubes. A comprehensive definition of these photon reference fields can be found in international standard ISO 4037; however, it lacks thorough indication of the allowed deviations of essential parameters that influence these X-ray reference fields. These parameters are the high-voltage tube potential, the thickness of the beryllium window and the purity and thickness of the filter materials used to create different radiation qualities. Small variations of these parameters can lead to significant changes in the created X-ray spectra and, hence, the spectra-dependent conversion coefficients for phantom-related radiation-protection quantities. This can lead to situations in which the conversion coefficients listed in ISO 4037 cannot be used, resulting in time-consuming spectrometry measurements. In this work, the impact on the resulting conversion coefficients is investigated using a simplified mathematical approximation model. The findings are validated with an independent X-ray spectra calculation programme. As a result, well-founded upper limit values on the allowed deviations of the essential X-ray tube parameters are proposed to be used in a future revision of ISO 4037. (authors)

  1. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) set-up with a low power X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sheenu; Deep, Kanan; Jain, Lalita; Ansari, M A; Mittal, Vijay Kumar; Mittal, Raj

    2010-10-01

    The X-ray fluorescence set-up with a 100 W X-ray tube comprises a computer controlled system developed for remote operation and monitoring of tube and an adjustable stable 3D arrangement to procure variable excitation energies with low scattered background. The system was tested at different filament currents/anode voltages. The MDL of the set-up at 0.05-1.00 mA/4-12 kV is found approximately (1-100)ppm for K and L excitations and approximately (200-700)ppm for M excitations of elements and improves with filament current and anode voltage. Moreover, L measurements for Sm and Eu at five K X-ray energies of elements(Z=29-40) and analytical determination in some synthetic samples were undertaken. PMID:20570160

  2. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) set-up with a low power X-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Sheenu; Deep, Kanan [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India); Jain, Lalita; Ansari, M.A. [Laser Electronic Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology (RRCAT), Indore (India); Mittal, Vijay Kumar [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India); Mittal, Raj, E-mail: rmsingla@yahoo.co [Nuclear Science Laboratories, Physics Department, Punjabi University, Patiala 147 002 (India)

    2010-10-15

    The X-ray fluorescence set-up with a 100 W X-ray tube comprises a computer controlled system developed for remote operation and monitoring of tube and an adjustable stable 3D arrangement to procure variable excitation energies with low scattered background. The system was tested at different filament currents/anode voltages. The MDL of the set-up at 0.05-1.00 mA/4-12 kV is found {approx}(1-100) ppm for K and L excitations and {approx}(200-700) ppm for M excitations of elements and improves with filament current and anode voltage. Moreover, L measurements for Sm and Eu at five K X-ray energies of elements(Z=29-40) and analytical determination in some synthetic samples were undertaken.

  3. Research on the Relationship of X-ray Tube Structure and Focal Spot%X射线管结构与焦斑关系研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王奇志; 沙京田; 任翔; 徐卫平; 卓琳

    2013-01-01

    X射线管是X射线机的心脏,是产生X射线的源泉[1].其焦斑大小及分布对整机图像清晰度起着决定性的作用.通过对X射线管结构特点、焦斑产生机理、电极结构与焦斑相关性实验的测试数据及理论分析等多方面的论述,探讨了X射线管结构尺寸对焦斑的影响.通过系列实验及理论分析表明:X射线管阴极结构对焦斑有巨大的影响.借助计算机模拟仿真计算,合理设计阴极结构,能够获取大小适中、分布均匀的焦斑,从而达到改善X射线机图像清晰度的目的.%X-ray tube is the core part of the X-ray machine and the source[1]of X-ray. The focus size and distribution play a decisive role in the definition of the X-ray machine. In relation to the X-ray tube structure characteristics, focus formation mechanism, the test experimental data of the correlation of the electrode structure with focusing, theoretical analysis and so on, the effect caused by X-ray tube structure and size are discussed. A series of experiments and theoretical analysis shows that cathode structure of X-ray tube has significant effect upon focus. With the help of simulation calculation, the reasonable cathode structure is obtained to produce uniform and moderate size focus, thus to improve image-definition purpose of X-ray machine.

  4. Impulse electron gun with plasma cathode for realization of large diameter tube-shaped beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are presented the results of investigations of a plasma electron source based on the gas discharge in a coaxial system of electrodes with longitudinal magnetic field. The examination is fulfilled from the viewpoint of applying the source as a plasma cathode for hybrid plasma-waveguide slow-wave structures on the basis of a disk-loaded coaxial. The source is optimized in order to get a powerful (up to 100 kW) nonrelativistic electron beam with the annular cross-section of a large diameter in the regime of relatively long current pulses (up to 0.2 ms) under the gas pressure ∼ 5 centre dot 10-4 mm Hg in the area of the discharge burning

  5. Characterization of angle – dependent Focal spot in a miniature X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature x-ray tube can be used to obtain important images easily due to its small size and movability. Because the miniature x-ray tube discussed in this paper is a transmission type, it can emit x-rays in all directions, making it possible to take angle-dependent images. Focal spot is essential in an x-ray tube because it affects the quality of images taken by the x-ray tube. The size of the focal spot is equivalent to that of the x-ray generation region located at the x-ray tube target. If the size of focal spot is too large, images produced will be blurry. In other words, smaller focal spots produce clearer images. Currently common x-ray tubes have a relatively thick target, causing them to emit x-rays in one direction with uniform focal spot size. This type of x-ray produced is called reflection x-ray. However, unlike the conventional, miniature x-ray tubes, that this paper focuses on, have thin beryllium targets, allowing for both reflection x-ray and transmission x-ray to be generated at the targets. And since both types can affect the size of focal spots, these miniature x-ray tubes can emit x-rays, which is a crucial property when taking angle-dependent images. By measuring the physical characteristics of the focal spots, methods of improving the qualities of angle-dependent images can be determined. Thus, this experiment, which deals with measuring these physical characteristics will substantially help in the improvement of the qualities of angle-dependent images. The result was obtained by analyzing the image with procedure provided by EN-12543-5 Focal spots increase with increase in angle from 0 degree to 90 degrees

  6. Stem radiation of medical X-ray tubes with rotating anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring the fraction of extrafocal radiation in the X-ray output of X-ray tubes was developed and tested under clinical conditions. A fraction of 10% was found, that increases with tube voltage and field size, while tube current and focal spot size have no influence. As a measure for the influence of stem radiation on image quality the contrast transfer function was used. Stem radiation causes detectable geometric unsharpness. If screen film systems are used, the unsharpness is negligible compared with the screen unsharpness. Approaches for educing stem radiation from medical X-ray tubes are discussed. (author)

  7. Beam characterization of a lab bench cold cathode ultra-soft X-ray generator

    OpenAIRE

    Ounoughi, Nabil; Mavon, Christophe; Belafrites, Abdelfettah; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; Fromm, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the Ultra Soft X-ray (USX, 1.5 keV, Al Kα) photon beam of a customized lab bench cold cathode generator. Within this generator, the electron beam is slowed down in a thin aluminium foil (16 μm) supported by an easily exchangeable anode. It is shown that the thickness of the foil and the anode configuration determine the spatial distribution and the fluence rate of the photon beam, whereas accelerating voltage determines both fluence rate and energy spec...

  8. Studies on the flavour and aroma of peel oil from citrus unshu irradiated with cathode ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flavor of peel oil from citrus unshu irradiated with 150 krad cathode ray were investigated by gas chromatography. The sample irradiated and stored for 30 days showed browning and unfavorable odor although the degree of the browning was not same as the report of Ojima et al. The yield of essential oil showed only a slight difference in all samples. Some changes were found in the carbohydrate components immediately after irradiation, whereas some changes were detected in hydrocarbon components, especially d-linonen and pinene after storage of irradiated samples. Unfavorable odor might be caused by the changes of quantitative ratio of the components. (auth.)

  9. Electron Emission And Beam Generation Using Ferroelectric Cathodes (electron Beam Generation, Lead Lanthanum Zicronate Titanate, High Power Traveling Wave Tube Amplfier)

    CERN Document Server

    Flechtner, D D

    1999-01-01

    In 1989, researchers at CERN published the discovery of significant electron emission (1– 100 A/cm2) from Lead- Lanthanum-Zirconate-Titanate (PLZT). The publication of these results led to international interest in ferroelectric cathodes studies for use in pulsed power devices. At Cornell University in 1991, experiments with Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) compositions were begun to study the feasibility of using this ferroelectric material as a cathode in the electron gun section of High Power Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier Experiments. Current-voltage characteristics were documented for diode voltages ranging from 50– 500,000 V with anode cathode gaps of.5– 6 cm. A linear current-voltage relation was found for voltages less than 50 kV. For diode voltages ≥ 200 kV, a typical Child-Langmuir V3/2 dependence was observed...

  10. An intraoral miniature x-ray tube based on carbon nanotubes for dental radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Hyun Nam; Raza, Hamid Saeed; Park, Han Beom; Cho, Sung Oh [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    A miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon-nanotube electron emitter has been employed for the application to a dental radiography. The miniature X-ray tube has an outer diameter of 7 mm and a length of 47 mm. The miniature X-ray tube is operated in a negative high-voltage mode in which the X-ray target is electrically grounded. In addition, X-rays are generated only to the teeth directions using a collimator while X-rays generated to other directions are shielded. Hence, the X-ray tube can be safely inserted into a human mouth. Using the intra-oral X-ray tube, a dental radiography is demonstrated where the positions of an X-ray source and a sensor are reversed compared with a conventional dental radiography system. X-ray images of five neighboring teeth are obtained and, furthermore, both left and right molar images are achieved by a single X-ray shot of the miniature X-ray tube.

  11. 21 CFR 892.1770 - Diagnostic x-ray tube mount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diagnostic x-ray tube mount. 892.1770 Section 892.1770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1770 Diagnostic x-ray tube mount....

  12. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved. - Highlights: • Computational Model was developed to X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology. • The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. • The energy range was 40–100 kV. • Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the Dental Radiology and reference X-ray tubes

  13. Using computational modeling to compare X-ray tube Practical Peak Voltage for Dental Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda Cassiano, Deisemar; Arruda Correa, Samanda Cristine; de Souza, Edmilson Monteiro; da Silva, Ademir Xaxier; Pereira Peixoto, José Guilherme; Tadeu Lopes, Ricardo

    2014-02-01

    The Practical Peak Voltage-PPV has been adopted to measure the voltage applied to an X-ray tube. The PPV was recommended by the IEC document and accepted and published in the TRS no. 457 code of practice. The PPV is defined and applied to all forms of waves and is related to the spectral distribution of X-rays and to the properties of the image. The calibration of X-rays tubes was performed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. An X-ray tube for Dental Radiology (operated from a single phase power supply) and an X-ray tube used as a reference (supplied from a constant potential power supply) were used in simulations across the energy range of interest of 40 kV to 100 kV. Results obtained indicated a linear relationship between the tubes involved.

  14. Numerical simulation of X-ray image converter tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bilamellar image converter tube was introduced, which adopts plate poles and electric quadrupole lenses. Based on the bilamellar tube model, the structure, operation mode and imaging characteristics, etc. of the tube were analyzed. The results show that the bilamellar structure can effectively control the space-charge effect and thus increase the temporal/spatial resolution of imaging. (authors)

  15. Deciphering the thermal behavior of lithium rich cathode material by in situ X-ray diffraction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Shoaib; Lee, Sangwoo; Kim, Hyunchul; Yoon, Jeongbae; Jang, Donghyuk; Yoon, Jaegu; Park, Jin-Hwan; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2015-07-01

    Thermal stability is one of the critical requirements for commercial operation of high energy lithium-ion batteries. In this study, we use in situ X-ray diffraction technique to elucidate the thermal degradation mechanism of 0.5Li2MnO3-0.5LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 lithium rich cathode material in the absence and presence of electrolyte to simulate the real life battery conditions and compare its thermal behavior with the commercial LiNi0.33Co0.33Mn0.33O2 cathode material. We show that the thermal induced phase transformations in delithiated lithium rich cathode material are much more intense compared to similar single phase layered cathode material in the presence of electrolyte. The structural changes in both cathode materials with the temperature rise follow different trends in the absence and presence of electrolyte between 25 and 600 °C. Phase transitions are comparatively simple in the absence of electrolyte, the fully charged lithium rich cathode material demonstrates better thermal stability by maintaining its phase till 379 °C, and afterwards spinel structure is formed. In the presence of electrolyte, however, the spinel structure appears at 207 °C, subsequently it transforms to rock salt type cubic phase at 425 °C with additional metallic, metal fluoride, and metal carbonate phases.

  16. Flash of the Cathode Rays: A History of J J Thomson's Electron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author, a senior physicist from Berkeley having some experience in historical accounts, covers well the standard story of J J Thomson's discovery of the electron, one hundred years ago. Starting from the investigations of cathode rays in Germany, France and mainly England, the successful path of J J is covered in some detail using available information (letters, notebooks, diaries, publications), as well as his later work on positive rays and the atomic model. Lesser emphasis is given to the parallel developments connected with the Zeeman effect. However, a synopsis of the story of β-rays, the measurement of the elementary charge and the rise of the Rutherford - Bohr nuclear model of the atom is included. Dahl presents the physical contents from the standard literature in a clear and convincing way. He illustrates the narrative with (well-chosen and well-reproduced) portraits of the people involved and sketches of their original apparatus. Hence the book can be recommended highly to physicists, who will be reminded of one of the most important events in the earlier history of their field. A broader public, including other scientists, and perhaps attentive high school graduates, might also benefit from the book, not to mention professional science historians (who may appreciate the detailed, reliable description of subtle experiments and their tricky interpretation). The author succeeds far less well in providing the general background (in the history of physics and beyond) of the Thomson story. The electron as a fundamental concept existed and was applied long before J Pluecker's discovery of cathodes rays (for example, by A-M Ampere and his successors), and the importance of the work by W Weber, F Neumann and R Clausius (to mention just a few scientists in the 19th century) is mainly suppressed. Dahl's treatment of P Lenard's work around 1900, for which Lenard won the Nobel prize before Thomson, is quite unfair. Further, Chapter 14 on the French N-rays and

  17. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquais, J. M.; Poret, F.; le Doze, R.; Ricaud, J. L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A.

    2003-06-01

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK).

  18. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK)

  19. Studies of X-ray tube aging by non-invasive methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the present work was the evaluation of an x ray tube aging with an anode made of tungsten, used in radio diagnostic. Workloads were applied, in accordance with Brazilian workload distribution, and periodic measurements of quantities related to the radiation quality of the beam were performed. For the purpose of this work, a single phase, full bridge clinical system was employed. For the long term x ray tube characteristics evaluation related to the applied workload, it was necessary to measure parameters that could quantitatively represent the tube aging, with special attention to the anode roughening. For the indirect measurement of tube aging, four parameters were chosen, some of them normally applied in x ray diagnostic quality control: first and second half value layers (HVL), focal spot dimensions, non invasive measurement of Practical Peak Voltage (PPV) and x ray spectroscopy. These parameters were measured before any workload and after each workload intervals. To assure confidence of the results reproducibility conditions were stated to each evaluated parameter. The uncertainties involved in all measurement processes were calculated to evaluate the real contributions of x ray tube aging effects on non invasive parameters. Within all evaluated parameters, the most sensitive to long term workload were the mean energy obtained from spectroscopy and half value layers. A model related to these parameters was applied and estimates of x ray tube aging rate for different acceleration voltages and anodic currents were calculated. (author)

  20. A portable x-ray source with a nanostructured Pt-coated silicon field emission cathode for absorption imaging of low-Z materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a portable x-ray generator for imaging of low-atomic number materials such as biological soft tissue. The system uses a self-aligned, gated, Pt-coated silicon field emitter cathode with two arrays of 62 500 nano-sharp tips arranged in a square grid with 10 μm emitter pitch, and a natural convection-cooled reflection anode composed of a Cu bar coated with a thin Mo film. Characterization of the field emitter array demonstrated continuous emission of 1 mA electron current (16 mA cm  −  2) with  >95% current transmission at a 150 V gate-emitter bias voltage for over 20 h with no degradation. The emission of the x-ray source was characterized across a range of anode bias voltages to maximize the fraction of photons from the characteristic K-shell peaks of the Mo film to produce a quasi-monochromatic photon beam, which enables capturing high-contrast images of low-atomic number materials. The x-ray source operating at the optimum anode bias voltage, i.e. 35 kV, was used to image ex vivo and nonorganic samples in x-ray fluoroscopic mode while varying the tube current; the images resolve feature sizes as small as ∼160 µm. (paper)

  1. A portable x-ray source with a nanostructured Pt-coated silicon field emission cathode for absorption imaging of low-Z materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Swanwick, Michael E.; Fomani, Arash A.; Velásquez-García, Luis Fernando

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of a portable x-ray generator for imaging of low-atomic number materials such as biological soft tissue. The system uses a self-aligned, gated, Pt-coated silicon field emitter cathode with two arrays of 62 500 nano-sharp tips arranged in a square grid with 10 μm emitter pitch, and a natural convection-cooled reflection anode composed of a Cu bar coated with a thin Mo film. Characterization of the field emitter array demonstrated continuous emission of 1 mA electron current (16 mA cm  -  2) with  >95% current transmission at a 150 V gate-emitter bias voltage for over 20 h with no degradation. The emission of the x-ray source was characterized across a range of anode bias voltages to maximize the fraction of photons from the characteristic K-shell peaks of the Mo film to produce a quasi-monochromatic photon beam, which enables capturing high-contrast images of low-atomic number materials. The x-ray source operating at the optimum anode bias voltage, i.e. 35 kV, was used to image ex vivo and nonorganic samples in x-ray fluoroscopic mode while varying the tube current; the images resolve feature sizes as small as ~160 µm.

  2. Computer-aided detection of tubes and lines in portable chest X-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer-aided detection method for highlighting lines and tubes in a portable chest X-ray image is developed. The method determines a region of interest in the image, and processes the image to provide edge enhancement forming an edge-enhanced image. Edge segments in the edge-enhanced image are detected. Connected lines from the edge segments are formed to obtain a set of connected lines. A tube structure is identified by pairing, from the set of connected lines, one or more pairs of edges separated by a width dimension in a predetermined range. A tip is detected according to the convergence or divergence of paired connected lines. Tube and tip are outlined on the radiographic image. Preliminary results showed that computer-aided detection of tubes in portable chest X-ray images is promising. It is expected that computer-aided interpretation of portable chest X-ray images improve the overall workflow and efficiency. (orig.)

  3. Note: Development of target changeable palm-top pyroelectric x-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    A target changeable palm-top size x-ray tube was realized using pyroelectric crystal and detachable vacuum flanges. The target metals can be exchanged easily by attaching them on the brass stage with carbon tape. When silver and titanium palates (area: 10 mm{sup 2}) were used as targets, silver L{alpha} and titanium K lines were clearly observed by bombarding electrons on the targets for 90 s. The intensities were the same or higher than those of previously reported pyroelectric x-ray tubes. Chromium, iron, nickel, copper, and zinc K lines in the x-ray tube (stainless steel and brass) disappeared by replacing the brass stage and the stainless steel vacuum flange with a carbon stage and a glass tube, respectively.

  4. A low power x-ray tube for use in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low power X-ray tube with thin molybdenum transmission target for use in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ENDXRF) element analysis has been indigenously built, along with its power supply. The X-ray tube has been in operation since August 1979, and it has been operated upto maximum target voltage of 35 KV and tube current upto 200 μA which is more than sufficient for trace element analysis. This X-ray tube has been used alongwith the indigenously built Si(Li) detector X-ray spectrometer with an energy resolution of 200 eV at 5.9 Kev MnKsub(α) X-ray peak for ENDXRF analysis. A simple procedure of calibration has been developed for thin samples based on the cellulose diluted, thin multielement standard pellets. Analytical sensitivities of the order of a few p.p.m. have been obtained with the experimental setup for elements with 20 < = Z < = 38 and 60 < = Z < = 90. A number of X-ray spectra for samples of environmental, biological, agricultural, industrial and metallurgical interest are presented to demonstrate the salient features of the experimental sep up. (auth.)

  5. TH-C-18A-10: The Influence of Tube Current On X-Ray Focal Spot Size for 70 KV CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Focal spot blooming is an increase in the focal spot size at increased tube current and/or decreased tube potential. In this work, we evaluated the influence of tube current on the focal spot size at low kV for two CT systems, one of which used a tube designed to reduce blooming effects. Methods: A slit camera (10 micron slit) was used to measure focal spot size on two CT scanners from the same manufacturer (Siemens Somatom Force and Definition Flash) at 70 kV and low, medium and maximum tube currents, according to the capabilities of each system (Force: 100, 800 and 1300 mA; Flash: 100, 200 and 500 mA). Exposures were made with a stationary tube in service mode using a raised stand without table movement or flying focal spot technique. Focal spot size, nominally 0.8 and 1.2 mm, respectively, was measured parallel and perpendicular to the cathode-anode axis by calculating the full-width-at-half-maximum of the slit profile recording using computed radiographic plates. Results: Focal spot sizes perpendicular to the anode-cathode axis increased at the maximum mA by 5.7% on the Force and 39.1% on the Flash relative to that at the minimal mA, even though the mA was increased 13-fold on the Force and only 5- fold on the Flash. Focal spot size increased parallel to the anode-cathode axis by 70.4% on Force and 40.9% on Flash. Conclusion: For CT protocols using low kV, high mA is typically required. These protocols are relevant in children and smaller adults, and for dual-energy scanning. Technical measures to limit focal spot blooming are important in these settings to avoid reduced spatial resolution. The x-ray tube on a recently-introduced scanner appears to greatly reduce blooming effects, even at very high mA values. CHM has research support from Siemens Healthcare

  6. Evaluation of single crystal LaB6 cathodes for use in a high frequency backward wave oscillator tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, L. W.; Davis, P. R.; Schwind, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of thermionic emission and evaporation studies of single crystal LaB6 cathodes are given. A comparison between the (100), (210) and (310) crystal planes shows the (310) and (210) planes to possess a work function approx 0.2 eV lower than (100). This translates into a significant increase in current density, J, at a specified temperature. Comparison with a state-of-the-art impregnated dispenser cathode shows that LaB6 (310) is a superior cathode in nearly all respects except operating temperature at j 10 A/sq cm. The 1600 K thermionic and room temperature retarding potential work functions for LaB6 (310) are 2.42 and 2.50 respectively.

  7. Beam characterization of a lab bench cold cathode ultra-soft X-ray generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounoughi, N.; Mavon, C.; Belafrites, A.; Groetz, J.-E.; Fromm, M.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the Ultra Soft X-ray (USX, 1.5 keV, Al Kα) photon beam of a customized lab bench cold cathode generator. Within this generator, the electron beam is slowed down in a thin aluminium foil (16 μm) supported by an easily exchangeable anode. It is shown that the thickness of the foil and the anode configuration determine the spatial distribution and the fluence rate of the photon beam, whereas accelerating voltage determines both fluence rate and energy spectrum feature. It is shown also that under specific operation parameters (i.e. accelerating voltage), a Gaussian energy distribution of the beam can be generated which is centred on the energy of the Al Kα line (1.5 keV). Dosimetric films of GAFCHROMIC® HD-810 were used to estimate the photon fluence rate distribution of the beam. Its variation, when the generator acts as a monoenergetic source, was characterized with the two different configurations of the anode assembly. Finally, it is verified that the anode assembly consisting in a flat washer, on which the aluminium foil is set, acts as a simple point-source.

  8. Sulfur X-ray absorption fine structure in porous Li–S cathode films measured under argon atmospheric conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Müller, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.mueller@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Choudhury, Soumyadip [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Gruber, Katharina [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Cruz, Valene B. [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Fuchsbichler, Bernd [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Jacob, Timo [Universität Ulm, Institut für Elektrochemie, 89069 Ulm (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Ulm (HIU), 89069 Ulm (Germany); Koller, Stefan [VARTA Micro Innovation GmbH, Stremayrgasse 9, 8010 Graz (Austria); Stamm, Manfred [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Physical Chemistry of Polymeric Materials ,01062 Dresden (Germany); Ionov, Leonid [Leibniz-Institut für Polymerforschung, Hohe Strasse 6, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Beckhoff, Burkhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we present the first results for the characterization of highly porous cathode materials with pore sizes below 1 μm for Lithium Sulfur (Li–S) batteries by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. A novel cathode material of porous carbon films fabricated with colloidal array templates has been investigated. In addition, an electrochemical characterization has been performed aiming on an improved correlation of physical and chemical parameters with the electrochemical performance. The performed NEXAFS measurements of cathode materials allowed for a chemical speciation of the sulfur content inside the cathode material. The aim of the presented investigation was to evaluate the potential of the NEXAFS technique to characterize sulfur in novel battery material. The long term goal for the characterization of the battery materials is the sensitive identification of undesired side reactions, such as the polysulfide shuttle, which takes place during charging and discharging of the battery. The main drawback associated with the investigation of these materials is the fact that NEXAFS measurements can usually only be performed ex situ due to the limited in situ instrumentation being available. For Li–S batteries this problem is more pronounced because of the low photon energies needed to study the sulfur K absorption edge at 2472 eV. We employed 1 μm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} windows to construct sealed argon cells for NEXAFS measurements under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions as a first step towards in situ measurements. The cells keep the sample under argon atmosphere at any time and the X-ray beam passes mainly through vacuum which enables the detection of the low energy X-ray emission of sulfur. Using these argon cells we found indications for the presence of lithium polysulfides in the cathode films whereas the correlations to the offline electrochemical results remain somewhat ambiguous. As a consequence of these findings one

  9. Measurement of x-ray tube potential in the mammographic region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mammography it is important to be able to measure x-ray tube potential with an accuracy of ±1 kV or better. Mammography x-ray sets generally use molybdenum for both target and filter. Consequently, a high proportion of the x-ray spectrum consists of characteristic radiation from the target. Devices for estimating tube potential such as penetrameters and digital kV meters, which depend on the relation between tube potential and the filtered x-ray spectrum, could be affected in their performance unless calibrated on similar x-ray sets. This paper reports tube potential measurements on a Mo/Mo x-ray set from 25 to 37 kV using the fluorescence technique, a manufacturer's potential divider, two penetrameters of different design and two digital meters of a single design. Agreement between all four techniques was good, being within the various combined experimental errors associated with each, from 37 down to 28 kV, below which the results diverged only slightly. (author)

  10. X-ray topography with scintillators coupled to image intensifiers or camera tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of imaging topographic figures in real time by using a thin scintillator coupled to either a high-gain image intensifier or a camera tube is investigated. The camera tube must have a high gain because of the low photon fluxes that are encountered in practice, and because of the relatively low quantum yield of thin phosphors. With conventional X-ray generators, the resolution is photon-noise limited. With more powerful generators like synchrotrons, real-time imaging appears possible, and the resolution is limited by the modulation transfer function of the image tube. Higher resolution can be reached by increasing the magnification between the screen and the image tube. When doing so, the input field is reduced and thinner phosphor screens must be used, resulting in a lower yield. Each time the magnification is doubled, the minimum required photon flux is multiplier by about 8, so that the advantages of increasing the magnification are rapidly limited, so far as real-time imaging is concerned. Because image tube resolution is mainly limited by the modulation transfer function of the phosphor for image intensifiers, and by that of the target for camera tubes, improvement of photocathode resolution can be obtained by magnifying electron optics. A zooming electron optic would permit the field and the resolution of the tube to be adapted to the observed subject. Unfortunately such tubes do not exist at present for this type of application, and in the required size

  11. Fine Synchronization of the CMS Muon Drift-Tube Local Trigger using Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; 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Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; 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Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment uses self-triggering arrays of drift tubes in the barrel muon trigger to perform the identification of the correct bunch crossing. The identification is unique only if the trigger chain is correctly synchronized. In this paper, the synchronization performed during an extended cosmic ray run is described and the results are reported. The random arrival time of cosmic ray muons allowed several synchronization aspects to be studied and a simple method for the fine synchronization of the Drift Tube Local Trigger at LHC to be developed.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of weld discontinuity in steel tubes by gamma ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. E.; Dantas, C. C.; Nery, M. S.; Barbosa, J. M.; Rolim, T. L.; Lima, E. A. O.; Melo, S. B.; Dos Santos, V. A.

    2015-04-01

    Weld discontinuity in steel tubes was investigated and dimensioned in a data analysis sequence. The correlation matrix, cosine distance and hierarchical cluster were applied as multivariate data processing in this analysis. Welded rings of 9236 mm3 were scanned in gamma ray CT in test tubes and compared with steel base and references. The discontinuity volume detected in the welded rings was assessed based on the pixel volume in data sampling. By modeling gamma ray trajectories and rotation angles in CT scanning, a discontinuity of 0.3 mm was determined and a limit detection of 23 mm3 was obtained.

  14. A comparison of cathode ray tube (CRT) and computed radiography (CR) diagnosis in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Takahiro; Odagiri, Kunio; Andoh, Kazuo; Doiuchi, Tunehiro; Seno, Kengo; Ohtsuka, Toshihiro [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama (Japan); Matsumoto, Toru

    1999-11-01

    Quantitative evaluation of CRT and CR observations in indentification of malignancy using phantom and clinical data. A breast phantom and a total of 40 patients were imaged by Fuji computed radiography (FCR). The images were interpreted twice by six radiologists both on CR film (2510 x 2000 pixels x 10 bits, 0.1 mm spatial resolution) and on a CRT monitor (1568 x 1152 pixels x 10 bits, 0.1 mm pixel size with double expansion) with image processing parameters of a toutine (RN 1.0, RE 0.2), for a calcification (RN 9.0, RE 4.0) and for a mass (RN 7.0, RE 2.0). The forty clinical cases included breast diseases with calcifications, masses, and normal breasts. Two-tailed t-test was performed to analyze interpretation of simulated microcalcifications and masses in the phantom. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to evaluate clinical cases. In all interpretation studies using both breast phantom and clinical cases, there was no significant difference between the two interpretation methods. However the CRT diagnosis was slightly less accurate than CR film diagnosis due to the lower luminance levels of the CRT monitor. Diagnosis via CRT monitor may be substituted for CR film diagnosing breast abnormalities, but the image processing parameters of CRT require improvement to compensate for low luminance. (author)

  15. The evaluation of display symbology - A chronometric study of visual search. [on cathode ray tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, R.; Williams, D.

    1984-01-01

    Three single-target visual search tasks were used to evaluate a set of CRT symbols for a helicopter traffic display. The search tasks were representative of the kinds of information extraction required in practice, and reaction time was used to measure the efficiency with which symbols could be located and identified. The results show that familiar numeric symbols were responded to more quickly than graphic symbols. The addition of modifier symbols such as a nearby flashing dot or surrounding square had a greater disruptive effect on the graphic symbols than the alphanumeric characters. The results suggest that a symbol set is like a list that must be learned. Factors that affect the time to respond to items in a list, such as familiarity and visual discriminability, and the division of list items into categories, also affect the time to identify symbols.

  16. High insulation foam glass material from waste cathode ray tube panel glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Jakob; Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; Yue, Yuanzheng

    parameters on the characteristics of foamed glass. CRT panel glass was crushed, milled and sieved below 63 m. Activated carbon used as a foaming agent and MnO2 as an ‘oxidizing’ agent were mixed with glass powders by means of a planetary ball mill. Foaming effect was observed in the temperature range...... between 750 and 850°C. We investigated the influence of milling time, particle size, foaming and oxidizing agent concentrations, temperature and time on the foaming process, foam density, foam porosity and homogeneity. Only moderate foaming was observed in carbon containing samples, while the addition of...... the oxidizing agent greatly improved the foaming quality. The results showed that the amount of oxygen available from the glass is not sufficient to combust all of the added carbon, therefore, additional oxygen was supplied via manganese reduction. In general, a minimum in the foam glass density was...

  17. Hydrometallurgical Processing and Recovery of Nickel from Spent Cathode Ray Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Coman V.; Robotin B.; Ilea P.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific and technological progress required for more and more advanced electrical and electronic equipment (EEE). Therefore, EEE manufacturing became one of the most important world activities, generating at the same time huge amounts of waste. In the last decades the accumulation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become a global problem (Widmer et al., 2005; Babu et al., 2007; Robinson, 2009). These wastes are a threat for the environment due to their high content of...

  18. Optimization of tube parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence (TEXRF) system using secondary fluorescers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the optimization of excitation parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence system (TEXRF) having Mo as the primary target has been carried out for biological matrix. Fe, Zn and Mo were used as the secondary fluorecers. For the present investigation a cellulose based synthetic standard containing K, Cr, Ni, Zn, Se and Y was excited with the TEXRF system. All experiments were carried out under the same experimental conditions except the tube potential. For each fluorescer the minimum detection limits (MDL) of excited elements were calculated for the corresponding tube voltage. The MDLs were found to be increasing with decreasing atomic number and it was also observed that the maximum sensitivity with Fe and Zn secondary fluorescers for elements analyzed occurred around 35 kV of the excitation potential. For Mo secondary fluorescer maximum sensitivity was found at higher excitation potential. In most cases MDLs were minimum at 40-45 kV of the excitation potential. 5 refs., 12 figs

  19. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a Circular X-ray tube: Its image reconstruction based on total-variation minimization and the image characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y. O.; Hong, D. K.; Cho, H. S.; Je, U. K.; Oh, J. E.; Lee, M. S.; Kim, H. J.; Lee, S. H.; Jang, W. S.; Cho, H. M.; Choi, S. I.; Koo, Y. S.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce an effective imaging system for digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a circular X-ray tube, the so-called circular-DTS (CDTS) system, and its image reconstruction algorithm based on the total-variation (TV) minimization method for low-dose, high-accuracy X-ray imaging. Here, the X-ray tube is equipped with a series of cathodes distributed around a rotating anode, and the detector remains stationary throughout the image acquisition. We considered a TV-based reconstruction algorithm that exploited the sparsity of the image with substantially high image accuracy. We implemented the algorithm for the CDTS geometry and successfully reconstructed images of high accuracy. The image characteristics were investigated quantitatively by using some figures of merit, including the universal-quality index (UQI) and the depth resolution. For selected tomographic angles of 20, 40, and 60°, the corresponding UQI values in the tomographic view were estimated to be about 0.94, 0.97, and 0.98, and the depth resolutions were about 4.6, 3.1, and 1.2 voxels in full width at half maximum (FWHM), respectively. We expect the proposed method to be applicable to developing a next-generation dental or breast X-ray imaging system.

  20. Reconstruction of the X-ray tube spectrum from a scattering measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inverse technique has been designed to unfold the x-ray tube spectrum from the measurement of the photons scattered by a target interposed in the path of the beam. A special strategy is necessary to circumvent the ill-conditioning of the forward transport algebraic problem. The proposed method is based on the calculation of both, the forward and adjoint analytical solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation. After testing the method with numerical simulations, a simple prototype built at the Operational Unit of Health Physics of the University of Bologna was used to test the method experimentally. The reconstructed spectrum was validated by comparison with a straightforward measurement of the X-ray beam. The influence of the detector was corrected in both cases using standard unfolding techniques. The method is capable to accurately characterize the intensity distribution of an X-ray tube spectrum, even at low energies where other methods fail. - Highlights: ► A complete inverse technique of source unfolding is presented. ► The X-ray tube spectrum is recovered from a scattering measurement. ► The ill conditioning of the plain forward transport algebraic problem is avoided. ► Forward and adjoint solutions of the Boltzmann transport equation are used. ► The technique characterizes X-ray tube spectra even at low energies.

  1. Influence of X-ray tube spectral distribution on uncertainty of calculated fluorescent radiation intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative radiation intensity (Ri) defined as fluorescent radiation intensity of analyte in specimen to fluorescent radiation intensity of pure element or compound, e.g., oxide is used in calculation in both fundamental parameter methods and in theoretical influence coefficient algorithms. Accuracy of calculated Ri is determined by uncertainties of atomic parameters, spectrometer geometry and also by X-ray tube spectral distribution. This paper presents the differences between Ri calculated using experimental and theoretical X-ray tube spectra evaluated by three different algorithms proposed by Pella et al., Ebel, and Finkelshtein-Pavlova. The calculations are performed for the most common targets, i.e., Cr, Mo, Rh and W. In this study, Ri is calculated for V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Mo in steels as an example. The differences between Ri calculated using different X-ray tube spectrum algorithms are presented when pure element standard, multielement standard similar to the analyzed material and one pure element standard for all analytes is used in X-ray fluorescence analysis. The differences between Ri for intermediate-thickness samples (and also for thin films) and for X-ray tube, which ran for many hours, are also evaluated

  2. Large dynamic range femtosecond soft X-ray streak image tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of inertial confinement fusion demands a streak image tube with femtosecond temporal resolution and large dynamic range. In order to obtain a setup in the practical application, a novel soft X-ray streak image tube was proposed and designed. A planar symmetric electrostatic cylindrical lens with five electrodes was introduced into the image tube model, which has a strong ability to focus the electron beam, and has no cross-over effects as in the axial-symmetrical system. The cylindrical lens can shorten the length of image tube, reduce the transit time dispersion, and restrain space charge effects, thus enlarging the dynamic range and improving the temporal resolution. The simulation results show that if the photoelectron's initial energy spread is 1.6 eV, and the slit area is 10 mm × 20 μm, the useful dynamic range of 100 is obtained with 500 fs temporal resolution. (authors)

  3. Rapid revolving x-ray tube housing assembly for magnification stereoscopic angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular diagnosis, showing yearly increase in necessity, its techniques are continually fractionizing and apparatuses are specialized. As for X-ray tube assemblies, they have almost been serialized with 400-kHU Rotanode(DRX-4224HD-S) for cineangiography, and DRX-8336HD for magnification radiography. In addition, a tube assembly for magnification stereoscopic angiography has been developed. The tube assembly for magnification stereoscopic angiography, having a pair of microfocuses (0.2 mm) on a large-diameter target, and combined with a control unit incorporating an electron tube, is capable of performing radiography more than 100 times/s. Provided also with a large target (125 mm in diameter and 350 kJ in anode capacity) and a high-speed revolving mechanism (10,000 rpm), it has a capacity of 11 kW for 0.2 mm focus to obtain high-contrast photographs clinically effectual. (author)

  4. The filter effects in X-ray tube XRF simulated by using the MCNP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, the use of filter reduces the background interference effectively, and improves the analysis sensitivity. In this paper, the MCNP5 code is used to simulate the filter effects in X-ray tube XRF. The XRF spectra by 140 keV electron beams, with filters of different materials and thicknesses, are compared. Their attenuation rates, i.e. background reduction from the original XRF spectra, are analyzed. (authors)

  5. High-resolution X-ray topographic images of dislocations in a silicon crystal recorded using an X-ray zooming tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Be-window-type X-ray zooming tube is an X-ray digital imaging system whose magnification factor of X-ray images can be easily varied from 10 to 200, and whose spatial resolution is less than 0.5 μm. This zooming tube was used as an imaging detector in double-crystal X-ray topography to obtain high-resolution images of dislocations in a silicon crystal. X-ray interference images of about 5 μm were observed even though optimal performance of the X-ray zooming tube could not be achieved. The results indicate that the X-ray zooming tube might make a good detector for X-ray topography with minor improvements in its stage structure

  6. Determination of dislocation density in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes by x-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For X-ray determination of the dislocation density in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes, a program was developed, using the Fourier analysis of X-ray line profiles and calculation of dislocation density by values of the coherent block size and the lattice distortion. The coincidence of obtained values of c- and a-dislocations with those, determined by the X-ray method for the same tube in AECL, was assumed to be the main criterion of validity of the developed program. The final variant of the program allowed to attain a rather close coincidence of calculated dislocation densities with results of AECL. The dislocation density was determined in all the zirconium grains with different orientations based on the texture of the stree-relieved CANDU tube. The complete distribution of c-dislocation density in -Zr grains depecding on their crystallographic orientations was constructed. The distribution of a-dislocation density within the texture maximum at L-direction, containing prismatic axes of all grains, was constructed as well. The analysis of obtained distributions testifies that -Zr grains of the stree-relieved CANDU tube significantly differ in their dislocation densities. Plotted diagrams of correlation between the dislocation density and the pole density allow to estimate the actual connection between texture and dislocation distribution in the studied tube. The distributions of volume fractions of all the zirconium grains depending on their dislocation density were calculated both for c- and a-dislocations. The distributions characterizes quantitatively the inhomogeneity of substructure conditions in the stress-relieved CANDU tube. the optimal procedure for determination of Nb content in β-phases of CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes was also established

  7. Determination of dislocation density in Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes by x-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Isaenkova, Perlovich; Cheong, Y. M.; Kim, S. S.; Yim, K. S.; Kwon, Sang Chul

    2000-11-01

    For X-ray determination of the dislocation density in CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes, a program was developed, using the Fourier analysis of X-ray line profiles and calculation of dislocation density by values of the coherent block size and the lattice distortion. The coincidence of obtained values of c- and a-dislocations with those, determined by the X-ray method for the same tube in AECL, was assumed to be the main criterion of validity of the developed program. The final variant of the program allowed to attain a rather close coincidence of calculated dislocation densities with results of AECL. The dislocation density was determined in all the zirconium grains with different orientations based on the texture of the stree-relieved CANDU tube. The complete distribution of c-dislocation density in -Zr grains depecding on their crystallographic orientations was constructed. The distribution of a-dislocation density within the texture maximum at L-direction, containing prismatic axes of all grains, was constructed as well. The analysis of obtained distributions testifies that -Zr grains of the stree-relieved CANDU tube significantly differ in their dislocation densities. Plotted diagrams of correlation between the dislocation density and the pole density allow to estimate the actual connection between texture and dislocation distribution in the studied tube. The distributions of volume fractions of all the zirconium grains depending on their dislocation density were calculated both for c- and a-dislocations. The distributions characterizes quantitatively the inhomogeneity of substructure conditions in the stress-relieved CANDU tube. the optimal procedure for determination of Nb content in {beta}-phases of CANDU Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tubes was also established.

  8. Tunable narrow-photon-energy X-ray generator utilizing a tungsten-target tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary experiment for producing narrow-photon-energy cone-beam X-rays using a silicon single crystal is described. In order to produce low-photon-energy X-rays, a 100-μm-focus X-ray generator in conjunction with a (1 1 1) plane silicon crystal is employed. The X-ray generator consists of a main controller and a unit with a high-voltage circuit and a microfocus X-ray tube. The maximum tube voltage and current were 35 kV and 0.50 mA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity of the microfocus generator was 48.3 μGy/s at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 30 kV and a current of 0.50 mA. The effective photon energy is determined by Bragg's angle, and the photon-energy width is regulated by the angle delta. Using this generator in conjunction with a computed radiography system, quasi-monochromatic radiography was performed using a cone beam with an effective energy of approximately 17 keV

  9. Dose reduction and increase of X-ray tube life in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to reduce radiation dose and increase X-ray tube life in computed tomography. Head, upper abdomen and chest scans were evaluated. We assessed the techniques employed and if these could be changed, suggested new protocols and compared the quality of the images, the radiation dose and the X-ray tube heating. A mAs reduction could be done without interfering with the diagnostic quality, allowing a decrease of up to 20% in the average dose for adults' head exams and up to 45% for 0 to 6 years old children; patients with less than 50 kg had a reduction of 37% on the upper abdomen radiation average dose; for chest routine scans the reduction was 54%. The decrease in the heating of the X-ray tube for head, upper abdomen and chest scan was approximately 13%, 23% and 41%, respectively. As a conclusion, a change on the described protocols will produce a significant reduction on the radiation dose and an increasing in X-ray tube life without loss of diagnostic quality. (author)

  10. Evaluated Plan Stress Of Weld In Pressure Tube Using X Ray Diffraction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X ray diffraction is a fundamental technique measuring stress, this technique has determined crystal strain in materials, from that determined stress in materials. This paper presents study of evaluating plane stress of weld in pressure tube, using modern XRD apparatus: X Pert Pro. (author)

  11. Measurement of residual stress in fuel cladding tubes by x-ray method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is difficult to predict the residual stress distribution in FBR or LWR fuel cladding tubes using computer code or mechanical methods. In order to measure these stresses by X-ray method, the characterization of X-ray diffraction and optimum condition for stress measurement are investigated. Following conclusions are obtained: (1) The (211) CrK sub(α) and (213-3) CuK sub(α) reflections are most suitable for the stress analysis of 316 stainless steel and Zircaloy-2 fuel cladding tubes, respectively. (2) Comparison between strain measured by X-ray and strain measured by strain gage shows good agreement in elastic region for both materials. (3) In order to obtain accurate results, it needs to remove surface more than 3 μm by electropolishing or acid etching. (4) There exists compressive residual stress in typical FBR fuel cladding tubes, and TIG welding of end plug induces additional compressive stress in welded portion or heat affected zone. (5) Residual stress distributions in Zircaloy-2 cladding tube deformed locally by the out-of-pile simulation tests, are obtained by the application of X-ray method. (author)

  12. X-ray images obtained from cold cathodes using carbon nanotubes coated with gallium-doped zinc oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray imaging data obtained from cold cathodes using gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO)-coated CNT emitters are presented. Multi-walled CNTs were directly grown on conical-type (250 μm-diameter) tungsten-tip substrates at 700 oC via inductively coupled plasma-chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD). GZO films were deposited on the grown CNTs at room temperature using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were used to monitor the variations in the morphology and microstructure of the CNTs before and after GZO coating. The formation of the GZO layers on the CNTs was confirmed using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The CNT-emitter that was coated with a 10-nm-thick GZO film displayed an excellent performance, such as a maximum emission current of 258 μA (at an applied field of 4 V/μm) and a threshold field of 2.20 V/μm (at an emission current of 1.0 μA). The electric-field emission characteristics of the GZO-coated CNT emitter and of the pristine (i.e., non-coated) CNT emitter were compared, and the images from an X-ray system were obtained by using the GZO-coated CNT emitter as the cold cathode for X-ray generation.

  13. Miniature X-ray Source for Planetary Exploration Instruments Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of the proposed work is to develop a design model for a CNT cold cathode, low power, passively cooled, and grounded-anode X-ray tube that is...

  14. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: X-ray tube imaging performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, John A.; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-04-15

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation.

  15. Closed-bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: x-ray tube imaging performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, John A; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-04-01

    A hybrid closed-bore x-ray/MRI system (CBXMR) is proposed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures. In this system, an x-ray C-arm will be positioned about 1 m from the entrance of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The CBXMR system will harness the complementary strengths of both modalities to guide and deploy a bioprosthetic valve into the aortic annulus of the heart without coronary artery obstruction. A major challenge in constructing this system is ensuring proper operation of a rotating-anode x-ray tube in the MRI magnetic fringe field environment. The electron beam in the x-ray tube responsible for producing x rays can be deflected by the fringe field. However, the clinical impact of electron beam deflection in a magnetic field has not yet been studied. Here, the authors investigated changes in focal spot resolving power, field of view shift, and field of view truncation in x-ray images as a result of electron beam deflection. The authors found that in the fringe field acting on the x-ray tube at the clinical location for the x-ray C-arm (4 mT), focal spot size increased by only 2%, so the fringe field did not limit the resolving power of the x-ray system. The magnetic field also caused the field of view to shift by 3 mm. This shift must be corrected to avoid unnecessary primary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The fringe field was too weak to cause field of view truncation. PMID:19472613

  16. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  17. Simple cathode design for Li–S batteries: cell performance and mechanistic insights by in operando X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulisch, Jörn; Sommer, Heino; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-09-21

    Rechargeable batteries have been receiving increasing attention over the past several years, particularly with regard to the accelerated development of electric vehicles, but also for their potential in grid storage applications. Among the broad range of cathode active materials, elemental sulfur has the highest theoretical specific capacity, thereby making it one of the most promising positive electrode materials these days. In the present work, we show that already a simple cathode design (cathodes with a non-optimized composite microstructure) provides good electrochemical performance both in coin and pouch cells with sulfur loadings of 2 mg cm−2. Our research data demonstrate that (1) specific capacities of 1000 mA h g−1 can be achieved over 60 cycles at room temperature while the cyclability at elevated temperatures (here, θ > 40 °C) is poor, (2) the discharge is the kinetically rate-limiting process, (3) the major fraction of active sulfur in the electrode is lost during the formation cycle at C/50 and (4) the Li–S cells suffer from drying-out due to continuous electrolyte decomposition on the lithium metal anode. In addition, in operando X-ray diffraction shows Li2S formation (grain size of <10 nm) on discharge and the appearance of single phase β-sulfur in the sub-100 nm size range – rather than the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic polymorph (α-sulfur) – by the end of the charge cycle. PMID:25077958

  18. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Thorsten; Kruell, Andreas [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Bereich Strahlentherapie; Grohmann, Carsten; Schumacher, Udo [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Anatomie und Experimentelle Morphologie

    2014-07-01

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm{sup 2} are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube.

  19. Partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals with an industrial X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated precise small laboratory animal irradiation sources are needed for basic cancer research and to meet this need expensive high precision radiation devices have been developed. To avoid such expenses a cost efficient way is presented to construct a device for partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals by adding specific components to an industrial X-ray tube. A custom made radiation field tube was added to an industrial 200 kV X-ray tube. A light field display as well as a monitor ionization chamber were implemented. The field size can rapidly be changed by individual inserts of MCP96 that are used for secondary collimation of the beam. Depth dose curves and cross sectional profiles were determined with the use of a custom made water phantom. More components like positioning lasers, a custom made treatment couch, and a commercial isoflurane anesthesia unit were added to complete the system. With the accessories described secondary small field sizes down to 10 by 10 mm2 (secondary collimator size) could be achieved. The dosimetry of the beam was constructed like those for conventional stereotactical clinical linear accelerators. The water phantom created showed an accuracy of 1 mm and was well suited for all measurements. With the anesthesia unit attached to the custom made treatment couch the system is ideal for the radiation treatment of small laboratory animals like mice. It was feasible to shrink the field size of an industrial X-ray tube from whole animal irradiation to precise partial body irradiation of small laboratory animals. Even smaller secondary collimator sizes than 10 by 10 mm2 are feasible with adequate secondary collimator inserts. Our custom made water phantom was well suited for the basic dosimetry of the X-ray tube.

  20. Mean glandular dose for different angles of the X-ray tube using different glandularity phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a three-dimensional radiographic technique that is beginning to be used as part of an imaging diagnostic program in some of Brazilian clinical practices. Studies are needed to evaluate the performance and to determine the radiation dose of patients that are undergoing this new procedure. The aim of this work is to present results of the mean glandular dose (DG) for different angles of the X-ray tube using a computed radiography (CR) mammography unit and different glandularity standard breast phantoms. DG values were derived from measurements of the incident air kerma (Ki) and tabulated conversion coefficients that are dependent on the half-value layer (HVL) of the X-ray spectrum. Irradiations were done in a 3000 Nova model Siemens MAMMOMAT mammography unit with the X-ray tube angle ranging from −30° to 30°. The protocol with 28 kV was used for Mo/Mo combination. The distance between focus and the 90×5–6 M model Radcal ionization chamber was 60.5 cm and the tube loading (PIt) used was 50 mA s. Exposures were done for DG determination using the semi-automatic exposure control mode and the 45 mm Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc phantoms which approximately simulate a standard breast with glandularities of 0, 30, 50, 70 and 100%. DG values ranged from 1.3±0.1 to 7.6±0.7 mGy. The results are in according to the reference level of 3 mGy established by the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS115) to breast with 45 mm of thickness, 50% of glandularity and for the X-ray tube positioned in 0°. The results showed that DG increases with the glandularity and with the rotation of the X-ray tube. This work contributes to begin in Brazil the dosimetry in DBT equipments using different protocols and target/filter combinations. - Highlights: ► Glandularity phantoms and a computed radiography mammography unit were used. ► Results were calculated from the incident air kerma and conversion coefficients. ► They are in

  1. Verification of a novel method for tube voltage constancy measurement of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chu; Belley, Matthew D. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, Mark W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yoshizumi, Terry, E-mail: yoshi003@mc.duke.edu [Duke Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: For orthovoltage x-ray irradiators, the tube voltage is one of the most fundamental system parameters as this directly relates to the dosimetry in radiation biology studies; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is no commercial portable quality assurance (QA) tool to directly test the constancy of the tube voltage greater than 160 kV. The purpose of this study is to establish the Beam Quality Index (BQI), a quantity strongly correlated to the tube voltage, as an alternative parameter for the verification of the tube voltage as part of the QA program of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators. Methods: A multipurpose QA meter and its associated data acquisition software were used to customize the measurement parameters to measure the BQI and collect its time-plot. BQI measurements were performed at 320 kV with four filtration levels on three orthovoltage x-ray irradiators of the same model, one of which had been recently energy-calibrated at the factory. Results: For each of the four filtration levels, the measured BQI values were in good agreement (<5%) between the three irradiators. BQI showed filtration-specificity, possibly due to the difference in beam quality. Conclusions: The BQI has been verified as a feasible alternative for monitoring the constancy of the tube voltage for orthovoltage irradiators. The time-plot of BQI offers information on the behavior of beam energy at different phases of the irradiation time line. In addition, this would provide power supply performance characteristics from initial ramp-up to plateau, and finally, the sharp drop-off at the end of the exposure.

  2. Verification of a novel method for tube voltage constancy measurement of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: For orthovoltage x-ray irradiators, the tube voltage is one of the most fundamental system parameters as this directly relates to the dosimetry in radiation biology studies; however, to the best of our knowledge, there is no commercial portable quality assurance (QA) tool to directly test the constancy of the tube voltage greater than 160 kV. The purpose of this study is to establish the Beam Quality Index (BQI), a quantity strongly correlated to the tube voltage, as an alternative parameter for the verification of the tube voltage as part of the QA program of orthovoltage x-ray irradiators. Methods: A multipurpose QA meter and its associated data acquisition software were used to customize the measurement parameters to measure the BQI and collect its time-plot. BQI measurements were performed at 320 kV with four filtration levels on three orthovoltage x-ray irradiators of the same model, one of which had been recently energy-calibrated at the factory. Results: For each of the four filtration levels, the measured BQI values were in good agreement (<5%) between the three irradiators. BQI showed filtration-specificity, possibly due to the difference in beam quality. Conclusions: The BQI has been verified as a feasible alternative for monitoring the constancy of the tube voltage for orthovoltage irradiators. The time-plot of BQI offers information on the behavior of beam energy at different phases of the irradiation time line. In addition, this would provide power supply performance characteristics from initial ramp-up to plateau, and finally, the sharp drop-off at the end of the exposure

  3. Peak potential meter applied to X-ray tubes in mammal radiography systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is of a great importance to identify accurately the real peak potential (or simply, KVp) applied to a X-ray tube purposed to medical diagnosis, since it defines the beam energetic quality in terms of photons penetration power. Mainly in mammographic systems. it is of fundamental relevance the KVp accurate measurement because the soft tissues involved in this kind of examination provides different absorption - and, hence, clear contrast on mammographic film - just in a very restrict energetic range. Thus a device to measure KVp with adequate accuracy in mammographic units, using the basic principles of scintillation detection, was developed. This system is therefore composed of a NaI(Tl) crystal which is a X-ray sensor - replacing radiographic films which usually are a source of errors in these measurements - , a photo multiplier tube and changed into amplified electric pulses. Finally the electronic circuit, after adequate pulses treatment, shows instantaneously the actual KVp value in the test on displays. (author)

  4. Measurement of focal spot size in mammography X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different measurement techniques for estimating the size of focal spots in X-ray tubes are described. These are the pin-hole, the slit and the star pattern or resolution pattern, and all are well known. Results are reported for a number of modern mammography X-ray tubes employed in a screening programme, using all three techniques. The results are compared with each other and with makers' specifications, IEC tolerances and UK Department of Health guidelines. Agreement between slit and star pattern results is generally within a few per cent, while pin-hole results are usually appreciably smaller. Although the slit technique is the most reliable for estimating focal spot size, both the others have a useful role, especially in revealing focal spot condition. Compliance with makers' specifications is usually demonstrated, but compliance with Department of Health guidelines is only found on the width of broad foci. (author)

  5. Two-ply anode X-ray tube for computed tomography scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatyev, D.; Taubin, M.; Chesnokov, D.; Malyshev, V.; Yaskolko, A.

    2016-04-01

    This report presents a method of the formation of tungsten layer on the graphite surface. The described method can be used to create the anode of powerful x-ray tubes for medical purposes, in particular, a computer tomograph (CT). The thermal properties of the graphite base and the deposited tungsten coating, as well as the strength of the resulting coating were studied. Thermal fields in the CT-anode with a power of 100 kW were calculated.

  6. Design of X-ray target for a CNT based high brightness microfocus X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A target for a high-brightness microfocus x-ray tube, which is based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) as electron source, is designed. The x-ray tube has the following specifications: brightness of 1 x 1011 ph/s-mm2mrad2, spot size ∼ 5μm, and average x-ray energy of 20∼40 keV. In order to satisfy the specifications, the design parameters of the target, such as configuration, material, thickness of the target as well as the required beam current, were optimized using computer code MCNPX. The design parameters were determined from the calculation of both x-ray spectrum and intensity distribution. From the calculation, transmission type was chosen for the target configuration. The material of the target was selected as molybdenum (Mo) and the optimized thickness was 7.2μm . Since such a thin target should withstand vacuum pressure and localized thermal loading, structural stability and temperature distribution were also considered. According to the analytic calculation, the transmission Mo target itself could not withstand the vacuum pressure. An alternative is to use backing material of 150μm beryllium (Be) on the backside of the Mo target. In addition, the calculation shows that the maximum temperature of the transmission target can be reduced to a stable-operation regime by forced air-convection cooling

  7. Design of high voltage power supply of miniature X-ray tube based on resonant Royer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: In recent years, X rays are widely used in various fields. With the rapid development of national economy, the demand of high quality, high reliability, and high stability miniature X-ray tube has grown rapidly. As an important core component of miniature X-ray tube, high voltage power supply has attracted wide attention. Purpose: To match miniature, the high voltage power supply should be small, lightweight, good quality, etc. Based on the basic performance requirements of existing micro-X-ray tube high voltage power supply, this paper designs an output from 0 to -30 kV adjustable miniature X-ray tube voltage DC power supply. Compared to half-bridge and full-bridge switching-mode power supply, its driving circuit is simple. With working on the linear condition, it has no switching noise. Methods: The main circuit makes use of DC power supply to provide the energy. The resonant Royer circuit supplies sine wave which drives to the high frequency transformer's primary winding with resultant sine-like high voltage appearing across the secondary winding. Then, the voltage doubling rectifying circuit would achieve further boost. In the regulator circuit, a feedback control resonant transistor base current is adopted. In order to insulate air, a silicone rubber is used for high pressure part packaging, and the output voltage is measured by the dividing voltage below -5 kV. Results: The stability of circuit is better than 0.2%/6 h and the percent of the output ripple voltage is less than 0.3%. Keeping the output voltage constant, the output current can reach 57 μA by changing the size of load resistor. This high voltage power supply based on resonant Royer can meet the requirement of miniature X-ray tube. Conclusions: The circuit can satisfy low noise, low ripple, low power and high voltage regulator power supply design. However, its efficiency is not high enough because of the linear condition. In the next design, to further reduce power consumption, we

  8. Microscope using an x-ray tube and a bubble compound refractive lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present x-ray images of grid meshes and biological material obtained using an unfiltered x-ray tube and a compound refractive lens composed of microbubbles embedded in epoxy inside a glass capillary. Images obtained using this apparatus are compared with those using a synchrotron source and the same lens. We find that the field of view is larger than that obtained using the synchrotron source, whereas the contrast and resolution are reduced. Geometrical distortion around the edges of the field of view is also reduced. The experiments demonstrate the usefulness of the apparatus in a modest laboratory setting

  9. Performance of the CMS drift-tube chamber local trigger with cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

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    2010-01-01

    The performance of the Local Trigger based on the drift-tube system of the CMS experiment has been studied using muons from cosmic ray events collected during the commissioning of the detector in 2008. The properties of the system are extensively tested and compared with the simulation. The effect of the random arrival time of the cosmic rays on the trigger performance is reported, and the results are compared with the design expectations for proton-proton collisions and with previous measurements obtained with muon beams.

  10. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; Osborne, I; Paul, T; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Taylor, L; Tuura, L; Anastassov, A; Gobbi, B; Kubik, A; Ofierzynski, R A; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Warchol, J; Wayne, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Killewald, P; Ling, T Y; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Garmash, A; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Wildish, T; Xie, Z; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Bonnett Del Alamo, M; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Santacruz, N; Zatzerklyany, A; Alagoz, E; Antillon, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gecse, Z; Gutay, L; Ippolito, N; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  11. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T. [Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., Advanced Materials Research Laboratory, 6 Kitahara, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-3294 (Japan); Tanaka, S. [Sumitomo Chemical Co., Ltd., Tsukuba Material Development Laboratory, 6 Kitahara, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 300-3294 (Japan); Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S. [National Institute for Materials Science, Synchrotron X-ray Station at SPring-8, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-08-28

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  12. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode

  13. Electronic structure of the polymer-cathode interface of an organic electroluminescent device investigated using operando hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, J.; Hamamatsu, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Tanaka, S.; Yamashita, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.; Ueda, S.

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structure of a polymer-cathode interface of an operating organic light-emitting diode (OLED) was directly investigated using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES). The potential distribution profile of the light-emitting copolymer layer as a function of the depth under the Al/Ba cathode layer in the OLED depended on the bias voltage. We found that band bending occurred in the copolymer of 9,9-dioctylfluorene (50%) and N-(4-(2-butyl)-phenyl)diphenylamine (F8-PFB) layer near the cathode at 0 V bias, while a linear potential distribution formed in the F8-PFB when a bias voltage was applied to the OLED. Direct observation of the built-in potential and that band bending formed in the F8-PFB layer in the operating OLED suggested that charges moved in the F8-PFB layer before electron injection from the cathode.

  14. Hard X-ray Imaging Microscopy using X-ray Guide Tube as Beam Condenser for Field Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Terada, Yasuko; Nakazawa, Hiromoto; Ohzawa, Sumito; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nii, Hajime; Handa, Katsumi

    2013-10-01

    An optical system for illumination of object in x-ray imaging microscopy is developed. The optical system is a beam condenser consisting of a single-bounce conical-shape mono-capillary (x-ray guide tube: XGT) made of Pyrex glass. The XGT condenser was tested at the beam line 47XU of SPring-8 using a Fresnel zone plate as an objective lens. Comparing with the microscope without beam condenser, the flux density is improved by a factor of 12-20 in the x-ray energy range of 6-8 keV. Test patterns with a 50 nm-structure are clearly resolved at 8 keV with an exposure time less than 1 s.

  15. Measurements of Residual Stresses in a Shape Welded Steel Tube by Neutron and X-Ray Diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Kockelmann, H.; Bokuchava, G. D.; Schreiber, J.; Taran, Yu. V.

    1999-01-01

    Shape welding of a ferritic steel layer on an austenitic steel tube is used to build compressive stresses on its outer surface, and as a result, suppress stress corrosion. Investigations of residual stresses in such bi-layer tubes are important for developing optimal welding techniques. The neutron and X-ray diffraction methods were used to analyze the stress behavior around the welded region on the tube. To this end, strain components in the radial, axial and tangential directions were measu...

  16. Practical consideration in the selection of X-ray fluorescence tube targets for analysis of geological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four X-ray fluorescence tubes with different targets (Cr, W, Mo and Rh) were compared for their suitability to analyze twelve of the most common major and trace elements in some geological samples. The major elements and Si, Al, Ca, K, Ti, and S. All elements having wavelengths higher than that of the iron K-absorption edge, gave significantly higher intensities of their characteristic fluorescence radiations when using a Cr-anode tube compared to W, Mo and Rh anode tubes. However, for the light elements (Si and Al) the Rh-anode tube of equal efficiency as the Cr-anode tube. The highest Ka-line intensity of Fe was obtained by the W-anode tube. The lowest detection limits (highest sensitivity) for the trace elements Rb, Sr, Zr, and Nb are obtained using both the Mo and Rh tubes. (author)

  17. Comparison between x-ray tube-based and synchrotron radiation-based μCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunke, Oliver; Brockdorf, Kathleen; Drews, Susanne; Müller, Bert; Donath, Tilman; Herzen, Julia; Beckmann, Felix

    2008-08-01

    Nowadays, X-ray tube-based high-resolution CT systems are widely used in scientific research and industrial applications. But the potential, convenience and economy of these lab systems is often underestimated. The present paper shows the comparison of sophisticated conventional μCT with synchrotron radiation-based μCT (SRμCT). The different aspects and characteristics of both approaches like spatial and density resolution, penetration depth, scanning time or sample size is described in detail. The tube-based μCT measurements were performed with a granite-based nanotom®-CT system (phoenix|x-ray, Wunstorf, Germany) equipped with a 180 kV - 15 W high-power nanofocus® tube with tungsten or molybdenum targets. The tube offers a wide range of applications from scanning low absorbing samples in nanofocus® mode with voxel sizes below 500 nm and highly absorbing objects in the high power mode with focal spot and voxel sizes of a few microns. The SRμCT measurements were carried out with the absorption contrast set-up at the beamlines W 2 and BW 2 at HASYLAB/DESY, operated by the GKSS Research Center. The range of samples examined covers materials of very different absorption levels and related photon energies for the CT scans. Both quantitative and qualitative comparisons of CT scans using biomedical specimens with rather low X-ray absorption such as parts of the human spine as well as using composites from the field of materials science are shown.

  18. 9/7-in. metal x-ray image intensifier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development has been made of a new X-ray intensifier tube (abbreviated to Metal X-I.I.) which produces images much better than ever in cardiac diagnosis. Unlike the conventional type of intensifier tube using a glass layer 3- to 4-mm thick as the input-window material, the new type employs a titanium layer only 250-μm thick for the window, with remarkable reduction in X-ray scattering and marked improvement of contrast, resolution and corpuscular quality obtained as the results. The development of the X-I.I. has been made on a number of technical improvements, such as regarding to binding titanium with other metals; the qualities of the pentode electron lens and the 25-mm-diameter output phosphor screen; the methods of manufacturing photocathodes and the input-and-output phosphor screen. The X-I.I. is especially noticeable in the improvement of the contrast and characteristics including intermediate tones; even in cases imaging is made under fairly high voltage or the object is very thick, it is possible for the X-I.I. to produce images with very good quality. It is expected that this image intensifier tube will contribute greatly to the diagnosis of heart diseases. (author)

  19. Assessment of a Picker Centrix combined X-ray tube and Bucky stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Centrix is a 'U' arm combined X-ray tube and Bucky stand, manufactured by Allmec S R L, Lissone, Italy. The X-ray tube is mounted on one arm and a tilting Bucky assembly is mounted on the other. The focus film distance (FFD) can be varied and the 'U' arm can be varied and the 'U' arm assembly rotated and moved vertically up and down the main column which is affixed to the floor and wall. Users at KCARE, King's College Hospital, found that, although the Centrix was capable of a wide range of examinations, the manipulation necessary to achieve a routine projection made the unit tedious and time consuming to use. To achieve versatility, it was necessary to use the patient trolley both along and perpendicular to the U arm axis of rotation. Sufficient space must therefore be allowed for this to be done. Difficulties were exacerbated by the brake for the rotational movement of the U arm being designed only for use as a lock, the coarseness of the rotational adjustment of the tube head and Bucky in the vicinity of the click stops, and difficulties in positioning the patient table with an average adult on it. (U.K.)

  20. Multiple imaging mode X-ray computed tomography for distinguishing active and inactive phases in lithium-ion battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Mohamed, Alexander I.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Litster, Shawn

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the use of nanometer scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) in the three-dimensional (3D) imaging of a Li-ion battery cathode, including the separate volumes of active material, binder plus conductive additive, and pore. The different high and low atomic number (Z) materials are distinguished by sequentially imaging the lithium cobalt oxide electrode in absorption and then Zernike phase contrast modes. Morphological parameters of the active material and the additives are extracted from the 3D reconstructions, including the distribution of contact areas between the additives and the active material. This method could provide a better understanding of the electric current distribution and structural integrity of battery electrodes, as well as provide detailed geometries for computational models.

  1. Influence of tube voltage and current on in-line phase contrast imaging using a microfocus x-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng; Yu Ai-Min; Li Cheng-Quan

    2007-01-01

    In-line x-ray phase contrast imaging has attracted much attention due to two major advantages:its effectiveness in imaging weakly absorbing materials,and the simplicity of its facilities.In this paper a comprehensive theory based on Wigner distribution developed by Wu and Liu [Med.Phys.31 2378-2384(2004)] is reviewed.The influence of x-ray source and detector on the image is discussed.Experiments using a microfocus x-ray source and a CCD detector are conducted,which show the role of two key factors on imaging:the tube voltage and tube current.High tube current and moderate tube voltage are suggested for imaging.

  2. X-ray phase imaging using a X-ray tube with a small focal spot. Improvement of image quality in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase contrast X-ray imaging has been studied intensively using X-rays from synchrotron radiation and micro-focus X-ray tubes. However, these studies have revealed the difficulty of this technique's application to practical medical imaging. We have created a phase contrast imaging technique using a molybdenum X-ray tube with a small focal spot size for mammography. We identified the radiographic conditions in phase contrast magnification mammography with a screen-film system, where edge effect due to phase contrast overcomes geometrical unsharpness caused by the 0.1 mm-focal spot of a molybdenum X-ray tube. The edge enhancement due to phase imaging was observed in an image of a plastic tube, and then geometrical configuration of the X-ray tube, the object and the screen-film system was determined for phase imaging of mammography. In order to investigate a potential for medical application of this method, we conducted evaluation of the images of the American Collage of Radiology (ACR) 156 mammography phantom. We obtained higher scores for phase imaging using high speed screen-film systems without any increase of X-ray dose than the score for contract imaging using a standard speed screen-film system. (author)

  3. First TDCR measurements at low energies using a miniature x-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developed for radionuclide standardization using liquid scintillation, the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method is applied using coincidence counting obtained with a specific three-photomultiplier system. For activity determination, a statistical model of light emission is classically used to establish a relation between the detection efficiency and the experimental TDCR value. At LNE-LNHB, a stochastic approach of the TDCR modeling was developed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The interest of this TDCR-Geant4 model is the possibility to simulate the propagation of optical photons from their creation in the scintillation vial to the production of photoelectrons in photomultipliers. As an alternative to the use of radionuclide sources, first TDCR measurements are presented using a miniature x-ray tube closely coupled to the scintillation vial. The objective of this new set-up was to enable low-energy depositions (lower than 20 keV) in liquid scintillator in order to study the influence of both time and geometrical dependence between PMTs already observed with radioactive sources. As for the statistical TDCR model, the non-linearity of light emission is implemented in the TDCR-Geant4 model using the Birks formula which depends on the kB factor and the scintillation yield. Measurements performed with the x-ray tube are extended to the assessment of these parameters and they are tested afterwards in the TDCR-Geant4 model for activity measurements of 3H. - Highlights: • TDCR measurements at low energies (E<20 keV). • LS counter coupled to a miniature x-ray tube. • TDCR modeling with the Geant4 code. • Measurement of the kB factor. • Standardization of 3H

  4. Soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography with an x-ray tube source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the first experimental soft-tissue phase-contrast tomography results using a conventional x-ray tube source, with a millimeter-sized focal spot. The setup is based on a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer operated at a mean energy of 28 keV. We present three-dimensional ex vivo images of a chicken heart sample, fixated in formalin. The results clearly demonstrate the advantageous contrast attainable through phase-contrast imaging over conventional attenuation-based approaches.

  5. Assessment of GEC Apollo X-ray tube ceiling suspension with GEC sectograph tomographic attachments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of a GEC Apollo X-ray tube ceiling suspension with GEC sectograph tomographic attachments was assessed in detail at the King's Centre for the Assessment of Radiological Equipment (KCARE). Particulars of the assessment and operational features of the equipment are described. The report indicates that the equipment is robustly and safely constructed and it has a versatility which enables it to be used for all the applications currently foreseen for such units. The use of the Apollo in conjunction with sectograph tomographic attachments can provide linear tomographs comparable in excellence with those produced on dedicated units. (U.K.)

  6. FFT Analysis of the X-ray Tube Voltage Waveforms of High-Frequency Generators for Radiographic Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To present a novel method for analyzing the voltage waveform from high-frequency X-ray generators for radiographic systems. Material and Methods: The output signal of the actual voltage across the tube of a high-frequency generator was measured using the built-in voltage sense taps that are used for voltage regulation feedback in X-ray generators. The output signal was stored in an analyzing recorder, and the waveforms were analyzed using FFT analysis. The FFT analysis of high-frequency generators consisted of obtaining the power spectrum, comparing the major frequency components in the tube voltage waveforms, and examining the intensity of each frequency component. Results: FFT analysis enables an objective comparison of the complex tube voltage waveforms in high-frequency X-ray generators. FFT analysis detected the change in the X-ray tube voltage waveform that occurred when there were problems with the high-frequency generator. Conclusion: High-frequency X-ray generators are becoming the universal choice for radiographic systems. The X-ray tube voltage and its waveform are important features of an X-ray generator, and quality assurance (QA) is important, too. As a tool for engineers involved in the design and development of X-ray generators, we can see that our methods (FFT analysis) might have some value as a means of describing generator performance under varying conditions. Furthermore, since the X-ray tube voltage waveform of a high-frequency generator is complex, FFT analysis may be useful for QA of the waveform

  7. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodoroaba, V.-D., E-mail: Dan.Hodoroaba@bam.d [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Radtke, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division I.3 Structure Analysis, Polymer Analysis, D-12200 Berlin (Germany); Vincze, L. [Ghent University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rackwitz, V.; Reuter, D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division VI.4 Surface Technologies, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  8. X-ray scattering in X-ray fluorescence spectra with X-ray tube excitation - Modelling, experiment, and Monte-Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray scattering may contribute significantly to the spectral background of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra. Based on metrological measurements carried out with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) having attached a well characterised X-ray source (polychromatic X-ray tube) and a calibrated energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) the accuracy of a physical model for X-ray scattering is systematically evaluated for representative samples. The knowledge of the X-ray spectrometer efficiency, but also of the spectrometer response functions makes it possible to define a physical spectral background of XRF spectra. Background subtraction relying on purely mathematical procedures is state-of-the-art. The results produced by the analytical model are at least as reliable as those obtained by Monte-Carlo simulations, even without considering the very challenging contribution of multiple scattering. Special attention has been paid to Compton broadening. Relevant applications of the implementation of the analytical model presented in this paper are the prediction of the limits of detection for particular cases or the determination of the transmission of X-ray polycapillary lenses.

  9. Using Multispectral Imaging to Measure Temperature Profiles and Emissivity of Large Thermionic Dispenser, Cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermionic dispenser cathodes are widely used in modern high-power microwave tubes. Use of these cathodes has led to significant improvement in performance. In recent years these cathodes have been used in electron linear accelerators (LINACs), particularly in induction LINACs, such as the Experimental Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Relativistic Test Accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. For induction LINACs, the thermionic dispenser cathode provides greater reproducibility, longer pulse lengths, and lower emittance beams than does a field emission cathode. Los Alamos National Laboratory is fabricating a dual-axis X-ray radiography machine called dual-axis radiograph hydrodynamic test (DARHT). The second axis of DARHT consists of a 2-kA, 20-MeV induction LINAC that uses a 3.2-MeV electron gun with a tungsten thermionic-dispenser cathode. Typically the DARHT cathode current density is 10 A/cm2 at 1050 C. Under these conditions current density is space-charge limited, which is desirable since current density is independent of temperature. At lower temperature (the temperature-limited regime) there are variations in the local current density due to a nonuniform temperature profile. To obtain the desired uniform current density associated with space-charge limited operation, the coolest area on the cathode must be at a sufficiently high temperature so that the emission is space-charge limited. Consequently, the rest of the cathode is emitting at the same space-charge-limited current density but is at a higher temperature than necessary. Because cathode lifetime is such a strong function of cathode temperature, there is a severe penalty for nonuniformity in the cathode temperature. For example, a temperature increase of 50 C means cathode lifetime will decrease by a factor of at least four. Therefore, we are motivated to measure the temperature profiles of our large-area cathodes

  10. First TDCR measurements at low energies using a miniature x-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halter, E; Thiam, C; Bobin, C; Bouchard, J; Chambellan, D; Chauvenet, B; Hamel, M; Rocha, L; Trocmé, M; Woo, R

    2014-11-01

    Developed for radionuclide standardization using liquid scintillation, the Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) method is applied using coincidence counting obtained with a specific three-photomultiplier system. For activity determination, a statistical model of light emission is classically used to establish a relation between the detection efficiency and the experimental TDCR value. At LNE-LNHB, a stochastic approach of the TDCR modeling was developed using the Monte Carlo code Geant4. The interest of this TDCR-Geant4 model is the possibility to simulate the propagation of optical photons from their creation in the scintillation vial to the production of photoelectrons in photomultipliers. As an alternative to the use of radionuclide sources, first TDCR measurements are presented using a miniature x-ray tube closely coupled to the scintillation vial. The objective of this new set-up was to enable low-energy depositions (lower than 20 keV) in liquid scintillator in order to study the influence of both time and geometrical dependence between PMTs already observed with radioactive sources. As for the statistical TDCR model, the non-linearity of light emission is implemented in the TDCR-Geant4 model using the Birks formula which depends on the kB factor and the scintillation yield. Measurements performed with the x-ray tube are extended to the assessment of these parameters and they are tested afterwards in the TDCR-Geant4 model for activity measurements of (3)H. PMID:24685767

  11. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Y.; Błachucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-01

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO2 optical fibers.

  12. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors’ assembly were also

  13. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also

  14. Measurements of residual strains in a shape welded steel tube by neutron and x-ray diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shape welding of a ferritic steel layer on an austenitic steel tube is used to build compressive stresses on its outer surface as a result, suppress stress corrosion. Investigations of residual stresses in such bi-layer tubes are important for developing of optimal welding techniques. The neutron and X-ray diffraction methods were used to analyze the stress behaviour around the welded region on the tube. To this end, strain components in the radial, axial and tangential directions were measured across the weld. The results are compared to the data obtained by the destructive turning out technique and theoretical predictions by the finite element method

  15. Correction of the X-ray tube spot movement as a tool for improvement of the micro-tomography quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays X-ray tubes in conjunction with digital pixelated imagers are standardly utilized for high resolution radiography with several micrometre or even sub-micrometre resolution. Achievement of the same resolution in X-ray computed tomography is a more demanding task due to the time-dependent tube electron beam drift as well as thermal deformations of the tube. In our work, the beam drift caused by the long-term stabilization of the tube electron optics was measured by observation of radiographs of 75 μm big tin ball rigidly mounted onto the tube head. The tube spot movement comprising both the beam drift and the movement caused by thermal deformations of the tube and its fixture was evaluated measuring the virtual movement of the inspected object. For this purpose, radiographs were recorded periodically at the same object position. Both the beam drift as well as spot movement were evaluated with subpixel resolution using digital image correlation tools. It was proven that the quality of a tomographic reconstruction can be significantly improved by the correction of the spot movement

  16. L X-ray intensity ratios for high Z elements induced with X-ray tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Xu, Zhongfeng; Zhang, Limin

    2015-07-01

    We have studied the intensity ratios I(Lα1,2)/I(Lβ1,2), I(Lα1,2)/I(Lγ) and I(Lβ1,2)/I(Lγ) for elements Ta, W, Au and Pb by 13.1 keV bremsstrahlung radiation. In this work, experimental values were compared with the theoretical results and other experimental results. Theoretical results of the intensity ratios were calculated with theoretical subshell photoionization cross sections, fractional X-ray emission rates, fluorescence yields, and Coster-Kronig transition probabilities. Good agreement can be observed between experimental values and theoretical results. Comparing with L1 and L2 subshells, the ionization cross section of L3 subshell shows a large increase for Ta and W with the variation of excitation energy from 59.5 keV to 13.1 keV.

  17. Determination of tungsten target parameters for transmission X-ray tube: A simulation study using Geant4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasseri, Mohammad M. [School of Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (AEOI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Transmission X-ray tubes based on carbon nanotube have attracted significant attention recently. In most of these tubes, tungsten is used as the target material. In this article, the well-known simulator Geant4 was used to obtain some of the tungsten target parameters. The optimal thickness for maximum production of usable X-rays when the target is exposed to electron beams of different energies was obtained. The linear variation of optimal thickness of the target for different electron energies was also obtained. The data obtained in this study can be used to design X-ray tubes. A beryllium window was considered for the X-ray tube. The X-ray energy spectra at the moment of production and after passing through the target and window for different electron energies in the 30-110 keV range were also obtained. The results obtained show that with a specific thickness, the target material itself can act as filter, which enables generation of X-rays with a limited energy.

  18. Monte Carlo simulations of a scanning system based on a panoramic X-ray tube with a conical anode

    OpenAIRE

    Andrii Sofiienko; Chad Jarvis; Ådne Voll

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to study photon production in a panoramic X-ray tube with a conical tungsten target to determine the optimal characteristics of the target shape and electron beam configuration. Several simulations were performed for accelerating potentials equal to 250 kV, 300 kV, and 500 kV with electron beams of various radii and anode sizes. The angular distribution of the photon intensity was analysed by numerical calculations for an assembly composed of an X-ray tube an...

  19. X-ray detection with a scintillating YAP-window hybrid photomultiplier tube

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Leutz, H; Puertolas, D; Rosso, E

    2000-01-01

    A YAP(YAlO/sub 3/:Ce)-scintillating window, coated on its inner surface with an S20-photocathode, seals a cross-focusing hybrid photomultiplier tube (HPMT) equipped with a small p-i-n anode of 2-mm diameter. This new radiation detector separates X-ray lines down to about 2-keV peak energy from the HPMT noise. Its detection efficiency for high gamma energies depends on the YAP-window thickness and amounts to about 18% attenuation at 400-keV energy in the present version. Competitive radiation detectors like Si photodiodes and Si drift chambers are discussed and compared to our prototype, with particular attention given to their energy resolution and noise performance, which limits their active area considerably. (19 refs).

  20. Determination of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry following electroenrichment on a copper cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrodepositons of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au from aqueous solution of pH = 1 on the cathode surface have been studied for X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF). A special holder for a copper electrode has been constructed to perform the electrodeposition process on only one side of the electrode. After electrolysis, the copper electrode can be easily removed from the holder; after rinsing it with water and drying it can be analyzed by XRF. The proposed method of sample preparation and preconcentration of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb, Au provides suitable samples which are devoid of the negative and undesirable effects of XRF analysis, such as particle size and matrix effects. The influence of time on the deposition yield has been examined. The method of preconcentration is efficient. The inhomogeneity of the prepared specimens has been studied using internal standard method. The calibration is based on using synthetic standards, certified reference materials and standard addition method. The best results are achieved by the standard addition method. The agreement between results obtained with XRF analysis and certified values is satisfactory and indicates the usefulness of the proposed method for determination of Te, Bi, Ni, Sb and Au in anode slime

  1. X-ray diagnostic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateral and orbital scanning movements can be carried out with the equipment. The assessment is carried out by a computer. Differences in sensitivity of the detectors can be compensated for by displacement of the electron beam of the X-ray tube compared to the anti-cathode or by bending of the electron beam by electromagnetic coils. (RW)

  2. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  3. A novel surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic detector to study the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Takamasa; Okuda, Chikaaki; Oka, Hideaki; Nishimura, Yusaku F.; Makimura, Yoshinari; Kondo, Yasuhito; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Yoji

    2016-09-01

    A surface-sensitive conversion-electron-yield X-ray absorption fine structure (CEY-XAFS) detector that operates at elevated temperatures is developed to investigate the thermal decomposition of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. The detector enables measurements with the sample temperature controlled from room temperature up to 450 °C. The detector is applied to the LiNi0.75Co0.15Al0.05Mg0.05O2 cathode material at 0% state of charge (SOC) and 50% SOC to examine the chemical changes that occur during heating in the absence of an electrolyte. The combination of surface-sensitive CEY-XAFS and bulk-sensitive transmission-mode XAFS shows that the reduction of Ni and Co ions begins at the surface of the cathode particles at around 150 °C, and propagates inside the particle upon further heating. These changes with heating are irreversible and are more obvious at 50% SOC than at 0% SOC. The fraction of reduced Ni ions is larger than that of reduced Co ions. These results demonstrate the capability of the developed detector to obtain important information for the safe employment of this cathode material in Li-ion batteries.

  4. Dynamic behavior of thermionic dispenser cathodes under ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortenraad, R.; van der Gon, A. W. Denier; Brongersma, H. H.; Gärtner, G.; Raasch, D.; Manenschijn, A.

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the surface coverage and electron emission of thermionic dispenser cathodes during 3 keV Ar+ ion bombardment, thereby simulating the bombardment of the cathodes by residual gases that takes place in cathode-ray tubes as used in television sets. During the ion bombardment at the operating temperature of 1030 °C, a dynamic equilibrium is established between the sputter removal and resupply mechanisms of the Ba and O atoms that form the dipole layer on the cathode substrate. We demonstrated that the performance of the cathodes under ion bombardment is governed by the O removal and resupply rates. It was found that the Ba resupply rate is almost an order of magnitude higher than the O resupply rate, but that the Ba can only be present on the surface bound to O atoms. Therefore, the Ba/O ratio is approximately equal to unity during the ion bombardment. Based on the investigations of the removal and resupply processes, we proposed a model that accurately describes the surface coverage and electron emission during the ion bombardment, including the dependence of the ion flux and cathode temperature.

  5. Phase identification and internal stress analysis of steamside oxides on superheater tubes by means of X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Montgomery, Melanie

    Steamside oxides formed on plant exposed superheated tubes were investigated using X-ray diffraction. Phase identification and stress analysis revealed that on ferritic X20CrMoV12-1 pure Hematite and pure Magnetite formed and both phases are under tensile stress. IN contrast, on austenitic TP347H...

  6. Adjustable lead glass shielding device for use with a over-the-table x-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sources of scattered radiation exposure to personnel from a ceiling-mounted x-ray tube were examined at the side of cardiac catheterization patients. A fully adjustable mounting for a lead glass shield was designed to afford maximum radiation protection to the attending physician's head and neck area, while minimizing interference with the procedure

  7. Evaluation of central catheters and endotracheal tubes in the unit of intensive care with x-ray of portable thorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carried out a revision of the parameters that define the connect location of the different types of central catheters and endotracheal tube in patients hospitalized at the intensive care unit; by means of the evaluation with portable X-ray of the thorax, describing the complications associated to this vital support

  8. [Increasing the anode characteristics of sharp-focused Coolidge X-ray tubes by changing from a high to a low vacuum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanikovskiĭ, V B

    2002-01-01

    The anode characteristics of up-to-date sharp-focused Coolidge X-ray tubes are analyzed. The reason for differences in the real anode characteristics from theoretical ones has been found to be a higher tube gas pressure than that accepted. There is evidence that there are new third-class X-tubes--electronic tubes with compensation for negative volumetric charge of electrons with positive gas ions. PMID:12512274

  9. Integrated structure vacuum tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeff, J.; Kerwin, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    High efficiency, multi-dimensional thin film vacuum tubes suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments are described. The tubes are fabricated by placing thin film electrode members in selected arrays on facing interior wall surfaces of an alumina substrate envelope. Cathode members are formed using thin films of triple carbonate. The photoresist used in photolithography aids in activation of the cathodes by carbonizing and reacting with the reduced carbonates when heated in vacuum during forming. The finely powdered triple carbonate is mixed with the photoresist used to delineate the cathode locations in the conventional solid state photolithographic manner. Anode and grid members are formed using thin films of refractory metal. Electron flow in the tubes is between grid elements from cathode to anode as in a conventional three-dimensional tube.

  10. CT x-ray tube voltage optimisation and image reconstruction evaluation using visual grading analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoming; Kim, Ted M.; Davidson, Rob; Lee, Seongju; Shin, Cheongil; Yang, Sook

    2014-03-01

    The purposes of this work were to find an optimal x-ray voltage for CT imaging and to determine the diagnostic effectiveness of image reconstruction techniques by using the visual grading analysis (VGA). Images of the PH-5 CT abdomen phantom (Kagaku Co, Kyoto) were acquired by the Toshiba Aquillion One 320 slices CT system with various exposures (from 10 to 580 mAs) under different tube peak voltages (80, 100 and 120 kVp). The images were reconstructed by employing the FBP and the AIDR 3D iterative reconstructions with Mild, Standard and Strong FBP blending. Image quality was assessed by measuring noise, contrast to noise ratio and human observer's VGA scores. The CT dose index CTDIv was obtained from the values displayed on the images. The best fit for the curves of the image quality VGA vs dose CTDIv is a logistic function from the SPSS estimation. A threshold dose Dt is defined as the CTDIv at the just acceptable for diagnostic image quality and a figure of merit (FOM) is defined as the slope of the standardised logistic function. The Dt and FOM were found to be 5.4, 8.1 and 9.1 mGy and 0.47, 0.51 and 0.38 under the tube voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kVp, respectively, from images reconstructed by the FBP technique. The Dt and FOM values were lower from the images reconstructed by the AIDR 3D in comparison with the FBP technique. The optimal xray peak voltage for the imaging of the PH-5 abdomen phantom by the Aquillion One CT system was found to be at 100 kVp. The images reconstructed by the FBP are more diagnostically effective than that by the AIDR 3D but with a higher dose Dt to the patients.

  11. Experimental research on the feature of an x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer versus tube accelerating voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Hao; Margie, P. Olbinado; Atsushi, Momose; Hua-Jie, Han; Hu, Ren-Fang; Wang, Zhi-Li; Gao, Kun; Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Pei-Ping; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2015-06-01

    X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer has been used most widely to perform x-ray phase-contrast imaging with a conventional low-brilliance x-ray source, and it yields high-sensitivity phase and dark-field images of samples producing low absorption contrast, thus bearing tremendous potential for future clinical diagnosis. In this work, by changing the accelerating voltage of the x-ray tube from 35 kV to 45 kV, x-ray phase-contrast imaging of a test sample is performed at each integer value of the accelerating voltage to investigate the characteristic of an x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer (located in the Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Japan) versus tube voltage. Experimental results and data analysis show that within a range this x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer is not sensitive to the accelerating voltage of the tube with a constant fringe visibility of ˜ 44%. This x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometer research demonstrates the feasibility of a new dual energy phase-contrast x-ray imaging strategy and the possibility to collect a refraction spectrum. Project supported by the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB825800), the Science Fund for Creative Research Groups, China (Grant No. 11321503), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11179004, 10979055, 11205189, and 11205157), and the Japan-Asia Youth Exchange Program in Science (SAKURA Exchange Program in Science) Administered by the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  12. Simple cathode design for Li-S batteries : cell performance and mechanistic insights by in operando X-ray diffraction

    OpenAIRE

    Kulisch, Jörn; Sommer, Heino; Brezesinski, Torsten; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Rechargeable batteries have been receiving increasing attention over the past several years, particularly with regard to the accelerated development of electric vehicles, but also for their potential in grid storage applications. Among the broad range of cathode active materials, elemental sulfur has the highest theoretical specific capacity, thereby making it one of the most promising positive electrode materials these days. In the present work, we show that already a simple cathode design (...

  13. Hybrid microwave oscillators with a virtual cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the developments and theoretical investigations of a fundamentally new class of microwave devices, namely, hybrid microwave oscillators with a virtual cathode, which combine the useful properties of virtual cathodes with the advantages of those traditional microwave oscillators that operate with subcritical-current beams and have a high efficiency in generating ultrarelativistic electron beams. Among such devices are the following: a hybrid diffractional microwave oscillator with a virtual cathode, a hybrid gyro-device with a virtual cathode, a hybrid beam-plasma vircator, a hybrid gyrocon with a virtual cathode, a hybrid Cherenkov oscillator with a virtual cathode, a hybrid microwave oscillator of the 'vircator + traveling-wave tube' type, an original two-beam tube with a virtual cathode, and a klystron-like vircator

  14. Detection sensibility study from a portable EDXRF system with a Si-PIN detector and an X ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy Dispersive X Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) technique was used for the sensibility variation study of a Si-PIN detector. For sample excitation a portable mini x ray tube (Ag target, 4W), under different operational conditions was used with the objective of optimize the analytical sensibility for trace elements determinations in environmental samples. The sensibility curves were obtained by standard reference materials irradiation on thin films from MicroMatter Inc. With these curves the concentration of two certified reference materials SRM1832 and SRM1833 were determined for validation purpose. The measurement time was 200s. Were used in the detector Al and Pb collimators. On the end of the X ray tube was used Mo filter. The best results were verified for Al and Pb collimator operating at 25kV and 20μA. (author)

  15. Material/element-dependent fluorescence-yield modes on soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Asakura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the utilities of fluorescence-yield (FY modes in soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS of several cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. In the case of total-FY (TFY XAS for LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4, the line shape of the Mn L3-edge XAS was largely distorted by the self-absorption and saturation effects, while the distortions were less pronounced at the Ni L3 edge. The distortions were suppressed for the inverse-partial-FY (IPFY spectra. We found that, in the cathode materials, the IPFY XAS is highly effective for the Cr, Mn, and Fe L edges and the TFY and PFY modes are useful enough for the Ni L edge which is far from the O K edge.

  16. Comparison of pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control using a grid-controlled x-ray tube with pulsed fluoroscopy by primary control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology (IVR) procedures may involve high radiation doses that are potentially harmful to the patient. In IVR procedures, pulsed fluoroscopy can greatly decrease the radiation that the physician and patient receive. There are two types of pulsed fluoroscopy: direct control and primary (indirect) control. The purpose of this study was to compare pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control, using a grid-controlled x-ray tube, with pulsed fluoroscopy using primary control. For both types of pulsed fluoroscopy, we measured the waveforms (x-ray tube voltage, x-ray tube current, and x-ray output) and the relative radiation dose. In addition, we compared the decrease in radiation during pulsed fluoroscopy using a care filter. The studies were performed using a Siemens Bicor Plus x-ray System (direct control) and a Siemens Multistar Plus x-ray System (primary control). Using primary pulse control, a 50% decrease in the x-ray output waveform took approximately 0.5-1.0 msec, or longer with a lower x-ray tube current. Using direct pulse control, a 50% decrease in the x-ray output waveform took approximately 0.1 msec, and was independent of x-ray tube current. The rate of radiation reduction with primary pulse control using the care filter with a lower x-ray tube current had a slope exceeding 10%. Pulsed fluoroscopy by direct control using a grid-controlled x-ray tube permits an optimal radiation dose. To decrease the radiation in primary pulse control, a care filter must be used, particularly with a lower x-ray tube current. (author)

  17. Use of X-ray imaging for the evaluation of superconducting ceramics fabricated by the powder-in-tube method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-spatial-resolution microfocus-based X-ray imaging technology, both real-time and film, has been used to study the thickness variation that occurs in the oxide core of silver-sheathed BSCCO ribbons produced by the powder-in-tube method. This thickness variation (also called 'sausaging') occurs during incremental rolling and degrades the critical current densities of the ribbons. Using X-ray image data, we determined the onset acid severity of sausaging. Onset occurred at a ribbon thickness of 203 mu m, and the severity increased with subsequent rolling reductions. Scanning electron microscopy was used to confirm the X-ray image data. X-ray imaging provides several advantages over more traditional methods of characterizing the superconductors, such as optical or scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray imaging provides nondestructive information about the entire width of the ribbon, with far greater speed, lower cost, and more flexibility than the traditional techniques. (author)

  18. Inspection of small multi-layered plastic tubing during extrusion, using low-energy X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The automotive industry uses nylon tubing with a thin ETFE (ethylene-tetrafluroethylene) inner layer to carry fuel from the tank to the engine. This fluorocarbon inner barrier layer is important to reduce the migration of hydrocarbons into the environment. Pilot Industries has developed a series of real-time inspection stations for dimensional measurements and flaw detection during the extrusion of this tubing. These stations are named LERATM (low-energy radioscopic analysis), use a low energy X-ray source, a special high-resolution image converter and intensifier (ICI) stage, image capture hardware, a personal computer, and software that was specially designed to meet this task. Each LERATM station operates up to 20 h a day, 6 days a week and nearly every week of the year. The tubing walls are 1-2 mm thick and the outer layer is nylon and the inner 0.2 mm thick layer is ethylene-tetrafluroethylene

  19. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: Active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, John A.; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J. A. [Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Medical Biophysics and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity ({approx_equal}1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session.

  20. Closed bore XMR (CBXMR) systems for aortic valve replacement: active magnetic shielding of x-ray tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, John A; DeCrescenzo, Giovanni; Komljenovic, Philip; Lillaney, Prasheel V; Fahrig, Rebecca; Rowlands, J A

    2009-05-01

    Hybrid closed bore x-ray/MRI systems are being developed to improve the safety and efficacy of percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedures by harnessing the complementary strengths of the x-ray and MRI modalities in a single interventional suite without requiring patient transfer between two rooms. These systems are composed of an x-ray C-arm in close proximity (approximately 1 m) to an MRI scanner. The MRI magnetic fringe field can cause the electron beam in the x-ray tube to deflect. The deflection causes the x-ray field of view to shift position on the detector receptacle. This could result in unnecessary radiation exposure to the patient and the staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Therefore, the electron beam deflection must be corrected. The authors developed an active magnetic shielding system that can correct for electron beam deflection to within an accuracy of 5% without truncating the field of view or increasing exposure to the patient. This system was able to automatically adjust to different field strengths as the external magnetic field acting on the x-ray tube was changed. Although a small torque was observed on the shielding coils of the active shielding system when they were placed in a magnetic field, this torque will not impact their performance if they are securely mounted on the x-ray tube and the C-arm. The heating of the coils of the shielding system for use in the clinic caused by electric current was found to be slow enough not to require a dedicated cooling system for one percutaneous aortic valve replacement procedure. However, a cooling system will be required if multiple procedures are performed in one session. PMID:19544789

  1. The impact of x-ray tube configuration on the eye lens and extremity doses received by cardiologists in electrophysiology room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domienik, J; Bissinger, A; Zmyślony, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of the x-ray tube configuration on the radiation doses to eye lens and extremities of cardiologists performing pacemaker implantation procedures in electrophysiology laboratory. The measurements were performed on one, widely used, portable C-arm system, first with x-ray tube mounted above the patient table and image intensifier below it and then on a reinstalled (but essentially the same) system with under-table x-ray tube configuration. Thermoluminescent dosimeters, placed in various positions near the eye lens, on the hands and ankle, were used during every procedure. The comparison of doses received by cardiologists after changing the x-ray tube configuration from over- to under-table shows statistically significant dose reduction (p lens closest to the x-ray tube, left finger, left wrist, while for the ankle a dose increase is observed. The corresponding over- to under-table x-ray tube median dose ratios are 4.1 for the right eye, 4.8 for the left finger, 3.0 for left wrist and, finally, 0.13 for the right ankle. Systems with under-table x-ray tube are preferable from a radiation protection point of view. The observed significant increase in doses to the legs should be partially compensated by the use of a protective lead curtain. PMID:25325561

  2. The impact of x-ray tube configuration on the eye lens and extremity doses received by cardiologists in electrophysiology room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to analyse the influence of the x-ray tube configuration on the radiation doses to eye lens and extremities of cardiologists performing pacemaker implantation procedures in electrophysiology laboratory. The measurements were performed on one, widely used, portable C-arm system, first with x-ray tube mounted above the patient table and image intensifier below it and then on a reinstalled (but essentially the same) system with under-table x-ray tube configuration. Thermoluminescent dosimeters, placed in various positions near the eye lens, on the hands and ankle, were used during every procedure. The comparison of doses received by cardiologists after changing the x-ray tube configuration from over- to under-table shows statistically significant dose reduction (p < 0.009) for the eye lens closest to the x-ray tube, left finger, left wrist, while for the ankle a dose increase is observed. The corresponding over- to under-table x-ray tube median dose ratios are 4.1 for the right eye, 4.8 for the left finger, 3.0 for left wrist and, finally, 0.13 for the right ankle. Systems with under-table x-ray tube are preferable from a radiation protection point of view. The observed significant increase in doses to the legs should be partially compensated by the use of a protective lead curtain. (note)

  3. Cathodic protection to control microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about the cathodic protection performance in environments with microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) effects is very fragmented and often contradictory. Not enough is known about the microbial effects on cathodic protection effectiveness, criteria, calcareous deposits, corrosion rates and possible hydrogen embrittlement of titanium and some stainless steel condenser tubes. This paper presents a review of cathodic protection systems, describes several examples of cathodic protection in environments with MIC effects and provides preliminary conclusions about cathodic protection design parameters, criteria and effectiveness in MIC environments. 30 refs

  4. Miniature Reservoir Cathode: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancil, Bernard K.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2002-01-01

    We report on recent work to produce a small low power, low cost reservoir cathode capable of long life (more than 100,000 hours) at high loading (> 5 A/sq cm). Our objective is a highly manufacturable, commercial device costing less than $30. Small highly loaded cathodes are needed, especially for millimeter wave tubes, where focusing becomes difficult when area convergence ratios are too high. We currently have 3 models ranging from .060-inch diameter to. 125-inch diameter. Reservoir type barium dispenser cathodes have a demonstrated capability for simultaneous high emission density and long life. Seven reservoir cathodes continue to operate on the cathode life test facility at NSWC, Crane, Indiana at 2 and 4 amps/sq cm. They have accumulated nearly 100,000 hours with practically no change in emission levels or knee temperature.

  5. Study on the influence of X-ray tube spectral distribution on the analysis of bulk samples and thin films: Fundamental parameters method and theoretical coefficient algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of X-ray tube spectral distribution is necessary in theoretical methods of matrix correction, i.e. in both fundamental parameter (FP) methods and theoretical influence coefficient algorithms. Thus, the influence of X-ray tube distribution on the accuracy of the analysis of thin films and bulk samples is presented. The calculations are performed using experimental X-ray tube spectra taken from the literature and theoretical X-ray tube spectra evaluated by three different algorithms proposed by Pella et al. (X-Ray Spectrom. 14 (1985) 125-135), Ebel (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 255-266), and Finkelshtein and Pavlova (X-Ray Spectrom. 28 (1999) 27-32). In this study, Fe-Cr-Ni system is selected as an example and the calculations are performed for X-ray tubes commonly applied in X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), i.e., Cr, Mo, Rh and W. The influence of X-ray tube spectra on FP analysis is evaluated when quantification is performed using various types of calibration samples. FP analysis of bulk samples is performed using pure-element bulk standards and multielement bulk standards similar to the analyzed material, whereas for FP analysis of thin films, the bulk and thin pure-element standards are used. For the evaluation of the influence of X-ray tube spectra on XRF analysis performed by theoretical influence coefficient methods, two algorithms for bulk samples are selected, i.e. Claisse-Quintin (Can. Spectrosc. 12 (1967) 129-134) and COLA algorithms (G.R. Lachance, Paper Presented at the International Conference on Industrial Inorganic Elemental Analysis, Metz, France, June 3, 1981) and two algorithms (constant and linear coefficients) for thin films recently proposed by Sitko (X-Ray Spectrom. 37 (2008) 265-272)

  6. Titanium condenser tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The corrosion resistance of titanium in sea water is extremely excellent, but titanium tubes are expensive, and the copper alloy tubes resistant in polluted sea water were developed, therefore they were not used practically. In 1970, ammonia attack was found on the copper alloy tubes in the air-cooled portion of condensers, and titanium tubes have been used as the countermeasure. As the result of the use, the galvanic attack an copper alloy tube plates with titanium tubes as cathode and the hydrogen absorption at titanium tube ends owing to excess electrolytic protection were observed, but the corrosion resistance of titanium tubes was perfect. These problems can be controlled by the application of proper electrolytic protection. The condensers with all titanium tubes adopted recently in USA are intended to realize perfectly no-leak condensers as the countermeasure to the corrosion in steam generators of PWR plants. Regarding large condensers of nowadays, three problems are pointed out, namely the vibration of condenser tubes, the method of joining tubes and tube plates, and the tubes of no coolant leak. These three problems in case of titanium tubes were studied, and the problem of the fouling of tubes was also examined. The intervals of supporting plates for titanium tubes should be narrowed. The joining of titanium tubes and titanium tube plates by welding is feasible and promising. The cleaning with sponge balls is effective to control fouling. (Kako, I.)

  7. A comparative experiments for tube agglutination test of pullorum antiserum with gamma ray Co60 irradiated salmonella pullorum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An agglutinability between naturally infected positive chicken serum of pullorum disease and hyperimmunized rabbit antiserum was compared. And the following results were obtained and summarized. On the agglutinability, Salmonella pullorum antigen which irradiated gamma-ray was better than another both formalized and heated antigen. Time of judgemented as positive titer in the tube agglutination test to the naturally infected positive chicken serum was it most suitable for 12 hours at 37°C. Agglutination titer of positive immune chicken serum against gamma-ray irradiate Salmonella pullorum were as 320 approximately 640x. (author).

  8. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  10. A Low Cost Traveling Wave Tube for Wireless Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancil, Bernard Kenneth; Wintucky, Edwin G.; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Demand for high data rate wireless communications is pushing up amplifier power, bandwidth and frequency requirements. Some systems are using vacuum electron devices again because solid-state power amplifiers are not able to efficiently meet the new requirements. The traveling wave tube is the VED of choice because of its excellent broadband capability as well as high power efficiency and frequency. But TWTs are very expensive on a per watt basis below about 200 watts of output power. We propose a new traveling wave tube that utilizes cathode ray tube construction technology and electrostatic focusing. We believe the tube can be built in quantity for under $1,000 each. We discuss several traveling wave tube slow wave circuits that lend themselves to the new construction. We will present modeling results and data on prototype devices.

  11. Observation of X-ray intensity distribution from the anode of a fine-focus tube using Δω - Δ2θ scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A split intensity distribution from the anode of fine focus x-ray tubes probably due to tungsten deposited on the target is reported. Such a doubling of the target complicates the interpretation of Δ ω -Δ2θ intensity distributions and introduces systematic errors in the determination of lattice parameters. It is estimated that the increasing tungsten deposit affects, in time, the intensity of x-ray tubes. 4 refs., 4 figs

  12. On the features of bursts of neutrons, hard x-rays and alpha-particles in the pulse vacuum discharge with a virtual cathode and self-organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Gus'kov, S. Yu; Samoylov, I. S.; Ostashev, V. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we continue the discussion of the experimental results on the yield of DD neutrons and hard x-rays in the nanosecond vacuum discharge (NVD) with a virtual cathode, which was started in the previous article of this issue, and previously (Kurilenkov Y K et al 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 4375). We have considered here the regimes of very dense interelectrode aerosol ensembles, in which diffusion of even hard x-rays is found. The yield of DD neutrons in these regimes is conditioned not only by the head-on deuteron-deuteron collisions in the potential well of virtual cathode, but also by the channel of “deuteron-deuterium cluster” reaction, which exceeds overall yield of neutrons per a shot by more than an order of magnitude, bringing it up to ∼ 107/(4π). Very bright bursts of hard x-rays are also represented and discussed here. Presumably, their nature may be associated with the appearance in the NVD of some properties of random laser in the x-ray spectrum. Good preceding agreeing of the experiment on the DD fusion in the NVD with its particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations provides a basis to begin consideration of nuclear burning “proton-boron” in the NVD, which will be accompanied by the release of alpha particles only. With this objective in view, there has been started the PIC-simulation of aneutronic burning of p-B11, and its preliminary results are presented.

  13. Development of miniaturized proximity focused streak tubes for visible light and x-ray applications. Final report and progress, April-September 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research performed to develop miniaturized proximity focused streak camera tubes (PFST) for application in the visible and the x-ray modes of operation is described. The objective of this research was to provide an engineering design and to fabricate a visible and an x-ray prototype tube to be provided to LASL for test and evaluation. Materials selection and fabrication procedures, particularly the joining of beryllium to a suitable support ring for use as the x-ray window, are described in detail. The visible and x-ray PFST's were successfully fabricated

  14. Development of small-diameter lead-glass-tube matrices for gamma-ray conversion in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gamma-ray converter for a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) positron emission tomograph is described. The converter is made of small-diameter (0.48 mm inner diameter, 0.06 mm wall thickness) lead-oxide-glass tubes fused to form a honeycomb matrix. The surfaces of the tubes are reduced in a hydrogen atmosphere to provide the drift electric field for detection of the conversion electrons. The detection efficiency for a 10 mm thick converter is 6.65%, with a time resolution of 160 ns (FWHM). A scheme which will improve the spatial resolution of the tomograph by use of the self quenching streamer mode of chamber operation is described. Details of construction of the converters and the MWPC are presented, as well as the design performance of a high spatial resolution positron emission tomograph (HISPET). 40 refs., 22 figs

  15. Anode thermal analysis of high power microfocus CNT x-ray tubes for in vivo small animal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jing; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2012-03-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) micro-focus x-ray tubes have been demonstrated as a novel technology for in-vivo small animal imaging. It enables simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gated prospective CT imaging of free breathing animals with high temporal resolution. Operating the micro-focus CNT x-ray source at high power is required to achieve high temporal resolution. The thermal loading of the anode focal spot is a limiting factor in determining the maximum power of an x-ray tube. In this paper, we developed a reliable simulation model to quantitatively analyze the anode heat load of the CNT x-ray source operating in both DC and pulse modes. The anode temperature distribution is simulated using finite element analysis. The model is validated by comparing simulation results for the micro-focus x- ray tube with reported experimental results. We investigated the relationship between the maximum power and the effective focal spot size for CNT micro-CT system running in both DC and pulse modes. Our results show that when operating in pulse mode, the maximum power of the CNT x-ray source can be significantly higher than when operating in DC mode. In DC mode, we found that the maximum power scales non-linearly with the effective focal spot size as P(in W) = (0.25/ sin θ+1.6)f0.73 s (in μm), where 1/sin θ is the projection factor for a given anode angle θ. However, in pulse mode the maximum power linearly increases with the effective focal spot size asP(in W) = (0.20/ sin θ+0.35)fs(in μm), and is significantly higher than that in the DC mode. This implies that it is feasible to improve the micro-CT temporal resolution further without sacrificing the image quality. The simulation method developed here also enables us to analyze the thermal loading of the other CNT x-ray sources for other applications, such as the stationary digital breast tomosynthesis scanner and the CNT microbeam radiation therapy system.

  16. Determination of the diagnostic x-ray tube practical peak voltage (PPV) from average or average peak voltage measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practical peak voltage (PPV) has been adopted as the reference measuring quantity for the x-ray tube voltage. However, the majority of commercial kV-meter models measure the average peak, U-barP, the average, U-bar, the effective, Ueff or the maximum peak, UP tube voltage. This work proposed a method for determination of the PPV from measurements with a kV-meter that measures the average U-bar or the average peak, U-barp voltage. The kV-meter reading can be converted to the PPV by applying appropriate calibration coefficients and conversion factors. The average peak kPPV,kVp and the average kPPV,Uav conversion factors were calculated from virtual voltage waveforms for conventional diagnostic radiology (50-150 kV) and mammography (22-35 kV) tube voltages and for voltage ripples from 0% to 100%. Regression equation and coefficients provide the appropriate conversion factors at any given tube voltage and ripple. The influence of voltage waveform irregularities, like 'spikes' and pulse amplitude variations, on the conversion factors was investigated and discussed. The proposed method and the conversion factors were tested using six commercial kV-meters at several x-ray units. The deviations between the reference and the calculated - according to the proposed method - PPV values were less than 2%. Practical aspects on the voltage ripple measurement were addressed and discussed. The proposed method provides a rigorous base to determine the PPV with kV-meters from U-barp and U-bar measurement. Users can benefit, since all kV-meters, irrespective of their measuring quantity, can be used to determine the PPV, complying with the IEC standard requirements.

  17. Modeling of life deterioration by ion bombardment of a dispenser cathode coated with an Ir/W film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Toshiharu; Yamamoto, Shigehiko; Kudo, Hiroshi; Murata, Hirotaka

    2002-11-01

    We have developed the calculation method for ion bombardment traces. When an M type dispenser cathode is operated in a cathode ray tube (CRT), the surface coating film is subjected to ion bombardment due to ionized residual gas. With long-time use, the coating film is dissipated and a change to an S type occurs. This occurrence of an S type causes a deterioration of emission and focus characteristics. A method for calculating the life time dependency of the shape of ion bombardment traces using the degree of vacuum in the tube, the grid voltage, and the cathode current was studied. The calculated results and measured results were in close agreement. As a result, it was confirmed that modeling is possible using (1) an electron and ion beam trajectory calculation program, and (2) formulas for calculating the ionization cross-section and sputtering yield.

  18. Mitigated phase transition during first cycle of a Li-rich layered cathode studied by in operando synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bohang; Day, Sarah J; Sui, Tan; Lu, Li; Tang, Chiu C; Korsunsky, Alexander M

    2016-02-14

    In operando synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (SXPD) studies were conducted to investigate the phase transition of Li-rich Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13)O2 and Cr-doped Li(Li0.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.03Cr0.10)O2 cathodes during the first charge/discharge cycle. Crystallographic (lattice parameters) and mechanical (domain size and microstrain) information was collected from SXPD full pattern refinement. It was found that Cr substitution at Co-site benefits in suppressing the activation of Li2MnO3 domains upon 1st charge, and thus mitigates the phase transition. As a consequence, Cr-doped layered cathode holds a better reversibility in terms of a full recovery of both lattice parameters and nano-domain size after a whole charge/discharge cycle. The effects of different cycling rates on the structural change were also discussed. PMID:26799191

  19. Advances in electrometer vacuum tube design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Single-ended, miniature-cathode tube with a relatively low grid current level is constructed. Adequate cathode temperature at relatively low heater power drain is provided by designing the supporting spacers to provide a square cathode hole. Method of assembling the mount and bonding the elements is discussed.

  20. Dependence of effective linear attenuation coefficient on X-ray tube voltage ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical importance of the effective linear coefficient of attenuation μ-bar is described and the basic mathematical relations derived. A calculation program was written for calculating μ-bar. Tabulated are analytical waveforms of voltage U(t) and current i(t) for the tube of the given types of generator. (E.S.). 1 tab., 1 ref

  1. Dose distribution around a needle-like anode X-ray tube: Dye-film vs. planar thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dosimetry around the X-ray tube with a needle-like anode (NAXT), developed at the Inst. of Nuclear Studies, for interstitial brachytherapy has been performed using (1) dye films (Gafchromic XR-T), (2) large-area thermoluminescent (TL) detectors - prepared either by gluing TL powder onto thin Al foil (so-called planar detectors with spatial resolution of 0.1 mm) and (3) miniature (2 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thick) TL detectors. The measurements were performed in following geometries. (1) Needle inside a PMMA cylinder - the planar TL detector mounted on the surface of the cylinder. (2) Needle inside a thick block of PMMA and TL detector mounted vertically 7 mm from needle axis. TL detectors were read with the planar (2D) thermoluminescence reader, developed at IFJ, with a sensitive CCD (charge couple device) camera. Gafchromic films were evaluated with a system based on Agfa Arcus 1200 scanner and calibrated with X-rays (35 kV) filtered with 0.03 mm Mo and with Co-60 photons. The intensity distribution of TL light on the planar detector was calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, using 137Cs gamma-rays. TL planar detectors seem to be a promising tool for 2D dosimetry of miniature X-ray sources. Obtained results for TLDs and Gafchromic films seem to be comparable but differences have been found. Both methods are useful for measurements of dose distribution around the NAXT X-rays source. (authors)

  2. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current–exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4–7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging

  3. Experimental investigation for determination of optimal X-ray beam tube voltages in a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Suk, E-mail: radiosugar@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ye-Seul, E-mail: radiohesugar@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young-Wook, E-mail: ywchoi@keri.re.kr [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, JaeGu, E-mail: jgchoi88@paran.com [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute (KERI), Ansan, Geongki 426-170 (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Yong-Chun, E-mail: ycrhee@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Joung, E-mail: hjk1@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Radiological Science and Research Institute of Health Science, Yonsei University, Wonju, Gangwon 220-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Our purpose was to investigate optimal tube voltages (kVp) for a newly developed digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) process and to determine tube current–exposure time products (mA s) for the average glandular dose (AGD), which is similar to that of the two views in conventional mammography (CM). In addition, the optimal acquisition parameters for this system were compared with those of CM. The analysis was based on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from the simulated micro-calcifications on homogeneous phantoms, and the figure of merit (FOM) was retrieved from the CNR and AGD at X-ray tube voltages ranging from 24 to 40 kVp at intervals of 2 kV. The optimal kVp increased more than 2 kV with increasing glandularity for thicker (≥50 mm) breast phantoms. The optimal kVp for DBT was found to be 4–7 kV higher than that calculated for CM with breast phantoms thicker than 50 mm. This is likely due to the greater effect of noise and dose reduction by kVp increment when using the lower dose per projection in DBT. It is important to determine optimum acquisition conditions for a maximally effective DBT system. The results of our study provide useful information to further improve DBT for high quality imaging.

  4. Screening of foods and related products for toxic elements with a portable X-ray tube analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capabilities of a portable X-ray tube-based analyzer were evaluated for screening foods, thin films, and ceramic glazes for toxic elements. A beverage spiked with Cr, Cu, and As and cocoa powder spiked with As and Pb could easily be distinguished from unadulterated products when analyzed through their original container walls. With calibration, results for thin films and ceramic glazes yielded accurate Pb results. Limits of detection (LODs) were 0.2-15 and 15 μg cm-2, respectively, for Pb and Cd in thin films and about 2 μg cm-2 for Pb in glazes. With analysis times of 0.5-1 min, sensitivities and LODs were superior to those obtained with radioisotopic X-ray fluorescence analysis. (author)

  5. Residual stress of monoclinic zircon obtained by X-ray diffraction in ZY4 oxidized cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well established that in Zircaloy-4 (ZY4) oxidized samples (in steam at 400 C), at least two crystallographic structures of zircon can be found : monoclinic (stable) and tetragonal (metastable). The tetragonal structure is stabilized by the strong stress in the inner part of the oxide layer. The stress measurement of the monoclinic part in zircon oxide and the proportion of tetragonal part may contribute to understand corrosion kinetics of Zr alloys. Non-destructive measurements of residual stresses by X-ray diffraction in the external monoclinic zircon were performed directly on ZY4 oxidized cladding tube. The monoclinic zircon has a compressive stress that increase with oxidation duration up to about -600 MPa (for an oxidation time of 30 days) and then it becomes almost constant at about -400 MPa (for oxidation times greater than 100 days). This variation allows to confirm the kinetic transition in the oxide growth already described. Stress measurements in the metal underlying the oxide show a low level of tensile stress of about 50 MPa. There is no important changes of the stress with the oxidation time. An improved method to obtain the volume fraction of tetragonal zircon present in the oxide layers of textured tubes, is proposed. Indeed, monoclinic and tetragonal zircon are textured and classical methods, taking into account relative intensities of (111) m and (anti 111) m from monoclinic and (111)t from tetragonal structures, can not be applied directly. Pole figures have been performed and geometric corrections induced by tube interaction with X-ray radiation in classic goniometric configuration have been calculated. Preliminary quantitative results show a decrease of the proportion of tetragonal zircon in the kinetic transition zone. (orig.)

  6. A simple test phantom for checking X-ray tube voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and inexpensive test tool is described, for checking kV-consistency both in fluoroscopic and radiographic modes. It is designed primarily for routine checking to recognise changes in effective kV. A plexiglass body with boreholes in which copper discs of different thicknesses are inserted is depicted on a film or the TV screen via the image intensifier. Due to the very different absorption properties of copper and plexiglass the relative transparency of the copper discs changes markedly when the tube voltage is varied. The copper step-associated with a reference number-having transparency equal to the surrounding plastic can be used as a good index for tube kilovoltage. The accuracy of the visual assessment is about +-2 kV at 60 kV. (author)

  7. GEIGER-MULLER TYPE COUNTER TUBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, I.L.; Watt, L.A.K.

    1959-12-15

    A single counter tube capable of responding to a wide range of intensities is described. The counter tube comprises a tubular cathode and an anode extending centrally of the cathode. The spacing between the outer surface of the anode and the inner surface of the cathode is varied along the length of the tube to provide different counting volumes in adjacent portions of the tube. A large counting volume in one portion adjacent to a low-energy absorption window gives adequate sensitivity for measuring lowintensity radiation, while a smaller volume with close electrode spacing is provided in the counter to make possible measurement of intense garnma radiation fields.

  8. Finite element calculation and direct x-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses induced by an hydraulic expansion in steam generator tubes during the sleeving process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When installing an internal sleeve to repair a steam generator tube, it is usual to expand the sleeve locally by means of an internal pressure, in order to put it into contact with the tube before welding. This process induces residual stresses in the parent tube, near the end of the contact zone, even if the residual bulging is very small. This study is aimed at assessing the residual stresses as a function of that bulging and of the respective mechanical properties of the materials. An analytical approach based on finite element calculations and an experimental one by x-ray diffraction have been used to evaluate the residual stresses

  9. Measuring device for fast determination of the tube peak voltage and the switch-on time of X-ray units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronder, T.; Eickelkamp, U.; Jakschik, J.

    1982-11-01

    A prototype of a measuring device is described, which reads the tube peak voltage and the switch-on time of X-ray units by means of two radiation detectors with different energy dependences due to detector materials. (Caesium iodine and silicon). With a storage oscilloscope the curves of the tube voltage and the relative absorbed dose rate of intensifying screens can be displayed. The measuring range of the tube peak voltage is 60 kV to 150 kV. It is possible to measure exposure times of radiography equipment above 2 ms with sufficiently low uncertainty. The tube peak voltage has been read with a relative uncertainty below 5% for almost all dose rates, which arise in practical application of medical X-ray units, and its calibration is made by means of X-ray apparatus with tube voltage reading, which has been compared to a Ge(Li) spectrometer. The stability of tube voltage reading of the measuring device is only effected by radiation damage of the detectors after a long time of utilization. The small diameter of the probe permits the accomodation of other probes, ionization chambers, phantoms, etc. in the radiation field at the same time.

  10. X-Band Thermionic Cathode RF Gun at UTNL

    CERN Document Server

    Fukasawa, Atsushi; Dobashi, Katsuhiro; Ebina, Futaro; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higo, Toshiyasu; Kaneyasu, Tatsuo; Matsuo, Kennichi; Ogino, Haruyuki; Sakae, Hisaharu; Sakamoto, Fumito; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Urakawa, Junji

    2005-01-01

    The X-band (11.424 GHz) linac for compact Compton scattering hard X-ray source are under construction at Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo. This linac designed to accelerate up to 35 MeV, and this electron beam will be used to produce hard X-ray by colliding with laser. It consists of a thermionic cathode RF gun, an alpha magnet, and a traveling wave tube. The gun has 3.5 cells (unloaded Q is 8250) and will be operated at pi-mode. A dispenser cathode is introduced. Since the energy spread of the beam from the gun is predicted to be broad due to the continuous emission from the thermionic cathode, a slit is placed in the alpha magnet to eliminate low energy electrons. The simulation on the injector shows the beam energy 2.9 MeV, the charge 23 pC/bunch, and the emittance less than 10 mm.mrad. The experiment on the gun is planed in the beginning of 2005, and the details will be discussed on the spot.

  11. Phase identification and internal stress analysis of steamside oxides on superheater tubes by means of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantleon, Karen; Montgomery, Melanie [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Manufacturing Engineering and Management

    2005-05-01

    For superheater tubes, the adherence of the inner steamside oxide is especially important as spallation of this oxide results in a) blockage of loops which cause insufficient steam flow through the superheaters and subsequently overheating and tube failure and b) spalled oxide can cause erosion of turbine blades. Oxide spallation is a serious problem for austenitic steels where the significant differences of the thermal expansion coefficients of steel and oxide cause relatively high thermal stresses. Usually, various oxides layered within the scale are suggested from microscopical observations of the morphology and/or topography of the oxide scale accompanied by the analysis of chemical elements present. Reports about the application of X-ray diffraction on the study of steamside oxide formation are very scarce in literature. If applied at all, XRD-studies are restricted to ideally flat samples oxidized under laboratory conditions, but relation to real operating conditions and the effect of the real sample geometry is missing. Within the frame of the project, steamside oxides on plant exposed components of ferritic/ martensitic X20CrMoV12-1 as well as fine- and coarse-grained austenitic TP347H were studied by means of X-ray diffraction. Depth dependent phase analysis on sample segments cut from the tubes was carried out by means of grazing incidence diffraction and, in order to obtain information from a larger depth, conventional XRD was combination with stepwise mechanical removal of the steamside oxides. After each removal step phase analysis was performed both on the segments and on the removed powders. Phase specific stress analysis was carried out on rings cut from the tube. Results show that steamside oxides on X20CrMoV12-1 consist of pure Hematite at the surface followed by a relatively thick layer of pure Magnetite. Both phases are under relatively high tensile stresses. While the phase composition of the Hematite layer appears to be the same for all

  12. Dose distribution around a needle-like anode X-ray tube: dye-film vs. planar thermoluminescent detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzanowski, M; Olko, P; Marczewska, B; Czopyk, L; Slapa, M; Stras, W; Traczyk, M; Talejko, M

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetry around the X-ray tube with a needle-like anode (NAXT), developed at the Institute of Nuclear Studies, for interstitial brachytherapy has been performed using (1) dye films (Gafchromic XR-T), (2) large-area thermoluminescent (TL) detectors--prepared either by gluing TL powder onto thin Al foil (so-called planar detectors with spatial resolution of 0.1 mm) and (3) miniature (2 mm diameter and 0.5 mm thick) TL detectors. The measurements were performed in following geometries. (1) Needle inside a PMMA cylinder--the planar TL detector mounted on the surface of the cylinder. (2) Needle inside a thick block of PMMA and TL detector mounted vertically 7 mm from needle axis. TL detectors were read with the planar (2D) thermoluminescence reader, developed at IFJ, with a sensitive CCD (charge couple device) camera. Gafchromic films were evaluated with a system based on Agfa Arcus 1200 scanner and calibrated with X rays (35 kV) filtered with 0.03 mm Mo and with Co-60 photons. The intensity distribution of TL light on the planar detector was calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, using (137)Cs gamma-rays. TL planar detectors seem to be a promising tool for 2D dosimetry of miniature X-ray sources. Obtained results for TLDs and Gafchromic films seem to be comparable but differences have been found. Both methods are useful for measurements of dose distribution around the NAXT X-rays source. PMID:16614087

  13. Flash vacuum-ultraviolet generator having a mercury-anode tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagae, Michiaki; Sato, Eiichi; Oizumi, Teiji; Yamamoto, Mariko; Takabe, Akihito; Sakamaki, Kimio; Ojima, Hidenori; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Tamakawa, Yoshiharu; Yanagisawa, Toru

    1995-09-01

    The fundamental studies on a flash vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) generator for producing water- window x rays are described. this generator consisted of the following essential components: a high-voltage power supply, a polarity-inversion-type high-voltage pulser having a 15 nF condenser, a thyristor pulser as a trigger device, a turbo molecular pump, and a VUV tube. The VUV tube employed a mercury anode, and the ferrite cathode was embedded in the anode. The pressure in the tube was primarily determined by the steam pressure of mercury as a function of temperature. The condenser in the pulser was charged from -10 to -30 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the radiation tube after closing a gap switch by the thyristor pulser. As the high electron flows from the cathode electrode evaporated the anode electrode, VUV rays were then produced. The maximum output voltage from the pulser was approximately -1 times the charging voltage, and both the tube voltage and current displayed damped oscillations. The maximum values of the tube voltage and current were 14 kV and 2.0 kA, respectively. Since the effective accelerating voltage was substantially decreased by the ferrite cathode, soft x rays were easily generated. The pulse durations of the VUV rays including water-window x rays were nearly equivalent to those of the damped oscillations of the voltage and current, and their values were less than 15 microsecond(s) .

  14. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model using a common X-ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies that investigate the radiation of human tumour xenografts require an appropriate radiation source and highly standardized conditions during radiation. This work reports on the design of standardized irradiation device using a commercially available X-ray tube with a custom constructed lead collimator with two circular apertures and an animal bed plate, permitting synchronous irradiation of two animals. Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation of non-tumorous and tumorous lesions in small animals. (author)

  15. Tumour bed irradiation of human tumour xenografts in a nude rat model using a common X-ray tube

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V Tokalov; W Enghardt; N Abolmaali

    2010-06-01

    Studies that investigate the radiation of human tumour xenografts require an appropriate radiation source and highly standardized conditions during radiation. This work reports on the design of a standardized irradiation device using a commercially available X-ray tube with a custom constructed lead collimator with two circular apertures and an animal bed plate, permitting synchronous irradiation of two animals. Dosimetry and the corresponding methodology for radiotherapy of human non-small cell lung cancer xenograft tumours transplanted to and growing subcutaneously on the right lower limb in a nude rat model were investigated. Procedures and results described herein prove the feasibility of use of the device, which is applicable for any investigation involving irradiation of non-tumorous and tumorous lesions in small animals.

  16. A high-precision X-ray tomograph for quality control of the ATLAS Muon Monitored Drift Tube Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Schuh, S; Banhidi, Z; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Lampl, W; Marchesotti, M; Rangod, Stephane; Sbrissa, E; Smirnov, Y; Voss, Rüdiger; Woudstra, M; Zhuravlov, V

    2004-01-01

    A dedicated X-ray tomograph has been developed at CERN to control the required wire placement accuracy of better than 20mum of the 1200 Monitored Drift Tube Chambers which make up most of the precision chamber part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The tomograph allows the chamber wire positions to be measured with a 2mum statistical and 2mum systematic uncertainty over the full chamber cross-section of 2.2 multiplied by 0.6m**2. Consistent chamber production quality over the 4-year construction phase is ensured with a similar to 15% sampling rate. Measurements of about 70 of the 650 MDT chambers so far produced have been essential in assessing the validity and consistency of the various construction procedures.

  17. Transmission diffraction-tomography system using a high-energy X-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrity, D J; Jenneson, P M; Crook, R; Vincent, S M

    2010-01-01

    A high-energy bench-top energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) system for 3-dimensional mapping of the crystalline structure and phase transformations in steel is described, for which preliminary data and system development are presented here. The use of precision tungsten slit screens with up to 225 keV X-rays allows for diffraction through samples of 304 L austenitic stainless steel of thickness 3-10 mm, while sample positioning is carried out with a precision goniometer and translation stage system. PMID:19962905

  18. Note: Effect of photodiode aluminum cathode frame on spectral sensitivity in the soft x-ray energy band

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, M. B.; Franz, P.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.; Johnson, J.

    2014-09-01

    Silicon photodiodes used for soft x-ray detection typically have a thin metal electrode partially covering the active area of the photodiode, which subtly alters the spectral sensitivity of the photodiode. As a specific example, AXUV4BST photodiodes from International Radiation Detectors have a 1.0 μm thick aluminum frame covering 19% of the active area of the photodiode, which attenuates the measured x-ray signal below ˜6 keV. This effect has a small systematic impact on the electron temperature calculated from measurements of soft x-ray bremsstrahlung emission from a high-temperature plasma. Although the systematic error introduced by the aluminum frame is only a few percent in typical experimental conditions on the Madison Symmetric Torus, it may be more significant for other instruments that use similar detectors.

  19. The effects of voltage of x-ray tube on fractal dimension and anisotropy of diagnostic image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the kV on fractal dimension of trabecular bone in digital radiographs. 16 bone cores were obtained from patients who had taken partial resection of tibia due to accidents. Each bone core along with an aluminum step wedge was radiographed with an occlusal film at 0.08 sec and with the constant film-focus distance (32 cm). All radiographs were acquired at 60, 75, and 90 kV. A rectangular ROI was drawn at medial part, distal part, and the bone defect area of each bone core image according to each kV. The directional fractal dimension was measured using Fourier Transform spectrum, and the anisotropy was obtained using directional fractal dimension. The values were compared by the repeated measures ANOVA. The fractal dimensions increased along with kV increase (p<0.05). The anisotropy measurements did not show statistically significant difference according to kV change. The fractal dimensions of the bone defect areas of the bone cores have low values contrast to the non-defect areas of the bone cores. The anisotropy measurements of the bone defect areas were lower than those of the non-defect areas of the bone cores, but not statistically significant. Fractal analysis can notice a difference of a change of voltage of x-ray tube and bone defect or not. And anisotropy of a trabecular bone is coherent even with change of the voltage of x-ray tube or defecting off a part of bone

  20. The effects of voltage of x-ray tube on fractal dimension and anisotropy of diagnostic image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Jee Seon; Lee, Sam Sun; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Choi, Soon Chul [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kwan Soo [Inje Univ. Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the kV on fractal dimension of trabecular bone in digital radiographs. 16 bone cores were obtained from patients who had taken partial resection of tibia due to accidents. Each bone core along with an aluminum step wedge was radiographed with an occlusal film at 0.08 sec and with the constant film-focus distance (32 cm). All radiographs were acquired at 60, 75, and 90 kV. A rectangular ROI was drawn at medial part, distal part, and the bone defect area of each bone core image according to each kV. The directional fractal dimension was measured using Fourier Transform spectrum, and the anisotropy was obtained using directional fractal dimension. The values were compared by the repeated measures ANOVA. The fractal dimensions increased along with kV increase (p<0.05). The anisotropy measurements did not show statistically significant difference according to kV change. The fractal dimensions of the bone defect areas of the bone cores have low values contrast to the non-defect areas of the bone cores. The anisotropy measurements of the bone defect areas were lower than those of the non-defect areas of the bone cores, but not statistically significant. Fractal analysis can notice a difference of a change of voltage of x-ray tube and bone defect or not. And anisotropy of a trabecular bone is coherent even with change of the voltage of x-ray tube or defecting off a part of bone.

  1. Liquid metal anode X-ray tubes and their potential for high continuous power operation

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, G; David, B

    2003-01-01

    A novel type of electron-impact X-ray source is described in which X-rays are produced in a turbulently flowing liquid metal that is separated from the vacuum region of the X-ray source by a thin membrane. Following a summary of the physics of electron and photon transport applicable to the liquid metal anode X-ray (LIMAX), the three diffusion processes responsible for thermal transport in (electron diffusion, heat conduction and turbulent mixing) are briefly discussed and their relative importance is quantitatively assessed. A simple Gaussian model is presented allowing the characteristic ranges of the three diffusion processes to be combined into a mean total diffusion range. The extent to which heat diffuses in the time taken for the liquid metal stream to pass the electron focus permits the loadability (electron beam power density per unit maximum anode temperature rise) of the turbulently flowing liquid metal target to be assessed. A description of an experimental LIMAX facility constructed in these labo...

  2. Cooling evaporating-condensation type system for X-ray tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gershuni A. N.; Nishchik A. P.

    2011-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations of the characteristics of the X-ray emitter cooling system, based on dielectric heat pipes are shown. The cooling system combines the high efficiency of heat transfer and electrical insulating properties at voltages of 100 kV.

  3. Comparison of simulated and measured spectra from an X-ray tube for the energies between 20 and 35 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yücel, M.; Emirhan, E.; Bayrak, A.; Ozben, C.S.; Yücel, E. Barlas, E-mail: barlase@itu.edu.tr

    2015-11-01

    Design and production of a simple and low cost X-ray imaging system that can be used for light industrial applications was targeted in the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of Istanbul Technical University. In this study, production, transmission and detection of X-rays were simulated for the proposed imaging device. OX/70-P dental tube was used and X-ray spectra simulated by Geant4 were validated by comparison with X-ray spectra measured between 20 and 35 keV. Relative detection efficiency of the detector was also determined to confirm the physics processes used in the simulations. Various time optimization tools were performed to reduce the simulation time.

  4. Spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray tubes using laplace inverse transform of the attenuation curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malezan, A.; Tomal, A.; Antoniassi, M.; Watanabe, P. C. A.; Albino, L. D.; Poletti, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a spectral reconstruction methodology for diagnostic X-ray, using Laplace inverse transform of the attenuation, was successfully applied to dental X-ray equipments. The attenuation curves of 8 commercially available dental X-ray equipment, from 3 different manufactures (Siemens, Gnatus and Dabi Atlante), were obtained by using an ionization chamber and high purity aluminium filters, while the kVp was obtained with a specific meter. A computational routine was implemented in order to adjust a model function, whose inverse Laplace transform is analytically known, to the attenuation curve. This methodology was validated by comparing the reconstructed and the measured (using semiconductor detector of cadmium telluride) spectra of a given dental X-ray unit. The spectral reconstruction showed the Dabi Atlante equipments generating similar shape spectra. This is a desirable feature from clinic standpoint because it produces similar levels of image quality and dose. We observed that equipments from Siemens and Gnatus generate significantly different spectra, suggesting that, for a given operating protocol, these units will present different levels of image quality and dose. This fact claims for the necessity of individualized operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose. The proposed methodology is suitable to perform a spectral reconstruction of dental X-ray equipments from the simple measurements of attenuation curve and kVp. The simplified experimental apparatus and the low level of technical difficulty make this methodology accessible to a broad range of users. The knowledge of the spectral distribution can help in the development of operating protocols that maximize image quality and dose.

  5. Ion bombardment investigations of impregnated cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaobing; Gaertner, Georg

    2003-06-01

    Ion bombardment is one of the important factors limiting the performance of impregnated cathodes (=Ba dispenser cathodes) in high end television tubes or in colour monitor tubes. Hence, when designing a new gun with, e.g. higher electron beam current density, it is important also to model the influence of ion bombardment. Therefore, relations between basic parameters as a function of temperature need to be known quantitatively. In this paper, the emission slump of impregnated cathodes has been analyzed in a diode configuration in UHV with a differentially pumped Ar ion gun. The emission degeneration during and regeneration periods after ion bombardment have been investigated as function of cathode temperature, ion current and ion energy. One of the important results is, that the degeneration time coefficient is only weakly dependent on ion energy. The data matrix obtained can be used to improve the ion bombardment model applied in new electron gun design.

  6. Ion bombardment investigations of impregnated cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion bombardment is one of the important factors limiting the performance of impregnated cathodes (=Ba dispenser cathodes) in high end television tubes or in colour monitor tubes. Hence, when designing a new gun with, e.g. higher electron beam current density, it is important also to model the influence of ion bombardment. Therefore, relations between basic parameters as a function of temperature need to be known quantitatively. In this paper, the emission slump of impregnated cathodes has been analyzed in a diode configuration in UHV with a differentially pumped Ar ion gun. The emission degeneration during and regeneration periods after ion bombardment have been investigated as function of cathode temperature, ion current and ion energy. One of the important results is, that the degeneration time coefficient is only weakly dependent on ion energy. The data matrix obtained can be used to improve the ion bombardment model applied in new electron gun design

  7. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  8. User certification of hand-held x-ray tube based analytical fluorescent devices in a canadian context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety education aims to reduce personal injury and improve well being. This health promotion principle is applied in the case of hand-held open beam x-ray tube based analytical x-ray devices. Such devices not only are light weight and portable, but also present high radiation exposure levels at the beam exit port and potentially can be used in a variety of industrial applications for determination of material composition. There is much potential for radiation risks to occur with resultant adverse effects if such devices are not used by trained individuals within controlled environments. A level of radiation safety knowledge and understanding of the device design, construction and performance characteristics appear warranted. To reduce radiation risks, user certification at a federal level was introduced in 2004 based on International Standards Organization 20807, since that standard comprises elements commensurate with risk reduction strategies. Within these contexts, a federally certified user is deemed to have acquired a level of safety knowledge and skills to facilitate safe use of the device. Certification, however, does not absolve the holder from obligations of compliance with applicable provincial, territorial or federal laws respecting device operation. The union of federal certification and applicable legislative mandated operational criteria reduces radiation risks overall. (author)

  9. Spectral sampling of a soft X-ray tube emission by a lamellar multilayer grating in standard and conical mountings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Lamellar Multilayer Amplitude Grating (LMAG) etched in a multilayer mirror was designed for an efficient use in the 1 keV region, through a multistep process involving sputtering coating, electron lithography and reactive ion etching. The multilayer structure has 115 W/B4C bilayers of 3.1 nm thickness, and the grating of period 1.33 μm has a small line-to-period ratio Γ equal to about 0.10. The properties of a LMAG illuminated in standard and conical mountings by a polychromatic radiation are given, and the concept of a ''polychromator'' based on a LMAG is presented. Taking benefit from the specific properties of a LMAG, the emission of a soft X-ray tube equipped with a copper target is spectrally analyzed with our LMAG in the Cu-L (930 eV) region in standard and conical mountings. This experiment shows that a LMAG could be an interesting spectral analyzer for short-duration X-ray sources. (orig.)

  10. Effect of gamma rays doses on pollen germination, polysiphony and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula Schiede et Deppe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aimed to study the effects of gamma radiation (60Co) on pollen germination and pollen tube elongation in Pinus patula. Pollen germination and pollen tube elongation are stimulated by low doses of radiation. Although higher doses of radiation inhibit the germination of pollen, pollen tube elongation remains unaffected. Thus in Pinus patula pollen tube elongation is less radiosensitive than pollen germination. Compared to control pollen, irradiated pollen produced more number of long pollen tubes. Therefore pollen tube size can be improved using low doses of radiation. (author). 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tables

  11. The use of multilayer monochromators and rotating-anode X-ray tubes in total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total-reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) has become a powerful analytical tool for ultra trace element analysis down to the ppt - level (parts per trillion). A further improvement of the method is achieved by monoenergetic excitation of the sample using synthetic multilayer structures as monochromators. These multilayers are better suited than crystal monochromators in TXRF due to their broader relative energy bandwidth. Advantages and disadvantages of using a W/C multilayer structure in TXRF are discussed. A new multifunctional vacuum chamber was constructed to compare monoenergetic and full spectrum excitation under optimized measuring geometries using rotating and standing anode x-ray tubes as primary radiation sources. Detection limits (extrapolated for a measuring time of 1000 s) of 170 femtogram (170 x 10-15 g) were obtained for the element Mn with full spectrum excitation (rotating Cu-anode). The quantitative analysis is substantially simplified applying monoenergetic excitation since fundamental parameters from tables can be used for elemental sensitivities. No more multielement standards are necessary for establishing calibration curves. Corrections for absorption of the fluorescence radiation in the sample can be neglected due to minute sample masses in TXRF (thin film approximation). The excitation energy is tuned by the multilayer using the bremsstrahlung and characteristic lines of different anode materials (W, Mo) to obtain selective excitation of certain elements in the sample. The multilayer monochromator is compared to total-reflection high energy cut-off filters as a device for modifying the primary spectrum

  12. High Energy X-Ray Detection OF G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E): Magnetic Flux Tube Emission Powered By Cosmic Rays?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shuo; Baganoff, Frederick K; Bauer, Franz E; Boggs, Steven E; Craig, William W; Christensen, Finn E; Gotthelf, Eric V; Harrison, Fiona A; Mori, Kaya; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Zhang, William W

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E>10 keV) emission from the Galactic Center non-thermal filament G359.89-0.08 (Sgr A-E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ~50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic Center monitoring campaign. The featureless power-law spectrum with a photon index of ~2.3 confirms a non-thermal emission mechanism. The observed flux in the 3-79 keV band is ~ 2.0e-12 erg/cm^2/s, corresponding to an unabsorbed X-ray luminosity of ~2.6e34 erg/s assuming a distance of 8.0 kpc. Based on theoretical predictions and observations, we conclude that Sgr A-E is unlikely to be a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) or supernova remnant-molecular cloud (SNR-MC) interaction, as previously hypothesized. Instead, the emission could be due to a magnetic flux tube which traps TeV electrons. We propose two possible TeV electron sources: old PWNe (up to ~100 kyr) with low surface brightness and radii up to ~30 pc or molecular clouds (MC...

  13. Characterization of electron bunches from field emitter array cathodes for use in next-generation x-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PSI is interested in developing an x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) as a companion radiation source to the existing Swiss Light Source. In order to achieve radiation wavelengths as low as 1 Α, the X-FEL requires excellent electron beam quality and high beam energy. The energy requirements and thus the size and cost of the project can be reduced considerably if an ultra-low emittance electron source is developed. Therefore PSI has started the Low Emittance Gun Project with the aim to design a novel type of electron source that will deliver an electron beam with unprecedented emittance at high peak currents to the linear accelerator of the proposed X-FEL. A source candidate for such a gun is field emission from cold cathodes. In order to gain first experience with field emission guns, investigate the dynamics of space charge dominated electron beams and to develop diagnostics capable of resolving ultra-low emittances, it was decided to build a 100 keV DC gun test stand. In the scope of this thesis, the test stand has been designed, assembled and commissioned. For the first time, transverse phase space measurements of bunches emitted by field emitter arrays in pulsed DC accelerating fields have been performed. (author)

  14. Dynamic study of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 cathodes by in-situ tender X-ray absorption near edge structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongniu; Wang, Huixin; Yang, Jinli; Zhou, Jigang; Hu, Yongfeng; Xiao, Qunfeng; Fang, Haitao; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2016-01-01

    Olivine-type phosphates (LiMPO4, M = Fe, Mn, Co) are promising cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries that are generally accepted to follow first order equilibrium phase transformations. Herein, the phase transformation dynamics of sub-micro sized LiFePO4 particles with limited rate capability at a low current density of 0.14 C was investigated. An in-situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurement was conducted at the Fe and P K-edge for the dynamic studies upon lithiation and delithiation. Fe K-edge XANES spectra demonstrate that not only lithium-rich intermediate phase LixFePO4 (x = 0.6-0.75), but also lithium-poor intermediate phase LiyFePO4 (y = 0.1-0.25) exist during the charge and discharge, respectively. Furthermore, during charge and discharge, a fluctuation of the FePO4 and LiFePO4 fractions obtained by liner combination fitting around the imaginary phase fractions followed Faraday's law and the equilibrium first-order two-phase transformation versus reaction time is present, respectively. The charging and discharging process has a reversible phase transformation dynamics with symmetric structural evolution routes. P K-edge XANES spectra reveal an enrichment of PF6-1 anions at the surface of the electrode during charging.

  15. Numerical evaluation of welded tube wall profiles from scanned X-ray line source data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunin, V.; Podobedov, D.; Ewert, U.; Redmer, B.

    2001-04-01

    This investigation presents an iterative algorithm for inversion of X-ray line scanning data of a multi-angle inspection. The main focus is the development of a robust algorithm that may successfully evaluate the influence of local surface geometry in welding regions. An idea here is to repetitively solve the forward problem with iterated profile parameters until the solution agrees with measurement. For accurate parameterization of a particular inner crack, this procedure can be combined with an analysis of the residual image obtained by subtracting the projection image caused by reconstructed surface wall profiles, from the original data.

  16. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  17. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings deposited by cathodic vacuum arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings with alternating Zr-O and Al-O layers having a bi-layer period of 6-7 nm and total coating thickness of 1.0-1.2 μm were deposited using a cathodic vacuum arc plasma process on rotating Si substrates. Plasmas generated from two cathodes, Zr and Al, were deposited simultaneously in a mixture of Ar and O2 background gases. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings, as well as bulk ZrO2 and Al2O3 reference samples, were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS spectra were analyzed on the surface and after sputtering with a 4 kV Ar+ ion gun. High resolution angle resolved spectra were obtained at three take-off angles: 15o, 45o and 75o relative to the sample surface. It was shown that preferential sputtering of oxygen took place during XPS of bulk reference ZrO2 samples, producing ZrO and free Zr along with ZrO2 in the XPS spectra. In contrast, no preferential sputtering was observed with Al2O3 reference samples. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings contained a large amount of free metals along with their oxides. Free Zr and Al were observed in the coating spectra both before and after sputtering, and thus cannot be due solely to preferential sputtering. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Zr-O/Al-O coatings had a nano-multilayered structure with well distinguished alternating layers. However, both of the alternating layers of the coating contained of a mixture of aluminum and zirconium oxides and free Al and Zr metals. The concentration of Zr and Al changed periodically with distance normal to the coating surface: the Zr maximum coincided with the Al minimum and vice versa. However the concentration of Zr in both alternating layers was significantly larger than that of Al. Despite the large free metal concentration, the Knoop hardness, 21.5 GPa, was relatively high, which might be attributed to super-lattice formation or formation of a metal-oxide nanocomposite within the layers.

  18. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  19. Behaviour of reconstructed attenuation values with X-ray tube voltage in an experimental third-generation industrial CT system using Xscan linear detector array

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, U; Pendharkar, A S; Singh, G

    2002-01-01

    The present paper discusses the adaptation of a digital radiographic scintillator-based linear detector array (LDA) in a third-generation continuous-rotate X-ray industrial tomographic imaging system. The LDA has been used in a collinear configuration. Behaviour of the reconstructed parameter, i.e., approximate linear absorption coefficient at the 'effective energy' with varying anode voltage of the constant potential X-ray tube is studied. Experiments have been carried out with a solid cylindrical Perspex block (50 mm dia.) in 50-150 kV tube voltage range. The experimentally reconstructed attenuation values were used to predict the effective energy of the X-ray beam. The present study also includes a discussion on the statistical behaviour of the reconstructed linear attenuation values.

  20. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    OpenAIRE

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Bennett, N. Robert; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail wit...

  1. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  2. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cobalt Perovskite Surfaces under Cathodic Polarization at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2013-08-08

    Heterostructured oxide interfaces have demonstrated enhanced oxygen reduction reaction rates at elevated temperatures (∼500-800 C); however, the physical origin underlying this enhancement is not well understood. By using synchrotron-based in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we focus on understanding the surface electronic structure, elemental composition, and chemical nature of epitaxial La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113), (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 (LSC 113/214) thin films as a function of applied electrical potentials (0 to -800 mV) at 520 C and p(O2) of 1 × 10-3 atm. Shifts in the top of the valence band binding energy and changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s spectral components under applied bias reveal key differences among the film chemistries, most notably in the degree of Sr segregation to the surface and quantity of active oxygen sites in the perovskite termination layer. These differences help to identify important factors governing the enhanced activity of oxygen electrocatalysis observed for the LSC113/214 heterostructured surface. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Application of an expectation maximization method to the reconstruction of X-ray-tube spectra from transmission data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrizzi, M., E-mail: m.endrizzi@ucl.ac.uk [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Siena, Via Roma 56, 53100 Siena (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Delogu, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “E. Fermi”, Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Oliva, P. [Dipartimento di Chimica e Farmacia, Università di Sassari, via Vienna 2, 07100 Sassari (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari, s.p. per Monserrato-Sestu Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    An expectation maximization method is applied to the reconstruction of X-ray tube spectra from transmission measurements in the energy range 7–40 keV. A semiconductor single-photon counting detector, ionization chambers and a scintillator-based detector are used for the experimental measurement of the transmission. The number of iterations required to reach an approximate solution is estimated on the basis of the measurement error, according to the discrepancy principle. The effectiveness of the stopping rule is studied on simulated data and validated with experiments. The quality of the reconstruction depends on the information available on the source itself and the possibility to add this knowledge to the solution process is investigated. The method can produce good approximations provided that the amount of noise in the data can be estimated. - Highlights: • An expectation maximization method was used together with the discrepancy principle. • The discrepancy principle is a suitable criterion for stopping the iteration. • The method can be applied to a variety of detectors/experimental conditions. • The minimum information required is the amount of noise that affects the data. • Improved results are achieved by inserting more information when available.

  4. Application of an expectation maximization method to the reconstruction of X-ray-tube spectra from transmission data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An expectation maximization method is applied to the reconstruction of X-ray tube spectra from transmission measurements in the energy range 7–40 keV. A semiconductor single-photon counting detector, ionization chambers and a scintillator-based detector are used for the experimental measurement of the transmission. The number of iterations required to reach an approximate solution is estimated on the basis of the measurement error, according to the discrepancy principle. The effectiveness of the stopping rule is studied on simulated data and validated with experiments. The quality of the reconstruction depends on the information available on the source itself and the possibility to add this knowledge to the solution process is investigated. The method can produce good approximations provided that the amount of noise in the data can be estimated. - Highlights: • An expectation maximization method was used together with the discrepancy principle. • The discrepancy principle is a suitable criterion for stopping the iteration. • The method can be applied to a variety of detectors/experimental conditions. • The minimum information required is the amount of noise that affects the data. • Improved results are achieved by inserting more information when available

  5. Novel multi-beam X-ray source for vacuum electronics enabled medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neculaes, V. Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    For almost 100 of years, commercial medical X-ray applications have relied heavily on X-ray tube architectures based on the vacuum electronics design developed by William Coolidge at the beginning of the twentieth century. Typically, the Coolidge design employs one hot tungsten filament as the electron source; the output of the tube is one X-ray beam. This X-ray source architecture is the state of the art in today's commercial medical imaging applications, such as Computed Tomography. Recently, GE Global Research has demonstrated the most dramatic extension of the Coolidge vacuum tube design for Computed Tomography (CT) in almost a century: a multi-beam X-ray source containing thirty two cathodes emitting up to 1000 mA, in a cathode grounded - anode at potential architecture (anode up to 140 kV). This talk will present the challenges of the X-ray multi-beam vacuum source design - space charge electron gun design, beam focusing to compression ratios needed in CT medical imaging applications (image resolution is critically dependent on how well the electron beam is focused in vacuum X-ray tubes), electron emitter choice to fit the aggressive beam current requirements, novel electronics for beam control and focusing, high voltage and vacuum solutions, as well as vacuum chamber design to sustain the considerable G forces typically encountered on a CT gantry (an X-ray vacuum tube typically rotates on the CT gantry at less than 0.5 s per revolution). Consideration will be given to various electron emitter technologies available for this application - tungsten emitters, dispenser cathodes and carbon nano tubes (CNT) - and their tradeoffs. The medical benefits potentially enabled by this unique vacuum multi-beam X-ray source are: X-ray dose reduction, reduction of image artifacts and improved image resolution. This work was funded in part by NIH grant R01EB006837.

  6. Operando and in situ X-ray spectroscopies of degradation in La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) thin film cathodes in fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Samson Y; Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Liu, Meilin; Alamgir, Faisal M

    2014-11-01

    Information from ex situ characterization can fall short in describing complex materials systems simultaneously exposed to multiple external stimuli. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was used to probe the local atomistic and electronic structure of specific elements in a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O(3-δ) (LSCF) thin film cathode exposed to air contaminated with H2O and CO2 under operating conditions. While impedance spectroscopy showed that the polarization resistance of the LSCF cathode increased upon exposure to both contaminants at 750 °C, XAS near-edge and extended fine structure showed that the degree of oxidation for Fe and Co decreases with increasing temperature. Synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy tracked the formation and removal of a carbonate species, a Co phase, and different oxygen moieties as functions of temperature and gas. The combined information provides insight into the fundamental mechanism by which H2O and CO2 cause degradation in the cathode of solid oxide fuel cells. PMID:25205041

  7. High-voltage virtual-cathode microwave simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thode, L.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential is sufficiently large to cause electron reflection. The region associated with electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and by reflexing electrons trapped in the potential well formed between the real and virtual cathodes. A virtual-cathode device based on the first mechanism is a vircator while one based on latter mechanism is a reflex diode. A large number of low-voltage virtual-cathode microwave configurations have been investigated. Initial simulations of a high-voltage virtual-cathode device using a self-consistent particle-in-cell code indicated reasonable conversion efficiency with no frequency chirping. The nonchirping character of the high-voltage virtual-cathode device lead to the interesting possibility of locking four very-high-power microwave devices together using the four transmission lines available at Aurora. Subsequently, in support of two high-voltage experiments, simulations were used to investigate the effect of field-emission threshold and velvet position on the cathode; anode and cathode shape; anode-cathode gap spacing; output waveguide radius; diode voltage; a cathode-coaxial-cavity resonator; a high-frequency ac-voltage drive; anode foil scattering and energy loss; and ion emission on the microwave frequency and power. Microwave

  8. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  9. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-09-10

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  10. HF electronic tubes. Technologies, grid tubes and klystrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article gives an overview of the basic technologies of electronic tubes: cathodes, electronic optics, vacuum and high voltage. Then the grid tubes, klystrons and inductive output tubes (IOT) are introduced. Content: 1 - context and classification; 2 - electronic tube technologies: cathodes, electronic optics, magnetic confinement (linear tubes), periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focussing, collectors, depressed collectors; 3 - vacuum technologies: vacuum quality, surface effects and interaction with electrostatic and RF fields, secondary emission, multipactor effect, thermo-electronic emission; 4 - grid tubes: operation of a triode, tetrodes, dynamic operation and classes of use, 'common grid' and 'common cathode' operation, ranges of utilisation and limitations, operation of a tetrode on unadjusted load, lifetime of a tetrode, uses of grid tubes; 5 - klystrons: operation, impact of space charge, multi-cavity klystrons, interaction efficiency, extended interaction klystrons, relation between interaction efficiency, perveance and efficiency, ranges of utilization and power limitations, multi-beam klystrons and sheet beam klystrons, operation on unadjusted load, klystron band pass and lifetime, uses; 6 - IOT: principle of operation, ranges of utilisation and limitations, interaction efficiency and depressed collector IOT, IOT lifetime and uses. (J.S.)

  11. Comparative study of the Quality Control of x-ray tubes and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance in Galician autonomous community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality guarantee in Diagnostic Radiology is defined as the organized effort of surgical staff to guarantee sufficient quality images, which provide the correct diagnostic information, as cheaply as possible and with the least exposure to radiation for the patient. In this paper a comparative study about the quality control of x-ray tube and generators in hospital assistance and primary assistance is present. In the conclusions, it is confirmed that the antiquity and poor conservation of the primary attendance x-ray equipment, have influence on the studied constants and therefore, influence the doses received by the patients. (author)

  12. Development and characterization of sub-100 ps photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the evaluation of a microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT), incorporating a 3 μm pore MCP and constant voltage anode and cathode gaps. The use of the small pore size results in PMTs with response functions of the order of 85 ps full-width-half-maximum, while the constant electric field across the anode and cathode gaps produces a uniform response function over the entire operating range of the device. The PMT was characterized on a number of facilities and employed on gas Cherenkov detectors fielded on various deuterium tritium fuel (DT) implosions on the Omega Laser Facility at the University of Rochester. The Cherenkov detectors are part of diagnostic development to measure Gamma ray reaction history for DT implosions on the National Ignition Facility.

  13. Calculation of x-ray spectra emerging from an x-ray tube. Part I. electron penetration characteristics in x-ray targets.

    OpenAIRE

    Poludniowski, GG; Evans, PM

    2007-01-01

    The penetration characteristics of electron beams into x-ray targets are investigated for incident electron kinetic energies in the range 50-150 keV. The frequency densities of electrons penetrating to a depth x in a target, with a fraction of initial kinetic energy, u, are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for beam energies of 50, 80, 100, 120 and 150 keV in a tungsten target. The frequency densities for 100 keV electrons in Al, Mo and Re targets are also calculated. A mixture of simple m...

  14. Hollow cathode ion source without magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of the IBM-4 ion source a hollow cathode source operating in the continuous regime is developed. The gas discharge chamber diameter equals 100 mm, chamber height - 50 mm. A hollow cathode represents a molybdenum tube with an internal diameter 13 mm and wall thickness 0,7-0,8 mm. An emitter is manufactured from zirconium carbide and lanthanum hexaboride. The investigations of the source operation have shown both cathodes operated efficiency. Electron emission density consitutes 25 A/cm2. At the 50 A discharge current ion current density in a center of plasma emitter constitutes 120 mA/cm2. As a result of the investigations carried out the compatibility of the hollow cathode and the IBM-type source is shown

  15. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  16. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  17. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  18. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages

  19. Optimization of protocols and increase the life of the tube of X rays in computer tomography;Otimizacao de protocolos e aumento dsa vida util do tubo de raios X em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viero, A.P. [Centro Universitario Franciscano, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Botelho, Marcel Z.; Torunsky, Caroline G. [STAFF - Solucoes em Fisica Medica e Radioprotecao, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Paula, V. [Clinica Radiologica Caridade (DIX), Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the reduction of the radiation dose and X-ray tube heating in computed tomography exams. Exams of the skull, abdomen and thorax were evaluated. It was verified that the technique used could be changed, suggesting new protocols and comparing image quality, radiation dose and X-ray tube heating. A mAs reduction could be done without compromising the diagnostic quality bringing a decrease up to 21,92% in the dose of skull exams, 20,25% for the examinations, abdomen and 22,06% for the examinations of thorax. The reduction on the X-ray tube heating for skull, abdomen and thorax exams was approximately 22,2%, 20,0% and 22,2% respectively. It is concluded that a change on the described protocols will cause a significant reduction dose delivered to patients and on X-ray tube heating without compromising the diagnosis. (author)

  20. Calculation of x-ray spectra emerging from an x-ray tube. Part I. Electron penetration characteristics in x-ray targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The penetration characteristics of electron beams into x-ray targets are investigated for incident electron kinetic energies in the range 50-150 keV. The frequency densities of electrons penetrating to a depth x in a target, with a fraction of initial kinetic energy, u, are calculated using Monte Carlo methods for beam energies of 50, 80, 100, 120 and 150 keV in a tungsten target. The frequency densities for 100 keV electrons in Al, Mo and Re targets are also calculated. A mixture of simple modeling with equations and interpolation from data is used to generalize the calculations in tungsten. Where possible, parameters derived from the Monte Carlo data are compared to experimental measurements. Previous electron transport approximations in the semiempirical models of other authors are discussed and related to this work. In particular, the crudity of the use of the Thomson-Whiddington law to describe electron penetration and energy loss is highlighted. The results presented here may be used towards calculating the target self-attenuation correction for bremsstrahlung photons emitted within a tungsten target

  1. Distributions of domain size, lattice distortion and dislocation density in tubes of Zr-based alloys studied by a method combining X-ray line profile analysis with texture measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distributions of substructure parameters for tubes of Zr-based alloys were constructed by use of the X-ray method of generalized pole figures, combining X-ray line analysis and texture measurement. Obtained distributions cover α-Zr crystallites of all orientations and give the fullest description of substructure features of the studied tubes. The interconnection of different substructure parameters are analyzed. (orig.)

  2. X线机管头支持装置的结构设计%Mechanism design of X-ray tube head support device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王士清; 钱炜

    2013-01-01

    Objective X-ray tube target supporting device is an important component of the radiography X-ray equipment,with the problems of low automatization and low displacement precision. Methods We design an X-ray tube target supporting device which can freely switch between manual and automatic according to the demand. The synchronous belt drive and open synchronous belt feedback mechanism are applied in the moving mechanism. And the composition and function of this device are discussed. Results This device solved the problem of the motor-driven block in the long rail and the displacement feedback. Conclusions This device freely switches between manual and automatic, and meets the positioning requirements of X-ray tube head in photography.%目的 X线机管头支持装置是摄影X线机中的重要部件,目前存在自动化程度及移动精度低的问题.方法 设计了一种根据需求可在手动和电动之间自由切换的X线管头支持装置,在移动机构中采用同步带传动机构和开口同步带反馈机构,并对装置的组成和功能进行了讨论.结果 解决了滑车在长导轨上的电动和滑车在导轨上位置的反馈.结论本装置可实现电动和手动之间的切换,并满足X线机在摄影时所需的X线管头位置要求.

  3. Cathodic behavior of zirconium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical behavior of Zr was studied by polarization measurements. The surface oxide and zirconium hydride formed by cathodic polarization of Zr have been examined by X-ray, SEM, and a hardness tester. Zirconium hydride would form on Zr cathode after the surface oxide is reduced at the potential, which is several hundred mV more noble than the predicted value shown by the Pourbaix diagram. The parameters for the hydrogen evolution reaction on the hydride formed Zr cathode differs from that on the oxide covered surface, which means that hydrogen evolution takes place on both surfaces under a different mechanism, while details are still veiled at present

  4. X-ray fluorescence study of the variation in the layer composition of a copper-nickel alloy tube corroded by sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation in the layerwise composition of a cupro-nickel tube corroded by sea-water has been studied using a chemico-X-ray fluorescence technique. The corroded tube had been in use in a nuclear reactor, using sea-water as coolant. A plot of composition (% Cu or Ni) against the depth of the layer from the surface, clearly demonstrated that the sea-water had leached away copper in preference to nickel. The composition of the top layers dropped to 38% Cu from the nominal composition of 90% Cu in the uncorroded surface. The percentage of copper increased gradually with the depth of the layers from the surface and at about 1 um depth the composition reached the nominal value. A thin top-most layer showed somewhat higher copper content than the subsequent layer which has been attributed to reabsorption or redeposition of copper during the non-flow period. (author)

  5. SU-D-207-03: Development of 4D-CBCT Imaging System with Dual Source KV X-Ray Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purposes of this work are to develop 4D-CBCT imaging system with orthogonal dual source kV X-ray tubes, and to determine the imaging doses from 4D-CBCT scans. Methods: Dual source kV X-ray tubes were used for the 4D-CBCT imaging. The maximum CBCT field of view was 200 mm in diameter and 150 mm in length, and the imaging parameters were 110 kV, 160 mA and 5 ms. The rotational angle was 105°, the rotational speed of the gantry was 1.5°/s, the gantry rotation time was 70 s, and the image acquisition interval was 0.3°. The observed amplitude of infrared marker motion during respiration was used to sort each image into eight respiratory phase bins. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc packages were used to simulate kV X-ray dose distributions of 4D-CBCT imaging. The kV X-ray dose distributions were calculated for 9 lung cancer patients based on the planning CT images with dose calculation grid size of 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm. The dose covering a 2-cc volume of skin (D2cc), defined as the inner 5 mm of the skin surface with the exception of bone structure, was assessed. Results: A moving object was well identified on 4D-CBCT images in a phantom study. Given a gantry rotational angle of 105° and the configuration of kV X-ray imaging subsystems, both kV X-ray fields overlapped at a part of skin surface. The D2cc for the 4D-CBCT scans was in the range 73.8–105.4 mGy. Linear correlation coefficient between the 1000 minus averaged SSD during CBCT scanning and D2cc was −0.65 (with a slope of −0.17) for the 4D-CBCT scans. Conclusion: We have developed 4D-CBCT imaging system with dual source kV X-ray tubes. The total imaging dose with 4D-CBCT scans was up to 105.4 mGy

  6. SU-D-207-03: Development of 4D-CBCT Imaging System with Dual Source KV X-Ray Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M; Ishihara, Y; Matsuo, Y; Ueki, N; Iizuka, Y; Mizowaki, T; Hiraoka, M [Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Kyoto (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purposes of this work are to develop 4D-CBCT imaging system with orthogonal dual source kV X-ray tubes, and to determine the imaging doses from 4D-CBCT scans. Methods: Dual source kV X-ray tubes were used for the 4D-CBCT imaging. The maximum CBCT field of view was 200 mm in diameter and 150 mm in length, and the imaging parameters were 110 kV, 160 mA and 5 ms. The rotational angle was 105°, the rotational speed of the gantry was 1.5°/s, the gantry rotation time was 70 s, and the image acquisition interval was 0.3°. The observed amplitude of infrared marker motion during respiration was used to sort each image into eight respiratory phase bins. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc and EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc packages were used to simulate kV X-ray dose distributions of 4D-CBCT imaging. The kV X-ray dose distributions were calculated for 9 lung cancer patients based on the planning CT images with dose calculation grid size of 2.5 x 2.5 x 2.5 mm. The dose covering a 2-cc volume of skin (D2cc), defined as the inner 5 mm of the skin surface with the exception of bone structure, was assessed. Results: A moving object was well identified on 4D-CBCT images in a phantom study. Given a gantry rotational angle of 105° and the configuration of kV X-ray imaging subsystems, both kV X-ray fields overlapped at a part of skin surface. The D2cc for the 4D-CBCT scans was in the range 73.8–105.4 mGy. Linear correlation coefficient between the 1000 minus averaged SSD during CBCT scanning and D2cc was −0.65 (with a slope of −0.17) for the 4D-CBCT scans. Conclusion: We have developed 4D-CBCT imaging system with dual source kV X-ray tubes. The total imaging dose with 4D-CBCT scans was up to 105.4 mGy.

  7. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC; Emma, Paul; /SLAC; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; Gilevich, Sasha; /SLAC; Hays, Gregory; /SLAC; Hering, Philippe; /SLAC; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard; /SLAC; Loos, Henrik; /SLAC; Miahnahri, Alan; /SLAC; Nordlund, Dennis; /SLAC; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; /SLAC; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Turner, James; /SLAC; Welch, James; /SLAC; White, William; /SLAC; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  8. Process For Patterning Dispenser-Cathode Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Charles E.; Deininger, William D.

    1989-01-01

    Several microfabrication techniques combined into process cutting slots 100 micrometer long and 1 to 5 micrometer wide into tungsten dispenser cathodes for traveling-wave tubes. Patterned photoresist serves as mask for etching underlying aluminum. Chemically-assisted ion-beam etching with chlorine removes exposed parts of aluminum layer. Etching with fluorine or chlorine trifluoride removes tungsten not masked by aluminum layer. Slots enable more-uniform low-work function coating dispensed to electron-emitting surface. Emission of electrons therefore becomes more uniform over cathode surface.

  9. Comprehensive analysis of the spectrometric determination of voltage applied to X-ray tubes in the radiography and mammography energy ranges using a silicon PIN photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terini, R A; Pereira, M A G; Künzel, R; Costa, P R; Herdade, S B

    2004-05-01

    This work describes the analysis of factors which affect the results of estimation of the electron accelerating potential (kVp) applied to an X-ray tube, through determination of the end point of the energy spectrum of the emitted radiation beam. Measurements have been performed utilizing two spectrometers each with a silicon PIN photodiode: one operating at room temperature, and the other, a high resolution spectrometer, with a Peltier cooler. Both were directly irradiated by different X-ray beams. Both systems work at low voltage and without liquid nitrogen cooling, thus avoiding the drawbacks presented by germanium detectors. Each kVp value was determined by linear regression of the end of the spectrum, so as to give, simultaneously, the best fit to the experimental data and low standard deviation for the kVp value. Detector energy resolution and calibration, counting statistics and high voltage waveform ripple have been investigated in order to establish better experimental conditions and to optimize measurement time. Results of measurements carried out with X-ray tubes connected to single-phase, three-phase or constant potential units, using additional filtration of Cu, Al or Mo (for mammographic beams), are presented. The variations resulted in kVp uncertainties up to 0.1 kV. PMID:15121703

  10. Study of the experimental parameters associated to the determination of residual macro stresses in stainless steel tubes, through x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles related to the determination of residual macro stresses by X-rays diffractometry are present, whereas different techniques associated with the respective experimental errors are discussed. The residual stresses in two 304 L stainless steel tubes were measured using three models of diffractometers, Rigaku SG-8, Jeol JDX-11PA and Rigaku Strainflex. The measured values of stresses as well as the reproducibilities are examined. The suitability of peak location method, by fitting three data points to the parabolic function, is discussed through values of position and intensity obtained by two of the above diffractometers. (author)

  11. Study of the experimental parameters associated to the determination of residual macro stresses in stainless steel tubes through x-rays diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic principles related to the determination of residual macro stresses by X-rays diffractometry are present, whereas different techniques associated with the respective experimental errors are discussed. The residual stresses in two 304 L stainless steel tubes were measured using three models of diffractometers, Rigaku SG-8, Jeol JDX-11PA and Rigaku Strainflex. The measured values of stresses as well as the reproducibilities are examined. The suitability of peak location method, by fitting three data points to the parabolic function, is discussed through values of position and intensity obtained by two of the above diffractometers. (author)

  12. Life-limiting mechanisms in Ba-oxide, Ba-dispenser and Ba-Scandate cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, G.; Barratt, D.

    2005-09-01

    Ba-oxide, Ba-dispenser and Ba-Scandate cathodes have been continuously improved in their emission performance in the past decades. Ba-oxide and Ba-dispenser cathodes are also the dominant types of thermionic cathodes used in most vacuum tube applications. When improvements in emissive properties are introduced, their impact on cathode life - where several years in a vacuum tube environment are typically required - also needs to be known. Hence, the investigation of cathode life-limiting effects is the basis of accelerated life predictions and of further cathode improvement. In this contribution, the main effects limiting the operating life of Ba/BaO-based thermionic cathodes are discussed, especially related to intrinsic dispensation and resupply to the emissive surface. Emission poisoning induced by adsorption of poisonous gases will not be addressed here. We will stress common points and point out the differences between the three types.

  13. Erosion behaviour of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Al$_{x}$Cr$_{1-x}$ composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres and their erosion behaviour was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres were non-uniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded centre region of the cathodes.

  14. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlxCr1−x composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N2, and O2 atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N2 and O2 atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes

  15. γ-射线透射技术在炉管测焦方面的应用%APPLICATION OF MEASURING COKING IN CRACKING FURNACE TUBE WITH γ-RAY TRANSMISSION TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封瑞江; 时维振

    2001-01-01

    In this paper,the basic principle of γ-ray transmission technique is introduced. Through the study of single tube coking experiments,the possibility of the application of γ-ray transmission technique in furnace tubes is also discussed. The effects of cracking temperature,retention period and steam dilution ratio on coking rate are investigated .Comparing to the results by means of coupon weighing weight,γ-ray transmission technique is feasible for coking measurement. The results are consistent with other reported data in literature.

  16. X-ray diffraction residual stress measurement in the rolled-joint zone of Zr - 2.5 % Nb pressure tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-service experience of Zr - 2.5 % Nb pressure tubes in CANDU-type nuclear reactors has demonstrated very good performance over a long period of time. However, analyses done by AECL specialists on most failure cases, showed that a big percentage of defects are manufacturing defects, which appear mostly at the beginning of the rolled-joint zone. It has been observed that a correct rolling ensures an acceptable distribution of residual stress, but an incorrect one leads to an accumulation of big values of residual stress. This determines a preferential radial orientation of hydrides, which during operation in the reactor can produce DHC. To ensure a suitable performance of the Zr - 2.5 % Nb pressure tubes in the CANDU reactor, it is very important to have a correct rolling as mentioned in the procedure. This work presents a methodology for the measurement of the stressing state in the surfaces layers of the rolled-joint zone. The X-ray diffraction method can also be used for establishing the residual stress distribution across the tub wall, in order to ensure a good performance at Cernavoda nuclear plant. The results obtained for the investigated tube have led to the conclusion that the rolling process was correctly applied in this case, the values obtained for the residual stress being in good agreement with those accepted in literature. (Author) 2 Figs., 2 Tabs

  17. Fuel cladding tubes and manufacture thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable smooth contaction between fuel pellets and cladding tubes, as well as prevent chemical reaction for the fission products released from the pellets. Method: The inner surface of a cladding tube is coated with a copper film and further provided thereover with a graphite film. The graphite film is formed through electrophoretic coating as follows: A cladding tube is supported rotatably in an electrophoretic coating tank containing coating solution incorporated with graphite powder and connected to an anode. A cathode is attached to the inside of the cladding tube. Coating current is supplied while rotating the cladding tube and the graphite film is formed through electrophoresis. (Ikeda, J.)

  18. Small size neutron tube UNG-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tube UNG-1 (universal neutron gas-filled) is designed for the use in the well neutron generators IGN-1 and IGN-1-M (a pulse neutron generator). Their serial production in the USSR has been started in 1963. At the same year, the serial production of the tubes UNG-1 has been started. Thus, this tube is the first serial logging accelerating tube in the USSR. A Penning source, equipped with a hot cathode, was selected as an ion source of the tube

  19. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-06-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5cm and orifice diameter of 0.3cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25A and a flow rate of 5.5sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25sccm and discharge current of 12A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow "sheath funneling" into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1A/mm2 in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the power

  20. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5 cm and orifice diameter of 0.3 cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25 A and a flow rate of 5.5 sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635 cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1 cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25 sccm and discharge current of 12 A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow 'sheath funneling' into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1 A/mm2 in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the

  1. Peak potential meter applied to X-ray tubes in mammal radiography systems; Medidor do potencial de pico aplicado em tubos de raio-X de sistemas mamograficos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiabel, Homero; Frere, Annie F. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia; Andreeta, Jose P. [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Quimica

    1989-12-31

    It is of a great importance to identify accurately the real peak potential (or simply, KVp) applied to a X-ray tube purposed to medical diagnosis, since it defines the beam energetic quality in terms of photons penetration power. Mainly in mammographic systems. it is of fundamental relevance the KVp accurate measurement because the soft tissues involved in this kind of examination provides different absorption - and, hence, clear contrast on mammographic film - just in a very restrict energetic range. Thus a device to measure KVp with adequate accuracy in mammographic units, using the basic principles of scintillation detection, was developed. This system is therefore composed of a NaI(Tl) crystal which is a X-ray sensor - replacing radiographic films which usually are a source of errors in these measurements - , a photo multiplier tube and changed into amplified electric pulses. Finally the electronic circuit, after adequate pulses treatment, shows instantaneously the actual KVp value in the test on displays. (author) 2 refs.

  2. Possible use of CdTe detectors in kVp monitoring of diagnostic x-ray tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Krmar, M.; Bucalović, N.; Baucal, M.; Jovančević, N.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that kVp of diagnostic X-ray devices (or maximal energy of x-ray photon spectra) should be monitored routinely; however a standardized noninvasive technique has yet to be developed and proposed. It is well known that the integral number of Compton scattered photons and the intensities of fluorescent x-ray lines registered after irradiation of some material by an x-ray beam are a function of the maximal beam energy. CdTe detectors have sufficient energy resolution to dist...

  3. Determination of the efficiency of high purity germanium and silicon diode detectors for improved assessment of emission spectra delivered by medical X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray sources are widely used in medicine: brachytherapy, radiodiagnosis, mammography and contact radiotherapy. Kerma in air is the primary quantity measured to determine the dose to the patient. Accurate air kerma assessment is obtained using correction factors calculated using the emission spectrum. The Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel launched an in-depth study of the spectral emission of its reference X-ray beams used in dosimetry. Two semiconductor detectors are discussed here: a High-Purity germanium and a silicon PiN, both cooled and operated with dedicated electronics and software. In the low energy range (E≤50 keV), those spectrometers are complementary but require a careful calibration to deduce the emitted spectrum from the detected one. Indeed, both detectors were characterized in terms of spectral response and intrinsic efficiency using a tuneable monochromatic X-ray source (SOLEX at CEA Saclay) in the 5- to 20-keV energy range and various radionuclides. The characterization methods and results, including the first measured spectra of medical X-ray tubes (high voltage≤50 kV), are presented in this work. This paper presents the first step of a broader project, aiming at assessing the emission spectrum independently of the detector choice. (authors)

  4. A position-sensitive gamma-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, K; Nagashima, Y; Hyodo, T; Nagai, Y; Muramatsu, S; Nagai, S; Masuda, K

    2002-01-01

    A new position-sensitive gamma-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi sub 4 Ge sub 3 O sub 1 sub 2 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV gamma-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the gamma-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation gamma-rays.

  5. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Koji; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota; Masuda, Keisuke

    2002-07-01

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi 4Ge 3O 12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mm×2.6 mm×18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mm×160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays.

  6. A position-sensitive γ-ray detector for positron annihilation 2D-ACAR based on metal package photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new position-sensitive γ-ray detector to be used in a two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) apparatus has been developed. It consists of 36 compact position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PS-PMT: HAMAMATSU R5900-00-C8), a light guide, and 2676 Bi4Ge3O12 (BGO) scintillator pieces of size 2.6 mmx2.6 mmx18 mm. A high detection efficiency for 511 keV γ-ray is achieved with the length of BGO scintillators used. The detection area is about 160 mmx160 mm. The 288 anode outputs of the PS-PMTs are wired and connected to resistor chains from which 16 outputs (8 outputs each along the X and Y directions) are taken to identify the incident position of the γ-ray. The spatial resolution is about 3 mm (FWHM). The timing signal taken from the last dynodes of the PS-PMTs gives a timing resolution of 7.7 ns (FWHM) for 511 keV positron annihilation γ-rays

  7. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  8. Lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode for dense plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow tube cathode using lanthanum hexaboride as the electron emitter has been designed and constructed. Tests in both argon and hydrogen indicate that this cathode is capable of producing over 800 A of electron current continuously, corresponding to over 25 A/cm2 from the LaB6. The cathode has been operated for over 300 h and exposed to air more than 100 times with no deterioration in emission. Projected lifetime is in excess of 3500 h for the sintered LaB6 piece tested in this configuration. Construction details, performance characteristics, and discussions of space charge limits on emission are described

  9. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  10. New Findings on the Phase Transitions in Li1-xCoO2 and Li1-xNiO2 Cathode Materials During Cycling: In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have utilized synchrotron x-ray radiation to perform ''in situ'' x-ray diffraction studies on Li1-xCoO2 and Li1-xNiO2 cathodes. A C/10 charging rate was used for a Li/Li1-xCoO2 cell. For the Li/Li1-xNiO2 cells, C/13 and C/84 rates were applied. The in situ XRD data were collected during the first charge from 3.5 to 5.2 V. For the Li1-xCoO2 cathode, in the composition range of x = 0 to x = 0.5, a new intermediate phase H2a was observed in addition to the two expected hexagonal phases H1 and H2. In the region very close to x = 0.5, some spectral signatures for the formation of a monoclinic phase M1 were also observed. Further, in the x = 0.8 to x = 1 region, the formation of a CdI2 type hexagonal phase has been confirmed. However, this new phase is transformed from a CdCl2 type hexagonal phase, rather than from a monoclinic phase M2 as previously reported in the literature. For the Li1-xNiO2 system, by taking the advantage of the high resolution in 2θ angles through the synchrotron based XRD technique, they were able to identify a two-phase coexistence region of hexagonal phase H1 and H2, which has been mistakenly indexed as a single phase region for monoclinic phase M1. Interesting similarities and differences between these two systems are also discussed

  11. Classic and novel electromagnetic source. The High Power Electron Tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron tubes which generate and amplify radio waves relying on the motion of electrons in vacuum are developing in fields where large electric-power and microwave are necessary. Fundamental structures and major purposes of use of practically available electron tubes including transmitting tube, magnetron, travelling-wave tube, and gyrotron are presented. As for microwave tubes, the process where electrons are bunched by the effect of the microwave and fall into the decelerating phase of the microwave are shown for each tube. Also introduced are used materials, outline of fabrication process, the cathode technology which strongly affects the reliability and the lifetime of electron tubes. (author)

  12. Phase and texture analysis of a hydride blister in a Zr-2.5%Nb tube by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a detailed phase and texture study within and around a hydride blister grown on the surface of a Zr-2.5%Nb pressure tube. The analysis is based on synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments using an 80 keV photon beam and a high-speed area detector placed in transmission geometry. It was found that the blister is composed of two main phases, α-Zr and (delta)-ZrH, with a composition which changes locally across the blister. No location within the blister presents pure (delta) zirconium hydride, with a maximum of 80% for the volume fraction of (delta) hydride at the center of the blister. The texture observed for both phases in the original pressure tube remains essentially unaltered across the hydride blister. A detailed analysis of this texture using well-known parent-precipitate relationships shows that some selective precipitation occurs at α-Zr grains with their c-axis under a tensile stress, and on grains with grain boundaries favorably aligned for hydride nucleation.

  13. Improved Dispenser Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Lou

    2006-01-01

    Variations in emission current from dispenser cathodes can be caused by variations in temperature and work function over the surface. This paper described research to reduce these variations using improved mechanical designs and controlled porosity cathodes made from sintered tungsten wires. The program goal is to reduce current emission variations to less than 5% over the surface of magnetron injection guns operating temperature limited.

  14. HIGH CURRENT COAXIAL PHOTOMULTIPLIER TUBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, N.W.

    1960-01-19

    A medium-gain photomultiplier tube having high current output, fast rise- time, and matched output impedance was developed. The photomultiplier tube comprises an elongated cylindrical envelope, a cylindrical anode supported at the axis of the envelope, a plurality of elongated spaced opaque areas on the envelope, and a plurality of light admitting windows. A photo-cathode is supported adjacent to each of the windows, and a plurality of secondary emissive dynodes are arranged in two types of radial arrays which are alternately positioned to fill the annular space between the anode and the envelope. The dynodes are in an array being radially staggered with respect to the dynodes in the adjacent array, the dynodes each having a portion arranged at an angle with respect to the electron path, such that electrons emitted by each cathode undergo multiplication upon impingement on a dynode and redirected flight to the next adjacent dynode.

  15. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    OpenAIRE

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-01-01

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent t...

  16. Correction of the X-ray tube spot movement as a tool for improvement of the micro-tomography quality

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vavřík, Daniel; Jandejsek, Ivan; Pichotka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2016), C01029. ISSN 1748-0221 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : computerized tomography (CT) * computed radiography (CR) * detector alignment and calibration methods * inspection with x-rays Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.399, year: 2014 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-0221/11/01/C01029

  17. 输卵管Sonovue超声造影与碘海醇X线造影的对比分析%Comparison of Sonovue contrast-enhanced ultrasound and Iohexol X-ray hysterosalpingogram for fallopian tube assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王士琴; 袁伟

    2013-01-01

      目的比较输卵管Sonovue超声造影与碘海醇X线造影的结果,以期提高超声造影的准确率。方法对45例不孕不育患者,分别在B超下行Sonovue输卵管造影,在X线下行碘剂造影。结果B超:输卵管通畅者35例(66条),通而不畅7例(13条),不通者7例(10条);X线:输卵管通畅者38例(73条),通而不畅4例(7条),不通者6例(9条)。结论输卵管Sonovue超声造影诊断准确率略低于碘海醇X线造影。%  Objective To compare Sonovue contrast-enhanced hysterosonography(CEUS)and Iohexol X-ray hysterosalpingography(HSG).Methods Forty-five patients with infertility underwent CEUS of fallopian tubes using Sonovue followed by Iohexol X-ray HSG.Results Sixty-six fallopian tubes in 35 patients were clearly demonstrated on CEUS. Contrast flow was impeded in 13 tubes of 7 patients. Ten tubes were obstructed in 7 patients.On Iohexol HSG,73 tubes were clearly demonstrated in 38 patients.Contrast flow was impeded in 7 tubes of 4 patients. Nine tubes were obstructed in 6 patients.Conclusions Sonovue CEUS is slightly less accurate than Iohexol X-ray HSG.

  18. Dose reduction and increase of X-ray tube life in computed tomography; Reducao de dose e aumento na vida util do tubo de raios X em tomografia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marconato, Jose Augusto; Vasques, Marcio Vieveger; Mazzola, Alessandro A. [Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Fisica Medica]. E-mail: ressonancia@hmv.org.br; Sanvitto, Paulo Cesar [Hospital Moinhos de Vento, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2004-10-01

    The objective was to reduce radiation dose and increase X-ray tube life in computed tomography. Head, upper abdomen and chest scans were evaluated. We assessed the techniques employed and if these could be changed, suggested new protocols and compared the quality of the images, the radiation dose and the X-ray tube heating. A mAs reduction could be done without interfering with the diagnostic quality, allowing a decrease of up to 20% in the average dose for adults' head exams and up to 45% for 0 to 6 years old children; patients with less than 50 kg had a reduction of 37% on the upper abdomen radiation average dose; for chest routine scans the reduction was 54%. The decrease in the heating of the X-ray tube for head, upper abdomen and chest scan was approximately 13%, 23% and 41%, respectively. As a conclusion, a change on the described protocols will produce a significant reduction on the radiation dose and an increasing in X-ray tube life without loss of diagnostic quality. (author)

  19. High-energy x-ray detection of G359.89–0.08 (SGR A–E): magnetic flux tube emission powered by cosmic rays?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuo; Hailey, Charles J.; Baganoff, Frederick K.;

    2014-01-01

    We report the first detection of high-energy X-ray (E > 10 keV) emission from the Galactic center non-thermal filament G359.89–0.08 (Sgr A–E) using data acquired with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR). The bright filament was detected up to ∼50 keV during a NuSTAR Galactic center...

  20. Measuring current emission and work functions of large thermionic cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one component of the nations Stockpile Stewardship program, Los Alamos National Laboratory is constructing a 20 MeV, 2 kA (with a 4 kA upgrade capability), 3ps induction linac for doing x-ray radiography of explosive devices. The linac is one leg of a facility called the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT). The electron gun is designed to operate at 3.2 MV. The gun is a Pierce type design and uses a 6.5' cathode for 2 kA operation and an 8' cathode for 4 kA operation. We have constructed a small facility called the Cathode Test Stand (CTS) to investigate engineering and physics issues regarding large thermionic dispenser-cathodes. In particular, we have looked at the issues of temperature uniformity on the cathode surface and cathode quality as measured by its work function. We have done thermal imaging of both 8' and 6.5' cathodes. Here we report on measurements of the cathode work function, both the average value and how it vanes across the face of the cathode.

  1. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Cathodes - Technological review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented

  3. 12Cao-7Al2o3 Electride Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Lauren P. (Inventor); Williams, John D. (Inventor); Martinez, Rafael A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The use of the electride form of 12CaO-7Al.sub.2O.sub.3, or C12A7, as a low work function electron emitter in a hollow cathode discharge apparatus is described. No heater is required to initiate operation of the present cathode, as is necessary for traditional hollow cathode devices. Because C12A7 has a fully oxidized lattice structure, exposure to oxygen does not degrade the electride. The electride was surrounded by a graphite liner since it was found that the C12A7 electride converts to it's eutectic (CA+C3A) form when heated (through natural hollow cathode operation) in a metal tube.

  4. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30oC under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis-tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu-sions were supported by the experimental results.

  5. Close cathode chamber: Low material budget MWPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance of asymmetric-type MWPC-s are presented. In this structure, referred to as Close Cathode Chamber in an earlier study, the material budget is significantly reduced on one hand by the elimination of external support frame, on the other hand by thin detector walls. In this paper it is demonstrated that the outline is compatible with large size detectors (1 m wire length), maintaining mechanical and operation stability, with total weight of 3 kg (including support structure) for a half square meter surface. The detection efficiency and response time is shown to be sufficient for L0 triggering in the ALICE VHMPID layout. Reduced sensitivity to cathode deformations (due to internal overpressure as mechanical strain) is directly demonstrated. On small sized chambers, improvement of position resolution with analog readout is evaluated, reaching 0.09 mm RMS with 2 mm wide cathode segments. Simulation results on signal time evolutions are presented. With the above studies, comparison of classical MWPC-s and the Close Cathode Chamber design is performed in all major aspects. -- Highlights: ► Asymmetric multi-wire proportional chamber, called the Close Cathode Chamber, is studied. ► Large size construction feasibility up to 1 m wire length is demonstrated in test beam and cosmic rays. ► Reduction of dependence of gas gain on chamber internal pressure is directly demonstrated. ► Position resolution and signal formation is shown to be compatible with classical MWPC.

  6. A model of dispenser cathode activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamartine, B. C.; Eyink, K. G.; Czarnecki, J. V.; Lampert, W. V.; Haas, T. W.

    1985-12-01

    A semiquantitative model of dispenser cathode activity based on recent work on the co-adsorption of Ba and O onto W surfaces is presented. The co-adsorption studies have determined the shape of a three-dimensional surface of work function as a function of θO and θBa, the surface coverages of O and Ba, respectively. Compositions of a variety of pedigreed dispenser cathodes were fitted to this surface and their composition changes during lifetime were modeled. Changes of surface composition with temperature and of workfunction, φ, with temperature were also found to fit these curves. The concept of a patchy surface implied by the co-adsorption measurements was used to explain earlier results on the shape of the X-ray excited Ba MNN Auger feature. Finally, SIMS measurements under UHV conditions was found to provide an extremely sensitive measurement of surface composition in the region of surface coverages of interest in the study of cathode phenomena. Extensions of this work to other types of cathodes such as M-types, and rhenium substrate cathodes is also discussed.

  7. Calibrating the MicroBooNE Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) Array with Michel Electrons from Cosmic Ray Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Amy

    2013-04-01

    MicroBooNE is a neutrino experiment at Fermilab designed to investigate the 3σ low-energy electron candidate events measured by the MiniBooNE experiment. Neutrinos from the Booster Neutrino Beam are detected by a 89-ton liquid argon time projection chamber, which is expected to start taking data in 2014. MicroBooNE measures both the ionization electrons and scintillation light produced by neutrino interactions in the liquid argon. The scintillation light is collected by an array of 30 PMTs located at one side of the detector. This array can be calibrated using Michel electrons from stopping cosmic ray muons, by fitting the measured PMT response with the theoretical expectation. I will report on the progress of the PMT calibration software that has been developed using the MicroBooNE Monte Carlo.

  8. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction

  9. SU-E-J-06: Additional Imaging Guidance Dose to Patient Organs Resulting From X-Ray Tubes Used in CyberKnife Image Guidance System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, A; Ding, G [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The use of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) has become increasingly common, but the additional radiation exposure resulting from repeated image guidance procedures raises concerns. Although there are many studies reporting imaging dose from different image guidance devices, imaging dose for the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System is not available. This study provides estimated organ doses resulting from image guidance procedures on the CyberKnife system. Methods: Commercially available Monte Carlo software, PCXMC, was used to calculate average organ doses resulting from x-ray tubes used in the CyberKnife system. There are seven imaging protocols with kVp ranging from 60 – 120 kV and 15 mAs for treatment sites in the Cranium, Head and Neck, Thorax, and Abdomen. The output of each image protocol was measured at treatment isocenter. For each site and protocol, Adult body sizes ranging from anorexic to extremely obese were simulated since organ dose depends on patient size. Doses for all organs within the imaging field-of-view of each site were calculated for a single image acquisition from both of the orthogonal x-ray tubes. Results: Average organ doses were <1.0 mGy for every treatment site and imaging protocol. For a given organ, dose increases as kV increases or body size decreases. Higher doses are typically reported for skeletal components, such as the skull, ribs, or clavicles, than for softtissue organs. Typical organ doses due to a single exposure are estimated as 0.23 mGy to the brain, 0.29 mGy to the heart, 0.08 mGy to the kidneys, etc., depending on the imaging protocol and site. Conclusion: The organ doses vary with treatment site, imaging protocol and patient size. Although the organ dose from a single image acquisition resulting from two orthogonal beams is generally insignificant, the sum of repeated image acquisitions (>100) could reach 10–20 cGy for a typical treatment fraction.

  10. Fundamental studies for the triple-flash x-ray generator for biomedical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental studies for the triple-flash x-ray generator having variable spectra for biomedical radiography are described. Two types of triple-flash x-ray generators consisted of the following components: a high-voltage generating unit, a voltage divider unit, three high-voltage pulsers, a triple-parallel impulse switching system utilizing air gap pulsers for the main gas gaps, a high-power gas diode having three terminals, a turbo molecular pump, and three x-ray tubes having cold cathodes. For the single-tube generator, the pulse condensers of the pulsers were charged to the same or different energies by using a voltage divider unit and were connected directly to three tubes without a diode. In contrast, the pulsers were connected directly to three tubes without a diode. The duration of each x-ray pulse was a few μ, and the minimum time interval between the two pulses was about 100μ (single-tube type), the x-ray intensity was less than 1 x 10-5C/kg at 1m per pulse, and the effective focal spot size was determined by the diameter of the anode rod. The triple exposure of pulsed x-rays having variable spectra and time intervals was obtained

  11. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  12. Elemental concentration analysis in soil contaminated with recyclable urban garbage by tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T. E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; Jesus, E.F.O.; Assis, J.T.; Cesareo, R.; Barroso, R.C.; Barradas, C.A.A

    2002-11-01

    Soil and radish (Raphanus Sp) samples from areas treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage were quantitatively analyzed by using tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. Soils treated with 10, 20 and 30 t/ha of recyclable urban garbage and control soil were analyzed. The layer soils were collected at 0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-40, 40-60 cm depth. It was possible simultaneously to determine the elemental concentration of various elements: K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in recyclable urban garbage, soil treated with organic compost of recyclable urban garbage and radish plants cultivated in these soils. The elemental concentration of K, Ca, Ti and Fe were determined at percent level (macro-elements) and the other elements at ppm level (micro-elements). It was also possible to observe a significant increase in the contents of K, Ca, Zn, Rb, Sr, Zr and Pb in the soil treated in comparison with the control soil and it was also verified whether the transport of these elements to radish plants cultivated in these soils occurred.

  13. Calculation of size specific dose estimates (SSDE) value at cylindrical phantom from CBCT Varian OBI v1.4 X-ray tube EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation based

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, M.; Pratama, D.; Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to calculate Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) generated by the varian OBI CBCT v1.4 X-ray tube working at 100 kV using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code used in this simulation was divided into two parts. Phase space file data resulted by the first part simulation became an input to the second part. This research was performed with varying phantom diameters of 5 to 35 cm and varying phantom lengths of 10 to 25 cm. Dose distribution data were used to calculate SSDE values using trapezoidal rule (trapz) function in a Matlab program. SSDE obtained from this calculation was compared to that in AAPM report and experimental data. It was obtained that the normalization of SSDE value for each phantom diameter was between 1.00 and 3.19. The normalization of SSDE value for each phantom length was between 0.96 and 1.07. The statistical error in this simulation was 4.98% for varying phantom diameters and 5.20% for varying phantom lengths. This study demonstrated the accuracy of the Monte Carlo technique in simulating the dose calculation. In the future, the influence of cylindrical phantom material to SSDE would be studied.

  14. X-rays revolutionized the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of Professor Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen's accidental discovery of x-radiation. On 8 November 1895, Roentgen was conducting laboratory tests at the University of Wuertsburg in order to study cathode rays in a gasdischarge tube. He noticed that a fluorescence paper that happened to be near the tube began to glow even though the radiation should not have penetrated the shield of the gas-discharge tube. Less than two months later Roentgen reported the discovery of a new type of penetrating radiation, which he called x-rays. The discovery became an immediate worldwide sensation, and doctors realised that they could now see inside the human body without surgery. In Finland, the first x-ray equipment was acquired as early as 1900. The following year, Roentgen was awarded the Nobel prize in physics for his work. The health risks of x-radiation were noticed early on, but their severity was not always understood. The new x-ray examination methods were difficult to control and the exposure times then were quite long. It was therefore not uncommon that radiation damage eventually led to skin cancer and haematological diseases. (orig.) (7 figs.)

  15. Following ORR intermediates adsorbed on a Pt cathode catalyst during break-in of a PEM fuel cell by in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaker, D E; Korovina, A; Croze, V; Melke, J; Roth, C

    2014-07-21

    In operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy data using the Δμ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) analysis procedure is used to follow the ORR intermediate adsorbate coverage on a working catalyst in a PEMFC during initial activation and break-in. The adsorbate coverage and log i (Tafel) curves reveal a strong correlation, i.e., an increase in adsorbate intermediate coverage poisons Pt sites thereby decreasing the current. A decrease in Pt-O bond strength commensurate with decrease in potential causes a sequence of different dominant adsorbate volcano curves to exist, namely first O, then OH, and then OOH exactly as predicted by the different ORR kinetics mechanisms. During break-in, the incipient O coverage coming from exposure to air during storage and MEA preparation is rather quickly removed, compared to the slower and more subtle nanoparticle morphological changes, such as the rounding of the Pt nanoparticle edges/corners and smoothing of the planar surfaces, driven by the nanoparticle's tendency to lower its surface energy. These morphological changes increase the Pt-Pt average coordination number, decrease the average Pt-O bond strength, and thereby decrease the coverage of ORR intermediates, allowing increase in the current. PMID:24664398

  16. Effect of crystallographic orientation on the anodic formation of nanoscale pores/tubes in TiO2 films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-organized nanopores and nanotubes have been produced in thin films of titanium (Ti) prepared using filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA), DC- and RF-sputter deposition systems. The anodization process was performed using a neutral electrolyte containing fluoride ions with an applied potential between 2 and 20 V (for clarity the results are only presented for 5 V). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques were used to characterise the films. It was found that the crystallographic orientation of the Ti films played a significant role in determining whether pores or tubes were formed during the anodic etching process.

  17. New style of photomultiplier tube voltage divider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An adjustable voltage divider chain has been developed for use with five-inch PM tubes in a neutron time-of-flight detector array. Best time response and pulse shape discrimination are obtained by maintaining high fixed gradients from the cathode to third dynode. Best saturation characteristics are obtained by maintaining high fixed gradient for the last several dynodes and the anode. Gain adjustments are made by reducing the voltage gradients in the non-critical central dynodes while simultaneously reducing the total tube voltage such that all tubes in the array can be powered by a common supply. (orig.)

  18. Novel Photo Multiplier Tubes for the Cherenkov Telescope Array Project

    OpenAIRE

    Toyama, Takeshi; Mirzoyan, Razmik; Dickinson, Hugh; Fruck, Christian; Hose, Jürgen; Kellermann, Hanna; Knötig, Max; Lorenz, Eckart; Menzel, Uta; Nakajima, Daisuke; Orito, Reiko; Paneque, David; Schweizer, Thomas; Teshima, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu

    2013-01-01

    Currently the standard light sensors for imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes are the classical photo multiplier tubes that are using bialkali photo cathodes. About eight years ago we initiated an improvement program with the Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT) manufacturers Hamamatsu (Japan), Electron Tubes Enterprises (England) and Photonis (France) for the needs of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. As a result, after about 40 years of stagnation of the peak Quantum Efficiency (QE) on t...

  19. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  20. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  1. 非介入技术在X光机管电流测量中的应用研究%Application of non-invasive technology in X-ray tube current measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄平; 龚岚; 刘志宏

    2012-01-01

    X-ray machine is widely used in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy, industrial testing and other related fields. It plays an important role in protecting the health of citizens and promoting social -economic ? Progress. As an important parameter of the intensity of X-ray, the current of X-ray tube has a major impact on the X-ray output quality, the clarity of pictures and other aspects. In order to ensure the accuracy of testing data and simplify the certification process, a testing method was designed on the basis of the non-invasive to measure the current of X-ray tube. Experimental results show that the method can accurately measure the X-ray tube's current.%X光机广泛应用于放射诊断、放射治疗、工业探伤等相关领域,在保障公民身体健康和促进社会经济进步方面发挥着重要作用.X光机管电流作为控制X射线强度的重要参数,对射线输出质量、拍片清晰度等方面产生重要影响.在保证检测数据准确、检定过程简易的情况下,设计采用了基于非介入式的X光机管电流测量方法,测试结果表明该方法能准确测量X光机管电流.

  2. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  3. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  4. Emission and surface characteristic of ternary alloy Ir/Re/W-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglai; Liu, Yanwen; Zhang, Mingchen; Li, Yutao

    2005-09-01

    In order to improve the activation characteristics and emission ability of the conventional Ir-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes, a new type of dispenser cathode with ternary alloy Ir/Re/W coating was developed. The improved cathodes show higher emission current density and faster activation characteristics than that of the conventional pure Ir-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the element compositions on the surface of the cathodes coated with pure Ir and Ir/Re/W alloy. The results show that for pure Ir coating cathode, binary alloy (Ir/W) is formed. The surface atom concentration is near 50/50 after full activation. For ternary alloy coating cathode, the surface atom concentration has changed from 35%Ir-25%Re-40%W to 33%Ir-19%Re-48%W before and after activation.

  5. Emission and surface characteristic of ternary alloy Ir/Re/W-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the activation characteristics and emission ability of the conventional Ir-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes, a new type of dispenser cathode with ternary alloy Ir/Re/W coating was developed. The improved cathodes show higher emission current density and faster activation characteristics than that of the conventional pure Ir-coated impregnated tungsten cathodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the element compositions on the surface of the cathodes coated with pure Ir and Ir/Re/W alloy. The results show that for pure Ir coating cathode, binary alloy (Ir/W) is formed. The surface atom concentration is near 50/50 after full activation. For ternary alloy coating cathode, the surface atom concentration has changed from 35%Ir-25%Re-40%W to 33%Ir-19%Re-48%W before and after activation

  6. Single crystal LaB6: a comparison with currently used thermionic cathodes for broad beam applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of single crystal LaB6 cathodes in microbeam applications has grown dramatically in the past few years, due to recognition of the high current density/low volatility characteristics of this material. We present here experimental results suggesting that advanced, single crystal LaB6 cathodes should also satisfy the requirements of broad beam applications, such as satellite-borne traveling wave tubes, where high current density, long lifetime and excellent stability and reproducibility are necessary. The most important parameters for cathode characterization are available emitted current density, material vaporization rate, lifetime and power consumption. Other important characteristics are activation procedure, resistance to poisoning by impurities, emission stability and emission uniformity across the cathode emitting surface. The current state of the art cathode type used in commercial devices is the impregnated dispenser cathode (IDC). The construction of such cathodes are outlined briefly, and their operating properties are discussed

  7. Pipeline integrity through cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N. [Gas Authority India Ltd., New Delhi (India); Khanna, A.S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2008-07-01

    Pipeline integrity management is defined as a process for assessing and mitigating pipeline risks in an effort to reduce both the likelihood and consequences of incidents. Defects on pipelines result in production losses, environmental losses, as well as loss of goodwill and subsequent financial losses. This presentation addressed pipeline integrity through cathodic protection. It noted that pipeline integrity can be strengthened by successfully controlling, monitoring and mitigating corrosion strategies. It can also be achieved by avoiding external and internal corrosion failures. A good coating offers the advantages of low current density; lower power consumption; low wear of anodes; larger spacing between cathodic protection stations; and minimization of interference problems. The presentation reviewed cathodic protection of cross-country pipelines; a sacrificial cathodic protection system; and an impressed current cathodic protection system. The efficiency of a cathodic system was shown to depend on the use of reliable power sources; proper protection criterion; efficient and effective monitoring of cathodic protection; proper maintenance of the cathodic protection system; and effective remedial measures. Selection criteria, power sources, and a comparison of cathodic protection sources were also presented. Last, the presentation addressed protection criteria; current interruption circuits; monitoring of the cathodic protection system; use of corrosion coupons; advantages of weightless coupons; checking the insulating flanges for shorted bolts; insulated/short casings; anodic and cathodic interference; common corridor problems; and intelligent pigging. tabs., figs.

  8. Electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube based field emission x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Shabana

    In this dissertation, electron optics simulation for designing carbon nanotube (CNT) based field emission x-ray source for medical imaging applications will be presented. However, for design optimization of x-ray tubes accurate electron beam optics simulation is essential. To facilitate design of CNT x-ray sources a commercial 3D finite element software has been chosen for extensive simulation. The results show that a simplified model of uniform electron field emission from the cathode surface is not sufficient when compared to experimental measurements. This necessitated the development of a refined model to describe a macroscopic field emission CNT cathode for electron beam optics simulations. The model emulates the random distribution of CNTs and the associated variation of local field enhancement factor. The main parameter of the model has been derived empirically from the experimentally measured I-V characteristics of the CNT cathode. Simulation results based on this model agree well with experiments which include measurements of the transmission rate and focus spot size. The model provides a consistent simulation platform for optimization of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray source design. A systematic study of electron beam optics in CNT x-ray tubes led to the development of a new generation of compact x-ray source with multiple pixels. A micro focus field emission x-ray source with a variable focal spot size has been fully characterized and evaluated. It has been built and successfully integrated into micro-CT scanners which are capable of dynamic cardiac imaging of free-breathing small animals with high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition a spatially distributed high power multi-beam x-ray source has also been designed and integrated into a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) configuration. This system has the potential to reduce the total scan time to 4 seconds and yield superior image quality in breast imaging.

  9. Development and performance of resistive seamless straw-tube gas chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takubo, Y.; Aoki, M.; Ishihara, A.; Ishii, J.; Kuno, Y.; Maeda, F.; Nakahara, K.; Nosaka, N.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Terai, K.; Igarashi, Y.; Yokoi, T.

    2005-10-01

    A new straw-tube gas chamber which is made of seamless straw-tubes, instead of ordinary wound-type straw-tubes is developed. Seamless straw-tubes have various advantages over ordinary wound-type ones, in particular, in terms of mechanical strength and lesser wall thickness. Our seamless straw-tubes are fabricated to be resistive so that the hit positions along the straw axis can be read by cathode planes placed outside the straw-tube chambers, where the cathode strips run transverse to the straw axis. A beam test was carried out at KEK to study their performance. As a result of the beam test, the position resolution of the cathode strips of 220 μm is achieved, and an anode position resolution of 112 μm is also obtained.

  10. Gastrostomy Tube (G-Tube)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endoscope (a thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera and light at the tip) inserted through the ... Nemours Foundation, iStock, Getty Images, Corbis, Veer, Science Photo Library, Science Source Images, Shutterstock, and Clipart.com

  11. Improved Traveling-Wave Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Art; Tammaru, Ivo; Vaszari, John

    1988-01-01

    New space traveling-wave tube (TWT) provides coherent source of 75 watts of continuous-wave power output over bandwidth of 5 GHz at frequency of 65 GHz. Coupled-cavity TWT provides 50 dB of saturated gain. Includes thermionic emitter, M-type dispenser cathode providing high-power electron beam. Beam focused by permanent magnets through center of radio-frequency cavity structure. Designed for reliable operation for 10 years, and overall efficiency of 35 percent minimizes prime power input and dissipation of heat.

  12. Thermionically electron emitting matrix cathodes for magnetohydrodynamic generators: Analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current and voltage drop calculations have been made for matrix cathodes having a number of sharp pins projecting out from its surface in open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic plasmas. It is assumed that from the cathode surface to the cathode sheath edge, the current flows in current tubes formed around the projected pins. The effect of high electric field on the work function of the tip has been taken into account and calculations are made for a variable number of tips and tip area. Work functions of the tip and the slant surface are taken to be different. The current and voltage characteristics have been obtained by solving the current continuity and Poisson's equations in spherical coordinate geometry. It is observed that the current increases with an increase in the number of pins per unit area and tip area. The theoretical results have been compared with the experimental observations

  13. Preparation and characterization of SOFC cathode films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) are being widely studied due to their possible utilization to produce electrical energy in a wide power range (from 1 kW up to few hundreds of kW).The principle of operation of this kind of fuel cells involves reduction of O2 in the cathode oxygen ions (O2-) diffusion of oxygen through the electrolyte and fuel oxidation in the anode.Commercial SOFC must work at temperature higher than to 1000 degree C to enable the O2- diffusion.Therefore, it is necessary to investigate new materials that enable to decrease the operation temperature, improving SOFC performance and cost. La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (LSCF) perovskites are good candidates for SOFC cathodes because these materials present high ionic and electronic conductivity. LSCF cathodes are adequate to fabricate Ce1-xGdxO2-δ electrolyte SOFC due to its low chemical reactivity with this material and its similar thermal expansion coefficient. In this work we present a study of microstructural and electrochemical characteristics of films for SOFC cathodes. La0.4Sr0.6Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ compounds were prepared by the acetate reaction method.Then, cathodes were deposited onto a Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ electrolyte disk by dip coating and spray techniques.Structural characterization is made by X-ray diffraction XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).Electrochemical properties are characterized by complex impedance measurements.Finally, the relation between structural characteristics and electrical properties is discussed

  14. Ear tube insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myringotomy; Tympanostomy; Ear tube surgery; Pressure equalization tubes; Ventilating tubes; Ear infection - tubes; Otitis - tubes ... trapped fluid can flow out of the middle ear. This prevents hearing loss and reduces the risk ...

  15. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Robert, E-mail: robert.franz@unileoben.ac.at; Mendez Martin, Francisca; Hawranek, Gerhard [Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Polcik, Peter [Plansee Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbürgerstrasse 23, 86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1−x} composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes.

  16. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  17. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  18. Coiled tubing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oil and gas wells that flow on initial completion eventually reach a condition of liquid loading that kills the wells. This results form declining reservoir pressure, decreased gas volume (velocity), increased water production and other factors that cause liquids to accumulate at the bottom of the well and exert back pressure on the formation. This restricts or in some cases prevents fluid entry into the wellbore form the formation. Flowing production can be restored or increased by reducing surface backpressure, well bore stimulation, pressure maintenance or by installing a string of smaller diameter tubing. This paper reports on installation (hanging off) of a concentric string of coiled tubing inside existing production tubing which is an economically viable, safe, convenient and effective alterative for returning some of these liquid loaded )logged-up) wells to flowing status

  19. Tube wall thickness guage for hot stretch reducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new system of tube wall thickness gauge for seamless tube on hot stretch reducing-mill is reported. The system adapts two methods using gamma rays. One is a new method measuring double wall thickness of tube another is a known method measuring mean value of cross section of tube. (author)

  20. Bilamellar type streak tube design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ICF experiments, high dynamic range, high temporal and spatial resolution X-ray streak camera is a necessary diagnosis tool. To meet this requirement, a streak tube which uses bilamellar electrode lens and quadrupolar lens to focus electrons has been designed. This tube uses different ways to focus electrons in temporal axis and spatial axis. In temporal axis, it uses two effectively. The spatial resolution of this tube reaches 40 lp/mm even at the edge of photocathode, the temporal resolution is about 10 ps and the effective length of photocathode is 20 mm. Using different focusing ways in temporal and spatial directions, the tube will not focus electrons to a small spot, compared with conventional rotary and symmetric tubes, and thus its space charge effect is much weaker, and dynamic range is much larger. (authors)

  1. Thermionic properties of Mo-La2O3 cathode wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张久兴; 周美玲; 周文元; 王金淑; 聂祚仁; 左铁镛

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Mo-La2O3 thermionic cathode materials were presented. It is shown that Mo-La2O3 cathode has better ductility, radioactive pollution-free, excellent thermionic electron-emission properties and lower operating temperature compared with W-ThO2 cathode. At operating temperature 1350~1400℃, the average saturation current of the Mo-La2O3 cathode is 118mA, the corresponding average current density is 367mA/cm2, and the average emission efficiency is 11.8mA/W. The lifetime of diode is more than 2000h when the stable emission current is 80mA. Moreover, the lifetime of practical 6T51-type triode is more than 1000h. These advances show that the Mo-La2O3 cathode electron tube is closer to industry application.

  2. High-speed dental radiography achieved with a kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a high-intensity kilohertz-range pulsed x-ray generator and its application to dental radiography are described. The pulsed x-ray generator consisted of the following major components: a constant high-voltage power supply, a high-voltage main condenser, a hot-cathode triode, a DC power supply for the filament (hot cathode), and a grid controller. The main condenser of 0.5 microF-100 kV in the pulser was charged from 50 to 70 kV by the power supply, and the electric charges in the condenser were discharged to the triode by the grid controller. To be exact, the tube voltage decreased during the discharging for generating pulsed x-rays, yet the maximum value was equivalent to the initial charging voltage of the main condenser. The maximum values of the tube current and the repetition rate were about 0.5 A and 30 kHz, respectively. The pulse width of the x-rays ranged from approximately 20 to 400 micros, and the x-ray intensity with a charging voltage of 70 kV and a total resistance of 5.1 MΩ was about 0.83 microC/kg at 1.0 m per pulse. Using this generator, high-speed dental radiography, e.g., delayed radiography and multiple-shot radiography, was performed

  3. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  4. A microwave plasma cathode electron gun for ion beam neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusellier, C.; Wartski, L.; Aubert, J.; Schwebel, C.; Coste, Ph.; Chabrier, A.

    1998-02-01

    It is well known that there exist two distinct types of ion beam neutralization, viz., charge and current neutralization. We have designed and studied a versatile and compact microwave plasma (MP) cathode electron gun dedicated to charge as well as current neutralization. Unlike the conventional hot cathode neutralizer, this MP cathode allows operation of the electron gun in a reactive gaseous environment when it is eventually associated with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion gun. Charge neutralization can be easily carried out by extracting from the MP cathode through a 1 mm diameter hole, a 35 mA electron beam under a 20 V voltage; the MP cathode being fed with a 75 W microwave power at 2.45 GHz. Higher beam intensities could be obtained using a multiaperture thin plate. Electron beam intensities as high as 300 mA and energies of 2 keV needed for current neutralization, e.g., when an ion beam impinges onto a thick dielectric surface, are obtained via a two-stage arrangement including an anodic chamber associated with a set of three monoaperture plates for the electron beam extraction. Transport of 200-2000 eV electron beams is ensured using focusing optics composed of three aligned tubes 6 cm in diameter and unsymmetrically polarized.

  5. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a β-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10-12 input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10-12 to 10-9 input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses

  6. Photomultiplier tubes for Low Level Cerenkov Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strindehag, O.

    1965-03-15

    Tube backgrounds of several 2-inch photomultiplier types having S11, 'S' , S13 and S20 cathodes are compared by measuring signal and background pulse height distributions at pulse heights corresponding to a few photo-electrons. The reference signal is generated by means of a {beta}-source and a plexiglass radiator. It is found that comparatively good results are obtained with selected tubes of the EMI types 6097B and 9514B having equivalent dark current dc values down to 10{sup -12} input lumens. Special interest is devoted to the correlation between the measured tube backgrounds and the dark current dc values of the tubes, as a good correlation between these parameters simplifies the selection of photomultiplier tubes. The equivalent dark currents of the tested tubes extend over the range 10{sup -12} to 10{sup -9} input lumens. Although the investigation deals with photomultiplier tubes intended for use in low level Cerenkov detectors it is believed that the results could be valuable in other fields where photomultiplier tubes are utilized for the detection of weak light pulses.

  7. 高频X线机管电压调整电路的工作原理及故障分析%Working Principle and Fault Analysis of Tube Voltage Adjustment Circuit for High-frequency X-ray Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵祥坤; 于广浩; 李永生

    2013-01-01

    High frequency X-ray machine and power frequency X-ray machine differ from voltage adjusting circuit. SCM TL594 is the core device in voltage adjusting circuit of high -frequency X -ray machine. Its application has a strong representation in high frequency X -ray machine's tube voltage adjustment. The tube voltage and frequency of high frequency X-ray machine are controlled by the output pulse width and frequency of TL594 .The understanding of the operating principle of TL594 not only has certain theory significance for high frequency machine teaching but also practical significance for the high frequency machine troubleshooting.%高频X线机区别于工频X线机的主要电路是管电压调整电路,而单片机TL594又是管电压调整电路中的核心器件,它的应用在高频机管电压调节中具有较强的代表性.TL594是通过改变输出脉宽和频率,直接控制高频X线机X线管电压的高低和频率的大小通过对TL594每一个管脚功能的深入探讨,研究TL594在高频X线管电压调节中的工作原理,将不仅对高频机教学具有一定的理论意义,而且在高频机故障排除中具有较强的实践意义.

  8. Testing of a cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen for anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Renzhu; Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Junliang; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wen, Tinglian [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (SICCAS), 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2010-01-15

    We have studied the properties of a cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen for use with anode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The porous cathode connects well with the electrolyte. A preliminary examination of a single tubular cell, consisting of a Ni-YSZ anode support tube, a Ni-ScSZ anode functional layer, a ScSZ electrolyte film, and a LSM-ScSZ cathode fabricated by painting with a brush pen, has been carried out, and an improved performance is obtained. The ohmic resistance of the cathode side clearly decreases, falling to a value only 37% of that of the comparable cathode made by dip-coating at 850 C. The single cell with the painted cathode generates a maximum power density of 405 mW cm{sup -2} at 850 C, when operating with humidified hydrogen. (author)

  9. Motion of a virtual cathode in a cylindrical channel with electron beam transport in the "compressed" state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Grishkov, A. A.; Kurkan, I. K.; Tsygankov, R. V.

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies the motion of a virtual cathode in a two-section drift tube with the formation and breakup of the "compressed" state of an electron beam. Experimental arrangements to intercept part of the injected current during the voltage pulse and to provide virtual cathode motion toward the collector are proposed. The arrangements were implemented on the SINUS-7 high-current electron accelerator. Theoretical and experimental dependences of the virtual cathode velocity on the injected current and cathode voltage are presented. The experimental data on virtual cathode motion agree with its theoretical model based on analytical solutions of equations assisted by computer simulation with the PIC code KARAT. The results of the work demonstrate the feasibility of controlling the virtual cathode motion which can be used in collective ion acceleration and microwave generation.

  10. Motion of a virtual cathode in a cylindrical channel with electron beam transport in the “compressed” state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Grishkov, A. A.; Tsygankov, R. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Kurkan, I. K., E-mail: ikk@lfe.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3 Akademichesky Ave., 634055 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-15

    This paper studies the motion of a virtual cathode in a two-section drift tube with the formation and breakup of the “compressed” state of an electron beam. Experimental arrangements to intercept part of the injected current during the voltage pulse and to provide virtual cathode motion toward the collector are proposed. The arrangements were implemented on the SINUS-7 high-current electron accelerator. Theoretical and experimental dependences of the virtual cathode velocity on the injected current and cathode voltage are presented. The experimental data on virtual cathode motion agree with its theoretical model based on analytical solutions of equations assisted by computer simulation with the PIC code KARAT. The results of the work demonstrate the feasibility of controlling the virtual cathode motion which can be used in collective ion acceleration and microwave generation.

  11. Destructive physical analysis of hollow cathodes from the Deep Space 1 Flight spare ion engine 30,000 hr life test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Destructive physical analysis of the discharge and neutralizer hollow cathode assemblies from the Deep Space 1 Flight Spare 30,000 Hr life test was performed to characterize physical and chemical evidence of operationally induced effects after 30,372 hours of operation with beam extraction. Post-test inspection of the discharge-cathode assembly was subdivided into detailed analyses at the subcomponent level. Detailed materials analysis and optical inspection of the insert, orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, keeper assembly, insulator, and low-voltage propellant isolator were performed. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and scanning electron microscopy (SEW analyses were used to determine the extent and composition of regions of net deposition and erosion of both the discharge and neutralizer inserts. A comparative approach with an un-operated 4:1:1 insert was used to determine the extent of impregnate material depletion as a function of depth from the ID surface and axial position from the orifice plate. Analysis results are compared and contrasted with those obtained from similar analyses on components from shorter term tests, and provide insight regarding the prospect for successful longer-term operation consistent with SOA ion engine program life objectives at NASA.

  12. Electron tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Motohiro (Hamamatsu, JP); Fukasawa, Atsuhito (Hamamatsu, JP); Arisaka, Katsushi (Los Angeles, CA); Wang, Hanguo (North Hills, CA)

    2011-12-20

    An electron tube of the present invention includes: a vacuum vessel including a face plate portion made of synthetic silica and having a surface on which a photoelectric surface is provided, a stem portion arranged facing the photoelectric surface and made of synthetic silica, and a side tube portion having one end connected to the face plate portion and the other end connected to the stem portion and made of synthetic silica; a projection portion arranged in the vacuum vessel, extending from the stem portion toward the photoelectric surface, and made of synthetic silica; and an electron detector arranged on the projection portion, for detecting electrons from the photoelectric surface, and made of silicon.

  13. Neutron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui; Reijonen, Jani

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  14. Straightening tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hexagonal wrapper tubes, especially for nuclear reactor core sub-assemblies, may suffer from unacceptable bow as a result of welding wear pads to the wrapper and heat treatment. Straightening of the bow is effected by a method wherein at each of a series of axially spaced locations the faces or vertices of the tube are measured relative to a reference to determine the direction of bow at the locations. From these measurements, the appropriate axial locations for the application of corrective loading can be determined, whereby by application of the loading at a selected face or vertex for such measurements the bow is reduced. Such loading, by an actuator, can be repeated at the locations until the bow is reduced to within tolerances. (author)

  15. Emission from ferroelectric cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have recently initiated an investigation of electron emission from ferroelectric cathodes. The experimental apparatus consisted of an electron diode and a 250 kV, 12 ohm, 70 ns pulsed high voltage power source. A planar triode modulator driven by a synthesized waveform generator initiates the polarization inversion and allows inversion pulse tailoring. The pulsed high voltage power source is capable of delivering two high voltage pulses within 50 μs of each other and is capable of operating at a sustained repetition rate of 5 Hz. The initial measurements indicate that emission current densities above the Child-Langmuir Space Charge Limit, JCL, are possible. They explain this effect to be based on a non-zero initial energy of the emitted electrons. They also determined that this effect is strongly coupled to relative timing between the inversion pulse and application of the main anode-cathode pulse. They also have initiated brightness measurements of the emitted beam and estimate a preliminary lower bound to be on the order of 109 A/m2-rad2 for currents close to JCL and factor of two less at currents over 4JCL. As in previous measurements at this Laboratory, they performed the measurement using a pepper pot technique. Beamlet profiles are recorded with a fast phosphor and gated cameras. They describe their apparatus and preliminary measurements

  16. Interaction between Cathodic Protection and Microbially Influenced Corrosion.

    OpenAIRE

    Bujang Masli, Azlan Bin

    2011-01-01

    The present work studied the interaction between cathodic protection and microbiallyinfluenced corrosion (MIC) on the surface of mild steel. Potential trending wasobserved when the currents were held constant, and current trending was observedwhen potentials were held constant. Scanning electron microscopy and energydispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to study surface deposits on the samples andfurther understand the result of the interaction. Sul...

  17. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus;

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c...

  18. Blacking FTO by strongly cathodic polarization with enhanced photocurrent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun; Lu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Wei, E-mail: hjhw9513@163.com; Li, Zelin, E-mail: lizelin@hunnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Transparent FTO became blackish under strongly cathodic polarization. • Part of SnO{sub 2} coating on the FTO can be reduced into Sn nanoparticles. • The black FTO increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses. • Take care in photoelectrochemistry test while FTO is strongly cathodically polarized. - Abstract: Transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide (TFTO) coating on quartz glass is widely used as substrate in photoelectrochemistry for solar energy transformation, sensing and so on. We observed that the TFTO could become blackish by strongly cathodic polarization. Characterization of the black FTO (BFTO) by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that part of SnO{sub 2} on the TFTO was reduced into metal Sn nanoparticles during the cathodic polarization. The BFTO greatly increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses in comparison with TFTO. It might be necessary to take caution in photoelectrochemical measurements while the FTO is strongly cathodically polarized.

  19. The Effects on Absorbed Dose Distribution in Intraoral X-ray Imaging When Using Tube Voltages of 60 and 70 kV for Bitewing Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Hellén-Halme

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Efforts are made in radiographic examinations to obtain the best image quality with the lowest possible absorbed dose to the patient. In dental radiography, the absorbed dose to patients is very low, but exposures are relatively frequent. It has been suggested that frequent low-dose exposures can pose a risk for development of future cancer. It has previously been reported that there was no significant difference in the diagnostic accuracy of approximal carious lesions in radiographs obtained using tube voltages of 60 and 70 kV. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the patient dose resulting from exposures at these tube voltages to obtain intraoral bitewing radiographs.Material and Methods: The absorbed dose distributions resulting from two bitewing exposures were measured at tube voltages of 60 and 70 kV using Gafchromic® film and an anatomical head phantom. The dose was measured in the occlusal plane, and ± 50 mm cranially and caudally to evaluate the amount of scattered radiation. The same entrance dose to the phantom was used. The absorbed dose was expressed as the ratio of the maximal doses, the mean doses and the integral doses at tube voltages of 70 and 60 kV.Results: The patient receives approximately 40 - 50% higher (mean and integral absorbed dose when a tube voltage of 70 kV is used.Conclusions: The results of this study clearly indicate that 60 kV should be used for dental intraoral radiographic examinations for approximal caries detection.

  20. Reduction of levels of radiation exposure over patients and medical staff by using additional filters of copper and aluminum on the outputs of X-ray tubes in hemodynamic equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioprotection in hemodynamic services is extremely important. Decrease of total exposition time, better positioning of medical staff in the room, use of individual and collective protection equipment and shorter distance between the patient and the image intensifier tube are, among others, some ways to reduce the levels of radiation. It is noted that these possible forms of reducing the radiation exposition varies depending on the medical staff. Hence, the purpose of the present paper is to reduce such levels of radiation exposition in a way apart from medical staffs. It is proposed, therefore, the use of additional filters on the output of the X-ray tube in three hemodynamic equipment from different generations: detector with a flat panel of amorphous selenium, image intensifier tube with charge coupled device, and image intensifier tube with video camera. In order to quantify the quality of the images generated, a simulator made of aluminum plates and other devices was set up, so it was possible to measure and compare the acquired images. Methods of images analysis (threshold, histogram, 3D surface) were used to measure the signal/noise ratio, the spatial resolution, the contrast and the definition of the signal area, thus doubts regarding the analysis of the images among observers (inter-observers) and even for a single observer (intra-observer) can be avoided. Ionization chambers were also used in order to quantify the doses of radiation that penetrated the skin of the patients with and without the use of the filters. In all cases was found an arrangement of filters that combines quality of the images with a significant reduction of the levels of exposure to ionizing radiation, concerning both the patient and the medical staff. (author)

  1. Single photon response of photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta or gamma rays, when directly incident on the window of an optically shielded photomultiplier tube, yield a typical single photon spectrum. The single photons are possibly generated in the glass window of the photomultiplier tube through excitation of atoms in glass by electrons. The coincidence resolving time has also been measured with a 60Co gamma source and a pair of optically shielded photomultiplier tubes detecting single photons. (orig.)

  2. The origins of radiotherapy: Discovery of biological effects of X-rays by Freund in 1897, Kienböck’s crucial experiments in 1900, and still it is the dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of X-rays by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1845–1923) was triggered by pursuing an anomalous phenomenon: arousal of fluorescence at a distance from tubes in which cathode rays were elicited, a phenomenon which suggested the existence of a new kind of ray other than cathode rays. The discovery of biological effects of these X-rays by Leopold Freund (1868–1943) was triggered by pursuit of the purportedly useless phenomenon of epilation and dermatitis ensuing from X-ray-diagnostic experiments that others had reported. The crucial experiments performed by Robert Kienböck (1871–1953) entailed the proof that X-ray-dose, not electric phenomena, was the active agent of biological effects ensuing when illuminating the skin using Röntgen tubes. For both the discovery of X-rays and the discovery of their biological effectiveness, priority did not matter, but understanding the physical and medico-biological significance of phenomena that others had ignored as a nuisance. Present discussions about the clinical relevance of improving the dose distribution including protons and other charged particles resemble those around 1900 to a certain degree

  3. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  4. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  5. Effects of tube potential and scatter rejection on image quality and effective dose in digital chest X-ray examination: An anthropomorphic phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of tube potential and scatter rejection techniques on image quality of digital posteroanterior (PA) chest radiographs. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom was imaged using a range of tube potentials (81–125 kVp) without scatter rejection, with an anti-scatter grid, and using a 10 cm air gap. Images were anonymised and randomised before being evaluated using a visual graded analysis (VGA) method. Results: The effects of tube potential on image quality were found to be negligible (p > 0.63) for the flat panel detector (FPD). Decreased image quality (p = 0.031) was noted for 125 kVp relative to 109 kVp, though no difference was noted for any of the other potentials (p > 0.398) for computed radiography (CR). Both scatter rejection techniques improved image quality (p p. Scatter rejection improved image quality, but with no difference found between techniques. The air-gap resulted in a smaller increase in effective dose than the anti-scatter grid and would be the preferred scatter rejection technique

  6. Application of ZnO nanopillars and nanoflowers to field-emission luminescent tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ye; Tailiang, Guo; Yadong, Jiang

    2012-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanopillars on a ZnO seed layer and ZnO nanoflowers were synthesized by electrochemical deposition on linear wires. The morphologies and crystal orientation of the ZnO nanostructures were investigated by a scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray diffraction pattern, respectively. Detailed study on the field-emission properties of ZnO nanostructures indicates that nanopillars with a high aspect ratio show good performance with a low turn-on field of 0.16 V/μm and a high field enhancement factor of 2.86 × 104. A luminescent tube with ZnO nanopillars on a linear wire cathode and a transparent anode could reach a luminance of about 1.5 × 104 cd/m2 under an applied voltage of 4 kV.

  7. Layer Formation by Resputtering in Ti-Si-C Hard Coatings during Large Scale Cathodic Arc Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anders; Zhu, Jianqiang; Ghafoor, Naureen; Johansson, Mats; Sjölen, Jacob; Jensen, Jens; Odén, Magnus; Hultman, Lars; Rosén, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the physical mechanism behind the phenomenon of self-layering in thin films made by industrial scale cathodic arc deposition systems using compound cathodes and rotating substrate fixture. For Ti-Si-C films, electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry reveals a trapezoid modulation in Si content in the substrate normal direction, with a period of 4 to 23 nm dependent on cathode configuration. This is caused by preferential resputtering of Si by the energet...

  8. An arrangement for irradiating cultured mammalian cells with aluminium characteristic ultrasoft x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasoft X-rays are useful for testing the validity of mechanistic models of biological damage caused by radiation. Described here is the construction and operation of a cold-cathode transmission-target discharge tube for irradiating mammalian cells in vitro with aluminium characteristic X-rays (1.487 keV). Particular attention is given to the problems of sample preparation and dosimetry for this shallowly penetrating radiation. The proportion of contaminating bremsstrahlung radiation is measured to establish the optimum operating conditions. Preliminary data from experiments using V79 Chinese hamster cells show that aluminium characteristic X-rays are about twice as effective at inactivating the cells as 250 kVsub(P) X-rays. (author)

  9. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  10. Effect of reconstruction methods and x-ray tube current–time product on nodule detection in an anthropomorphic thorax phantom: A crossed-modality JAFROC observer study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, J D; Chakraborty, D. P.; Szczepura, K; Tootell, A K; Vamvakas, I.; Manning, D J; Hogg, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate nodule detection in an anthropomorphic chest phantom in computed tomography (CT) images reconstructed with adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR3D) and filtered back projection (FBP) over a range of tube current–time product (mAs). Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study: (i) an anthropomorphic chest phantom was loaded with spherical simulated nodules of 5, 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter and +100, −630, and −800 Hounsfield units electron density; this would gener...

  11. Micro-hollow cathode dischargers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a hollow cathode discharge (HCD) with its increased current over planar electrode glow discharges, the cathode fall, which is on the order of the mean free path for ionization, must be comparable in length to the hole diameter. This indicates that the discharge parameters vary with pressure, p, times hole diameter, D. The pD product for stable operation of a hollow cathosde discharge was quoted to be on the order of one to ten Torr cm for noble gases, less for molecular gases. White (1959) observed the hollow cathode effect in a neon discharge at a pressure of 100 Torr when the hole dimensions were less than 1 mm. The cathode hole in his experiments changed from a cylindrical into a spherical cavity due to sputtering. The anode consisted in White's experiment of a pin on the axis of the discharge geometry. We have studied micro-hollow (submillimeter) cathode discharges between two electrodes with aligned cylindrical holes by determining the current-voltage characteristics and the visual appearance of the discharge in argon over a wide range of pressure and voltage. The cross-section of the discharge geometry. The cathode is made of molybdenum or barium oxide inserted into a tungsten matrix (dispenser-cathode), the anode of molybdenum, and the dielectric spacer is mica. The discharge was operated under dc conditions, with half-wave rectified ac voltage applied, and pulsed with a 400 μs rectangular voltage pulse. The lower limit in pressure was determined by the maximum voltage which could be applied to the discharge geometry without breakdown along insulators. The upper limit, in this study, is determined by the transition from cathode electrode emission due to ion-impact to thermal emission of electrons, which causes a dramatic increase in current and a drop in forward voltage to values on the order of 20 V

  12. Hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. This paper describes a hydrogen ion source which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency. A 1.3-cm diameter hollow cathode using a low work function material dispenser performed satisfactorily over a discharge current range of 10 to 90 A. Cylindrical probe measurements taken without ion extraction indicate maximum ion number densities on the order of 1012 cm-3. Discharge durations ranged from 30 seconds to continuous operation. Tests with beam extraction at 2.5 keV and 30 A discharge current yield average ion beam current densities of 0.1 A cm-2 over a 5-cm extraction diameter. Results of this study can be used to supply the baseline information needed to scale hollow cathodes for operation at discharge currents of hundreds of amperes using distributed cathodes

  13. Realisation of 50% quantum efficiency from photomultiplier cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard trialkali red sensitive photomultiplier (PM) tubes have cathode quantum efficiencies which typically fall from ∼25% at 400 nm to ∼1% at 800 nm, partly because the material has lower optical absorption coefficients at long wavelengths. Increasing cathode thickness benefits long wavelength response but overall reduces electron extraction efficiency. In the present work modelling of the interaction of light within the dielectric materials of the windows indicates that considerably greater quantum efficiency (QE) is feasible under a variety of conditions. Some of these possibilities have been explored with standard PM tubes giving data where the blue response is increased by a factor of 2, to ∼50%. Much higher improvement factors, of more than 10 times, are realised at longer wavelengths. Current work suggests that the enhancement methods can be exploited further, and at least 50% performance obtained across most of the range of spectral response. A secondary feature of the enhancement is that the useful operating range of the tube is extended further into the near infrared

  14. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, J.C.E., E-mail: james.mertens@asu.edu; Williams, J.J., E-mail: jason.williams@asu.edu; Chawla, Nikhilesh, E-mail: nchawla@asu.edu

    2014-06-01

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution

  15. Development of a lab-scale, high-resolution, tube-generated X-ray computed-tomography system for three-dimensional (3D) materials characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of a modular high resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) system is highlighted in this paper. The design approach is detailed for meeting a specified set of instrument performance goals tailored towards experimental versatility and high resolution imaging. The XCT tool is unique in the detector and X-ray source design configuration, enabling control in the balance between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. The system package is also unique: The sample manipulation approach implemented enables a wide gamut of in situ experimentation to analyze structure evolution under applied stimulus, by optimizing scan conditions through a high degree of controllability. The component selection and design process is detailed: Incorporated components are specified, custom designs are shared, and the approach for their integration into a fully functional XCT scanner is provided. Custom designs discussed include the dual-target X-ray source cradle which maintains position and trajectory of the beam between the two X-ray target configurations with respect to a scintillator mounting and positioning assembly and the imaging sensor, as well as a novel large-format X-ray detector with enhanced adaptability. The instrument is discussed from an operational point of view, including the details of data acquisition and processing implemented for 3D imaging via micro-CT. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated on a silica-glass particle/hydroxyl-terminated-polybutadiene (HTPB) matrix binder PBX simulant. Post-scan data processing, specifically segmentation of the sample's relevant microstructure from the 3D reconstruction, is provided to demonstrate the utility of the instrument. - Highlights: • Custom built X-ray tomography system for microstructural characterization • Detector design for maximizing polychromatic X-ray detection efficiency • X-ray design offered for maximizing X-ray flux with respect to imaging resolution

  16. Cadmium zinc telluride based infrared interferometry for X-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a wide band gap semiconductor for room temperature radiation detection. The electro-optic Pockels effect of the material has been exploited in the past to study electric field non-uniformities and their consequence on conventional detector signals in CZT, by imaging the intensity distribution of infrared (IR) light transmitted through a device placed between crossed polarizers. Recently, quantitative monitoring of extremely high intensity neutron pulses through the change of transmitted IR intensity was demonstrated, offering the advantage to place sensitive electronics outside the measured radiation field. In this work, we demonstrate that X-ray intensity can be deduced directly from measuring the change in phase of 1550 nm laser light transmitted through a 7 × 7 × 2 mm3 CZT based Pockels cell in a simple Mach Zehnder interferometer. X-rays produced by a 50 kVp Mo X-ray tube incident on the CZT cathode surface placed at 7 mm distance cause a linearly increasing phase shift above 0.3 mA tube current, with 1.58 ± 0.02 rad per mA for an applied bias of 500 V across the 2 mm thick device. Pockels images confirm that the sample properties are in agreement with the literature, exhibiting electric field enhancement near the cathode under irradiation, which may cause the non-linearity at low X-ray tube anode current settings. The laser used to probe the X-ray intensity causes itself some space charge, whose spatial distribution does not seem to be exclusively determined by the incident laser position, i.e., charge carrier generation location, with respect to the electrodes

  17. A computational analysis of intrinsic detection efficiencies of Geiger-Mueller tubes for photons

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, T

    1999-01-01

    A new calculation of the intrinsic detection efficiency of the Geiger-Mueller tube (GM tube) for photons is presented. It is found by the calculation that the relation between the efficiency and incident photon energy depends on the cathode materials and thicknesses. For a bare GM tube with the lead cathode of 20 mm in inner diameter, the 0.1 mm thick cathode wall is sensitive in lower photon energies, while 1 mm thick one works sensitively in the higher energy region. On the other hand, the 0.2 mm tube has flat sensitivity over a wide energy region between 0.3 and 3 MeV. For the GM tubes with lead, tin, and copper cathodes whose wall thicknesses are selected as having flat sensitivity, while the efficiency decreases with decreasing atomic number of the wall metal, flat regions extend to lower photon energies. The detection efficiencies of GM tubes with a sheath or a probe (sheathed GM tube) are discussed.

  18. A computational analysis of intrinsic detection efficiencies of Geiger-Mueller tubes for photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new calculation of the intrinsic detection efficiency of the Geiger-Mueller tube (GM tube) for photons is presented. It is found by the calculation that the relation between the efficiency and incident photon energy depends on the cathode materials and thicknesses. For a bare GM tube with the lead cathode of 20 mm in inner diameter, the 0.1 mm thick cathode wall is sensitive in lower photon energies, while 1 mm thick one works sensitively in the higher energy region. On the other hand, the 0.2 mm tube has flat sensitivity over a wide energy region between 0.3 and 3 MeV. For the GM tubes with lead, tin, and copper cathodes whose wall thicknesses are selected as having flat sensitivity, while the efficiency decreases with decreasing atomic number of the wall metal, flat regions extend to lower photon energies. The detection efficiencies of GM tubes with a sheath or a probe (sheathed GM tube) are discussed

  19. Redução de dose e aumento na vida útil do tubo de raios X em tomografia computadorizada Dose reduction and increase of X-ray tube life in computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Marconato

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Reduzir a dose de radiação e aumentar a vida útil do tubo de raios X em exames de tomografia computadorizada. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados exames de crânio, abdome superior e tórax. Foi verificado se a técnica utilizada poderia ser alterada, foram sugeridos novos protocolos, e feitas comparações de qualidade da imagem, dose de radiação e aquecimento do tubo de raios X. RESULTADOS: Uma redução no mAs pôde ser feita sem comprometer a qualidade do diagnóstico, proporcionando redução de até 20% na dose média dos exames de crânio em adultos e de até 45% em crianças com idade de 0 a 6 meses; pacientes com menos de 50 kg tiveram redução de aproximadamente 37% na dose média de radiação para os exames de abdome superior; para o exame de tórax de rotina a redução chegou a 54%. O aquecimento do tubo de raios X para os exames de crânio, abdome superior e tórax teve redução estimada em aproximadamente 13%, 23% e 41%, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: Uma alteração nos protocolos dos exames descritos acarretará diminuição significativa na dose de radiação e aumento na vida útil do tubo de raios X, sem comprometer o diagnóstico.OBJECTIVE: To reduce radiation dose and increase x-ray tube life in computed tomography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Head, upper abdomen and chest scans were evaluated. We assessed the techniques employed and if these could be changed, suggested new protocols and compared the quality of the images, the radiation dose and the x-ray tube heating. RESULTS: A mAs reduction could be done without interfering with the diagnostic quality, allowing a decrease of up to 20% in the average dose for adults' head exams and up to 45% for 0 to 6 years old children; patients with less than 50 kg had a reduction of 37% on the upper abdomen radiation average dose; for chest routine scans the reduction was 54%. The decrease in the heating of the x-ray tube for head, upper abdomen and chest scans was

  20. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on ... when you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or ...

  1. Image converter tube and delete process of interference gleams in this tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patent consists in an improvement of image converter tubes, which change the X-ray image delivered on their input screen into a visible image. Interference gleams extend on insulators inside these tubes, and the invention allows to delete these gleams while depositing on the insulators a product thin layer such as amorphous diamond like carbon, which has a weak electron secondary emission rate. The metal oxides are also suiting. The method may apply to image intensifier tubes. 4 refs., 4 figs

  2. Thermal analysis and structural Optimization of electron gun for traveling wave tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady-state and transient thermal analysis of electron gun for a Ka-band traveling wave tube are theoretically performed with a newly-developed 2 mm cathode model by ANSYS software. The heat flux vector chart and temperature distribution chart as well as warm-up time are also derived. The discrepancy of 2% between simulation results and test results, proves that the finite element method is feasible. The ultimate temperature reached by cathode, at given heater power, remarkably depends on the thermal conduction mechanism through cathode module. Based on the heat flux vector chart, the structure of cathode support sleeve with the highest flux is optimized. After optimization, the temperature of cathode increases 28 ℃ the highest temperature of electron gun increases 27 ℃ and the warm-up time of cathode reduces 40 s under the same given heater power. The optimized structure can effectively shorten the warm-up time of cathode by 33% and thus improve fast warm-up the performance of cathode, enhancing the rapid response capability of traveling wave tube. (authors)

  3. A performance evaluation system for photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive performance evaluation system for Photomultiplier tubes has been built up. The system is able to review diverse cathode and anode properties for PMTs with different sizes and dimensions. Relative and direct methods were developed for the quantum efficiency measurement and the results are consistent with each other. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional scanning platforms were built to test both the cathode and anode uniformity for either the plane type or spherical type photocathode. A Flash Analog-to-Digital Convertor module is utilized to achieve high speed waveforms sampling. The entire system is highly automatic and flexible. Details of the system and some typical experimental results are presented in this paper

  4. Baking of tandem accelerator tube by low voltage arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In designing the accelerating tube for a static tandem accelerator in Kyushu University, the basic policy was as described below: individual unit composing the accelerating tube should fully withstand the electric field of 2 MV/m, and electric discharge must not be propagated from one unit to the adjacent unit when these are assembled to the accelerating tube. The accelerating tube units are each 25 cm in length, and both high and low energy sides are composed of 20 units, respectively. Although about 10-9 Torr vacuum was obtained at the both ends of the accelerating tube by baking the tube at 300 to 350 deg C with electric heaters wound outside the tube in the conventional method, vast outgas was generated, which decreased vacuum by two or three figures if breakdown occurred through the intermediary of outgas. As a method of positively outgassing and cleaning the electrodes inside the accelerating tube, it was attempted to directly bake all the electrodes in the accelerating tube by causing strong arc discharge flowing H2 gas in the tube. As a result of considering the conditions for this method, the low voltage arc discharge was employed using oxide cathodes. Thus, after implementing 10A arc discharge for several hours, the voltage was able to be raised to 10 MV almost immediately after the vacuum recovery, and further, after another conditioning for several hours, it was successful to raise voltage up to 11 MV. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  5. An investigation on SA 213-Tube to SA 387-Tube plate using friction welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) is a relatively newer solid state welding process used for joining tube to tube plate of either similar or dissimilar materials with enhanced mechanical and metallurgical properties. In the present study, FWTPET has been used to weld SA 213 (Grade T12) tube with SA 387 (Grade 22) tube plate. The welded samples are found to have satisfactory joint strength and the Energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) study showed that inter metallic compound is absent in the weld zone. The different weld joints have been identified and the phase composition is found using EDX and XRD. Microstructures have been analyzed using optical and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanical properties such as hardness, compressive shear strength and peel test for different weld conditions are studied and the hardness survey revealed that there is increase in hardness at the weld interface due to grain refinement. The corrosion behavior for different weld conditions have been analyzed and the weld zone is found to have better corrosion resistance due to the influence of the grain refinement after FWTPET welding process. Hence, the present investigation is carried out to study the behavior of friction welded dissimilar joints of SA 213 tube and SA 387 tube plate joints and the results are presented. The present study confirms that a high quality tube to tube plate joint can be achieved using FWTPET process at 1120 rpm

  6. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  7. Correlation between microstructure and thermionic electron emission from Os-Ru thin films on dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmium-ruthenium films with different microstructures were deposited onto dispenser cathodes and subjected to 1000 h of close-spaced diode testing. Tailored microstructures were achieved by applying substrate biasing during deposition, and these were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy before and after close-spaced diode testing. Knee temperatures determined from the close-spaced diode test data were used to evaluate cathode performance. Cathodes with a large (10-11) Os-Ru film texture possessed comparatively low knee temperatures. Furthermore, a low knee temperature correlated with a low effective work function as calculated from the close-spaced diode data. It is proposed that the formation of strong (10-11) texture is responsible for the superior performance of the cathode with a multilayered Os-Ru coating

  8. Correlation between microstructure and thermionic electron emission from Os-Ru thin films on dispenser cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartzentruber, Phillip D.; John Balk, Thomas, E-mail: john.balk@uky.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, 177 F. Paul Anderson Tower, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0046 (United States); Effgen, Michael P. [Semicon Associates, Lexington, Kentucky 40510 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Osmium-ruthenium films with different microstructures were deposited onto dispenser cathodes and subjected to 1000 h of close-spaced diode testing. Tailored microstructures were achieved by applying substrate biasing during deposition, and these were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy before and after close-spaced diode testing. Knee temperatures determined from the close-spaced diode test data were used to evaluate cathode performance. Cathodes with a large (10-11) Os-Ru film texture possessed comparatively low knee temperatures. Furthermore, a low knee temperature correlated with a low effective work function as calculated from the close-spaced diode data. It is proposed that the formation of strong (10-11) texture is responsible for the superior performance of the cathode with a multilayered Os-Ru coating.

  9. Improved instrumental sensitivity for Cd determination in aqueous solutions using Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Rh-target tube instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work was aimed at improving the instrumental sensitivity and detection limits for Cd determination in liquid samples by using conventional Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) instrumentation equipped with Rh-anode X-ray sources. The fact that the background is drastically reduced when using activated membranes as a preconcentration tool to collect Cd from liquid samples permits an improvement of the sensitivity compared with the direct analysis of liquid samples. Instrumental WDXRF parameters, as well as the study of Cd-K and Cd-L series spectral lines, were evaluated to select the best conditions for Cd quantitation. The Cd-Lα spectral line was found to be the best choice in terms of sensitivity and repeatability. The calculated detection limit when this spectral line was used to carry out the measurements was 0.17 mg L-1 Cd, which is suitable for Cd determination in most liquid samples involved in environmental studies

  10. High energy cathode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Caldwell, Marissa; Tong, Wei; Kaye, Steven; Bhat, Vinay

    2015-09-01

    A composition for use in a battery electrode comprising a compound including lithium, manganese, nickel, and oxygen. The composition is characterized by a powder X-ray diffraction pattern having peaks including 18.6.+-.0.2, 35.0.+-.0.2, 36.4.+-.0.2, 37.7.+-.0.2, 42.1.+-.0.2, and 44.5.+-.0.2 degrees 2.theta. as measured using Cu K.sub..alpha. radiation.

  11. Analyzis of Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) Value towards X-ray Tube Current and Voltage Variations of Computed Tomography Scanner (CT Scan) by using PPMA Phantom

    OpenAIRE

    DEWANG, SYAMSIR

    2014-01-01

    Medical physics gave the contribution in the field of health, especially for developing of radio diagnostics and radiotherapy. The applying of radiography machine is intended to diagnoses of disease, which is needed by patient for detecting their sickness. There were measured the X-ray radiations using a simulator computed tomography Scanner (CT scan). The CT scan is the radiology checkup to describe internal body structure by multislice CT scan (MSCT scan). It was observed the influence of e...

  12. Characterization of the collisionally pumped optical-field-ionized soft-x-ray laser at 41.8 nm driven in capillary tubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cross, B.; Mocek, Tomáš; Bettaibi, I.; Vieux, G.; Farinet, M.; Dubau, J.; Sebban, S.; Maynard, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 3 (2006), 033801/1-033801/12. ISSN 1050-2947 Grant ostatní: European Commission(XE) HPMF-CT-2002-01554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : X- and gamma-ray lasers * self-focussing * channeling * filamentation in plasmas Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2006

  13. Direct observation of the oxygenated species during oxygen reduction on a platinum fuel cell cathode

    OpenAIRE

    Kaya, Sarp; Casalongue, Hernan Sanchez; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian ; Miller, Daniel J. ; Friebel, Daniel ; Hansen, Heine A. ; Nørskov, Jens K. ; Nilsson, Anders ; Ogasawara, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    The performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is limited by the reduction at the cathode of various oxygenated intermediates in the four-electron pathway of the oxygen reduction reaction. Here we use ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and directly probe the correlation between the adsorbed species on the surface and the electrochemical potential. We demonstrate that, during the oxygen reduction reaction, hydroxyl intermediates on the cathode surface occur in sever...

  14. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  15. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  16. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  17. Hollow cathode arc: effect of the cathode material on the internal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In discharges with hollow cathodes functioning in the arc regime, the cathode emits thermionic electrons which ionize the gas. To reduce the electrical power consumed by these discharges, cathodes made of thoriated tungsten and lathanum hexaboride have been used. The parameters of the plasma generated into the cathode have been measured with electrostatic probes. (Auth.)

  18. Electron accelerating unit for streak image tubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fangke Zong; Qinlao Yang; Houzhi Cai; Li Gu; Xiang Li; Jingjin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    An electron accelerating unit is proposed for use in streak image tubes (SITs). An SIT with this new accelerating unit was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The simulation results show that the accelerating unit improves both the spatial and temporal resolution. Compared to a traditional SIT, the transit time spread for electrons in the cathode-to-mesh region is reduced from 247 to 162 fs, the line width of the electron beam on the image surface is reduced from 42.7 to 26.1 m, and the temporal resolution is improved from 515 to 395 fs.

  19. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  20. Evaluation of the Timing Properties of a High Quantum Efficiency Photomultiplier Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Qiyu; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, W. William

    2013-01-01

    We measured the timing resolution of 189 R9800–100 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs), which are a SBA (Super Bialkali, high quantum efficiency) variant of the R9800 high-performance PMT manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics, and correlated their timing resolutions with various measures of PMT performance, namely Cathode Luminous Sensitivity (CLS), Anode Luminous Sensitivity (ALS), Gain times Collection Efficiency (GCE), Cathode Blue Sensitivity Index (CBSI), Anode Blue Sensitivity Index (ABSI) and d...

  1. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    conditions. This was also confirmed by x-ray analyses. For example, soft x-ray XANES data reveal that Co cations displace the Mn cations as being more favored to be reduced. Variations in the Sr-O in the annealed LSCF Fourier-transformed (FT) EXAFS suggest that some Sr segregation is occurring, but is not present in the annealed LSM-infiltrated LSCF cathode materials. Further, a surface enhanced Raman technique was also developed into to probe and map LSM and LSCF phase on underlying YSZ substrate, enabling us to capture important chemical information of cathode surfaces under practical operating conditions. Electrochemical models for the design of test cells and understanding of mechanism have been developed for the exploration of fundamental properties of electrode materials. Novel catalyst coatings through particle depositions (SDC, SSC, and LCC) or continuous thin films (PSM and PSCM) were successfully developed to improve the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes. Finally, we have demonstrated enhanced activity and stability of LSCF cathodes over longer periods of time in homemade and commercially available cells by an optimized LSM infiltration process. Microstructure examination of the tested cells did not show obvious differences between blank and infiltrated cells, suggesting that the infiltrated LSM may form a coherent film on the LSCF cathodes. There was no significant change in the morphology or microstructure of the LSCF cathode due to the structural similarity of LSCF and LSM. Raman analysis of the tested cells indicated small peaks emerging on the blank cells that correspond to trace amounts of secondary phase formation during operation (e.g., CoO{sub x}). The formation of this secondary phase might be attributed to performance degradation. In contrast, there was no such secondary phase observed in the LSM infiltrated cells, indicating that the LSM modification staved off secondary phase formation and thus improved the stability.

  2. Cathodic protection criteria for controlling microbially influenced corrosion in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekoksa, G. (Corrosion Failure Analysis and Control, San Ramon, CA (USA)); Gutherman, B. (Florida Power Corp., St. Petersburg, FL (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate galvanic corrosion on coupled samples and to determine cathodic protection criteria and effectiveness on four materials in an untreated seawater cooling system with microbially influenced corrosion. Hydrogen embrittlement of two cathodically protected high performance condenser tube materials was also evaluated. The long-term field testing was conducted at the intake structure of Florida Power Corporation's Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Power Plant. The test results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel can be galvanically corroded when coupled to Cu/Ni and fully cathodically protected when coupled to a carbon steel anode. Cathodic protection did protect carbon steel, but less than expected from the literature. The cathodic protection effectiveness on carbon steel was approximately 82% at {minus}1.01 V (SCE). To prevent hydrogen embrittlement, the tested titanium or ferritic stainless steel should not be polarized to more negative potentials than {minus}0.75 V (SCE). This report consists of a literature search, preliminary laboratory polarization testing, laboratory testing to determine microbial effects caused by an interruption of cathodic current, development of exposure racks for long-term electrochemical testing and analyses of corrosion, metallurgical, microbial and chemical data. 44 refs., 26 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Coke from small-diameter tubes analyzed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism for coke deposit formation and the nature of the coke itself can vary with the design of the ethylene furnace tube bank. In this article, coke deposits from furnaces with small-diameter pyrolysis tubes are examined. The samples were taken from four furnaces of identical design (Plant B). As in both the first and second installments of the series, the coke deposits were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX). The deposits from the small-diameter tubes are compared with the coke deposits from the furnace discussed in earlier articles. Analysis of the coke in both sets of samples are then used to offer recommendations for improved decoking procedures, operating procedures, better feed selection, and better selection of the metallurgy used in furnace tubes, to extend the operating time of the furnace tubes by reducing the amount and type of coke build up

  4. Indirect measure of X-rays spectra using TLDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology of indirect measure of X-rays spectra, emitted by conventional tubes, was developed recently and its feasibility verified in the first place by Monte Carlo simulations. For that case is intended to measure, by means of plastic scintillators, attenuation curves of dispersed beams previously. In this work were carried out measurements of attenuation curves with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to verify the kindness of the indirect measure method. The attenuation curve was also measured using an ionization chamber brand Capintec (model 192) with the purpose of making a comparison. The results of the attenuation curve measured with both dosimeters present a good resolution inside the statistical fluctuations and the spectral reconstruction using diverse parametric functions is carried out in a quick and simple way with excellent resolutions in the functional form. For this reconstruction method are of fundamental importance the following properties of the used dosimeter: in the first place the repetition of the measures, property that could check; in second place the precision of the measured data and lastly the dosimeter response, this is, the increase of the thermoluminescent signal before an increase of the photons flow of X-rays. This parameter is the gradient of the curve thermoluminescent signal versus the dose imparted to the dosimeter. The measures were realized with a generator of X-rays brand Kevex provided of a conventional tube with tungsten anti cathode that polarizes with high tension to a maximum value of 50 kV and current of 0.5 ma. (Author)

  5. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  6. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy investigation on indium tin oxide films under cathodic polarization in NaOH solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviors of indium tin oxide (ITO) films under the cathodic polarization in 0.1 M NaOH solution were investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The as-received and the cathodically polarized ITO films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction for morphological, compositional and structural studies. The results showed that ITO films underwent a corrosion process during the cathodic polarization and the main component of the corrosion products was body-centered cubic indium. The electrochemical impedance parameters were related to the effect of the cathodic polarization on the ITO specimens. The capacitance of ITO specimens increased, while the charge transfer resistance and the inductance decreased with the increase of the polarization time. The proposed mechanism indicated that the corrosion products (metallic indium) were firstly formed during the cathodic polarization and then absorbed on the surface of the ITO film. As the surface was gradually covered by indium particles, the corrosion process was suppressed. - Highlights: ► Cathodic polarization of indium tin oxide (ITO) in 0.1 M NaOH. ► Cathodic polarization studied with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ► ITO underwent a corrosion attack during cathodic polarization, indium was observed. ► Electrochemical parameters of ITO were obtained using equivalent electrical circuit. ► A corrosion mechanism is proposed.

  7. Silver electrodeposition on the activated carbon air cathode for performance improvement in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Liangtao; Li, Kexun; Chen, Zhihao; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xi; Fu, Zhou

    2014-12-01

    The present work was to study silver electrodeposition on the activated carbon (AC) air cathode for performance improvement in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The treated cathodes were proved to be effective to enhance the performance of MFCs. The maximum power density of MFC with silver electrodeposition time of 50 s (Ag-50) cathode was 1080 ± 60 mW m-2, 69% higher than the bare AC air cathode. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results showed that zero-valent, monovalent and divalent silver were present to transform mutually, which illustrated that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode took place through four-electron pathway. From electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, the electrodeposition method made the total resistance of the electrodes largely reduced. Meanwhile the deposited silver had no toxic effects on anode culture but inhibited the biofilm growth of the cathodes. This kind of antimicrobial efficient cathode, prepared with a simple, fast and economical method, was of good benefit to the performance improvement of MFCs.

  8. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging

  9. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif, E-mail: arifjumari@yahoo.com; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus [Research Group of Battery & Advanced Material, Department of Chemical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A Kentingan, Surakarta Indonesia 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO{sub 4} and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  10. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  11. Characteristics of specifications of transportable inverter-type X-ray equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Asano, H

    2003-01-01

    Our X-ray systems study group measured and examined the characteristics of four transportable inverter-type X-ray equipments. X-ray tube voltage and X-ray tube current were measured with the X-ray tube voltage and the X-ray tube current measurement terminals provided with the equipment. X-ray tube voltage, irradiation time, and dose were measured with a non-invasive X-ray tube voltage-measuring device, and X-ray output was measured by fluorescence meter. The items investigated were the reproducibility and linearity of X-ray output, error of pre-set X-ray tube voltage and X-ray tube current, and X-ray tube voltage ripple percentage. The waveforms of X-ray tube voltage, the X-ray tube current, and fluorescence intensity draw were analyzed using the oscilloscope gram and a personal computer. All of the equipment had a preset error of X-ray tube voltage and X-ray tube current that met Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) standards. The X-ray tube voltage ripple percentage of each equipment conformed to the tendenc...

  12. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  13. Temporal response of a surface flashover on a velvet cathode in a relativistic diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Crawford, M. T.; Welch, D. R.; Offermann, D. T.

    2015-03-01

    Surface flashover of a carbon fiber velvet cathode generates a discharge from which electrons are relativistically accelerated to γ ranging from 4.9 to 8.8 through a 17.8 cm diode. This discharge is assumed to be a hydrocarbon mixture. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the dynamics over the ˜100 ns pulse of the plasma discharge generated on the surface of the velvet cathode and across the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. A qualitative comparison of calculated and measured results is presented, which includes time resolved measurements with a photomultiplier tube and charge-coupled device images. In addition, initial visible spectroscopy measurements will also be presented confirming the ion species are dominated by hydrogen.

  14. Temporal response of a surface flashover on a velvet cathode in a relativistic diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface flashover of a carbon fiber velvet cathode generates a discharge from which electrons are relativistically accelerated to γ ranging from 4.9 to 8.8 through a 17.8 cm diode. This discharge is assumed to be a hydrocarbon mixture. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the dynamics over the ∼100 ns pulse of the plasma discharge generated on the surface of the velvet cathode and across the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. A qualitative comparison of calculated and measured results is presented, which includes time resolved measurements with a photomultiplier tube and charge-coupled device images. In addition, initial visible spectroscopy measurements will also be presented confirming the ion species are dominated by hydrogen

  15. Temporal response of a surface flashover on a velvet cathode in a relativistic diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Crawford, M. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Welch, D. R.; Offermann, D. T. [Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Surface flashover of a carbon fiber velvet cathode generates a discharge from which electrons are relativistically accelerated to γ ranging from 4.9 to 8.8 through a 17.8 cm diode. This discharge is assumed to be a hydrocarbon mixture. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the dynamics over the ∼100 ns pulse of the plasma discharge generated on the surface of the velvet cathode and across the anode-cathode (A-K) gap. A qualitative comparison of calculated and measured results is presented, which includes time resolved measurements with a photomultiplier tube and charge-coupled device images. In addition, initial visible spectroscopy measurements will also be presented confirming the ion species are dominated by hydrogen.

  16. Simulations of Field-Emission Electron Beams from CNT Cathodes in RF Photoinjectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihalcea, Daniel [NIU, DeKalb; Faillace, Luigi [RadiaBeam Tech.; Panuganti, Harsha [NIU, DeKalb; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T. [Fermilab; Piot, Philippe [NIU, DeKalb

    2015-06-01

    Average field emission currents of up to 700 mA were produced by Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) cathodes in a 1.3 GHz RF gun at Fermilab High Brightness Electron Source Lab. (HBESL). The CNT cathodes were manufactured at Xintek and tested under DC conditions at RadiaBeam. The electron beam intensity as well as the other beam properties are directly related to the time-dependent electric field at the cathode and the geometry of the RF gun. This report focuses on simulations of the electron beam generated through field-emission and the results are compared with experimental measurements. These simulations were performed with the time-dependent Particle In Cell (PIC) code WARP.

  17. Photomultiplier tube characterization for MiniCLEAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaditz, Stephen; Miniclean Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    MiniCLEAN is a single-phase dark matter experiment which uses liquid argon (87 K) or neon (27 K) as an active medium. Photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) submerged in the cryogen detect light emitted by tetraphenyl butadiene, which fluoresces at short optical wavelengths when excited by the primary ultraviolet scintillation of the argon or neon. The collaboration has chosen to use 8'' Hamamatsu R5912-02MOD PMTs, the low-temperature successor of the R1408-R5912 lineage. The bialkali photocathode of the R5912-02MOD has a platinum underlay which increases electron mobility, enabling operation at temperatures lower than 150 K where traditional bialkali cathodes fail. The number of dynodes in the tube has also been increased to 14, which lowers the bias required to attain reasonable gain and saves heat load in the voltage divider chain of the base. This talk describes characterization of the tube and base for use in MiniCLEAN. I present gain and dark rate measurements as a function of temperature, considerations that inform the base design, and implications of using this tube in a low-background experiment.

  18. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the first month ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In spina bifida, ...

  19. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Cathode Materials for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Mie Møller

    A possible future battery type is the Li-air battery which theoretically has the potential of reaching gravimetric energy densities close to those of gasoline. The Li-airbattery is discharged by the reaction of Li-ions and oxygen, drawn from the air, reacting at the battery cathode to form Li2O2....... The type of cathode material affects the battery discharge capacity and charging potential and with a carbon based cathode many questions are still unanswered. The focus of this Ph.D. project has been the synthesis of reduced graphene oxide as well as the investigation of the effect of reduced...... discharge capacity of the battery as well as the charging potential. In situ X-ray diffraction studies on carbon black cathodes in a capillary battery showed the formation of crystalline Li2O2 on the first discharge cycle, the intensity of Li2O2 on the second discharge cycle was however diminished. The...

  1. Some aspects of electron spectroscopic investigations of impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impregnated tungsten dispenser cathodes from various manufacturers and of various impregnant compositions have been examined by several surface analytical techniques. In situ activation of these cathodes in UHV was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and energy loss spectroscopy. Previous work on model compounds and structures of barium, oxygen and tungsten has been used to interpret the results, although no generally accepted conclusions could be drawn on the exact chemical states of the various elements present on an activated, operating cathode. The results presented will show that the measurements must be taken at temperature, and will demonstrate a method to overcome charging and other artifacts. In addition, the signature of a good cathode will be shown, which can be synthesized by adding standard barium metal on tungsten and barium on oxygen thin film spectra. (orig.)

  2. Calculation of aberration of electron gun in color picture tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a color picture tube, aberration is an important factor influencing the electron beam spot on the screen. This paper discusses a new method which is used to calculate the aberration of an electron gun in a CPT. In this method, electron trajectories are simulated directly in the cathode and the pre-focus lens. In the main lens, the asymptotic aberration is calculated to decide the size of the image. Some results of the calculation are shown in this paper. (orig.)

  3. Some characteristics of the long straw drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article represents the construction and testing of the long straw drift tubes of different types. The diameter and the length of each straw were equal to 15 mm and 3 m respectively. The cathode resistance of these straws has a small value, i.e. about 100 Ohm/m. Thus, they do not have a large attenuation length. Installation of the spacers reduces the effective straw length by 0.5 % per meter, at least

  4. Power-Efficient, High-Current-Density, Long-Life Thermionic Cathode Developed for Microwave Amplifier Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2002-01-01

    A power-efficient, miniature, easily manufactured, reservoir-type barium-dispenser thermionic cathode has been developed that offers the significant advantages of simultaneous high electron-emission current density (>2 A/sq cm) and very long life (>100,000 hr of continuous operation) when compared with the commonly used impregnated-type barium-dispenser cathodes. Important applications of this cathode are a wide variety of microwave and millimeter-wave vacuum electronic devices, where high output power and reliability (long life) are essential. We also expect it to enable the practical development of higher purveyance electron guns for lower voltage and more reliable device operation. The low cathode heater power and reduced size and mass are expected to be particularly beneficial in traveling-wave-tube amplifiers (TWTA's) for space communications, where future NASA mission requirements include smaller onboard spacecraft systems, higher data transmission rates (high frequency and output power) and greater electrical efficiency.

  5. Physical phenomena in a hollow cathode and interaction of powder with the vacuum arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic design of an arc discharge is a tube with the inner diameter R and working gas being fed through it into the low pressure chamber. The open end of the tube is directed to the anode. The length of the cathode tube is several inner diameters of the tube. There are four main working regimes of hollow arc discharge being distinguished by the magnitudes of plasma gas flow rate G, pressure P in a vacuum chamber and discharge current j : 1) normal regime, 2) low flow rate of plasma gas regime, 3) low current regime and 4) high pressure regime. The normal regime is of the greatest interest for its applications in plasma technologies so the latter one was thoroughly investigated in the present paper

  6. Gastrostomy feeding tube - bolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a gastrostomy tube. Delmar’s Fundamental and Advanced Nursing Skills . 2nd Ed. Albany, NY: Delmar Thomson Learning; 2003: 742-749. Simmons, Remmington R.The percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube: a nurse's guide to PEG tubes. Medsurg Nurs . 2013 Mar- ...

  7. KER-2 tube history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banister, W.C.

    1963-08-16

    Zirconium process tube No. 1986 was installed in KE Reactor tube channel No. 2864 on April 16, 1959. This report describes the history and the conditions to which it was exposed during its residence in the reactor. The tube was removed on May 31, 1963.

  8. Repetitive operation of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fen; Wang, Dong; Xu, Sha; Zhang, Yong; Fan, Zhi-kai

    2016-04-01

    We present the repetitive operation research results of an L-band magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator with metal array cathode (MAC-MILO) in this paper. To ensure a more uniform emission of electrons emitted from the cathode, metal plates with different outer radii and thicknesses are periodically arranged in longitudinal direction on the cathode substrate to act as emitters. The higher order mode depressed MILO (HDMILO) structure is applied to ensure stability of the tube. Comparison experiments are carried out between velvet cathode and MAC MILO driven by a 20 GW/40 Ω/40 ns/20 Hz pulse power system. Experimental results reveal that the MAC has much lower outgassing rate, much longer life time, and higher repetitive stability. The MAC-MILO could work stably with a rep-rate up to 20 Hz at a power level of 550 MW when employing a 350 kV/35 kA electric pulse. The TE11 mode radiation pattern in the farfield region reveals the tube works steadily on the dominant mode. More than 2000 shots have been tested in repetitive mode without any obvious degradation of the detected microwave parameters.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of Ni-Mo filler brazing alloy for Mo-W joining for microwave tube technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ferrer Sene

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A brazing process based on Ni-Mo alloy was developed to join porous tungsten cathode bottom and dense molybdenum cathode body for microwave tubes manufacture. The Ni-Mo alloy was obtained by mixing and milling powders in the eutectic composition, and applied on the surface of the components. The brazing was made at 1400 °C by using induction heating in hydrogen for 5 minutes. Alumina surfaces were coated with the binder and analyzed by Energy Dispersive X-rays Fluorescence. The brazed samples were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled to Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. Stress-strain tests were performed to determine the mechanical behavior of the joining. The quality of the brazing was evaluated by assuring the presence of a "meniscus" formed by the Ni-Mo alloy on the border of the tungsten and molybdenum joint, the absence of microstructural defects in the interface between the tungsten and molybdenum alloys, and the adhesion of the brazed components.

  10. Scintillation counter: photomultiplier tube alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into the sample receiving zone. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (auth)

  11. On possibility of high frequency electron beam scanning with application of focusing system for x-ray generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the electron beam scanning system in combination with electromagnetic focusing system. These systems find their application in different vacuum tube devices that provide the generation of X-ray radiation. Similar systems can be utilized in such fields as medicine, industry and defectoscopy. Electron tube system can be based on thermal or field emission cathodes. Scanning system is built up on two pair of electrical deflecting dipoles. The scanning can also be based on magnetic deflecting system. Beam focusing is achieved by the geometrical fea-tures of electrodes structure and electron lenses. Magnetic focusing can also be used for transversal focusing of the beam. The article describes the schemes of the unit with electron beam scanning and different methods of realization. Beam dynamics investigation in electromagnetic fields of the unit is considered

  12. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into...

  13. Bulk metallic glass tube casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Tubular specimens of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 cast in custom arc-melting furnace. → Tilt casting supplemented by suction casting. → Bulk metallic glass formed only with optimized processing parameters. → Fully amorphous tubes with 1.8 mm wall thickness and 25 mm diameter. - Abstract: Tubular bulk metallic glass specimens were produced, using a custom-built combined arc-melting tilt-casting furnace. Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 tubes with outer diameter of 25 mm and 0.8-3 mm wall thicknesses were cast, with both tilt and suction casting to ensure mold filling. Tilt casting was found to fill one side of the tube mold first, with the rest of the tube circumference filled subsequently by suction casting. Optimized casting parameters were required to fully fill the mold and ensure glass formation. Too small melt mass and too low arc power filled the mold only partially. However, too large melt mass and higher arc power which lead to the best mold filling also lead to partial crystallization. Variations in processing parameters were explored, until a glassy ring with 1.8 mm thickness was produced. Different sections of the as-cast ring were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and instrumented indentation to ensure amorphous microstructure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to compare the surface qualities of the first- and last-filled sections. These measurements confirmed the glassy structure of the cast ring, and that, the tilt cast tube section consistently showed better surface quality than the suction cast section. Optimized casting parameters are required to fully realize the potential of directly manufacturing complex shapes out of high-purity bulk metallic glasses by tilt casting.

  14. Heat exchanger tube tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain types of heat-exchangers have tubes opening through a tube sheet to a manifold having an access opening offset from alignment with the tube ends. A tool for inserting a device, such as for inspection or repair, is provided for use in such instances. The tool is formed by a flexible guide tube insertable through the access opening and having an inner end provided with a connector for connection with the opening of the tube in which the device is to be inserted, and an outer end which remains outside of the chamber, the guide tube having adequate length for this arrangement. A flexible transport hose for internally transporting the device slides inside of the guide tube. This hose is long enough to slide through the guide tube, into the heat-exchanger tube, and through the latter to the extent required for the use of the device. The guide tube must be bent to reach the end of the heat-exchanger tube and the latter may be constructed with a bend, the hose carrying anit-friction elements at interspaced locations along its length to make it possible for the hose to negotiate such bends while sliding to the location where the use of the device is required

  15. Field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes and its application to electron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Hamaguchi, K.; Uemura, S.; Uchida, K.; Tasaka, Y.; Ikazaki, F.; Yumura, M.; Kasuya, A.; Nishina, Y.

    Field emission from closed and open-ended multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs) was studied by field-emission microscopy. As an application of nanotube field emitters, we manufactured lighting elements with the structure of a triode-type vacuum tube by replacing the conventional thermionic cathodes with the MWNT field emitters. Stable electron emission, adequate luminance and long life of the tubes have been demonstrated.

  16. X-raying with low dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the purpose of the improvement of diagnostics quality and reduction of beam load on a patient in modern x-ray devices pulse x-raying is applied. It is based on the using of radiation pulses with various frequencies of intervals between them instead of continuous radiation. At pulse x-raying with the net control the principle of filling of an interval is used, when the information about the image, received with the last pulse, get into memory and is displayed before occurrence of other pulse. It creates impression of the continuous image even at low frequency of pulses. Due to the unique concept of the simultaneous (double) control, all of 3 parameters, which define the quality of the image (pressure(voltage), force of a current and length of a pulse), are adjusted automatically at each pulse, thus optimum adaptation to varied thickness of object during dynamic researches occurs. At x-raying pulse the presence of a free interval from x-ray radiation between two pulses results in the decrease of a radiation dose. Pulsing occurs some times per one second with equal intervals between pulses. Thus, the degree of decrease irradiation dose depends on duration of a pause between pulses. On the screen the image of last pulse before occurrence of the following is kept and repeats. The principle of x-raying pulse was realized in system Grid Controlled Fluoroscopy by the firm 'Philips Medi zin Systeme'. In the x-ray tube of this system inclusion and de energizing of radiation occurs directly on a source. Electron cloud is broken off by the special grid, which is located between the cathode and the anode and operates as a barrier. Thus the tube continues to be energized. In usual devices for pulses formation is used generator pulsation system, which at increase and attenuation of a x-ray pulse results in occurrence of the increasing and fading radiation which are not participating in the formation of the image, but creating beam load on the patient and the personnel. Thus

  17. Development of an accelerator for X-ray inspection apparatus with high clairvoyance

    CERN Document Server

    Onishi, T

    2002-01-01

    At present, there is no portable X-ray generator usable for non-destructive inspection of thick concretes used for bridges, and so on. To enable on non-destructive inspection of such thick concrete materials with more than 300 mm in thickness, authors developed a new small size accelerator with same acceleration principle as that of betatron. And, the authors also developed two types of new induction accelerators such as 'spiral orbit type' and 'cylindrical type'. Furthermore, development of a detector with excellent sensitivity to X-ray with wavelength suitable for inspection and software for image processing are planned. Here was described acceleration principles of new accelerators, test results on prototypes of the accelerators, and development states on field emission array considering new electron gun alternating thermal one and cold cathode type electron gun using carbon nano-tubes. (G.K.)

  18. Early experience with a picture archiving and communication system for X-ray CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A network using fiberoptic ring architecture has been implemented to connect an x-ray CT unit with an image work station and optical disk storage unit. The work station has three noninterlaced cathode-ray tube (CRT) monitors of 1,024 X 1,024 pixels. The optical disk system stores 32 optical disk cartridges (2.6 Gbytes per cartridge). A general-purpose interface bus is used for communication between the CT unit and the network interface unit. Transfer time from CT to interface unit is 40 kbyte/second, 5 seconds per image. On-line data acquisition, long-term archiving, and CT interpretation using CRTs have been tested and the system has been working for 3 months in a clinical environment

  19. Development of an accelerator for X-ray inspection apparatus with high clairvoyance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, there is no portable X-ray generator usable for non-destructive inspection of thick concretes used for bridges, and so on. To enable on non-destructive inspection of such thick concrete materials with more than 300 mm in thickness, authors developed a new small size accelerator with same acceleration principle as that of betatron. And, the authors also developed two types of new induction accelerators such as 'spiral orbit type' and 'cylindrical type'. Furthermore, development of a detector with excellent sensitivity to X-ray with wavelength suitable for inspection and software for image processing are planned. Here was described acceleration principles of new accelerators, test results on prototypes of the accelerators, and development states on field emission array considering new electron gun alternating thermal one and cold cathode type electron gun using carbon nano-tubes. (G.K.)

  20. Development of an accelerator for X-ray inspection apparatus with high clairvoyance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Takehiro [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    At present, there is no portable X-ray generator usable for non-destructive inspection of thick concretes used for bridges, and so on. To enable on non-destructive inspection of such thick concrete materials with more than 300 mm in thickness, authors developed a new small size accelerator with same acceleration principle as that of betatron. And, the authors also developed two types of new induction accelerators such as 'spiral orbit type' and 'cylindrical type'. Furthermore, development of a detector with excellent sensitivity to X-ray with wavelength suitable for inspection and software for image processing are planned. Here was described acceleration principles of new accelerators, test results on prototypes of the accelerators, and development states on field emission array considering new electron gun alternating thermal one and cold cathode type electron gun using carbon nano-tubes. (G.K.)

  1. Hollow cathode startup using a microplasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, G.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a microplasma discharge to initiate a hollow cathode discharge for such applications as plasma flow experiments, the electric propulsion of space vehicles, and as a replacement for filament cathodes in neutral beam injector ion sources. The technique results in a cathode that is easy to start, simple in design, and which does not require external RF exciters, inserts or heating elements. Future applications may include ion beam milling and ion implantation.

  2. Current densities and closure rates in diodes containing laser-driven, cesium-coated thermionic cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Oettinger, P. E.

    1985-09-01

    Cathodes emitting electron current pulses of 100-1,000 A/sq cm for durations of longer than 1 microsecond, with very low emittance, are desirable for free electron laser and high-power microwave tube applications. Not all of these criteria can be satisfied by either dispenser thermionic cathodes or plasma forming field emitters. However, pulse-laser heated smooth cesiated refractory metal surfaces have the potential to achieve these conditions. In this paper, test results from low-voltage (2-20 kV) diodes containing cesiated tungsten cathodes are discussed. Space-charge-limited current densities of up to 30 A/sq cm were obtained in fields with maximum strengths of 40 kV/cm. Plasma closure rates at these currents were measured to be 0.17-0.4 cm/microsecond. Such slow velocity fronts are postulated to be due to the domination of the plasma by massive cesium ions generated from species desorbed from the cathode, rather than to light hydrogen ions (as in the case of field-emission-type cathodes).

  3. Current densities and closure rates in diodes containing laser-driven, cesium-coated thermionic cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathodes emitting electron current pulses of 102--103 A/cm2 for durations of longer than 1 μs, with very low emittance, are desirable for free electron laser and high-power microwave tube applications. Not all of these criteria can be satisfied by either dispenser thermionic cathodes or plasma forming field emitters. However, pulse-laser heated smooth cesiated refractory metal surfaces have the potential to achieve these conditions. In this paper, test results from low-voltage (2--20 kV) diodes containing cesiated tungsten cathodes are discussed. Space-charge-limited current densities of up to 30 A/cm2 were obtained in fields with maximum strengths of 40 kV/cm. Plasma closure rates at these currents were measured to be 0.17--0.4 cm/μs. Such slow velocity fronts are postualted to be due to the domination of the plasma by massive cesium ions generated from species desorbed from the cathode, rather than to light hydrogen ions (as in the case of field-emission-type cathodes)

  4. Gamma ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved Anger-type gamma ray camera utilizes a proximity-type image intensifier tube. It has a greater capability for distinguishing between incident and scattered radiation, and greater spatial resolution capabilities

  5. Effect of the energy transfer collision between noble gas and sputtered metal atom on the voltage-current curve of a hollow-cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltage-current curves and the optogalvanic signals of hollow-cathode discharge tubes were measured. Attention was focused on the existence of negative dynamic resistance properties for argon and neon discharges. Three hollow-cathodes, each was made of gadolinium, uranium, and copper, were used with both the noble gases. The negative dynamic resistance regions were observed only in Ar/U, Ar/Gd, and Ne/Cu discharges. These results suggest that resonant Penning ionization is one of the main reactions producing the negative dynamic resistance characteristics in hollow cathode discharges

  6. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI on Twitter NEI on YouTube ...

  7. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI on Twitter NEI on YouTube NEI ...

  8. Oxidation studies of impregnated dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on surface studies of the type M and type S impregnated dispenser cathode using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy. The results indicate the presence of two barium configurations on the room temperature type S surface, probably barium metal and BaO. The room-temperature type M cathode has about a monolayer of barium metal and about a monolayer of tungsten, apparently alloyed to the Os/Ru coating, on the surface. The barium-related features of the type S cathode are extremely sensitive to small oxygen exposures, while the tungsten-related features are more sensitive to oxygen in the type M cathode

  9. Investigation of the flickering of La2O3 and ThO2 doped tungsten cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short-arc lamps are equipped with tungsten electrodes due to their ability to withstand a high thermal load dur