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Sample records for catheter related bloodstream

  1. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  2. Intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection.

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    Shah, Harshal; Bosch, Wendelyn; Thompson, Kristine M; Hellinger, Walter C

    2013-07-01

    Intravascular catheters required for the care of many hospitalized patients can give rise to bloodstream infection, a complication of care that has occurred most frequently in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Elucidation of the pathogenesis of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) has guided development of effective diagnostic, management, and prevention strategies. When CRBSIs occur in the ICU, physicians must be prepared to recognize and treat them. Prevention of these infections requires careful attention to optimal catheter selection, insertion and maintenance, and to removal of catheters when they are no longer needed. This review provides a succinct summary of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and microbiology of CRBSIs and a review of current guidance for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of these infections.

  3. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

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    Jung Hyun Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci , and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses.

  4. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.; Afzal, R.K.; Ahmad, R.N.; Hussain, I.; Anwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) in cancer patients and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates. Subjects and Methods: Cancer patients requiring short or long-term central venous catheterization at the time of admission or thereafter were included. Catheter tips on removal were cultured quantitatively; specimens of blood and pus were cultured qualitatively. Isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by standard techniques. Results: Eighty-nine patients were included in the study. The frequency of CR-BSI was 17%. Out of the 19 organisms isolated, 10 (53%) were Gram-positive cocci, 8 (42%) were Gram-negative rods and 1 (5%) was a fungus. Coagulase negative staphylococci (27%) were the predominant pathogens. Among the staphylococci, 46% of the isolates were methicillin-resistant. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptive to glycopeptides. Gram-negative rods were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial groups. Conclusion: Central venous catheter is an important source of bloodstream infections in cancer patients. Most of the infections are caused by Gram-positive cocci. Rigorous infection control measures and continuous surveillance is required to curb the frequency of these infections. (author)

  5. Tsukamurella: a cause of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

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    Bouza, E; Pérez-Parra, A; Rosal, M; Martín-Rabadán, P; Rodríguez-Créixems, M; Marín, M

    2009-02-01

    Tsukamurellae are strictly aerobic Gram-positive rods that can be easily misidentified as Corynebacterium species, Rhodococcus species, Nocardia species, Mycobacterium species, or other Gram-positive aerobic rods. They have been uncommonly reported as a cause of different human infections, including bloodstream infections. We describe 2 new cases of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) caused by Tsukamurella species and review 12 similar cases reported in the literature. Conventional procedures have often misidentified Tsukamurella species as other aerobic Gram-positive rods. This misidentification could be avoided using genotyping. All cases ultimately required the withdrawal of the infected line. The literature provides no firm conclusions regarding ideal choice or duration of antimicrobial therapy for this infection. Tsukamurella species should be added to the list of agents able to produce CR-BSI. Genotypic methods such as PCR 16S rRNA can allow a reliable identification at the genus level of Tsukamurella strains faster than a combination of conventional phenotypic methods.

  6. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis in an Immunocompromised Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Takebe, Isao; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko; Tohda, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of catheter-related bloodstream infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a patient with myelofibrosis who underwent a bone marrow transplant. Tsukamurella species infections are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of T. inchonensis bloodstream infection in an immunocompromised patient.

  7. Catheter-related bloodstream infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebe, Isao; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko; Tohda, Shuji

    2014-06-01

    We report a case of catheter-related bloodstream infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a patient with myelofibrosis who underwent a bone marrow transplant. Tsukamurella species infections are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of T. inchonensis bloodstream infection in an immunocompromised patient. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension

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    Kristen A. Wendorf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients.

  9. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension.

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    Wendorf, Kristen A; Espinosa, Claudia M; Lebar, William D; Weinberg, Jason B

    2010-02-03

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients.

  10. Catheter related bloodstream infection following PICC removal in preterm infants.

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    Brooker, R W; Keenan, W J

    2007-03-01

    Describe the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) in preterm infants. A retrospective cohort study of infants PICC revealed 101 PICCs placed (2159 PICC days). Patients were hospitalized in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between January 2002 and December 2003. Chi(2) analysis was performed. One infection was detected after the removal of a PICC (1 per 202 days). Ten infants had a CRBSI attributed to a PICC (1 per 216 PICC days). CRBSI during indwelling PICC was associated with increased risk for sepsis evaluation after PICC removal (PPICC removal was not different than the incidence of CRBSI while a PICC was in-dwelling. There was no evidence from this study to support antibacterial prophylaxis before PICC removal.

  11. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A common complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs). The CRBSI incidence has been advocated as an outcome parameter assessing the quality of care. This study aimed to illustrate how the use of different CRBSI......) and European Society for Clinical Nutrition (ESPEN) CRBSI criteria. Employing a catheter-salvaging strategy, 40% of the CRBSI diagnoses were supported by the paired blood culture positivity criteria and only 6% by a positive catheter tip. In 53%, CRBSIs were categorized as a clinical or "probable CRBSI...

  12. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

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    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

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    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  14. CHLORHEXIDINE-IMPREGNATED DRESSING FOR PREVENTION OF CATHETER-RELATED BLOODSTREAM INFECTION: A META-ANALYSIS

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    Safdar, Nasia; O’Horo, John C.; Ghufran, Aiman; Bearden, Allison; Didier, Maria Eugenia; Chateau, Dan; Maki, Dennis G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality and effective methods for their prevention are needed. Objective To assess the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing for prevention of central venous catheter-related colonization and CRBSI using meta-analysis. Data Sources Multiple computerized database searches supplemented by manual searches including relevant conference proceedings. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating the efficacy of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing compared with conventional dressings for prevention of catheter colonization and CRBSI. Data Extraction Data were extracted on patient and catheter characteristics and outcomes. Data Synthesis Pooled estimates of the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model and the Mantel-Haenszel fixed effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed using the Cochran Q statistic and I2. Subgroup analyses were used to explore heterogeneity. Results Nine RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Use of a chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing resulted in a reduced incidence of CRBSI (random effects RR 0.57, 95% CI 0.42–0.79, P=0.002). The incidence of catheter colonization was also markedly reduced in the chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing group (random effects RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.39–0.67, Pchlorhexidine-impregnated dressing is beneficial in preventing catheter colonization and, more importantly, CRBSI and warrants routine use in patients at high risk of CRBSI and CVC or arterial catheter colonization in ICUs. PMID:24674924

  15. Clinical-epidemiological characteristics and outcome of patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections in Europe (ESGNI-006 Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, P; Bouza, E; San Juan, R

    2004-01-01

    (1.55 vs. 0.33/1,000 admissions). Most (67%) catheters were non-tunneled central venous catheters, were in the jugular vein (44%), had been implanted for > 7 days (70%), were made of polyurethane (61%) and were multi-lumen (67%). In 36% of cases, catheters were implanted by physicians other than......This study analysed 89 episodes of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) occurring during one week in 107 hospitals from 21 European countries (1.02 episodes/1,000 admissions). Patients from European Union (EU) countries had a higher incidence of CR-BSI than patients from non-EU countries...

  16. Prevention of Subsequent Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Using Catheter Locks in High-Risk Patients Receiving Home Parenteral Nutrition.

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    Davidson, Jacob B; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; Okano, Akiko; Whitaker, Jennifer A; Bonnes, Sara L; Kelly, Darlene G; Mundi, Manpreet S; Hurt, Ryan T

    2017-05-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a serious complication in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) and ethanol lock therapy (ELT) can be used to prevent CRBSI episodes in high-risk patients. Following institutional review board approval, all patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic HPN program from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2013, with catheter locking were eligible to be included. Patients without research authorization and ELT were estimated in all patients. A total of 63 patients were enrolled during the study period. Of 59 eligible patients, 29 (49%) were female, and 30 (51%) were male. The median duration of HPN was 3.66 (interquartile range, 0.75-8.19) years. The mean age ± SD at initiation of HPN was 49.89 ± 14.07 years. A total of 51 patients were instilled with ALT, and 8 patients were instilled with ELT during their course of HPN. A total of 313 CRBSI episodes occurred in these patients, 264 before locking and 49 after locking ( P ELT can reduce the overall rate of infections per 1000 catheter days. ALT or ELT can be used in appropriate clinical setting for patients receiving HPN.

  17. Catheter-free Period Over 2 Days Is Associated with Better Outcome in Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection due to Candida

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, Takahiro; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Hoshino, Eri; Sakurai, Aki; Furukawa, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Regardless of active antifungal drugs, mortality of candidemia remains high. Although it is well-known that central venous catheter (CVC) is one of the most important risk factors of candidemia and should be removed immediately, little is known about optimal timing of CVC replacement after removal. Here, we analyzed contributing risk factors associated with 30-day mortality for catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) due to candida and optimal timing of CVC replacem...

  18. Identification and characterization of catheter-related bloodstream infections due to viridans group streptococci in patients with cancer.

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    Shelburne, Samuel A; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Jamal, Mohamed; Al Wohoush, Iba; Jiang, Ying; Abughazaleh, Shaadi; Cairo, Javier; Raad, Sammy; Debiane, Labib; Raad, Issam

    2014-10-01

    Viridans group streptococci (VGS), a leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI) in cancer patients, are thought to arise from the gastrointestinal tract. We sought to determine whether central venous catheters may serve as the source of VGS BSI, and to compare the ability of the newly proposed mucosal barrier injury laboratory-confirmed BSI definition to assign a VGS BSI source compared with the catheter-related BSI definition. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Taurolidine-citrate-heparin lock reduces catheter-related bloodstream infections in intestinal failure patients dependent on home parenteral support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tribler, Siri; Brandt, Christopher F.; Petersen, Anne H.

    2017-01-01

    , and prior CRBSI incidence. The prior CRBSI incidence in the study population was 2.4 episodes/1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days [95% Poisson confidence limits (CLs): 2.12, 2.71 episodes/1000 CVC days]. The maximum treatment period was 2 y or until occurrence of a CRBSI or right-censoring because......Background: In patients with intestinal failure who are receiving home parenteral support (HPS), catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) inflict health impairment and high costs.Objective: This study investigates the efficacy and safety of the antimicrobial catheter lock solution.......02).Conclusions: In patients with intestinal failure who are life dependent on HPS, the taurolidine-citrate-heparin catheter lock demonstrates a clinically substantial and cost-beneficial reduction of CRBSI occurrence in a high-risk population compared with heparin. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials...

  20. Peripherally inserted central catheter-related bloodstream infection due to Tsukamurella pulmonis: a case report and literature review.

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    Suzuki, Jun; Sasahara, Teppei; Toshima, Masaki; Morisawa, Yuji

    2017-10-11

    Tsukamurella pulmonis is an aerobic gram-positive and rod-shaped organism that causes central catheter-related bloodstream infections in immunocompromised hosts. However, peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related bloodstream infections due to this organism have not been reported. We describe a case of a 48-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and diffuse large B cell lymphoma who received five courses of chemotherapy including rituximab , cyclophosphamide , doxorubicin hydrochloride , vincristine , and prednisone via a PICC. Five days after the last chemotherapy course, he presented with a high fever and shaking chills. His absolute neutrophil count was 4200/μL. Cultures obtained from blood and PICC culture revealed T. pulmonis. The colony count of T. pulmonis grown from PICC culture was 10 3 colony-forming units. Therefore, he was diagnosed with T. pulmonis bacteremia resulting from PICC-related bloodstream infection. The patient's condition improved and he became afebrile within 48 h after intravenous administration of cefozopran hydrochloride, which is a fourth generation cephalosporin. PICCs can be associated with T. pulmonis bacteremia, and fourth generation cephalosporins may be effective treatment.

  1. Use of ethanol lock therapy to reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients.

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    Opilla, Marianne T; Kirby, Donald F; Edmond, Michael B

    2007-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a serious complication for home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients. To reduce the incidence of infection in frequently infected HPN patients, prophylactic ethanol lock therapy (ELT) was initiated. Nine patients were selected as candidates for ELT because of their history of recurrent CRBSI. Diagnosis of CRBSI was determined by symptoms correlating with positive peripheral and access device blood cultures. Medical-grade ethyl alcohol 25%-70% was instilled into the central venous access device and allowed to dwell for 2-4 hours. The incidence of CRBSI and catheter changes was compared before and after initiation of ELT. Nine patients experienced 81 CRBSIs (8.3 per 1,000 catheter-days) before starting ELT vs 9 infections (2.7 per 1,000 catheter-days: relative risk [RR], 0.325; confidence interval [CI] 95%, 0.17-0.64) after ELT. Catheter changes were also reduced from 69 (7.0 per 1000 days) before ELT to 1 (0.3 per 1,000 days: RR, 0.043; CI 95%, 0.01-0.25) after ELT. No significant adverse effects were noted, although some patients complained of transient dizziness and nausea. ELT shows promise in reducing the incidence of CRBSI in the frequently infected HPN population. Further studies are warranted.

  2. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection withKocuria kristinaein a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

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    Kimura, Masato; Kawai, Eichiro; Yaoita, Hisao; Ichinoi, Natsuko; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  3. Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

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    Masato Kimura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kocuria kristinae is a catalase-positive, coagulase-negative, Gram-positive coccus found in the environment and in normal skin and mucosa in humans; however, it is rarely isolated from clinical specimens and is considered a nonpathogenic bacterium. We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to K. kristinae in a young adult with propionic acidemia undergoing periodic hemodialysis. The patient had a central venous catheter implanted for total parenteral nutrition approximately 6 months prior to the onset of symptoms because of repeated acute pancreatitis. K. kristinae was isolated from two sets of blood cultures collected from the catheter. Vancomycin followed by cefazolin for 16 days and 5-day ethanol lock therapy successfully eradicated the K. kristinae bacteremia. Although human infections with this organism appear to be rare and are sometimes considered to result from contamination, physicians should not underestimate its significance when it is isolated in clinical specimens.

  4. A new central venous catheter cap: decreased microbial growth and risk for catheter-related bloodstream infection.

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    Buchman, A L; Spapperi, J; Leopold, P

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, and is a source of significant healthcare expenditures in patients that require central venous catheters for intravenous nutrition, chemotherapy, and other products. The source of many catheter-related infections is contamination of the catheter hub. Herein an antimicrobial catheter cap, the AB Cap is described. The AB Cap device is a catheter cleaning device designed to keep needleless luer valves clean by encapsulating them in a cleaning solution. This device was evaluated using an in vitro model of hub contamination with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans (C. albicans). Following hub contamination on days 1, 3, 5 and 7, saline was infused through the AB Cap and effluent collected from the efferent end. The effluent fluid was cultured for the index organisms, and allowed to incubate in culture for up to 7 days. Negative control caps were not contaminated and positive controls lacked cleaning solution and were contaminated. Microbial growth developed for all index organisms, and generally within 1 day of culture growth following the first day of contamination (day 1) in effluent from all positive controls, while no growth occurred in effluent from negative controls. No growth of any organism occurred in any of the test items after the first day of contamination. Growth of three organisms was detected in two of the three test AB Caps following contamination day 3, after 1-4 days of incubation. All organisms could be cultured in the effluent from two of the three test items at contamination day 5, generally by the second day of incubation. One test item remained free of growth for the entire test period except for one organism. By day 7, this particular test item grew an additional organism and the testing was concluded. All positive growth test

  5. Comparative Efficacy of Antimicrobial Central Venous Catheters in Reducing Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections in Adults: Abridged Cochrane Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

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    Chong, Huey Yi; Lai, Nai Ming; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2017-05-15

    The efficacy of antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs) remains questionable. In this network meta-analysis, we aimed to assess the comparative efficacy of antimicrobial CVC impregnations in reducing catheter-related infections in adults. We searched 4 electronic databases (Medline, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, CINAHL) and internet sources for randomized controlled trials, ongoing clinical trials, and unpublished studies up to August 2016. Studies that assessed CVCs with antimicrobial impregnation with nonimpregnated catheters or catheters with another impregnation were included. Primary outcomes were clinically diagnosed sepsis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and all-cause mortality. We performed a network meta-analysis to estimate risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Sixty studies with 17255 catheters were included. The effects of 14 impregnations were investigated. Both CRBSI and catheter colonization were the most commonly evaluated outcomes. Silver-impregnated CVCs significantly reduced clinically diagnosed sepsis compared with silver-impregnated cuffs (RR, 0.54 [95% CI, .29-.99]). When compared to no impregnation, significant CRBSI reduction was associated with minocycline-rifampicin (RR, 0.29 [95% CI, .16-.52]) and silver (RR, 0.57 [95% CI, .38-.86]) impregnations. No impregnations significantly reduced all-cause mortality. For catheter colonization, significant decreases were shown by miconazole-rifampicin (RR, 0.14 [95% CI, .05-.36]), 5-fluorouracil (RR, 0.34 [95% CI, .14-.82]), and chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (RR, 0.60 [95% CI, .50-.72]) impregnations compared with no impregnation. None of the studies evaluated antibiotic/antiseptic resistance as the outcome. Current evidence suggests that the minocycline-rifampicin-impregnated CVC appears to be the most effective in preventing CRBSI. However, its overall benefits in reducing clinical sepsis and mortality remain uncertain

  6. High positive predictive value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection in intensive care neonates.

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    Deleers, M; Dodémont, M; Van Overmeire, B; Hennequin, Y; Vermeylen, D; Roisin, S; Denis, O

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) remain a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in preterm infants. Rapid and accurate methods for the diagnosis of CRBSIs are needed in order to implement timely and appropriate treatment. A retrospective study was conducted during a 7-year period (2005-2012) in the neonatal intensive care unit of the University Hospital Erasme to assess the value of Gram stain on catheter-drawn blood samples (CDBS) to predict CRBSIs. Both peripheral samples and CDBS were obtained from neonates with clinically suspected CRBSI. Gram stain, automated culture and quantitative cultures on blood agar plates were performed for each sample. The paired quantitative blood culture was used as the standard to define CRBSI. Out of 397 episodes of suspected CRBSIs, 35 were confirmed by a positive ratio of quantitative culture (>5) or a colony count of CDBS culture >100 colony-forming units (CFU)/mL. All but two of the 30 patients who had a CDBS with a positive Gram stain were confirmed as having a CRBSI. Seven patients who had a CDBS with a negative Gram stain were diagnosed as CRBSI. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of Gram stain on CDBS were 80, 99.4, 93.3 and 98.1 %, respectively. Gram staining on CDBS is a viable method for rapidly (<1 h) detecting CRBSI without catheter withdrawal.

  7. The first reported catheter-related Brevibacterium casei bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia and review of the literature

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    Zumrut Sahbudak Bal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brevibacterium spp. are catalase-positive, non-spore-forming, non motile, aerobic Gram-positive rods that were considered apathogenic until a few reports of infections in immunocompromised patients had been published. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of B. casei catheter-related bloodstream infection in a child with acute leukemia. We aim to enhance the awareness of pediatric hematology and infectious disease specialists about this pathogen and review of the literature.

  8. High MICs for Vancomycin and Daptomycin and Complicated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections with Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

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    Viedma, Esther; Chaves, Fernando; Lalueza, Antonio; Fortún, Jesús; Loza, Elena; Pujol, Miquel; Ardanuy, Carmen; Morales, Isabel; de Cueto, Marina; Resino-Foz, Elena; Morales-Cartagena, Alejandra; Rico, Alicia; Romero, María P.; Orellana, María Ángeles; López-Medrano, Francisco; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic role of high MICs for antistaphylococcal agents in patients with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus catheter-related bloodstream infection (MSSA CRBSI). We prospectively reviewed 83 episodes from 5 centers in Spain during April 2011–June 2014 that had optimized clinical management and analyzed the relationship between E-test MICs for vancomycin, daptomycin, oxacillin, and linezolid and development of complicated bacteremia by using multivariate analysis. Complicated MSSA CRBSI occurred in 26 (31.3%) patients; MICs for vancomycin and daptomycin were higher in these patients (optimal cutoff values for predictive accuracy = 1.5 μg/mL and 0.5 μg/mL). High MICs for vancomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.2–5.5) and daptomycin (hazard ratio 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.9) were independent risk factors for development of complicated MSSA CRBSI. Our data suggest that patients with MSSA CRBSI caused by strains that have high MICs for vancomycin or daptomycin are at increased risk for complications. PMID:27192097

  9. Use of corporate Six Sigma performance-improvement strategies to reduce incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in a surgical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Heidi L; Crede, William B; Topal, Jeffrey E; Roumanis, Sarah A; Devlin, Marie W; Foley, Andrea B

    2005-09-01

    Corporate performance-improvement methodologies can outperform traditional ones in addressing ICU-based adverse events. My colleagues and I used Six Sigma methodology to address our catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI) rate, which considerably exceeded the nationally established median over a 9-year period. We hypothesized that use of Six Sigma methodology would result in a substantial and sustainable decrease in our CR-BSI rate. All patients were directly cared for by a geographically localized surgical ICU team in an academic tertiary referral center. CR-BSIs were identified by infection control staff using CDC definitions. Personnel trained in Six Sigma techniques facilitated performance-improvement efforts. Interventions included barrier precaution kits, new policies for catheter changes over guide wires, adoption of a new site-preparation antiseptic, direct attending supervision of catheter insertions, video training for housestaff, and increased frequency of dressing changes. After additional data analysis, chlorhexidine-silver catheters were used selectively in high-risk patients. The impact of interventions was assessed by monitoring the number of catheters placed between CR-BSIs. Before the intervention period, 27 catheters were placed, on average, between individual CR-BSIs, a CR-BSI rate of 11 per 1,000 catheter days. After all operations were implemented, 175 catheters were placed between line infections, and average CR-BSI rate of 1.7/1,000 catheter days, a 650% improvement (p impact (50% reduction; p corporate performance-improvement method impacting purely clinical outcomes. CR-BSI reduction was highly substantial and sustained after other traditional strategies had failed.

  10. Ethanol lock therapy in reducing catheter-related bloodstream infections in adult home parenteral nutrition patients: results of a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Bijo K; Khan, Maqsood A; Speerhas, Rex; Rhoda, Kristen; Hamilton, Cindy; Dechicco, Robert; Lopez, Rocio; Steiger, Ezra; Kirby, Donald F

    2012-09-01

    Equivocal data demonstrate the efficacy of ethanol lock therapy (ELT) in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in home parenteral nutrition (HPN) patients, but it is not currently a standard of practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the efficacy of ELT in reducing the incidence of CRBSIs in HPN patients. Medical records from the Cleveland Clinic database of adult HPN patients with CRBSIs placed on prophylactic ELT were retrospectively studied from January 2006 to August 2009 (n = 31). Outcomes were compared pre- and post-ELT with the patients serving as their own controls. Medical-grade (70%) ethanol was instilled daily into each lumen of the central venous catheter (CVC) between PN infusion cycles. Comparative analysis was performed using McNemar's test and Wilcoxon ranked tests. Thirty-one patients had 273 CRBSI-related admissions prior to ELT in comparison to 47 CRBSI-related admissions post-ELT. Adjusted data for only tunneled CVC pre- and post-ELT showed a similar reduction of CRBSI-related admissions from 10.1 to 2.9 per 1000 catheter days (P ELT. There were no reported side effects or complications in any patient undergoing ELT. This study supports the efficacy and safety of ELT in reducing CRBSI-related admissions in HPN patients and potentially helps reduce the burden of CRBSI-related healthcare costs. This novel technique shows great promise as a standard prophylaxis for CRBSI in HPN patients and must be incorporated in routine practice.

  11. Cost savings from reduced catheter-related bloodstream infection after simulation-based education for residents in a medical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elaine R; Feinglass, Joe; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Barnard, Cynthia; O'Donnell, Anna; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2010-04-01

    Interventions to reduce preventable complications such as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) can also decrease hospital costs. However, little is known about the cost-effectiveness of simulation-based education. The aim of this study was to estimate hospital cost savings related to a reduction in CRBSI after simulation training for residents. This was an intervention evaluation study estimating cost savings related to a simulation-based intervention in central venous catheter (CVC) insertion in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) at an urban teaching hospital. After residents completed a simulation-based mastery learning program in CVC insertion, CRBSI rates declined sharply. Case-control and regression analysis methods were used to estimate savings by comparing CRBSI rates in the year before and after the intervention. Annual savings from reduced CRBSIs were compared with the annual cost of simulation training. Approximately 9.95 CRBSIs were prevented among MICU patients with CVCs in the year after the intervention. Incremental costs attributed to each CRBSI were approximately $82,000 in 2008 dollars and 14 additional hospital days (including 12 MICU days). The annual cost of the simulation-based education was approximately $112,000. Net annual savings were thus greater than $700,000, a 7 to 1 rate of return on the simulation training intervention. A simulation-based educational intervention in CVC insertion was highly cost-effective. These results suggest that investment in simulation training can produce significant medical care cost savings.

  12. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  13. Chlorhexidine-Impregnated Dressings and Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzkaya, Duygu Sönmez; Sahiner, Nejla Canbulat; Uysal, Gülzade; Yakut, Tülay; Çitak, Agop

    2016-12-01

    Bloodstream infections related to use of catheters are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, prolonged hospital lengths of stay, and increased medical costs. To compare the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings with that of standard dressings in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections. A total of 100 children were randomly divided into 2 groups of 50 each: a chlorhexidine group and a standard group. Patient care was provided in accordance with prevention bundles. Patients were followed up for development of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Catheter colonization occurred in 4 patients in the standard group (8%) and in 1 patient in the chlorhexidine group (2%). Catheter-related bloodstream infections occurred in 5 patients in the standard group (10%) and in 1 patient in the chlorhexidine group (2%). Although more patients in the standard group had catheter-related bloodstream infections, the difference in infection rates between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .07). Use of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings reduced rates of catheter-related bloodstream infections, contamination, colonization, and local catheter infection in a pediatric intensive care unit but was not significantly better than use of standard dressings. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  14. An educational program for decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections in intensive care units: a pre- and post-intervention observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Yuichiro; Umegaki, Osamu; Agui, Tomoyuki; Kadono, Noriko; Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Minami, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in the management of critically ill patients. This study aimed to determine whether an educational program could reduce the rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in intensive care units (ICUs). All patients admitted to a medical ICU at a college affiliated with the Japan Society of Intensive Care Medicine between January 2008 and December 2014 were surveyed prospectively for the development of CRBSIs. A mandatory educational program (the intervention) targeting an infection control committee consisting of physicians was developed by a multidisciplinary task force to highlight correct practices for preventing CRBSIs. The program included a 30-min video-based introduction, 120-min lectures with a number of hands-on training sessions, a post-test, posters, safety check sheets, and feedback from the infection control committee. Lectures based on the education program were held every 3 months, and participants were free to choose when they attended the lectures. Each participant was required to view the 30-min introduction before attending the 120-min lectures and complete the post-test after each lecture. Safety check sheets were made to ascertain adherence to contents of the educational program. Posters describing the educational program were posted throughout the ICU. A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was employed, with the main outcome measure being yearly CRBSIs. We also calculated cost savings that resulted from improved CRBSI rates.During the 12-month pre-intervention period, four episodes of CRBSIs occurred in 1171 patient ICU-days (i.e., 3.4 per 1000 patient ICU-days). In the first year after the intervention, the rate of CRBSIs decreased to 0 in 1157 patient ICU-days ( P  ≤ 0.05). The estimated cost savings secondary to this decreased rate for the 1 year following introduction of the program was between 1850,000 and 27,000,000 yen ($14,800-$216,000). A program

  15. Risk Factors of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection With Percutaneously Inserted Central Venous Catheters in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Center's Experience in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Fu Hsu

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: It is important to avoid inserting a PICC at the femoral site. Strict catheter care protocol should also be applied to reduce local site bacterial colonization and removal of PICCs as soon as they are no longer essential for patient care to reduce the incidence of infection.

  16. Executive summary: Diagnosis and Treatment of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection: Clinical Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC) and the Spanish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and Coronary Units (SEMICYUC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernando; Garnacho-Montero, José; Del Pozo, José Luis; Bouza, Emilio; Capdevila, José Antonio; de Cueto, Marina; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Esteban, Jaime; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Fernández Sampedro, Marta; Fortún, Jesús; Guembe, María; Lorente, Leonardo; Paño, Jose Ramón; Ramírez, Paula; Salavert, Miguel; Sánchez, Miguel; Vallés, Jordi

    2018-02-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) constitute an important cause of hospital-acquired infection associated with morbidity, mortality, and cost. The aim of these guidelines is to provide updated recommendations for the diagnosis and management of CRBSI in adults. Prevention of CRBSI is excluded. Experts in the field were designated by the two participating Societies (Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica and the Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva, Crítica y Unidades Coronarias). Short-term peripheral venous catheters, non-tunneled and long-term central venous catheters, tunneled catheters and hemodialysis catheters are covered by these guidelines. The panel identified 39 key topics that were formulated in accordance with the PICO format. The strength of the recommendations and quality of the evidence were graded in accordance with ESCMID guidelines. Recommendations are made for the diagnosis of CRBSI with and without catheter removal and of tunnel infection. The document establishes the clinical situations in which a conservative diagnosis of CRBSI (diagnosis without catheter removal) is feasible. Recommendations are also made regarding empirical therapy, pathogen-specific treatment (coagulase-negative staphylococci, Sthaphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp, Gram-negative bacilli, and Candida spp), antibiotic lock therapy, diagnosis and management of suppurative thrombophlebitis and local complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro activities of vancomycin and linezolid against biofilm-producing methicillin-resistant staphylococci species isolated from catheter-related bloodstream infections from an Egyptian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Asmaa A; Abd El Fadeal, Noha M; Shehata, Atef S

    2017-06-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are among the most common hospital-acquired infections. We aimed to survey methicillin resistance, biofilm production and susceptibility to vancomycin, linezolid and other antibiotics for staphylococci isolated from CRBSIs. Fifty-eight isolates [20 S. aureus and 38 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS; 20 Staphylococcusepidermidis, nine Staphylococcushaemolyticus, three Staphylococcusschleiferi, two Staphylococcuswarneri and four Staphylococcuslugdunensis)] were tested for methicillin resistance by cefoxitin disk diffusion and detection of the mecA gene by PCR; biofilm-forming ability using Congo red agar and tissue culture plate methods; susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, cotrimoxazole, erythromycin, gentamicin, linezolid, rifampicin and tetracycline; and MIC determination for vancomycin.Results/Key findings. Cefoxitin resistance was detected among 40 % (8/20) S. aureus isolates, 70 % (14/20) S. epidermidis isolates and 16.7 % (3/18) of other CoNS, although the mecA gene was detected in 45 % (9/20) S. aureus isolates, 35 % (7/20) S. epidermidis isolates and 16.7 % (3/18) of other CoNS. Biofilm-forming ability ranged from 45 to 75 %. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus and other CoNS were considered to be more virulent than methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis due to the higher biofilm forming abilities of the former. All tested isolates exhibited 100 % sensitivity to vancomycin and linezolid, irrespective of their methicillin resistance or biofilm-forming ability. Rifampicin showed overall sensitivity of 75.9 %. Varying degrees of multi-resistance were found for the other antibiotics. Vancomycin, linezolid and rifampicin could be used effectively against methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from CRBSIs.

  18. High Rate of qacA- and qacB-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Chlorhexidine-Impregnated Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Cheng-Mao; Li, Chi-Yuan; Ho, Mao-Wang; Lin, Chien-Yu; Liu, Shu-Hui; Lu, Jang-Jih

    2012-01-01

    Chlorhexidine has been widely used for infection control. Although the use of chlorhexidine-impregnated catheters has reduced catheter-related infections, chlorhexidine-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged. The correlation between the existence of the chlorhexidine-resistant genes qacA and qacB (qacA/B) in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates and the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-impregnated catheters in the prevention of MRSA infections is unknown. Sixty methic...

  19. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freshta Akbari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs. Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs.

  20. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  1. Prevention of hospital infections by intervention and training (PROHIBIT): results of a pan-European cluster-randomized multicentre study to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooi, Tjallie; Sax, Hugo; Pittet, Didier; van Dissel, Jaap; van Benthem, Birgit; Walder, Bernhard; Cartier, Vanessa; Clack, Lauren; de Greeff, Sabine; Wolkewitz, Martin; Hieke, Stefanie; Boshuizen, Hendriek; van de Kassteele, Jan; Van den Abeele, Annemie; Boo, Teck Wee; Diab-Elschahawi, Magda; Dumpis, Uga; Ghita, Camelia; FitzGerald, Susan; Lejko, Tatjana; Leleu, Kris; Martinez, Mercedes Palomar; Paniara, Olga; Patyi, Márta; Schab, Paweł; Raglio, Annibale; Szilágyi, Emese; Ziętkiewicz, Mirosław; Wu, Albert W; Grundmann, Hajo; Zingg, Walter

    2018-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of a central venous catheter (CVC) insertion strategy and a hand hygiene (HH) improvement strategy to prevent central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in European intensive care units (ICUs), measuring both process and outcome indicators. Adult ICUs from 14 hospitals in 11 European countries participated in this stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled multicentre intervention study. After a 6 month baseline, three hospitals were randomised to one of three interventions every quarter: (1) CVC insertion strategy (CVCi); (2) HH promotion strategy (HHi); and (3) both interventions combined (COMBi). Primary outcome was prospective CRBSI incidence density. Secondary outcomes were a CVC insertion score and HH compliance. Overall 25,348 patients with 35,831 CVCs were included. CRBSI incidence density decreased from 2.4/1000 CVC-days at baseline to 0.9/1000 (p < 0.0001). When adjusted for patient and CVC characteristics all three interventions significantly reduced CRBSI incidence density. When additionally adjusted for the baseline decreasing trend, the HHi and COMBi arms were still effective. CVC insertion scores and HH compliance increased significantly with all three interventions. This study demonstrates that multimodal prevention strategies aiming at improving CVC insertion practice and HH reduce CRBSI in diverse European ICUs. Compliance explained CRBSI reduction and future quality improvement studies should encourage measuring process indicators.

  2. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections and thrombotic risk in hematologic patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Latagliata, Roberto; Girmenia, Corrado; Massaro, Fulvio; Berneschi, Paola; Guerriero, Alfonso; Giampaoletti, Massimo; Sammarco, Arianna; Annechini, Giorgia; Fama, Angelo; Di Rocco, Alice; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Molica, Matteo; Barberi, Walter; Minotti, Clara; Brunetti, Gregorio Antonio; Breccia, Massimo; Cartoni, Claudio; Capria, Saveria; Rosa, Giovanni; Alimena, Giuliana; Foà, Robin

    2015-11-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) as an alternative to other central venous access devices (CVAD) is becoming very frequent in cancer patients. To evaluate the impact of complications associated to these devices in patients with hematologic malignancies, we revised the catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) and the catheter-related thrombotic complications (CRTC) observed at our institute between January 2009 and December 2012. A total of 612 PICCs were inserted into 483 patients at diagnosis or in subsequent phases of their hematologic disease. PICCs were successfully inserted in all cases. The median duration of in situ PICC placement was 101 days (interquartile range, 48-184 days). A CRBSI occurred in 47 cases (7.7 %), with a rate of 0.59 per 1000 PICC days. A CRTC was recorded in 16 cases (2.6 %), with a rate of 0.20 per 1000 PICC days. No serious complication was associated to these events. Cox regression analyses of variables associated to CRBSIs and to CRTCs showed that only the type of disease (acute leukemia compared to other diseases) was significantly associated to a higher incidence of CRBSIs, while no feature was predictive for a higher risk of CRTCs. PICCs represent a useful and safe alternative to conventional CVAD for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies.

  3. Equipe interdisciplinar reduz infecção sanguínea relacionada ao cateter venoso central em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Pediátrica Interdisciplinary task-force reduces catheter-related bloodstream infection in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Vilela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto de intervenções interdisciplinares nos indicadores de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada ao cateter venoso central e microrganismos isolados, em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Pediátrica. MÉTODOS: Estudo de intervenção do tipo antes e depois. Foi criado um programa educativo e constituída uma equipe interdisciplinar de intervenção composta por médicos e enfermeiros da unidade e do Serviço de Controle de Infecção Hospitalar. As intervenções foram compostas por medidas diretas e indiretas educativas e processuais. O período pré-intervenção (Fase 1, de junho de 2003 a maio de 2004, foi comparado ao período pós-intervenção nas Fases 2 (junho de 2004 a maio de 2005 e 3 (junho de 2005 a maio de 2006. As taxas de infecção foram comparadas por ANOVA, sendo significante pOBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of interdisciplinary interventions on central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections rates in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU and on the bloodstream infection organisms. METHODS: Interventional study type before-and-after. An educational program was performed and an interdisciplinary team of interventions was created. This team was formed by nurses and doctors of the PICU and of the Infection Control Committee. The interventions were composed by direct and indirect educational and procedural measures. Task-force interventions were developed from Jun/2003 to May/2004. This pre-intervention period (Phase 1 was compared with two post-intervention periods: Phases 2 (Jun/2004 to May/2005 and 3 (Jun/2005 to May/2006. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection rates during the three periods were compared by ANOVA, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: 1,234 patients were studied from June 1st 2003 to May 31, 2006. The number of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections was 22.72 per 1,000 catheter-days in Phase 1, and 6.81 and 5.87 in Phases 2 and 3

  4. [Catheter-associated bloodstream infections: implementation of a new consensus protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrea Ayala, M; Rozas Quesada, L

    2009-07-01

    Catheter-associated bloodstream infection is highly prevalent and often associated with fatal complications. Some studies have shown that applying preventive interventions could help to reduce and control this type of infection. To determine whether a new consensus protocol for the manipulation and maintenance of central venous catheters would decrease catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSIs) in paediatric patients. To evaluate its compliance in intensive care units. Prospective study in the paediatric (PICU) and neonatal (NICU) intensive cares units, haematology, oncology and hospital wards in a Maternal and Paediatric reference Hospital in Barcelona. The study period is divided into two periods: before (first semester) and after the start of the new protocol (second semester) in 2007. The most important changes have been the insertion of the hermetic connection in the proximal and distal site (between the line and the syringe) of the central venous catheter (CVC), the labelling of the medication line and the CVC with the date of placement. A check-list to evaluate compliance was introduced in both intensive care units (paediatrics and neonatal) during the second study period. The rates of bloodstream infection per 1000 catheter-days were assessed. The rate of bloodstream infections per 1000 catheter-days before and after the start of the new protocol was 5.7 and 4.9 in PICU; 24.6 and 18.0 in NICU; 7.6 and 4.6 in haematology-oncology, and 11.9 and 10.3 in hospital wards. As regards compliance to the protocol, we found that proximal sealed connectors were used in more than 95% of the cases and up to 85% of the central venous catheter were labelled with the insertion date in both intensive care units. A consensus protocol for the use and maintenance of central venous catheters and healthcare worker training helped to control the rate of CA-BSIs. We reaffirm the importance of epidemiological surveillance as a measure for controlling nosocomial infections.

  5. Unnecessary Removal of Central Venous Catheters in Cancer Patients with Bloodstream Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftari, Anne Marie; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Sammy; Jiang, Ying; Natividad, Elizabeth; Chaftari, Patrick; Raad, Issam

    2018-02-01

    We evaluated the rate of central venous catheter (CVC) removal in 283 cancer patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). Removal of CVCs occurred unnecessarily in 57% of patients with non-central-line-associated BSI (non-CLABSI), which was equivalent to the rate of CVC removal in patients with CLABSIs. Physician education and safe interventions to salvage the vascular access are warranted. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:222-225.

  6. Second-Generation central venous catheter in the prevention of bloodstream infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Janislei Gislei Dorociaki; Hoers, Hellen; Pott, Franciele Soares; Crozeta, Karla; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida; Meier, Marineli Joaquim

    2016-08-08

    to evaluate the effectiveness and safety in the use of second-generation central venous catheters impregnated in clorhexidine and silver sulfadiazine when compared with other catheters, being them impregnated or not, in order to prevent the bloodstream infection prevention. systematic review with meta-analysis. Databases searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; search in Congress Proceedings and records from Clinical Trials. 1.235 studies were identified, 97 were pre-selected and 4 were included. In catheter-related bloodstream infection, there was no statistical significance between second-generation impregnated catheter compared with the non-impregnated ones, absolute relative risk 1,5% confidence interval 95% (3%-1%), relative risk 0,68 (confidence interval 95%, 0,40-1,15) and number needed to treat 66. In the sensitivity analysis, there was less bloodstream infection in impregnated catheters (relative risk 0,50, confidence interval 95%, 0,26-0,96). Lower colonization, absolute relative risk 9,6% (confidence interval 95%, 10% to 4%), relative risk 0,51 (confidence interval 95% from 0,38-0,85) and number needed to treat 5. the use of second-generation catheters was effective in reducing the catheter colonization and infection when a sensitivity analysis is performed. Future clinical trials are suggested to evaluate sepsis rates, mortality and adverse effects. evaluar la efectividad y seguridad del uso de catéteres venosos centrales de segunda generación, impregnados en clorhexidina y sulfadiazina de plata, comparados con otros catéteres impregnados o no impregnados, para prevención de infección de la corriente sanguínea. revisión sistemática con metaanálisis. La búsqueda fue realizada en las bases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILACS/SciELO, Cochrane CENTRAL; fueron consultados anales de congresos y registros de ensayos clínicos. fueron identificados 1.235 estudios, 97 preseleccionados y cuatro incluidos. En la infección de la

  7. Etiology and epidemiology of catheter related bloodstream infections in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition in a gastromedical center at a tertiary hospital in denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen; Chen, Ming; Hellesøe, Anne-Marie Blok

    2012-01-01

    (44.7% of all CRBSI episodes), followed by Enterobacteriaceae (33.2%). Prevalence for candidemia and Enterococcus bacteremia was relatively high (14.4% and 10.8%, respectively). Cefuroxime resistance was observed in 65.4% CoNS and 31.5% Enterobacteriaceae. Based on the results from the study, a new...

  8. Bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and peripherally inserted central catheters: reappraising the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Krein, Sarah L; Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has transformed the care of medical and surgical patients. Whereas intravenous antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and administration of chemotherapy once necessitated prolonged hospitalization, PICCs have eliminated the need for such practice. However, PICCs may not be as innocuous as once thought; a growing body of evidence suggests that these devices also have important risks. This review discusses the origin of PICCs and highlights reasons behind their rapid adoption in medical practice. We evaluate the evidence behind 2 important PICC-related complications--venous thrombosis and bloodstream infections--and describe how initial studies may have led to a false sense of security with respect to these outcomes. In this context, we introduce a conceptual model to understand the risk of PICC-related complications and guide the use of these devices. Through this model, we outline recommendations that clinicians may use to prevent PICC-related adverse events. We conclude by highlighting important knowledge gaps and identifying avenues for future research in this area. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Central venous catheters and bloodstream infection during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Kristin; Hasle, Henrik; Asdahl, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the risk of firsttime bloodstream infection (BSI) according to type of central venous catheter (CVC) during induction therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients eligible for our analysis were all newly diagnosed children with ALL...... treated at 3 pediatric centers in Denmark between 2008 and 2014. A total of 136 patients were followed from initial CVC placement until first BSI, CVC removal, death, or day 28, whichever occurred first. Thirty-nine BSIs were detected, of which 67% were gram-positive infections, and 59% met the criteria...

  10. Time to Blood Culture Positivity as a Marker for Catheter-Related Candidemia▿

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Weinberger, Miriam; Orni-Wasserlauff, Ruth; Schwartz, David; Itzhaki, Avraham; Lazarovitch, Tzipora; Bash, Edna; Aharoni, Yuval; Moroz, Irina; Giladi, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Candida spp. are important causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Around 80% of patients with candidemia have an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC). Determining whether the CVC is the source of candidemia has implications for patient management. We assessed whether the time to detection of Candida species in peripheral blood (time to positivity [TTP]) can serve as a marker for catheter-related candidemia. Prospective surveillance of Candida bloodstream infection was conducted in t...

  11. Incidence of central line related/associated bloodstream infections in an acute hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, M; Dornikova, G; Curran, R; Staunton, M; Woolhead, A; Kennedy, M; Tinsley, A; Shepherd, E; Doherty, T

    2014-09-01

    Bloodstream infection related to a central venous catheter in the intensive care unit is a substantial clinical and economic problem. The aim of the study was to examine the incidence of central line related bloodstream infections and central line associated bloodstream infections in Our Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Drogheda, during a six month period, using an active patient based prospective surveillance method. CLRBSI rate in ICU/HDU was 0.93/1000 central line days. There was no CLABSI identified in the studied time period. However, further interventions are needed, particularly with CVC care bundle. Also, the implementation of 2% chlorhexidin in 70% isopropylalcohol use for skin asepsis, which is recommended by the Irish national guidelines, would be beneficial.

  12. The effectiveness of a nurse-initiated intervention to reduce catheter-associated bloodstream infections in an urban acute hospital: an intervention study with before and after comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Toshie; Makimoto, Kiyoko; Toki, Masayo; Sakai, Keiko; Onaka, Emiko; Otani, Yoshiko

    2007-11-01

    Catheter care is considered to be important for prevention of catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CABSIs) although epidemiological evidence is sparse. To identify problems associated with catheter care and evaluate the effectiveness of nurse-initiated interventions to reduce CABSIs. An intervention study with before and after comparison. CABSI surveillance was conducted in a 560-bed acute hospital located in a major urban area in Japan. Patients were enrolled in this study from April 2000 to December 2002 based on the following criteria: (1) adult inpatients; and (2) those in whom central venous lines or Swan-Ganz catheters were inserted for 2 days or longer. In the first year, risk factors for CABSI and problems associated with catheter care were identified by inspection of the infection control nurse (ICN) or four trained link nurses, and the laboratory results. In the subsequent 2 years, the following interventions based on the surveillance results were implemented: (1) enhanced skin preparation by scrubbing with regular bathing soap and tap water; (2) a new method for stabilisation of the catheter inserted into the internal jugular vein, where additional dressing was placed over the sterilised dressing; (3) educating the staff on maximal sterile precautions by teaching staff members at their section meetings and displaying posters; (4) use of a check list and observation of catheter insertion by link nurses to monitor compliance; and (5) selection of a disinfectant that requires shorter contact time and has longer residual effect. After these interventions were implemented, the overall bloodstream infection (BSI) rate declined from 4.0/1000 device-days to 1.1/1000 device-days (p<0.005). We identified four problems-those related to skin preparation, dressing, sterile precautions and disinfectant. We implemented a series of interventions to reduce CABSIs; the overall CABSI rate decreased significantly.

  13. The risk of bloodstream infection associated with peripherally inserted central catheters compared with central venous catheters in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; O'Horo, John C; Rogers, Mary A M; Maki, Dennis G; Safdar, Nasia

    2013-09-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The magnitude of this risk relative to central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. To compare risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs. MEDLINE, CinAHL, Scopus, EmBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched. Full-text studies comparing the risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs were included. Studies involving adults 18 years of age or older who underwent insertion of a PICC or a CVC and reported CLABSI were included in our analysis. Studies were evaluated using the Downs and Black scale for risk of bias. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate summary estimates of CLABSI risk in patients with PICCs versus CVCs. Of 1,185 studies identified, 23 studies involving 57,250 patients met eligibility criteria. Twenty of 23 eligible studies reported the total number of CLABSI episodes in patients with PICCs and CVCs. Pooled meta-analyses of these studies revealed that PICCs were associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than were CVCs (relative risk [RR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.94). Statistical heterogeneity prompted subgroup analysis, which demonstrated that CLABSI reduction was greatest in outpatients (RR [95% CI], 0.22 [0.18-0.27]) compared with hospitalized patients who received PICCs (RR [95% CI], 0.73 [0.54-0.98]). Thirteen of the included 23 studies reported CLABSI per catheter-day. Within these studies, PICC-related CLABSI occurred as frequently as CLABSI from CVCs (incidence rate ratio [95% CI], 0.91 [0.46-1.79]). Only 1 randomized trial met inclusion criteria. CLABSI definition and infection prevention strategies were variably reported. Few studies reported infections by catheter-days. Although PICCs are associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than CVCs in outpatients, hospitalized patients may be just as likely to experience CLABSI with PICCs as with CVCs. Consideration of risks and benefits before PICC use in inpatient

  14. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  15. Skin colonisation at the catheter exit site is strongly associated with catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Vennila; Perperoglou, Aris; Venkatesh, Vidheya; Curley, Anna; Brown, Nicholas; Tremlett, Catherine; Clarke, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The commonest mode of catheter colonisation is via the extraluminal route with skin bacteria. Catheter-related sepsis causes significant mortality and morbidity in neonates. Our aim was to study the relationships between culture-positive catheter exit site skin swabs, percutaneous central venous catheter segments and blood to determine the magnitude of associations between exit site skin colonisation, catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis. In a prospective study, an exit site skin swab and three formerly in vivo catheter segments (proximal, middle and tip) were taken for culture at catheter removal. In those neonates who were clinically unwell at catheter removal, a peripheral blood culture was also collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to study associations. Skin swabs were culture positive in 39 (21%) of 187 catheter removals. With a culture-positive skin swab, the risk of associated catheter colonisation was nearly eight times higher (OR: 7.84, 95% CI: 3.59-17.15) and the risk of definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism was nearly 10 times higher (OR 9.86, 95% CI: 3.13-31.00). Culture-positive skin swabs from the catheter exit site were strongly associated with catheter colonisation and with definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism. These data provide further evidence supporting catheter colonisation via the extraluminal route and highlight the importance of optimising skin disinfection before catheter insertion. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Método bundle na redução de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada a cateteres centrais: revisão integrativa Método bundle en la redución de infecciones relacionadas a catéteres centrales: una revisión integrativa Care bundle to reduce central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Dane Pereira Brachine

    2012-12-01

    éter con su retirada inmediata cuando posible. La mayoría de los estudios analizados mostraron una reducción significante de infección sanguínea relacionadas o asociadas con catéteres intravenosos centrales.This is an integrative review of literature aimed to identify evidence-based interventions which make up care bundles to reduce central venous catheter-related or associated bloodstream infections. To collect data in Brazilian and international databases were used the key word bundle and the descriptors catheter-related infection, infection control and central venous catheterization, resulting in fifteen articles, after inclusion criteria application. This work showed five interventions as those commonly employed in the bundles methods: hand hygiene, chlorhexidine gluconate for skin antisepsis, use of maximal sterile barrier precaution during the catheter insertion, avoid the femoral access and daily review of catheter necessity with prompt removal as no longer essential. The majority of the studies showed a significant reduction in bloodstream infection related to or associated with central venous catheters.

  17. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related infections in a neonatal population - systematic review,

    OpenAIRE

    Rosado, Viviane; Camargos, Paulo A.M.; Anchieta, Lêni M.; Bouzada, Maria C.F.; Oliveira, Gabriela M. de; Clemente, Wanessa T.; Romanelli, Roberta M. de C.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This was a systematic review of the incidence density and risk factors for central venous catheter-related infections in a neonatal population. Data source: The MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, BDENF, SciELO, and LILACS databases were used without date or language restriction. Studies that analyzed risk factors for bloodstream infections in newborns were identified. Data synthesis: A total of 134 articles were found that met the eligibility criteria. Of these articles, 14 wer...

  18. First reported case of Staphylococcus condimenti infection associated with catheter-related bacteraemia

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    Y. Misawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient who experienced a catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Staphylococcus condimenti, which was first isolated from soy sauce mash. This is the first reported case of human infection. Although blood culture isolates and the catheter tip tube did not reveal coagulase or clumping factor, false-positive results were obtained from latex agglutination tests for clumping factor and protein A due to self-agglutination. Care is needed when performing only latex agglutination test without a coagulase test. Further studies are needed to determine the pathogenic potential of S. condimenti based on appropriate identification.

  19. Catheter Related Blood Stream Infections In Patients Of The Intensive Care Unit

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    Ana Carolina Coimbra de Castro

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the prevalence of bloodstream infection associated with the Catheter related Blood stream infections in patients of the Intensive Care Unit, and the characteristics of its use and handling. Methods: Descriptive and transversal study with a sample of 88 participants. Data were collected through the observational method and the records in the medical records. The absolute and relative frequencies were used for data analysis. Results: 73.86% of the patients had central venous access in the subclavian vein, 100% used double lumen Catheter related Blood stream infections, 0.5% chlorhexidine solution for skin antisepsis, dressing coverage is performed mostly with Sterile gauze and tape, with a daily exchange. The rate of infection related to the use of the Catheter related Blood stream infections was (6.81%. The most infused pharmacological drugs were antimicrobials (69.32%. Conclusion: The study showed that care with central venous accesses is performed according to recommendations for prevention of bloodstream infection related to the use of these devices. The infection rate is close to the standards found in the literature. Key words: Central Venous Catheterization. Hospital Infection. Intensive care unit. Risk factors. Catheter-Related Infection..

  20. Impact of Postplacement Adjustment of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters on the Risk of Bloodstream Infection and Venous Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Sanjiv M.; Shuman, Emily K.; Scipione, Christy A.; Chen, Benrong; Sharma, Aditi; Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Chenoweth, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) tip malposition is potentially associated with complications, and postplacement adjustment of PICCs is widely performed. We sought to characterize the association between central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) or venous thrombus (VT) and PICC adjustment. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING University of Michigan Health System, a large referral hospital. PATIENTS Patients who had PICCs placed between February 2007 and August 2007. METHODS The primary outcomes were development of CLABSI within 14 days or VT within 60 days of postplacement PICC adjustment, identified by review of patient electronic medical records. RESULTS There were 57 CLABSIs (2.69/1,000 PICC-days) and 47 VTs (1.23/1,000 PICC-days); 609 individuals had 1, 134 had 2, and 33 had 3 or more adjustments. One adjustment was protective against CLABSI (P = .04), whereas 2 or 3 or more adjustments had no association with CLABSI (P = .58 and .47, respectively). One, 2, and 3 or more adjustments had no association with VT formation (P = .59, .85, and .78, respectively). Immunosuppression (P PICCs (P = .05), and 3 PICC lumens compared with 1 lumen (P = .02) were associated with CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were also associated with increased VT formation (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression and 3 PICC lumens were associated with increased risk of CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were associated with increased risk of CLABSI and VT formation. Postplacement adjustment of PICCs was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI or VT. PMID:23838218

  1. Differential time to positivity of central and peripheral blood cultures is inaccurate for the diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus long-term catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidi, H; Emirian, A; Marty, A; Chachaty, E; Laplanche, A; Gachot, B; Blot, F

    2018-02-10

    Differential time to positivity of cultures of blood drawn simultaneously from central venous catheter and peripheral sites is widely used to diagnose catheter-related bloodstream infections without removing the catheter. However, the accuracy of this technique for some pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, is debated in routine practice. In a 320-bed reference cancer centre, the charts of patients with at least one blood culture positive for S. aureus among paired blood cultures drawn over a six-year period were studied retrospectively. Microbiological data were extracted from the prospectively compiled database of the microbiology unit. Data concerning the 149 patients included were reviewed retrospectively by independent physicians blinded to the absolute and differential times to positivity, in order to establish or refute the diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis. Due to missing data, 48 charts were excluded, so 101 cases were actually analysed. The diagnosis was established in 62 cases, refuted in 15 cases and inconclusive in the remaining 24 cases. For the 64 patients with both central and peripheral positive blood cultures, the differential positivity time was significantly greater for patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections due to S. aureus (Pcatheter-related bloodstream infection due to S. aureus. These results strongly suggest that despite its high specificity, the differential time to positivity may not be reliable to rule out catheter-related bloodstream infection due to S. aureus. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A Retrospective Analysis of Bloodstream Infections in Pediatric Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients: The Role of Central Venous Catheters and Mucosal Barrier Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balian, Chelsea; Garcia, Michelle; Ward, Jessica

    2018-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) increase risk for BSIs, yet mucosal barrier injury-associated laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (MBI-LCBI) may also occur due to translocation of pathogenic organisms from the gastrointestinal tract into the bloodstream. The purpose of this study was to determine the association between stool organisms and BSIs in children with CVCs who underwent HSCT. We performed a retrospective analysis of 78 children who received allogeneic HSCT over 3 years (2012-2014). Surveillance stool cultures were analyzed pre- and post-HSCT to assess correlations between organisms isolated from stool and CVC cultures. Twenty-four of 78 children experienced 31 BSIs. Fifteen (48%) of these isolates were identified in stool within 30 days of the positive blood culture, and 11 (36%) isolates met criteria for MBI-LCBI. Mucosal barrier injury leads to translocation of pathogenic organisms into the bloodstream and accounts for a significant number of BSIs in children undergoing HSCT. Nursing assessment of mucosal changes during HSCT and interventions to preserve intact mucosa are essential to prevent MBI-LCBI.

  3. The incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter-related infection among cancer patients

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    Gao Y

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Yufang Gao,1,* Yuxiu Liu,2,* Xiaoyan Ma,3 Lili Wei,4 Weifen Chen,2 Lei Song2 1President’s Office, 2Oncology Department, the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, 3Intensive Care Unit, Shanghai East Hospital, Shanghai, 4Nursing Department, the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: As the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs increased in chemotherapy, the identification of complications and risk factors became essential to prevent patient harm. But little is known about PICC-related infection and risk factors among patients with cancer. Our study was to identify the prevalence, patterns, and risk factors of catheter-related infections associated with PICCs.Methods: A 3-year prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital. All patients with cancer who met inclusion criteria were enrolled. The patients were followed up until catheter removal. Tip cultures were routinely performed at the time of catheter removal. The general information was recorded at the time of PICC insertion, weekly care, and removal. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors.Results: In total, 912 cancer patients with 912 PICCs of 96,307 catheter days were enrolled. Ninety-four developed PICC-related infection; 46 were exit-site infection, 43 were catheter bacterial colonization, and five were PICC-related bloodstream infection. The median time from catheter insertion to infection was 98.26 days. Multivariate analysis showed StatLock fixing (odds ratio [OR] =0.555, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.326–0.945 and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava (OR =0.340, 95% CI: 0.202–0.571 were associated with lower PICC infection rate. Catheter care delay (OR =2.612, 95% CI: 1.373–4.969 and indwelling mostly in summer (OR =4

  4. Catheter-related Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia manifested with skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy

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    Shou-Hsin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previously rare, catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria is now increasingly encountered, especially among cancer patients who have catheters implanted for chemotherapy treatments. A 73-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML had Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia with manifestations of multiple skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy 4 months after the implantation of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC for the delivery of chemotherapy. The catheter-related M. abscessus bacteremia was confirmed by positive blood cultures of specimens drawn from a PICC line and a peripheral vein. She defervesced with the administration of meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and by the removal of PICC. Her fever subsided for 3 months with the disappearance of skin and lung lesions; however, she died of AML relapse. Bacteremia and skin infection caused by M. abscessus can be detected by culture and pathological examinations and should be considered in leukemia patients with a PICC. With appropriate laboratory diagnosis, M. abscessus bacteremia with disseminated infections can improve with catheter removal and combination antimicrobial therapy.

  5. Trisodium citrate 46.7% selectively and safely reduces staphylococcal catheter-related bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnett, Georgia; Nolan, Jonathan; Miller, Michael; Ashman, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Trisodium citrate (TSC) 30% has been shown in a randomized control trial to be an effective antimicrobial catheter locking solution, able to significantly reduce catheter-related bacteraemia (CRB) in haemodialysis patients. Since that report, the formulation in Europe has been changed to 46.7% TSC without confirmatory data on efficacy. We report a 55 915 patient-day at risk experience in tunnelled lines of 46.7% TSC, emphasizing efficacy and changes in microbiology seen. On 1 July 2006, inter-dialytic catheter locking solution was changed from 5000 IU/ml heparin to Citra-lock(TM) (46.7% TSC) in all haemodialysis patients at Barts and the London Renal Unit dialysing through an incident or prevalent tunnelled catheter. Prospectively collected blood culture data for the 6 months prior to the switch and 3 months at the end of the first year of TSC use were analysed. TSC tolerability was excellent with only a single withdrawal for intolerance of the agent. No major adverse events were reported. A major fall in CRB rates was noticed with a change from heparin (2.13/1000 catheter-days) in 2006 to TSC (0.81/1000 catheter-days) in 2007. This was due to significant reductions in staphylococcal CRB, true for sensitive, methicillin-resistant and coagulase-negative staphylococci. No increase in catheter malfunction was observed. We found that 46.7% TSC is a safe, convenient and highly effective catheter locking solution, leading to significant reduction in CRB largely by preventing staphylococcal bloodstream infections. Given that Staphylococcus aureus in particular is associated with serious and often disseminated infection, TSC seems to be a powerful tool for dialysis units.

  6. Indwelling Urinary Catheter-Related Problems After Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuvers, Sarah; Zonneveld, Willemijn; Meiland-van Bakel, Marja; Putter, Hein; Nicolai, Melianthe; Pelger, Rob; Elzevier, Henk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine occurrence rates of catheter-related problems and their association to pertinent clinical characteristics in men with indwelling urinary catheters following laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. Descriptive, correlational study. One hundred twelve men who underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy between December 2010 and December 2012 at the Leiden University Medical Centre in the Netherlands were included in this study. After surgery, a Charriere 20 (20F) silicone catheter was left indwelling for 1 week. Data were gathered from 2 sources; we reviewed participants' medical records, and participants completed a questionnaire designed for this study. Pearson χ tests were used to analyze associations between dichotomous and ordinal variables and catheter-related problems. Univariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between continuous factors and catheter-related problems. Seventy-five percent of participants reported at least 1 catheter-related problem. Univariate regression analyses revealed correlations between body weight and experiencing catheter-related problems (odds ratio [OR] = 1.050; P = .028) and between body mass index and experiencing catheter-related problems (OR = 1.159; P = .049). Indwelling catheter-related problems after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy are prevalent, and they may occur at any time during the entire period of catheter use. High body mass index and high body weight were associated with an increased likelihood of catheter-related problems following radical prostatectomy.

  7. Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Hospitalized Children with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: Extending Risk Analyses Outside the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Sonali; Reich, Nicholas G.; Sengupta, Arnab; Gosey, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Background. Increasingly, peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are placed for prolonged intravenous access. Few data exist regarding risk factors for central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) complicating PICCs in hospitalized children, especially children hospitalized outside the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods. We identified all children with a PICC inserted at The Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD) from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2009 and used Poisson regression models to identify risk factors for PICC-associated CLABSIs. Results. A total of 2592 PICCs were placed in 1819 children. One hundred sixteen CLABSIs occurred over 44,972 catheter-days (incidence rate [IR], 2.58 cases per 1000 catheter-days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07–3.00 cases per 1000 catheter-days). Independent predictors of CLABSI in the entire cohort included PICC dwell time of ≥21 days (IR ratio [IRR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.26), parenteral nutrition as indication for insertion (IRR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.31–3.84), prior PICC-associated CLABSI (IRR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.18–5.25), underlying metabolic condition (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.14–3.74), and pediatric ICU exposure during hospitalization (IRR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.18–2.75). Risk factors for CLABSI in children without PICU exposure included younger age, underlying malignancy and metabolic conditions, PICCs inserted in the lower extremity, and a prior PICC-associated CLABSI. Conclusions. Prolonged catheter dwell time, pediatric ICU exposure, and administration of parenteral nutrition as the indication for PICC insertion are important predictors of PICC-associated CLABSI in hospitalized children. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing CLABSIs in hospitalized children with PICCs. PMID:21454298

  8. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

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    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  9. Totally implantable catheter embolism: two related cases

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    Rodrigo Chaves Ribeiro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Long-term totally implantable catheters (e.g. Port-a-Cath® are frequently used for long-term venous access in children with cancer. The use of this type of catheter is associated with complications such as infection, extrusion, extravasation and thrombosis. Embolism of catheter fragments is a rare complication, but has potential for morbidity. The aim here was to report on two cases in which embolism of fragments of a long-term totally implantable catheter occurred. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series study at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective review of catheter embolism in oncological pediatric patients with long-term totally implantable catheters. RESULTS: The first patient was a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with stage IV Wilms' tumor. Treatment was started with the introduction of a totally implantable catheter through the subclavian vein. At the time of removal, it was realized that the catheter had fractured inside the heart. An endovascular procedure was necessary to remove the fragment. The second case was a boy diagnosed with stage II Wilms' tumor at the age of two years. At the time of removal, it was noticed that the catheter had disconnected from the reservoir and an endovascular procedure was also necessary to remove the embolized catheter. CONCLUSION: Embolism of fragments of totally implantable catheters is a rare complication that needs to be recognized even in asymptomatic patients.

  10. Clinical features of catheter-related candidemia at disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Yusuke; Wakabayashi, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Satoshi; Seo, Kazunori; Koga, Ichiro; Kitazawa, Takatoshi; Okugawa, Shu; Ota, Yasuo

    2014-11-01

    Early detection of catheter-related candidemia is necessary to ensure that patients receive prompt and appropriate treatment. The aim of the present case-control study is to investigate the clinical features of catheter-related candidemia at disease onset, so as to determine the clinical indications for empiric antifungal therapy. All 41 cases of catheter-related candidemia from September 2009 to August 2011 at a teaching hospital were included in the present study. To determine the characteristics that were risk factors for developing catheter-related candidemia, we compared all cases of catheter-related candidemia with all 107 cases of catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) caused by non-Candida spp. In comparison with CRBSI due to non-Candida spp., the duration of catheter use was significantly longer in cases of catheter-related candidemia (13.9 ± 9.0 days vs. 23.2 ± 25.2 days). There was also a significant difference in the frequency of pre-antibiotic treatment between catheter-related candidemia and CRBSI due to non-Candida spp. (97.6% [40/41 cases] vs. 44.9% [48/107 cases]). Patients with catheter-related candidemia also had significantly more severe clinical statuses (measured using the Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment score) than patients with CRBSI due to non-Candida spp. (7.63 ± 3.65 vs. 5.92 ± 2.81). When compared to patients with CRBSI caused by non-Candida spp., patients with catheter-related candidemia had significantly more severe clinical backgrounds, longer duration of catheter use and more frequent prior administration of antibiotic agents.

  11. The incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter-related infection among cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yufang; Liu, Yuxiu; Ma, Xiaoyan; Wei, Lili; Chen, Weifen; Song, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background As the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) increased in chemotherapy, the identification of complications and risk factors became essential to prevent patient harm. But little is known about PICC-related infection and risk factors among patients with cancer. Our study was to identify the prevalence, patterns, and risk factors of catheter-related infections associated with PICCs. Methods A 3-year prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital. All patients with cancer who met inclusion criteria were enrolled. The patients were followed up until catheter removal. Tip cultures were routinely performed at the time of catheter removal. The general information was recorded at the time of PICC insertion, weekly care, and removal. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors. Results In total, 912 cancer patients with 912 PICCs of 96,307 catheter days were enrolled. Ninety-four developed PICC-related infection; 46 were exit-site infection, 43 were catheter bacterial colonization, and five were PICC-related bloodstream infection. The median time from catheter insertion to infection was 98.26 days. Multivariate analysis showed StatLock fixing (odds ratio [OR] =0.555, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.326–0.945) and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava (OR =0.340, 95% CI: 0.202–0.571) were associated with lower PICC infection rate. Catheter care delay (OR =2.612, 95% CI: 1.373–4.969) and indwelling mostly in summer (OR =4.784, 95% CI: 2.681–8.538) were associated with higher infection incidence. Conclusion StatLock fixing and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava were protective factors against PICC-related infection, while catheter care delay and indwelling mostly in summer were risk factors. Policy and measures targeting these factors may be necessary to reduce the risk of infection

  12. Hemodialysis catheter-related infection: rates, risk factors and pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Farida; Feidjel, Razika; Laalaoui, Rima

    The main complication of central venous catheter (CVC) in hemodialysis is infection. Identifying CVC related infection (CVC-RI) risk factors and causative micro-organisms is important for setting prevention policies. There were no data regarding CVC-RI in hemodialysis in Algeria. To determine rates of CVC-RI in hemodialysis in Setif university hospital, risk factors and causative microorganisms, we conducted a prospective study from November 2014 to May 2015 involving patients with CVC in hemodialysis. Micro-organisms isolated from semi quantitative culture of CVC and blood culture were identified and tested for antibiotic susceptibility using the automated MicroScan system (DADE Behring, Sacramento, CA, USA). Chi-square test was performed to compare demographic and clinical variables (age, sex, comorbidities, duration of CVC, insertion site) in the groups of patients with and without CVC-RI. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. All analyses were performed using SPSS V17 for Windows statistical package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). 94 patients and 152 CVC procedures were analyzed. 34 CVC-RI were documented with an incidence of 16.6 per 1000 CVC-days. Incidence of CVC related bloodstream infection (CVC-RBI) was 10.8 per 1000 CVC-days. Independent risk factors associated with CVC-RI were diabetes (P=0.01) and duration of catheterization (P= 0.01). Causative micro-organisms were: Klebsiella pneumoniae 26.5%, coagulase-negative staphylococci 23.5% and Staphylococcus aureus 23.5%. Micro-organisms were multidrug-resistant (MDR). Mortality was statistically associated to inadequate antibiotic therapy. The duration of CVC should be reduced by creation of fistulas. More compliance to hygiene measure is needed for decreasing CVC-RI and resistance rate. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  14. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  15. Clinical impact of delayed catheter removal for patients with central-venous-catheter-related Gram-negative bacteraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y-M; Moon, C; Kim, Y J; Lee, H J; Lee, M S; Park, K-H

    2018-01-10

    Gram-negative bacteria are increasingly the cause of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), and the prevalence of multi-drug-resistant strains is rising rapidly. This study evaluated the impact of delayed central venous catheter (CVC) removal on clinical outcomes in patients with Gram-negative CRBSI. Between January 2007 and December 2016, patients with Gram-negative bacteraemia and CVC placement, from two tertiary care hospitals, were included retrospectively. Cases with CVC removal more than three days after onset of bacteraemia or without CVC removal were classified as having delayed CVC removal. In total, 112 patients were included. Of these, 78 had CRBSI (43 definite and 35 probable) and 34 had Gram-negative bacteraemia from another source (non-CRBSI). Enterobacteriaceae were less common pathogens in patients with CRBSI than in patients with non-CRBSI (11.5% vs 41.3%; P0.99). Delayed CVC removal [odds ratio (OR) 6.8], multi-drug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteraemia (OR 6.3) and chronic renal failure (OR 11.1) were associated with 30-day mortality in patients with CRBSI. The protective effect of early CVC removal on mortality was evident in the MDR group (48.3% vs 18.2%; P=0.03), but not in the non-MDR group (11.1% vs 0%; P=0.43). CVCs should be removed early to improve clinical outcomes in patients with Gram-negative CRBSI, especially in settings where MDR isolates are prevalent. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Infections in a Cohort of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzad, Caroline; Duron, Sandrine; Bousquet, Aurore; Arnaud, François-Xavier; Valbousquet, Laura; Weber-Donat, Gabrielle; Teriitehau, Christophe; Baccialone, Jacques; Potet, Julien

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections

  17. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Infections in a Cohort of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzad, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.bouzad@gmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Duron, Sandrine, E-mail: duronsandrine@yahoo.fr [GSBdD, Military Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CESPA) (France); Bousquet, Aurore, E-mail: aurorebousquet@yahoo.fr [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Bacteriology Department (France); Arnaud, François-Xavier, E-mail: fxa0160@hotmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Valbousquet, Laura, E-mail: laura.valbousquet@gmail.com [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Weber-Donat, Gabrielle, E-mail: weberdonatgabrielle@yahoo.fr; Teriitehau, Christophe, E-mail: cteriitehau@me.com; Baccialone, Jacques, E-mail: jacques.baccialone@wanadoo.fr; Potet, Julien, E-mail: potet-julien@yahoo.fr [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections.

  18. The microbiological characteristics and risk factors for PICC-related bloodstream infections in intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shumin; Sun, Xiaofeng; Lei, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the pathogens distribution and risk factors for PICC-related bloodstream infection in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. 402 patients placed with PICC in ICU were recruited in the study. The microbiological characteristics of PICC-related infection were investigated by Vitek 2 Compact automated microbial system. Antibiotics sensitivity was performed with disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. Multivariate logistic and cox analyse...

  19. Diagnosis of intra vascular catheter-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicalini, S; Palmieri, F; Noto, P; Boumis, E; Petrosillo, N

    2002-01-01

    The use of central vascular catheters (CVC) is associated with a substantial number of complications, amongst which infections predominate. A diagnosis of CVC-related infection usually requires catheter removal for culture. Semiquantitative (roll-plate method) and quantitative methods (flush, vortex, centrifugation or sonication methods) are the most reliable diagnostic methodologies requiring catheter removal, because of their greater specificity. The roll-plate method is the simplest and most commonly used technique. This method only samples the external surface of the catheter, and is particularly indicated for recently inserted catheters in which extraluminal colonisation is the primary mechanism of infection. Luminal culture techniques, such as the quantitative methods, may be more relevant for catheters that have been in place for a long period of time. However, in up to 85% of removed CVC the culture is negative, and other diagnostic techniques that do not require catheter removal have been proposed, including paired quantitative blood cultures, endoluminal brushing, and differential time to positivity (DTP) of paired blood cultures. DTP, that compares the time to positivity for qualitative cultures of blood samples simultaneously drawn from the CVC and a peripheral vein, appears to be the most reliable in the routine clinical practice since many hospitals use automatic devices for qualitative blood culture positivity detection. More recently catheter-sparing direct diagnostic methods, which include Gram stain and acridin-orange leucocyte cytospin (AOLC) test, appeared to be especially useful because of the rapidity of results and the ability to distinguish different microorganisms, allowing early targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  20. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

  1. Daptomycin antibiotic lock therapy for hemodialysis patients with Gram-positive bloodstream infections following use of tunneled, cuffed hemodialysis catheters: retrospective single center analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hung-Wen; Yang, Wu-Chang; Tarng, Der-Cherng; Yang, Chih-Yu; Chuang, Chiao-Lin; Huang, Ling-Ju; Lin, Pei-Yu; Wang, Chih-Chun; Li, Szu-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) is a major complication in hemodialysis patients. We assessed the efficacy of systemic daptomycin (DPT) plus DPT antibiotic lock therapy (DPT-ALT) for catheter salvage in patients with Gram-positive CRBSIs. This is a retrospective study of hemodialysis patients with tunneled and cuffed hemodialysis catheters. All patients were from a single institution in Taipei and received systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT for the treatment of Gram-positive CRBSI. Successful resolution of CRBSI was implemented. Resolution of fever within 48 hours, negative result of repeated blood cultures after resolution of fever, no clinical evidence of CRBSI relapse and no need for catheter removal were measured. Fifteen hemodialysis patients received DPT-ALT for CRBSI, nine with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CONS), two with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), three with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and one with polymicrobial infections. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT cured 11 patients (73.3%). Treatment failed in all three MRSA cases (two with MRSA and one with MRSA + Enterococcus faecalis). Retrospective design and small sample size were the limitations of this study. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT appears to be a promising treatment for CRBSI from CONS and MSSA, but not for MRSA CRBSI. Systemic DPT plus DPT-ALT should be considered for patients with CRBSIs caused by certain species. © 2015 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  2. Is 2% chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropyl alcohol more effective at preventing central venous catheter-related infections than routinely used chlorhexidine gluconate solutions: A pilot multicenter randomized trial (ISRCTN2657745)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Margaret; Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Mellotte, George; Clarke, Michael

    2016-08-01

    A pilot randomized trial in 3 Irish outpatient hemodialysis units compared 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) in 70% isopropyl alcohol with routinely used CHG solutions for central venous catheter exit site antisepsis. We found no significant difference between the groups for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections (1/53 vs 2/52; relative risk [RR], 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-5.25; P = .55) and catheter-associated bloodstream infections (1/53 vs 4/52; RR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.03-2.12; P = .16). Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The microbiological characteristics and risk factors for PICC-related bloodstream infections in intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shumin; Sun, Xiaofeng; Lei, Yan

    2017-11-08

    The study was aimed to investigate the pathogens distribution and risk factors for PICC-related bloodstream infection in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. 402 patients placed with PICC in ICU were recruited in the study. The microbiological characteristics of PICC-related infection were investigated by Vitek 2 Compact automated microbial system. Antibiotics sensitivity was performed with disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. Multivariate logistic and cox analyses were performed to identify the risk factors for PICC-related infection in ICU patients. 38 PICC-related infection cases were observed, and its morbidity was 9.45%. The morbidity was significantly higher in power PICC cases than that in common PICC cases. Gram-positive bacteria might be responsible for the major infection cases, followed by gram-negative bacteria, and fungi. Drug sensitivity analyses indicated that gram-negative bacteria showed low resistance to carbapenems antibiotics, and Cefperazone/sulbactam. The gram-positive bacterial exhibited sensitive to Teicoplanin and Vancomycin. The isolated fungi showed low resistance to the commonly used antifungal antibiotics. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that power PICC, high Charison scores, diabetes mellitus, double lumens triple lumens were risk factors for PICC-related infections among ICU patients. Power PICC, high Charison scores, diabetes mellitus, multi-lumens are risk factors for PICC-related bloodstream infection in ICU patients.

  4. Is biofilm production a predictor of catheter-related candidemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guembe, María; Guinea, Jesús; Marcos-Zambrano, Laura; Fernández-Cruz, Ana; Peláez, Teresa; Muñoz, Patricia; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    Catheter-related candidemia (CRC) is typically a biofilm related disease, but it is mostly unknown if the production of biofilm is a feature exclusively shown by Candida spp. isolates causing CRC. We performed an in vitro biofilm assay using Candida isolates obtained from the blood of patients with candidemia. We demonstrated that biofilm production was not a good predictor of catheter-related candidemia. Also, we demonstrated that there was no difference in the mortality of candidemia patients infected by biofilm-forming isolates and those in which the infection is caused by nonbiofilm-forming species.

  5. Cefotaxime-heparin lock prophylaxis against hemodialysis catheter-related sepsis among Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Saxena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriers undergoing hemodialysis (HD through tunneled cuffed catheters (TCCs form a high-risk group for the development of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI and ensuing morbidity. The efficacy of antibiotic-locks on the outcomes of TCCs among S. aureus nasal carriers has not been studied earlier. Persistent nasal carriage was defined by two or more positive cultures for methicillin-susceptible (MSSA or methicillin-resistant (MRSA S. aureus of five standardized nasal swabs taken from all the participants dialyzed at a large out-patient HD center affiliated to a tertiary care hospital. Of 218 participants, 82 S. aureus nasal carriers dialyzed through TCCs (n = 88 were identified through April 2005 to March 2006 and randomized to two groups. Group I comprised of 39 nasal carriers who had TCCs (n = 41 "locked" with cefotaxime/heparin while group II included 43 patients with TCCs (n = 47 filled with standard heparin. The CRBSI incidence and TCC survival at 365 days were statistically compared between the two groups. A significantly lower CRBSI incidence (1.47 vs. 3.44/1000 catheter-days, P <0.001 and higher infection-free TCC survival rates at 365 days (80.5 vs. 40.4%, P <0.0001 were observed in the cefotaxime group compared with the stan-dard heparin group. However, no significant difference in MRSA-associated CRBSI incidence was observed between the two groups. Cefotaxime-heparin "locks" effectively reduced CRBSI-incidence associated with gram-positive cocci, including MSSA, among S. aureus nasal carriers. There remains a compelling requirement for antibiotic-locks effective against MRSA.

  6. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  7. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  8. A European perspective on intravascular catheter-related infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouza, E; San Juan, R; Muñoz, P

    2004-01-01

    The laboratory workload, microbiological techniques and aetiology of catheter-related infections in European hospitals are mostly unknown. The present study (ESGNI-005) comprised a 1-day (22 October 2001), laboratory-based, point-prevalence survey based on a questionnaire completed by microbiology...... by these institutions was 121,363,800, and the estimated number of admissions during 2000 was 6,712,050. The total number of catheter tips processed during 2000 was 142,727, or 21/1,000 admissions, of which 23.7% were considered to be positive in the institutions using semiquantitative or quantitative techniques....... Overall, EU centres received significantly more catheter tip samples/1,000 admissions and had a significantly higher rate of 'positivity' (p...

  9. [Prevention of catheter-related infection: usefulness and cost-effectiveness of antiseptic catheters in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Ana M; Vassallo, Juan C; Moreno, Guillermo E; Althabe, María; Gómez, Silvia; Magliola, Ricardo; Casimir, Lidia; Bologna, Rosa; Barretta, Jorge; Ruffa, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the antiseptic-impregnated catheter compared with conventional catheters in preventing catheter- related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Cost-effectiveness analysis; clinical trial, experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, open label. Patients and methods. A 172 patient cohort, under 1-year-old or less than 10 kg, postoperative cardiovascular children with central venous catheters (CVC) admitted to Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (UCI 35) at Hospital Nacional de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan", since September 2005 to December 2007. Demographic and CVC data were retrieved to compare: age, gender, weight, diagnosis, surgery, CVC days, costs and complications. Intervention. CVC Arrow, double-lumen, > 48 h of duration; intervention group: antiseptic-impregnated CVC vs. control group: CVC without antiseptics (conventional). The incidence of CR-IE (CR-Infected Events: colonization, local infection and/or CRBSI; combined end point) was 27% for antiseptic- impregnated CVC vs. 31% for conventional catheters (p= 0.6) with similar accumulated incidence of CR- BSI: 2.8 vs. 3.3 per 1000 dayscatheter. We found no differences between groups, except in weight: median 4.0 kg (r 2-17) vs. 4.7 kg (r 2-9) p= 0.0002 and age, median 2 months (r 1- 48) vs. 5 months (r 1- 24) p= 0.0019 in antiseptic-impregnated CVC group. These differences, though statistically significant were clinically non relevant. Median cost per patient during intensive care stay in the conventional CVC group was $3.417 (359-9.453) and in the antiseptic-impregnated-CVC group was $4.962 (239-24.532), p= 0.10. The use of antiseptic-impregnated CVC compared with conventional CVC did not decrease CR-BSI in this population. The cost per patients was higher in the antiseptic impregnated CVC group. These results do not support the routine use of this type of CVC in our population.

  10. Decreasing dialysis catheter rates by creating a multidisciplinary dialysis access program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Patricia M; Niederhaus, Silke V; Schweitzer, Eugene J; Leeser, David B

    2018-03-01

    Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have determined that chronic dialysis units should have central venous catheters for hemodialysis treatments. On the Eastern Shore of Maryland, the central venous catheter rates in the dialysis units averaged >45%. A multidisciplinary program was established with goals of decreasing catheter rates in order to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections, decrease mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection, decrease hospital days, and provide savings to the healthcare system. We collected the catheter rates within three dialysis centers served over a 5-year period. Using published data surrounding the incidence and related costs of central line-associated bloodstream infection and mortality per catheter day, the number of central line-associated bloodstream infection events, the costs, and the related mortality could be determined prior to and after the initiation of the dialysis access program. An organized dialysis access program resulted in a 82% decrease in the number of central venous catheter days which lead to a concurrent reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infection and deaths. As a result of creating an access program, central venous catheter rates decreased from an average rate of 45% to 8%. The cost savings related to the program was calculated to be over US$5 million. The decrease in the number of mortalities is estimated to be between 13 and 27 patients. We conclude that a formalized access program decreases catheter rates, central line-associated bloodstream infection, and the resultant hospitalizations, mortality, and costs. Areas with high hemodialysis catheter rates should develop access programs to better serve their patient population.

  11. Central Venous Catheter (CVC) related infections: a local retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Manuela Fresu; Agostina Ronca; Carla Pruzzo; Simona Roveta

    2008-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheter (CVC) related infection is associated with significant increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care cost.This local surveillance study was carry out to monitor the frequency of occurrence of CVC-related blood stream infections. Materials and methods. During the period January – December 2005, 226 CVC specimens were analyzed (quantitative method) and microrganism identification from positive samples was performed by Vitek II. In 53 patients it was poss...

  12. Can procalcitonin be a diagnostic marker for catheter-related blood stream infection in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Ozsurekci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The potential role of procalcitonin (PCT in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSIs is still unclear and requires further research. The diagnostic value of serum PCT for the diagnosis of CRBSI in children is evaluated here. Method This study was conducted between October 2013 and November 2014, and included patients with suspected CRBSI from 1 month to 18 years of age who were febrile, with no focus of infection, and had a central venous catheter. Levels of PCT and other serum markers were measured, and their utility as CRBSI markers was assessed. Additionally, the clinical performance of a new, automated, rapid, and quantitative assay for the detection of PCT was tested. Results Among the 49 patients, 24 were diagnosed with CRBSI. The PCT-Kryptor and PCT-RTA values were significantly higher in proven CRBSI compared to those in unproven CRBSI (p = 0.03 and p = 0.03, respectively. There were no differences in white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP levels between proven CRBSI and unproven CRBSI. Among the 24 patients with CRBSI, CRP was significantly higher among those with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections. PCT-Kryptor was also significantly higher among patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02, respectively. Conclusions The authors suggest that PCT could be a helpful rapid diagnostic marker in children with suspected CRBSIs.

  13. Can procalcitonin be a diagnostic marker for catheter-related blood stream infection in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Oktay Arıkan, Kamile; Bayhan, Cihangül; Karadağ-Öncel, Eda; Emre Aycan, Ahmet; Gürbüz, Venhar; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    The potential role of procalcitonin (PCT) in the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSIs) is still unclear and requires further research. The diagnostic value of serum PCT for the diagnosis of CRBSI in children is evaluated here. This study was conducted between October 2013 and November 2014, and included patients with suspected CRBSI from 1 month to 18 years of age who were febrile, with no focus of infection, and had a central venous catheter. Levels of PCT and other serum markers were measured, and their utility as CRBSI markers was assessed. Additionally, the clinical performance of a new, automated, rapid, and quantitative assay for the detection of PCT was tested. Among the 49 patients, 24 were diagnosed with CRBSI. The PCT-Kryptor and PCT-RTA values were significantly higher in proven CRBSI compared to those in unproven CRBSI (p=0.03 and p=0.03, respectively). There were no differences in white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels between proven CRBSI and unproven CRBSI. Among the 24 patients with CRBSI, CRP was significantly higher among those with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections. PCT-Kryptor was also significantly higher among patients with Gram-negative bacterial infection than in those with Gram-positive bacterial infections (p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). The authors suggest that PCT could be a helpful rapid diagnostic marker in children with suspected CRBSIs. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Antiseptic barrier cap effective in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voor In 't Holt, Anne F; Helder, Onno K; Vos, Margreet C; Schafthuizen, Laura; Sülz, Sandra; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Ista, Erwin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microorganisms can intraluminally access a central venous catheter via the catheter hub. The catheter hub should be appropriately disinfected to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). However, compliance with the time-consuming manual disinfection process is

  15. Intravascular catheter related infections in children admitted on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peripheral venous intravascular catheters uncoated with no antibiotic or antiseptic, was done. Social demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical examination including the catheter site were determined at enrollment. The children had their blood, catheter tip and hub samples taken off for culture and sensitivity as ...

  16. Severe Tricuspid Valve Endocarditis Related to Tunneled Catheters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient improved after catheter removal and treatment with ceftazidime, vancomycin and amikacin. Another patient who was maintained on chronic HD through a tunneled catheter in the right internal jugular vein presented with a limited infection in the sub-cutaneous tunnel of the catheter that improved after treatment ...

  17. Treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia with an antibiotic lock protocol: effect of bacterial pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Christopher V; Carlton, Donna; Bimbo, Lisa; Allon, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The standard therapy of dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia involves both systemic antibiotics and catheter replacement. We reported recently that instillation of an antibiotic lock (highly concentrated antibiotic solution) into the catheter lumen after dialysis sessions, in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, can successfully treat many episodes of catheter-related bacteraemia without requiring catheter removal. The present study evaluated whether the likelihood of achieving a cure with this protocol depends on the type of pathogen. This was a historically controlled interventional study of an antibiotic lock protocol for the treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia. We analysed prospectively the likelihood of clinical cure (fever resolution and negative surveillance cultures) with an antibiotic lock protocol among patients with dialysis catheter-related bacteraemia. In addition, infection-free catheter survival was evaluated for up to 150 days, and compared with that observed among patients managed with routine catheter replacement. Overall, the antibiotic lock protocol was successful in 33 of 47 infected patients (70%) with catheter-related bacteraemia. The likelihood of a clinical cure was 87% for Gram-negative infections, 75% for Staphylococcus epidermidis infections, and only 40% for Staphylococcus aureus infections (P = 0.04). The median infection-free catheter survival with the antibiotic lock protocol was longer than that observed among patients with routine catheter replacement (154 vs 71 days, P = 0.02). The clinical success of an antibiotic lock protocol in eradicating catheter-related bacteraemia while salvaging the catheter is highly dependent on the bacterial pathogen. Thus, the overall success rate in an individual dialysis programme will depend on the relative frequencies of different bacterial pathogens.

  18. Recommended Clinical Trial End Points for Dialysis Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allon, Michael; Brouwer-Maier, Deborah J; Abreo, Kenneth; Baskin, Kevin M; Bregel, Kay; Chand, Deepa H; Easom, Andrea M; Mermel, Leonard; Mokrzycki, Michele H; Patel, Priti R; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Shenoy, Surendra; Valentini, Rudolph P; Wasse, Haimanot

    2018-03-07

    Central venous catheters are used frequently in patients on hemodialysis as a bridge to a permanent vascular access. They are prone to frequent complications, including catheter-related bloodstream infection, catheter dysfunction, and central vein obstruction. There is a compelling need to develop new drugs or devices to prevent central venous catheter complications. We convened a multidisciplinary panel of experts to propose standardized definitions of catheter end points to guide the design of future clinical trials seeking approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Our workgroup suggests diagnosing catheter-related bloodstream infection in catheter-dependent patients on hemodialysis with a clinical suspicion of infection (fever, rigors, altered mental status, or unexplained hypotension), blood cultures growing the same organism from the catheter hub and a peripheral vein (or the dialysis bloodline), and absence of evidence for an alternative source of infection. Catheter dysfunction is defined as the inability of a central venous catheter to ( 1 ) complete a single dialysis session without triggering recurrent pressure alarms or ( 2 ) reproducibly deliver a mean dialysis blood flow of >300 ml/min (with arterial and venous pressures being within the hemodialysis unit parameters) on two consecutive dialysis sessions or provide a Kt/V≥1.2 in 4 hours or less. Catheter dysfunction is defined only if it persists, despite attempts to reposition the patient, reverse the arterial and venous lines, or forcefully flush the catheter. Central vein obstruction is suspected in patients with >70% stenosis of a central vein by contrast venography or the equivalent, ipsilateral upper extremity edema, and an existing or prior history of a central venous catheter. There is some uncertainty about the specific criteria for these diagnoses, and the workgroup has also proposed future high-priority studies to resolve these questions. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of

  19. Central Venous Catheter (CVC related infections: a local retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Fresu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central venous catheter (CVC related infection is associated with significant increases in morbidity, mortality, and health care cost.This local surveillance study was carry out to monitor the frequency of occurrence of CVC-related blood stream infections. Materials and methods. During the period January – December 2005, 226 CVC specimens were analyzed (quantitative method and microrganism identification from positive samples was performed by Vitek II. In 53 patients it was possible to compare quantitative results with those obtained from blood cultures. Results. Positive CVC samples were 125 (55% and 130 microrganisms were isolated: 109 Gram-positives (84%, 4 Gram-negatives (3%, and 17 mycetes (13%. Among pathogens collected simultaneously from CVC and blood samples, the most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus spp. (30% coagulase-negative staphylococci and 20%. S. aureus and Candida spp. (45%. In the group of patients that presented positive CVC and negative blood samples the most frequently recovered microrganisms were staphylococci. Many isolates (33% were polymicrobial. Conclusions. Catheter-related infections occurred in those patients who presented the same pathogen in both CVC and blood cultures. These infections were principally caused by staphylococci and Candida spp. On the contrary, a possible CVC contamination could be suspected when positive CVC and negative blood cultures were found.

  20. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure: Catheter-Related Complications Over 4 Decades at the Main Danish Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M; Brøbech, Per; Staun, Michael; Jeppesen, Palle Bekker

    2018-01-01

    Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and consequences of CRCs, their association to demographic characteristics, and potential risk factors in an effort to provide the rationale for preventive precautions to the relevant patients with IF at risk. All patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010 were included. Patient and treatment characteristics were extracted from the Copenhagen IF database. The incidences were given per 1000 central venous catheter (CVC) days. The 1715 CRCs occurred in 70% of the 508 patients with IF (56% of the 2191 CVCs). The incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) was 1.43. Higher age, HPN administration by community home nurses, and prior CRBSIs significantly raised the hazard for CRBSIs. In the 1970s, catheters were generally replaced following CRBSIs, whereas catheter salvage was the norm in the 2000s. The incidences of mechanical complications, tunnel infections, and catheter-related venous thromboses were 0.80, 0.25, and 0.11, respectively. The overall CRC incidence was 2.58, decreasing the first 3 decades but peaking in the last (2.84). The deaths related to CRCs were low (0.018). Even in an experienced IF center of excellence, the incidence of CRCs increased over the 4 decades. This increase could be explained by the expansion of the indication of HPN to a more elderly and frail patient population. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer: a randomized controlled open-labelled trial of taurolidine versus heparin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...... infections (CRBSI) was 0.1 per 1000 catheter-days using taurolidine and 0.9 per 1000 catheter-days using heparin (p = 0.03). This randomized trial confirmed that the use of taurolidine as catheter-lock compared with heparin reduced the rate of CRBSIs; this reduction was not related to a reduction...

  2. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin (n...... = 22) or taurolidine (n = 26), respectively. After removal, catheters were examined by standardized scanning electron microscopy to assess quantitative biofilm formation. Biofilm was present if morphologically typical structures and bacterial cells were identified. Quantitative and semi......-quantitative cultures were also performed. Biofilm was identified in 23 of 26 catheters from the taurolidine group and 21 of 22 catheters from the heparin group. A positive culture was made of six of the catheters locked with taurolidine and heparin, respectively (p = 0.78). The rate of catheter-related bloodstream...

  3. Identification of Ochrobactrum oryzae in Bloodstream Primary Infection in a Dialysis Patient: Can it be an Emerging Pathogen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana S Borges, Jussimara N Monteiro, Lisia Miglioli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ochrobactrum spp is a gram-negative bacillus currently considered an emerging and opportunistic infection, rare in humans, and generally associated with indwelling foreign bodies. We report a case of primary bloodstream infection related to a dialysis catheter, caused by Ochrobactrum oryzae misidentified as Ochrobactrum anthropi. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016; 6(3: 128-131

  4. [A case of catheter-related bacteremia of Tsukamurella pulmonis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyoeun Eun; Sung, Heungsup; Baek, Seung Mi; Namgung, Seung; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yong Gyun; Lee, Gyu Hyung

    2009-02-01

    Tsukamurella pulmonis is an aerobic actinomycete. We report a catheter-related bacteremia of T. pulmonis. A 39 yr-old male with ALL was hospitalized to receive bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Although the patient developed a high fever at the 7th hospital day (HD), it subsided with vancomycin treatment, and he received BMT at 9th HD. Fever resurged at 16th HD despite sustained treatment with vancomycin, meropenem, and amphotericin B, but subsided with removal of Hickman catheter (HC) at 19th HD. Three sets of blood cultures comprising one from the HC and two from venipunctures were taken at 7th, 16th, and 19th HD, and the distal tip of the HC was also cultured. The aerobic vials of all 3 HC-withdrawn blood cultures and one peripheral blood culture taken at 19HD and the HC tip culture grew long, straight, thin gram-positive rods that were positive on modified Kinyoun stain. This organism showed tiny, rough, grey colonies after 3-day incubation and grew to large flat colonies when incubation was extended. It was catalase-positive, urease-positive, and alkaline-slant/alkaline-deep on triple sugar iron agar, and hydrolyzed hypoxanthine. The sequence of 1,296 base pairs of 16S rRNA of this organism showed a 100.0% homology with the published sequence of T. pulmonis DSM 44142T. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. pulmonis bacteremia in Korea.

  5. Catheter Fracture and Embolization Related to an Arm Venous Port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent E. Burbridge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This 55-year-old female had a chest X-ray during a follow-up visit for the management of her breast cancer. The chest X-ray demonstrated an embolized venous catheter superimposed upon the mediastinum. It was determined that the catheter of the patient's arm port had fractured and embolized to the pulmonary circulation. The catheter was retrieved, in the interventional radiology suite, under fluoroscopic guidance. The patient suffered no ill effects. Subsequently, one day later, the old vein port was removed and a new arm port and associated catheter were implanted to facilitate the delivery of the patient's ongoing chemotherapy.

  6. Procalcitonin level as a surrogate for catheter-related blood stream infection among hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada Imam, Mahmoud; Gamal, Eman

    2017-11-17

    Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is a frequent complication among hemodialysis patients who usually are presented with nonspecific signs such as fever, rigors, and hypotension. Blood culture will take up to 5 days and antimicrobials will be started. Procalcitonin (PCT) is a valid marker in sepsis. Our goal in this study is to evaluate its usefulness as a diagnostic marker in detecting CRBSI among hemodialysis patients who present with suspected CRBSI. Thirty-one hemodialysis patients with suspected CRBSI were enrolled in this study. PCT level was measured at the time of presentation. Patients were divided into two groups according to blood culture results: positive and negative groups. PCT level and other markers for inflammation: white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and ferritin were compared between the two groups. Statistical analysis of variables was performed using the t-test or Mann-Whitney test together with Spearman correlation test. Thirty-one patients had median age 44.7 ± 2.1 years. They comprised 16 males (52%) and 15 females (48%). Sixteen patients had a positive blood culture result while in 15 it was negative. PCT level was significantly higher in the positive blood culture group (40.0 ± -21.9) (95% confidence interval [CI] 28.4-51.8) while its level was 1.1 ± 1 (95% CI 0.54-1.8) in the negative blood culture group [t(15) = -7, p<0.001). In the positive culture group, there was a correlation between CRP and ferritin (r = -0.58, p = 0.01, n = 16), while no correlation between PCT and other markers of inflammation. PCT is a useful marker for diagnosis of CRBSI among hemodialysis patients.

  7. Polyurethane versus silicone catheters for central venous port devices implanted at the forearm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Lueg, Claudia; Borgmeyer, Sebastian; Karimov, Ilham; Braun, Ulrike; Kiechle, Marion; Meier, Reinhard; Koehler, Michael; Ettl, Johannes; Berger, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to analyse short and long-term complications of polyurethane (PU) versus silicone catheters used in totally implantable venous-access ports (TIVAPs) implanted at the forearm. Retrospective analysis of 698 consecutively implanted TIVAPs was performed. Primary end-points were defined as rates of major complications associated with either type of central venous port catheter. Technical success rate, device service interval as well as minor complications not requiring port explantation were defined as secondary end-points. A total of 698 port devices were implanted in 681 patients, 396 equipped with a PU catheter, 302 with a silicone catheter. The technical success rate was 99.9% with no major periprocedural complications. During follow-up a total of 211 complications in 146 patients were observed (1.0/1000 catheter days), 183 occurred associated with PU catheters (1.8/100 catheter days), 28 (0.3/1000 catheter days) with silicone catheters (log rank test p < 0.0001). Catheter-related bloodstream infections as well as thrombotic complications occurred significantly more frequently with PU catheters, while silicone catheters exhibited a trend towards a higher rate of mechanical failure such as disconnection or catheter rupture. Major complications requiring explantation of the device occurred more frequently with PU-based catheters (10.6%) compared to silicone catheter carrying ports (4.6%, log rank test p < 0.001). PU catheters are more susceptible to catheter-related infections and exhibit a higher thrombogenicity, compared to silicone catheters. Silicone catheters instead exhibit a trend towards decreased mechanical stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Co-release of dicloxacillin and thioridazine from catheter material containing an interpenetrating polymer network for inhibiting device-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenger, Michael; Klein, Kasper; Grønnemose, Rasmus B

    2016-01-01

    Approximately half of all nosocomial bloodstream infections are caused by bacterial colonization of vascular catheters. Attempts have been made to improve devices using anti-adhesive or antimicrobial coatings; however, it is often difficult to bind coatings stably to catheter materials, and the low...... to an enhanced loading capacity of DCX when co-loaded with TDZ. Lastly, the IPN catheters were tested in a novel porcine model of central venous catheter-related infection, in which drug-loaded IPN catheters were found to significantly decrease the frequency of infection....

  9. Comparison of the roll plate method to the sonication method to diagnose catheter colonization and bacteremia in patients with long-term tunnelled catheters: A randomized prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Slobbe (Lennert); A.E. Barzouhi (Abdelilah); H. Boersma (Eric); B.J.A. Rijnders (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) still often involves tip culture. The conventional method is the semiquantitative roll plate method. However, the use of a quantitative sonication technique could have additional value, as it may detect endoluminal microorganisms

  10. Dialysis catheter-related septicaemia--focus on Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Ladefoged, S D; Kolmos, H J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dialysis catheters are a common cause of nosocomial septicaemia in haemodialysis units usually due to staphylococci, of which Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic. In this study, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dialysis catheter-related infections were studied, and methods...... to infection were measured. After catheter insertion, all patients were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus, and a culture was taken from the skin overlying the catheter insertion site. Once a week, cultures were taken from the insertion site and from the hub, and aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were...... drawn from the catheter. If clinical signs of septicaemia occurred, peripheral blood cultures were also performed, when it was possible. RESULTS: The incidence of septicaemia was 49% (21/43) in patients, and 56% of all cases were caused by S. aureus. The mortality was 14% (3/21) and the incidence...

  11. A comparison between two types of central venous catheters in the prevention of catheter-related infections: the importance of performing all the relevant cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, J.; Leusink, J.A.; de Jongh, B.M.; de Boer, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: to determine the efficacy of double-lumen central venous catheters coated with chlorhexidine and silver-sulfadiazine in reducing the incidence of catheter-related infections. Design: a randomized controlled trial. Setting: medical-surgical intensive care unit of a 600-bed teaching

  12. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis. PMID:26904283

  13. Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Philip J; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G

    2011-02-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71-3.53, p PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  14. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Philip J.; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71–3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  15. Intravascular catheter-related infection – current concepts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... They have been shown to lower the risk of catheter colonisation and CRBSI in critically ill patients.42,43 The anti-infective effect is short-lived, however, as the collagen to which the silver ions are chelated is biodegradable. Other drawbacks include cost and the need for specialised training. Antiseptic hubs.

  16. Long-Term Outcome of Catheter-Related Arterial Thrombosis in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Mattia; Kroiss, Sabine; Kretschmar, Oliver; Forster, Ishilde; Brotschi, Barbara; Albisetti, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the long-term outcome of catheter-related arterial thrombosis in children. Data from clinical and radiologic long-term follow-up of infants with congenital heart disease developing arterial thrombosis following femoral catheterization are presented. Ninety-five infants with radiologically proven arterial thrombosis because of cardiac catheter (n = 52; 55%) or indwelling arterial catheter (n = 43; 45%) were followed for a median time of 23.5 months (IQR 13.3-47.3). Overall, radiologic complete thrombus resolution was observed in 64 (67%), partial resolution in 8 (9%), and no resolution in 23 (24%) infants. Complete resolution was significantly more frequent in infants with indwelling arterial catheter-related thrombosis compared with cardiac catheter-related thrombosis (P = .001). Patients with complete resolution had a significantly lower blood pressure difference and increased ankle-ankle index compared with patients with partial or no resolution (P < .0001). However, symptoms of claudication were present only in 1 case and clinical significant legs growth retardation (≥ 15 mm) was present in 1%. A significant percentage of persistent occlusion is present in children with arterial catheter-related thrombosis on long-term follow-up. In these children, the magnitude of leg growth retardation is small and possibly not clinically relevant. However, in children with congenital heart disease, the high prevalence of persistent arterial occlusion may hamper future diagnostic and/or interventional catheterization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complications catheter-related infections in patients on hemodialysis (septic infections of patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knežević Violeta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hemodialysis catheters are used for quick establishing of an adequate vascular approach, when urgent hemodialysis is indicated in time of maturation of artery-vein fistula and in patients in whom all other vascular approach have been exhausted. Although the placement of the catheter provides the necessary vascular access, carries a risk of both local-infection exit site of a catheter, as well as systemic complications, including catheter-related infection, septic thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, and other metastatic infections such as lung abscess and brain, osteomyelitis and endophthalmitis. Cases series: We have presented a retrospective series of 5 cases of hemodialysis patients hospitalized at the Clinic of Nephrology and Clinical Immunology, of the Clinical Center of Vojvodina in the period of 2010 to 2017, which have developed different complications of catheter-related infections. Three patients diagnosed with spondylodiscitis and endocarditis in two. In one patient with native valve endocarditis, due to the appearance of other complications, there was a death, while the other patients had an adequate response to therapy. Conclusion: Early recognition of potential complications of catheter-related infections to more successful treatment of these patients.

  18. Catheter-related candidemia caused by Candida lipolytica in a child with tubercular meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Santwana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Candida lipolytica is weakly pathogenic yeast, which is rarely isolated from the blood. We recovered this species from repeated blood samples and in the central venous catheter in a debilitated pediatric patient of tubercular meningitis. Identity was established on the basis of colony morphology and sugar assimilation tests (ID 32C assimilation profile. The fungemia and associated fever subsided after the removal of catheter and amphotericin B therapy. The data suggest that though of low virulence and usually a contaminant, C. lipolytica is emerging yeast pathogen in cases of catheter-related candidemia. Pathogenicity is indicated by isolation from repeated samples as in our case. Intensive therapy is recommended in cases not resolving spontaneously or responding to removal of catheter alone.

  19. Outcomes in a nurse-led peripherally inserted central catheter program: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, Sheryl; Scrivens, Nicholas; Carrier, Marc; Sabri, Elham; Toye, Baldwin; Huebsch, Lothar; Fergusson, Dean

    2017-06-30

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provide enormous benefit to patients. However, recent publications have highlighted relatively high PICC-associated complication rates. We report on patient and device outcomes from a nurse-led program. We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of consecutive patients undergoing PICC insertion at The Ottawa Hospital between Jan. 1, 2013 and Dec. 31, 2014. Of the 8314 BioFlo PASV PICCs inserted, we randomly selected a sample of 700 and obtained a complete data set for 656. We measured the cumulative incidence of major complications (catheter-related bloodstream infections and deep vein thrombosis) and use of a thrombolytic to alleviate occlusions. The total number of catheter days was 58 486, and the median dwell time 45 days. We observed 4 cases of catheter-related bloodstream infection (0.6% [95% CI 0.17%-1.55%]) (0.07/1000 catheter days). Ten patients (1.5% [95% CI 0.83%-2.78%]) (0.17/1000 catheter days) had catheter-related deep venous thrombosis. At least 1 dose of thrombolytic was required in 75 catheters (11.4% [95% CI 8.61%-13.39]), 31 (7.1%) of the 436 single-lumen catheters and 113 (25.7%) of the 440 lumina of dual-lumen catheters ( p < 0.001). We attribute our low rates of major complications to a nurse-led expert insertion team, standardized care and maintenance protocols, high insertion volumes, novel catheter material and continuous quality-improvement initiatives that are implemented and evaluated regularly. We conclude that the considerable benefits PICCs provide to patients are attained with a low risk of major complications. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  20. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francimar Tinoco de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. METHOD An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. RESULTS In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69 were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56 of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. CONCLUSION Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care.

  1. Culture Positivity of CVCs Used for TPN: Investigation of an Association with Catheter-Related Infection and Comparison of Causative Organisms between ICU and Non-ICU CVCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criona Walshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between central venous catheter (CVC tip colonisation and catheter-related blood-stream infection (CRBSI has been suggested. We examined culture positivity of CVC tips (colonised and infected CVCs in a total parenteral nutrition (TPN population. Our aims were to define the relationship between culture positivity and CRBSI, and to compare causative organisms between culture positive and CRBSI CVCS, and between ward and ICU CVCs. All patients receiving TPN via non-tunnelled CVCs during the study (1997–2009 were included. All CVC tips were analysed. Data were collated contemporaneously. A TPN audit committee determined whether CVC tip culture positivity reflected colonisation/CRBSI using CDC criteria. 1,392 patients received TPN via 2,565 CVCs over 15,397 CVC days. 25.4% of CVCs tips were culture positive, of these 32% developed CRBSI. There was a nonsignificant trend of higher Gram negative Bacilli isolation in ICU CVCs (=0.1, ward CVCs were associated with higher rates of staphylococcal isolation (=0.01. A similar pattern of organisms were cultured from CRBSI and culture positive CVCs. The consistent relationship between CRBSI and culture positive CVCs, and similar pattern of causative organisms further supports an aetiological relationship between culture positive CVC tips and CRBSI, supporting the contention that CVC culture-positivity may be a useful surrogate marker for CRBSI rates.

  2. Utilização de cateter central de inserção periférica e ocorrência da infecção da corrente sanguínea em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal | Use of peripherally inserted central catheters and occurrence of bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Yumi Yonekura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar a prevalência de infecção hospitalar primária da corrente sanguínea em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo, com análise de prontuários de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2010. Foi calculada a densidade de incidência de infecção de corrente sanguínea associada ao cateter por 1000 cateteres-dia. Resultados: Dos 192 recém-nascidos, 16 (8,3% apresentaram infecção da corrente sanguínea e todos estes utilizaram o cateter central de inserção periférica. A densidade de infecção confirmada por hemocultura foi de 5,9 e a baseada em critérios clínicos foi de 3,5 por 1000 pacientes com cateter vascular central-dia. A distribuição por faixa de peso foi de: 30,9 (750-999g; 11 (1000-1499g; 8,5 (1500-2499g e 6,8 (> 2500g por 1000 pacientes com cateter vascular dia. A média do tempo de uso do cateter foi de 11 dias. O sítio de inserção mais comum foi o acesso jugular (37,5% e a mortalidade associada à infecção da corrente sanguínea foi de 31%. Conclusões: A utilização do cateter central de inserção periférica é uma prática não isenta de riscos, considerando que este é um dispositivo invasivo e pode predispor à ocorrência de infecção. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Objective: To analyze the prevalence of hospital primary bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Methods: A retrospective study involving analyses of records of patients admitted to the NICU from January to December 2010 was conducted. The incidence density of catheter-associated bloodstream infections per 1000 catheter-days was calculated. Results: Among 192 newborns, 16 (8.3% who used peripherally inserted central catheters had bloodstream infections. The infection density confirmed by blood culture reached 5.9, while the density based on clinical criteria accounted for

  3. STUDY OF CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER RELATED BLOOD STREAM INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS ON HAEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Temporary and permanent central venous catheters are used in majority of patients of CKD when initiated on hemodialysis and mostly these catheters act as bridge before permanent AV fistula assess could be obtained. Blood stream infections related to these central venous catheters are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. Appropriate antiseptic precautions while inserting central venous catheter and early identification of catheter related blood stream infections (CRBSI are of utmost importance for reducing hospital stay, cost of therapy and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 50 patients of CKD were included in the study who had central venous catheter in situ (internal jugular or subclavian and developed symptoms related to blood stream infections. Blood cultures were obtained from the catheter lumen and a separate venous site 1 hour apart. All the culture sensitivity reports were obtained from department of microbiology of our institute. Inclusion Criteria- Known case of CKD patients aged more than 18yrs on hemodialysis with symptoms and signs of catheter related blood stream infections were included in the study. Exclusion Criteria- Patients with other associated comorbid infections like Koch’s, urinary tract infection or others mimicking symptoms of CRBSI. RESULTS The cultures were found positive in 38 patients (76% while in rest 24% cases positive cultures could not be obtained. Out of culture positive patients 52.63% cases were found to have gram positive infections while 44.74% had gram negative infections. In 2.63% patients, fungus was isolated to be the causative organism. Among the gram positive organisms 50% had CoNS, 30% had MSSA and 20% had MRSA infections. Among the gram negative group, 47.06% had klebsiella, 23.53% had acinetobacter, 17.65% had E.coli and 11.76% had pseudomonas as the causative organisms. Mortality was observed in 14% patients out of which 28.57% were culture

  4. Delayed Catheter-Related Intracranial Hemorrhage After a Ventriculoperitoneal or Ventriculoatrial Shunt in Hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Zhouqi; Gao, Liang; Wang, Ke; Pandey, Sajan

    2017-11-01

    Delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is not rare after a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) or ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt for the treatment of hydrocephalus. Immediate postoperative catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is possibly due to the procedure itself; however, delayed intracranial hemorrhage may have other underlying mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics and reveal the risk factors of delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage after a VP or VA shunt. We did a retrospective study to review patients with hydrocephalus and underwent VP or VA shunt in our department from September 2011 to December 2015. We reviewed the clinical characteristics of the patients with delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage, and its risk factors were analyzed with SPSS 16.0. Of the 218 patients enrolled in the study (145 male, 73 female), 17 (7.8%) patients experienced delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage, including 11 of 151 (7.3%) patients with a VP shunt and 6 of 67 (9.0%) patients with a VA shunt. Additionally, 4 of the 16 patients with postoperative low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) therapy and 13 of the 202 patients without LMWH experienced bleeding, showing a significant difference (25% vs. 6.4%, P = 0.026). The relative risk was 4.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.4-17.1). Delayed catheter-related intracranial hemorrhage is not rare after a VP or VA shunt. However, most patients can be cured after appropriate treatment. Postoperative anticoagulation therapy with enoxaparin may be associated with an increased risk of bleeding. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens intravascular catheter-related bacteremia in a haematology patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, R; Halim, H A; Ng, K P; Hanifah, Y A; Chin, E; Jaafar, F L; Abubakar, S

    2011-11-01

    Tsukamurella spp. are a rare but important cause of intravascular catheter-related bacteremia in immunocompromised patients. The organism is an aerobic, Gram-positive, weakly acid-fast bacillus that is difficult to differentiate using standard laboratory methods from other aerobic actinomycetales such as Nocardia spp., Rhododoccus spp., Gordonia spp., and the rapid growing Mycobacterium spp. We report a case of Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens catheter-related bacteremia in a 51-year-old haematology patient who responded to treatment with imipenem and subsequent line removal. 16srRNA sequencing allowed for the prompt identification of this organism.

  6. A hospital-acquired outbreak of catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children on peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Takuji; Ushijima, Katsumi; Uemura, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children with chronic renal failure on peritoneal dialysis (PD) is rare. However, there have been five such infections in infants among PD patients at our center. Although the patients were treated with antibiotics to which the organisms showed in vitro sensitivity, they were clinically drug resistant. Hence, all PD catheters needed to be removed. Thereafter, following hemodialysis treatment for approximately 1 month, the PD catheters...

  7. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  8. Femoral Vein Catheter is an Important Risk Factor for Catheter-related Thrombosis in (Near-)term Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbink-Verheij, Gerdina H; Pelsma, Iris C M; van Ommen, Cornelia H; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; Visser, Remco; Steggerda, Sylke J; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lopriore, Enrico

    2018-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) in neonates are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Most reports focus on umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), whereas data available on femoral venous catheters (FVCs) are limited. We performed a retrospective cohort study in all neonates (gestational age ≥34 wk) with CVCs. The primary outcome was the occurrence of thrombosis in CVCs. The secondary outcomes were possible risk factors for thrombosis, the thrombotic incidence in FVCs, UVCs, and PICCs, and clinical aspects of thrombosis in these groups. A total of 552 neonates received a total of 656 catheters, including 407 (62%) UVCs, 185 (28%) PICCs, and 64 (10%) FVCs. Thrombosis was detected in 14 cases, yielding an overall incidence of 2.1% or 3.6 events per 1000 catheter days. FVC was significantly associated with the occurrence of thrombosis when compared with UVC (P=0.02; odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-12.0) and PICC (P=0.01; odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-41.7). The incidence of thrombosis was higher in FVCs than in UVCs and PICCS, that is, 7.8% (5/64), 1.7% (7/407), and 1.1% (2/185), respectively (Pcatheter days was 12.3 in FVCs, 3.2 in UVCs, and 1.5 in PICCs (P<0.05). We concluded that thrombosis occurs more frequently in FVCs than in other CVCs.

  9. Tsukamurella paurometabolum: a novel pathogen causing catheter-related bacteremia in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, C L; Haft, R F; Gantz, N M; Doern, G V; Christenson, J C; O'Brien, R; Overall, J C; Brown, B A; Wallace, R J

    1992-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabolum is a weakly acid-fast, pleomorphic gram-positive bacterium found in soil. Human infection due to this organism has rarely been described, and there are no published accounts of bacteremia. Three cases of bacteremia due to T. paurometabolum and related to long-term use of a central venous catheter in patients with cancer who were receiving chemotherapy are described.

  10. Implementation of a children's hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.F. Kornelisse (René); C. van der Starre (Cynthia); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); M.J. Poley (Marten); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation

  11. Epidemiology, surveillance, and prevention of bloodstream infections in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Priti R; Kallen, Alexander J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2010-09-01

    Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are particularly problematic, accounting for a substantial number of hospitalizations in these patients. Hospitalizations for BSI and other vascular access infections appear to have increased dramatically in hemodialysis patients since 1993. These infections frequently are related to central venous catheter (CVC) use for dialysis access. Regional initiatives that have shown successful decreases in catheter-related BSIs in hospitalized patients have generated interest in replicating this success in outpatient hemodialysis populations. Several interventions have been effective in preventing BSIs in the hemodialysis setting. Avoiding the use of CVCs in favor of access types with lower associated BSI risk is among the most important. When CVCs are used, adherence to evidence-based catheter insertion and maintenance practices can positively influence BSI rates. In addition, facility-level surveillance to detect BSIs and stimulate examination of vascular access use and care practices is essential to a comprehensive approach to prevention. This article describes the current epidemiology of BSIs in hemodialysis patients and effective prevention strategies to decrease the incidence of these devastating infections.

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray ... are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test ...

  13. A novel technique of axillary vein puncture involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters for a small basilic vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Fumito; Odaka, Yoshinobu; Mutoh, Mitsuhisa; Katayose, Yu; Tokumura, Hiromi

    2018-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are some of the most useful devices for vascular access used globally. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters have a low rate of fatal mechanical complications when compared to non-tunnel central venous catheters. However, as peripherally inserted central venous catheter access requires a smaller vein, there is a high risk of thrombosis. The axillary vein (confluence of the basilic and brachial veins) can serve as an access for cannulation. Moreover, as this vein is larger than the basilic or brachial vein, it might be a superior option for preventing thrombosis. The risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection should be considered when the puncture site is at the axillary fossa. The aim of this study was to present our new protocol involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters (non-tunneled/tunneled) and a tunneling technique and assess its feasibility and safety for improving cannulation and preventing thrombosis and infection. The study included 20 patients. The axillary vein in the upper arm was used for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in patients with a small-diameter basilic vein (venous catheter. The observed catheter duration was 645 days (median ± standard deviation, 26 ± 22.22 days). Catheterization was successful in all cases, however, two accidental dislodgements were identified. No fatal or serious complications were observed after catheterization. Our new protocol for axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters/tunneled axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters use for a small-diameter basilic vein is safe and feasible.

  14. Human factors related to time-dependent infection control measures: "Scrub the hub" for venous catheters and feeding tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspari, Lindsay; Epstein, Elizabeth; Blackman, Amy; Jin, Li; Kaufman, David A

    2017-06-01

    The use of catheter hub decontamination protocols is a common practice to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections. However, few data exist on the most effective disinfection procedure prior to hub access accounting for human factors and time-dependent practices in real time in the clinical setting. An observational design with a multimodal intervention was used in this study in a neonatal intensive care unit. Direct observations on nurse compliance of scrub times with decontamination when accessing of venous catheter and feeding tube hubs were conducted during 3 phases: (1) baseline period prior to any interventions; (2) during an educational intervention phase; and (3) during a timer intervention period when using a timing device, either an actual timer or music button. Overall, both education and the timing device interventions increased the mean scrub time ± SD of venous catheter hubs. Mean baseline scrub times of 10 ± 5 seconds were lower compared with 23 ± 12 seconds after educational intervention (P music button use (P observed with scrub times of feeding tubes. Time-based infection control measures, such as scrubbing the hub, must be implemented with aids that qualify specific times to account for human factors, to ensure adherence to time-dependent measures aimed at decreasing nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Retrospective Analysis of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-related Vein
Thrombosis in Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CHEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that peripherally inserted central catheter-related vein thrombosis is a unignorable complication which causes serious harm and economic burden to patients. We designed a study to analyze factors causing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC-related vein thrombosis, and find some nursing interventions to reduce the incidence of PICC-related vein thrombosis, and prolong the service time of peripherally inserted central catheters. Methods We designed a retrospective analysis. The study participants were 1,538 lung cancer patients who underwent PICCs placement between January 2010 and September 2013. And tried to determine age, gender, indwelling vein, platelet count, prothrombin time, fibrinogen associated with PICC-related vein thrombosis. Results Of the 1,538 unique PICC placements, 38 patients developed PICC-related vein thrombosis, the incidence was 2.47%. The gender (OR=2.194, P=0.024, indwelling vein (OR=1.955, P=0.006, fibrinogen (OR=2.055, P=0.028 can significantly affect the occurrence of PICC-related vein thrombosis. Conclusion Patients’ gender, indwelling vein, fibrinogen can affect the occurrence of PICC-related vein thrombosis. Assessing the patients’ condition carefully, implementing individual nursing care can reduce the incidence of PICC-related vein thrombosis, and prolong the service time of PICCs.

  16. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of central venous catheters treated with Minocycline and Rifampicin in preventing bloodstream infections in intensive care patients [Medizinische Wirksamkeit und Kosteneffektivität von Minocyclin/Rifampicin-beschichteten zentralvenösen Kathetern zur Prävention von Blutbahninfektionen bei Patienten in intensivmedizinischer Betreuung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusser, Silke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] The use of central venous catheters coated with antibiotics can avoid bloodstream infections with intensive care patients. This is the result of a scientific examination which has been published by the DIMDI. Costs could be also saved in this way. However, according to the authors, the underlying studies do not allow absolutely valid statements.[german] Der Einsatz bestimmter Antibiotika-beschichteter Venenkatheter kann bei Intensivpatienten Blutbahninfektionen vermeiden. So das Ergebnis einer wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung, die das DIMDI veröffentlicht hat. Auch ließen sich damit Kosten einsparen. Allerdings erlauben, laut den Autoren, die zugrunde gelegten Studien keine uneingeschränkt gültigen Aussagen.

  17. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related thrombosis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochios, Vasileios; Umar, Imraan; Simpson, Nicola; Jones, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are being increasingly used in critical care setting. However, PICCs are associated with a number of complications, particularly upper extremity venous thrombosis (UEVT), leading to post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary embolism and increased risk of catheter-related infection. To review the literature surrounding PICCs and highlight the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of PICC-related thrombosis in critically ill patients. We performed an electronic literature search of the databases PubMed, EMBASE and Google scholar using set search terms, from their commencement date to the end of January 2014. It has been shown that PICCs may double the risk of deep venous thrombosis compared with centrally inserted venous catheters, in critically ill patients. However, the incidence of PICC-related thrombosis in critically ill patients has not been quantified. Ultrasonography is the preferred diagnostic imaging modality. There are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the best treatment of PICC-related thrombosis in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and in most cohort studies, anticoagulation strategies with or without PICC removal have been used. Decision to insert a PICC should be taken after careful risk stratification. There is lack of high-quality evidence assessing prevention strategies and management of PICC-related thrombosis in the ICU. Well-designed RCTs are required to estimate the prevalence of UEVT in ICU patients with PICCs and evaluate the efficacy and magnitude of clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of therapeutic strategies.

  18. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  19. Leclercia adecarboxylata and catheter-related bacteraemia: review of the literature and outcome with regard to catheters and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mauri, Andreana; Chiarinotti, Doriana; Andreoni, Stefano; Molinari, Gian Lorenzo; Conti, Novella; De Leo, Martino

    2013-10-01

    Infection is a common complication in patients carrying a central venous catheter (CVC) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Leclercia adecarboxylata is an unusual but emerging pathogen in healthy and immunocompromised patients. We report a case of L. adecarboxylata bacteraemia in a patient with a haemodialysis tunnelled CVC. In accordance with the susceptibility to the tested antimicrobials, a long-course treatment with intravenous gentamicin plus amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and gentamicin-lock therapy was adopted. The patient had a full recovery and the catheter was not removed. We also performed a systematic PubMed/Medline and Scopus review of peer-reviewed English papers on L. adecarboxylata infections, focusing on bacteraemia in patients with different types of CVCs. Moreover, we suggest a treatment algorithm to preserve the patient and maintain the CVC.

  20. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ...

  1. [Evaluation of practices for the prevention and control of bloodstream infections in a government hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Jaquelline Maria; Lacerda, Rúbia Aparecida; Soares, Naury de Jesus Danzi; Nunes, Bruna Kosar

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to observe clinical procedures in order to evaluate the practices used for the control and prevention of bloodstream infections associated with short-term central venous catheters (BSI-ACVC). The study data came from 5877 assessments distributed among selected practices. The results revealed the following adherence rates among the practices selected: 91.6% for recording the indication and permanence time of the CVC, 51.5% for adhering to the care and maintenance of the dressing at the CVC insertion site and its devices, 10.7% for hand hygiene practices while performing procedures related to the CVC, and 0.0% for the practices related to the insertion of the central venous catheter (CVC). The results demonstrate the need for further elaboration of strategies that ensure sustainable compliance practices for prevention and control BSI-ACVC in the institution being assessed.

  2. Diagnostic Usefulness of Differential Time to Positivity for Catheter-Related Candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ki-Ho; Lee, Mi Suk; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2014-01-01

    A differential time to positivity (DTP) of ≥120 min is useful for diagnosing catheter-related bacteremia, but data on diagnosing catheter-related candidemia (CRC) in this way are limited. We wished to evaluate the usefulness of the DTP for diagnosing CRC. All adult patients who had the same Candida species isolated from blood cultures drawn simultaneously from a central venous catheter (CVC) and a peripheral vein were included at a tertiary care hospital over an 18-month period. A total of 105 patients with candidemia who had positive simultaneous CVC and peripheral vein blood cultures were included in our study. Sixty-one patients (58%) had CRC (47 definite and 14 probable), and 38 (36%) had candidemia from another source (non-CRC). The remaining 6 patients (6%) with indeterminate candidemia were excluded from the final analysis. The overall sensitivity and specificity of a DTP of ≥120 min for diagnosing CRC were 85% (95% confidence interval [CI], 74% to 93%) and 82% (95% CI, 66% to 92%), respectively, and for neutropenic patients, they were 75% (95% CI, 19% to 99%) and 100% (95% CI, 75% to 100%), respectively. For Candida glabrata infections, the optimal DTP cutoff was ≥6 h, with a sensitivity of 63% (95% CI, 35% to 85%) and a specificity of 75% (95% CI, 35% to 97%). In summary, DTP is useful for diagnosing CRC, and a DTP of ≥120 min appears to be the optimal cutoff except for CRC caused by C. glabrata. For neutropenic patients, DTP may be useful as an adjunct test to rule in CRC and to decide whether a catheter should be removed. PMID:24829236

  3. Catheter-related infection in Irish intensive care units diagnosed with HELICS criteria: a multi-centre surveillance study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conrick-Martin, I

    2013-03-01

    Catheter-related infection (CRI) surveillance is advocated as a healthcare quality indicator. However, there is no national CRI surveillance programme or standardized CRI definitions in Irish intensive care units (ICUs).

  4. Catheter-related urinary nosocomial infections in intensive care units: An epidemiologic study in North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of nosocomial catheter- associated UTI and its related factors in hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who were admitted in hospitals and urinary catheterization was performed for them. Beds of intensive care units were followed-up for the occurrence of catheter-associated UTI for 14 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Results: Our results showed that of the 1409 patients (11648 catheter - days), the incidence of catheter-related UTI was 18.2% (among 256 individuals) equals to 21.987 per 1,000 catheter - days. E. coli was the most important cause of UTI. The results show that the history of the underlying disease, duration of catheterization and perineal washing were significantly associated with the incidence of UTIs. Conclusion: The findings of this study show a high incidence of UTIs caused by catheters in ICU. The incidence of this infection increased hospital length of stay and hospital cost. It seems that the necessary use of urinary catheters and its reduced duration use can be effective in decreasing this incidence. PMID:28702145

  5. Impact of flushing with aseptic non-touch technique using pre-filled flush or manually prepared syringes on central venous catheter occlusion and bloodstream infections in pediatric hemato-oncology patients: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerçeker, Gülçin Özalp; Sevgili, Seda Ardahan; Yardımcı, Figen

    2018-04-01

    To compare standardized flushing methods with aseptic non-touch technique; (1) Manually prepared syringes (2) Single-use prefilled flush syringes. Forty-eight PHO patients with Hickman or Port catheters were recruited to participate in a prospective, randomized study. Standardized flushing methods with aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) using single-use pre-filled flush syringes (intervention group) or manually prepared syringes (control group) also included the pulsatile technique, use of 10-mL syringe size with 0.9% NaCl for flushing, flushing once a day, flushing training of the nurses. The effects of standardized flushing methods on occlusion and CLABSI evaluated. Of the patients in the intervention group, 8.7% (n: 2) had catheter occlusion, while this rate was 20.0% (n: 5) in the control group. Of the patients in the intervention group, 8.7% (n: 2) had CLABSI, while this rate was 36.0% (n: 9) in the control group. While there was no difference in occlusion, there was a difference between the groups in terms of CLABSI development. In the intervention group, CLABSI rate was 1.9/1000 per catheter-days, in the control group CLABSI rate was 10.1/1000 per catheter-days. In the intervention group, occlusion rate was 1.9/1000 per catheter-days, in the control group, occlusion rate was 5.6/1000 per catheter-days. Standardized flushing and single-use prefilled flush syringes are effective in reducing CLABSI rates in PHO patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Intravascular Cooling Catheter-Related Venous Thromboembolism After Hypothermia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Moy, Brian T; Hiendlmayr, Brett J; Krainski, Felix; Duvall, W Lane; Fernandez, Antonio B

    2018-03-23

    Fifty-four year-old man with recent history of myocardial infarction and a percutaneous coronary intervention who suffered a ventricular fibrillation arrest at home. He was resuscitated in the field. His heart rhythm was in atrial fibrillation. The cardiac catheterization showed a patent stent from his previous myocardial infarction and no new occlusions. He subsequently underwent hypothermia protocol using the Alsius CoolGard 3000 Temperature Control System and Icy Catheter. Heparin drip was started for atrial fibrillation 36 hours after catheter insertion and became therapeutic 2 hours before the end of cooling maintenance phase. Heparin drip was stopped 4 hours into the rewarming phase because of spontaneous conversion to sinus rhythm. Subcutaneous heparin was resumed for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis. He was extubated to room air after hypothermia protocol. The cooling catheter was removed 88 hours after insertion. Within 1 minute of catheter removal, his oxygen saturation dropped to 80%. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed a mobile thrombus in the right atrium prolapsing into the right ventricle. Computer tomography angiography of the chest confirmed a large saddle embolus. Ninety minutes later, patient went into cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity while he was being considered for surgical embolectomy, but he could not be resuscitated. The temporal relationship of the catheter removal and his acute clinical decompensation led to believe that this was an intravascular cooling catheter (ICC)-related event. Providers should be cognizant of the complications of central venous catheters such as thrombosis formation, as it could lead to fatal pulmonary embolism. Physicians should promote frequent assessment of the access site(s) during routine physical examinations and potentially use point of care vascular ultrasound in high-risk cases to rule out a catheter-associated thrombus before catheter removal.

  7. Management of hemodialysis catheter-related bacteremia with an adjunctive antibiotic lock solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasami, Zipporah; Carlton, Donna; Bimbo, Lisa; Taylor, Maria E; Balkovetz, Daniel F; Barker, Jill; Allon, Michael

    2002-03-01

    Tunneled dialysis catheters are complicated by frequent systemic infections. Standard therapy of catheter-associated bacteremia involves both systemic antibiotics and catheter replacement. Recent data suggest that biofilms in the catheter lumen are responsible for the bacteremia, and that instillation of an antibiotic lock (highly concentrated antibiotic solution) into the catheter lumen after dialysis sessions can eradicate the biofilm. We analyzed prospectively the efficacy of an antibiotic lock protocol, in conjunction with systemic antibiotics, for treatment of patients with dialysis catheter-associated bacteremia without catheter removal. Protocol success was defined as resolution of fever and negative surveillance cultures one week following completion of the protocol. Protocol failure was defined as persistence of fever or surveillance cultures positive for any pathogen. In addition, infection-free catheter survival was compared to that observed in institutional historical control patients treated with catheter replacement. Blood cultures were positive in 98 of 129 of episodes (76%) in which patients dialyzing with a catheter had fever or chills. Protocol success occurred in 40 of 79 infected patients (51%) treated with the antibiotic lock. Protocol failure occurred in 39 cases (49%): 7 had persistent fever, 15 had positive surveillance cultures (9 for Candida and 6 for bacteria), and 17 required catheter removal due to malfunction. Each of the pathogens in the surveillance cultures was different from the original pathogen in that patient. Eight of the 9 secondary Candida infections and all 6 secondary bacterial infections resolved after catheter exchange and specific antimicrobial treatment. Overall catheter survival with the antibiotic lock protocol was similar to that observed among patients managed with catheter replacement (median survival, 64 vs. 54 days, P = 0.24). Use of an antibiotic lock, in conjunction with systemic antibiotic therapy, can

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive ... of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  13. Urinary catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter, clean the area where the catheter exits your body and the catheter itself with soap ... DO, urologist with the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  15. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature.

  16. ABO blood group related venous thrombosis risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chung Mo; Vissapragada, Ravi; Sharp, Rebecca; Nguyen, Phi; Ung, Thomas; Solanki, Chrismin; Esterman, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the association between ABO blood group and upper limb venous thrombosis (VT) risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). Single centre retrospective cohort study. A cohort of patients who underwent PICC insertion from September 2010 to August 2014 were followed up for symptomatic VT presentations diagnosed by ultrasound. Blood group status was identified from hospital information systems. 2270 participants had 3020 PICCs inserted. There were 124 cases of symptomatic VT, an incident rate of 4% [95% confidence interval, CI (3-5%)]. Univariate analysis adjusting for the clustered sample showed that having chemotherapy, two or more previous PICCs, a larger catheter size, a diagnosis of cancer and having a blood group B were all associated with an increased risk of a VT. In the multivariate analysis, PICC diameter, cancer diagnosis and blood group B were all independently associated with increased risk of VT. Patients undergoing PICC insertion with a blood group B appear to have a higher risk of VT, independent of risks attached to the PICC procedure and cancer diagnosis. Without any existing guidelines for PICC-related VT, this investigation creates a platform for further research to be conducted in order to establish guidelines. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies investigating VT risk associated with blood group status related to large heterogeneous populations. In this article, we look at patients specifically with PICC, which reduces the heterogeneity in the cohort. In addition, due to the substantial number of patients enrolled, we had a chance to perform multivariate analyses with statistical significance.

  17. Performing Gram stain directly on catheter tips: assessment of the quality of the observation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guembe, M; Pérez-Granda, M J; Rivera, M L; Martín-Rabadán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-06-01

    A previous study performed in our institution showed that catheter tip (CT) staining by combining acridine orange and Gram stain (GS) before culture anticipated catheter colonization with exhaustive and careful observation by a highly trained technician. Our objective was to assess the validity values of GS without acridine orange on an external smear of CT for predicting catheter colonization and catheter-related bloodstream infection (C-RBSI). We compared different periods of observation and the results of two technicians with different levels of professional experience. Over a 5-month period, the roll-plate technique was preceded by direct GS of all CTs sent to the microbiology laboratory. The reading was taken at ×100 by two observers with different skill levels. Each observer performed a routine examination (3 min along three longitudinal lines) and an exhaustive examination (5 min along five longitudinal lines). The presence of at least one cell was considered positive. All slides were read before culture results were known. We included a total of 271 CTs from 209 patients. The prevalence of catheter colonization and C-RBSI was 16.2 % and 5.1 %, respectively. Routine and exhaustive examinations revealed only 29.5 % and 40.9 % of colonized catheters, respectively (p staining is performed exhaustively. However, the decision to implement this approach in daily routine will depend on the prevalence rate of catheter colonization at each institution.

  18. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Amer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC, who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration was subsequently detected, with the UVC tip located within the heart. Upon withdrawal of the UVC and a final dose of adenosine, the arrhythmia permanently resolved. Our literature review confirms that tachyarrhythmia is a rare but recognised neonatal complication of malpositioned central venous catheters. We recommend the immediate investigation of central catheter position when managing neonatal tachyarrhythmia, as catheter repositioning is an essential aspect of management.

  19. Endovascular cooling versus standard femoral catheters and intravascular complications: A propensity-matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andremont, Olivier; du Cheyron, Damien; Terzi, Nicolas; Daubin, Cedric; Seguin, Amélie; Valette, Xavier; Lecoq, Flore-Anne; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Sauneuf, Bertrand

    2018-03-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) contributes to improved neurological outcome in adults who have been successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest with shockable rhythm. Endovascular cooling catheters are widely used to induce and maintain targeted temperature in the ICU. The aim of the study was to compare the risk of complications with cooling catheters and standard central venous catheters. In this prospective single-centre cohort study, we included all patients admitted to an intensive care unit for successfully resuscitated cardiac arrest that required endovascular TTM (Coolgard ® , Zoll™ Medical corporation, MA, USA), between August 2012 and November 2014, inclusive. We matched the endovascular cooling catheter cohort with a retrospective historical cohort of 512 central femoral venous catheters from the 3SITES trial to compare thrombotic and infectious complications. Overall, 108 patients were included in the cooling cohort, of which 89 had ultrasound doppler. The duration of catheterization was 4.9 days in the control group versus 4.2 days in the TTM group (p = 0.08). After propensity-score matching, there were significantly more thrombotic complications in the cooling (n = 75) than in the control (n = 75) group (12 of 75 (16%) versus 0 of 75 (0%), respectively, p = 0.005), and 4 patients presented major complications. There were 8 colonized catheters in each group (11%) (p > 0.99), and none of the patients had a catheter-related bloodstream infection. In our propensity-score matched study, endovascular cooling catheters were associated with an increased risk of venous catheter-related thrombosis compared to standard central venous catheters. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Central Venous Catheter-Related Tachycardia in the Newborn: Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Amer, Aya; Broadbent, Roland S.; Edmonds, Liza; Wheeler, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Central venous access is an important aspect of neonatal intensive care management. Malpositioned central catheters have been reported to induce cardiac tachyarrhythmia in adult populations and there are case reports within the neonatal population. We present a case of a preterm neonate with a preexisting umbilical venous catheter (UVC), who then developed a supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). This was initially treated with intravenous adenosine with transient reversion. Catheter migration w...

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  2. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Başak Akça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 μ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 μ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0 and 15 (t1, 60 (t2, 120 (t3, and 360 (t4 minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042 was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044.The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004 were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017. Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034 and the control group (p=0.005. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed.

  3. Tricuspid valve endocarditis following central venous cannulation: The increasing problem of catheter related infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Kale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A central venous catheter (CVC is inserted for measurement of haemodynamic variables, delivery of nutritional supplements and drugs and access for haemodialysis and haemofiltration. Catheterization and maintenance are common practices and there is more to the technique than routine placement as evident when a procedure-related complication occurs. More than 15% of the patients who receive CVC placement have some complications and infectious endocarditis involving the tricuspid valve is a rare and serious complication with high morbidity and mortality. Overenthusiastic and deep insertion of the guide wire and forceful injection through the CVC may lead to injury of the tricuspid valve and predispose to bacterial deposition and endocarditis. We report a case of tricuspid valve endocarditis, probably secondary to injury of the anterior tricuspid leaflet by the guide wire or the CVC that required open heart surgery with vegetectomy and repair of the tricuspid valve.

  4. Skin antisepsis with 0.05% sodium hypochlorite before central venous catheter insertion in neonates: A 2-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Matilde; Chakrokh, Roksana; Molinazzi, Dario; Zanni, Angela; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sandri, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    The study reports a 2-year single-center experience of the practice of skin antisepsis using a 0.05% sodium hypochlorite solution before central venous catheter placement in neonates. Eligible subjects included any hospitalized neonate who needed a central line for at least 48 hours. Infants were excluded if they had a generalized or localized skin disorder. An ad hoc Excel (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA) file was used to record the data from each patient. The catheter sites were monitored daily for the presence of contact dermatitis. Central line-associated bloodstream infection was diagnosed according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. One hundred five infants underwent central venous catheter placement and were enrolled. A total of 198 central lines were inserted. The median gestational age was 31 weeks (range, 23-41 weeks) and median birth weight was 1,420 g (range, 500-5,170 g). There were no signs of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite-related skin toxicity in any infant. Of 198 catheters (1,652 catheter-days) prospectively studied, 9 were associated with bloodstream infections (5.4 per 1,000 catheter-days). During the observation period, no local adverse effects were observed suggesting that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite may be a safe choice in this context. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Catheter-related infections caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: virulence factors involved and their relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnickova, Katerina; Hola, Veronika; Ruzicka, Filip

    2014-11-01

    The nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is equipped with a large arsenal of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors which enhance its invasive potential. The complex relationships among virulence determinants have hitherto not been fully elucidated. In the present study, 175 catheter-related isolates were observed for the presence of selected virulence factors, namely extracellular enzymes and siderophore production, biofilm formation, resistance to antibiotics, and motility. A high percentage of the strains produced most of the tested virulence factors. A positive correlation was identified between the production of several exoproducts, and also between the formation of both types of biofilm. An opposite trend was observed between the two types of biofilm and the production of siderophores. Whereas the relationship between the submerged biofilm production (i.e. the biofilm formed on the solid surface below the water level) and the siderophore secretion was negative, the production of air-liquid interface (A-L) biofilm (i.e. the biofilm floating on the surface of the cultivation medium) and the siderophore secretion were positively correlated. All correlations were statistically significant at the level P = 0.05 with the correlation coefficient γ ≥ 0.50. Our results suggest that: (1) the co-production of the lytic enzymes and siderophores can play an important role in the pathogenesis of the catheter-related infections and should be taken into account when the virulence potential is assessed; (2) biofilm-positive strains are capable of forming both submerged and non-attached A-L biofilms; and (3) the different micro-environment in the submerged biofilm and A-L biofilm layers have opposite consequences for the production of other virulence factors. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between keeping home records of catheter exit-site and incidence of peritoneal dialysis-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Hidekazu; Kurita, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Shino; Kamijo, Yuka; Ishibashi, Yoshitaka; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-04-01

    To prevent peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related infection, components of self-catheter care have been emphasized. However, studies on the effectiveness of home recording for the prevention of PD-related infections are limited. This study aimed to examine the association between keeping home records of catheter exit site and incidence of PD-related infections. Home record books were submitted by patients undergoing PD. The proportion of days on which exit-site home recording was carried out for 120 days (0-100%) was obtained. The patients were divided into the frequent home recording group (≥ 40.5%; median value) and the infrequent home recording group (home recording groups for PD-related infection were 1.58 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72-3.46) in the univariate analysis and 1.49 (95% CI, 0.65-3.42) in the multivariate analysis. The IRRs of the frequent versus infrequent home recording groups for composite of surgery to create a new exit site and removal of PD catheter were 0.55 (95% CI, 0.78-3.88) and 0.35 (95% CI, 0.06-1.99), respectively. This study could not prove that keeping home records of patients' catheter exit site is associated with a lower incidence of PD-related infections.

  7. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Michael Z

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  8. Impact of a program aimed at reducing catheter-related infections implemented in nine pediatric intensive care units in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Ana M; Andion, Elena; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Aguirre, Clarisa; Alvarez Parma, Julieta; Jorro, Facundo; López Cruz, Gabriela; Pascutto, Martín; Penazzi, Matías; Santos, Silvia; Zuázaga, Marcela; Aquino, Norma; Vassallo, Juan C; Moreno, Guillermo; Magliola, Ricardo; Haimovich, Aldo; Landry, Luis; Bologna, Rosa

    2018-04-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) cause a high level of morbidity and mortality with the increasing use of hospital resources. To describe the outcomes of a program implemented to reduce the rate of CRIs in pediatric intensive care units in Argentina. Collaborative, multi center, clinical-epidemiological, quasiexperimental, before-and-after intervention study. Children who had a central venous catheter during hospitalization in 9 pediatric intensive care units in the Autonomous City of Buenos Aires, Greater Buenos Aires, and other provinces between June 2011 and April 2012 were included. A bundle of measures based on health care staff training on catheter insertion, hand hygiene, and checklists was put into practice and implemented measures were monitored. The number and annual rate of CRIs and the rate of central venous catheter use before and after the program implementation were compared (Stata 8.0). The total number of CRIs was 117 and 74 before and after the intervention, respectively. The rate of CRIs was 8.6/1000 days of central venous catheter use and 5.8/1000 days before and after the intervention, respectively; RR: 0.82 (95% confidence interval: 0.68-0.98), p= 0.015. The rate of central venous catheter use decreased from 54% to 49%, a non-significant difference. The program achieved a significant reduction in CRI rates. Based on the program, CRI surveillance was implemented in all participating pediatric intensive care units. Training and continuous surveillance are necessary to maintain and improve the outcomes accomplished with the program. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  9. Subphrenic abscess as a complication of hemodialysis catheter-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Fernando; Burguera, Victor; Fernández-Lucas, Milagros; Teruel, José Luis; Quereda, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis. The diagnosis was made through computed tomography, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the purulent drainage of the subphrenic abscess, the catheter tip and exit site, and the blood culture samples. A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci. Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

  10. Subphrenic Abscess as a Complication of Hemodialysis Catheter-Related Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Caravaca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an unusual case of subphrenic abscess complicating a central venous catheter infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a 59-year-old woman undergoing hemodialysis. The diagnosis was made through computed tomography, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the purulent drainage of the subphrenic abscess, the catheter tip and exit site, and the blood culture samples. A transesophageal echocardiography showed a large tubular thrombus in superior vena cava, extending to the right atrium, but no evidence of endocarditis or other metastatic infectious foci. Catheter removal, percutaneous abscess drainage, anticoagulation, and antibiotics resulted in a favourable outcome.

  11. Current strategies for the prevention and management of central line-associated bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuolin Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Zhuolin Han, Stephen Y Liang, Jonas MarschallDivision of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USAAbstract: Central venous catheters are an invaluable tool for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in today’s medicine, but their use can be complicated by bloodstream infections (BSIs. While evidence-based preventive measures are disseminated by infection control associations, the optimal management of established central line-associated BSIs has been summarized in infectious diseases guidelines. We prepared an overview of the state-of-the-art of prevention and management of central line-associated BSIs and included topics such as the role of antibiotic-coated catheters, the role of catheter removal in the management, and a review of currently used antibiotic compounds and the duration of treatment.Keywords: central venous catheters, bloodstream infections, guidelines, prevention

  12. Prevention of catheter-related venous thrombosis with nadroparin in patients receiving chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies: a randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niers, T. M. H.; Di Nisio, M.; Klerk, C. P. W.; Baarslag, H. J.; Bueller, H. R.; Biemond, B. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemato-oncology patients treated with intensive chemotherapy usually require the placement of a central venous catheter (CVC). CVCs are frequently complicated by catheter-related central venous thrombosis (CVT), which has been associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism and

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... anxiety during the procedure. The area of the groin or arm where the catheter will be inserted ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... a tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... should inform the nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the ... Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter tip ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the ... days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material ... inserted into an artery. The catheter is then guided through the arteries to the area to be ...

  20. Body surface infrared thermometry in patients with central venous cateter-related infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvah, José Henrique; Lima, Cristiane Maria Mártires de; Unamuno, Maria do Rosário Del Lama de; Schetino, Marco Antônio Alves; Schetino, Luana Pereira Leite; Fassini, Priscila Giácomo; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Costa e Cunha Moraes; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Cunha, Selma Freire Carvalho da; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate if body surface temperature close to the central venous catheter insertion area is different when patients develop catheter-related bloodstream infections. Observational cross-sectional study. Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, 3 consecutive measurements of body surface temperature were collected from 39 patients with central venous catheter on the following sites: nearby the catheter insertion area or totally implantable catheter reservoir, the equivalent contralateral region (without catheter), and forehead of the same subject. A total of 323 observations were collected. Respectively, both in male and female patients, disregarding the occurrence of infection, the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the contralateral region (mean ± standard deviation: -0.3±0.6°C versus-0.2±0.5ºC; p=0.36), and the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the forehead (mean ± standard deviation: -0.2±0.5°C versus-0.1±0.5ºC; p=0.3) resulted in negative values. Moreover, in infected patients, higher values were obtained on the catheter area (95%CI: 36.6-37.5ºC versus 36.3-36.5ºC; p<0.01) and by temperature subtractions: catheter area minus contralateral region (95%CI: -0.17 - +0.33ºC versus -0.33 - -0.20ºC; p=0.02) and catheter area minus forehead (95%CI: -0.02 - +0.55ºC versus-0.22 - -0.10ºC; p<0.01). Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections had higher temperature values both around catheter insertion area and in the subtraction of the temperatures on the contralateral and forehead regions from those on the catheter area.

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding ...

  2. Clinical practice and costs of treating catheter-related infections with teicoplanin or vancomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoens S

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To elicit actual clinical practice of treating intensive care unit patients with catheter-related infections with teicoplanin or vancomycin from a hospital perspective. As clinical trials have demonstrated similar efficacy of these glycopeptides, a cost-minimisation analysis was also carried out. Methods: The Delphi survey technique was used to gather the opinion of nine physicians regarding resource utilization associated with teicoplanin and vancomycin. Treatment costs considered were costs of drug acquisition, costs of material and nursing time required for drug preparation and administration, and costs of laboratory tests. Results: Physicians tend to administer higher loading doses of teicoplanin than recommended in the drug information leaflet. Even though evidence of the effectiveness of vancomycin is mainly derived from trials using multiple-daily administration schedules, five physicians administered it on a once-daily basis. Mean treatment costs amounted to 1,272€ with teicoplanin and 1,041€ with vancomycin. Higher treatment costs with teicoplanin arose from more elevated drug acquisition costs (1,076€ versus 795€. Treatment with vancomycin was associated with higher costs of laboratory tests as a result of more frequent monitoring of serum concentrations (217€ versus 150€. Conclusions: This analysis of clinical practice and costs indicated that the resource utilisation advantages from fewer laboratory tests with teicoplanin partially offset higher drug acquisition costs. In addition to efficacy and costs, other factors such as route of administration, patient profile and adverse effects need to inform the choice between teicoplanin and vancomycin.

  3. Blood culture procedures and diagnosis of Malassezia furfur bloodstream infections : Strength and weakness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iatta, Roberta; Battista, Michela; Miragliotta, Giuseppe; Boekhout, Teun; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of Malassezia spp. bloodstream infections (BSIs) in neonatal intensive care unit was evaluated by using pediatric Isolator, BacT/Alert systems and central venous catheter (CVC) culture. The efficacy of BacT/Alert system in detecting Malassezia was assessed by conventional procedures,

  4. Case report: bilateral tunneled epidural catheters to prevent unilateral analgesia for cancer-related pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padalia RB

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Raj B Padalia,1 Corey J Reeves,2 Neal Shah,1 Ankur A Patel,3 Devang M Padalia4 1Pain Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, VA, USA; 4Interventional Pain, Moffitt Cancer Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA Objective: Unilateral analgesia often occurs with epidural analgesia. Traditional methods of troubleshooting this problem can be insufficient in obtaining adequate pain relief in a timely manner for terminal cancer patients. This case report demonstrates a safe and effective solution which can be utilized in these circumstances.Case report: A 55-year-old female with stage IV pancreatic cancer and life expectancy of a few weeks presented to the interventional pain clinic with intractable sacral pain. The decision to place an epidural catheter and external pump for analgesia was made. An epidural catheter placed at the L5-S1 level showed contrast spread only along the right nerve roots and a test dose produced only right-sided analgesia. Suspecting compartmentalization of the epidural space, a second left-sided epidural catheter was placed and bilateral analgesia was achieved by using both catheters. This dual catheter technique gave the patient effective bilateral analgesia until she passed away several weeks later. Conclusion: The bilateral epidural catheter technique is safe and effective in patients who present with persistent unilateral epidural analgesia despite exhausting traditional solutions. Keywords: pain management, palliative care, cancer, regional techniques

  5. Preventing central venous catheter-related infection in a surgical intensive-care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijma, R; Girbes, AR; Kleijer, DJ; Zwaveling, JH

    The cumulative effect of five measures (introduction of hand disinfection with alcohol, a new type of dressing, a one-bag system for parenteral nutrition, a new intravenous connection device, and surveillance by an infection control practitioner) on central venous catheter colonization and

  6. Colonization of peripheral intravascular catheters with biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Biofilms often colonize catheters and contribute to catheter-related septicemia. However, predictors of catheter colonization by biofilms remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical factors that may be associated with biofilm colonization of catheters. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 ...

  7. Catheter-Related Right Atrial Thrombus and Pulmonary Embolism: A Case Report and Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen EA Burns

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are commonly used in clinical practice. One of the foremost complications associated with their use is the potential for symptomatic or asymptomatic thrombosis. CVC thrombosis, in turn, may not only result in vascular and catheter occlusion but also infection, pulmonary embolism, and formation of right heart thromboemboli. Thrombi within cardiac chambers are associated with an increased risk of mortality due to their potential for embolization to the pulmonary vasculature. We describe the case of a 77-year-old man, who was successfully thrombolyzed following detection of a right atrial thrombus and hemodynamically significant pulmonary embolism resulting from thrombus formation on the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC. The present article is the first report of a PICC-related right atrial thrombus in an adult treated with thrombolysis. A systematic review of the literature suggests that the true incidence of this complication may be underestimated because the diagnosis may not be considered in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients, or may be missed by transthoracic echocardiography. The present case highlights the importance of maintaining a high index of suspicion for thromboembolic complications and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia in patients with CVCs or a PICC. It also underscores the important role of transesophageal echocardiography and thrombolysis in the diagnosis and management, respectively, of right heart thromboemboli with associated pulmonary embolism.

  8. Rapid Diagnosis of Staphylococcal Catheter-Related Bacteraemia in Direct Blood Samples by Real-Time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Zboromyrska

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bacteremia (CRB is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among hospitalized patients, being staphylococci the main etiologic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the use of a PCR-based assay for detection of staphylococci directly from blood obtained through the catheter to diagnose CRB caused by these microorganisms and to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis. A total of 92 patients with suspected CRB were included in the study. Samples were obtained through the catheter. Paired blood cultures were processed by standard culture methods and 4 ml blood samples were processed by GeneXpert-MRSA assay for the detection of methicillin-susceptible (MSSA or methicillin-resistant (MRSA Staphylococcus aureus, and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS. Sixteen CRB caused by staphylococci were diagnosed among 92 suspected patients. GeneXpert detected 14 out of 16 cases (87.5%, including 4 MSSA and 10 MR-CoNS in approximately 1 hour after specimen receipt. The sensitivity and specificity of GeneXpert were 87.5% (CI 95%: 60.4-97.8 and 92.1% (CI 95%: 83-96.7, respectively, compared with standard culture methods. The sensitivity of GeneXpert for S. aureus was 100%. Regarding a cost-effectiveness analysis, the incremental cost of using GeneXpert was of 31.1€ per patient while the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of GeneXpert compared with blood culture alones was about 180€ per life year gained. In conclusion, GeneXpert can be used directly with blood samples obtained through infected catheters to detect S. aureus and MR-CoNS in approximately 1h after sampling. In addition, it is cost-effective especially in areas with high prevalence of staphylococcal CRB.

  9. PICC-associated bloodstream infections: prevalence, patterns, and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Ratz, David; Kuhn, Latoya; Lopus, Tracy; Chenoweth, Carol; Krein, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    Growing use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has led to recognition of the risk of PICC-associated bloodstream infection. We sought to identify rates, patterns, and patient, provider, and device characteristics associated with this adverse outcome. A retrospective cohort of consecutive adults who underwent PICC placement from June 2009 to July 2012 was assembled. Using multivariable logistic and Cox-proportional hazards regression models, covariates specified a priori were analyzed for their association with PICC-associated bloodstream infection. Odds ratios (OR) and hazard ratios (HR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were used to express the association between each predictor and the outcome of interest. During the study period, 966 PICCs were inserted in 747 unique patients for a total of 26,887 catheter days. Indications for PICC insertion included: long-term antibiotic administration (52%, n = 503), venous access (21%, n = 201), total parenteral nutrition (16%, n = 155), and chemotherapy (11%, n = 107). On bivariate analysis, intensive care unit (ICU) status (OR 3.23; 95% CI, 1.84-5.65), mechanical ventilation (OR 4.39; 95% CI, 2.46-7.82), length of stay (hospital, OR 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06 and ICU, OR 1.03; 95% CI, 1.02-1.04), PowerPICCs (C. R. Bard, Inc., Murray Hill, NJ; OR 2.58; 95% CI, 1.41-4.73), and devices placed by interventional radiology (OR 2.57; 95% CI, 1.41-4.68) were associated with PICC-bloodstream infection. Catheter lumens were strongly associated with this event (double lumen, OR 5.21; 95% CI, 2.46-11.04, and triple lumen, OR 10.84; 95% CI, 4.38-26.82). On multivariable analysis, only hospital length of stay, ICU status, and number of PICC lumens remained significantly associated with PICC bloodstream infection. Notably, the HR for PICC lumens increased substantially, suggesting earlier time to infection among patients with multi-lumen PICCs (HR 4.08; 95% CI, 1.51-11.02 and HR 8.52; 95% CI, 2.55-28.49 for

  10. Does antimicrobial lock solution reduce catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients with central venous catheters? A Bayesian network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Rongke; Ge, Long; Chen, Kee-Hsin; Tian, Jinhui

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of our study is to carry out a Bayesian network meta-analysis comparing the efficacy of different antimicrobial lock solutions (ALS) for prevention of catheter-related infections (CRI) in patients with hemodialysis (HD) and ranking these ALS for practical consideration. We searched six electronic databases, earlier relevant meta-analysis and reference lists of included studies for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared ALS for preventing episodes of CRI in patients with HD either head-to-head or against control interventions using non-ALS. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool and extracted relevant information according to a predesigned extraction form. Data were analysed using the WinBUGS (V.1.4.3) and the Stata (V.13.0). Finally, 18 studies involving 2395 patients and evaluating 9 ALS strategies were included. Network meta-analysis showed that gentamicin plus citrate (OR 0.07, 95% CrI 0.00-0.48) and gentamicin plus heparin (OR 0.04, 95% CrI 0.00-0.23) were statistically superior to heparin alone in terms of reducing CRBSI. For exit site infection and all-cause mortality, no significant difference in the intervention effect (p > 0.05) was detected for all included ALS when compared to heparin. Moreover, all ALS were similar in efficacy (p > 0.05) from each other for CRBSI, exit site infection and all-cause mortality. Our findings indicated that gentamicin plus heparin may be selected for the prophylaxis of CRI in patients undergoing HD with CVCs. Whether this strategy will lead to antimicrobial resistance remains unclear in view of the relatively short duration of included studies. More attentions should be made regarding head-to-head comparisons of the most commonly used ALS in this field.

  11. Mechanic and surface properties of central-venous port catheters after removal: A comparison of polyurethane and silicon rubber materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ulrike; Lorenz, Edelgard; Weimann, Christiane; Sturm, Heinz; Karimov, Ilham; Ettl, Johannes; Meier, Reinhard; Wohlgemuth, Walter A; Berger, Hermann; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2016-12-01

    Central venous port devices made of two different polymeric materials, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and silicone rubber (SiR), were compared due their material properties. Both naïve catheters as well as catheters after removal from patients were investigated. In lab experiments the influence of various chemo-therapeutic solutions on material properties was investigated, whereas the samples after removal were compared according to the implanted time in patient. The macroscopic, mechanical performance was assessed with dynamic, specially adapted tests for elasticity. The degradation status of the materials was determined with common tools of polymer characterisation, such as infrared spectroscopy, molecular weight measurements and various methods of thermal analysis. The surface morphology was analysed using scanning electron microscopy. A correlation between material properties and clinical performance was proposed. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the polyurethane catheter materials can potentially result in increased susceptibility of the catheter to bloodstream infections and thrombotic complications. The higher mechanic failure, especially with increasing implantation time of the silicone catheters is related to the lower mechanical performance compared to the polyurethane material as well as loss of barium sulphate filler particles near the surface of the catheter. This results in preformed microscopic notches, which act as predetermined sites of fracture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Standardizing umbilical catheter usage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaneela; Dutta, Sourabh; Symington, Amanda; Shivananda, Sandesh

    2014-06-01

    Absence of guidelines on umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and umbilical venous catheter (UVC) use and inability to predict the hospital course may sway the frontline staff to overuse umbilical catheters in preterm infants. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters and its impact on the incidence of sepsis and resource use. All inborn infants delivered at <33 weeks' gestation and admitted to the NICU were included in this quality improvement study. The primary outcome was proportion of infants receiving umbilical catheters. Secondary outcomes were central venous catheter (CVC) use and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The proportion of infants receiving UACs and UVCs was significantly lower in postintervention (sustainment) phase than in the preintervention phase (93 [42.3%] vs 52 [23.6%], P = .0001) and (137 [62.6%] vs 93 [42.3%], P = .0001), respectively. There was no corresponding increase in the proportion of infants receiving peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) or surgical CVCs (SCVCs) during the sustainment phase. There was a significant reduction in the proportion of infants receiving CVCs (UVC, PICC, and SCVC) in the sustainment phase. The incidence of CLABSI was similar in the preintervention and sustainment phases. Implementation of guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters in the NICU is feasible. Fewer infants were exposed to the risk of UVC or UAC, and fewer resources were used. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  17. EXPLORING INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING REGISTERED NURSES IN PREVENTING PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER RELATED COMPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Boka Dugassa Tolera; Feng Hui

    2017-01-01

    Peripherally InsertedCentral Catheter (PICC) isan essential vascular access device used in clinical practice in the delivery of fluids, medications, blood products, and nutrition. Despite the numerous benefits of PICC, various individual and organizational factors have made it difficult for registered nurses to practice in accordance with standardized nursing guideline developed for PICC insertion and removal. The purpose of this review was to explore factors influencing registered nurse in p...

  18. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bones appear white on the x-ray, soft tissue shows up in shades of gray and air appears black. When a contrast material is introduced to the bloodstream during the procedure, it clearly defines the blood vessels being examined by making them appear bright ...

  20. A 12-year review of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in haemodialysis patients: more work to be done.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, S F

    2012-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in haemodialysis patients. This study describes a 12-year retrospective review of S. aureus BSI in a large haemodialysis centre in a tertiary referral hospital. The overall rate of S. aureus BSI was 17.9 per 100 patient-years (range 9.7-36.8). The rate of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) BSI was 5.6 per 100 patient-years (range 0.9-13.8). Infective complications occurred in 11% of episodes, the most common being infective endocarditis (7.6%). Ten percent of patients died within 30 days of S. aureus being isolated from blood. Most cases of S. aureus BSI (83%) were related to vascular catheters. The provision of lower-risk vascular access, such as arteriovenous fistulae, and reduced use of intravascular catheters should be priorities in all haemodialysis units. Where alternative vascular access cannot be established, interventions to reduce the risk of catheter-related infections should be implemented to reduce morbidity and mortality in this vulnerable patient group.

  1. Endovascular Therapy for Ruptured Cerebral Aneurysms in the Elderly: Poor Accessibility of the Guiding Catheter and Use of Local Anesthesia as the Predictors of Procedure-Related Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Hitoshi; Handa, Akira; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Yoshida, Kazumichi; Lo, Benjamin W Y; Yamagata, Sen

    2015-10-01

    Endovascular therapy is favored for ruptured intracranial aneurysms in the elderly. However, poor accessibility to the aneurysm through the parent artery and use of local anesthesia in this age group may predispose to intraprocedural complications. To evaluate whether age-related poor access to the ruptured target aneurysm and use of local anesthesia are associated with increased incidence of procedure-related rupture during endovascular embolization. A total of 117 patients with 117 ruptured aneurysms underwent endovascular embolization at a single institution. Correlation of increasing age with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter was analyzed. In addition, the distance from the aneurysm to the guiding catheter was investigated to identify an association with incidence of procedure-related rupture. Correlation of local anesthesia with procedure-related rupture was also evaluated in the multivariable analysis. Increasing age was significantly associated with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter (P = .001, Mann-Whitney U test). Procedure-related rupture occurred in 9 of 117 aneurysms (7.7%). Longer distance between distal aneurysms and low-positioned guiding catheters carried a higher risk of procedure-related rupture than a shorter distance between proximal aneurysms and high-positioned guiding catheters (odds ratio, 19.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.84-201; P = .01, multivariable analysis). Use of local anesthesia was also a significant risk factor of procedure-related rupture by multivariable analysis. Increasing age was correlated with poor accessibility of the guiding catheter in endovascular embolization of ruptured intracranial aneurysms. Distally located aneurysms treated through a low-positioned guiding catheter and use of local anesthesia increased the risk of procedure-related rupture.

  2. Risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheters: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle de Mendonça Henrique

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Infections related to central venous catheter (CVC use constitute an important a problem. It is estimated that approximately 90% of bloodstream infections (BSI are caused by CVC use. This study aims at reviewing the risk factors and current recommendations for prevention of infections associated with central venous catheter use. Methods: A total of 12 articles published in the last 5 years and indexed in the databases of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS, Nursing Database (BDENF, International Literature on Health Sciences (Medline/Pubmed were selected, as well as publications related to the recommendations for BSI prevention, such as: Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC and the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. Results: Two categories were identified: prevention and control measures and risk factors for BSI associated with central venous catheter use. Conclusions: Some recommendations that were well-defined over the years have been questioned by some authors and continuing training and education of the multidisciplinary team are the most important factors for the prevention of bloodstream infections associated with CVC use.

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic ... By selecting the arteries through which the catheter passes, it is possible to assess vessels in several ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... prick when the needle is inserted into your vein for the intravenous line (IV). Injecting a local anesthetic at the site where the catheter is inserted may sting briefly, but it will ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... dose of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ... live more than an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... by angioplasty and placement of a stent . The degree of detail displayed by catheter angiography may not ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in your ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once ... in the chest and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... material injection, you should immediately inform the technologist. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible ... and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery of the neck, ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of severe arterial narrowing, ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... disease). evaluate obstructions of vessels. top of page How should I prepare? You should inform your physician ... as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine blood ... an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  18. [Catheter-related bladder discomfort after urological surgery: importance of the type of surgery and efficiency of treatment by clonazepam].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maro, S; Zarattin, D; Baron, T; Bourez, S; de la Taille, A; Salomon, L

    2014-09-01

    Bladder catheter can induce a Catheter-Related Bladder Discomfort (CRBD). Antagonist of muscarinic receptor is the gold standard treatment. Clonazepam is an antimuscarinic, muscle relaxing oral drug. The aim of this study is to look for a correlation between the type of surgical procedure and the existence of CRBD and to evaluate the efficiency of clonazepam. One hundred patients needing bladder catheter were evaluated. Sexe, age, BMI, presence of diabetes, surgical procedure and existence of CRBD were noted. Pain was evaluated with analogic visual scale. Timing of pain, need for specific treatment by clonazepam and its efficiency were noted. Correlation between preoperative data, type of surgical procedure, existence of CRBD and efficiency of treatment were evaluated. There were 79 men and 21 women (age: 65.9 years, BMI: 25.4). Twelve patients presented diabetes. Surgical procedure concerned prostate in 39 cases, bladder in 19 cases (tumor resections), endo-urology in 20 cases, upper urinary tract in 12 cases (nephrectomy…) and lower urinary tract in 10 cases (sphincter, sub-uretral tape). Forty patients presented CRBD, (pain 4.5 using VAS). This pain occurred 0.6 days after surgery. No correlation was found between preoperative data and CRBD. Bladder resection and endo-urological procedures were surgical procedures which procured CRBD. Clonazepam was efficient in 30 (75 %) out of 40 patients with CRBD. However, it was less efficient in case of bladder tumor resection. CRBD is frequent and occurred immediately after surgery. Bladder resection and endo-urology were the main surgical procedures which induced CRBD. Clonazepam is efficient in 75 %. Bladder resection is the surgical procedure which is the most refractory to treatment. 5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P<0.05. In summary, we have shown here that the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  20. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dong; Liu, Xu; Wang, Rui; Bai, Yan; Cai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  1. A Novel Nonantibiotic Nitroglycerin-Based Catheter Lock Solution for Prevention of Intraluminal Central Venous Catheter Infections in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Szvalb, Ariel; Taremi, Mahnaz; Granwehr, Bruno; Viola, George Michael; Sapna, Amin; Assaf, Andrew; Numan, Yazan; Shah, Pankil; Gasitashvili, Ketevan; Natividad, Elizabeth; Jiang, Ying; Slack, Rebecca; Reitzel, Ruth; Rosenblatt, Joel; Mouhayar, Elie; Raad, Issam

    2017-07-01

    For long-term central lines (CL), the lumen is the major source of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The current standard of care for maintaining catheter patency includes flushing the CL with saline or heparin. Neither agent has any antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, heparin may enhance staphylococcal biofilm formation. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a novel nonantibiotic catheter lock solution for the prevention of CLABSI. Between November 2015 and February 2016, we enrolled 60 patients with hematologic malignancies who had peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to receive the study lock solution. The study lock consisted of 15 or 30 μg/ml of nitroglycerin in combination with 4% sodium citrate and 22% ethanol. Each lumen was locked for at least 2 h once daily prior to being flushed. After enrollment of 10 patients at the lower nitroglycerin dose without evidence of toxicity, the dose was escalated to the higher dose (30 μg/ml). There were no serious related adverse events or episodes of hypotension with lock administration. Two patients experienced mild transient adverse events (one headache and one rash) possibly related to the lock and that resolved without residual effect. The CLABSI rate was 0 on lock days versus 1.6/1,000 catheter days (CD) off lock prophylaxis, compared with a rate of 1.9/1,000 CD at the institution in the same patient population. In conclusion, the nitroglycerin-based lock prophylaxis is safe and well tolerated. It may prevent CLABSI when given daily to cancer patients. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to validate these findings. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02577718.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. [Clinical suspicion of vertebral osteomielitis: back pain in patients with hemodyalisis by catheter related infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, R; Castañeda, O; de Francisco, A L M; Piñera, C; Rodrigo, E; Arias, M

    2004-01-01

    The overall incidence of vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing due to, the increasing rates of bacteraemia due to intravascular devices. We report a patient with end-stage renal failure under hemodialysis by internal jugular catheters who started with back pain after several episodes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia, and whose magnetic resonance imaging was showed signs suggestive of spondylodiscitis. Other 4 similar cases from our service have been analysed, thereby we can conclude the most effective treatment of vertebral osteomyelitis and/or epidural abscess is premature diagnosis of these pathologies. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive radiologic technique whom we have. Treatment of vertebral osteomyelitis must be preceded by a correct bacteriological diagnosis. Surgery plays a central role in the successful treatment and should be performed as soon as neurological problems are apparent.

  3. Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter-Related Problems in the Early Phase of Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation and Effects on Transplant Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Yeral

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Haematopoietic stem cell recipients need central venous catheters (CVCs for easy administration of intravenous fluid, medications, apheresis, or dialysis procedures. However, CVCs may lead to infectious or non-infectious complications such as thrombosis. The effect of these complications on transplantation outcome is not clear. This manuscript presents the complication rates of double-lumen tunnelled CVCs and their effect on transplantation outcome. METHODS: Data from 111 consecutive patients, of whom 75 received autologous and 36 received allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations, were collected retrospectively. The data were validated by the Record Inspection Group of the related JACIE-accredited transplantation centre. RESULTS: Thrombosis developed in 2.7% of recipients (0.9 per 1000 catheter days. Catheter-related infection was identified in 14 (12.6% patients (3.6 per 1000 catheter days. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most common causative agent. Engraftment time, rate of 100-day mortality, and development of grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease were not found to be associated with catheter-related complications. CONCLUSION: Sonuçlarımız nakil hastalarında tünelli SVK komplikasyonlarının yönetilebilir olduğunu ve bu komplikasyonların nakil üzerine olumsuz bir etki yaratmadığını göstermektedir.

  4. Pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications in refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chih-Yang; Huang, Wei-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Kai; Huang, Chien-Wei; Chou, Nan-Hua; Lee, Po-Tsang; Fang, Hua-Chang; Chou, Kang-Ju; Chen, Chien-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Some patients with refractory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis continue to develop intra-abdominal complications despite removal of the peritoneal catheter. Repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy is often required, and mortality is not uncommon. The benefits of pelvic drainage placement during catheter removal in decreasing these complications and interventions remain unproven. Forty-six patients with refractory peritonitis who underwent removal of a Tenckhoff catheter between 1991 and 2013 were reviewed retrospectively. Twelve patients had pelvic drainage using closed active suction devices during catheter removal (drainage group). The remaining 34 patients underwent catheter removal without drainage (non-drainage group). The outcomes measured were the development of intra-abdominal complications and the requirement for repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy within 90 days after the catheter removal. Baseline characteristics were similar with the exception of a higher median number of previous peritonitis episodes in the drainage group compared with the non-drainage group (2 vs 0, P = 0.02). During the follow-up period, intra-abdominal complications occurred in 15 (44%) of 34 patients in the non-drainage group, compared with one (8%) of 12 patients in the drainage group (P = 0.03). Twelve (35%) patients in the non-drainage group required repeated percutaneous drainage or open laparotomy for management, compared with zero (0%) patients in the drainage group (P = 0.02). Drain tubes were removed at a median of 6 days (inter-quartile range: 5-10) without complications. In the management of refractory peritonitis, pelvic drainage during removal of dialysis catheter decreases the risk of subsequent intra-abdominal complications and invasive interventions. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Chlorhexidine gluconate or polyhexamethylene biguanide disc dressing to reduce the incidence of central-line-associated bloodstream infection: a feasibility randomized controlled trial (the CLABSI trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, J; Larsen, E; Marsh, N; Choudhury, A; Harris, P; Rickard, C M

    2017-07-01

    A number of antimicrobial-impregnated discs to prevent central-line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) are marketed but it is unclear which disc is most effective. To investigate the feasibility and safety of comparing two antimicrobial-impregnated discs to prevent CLABSI. A single-centre, parallel group, randomized controlled trial was conducted in a 929-bed tertiary referral hospital. Hospital inpatients requiring a peripherally inserted central catheter were randomized to chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) or polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) disc dressing group. Dressings were replaced every seven days, or earlier, if clinically required. Participants were followed until device removal or hospital discharge. Feasibility outcomes included: proportion of potentially eligible participants who were enrolled; proportion of protocol violations; and proportion of patients lost to follow-up. Clinical outcomes were: CLABSI incidence, diagnosed by a blinded infection control practitioner; all-cause bloodstream infection (BSI); and product-related adverse events. Of 143 patients screened, 101 (71%) were eligible. Five (3.5%) declined participation. There was one post-randomization exclusion. Two (2%) protocol violations occurred in the CHG group. No patients were lost to follow-up. Three (3%) BSIs occurred; two (2%) were confirmed CLABSIs (one in each group) and one a mucosal barrier injury-related BSI. A total of 1217 device-days were studied, resulting in 1.64 CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days. One (1%) disc-related adverse event occurred in the CHG group. Disc dressings containing PHMB are safe to use for infection prevention at catheter insertion sites. An adequately powered trial to compare PHMB and CHG discs is feasible. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. All rights reserved.

  6. [The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoli, Alessandro; Cappuccio, Serena; Marche, Bruno; Musarò, Andrea; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). The insertion of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is not without risks. The Italian Group for the Study of Long-Term Central Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has developed a protocol (SIP: Safe Implantation of PICCs) with the aim of minimizing the risks which may be associated with the placement of PICCs. The protocol is based on recommendations available in the literature and on the main clinical practice guidelines. The SIP protocol, a bundle of evidence-based recommendations, it is is easy to use, inexpensive, and cost-effective. If routinely used and carefully inplemented, it greatly reduces complications such as failure of venipuncture, accidental arterial puncture, damage of median nerve, infection and catheter related venous thrombosis.

  7. Are central venous catheter tip cultures reliable after 6-day refrigeration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, Emilio; Guembe, Maria; Gómez, Haydee; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Rivera, Marisa; Alcalá, Luis

    2009-07-01

    Present guidelines recommend culturing only central venous catheter (CVC) tips from patients with suspected catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI). However, a high proportion of these suspicions are not confirmed. Moreover, CVC tip culture increases laboratory workload, and reports of colonization may be meaningless or misleading for the clinician. Our working hypothesis was that CVC tips should be refrigerated and cultured only in patients with positive blood cultures. We evaluated the effect of 6-day refrigeration of 215 CVC tips. We selected all the catheters with a significant count according to the Maki's roll-plate technique and randomly assigned them to 2 groups. In group A, the catheters were recultured after 24 h of refrigeration, and in group B, the catheters were recultured after 6 days more of refrigeration, so that the refrigeration time evaluated would be of 6 days. The yield of refrigerated CVC tips that grow significant colony counts of primary culture in group B was compared with the yield of refrigerated catheter tips in group A. The difference showed that 6-day refrigeration reduced the number of significant CVCs by 15.2%. Only 61 CVCs were obtained from patients with CR-BSI, and in most of them, blood cultures were already positive before CVC culture, so only 0.91% of the CR-BSI episodes would have been misdiagnosed as culture negative after refrigeration. Refrigeration of CVC tips sent for culture and culturing only those from patients with positive blood cultures reduce the workload in the microbiology laboratory without misdiagnosing CR-BSI.

  8. Catheter-related bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant Leclercia adecarboxylata in a patient with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Gee-Wook; You, Myung-Jo; Lee, Hye-Soo; Lee, Chang-Seop

    2012-09-01

    We report a multidrug-resistant strain of Leclercia adecarboxylata responsible for catheter-related bacteremia in a 47-year-old female with breast cancer. The isolated strain was resistant to several β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and folate pathway inhibitors and harbored bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M) group 1 and intl1 genes (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2) as genetic determinants for resistance. Based on a review of the L. adecarboxylata literature, there have been only 4 reports of antibiotic-resistant strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an L. adecarboxylata strain with simultaneous resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and sulfonamides.

  9. [Investigation of biofilm-associated antibiotic susceptibilities of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from catheter-related nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayındır Bilman, Fulya; Can, Füsun; Kaya, Melek; Yazıcı, Ayşe Canan

    2013-07-01

    Risks for development of local and/or systemic infections are the most important complications of catheters that are widely used during hospitalization process. The aims of this study were to investigate and compare the antibiotic susceptibilities of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from catheters, in planktonic and biofilm forms, and to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of antibiotics on those forms alone and in combinations. A total of 30 strains [15 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 15 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS)] isolated from catheter cultures of patients hospitalized in different clinics and intensive care units in Baskent University Medical School Hospital between 2006-2009, were included in the study. The antibiotic sensitivities of MRSA and MR-CNS isolates were investigated in vitro in planktonic phase and on sessile cells after biofilm was formed. Vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, gentamicin, meropenem, tigecycline, linezolid, ceftazidime and cephazolin were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. The sensitivity of planktonic cells to antibiotics was primarily investigated, so that minimal inhibitor concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined by broth microdilution method. Afterwards, each strain was transformed to sessile cell in a biofilm environment, and MIC and MBC values were also determined for sessile cells. Double and triple antibiotic combinations were prepared, the effectiveness of combinations were studied on both planktonic and biofilm cells with multiple-combination bactericidal testing (MCBT) method. The data set obtained from planktonic and biofilm cells for each antibiotic analyzed via two proportion z test. Statistically significant decreases were found in the sensitivities of sessile cells when compared to planktonic cells (pantibiotic combinations also showed the susceptibility decrease between planktonic and

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ... the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a regular x-ray ... any possibility that they are pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

  14. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  15. Efficacy of two antiseptic regimens on skin colonization of insertion sites for two different catheter types: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Juergen Thomas; Diener, Isabel Victoria; Freiberg, Kerstin; Zillmann, Robert; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Seifert, Harald; Berger-Schreck, Bettina; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar

    2016-12-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections affect patients in surgical and intensive care settings worldwide, causing complications, aggravation of existing symptoms and increased length of stay. The trial aimed at comparing two registered skin antiseptics with respect to their residual and therefore infection-preventing effects. In a parallel, monocentric, prospective, triple-blind, randomized trial the difference in bacterial recolonization of catheter skin sites in central venous (CVC) and epidural catheters (EC) was investigated by comparing two alcoholic-based skin disinfectants. Patients receiving planned surgeries or intensive care were eligible for the trial. Those in the trial group received skin disinfection with the additive octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT) (n = 51), those in the control group were treated with benzalkonium chloride as additive (BAC) (n = 59) prior to catheter insertion. Randomization was carried out by assigning patients to groups week-wise. Endpoints of the investigation were skin colonization of the catheter site counted in colony forming units per swab at three time points: (1) prior to catheter insertion, on untreated skin; (2) directly after catheter insertion, prior to sterile coverage; (3) 48 h after catheter insertion. The hypothesis was tested by a Wilcoxon test with a two-sided alpha = 5 %. From second to third swab, recolonization of the catheter-surrounding skin was significantly lower in the trial group for both sorts of catheters: delta 2-3 OCT group: 0.72 (95 % CI: 0.42; 1.02); delta 2-3 BAC group: 1.97 (95 % CI: 1.45; 2.50); p < 0.001. None of the patients enrolled developed a catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) during follow-up. Previous studies have shown that skin colonization is strongly associated with the occurrence of CRBSI. This randomized controlled trial supports the observations made in previous trials that octenidine dihydrochloride in disinfectants is more effective than agents

  16. Catheter-Related Urinary Tract Infection in Patients Suffering from Spinal Cord Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amela Dedeić-Ljubović

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection is commoner in patients with spinal cord injuries because of incomplete bladder emptying and the use of catheters that can result in the introduction of bacteria into the bladder. 145 patients suffering from spinal cord injuries, admitted to the Institute for physical medicine and rehabilitation, Centre for paraplegia of the Clinical Centre of the University of Sarajevo, were included. The patients were divided in three groups according to the method of bladder drainage: Group A (n=61 consisted of patients on clean intermittent catheterization; Group B (n=54 consisted of patients with indwelling catheters; Group C (n=30 consisted of patients who had performed self-catheterization. From a total of 4539 urine samples, 3963 (87,3% were positive and 576 (12,7% were sterile. More than 90% of the infected patients were asymptomatic.The overall rate of urinary infection amounted to about 2,1 episodes, and bacteriuria to 8,1 episodes per patient. 77% of infections (113/145 were acquired within seven days from catheterization.Infection was usually polymicrobial; the greatest number of urine samples 1770/3943 (44,9% included more than one bacterium.The vast majority of cases of urinary tract infection and bacteriuria are caused by Gram-negative bacilli and enterococci, commensal organisms of the bowel and perineum, representative of those from the hospital environment. Providencia stuarti (18,9% being the most common, followed by Proteus mirabilis (16,3%, Escherichia coli (11,8%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10,2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (8,1%, Morganella morgani (5,4%, Acinetobacter baumannii (4,6%, Providencia rettgeri (3,5%. 15,7% of isolates were Gram-positive with Enterococcus faecalis (8,6% as the most common. 55,3% of isolates were multidrug-resistant, and the highest rates of resistance were found among Acinetobacter baumannii (87,8%, Providencia rettgeri (86,7%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85,4%, Providencia stuarti (84,3% and

  17. Epidemiology and mortality of candidemia both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, S; Denis, O; Montesinos, I; Cherifi, S; Miendje Deyi, V Y; Zech, F

    2017-03-01

    Our objective was to compare mortality, epidemiology, and morbidity in hospitalized patients with candidemia which was both related and unrelated to the central venous catheter (CVC). This was a monocentric, retrospective cohort study of candidemia. The sample consisted of 103 patients with laboratory-confirmed nosocomial candidemia hospitalized between 2006 and 2013 in a tertiary care public hospital. We included 65 (63.1 %) patients (24 in the CVC-positive group, 41 in the CVC-negative group). Demographic data and risk factors were recorded using a structured case report form. In the group of candidemia associated to the CVC, survival at day 50 was 58.6 ± 11.9 %, compared to 26.5 ± 8.9 % for the CVC-negative group (p-value = 0.012); the hazard ratio of death was 0.38 (95 % confidence interval 0.17-0.85, p-value = 0.019). Compared with the CVC-positive patients, CVC-negative patients were often colonized with yeast (41.5 % vs. 16.7 %, p-value = 0.041), had a shorter previous in-hospital stay (20 days vs. 34 days, p-value = 0.023), and were more severely ill (severe sepsis 85.4 % vs. 58.3 %, p-value = 0.016). In this study, when the origin of candidemia was not the CVC, patients were more seriously ill, had a higher mortality rate, and the removal of the catheter seemed to lead to disappointing results. It would be useful to explore the impact of retention of the CVC on survival in the CVC-negative patients, where the CVCs are essential to treating these patients.

  18. [Ultrasound-guided peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in cancer patients: success of the insertion, survival and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraza-Dulanto, Maria Inmaculada; Garate-Echenique, Lucía; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Armenteros-Yeguas, Victoria; Tomás-López, María Aranzazu; Benítez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the results of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) inserted by nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at bed-side. An observational and prospective study was conducted on all the PICC inserted at bed-side by an ultrasound-guided technique at the Araba University Hospital. The technique was introduced in June 2010, and the data collection period ended in November 2011. The main study variables were successful insertion, duration of PICC, incidences related to the catheter, devices reaching end of treatment and reasons for withdrawal. Patient sociodemographic data and PICC technical features were also registered. A total of 165 PICC were inserted, 73 are still in use, with 95.2% inserted in patients from oncology or haematology departments. Insertion was successful in the 89.7% (95% CI: 85.1%-94.3%) of the cases. The study included 16,234 catheter days, with a median dwell time of 92 days by PICC. The most frequent incidence was accidental removal in 0.986 per 1000 catheter days (95% CI=0.970-1.001). The thrombosis rate was 0.308 per 1,000 days (95% CI= 0.299-0.317), and the catheter-associated bloodstream infection rate was 0.062 per 1,000 catheter days (95% CI=0.058-0.065). Ultrasound-guided PICC insertion can be performed at bedside by trained nurses with a high probability of success. PICC, because of its low complication rate and long indwelling catheter survival, is a suitable central venous device for long-term treatment in oncology and haematology patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis Associated with Lancefield Group G Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus: Report of Two Cases Requiring Tenckhoff Catheter Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Wong, Samson S. Y.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Yuen, Kwok-yung

    2004-01-01

    We describe the first two cases of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis associated with Lancefield group G beta-hemolytic streptococci in the literature. Both patients presented with abdominal pain and turbid dialysis effluent with or without fever. Both had concomitant gastrointestinal tract disturbance. Both did not respond to intraperitoneal cefazolin and tobramycin and required removal of the Tenckhoff catheters. PMID:15365055

  20. Beyond the bundle--journey of a tertiary care medical intensive care unit to zero central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exline, Matthew C; Ali, Naeem A; Zikri, Nancy; Mangino, Julie E; Torrence, Kelly; Vermillion, Brenda; St Clair, Jamie; Lustberg, Mark E; Pancholi, Preeti; Sopirala, Madhuri M

    2013-03-04

    We set a goal to reduce the incidence rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections to rate of IY) 1 (January to December 2010), and IY 2 (January to December 2011). Infection rates were as follows: baseline: 2.65 infections per 1,000 catheter days; IY1: 1.97 per 1,000 catheter days; the incidence rate ratio (IRR) was 0.74 (95% CI=0.37 to 1.65, P=0.398); residual seven CLA-BSIs during IY1 were VRE faecium blood cultures positive from central line alone in the setting of findings explicable by noninfectious conditions. Following staff education, environmental decontamination and CHG bathing (IY2): 0.53 per 1,000 catheter days; the IRR was 0.20 (95% CI=0.06 to 0.65, P=0.008) with 80% reduction compared to the baseline. Over the two-year intervention period, the overall rate decreased by 53% to 1.24 per 1,000 catheter-days (IRR of 0.47 (95% CI=0.25 to 0.88, P=0.019) with zero CLA-BSI for a total of 15 months. Residual CLA-BSIs, despite strict adherence to central line bundle, may be related to blood culture contamination categorized as CLA-BSIs per CDC/NHSN definition. Efforts to reduce residual CLA-BSIs require a strategic multidisciplinary team approach focused on epidemiologic investigations of practitioner- or unit-specific etiologies.

  1. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-07-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral nutrition. We conducted a systematic review of the efficacy, safety and feasibility of anticoagulant use for preventing and treating catheter-related thrombosis during parenteral nutrition. We searched for interventional and observational studies on adults and children receiving systemic anticoagulants during either short- or long-term parenteral nutrition delivered via central venous access. Primary outcomes were: objectively-confirmed catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and bleeding. Secondary outcomes were: heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, prevalence of anticoagulation, and quality of International Normalised Ratio management in vitamin K antagonist-treated patients. We identified 1,199 studies, of which 23 were included. Seven interventional studies of short-term parenteral nutrition (adult population, n=5) were classified as low-quality: in those, intravenous unfractionated heparin did not prevent catheter-related thrombosis if compared to saline. No interventional studies were conducted in patients on long-term parenteral nutrition. Observational data were sparse, rarely focusing on anticoagulation, and overall of low quality. The reported use of anticoagulants was between 22 and 66% in recent multicentre cohorts. The amount and quality of data in this area are very suboptimal: most studies are outdated and involved heterogeneous populations. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to allow conclusions to be reached regarding the efficacy and safety of anticoagulants in this setting.

  2. Septic transfusion reactions during blood transfusion via indwelling central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Kristin S; Martinez, Fernando; Lichtiger, Benjamin; Han, Xiang Y

    2014-10-01

    Transfusion of blood products requires a vascular port. Use of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) provides this port readily and safely in general; however, potential risks require assessment. The objective was to examine septic reactions to blood transfusions performed via CVCs owing to subclinical microbial catheter colonization. All transfusion reactions that occurred from 2007 to 2011 at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were analyzed and correlated with microbiology culture results. Data on the reactions, including vascular access via a catheter or peripheral venipuncture, were collected prospectively. A total of 999 reactions were reported, with an incidence of two per 1000 transfusion events. A total of 738 reactions occurred in 642 patients during transfusion through a CVC. Among them, 606 reactions occurred in patients that had cultures of blood samples drawn within 7 days before or after reaction. Sixty of these (9.9%) had at least one significant microorganism isolated from their catheters and/or peripheral blood. The blood culture results and timing suggested that these patients likely had catheter-related bloodstream infections caused by transfusion through a CVC with subclinical microbial colonization. Fever and chills occurred in 35 of these patients (58%), which resembled febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions. Culture results of the transfused blood products, although not performed in all cases, were mostly negative in these CVC-related reactions. Blood transfusion through an indwelling CVC may lead to septic reaction owing to subclinical microbial colonization. This risk should be considered before transfusion and during investigation of transfusion reactions. © 2014 AABB.

  3. Use of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children receiving autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Stefano; Ceresoli, Rosanna; Boroni, Giovanni; Parolini, Filippo; Porta, Fulvio; Alberti, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    The aim of our study was to present our experience with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in pediatric patients receiving autologous or allogenic blood stem-cell transplantation. The insertion of the device in older children does not require general anesthesia and does not require a surgical procedure. From January 2014 to January 2017, 13 PICCs were inserted as a central venous device in 11 pediatric patients submitted to 14 autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, at the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the Children's Hospital of Brescia. The mean age of patients at the time of the procedure was 11.3 years (range 3-18 years). PICCs remained in place for an overall period of 4104 days. All PICCs were positioned by the same specifically trained physician and utilized by nurses of our stem-cell transplant unit. No insertion-related complications were observed. Late complications were catheter ruptures and line occlusions (1.2 per 1000 PICC days). No rupture or occlusion required removal of the device. No catheter-related venous thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), accidental removal or permanent lumen occlusion were observed. Indications for catheter removal were completion of therapy (8 patients) and death (2 patients). Three PICCs are currently being used for blood sampling in follow-up patients after transplantation. Our data suggest that PICCs are a safe and effective alternative to conventional central venous catheters even in pediatric patients with high risk of infectious and hemorrhagic complications such as patients receiving stem-cell transplantation.

  4. Clinical impact of antimicrobial resistance in European hospitals: excess mortality and length of hospital stay related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    de Kraker, Marlieke E A

    2011-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is threatening the successful management of nosocomial infections worldwide. Despite the therapeutic limitations imposed by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), its clinical impact is still debated. The objective of this study was to estimate the excess mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS) associated with MRSA bloodstream infections (BSI) in European hospitals. Between July 2007 and June 2008, a multicenter, prospective, parallel matched-cohort study was carried out in 13 tertiary care hospitals in as many European countries. Cohort I consisted of patients with MRSA BSI and cohort II of patients with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) BSI. The patients in both cohorts were matched for LOS prior to the onset of BSI with patients free of the respective BSI. Cohort I consisted of 248 MRSA patients and 453 controls and cohort II of 618 MSSA patients and 1,170 controls. Compared to the controls, MRSA patients had higher 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.4) and higher hospital mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.5). Their excess LOS was 9.2 days. MSSA patients also had higher 30-day (aOR = 2.4) and hospital (aHR = 3.1) mortality and an excess LOS of 8.6 days. When the outcomes from the two cohorts were compared, an effect attributable to methicillin resistance was found for 30-day mortality (OR = 1.8; P = 0.04), but not for hospital mortality (HR = 1.1; P = 0.63) or LOS (difference = 0.6 days; P = 0.96). Irrespective of methicillin susceptibility, S. aureus BSI has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. In addition, MRSA BSI leads to a fatal outcome more frequently than MSSA BSI. Infection control efforts in hospitals should aim to contain infections caused by both resistant and susceptible S. aureus.

  5. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use in Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Montoya, Ana; Joshi, Darius; Becker, Carol; Brant, Amy; McGuirk, Helen; Clark, Jordyn; Harrod, Molly; Kuhn, Latoya; Mody, Lona

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe patterns of use, care practices, and outcomes related to peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) use in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Two community SNFs. PARTICIPANTS Adult SNF residents with PICCs (N = 56). MEASUREMENTS Information on indication for PICC use, device characteristics (e.g., lumens, gauge), and participant data (comorbidities, medications) were obtained from medical records. Care practices (e.g., frequency of flushing, dressing care) and problems related to PICCs were recorded. Major (central line–associated bloodstream infection, venous thromboembolism, catheter dislodgement) and minor (migration, dressing disruption, lumen occlusion, exit site infection) complications and process measures (flushing of PICC, assessment of necessity) were recorded. Bivariate analyses with t-tests, chi-square tests, or Fischer exact tests were used for continuous and categorical data. RESULTS Participants were enrolled from two SNFs. The most common indication for PICC use was intravenous antibiotic delivery. The average PICC dwell time was 43 days, and most devices were single-lumen PICCs. Major and minor complications were common and occurred in 11 (20%) and 18 (32%) participants, respectively. Occlusion (23%, n = 13), accidental dislodgement (12%, n = 7), and dressing disruption (11%, n = 6) were the commonest complications observed. Documentation regarding catheter care practices occurred in 41% of cases. CONCLUSION Quality improvement efforts that seek to benchmark practice, identify gaps, and institute efforts to improve PICC care and practice in SNFs appear necessary. PMID:26312402

  6. Lidocaine-prilocaine cream reduces catheter-related bladder discomfort in male patients during the general anesthesia recovery period: A prospective, randomized, case-control STROBE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Li; Geng, Li-Cheng; Xu, Hui; Luo, Man; Geng, Jing-Miao; Li, Li

    2017-04-01

    Urethral catheterization is a predictor of agitation during the general anesthesia recovery period. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of intraurethral 5% lidocaine and 25 mg/g prilocaine cream in reducing catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in male patients during the general anesthesia recovery period. Adult male patients undergoing elective operations that required urinary catheterization under general anesthesia were enrolled and assigned randomly to 2 groups. In the lidocaine-prilocaine cream group (n = 72), approximately 5 g of topical cream was spread in the preputial sac, the glans, the meatus, and on the urinary catheter surface before urinary catheterization. In the control group (n = 74), the urinary catheter was lubricated with lidocaine gel. The incidence and severity of CRBD were assessed 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes postoperatively. We found that the incidence of CRBD in the lidocaine-prilocaine cream group was significantly lower than in the control group. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that lidocaine-prilocaine cream applications reduced moderate or severe CRBD. Thirty minutes postoperation was the most frequent time point for the incidence of CRBD. Application of lidocaine-prilocaine cream on the surface of the urinary catheter is an efficient and safe method to reduce the incidence and severity of CRBD.

  7. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley catheter ... You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter is working properly. You will also need to ... not get an infection or skin irritation. Make catheter and skin care part of your daily routine. ...

  8. Engaging Frontline Staff in Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Practice in the Wake of Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Rebecca E; Devins, Lea; Geraghty, Gail; Bock, Steven; Dugan, Christina A; Transou, Marjorie; Phillips, Michael; Lighter-Fisher, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Central venous catheters are crucial devices in the care of hospitalized children, both in and out of critical care units, but the concomitant risk of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) affects 15,000 Americans annually. In 2012, CLABSI rates varied among units from 6.8/1,000 to 1.0/1,000 in a 109-bed children's service within NYU Langone Medical Center (NYULMC; New York City), a 1,069-bed tertiary care academic medical center. In response to variation in central line-related practices and infection prevention rates, a CLABSI Prevention Core Team began an effort to standardize central venous catheter (CVC) care across all pediatric units (ICU and non-ICU). Momentum in this quality improvement (QI) work was interrupted when Superstorm Sandy shuttered the flagship hospital, but the relatively decreased clinical load provided a "downtime" opportunity to address CLABSI prevention. The first phase of the collaborative effort, Booster 1, Planning/Initial Phase: Development of a Pediatric Central Venous Catheter Working Group, was followed by Booster 2, Maintenance/Sustaining Phase: Transitioning for Sustainability and Adopting Model for Improvement. Data in the subsequent 21 months after the temporary closure of the facility (January 2013-September 2014) showed an increase in maintenance bundle reliability. The inpatient CLABSI rate for patients<18 years decreased from an annual rate of 2.7/1,000 line days (2012) to 0.6/1,000 line days (2013) to 0.5/1,000 line days as of August 2014. There was a decrease in pediatric CLABSI events and no significant change in line days. Key elements contributing to initial success with evolving QI capacity and resources were likely multi-factorial, including staff and leadership engagement, culture change, consistent guidelines, and accountability by individuals and by our multidisciplinary core team.

  9. Risk Factors of Catheter-Related Thrombosis (CRT) in Cancer Patients: A Patient-Level Data (IPD) Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials and Prospective Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saber, W.; Moua, T.; Williams, E. C.; Verso, M.; Agnelli, G.; Couban, S.; Young, A.; De Cicco, M.; Biffi, R.; van Rooden, C. J.; Huisman, M. V.; Fagnani, D.; Cimminiello, C.; Moia, M.; Magagnoli, M.; Povoski, S. P.; Malak, S. F.; Lee, A. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Background Knowledge of independent, baseline risk factors of catheter-related thrombosis (CRT) may help select adult cancer patients at high risk to receive thromboprophylaxis. Objectives We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient-level data to identify these baseline risk factors. Patients/Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, DARE, Grey literature databases were searched in all languages from 1995-2008. Prospective studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible. Studies were included if original patient-level data were provided by the investigators and if CRT was objectively confirmed with valid imaging. Multivariate logistic regression analysis of 17 prespecified baseline characteristics was conducted. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results A total sample of 5636 subjects from 5 RCTs and 7 prospective studies was included in the analysis. Among these subjects, 425 CRT events were observed. In multivariate logistic regression, the use of implanted ports as compared with peripherally implanted central venous catheters (PICC), decreased CRT risk (OR = 0.43; 95% CI, 0.23-0.80), whereas past history of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.05-3.92), subclavian venipuncture insertion technique (OR = 2.16; 95% CI, 1.07-4.34), and improper catheter tip location (OR = 1.92; 95% CI, 1.22-3.02), increased CRT risk. Conclusions CRT risk is increased with using PICC catheters, previous history of DVT, subclavian venipuncture insertion technique and improper positioning of the catheter tip. These factors may be useful for risk stratifying patients to select those for thromboprophylaxis. Prospective studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:21040443

  10. Relationship between neighborhood poverty rate and bloodstream infections in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendu, Mallika L; Zager, Sam; Gibbons, Fiona K; Christopher, Kenneth B

    2012-05-01

    Poverty is associated with increased risk of chronic illness, but its contribution to bloodstream infections is not well-defined. We performed a multicenter observational study of 14,657 patients, aged 18 yrs or older, who received critical care and had blood cultures drawn between 1997 and 2007 in two hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts. Data sources included 1990 U.S. Census and hospital administrative data. Census tracts were used as the geographic units of analysis. The exposure of interest was neighborhood poverty rate categorized as 40%. Neighborhood poverty rate is the percentage of residents with income below the federal poverty line. The primary end point was bloodstream infection occurring 48 hrs before critical care initiation to 48 hrs after. Associations between neighborhood poverty rate and bloodstream infection were estimated by logistic regression models. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated by multivariable logistic regression models. Two thousand four-hundred thirty-five patients had bloodstream infections. Neighborhood poverty rate was a strong predictor of risk of bloodstream infection, with a significant risk gradient across neighborhood poverty rate quintiles. After multivariable analysis, neighborhood poverty rate in the highest quintiles (20%-40% and >40%) were associated with a 26% and 49% increase in bloodstream infection risk, respectively, relative to patients with neighborhood poverty rate of poverty rate, a proxy for decreased socioeconomic status, appears to be associated with risk of bloodstream infection among patients who receive critical care.

  11. Brain Plasticity Related to Psychomotor Skills in Catheter-based Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Katja; Cnossen, Fokeltje; Taatgen, Niels; Lanzer, Peter; Villringer, Arno

    2016-01-01

    A fascinating property of the brain is its ability to reorganise as a result of experience. Practice-related change has been shown in grey and white matter as a result of for example juggling training, but tasks that require many interrelated skills such as very fine motor skills, mental rotation

  12. Infection related to implantable central venous access devices in cancer patients: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Maristela P; Pierrotti, Ligia C; Zerati, Antônio E; Araújo, Pedro H X N; Motta-Leal-Filho, J M; Duarte, Laiane P G; Ibrahim, Karim Y; Souza, Antonia A L; Diz, Maria P E; Pereira, Juliana; Hoff, Paulo M; Abdala, Edson

    2013-07-01

    To describe the epidemiology of infections related to the use of implantable central venous access devices (CVADs) in cancer patients and to evaluate measures aimed at reducing the rates of such infections. Prospective cohort study. Referral hospital for cancer in São Paulo, Brazil. We prospectively evaluated all implantable CVADs employed between January 2009 and December 2011. Inpatients and outpatients were followed until catheter removal, transfer to another facility, or death. Outcome measures were bloodstream infection and pocket infection. We also evaluated the effects that the creation of a multidisciplinary team for CVAD care, avoiding in-hospital implantation of CVADs, and limiting CVAD insertion in neutropenic patients have on the rates of such infections. During the study period, 966 CVADs (mostly venous ports) were implanted in 933 patients, for a combined total of 243,792 catheter-days. We identified 184 episodes of infection: 154 (84%) were bloodstream infections, 21 (11%) were pocket infections, and 9 (5%) were surgical site infections. During the study period, the rate of CVAD-related infection dropped from 2.2 to 0.24 per 1,000 catheter-days ([Formula: see text]). Multivariate analysis revealed that relevant risk factors for such infection include surgical reintervention, implantation in a neutropenic patient, in-hospital implantation, use of a cuffed catheter, and nonchemotherapy indication for catheter use. Establishing a multidisciplinary team specifically focused on CVAD care, together with systematic reporting of infections, appears to reduce the rates of infection related to the use of these devices.

  13. Infecciones asociadas a catéteres en niños tratados con hemodiálisis Catheter-related infections in hemodyalisis-treated children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Patricia Durán Casal

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron los expedientes clínicos de los 22 pacientes incluidos en el plan de enfermos crónicos del Servicio de Hemodiálisis de nuestro hospital en el 2005. Diez de estos pacientes tenían como acceso vascular temporal para hemodiálisis un catéter venoso central percutáneo (45,5 % y en ellos se registraron 26 procesos infecciosos relacionados con el cateterismo −algunos de ellos presentaron más de un episodio de infección relacionado con el catéter. Los catéteres utilizados fueron colocados por vía percutánea en las venas subclavia, femoral y yugular interna. Los catéteres insertados en la vena femoral presentaron el mayor número de complicaciones infecciosas. El hemocultivo fue positivo para el mismo germen en 14 casos del total de pacientes infectados, lo que evidenció que 53,8 % de los pacientes desarrollaron una infección asociada al uso del catéter. Los gérmenes que predominaron fueron los grampositivos (53,7 %, representados mayoritariamente por el estafilococo coagulasa-negativo. Las sepsis sistémicas predominaron en el estudio y todos los pacientes desarrollaron manifestaciones clínicas. En nuestro servicio la tasa estimada de sepsis por catéter para hemodiálisis fue de 18,1 %.The medical histories of the 22 patients from the chronically-ill patient program of Hemodyalisis Service at our hospital were studied in 2005. Ten of them had a central percutaneous venous catheter as a temporary vascular access for hemodyalisis (45,5%, but they also suffered 26 catheter-related infectious processes, some of them even more than one episode of infection. The used catheters were percutaneously placed in subclavian, femoral and internal jugular veins. Those catheters inserted into the femoral vein exhibited the highest number of infectious complications. Hemoculture was positive to the same germ in 14 cases of the total number of infected patients, which proved that 53,8% of patients developed catheter-related infection

  14. Urethral catheter-related urinary infection in critical patients admitted to the ICU. Descriptive data of the ENVIN-UCI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, F; Gracia-Arnillas, M P; Palomar, M; Olaechea, P; Insausti, J; López-Pueyo, M J; Otal, J J; Gimeno, R; Seijas, I

    2013-03-01

    To describe trends in national catheter-related urinary tract infection (CRUTI) rates, as well as etiologies and multiresistance markers. An observational, prospective, multicenter voluntary participation study was conducted from 1 April to 30 June in the period between 2005 and 2010. Intensive Care Units (ICUs) that participated in the ENVIN-ICU registry during the study period. We included all patients admitted to the participating ICUs and patients with urinary catheter placement for more than 24 hours (78,863 patients). Patient monitoring was continued until discharge from the ICU or up to 60 days. CRUTIs were defined according to the CDC system, and frequency is expressed as incidence density (ID) in relation to the number of urinary catheter-patients days. A total of 2329 patients (2.95%) developed one or more CRUTI. The ID decreased from 6.69 to 4.18 episodes per 1000 days of urinary catheter between 2005 and 2010 (p<0.001). In relation to the underlying etiology, gramnegative bacilli predominated (55.6 to 61.6%), followed by fungi (18.7 to 25.2%) and grampositive cocci (17.1 to 25.9%). In 2010, ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains (37.1%) increased, as well as imipenem-resistant (36.4%) and ciprofloxacin-resistant (37.1%) strains of P. aeruginosa. A decrease was observed in CRUTI rates, maintaining the same etiological distribution and showing increased resistances in gramnegative pathogens, especially E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Francimar Tinoco de; Ferreira, Maria Manuela Frederico; Araújo, Silvia Teresa Carvalho de; Bessa, Amanda Trindade Teixeira de; Moraes, Advi Catarina Barbachan; Stipp, Marluci Andrade Conceição

    2017-04-03

    To describe the application of positive deviance as a strategy to prevent and control bloodstream infections. An intervention study with nursing and medical team members working in an intensive care unit in a university hospital, between June and December 2014. The four steps of the positive defiance methodology were applied: to define, to determine, to discover and to design. In 90 days, 188 actions were observed, of these, 36.70% (n=69) were related to catheter dressing. In 81.15% (n=56) of these dressings, the professionals most adhered to the use of flexible sterile cotton-tipped swabs to perform antisepsis at catheter entry sites and fixation dressing. Positive deviance contributed to the implementation of proposals to improve work processes and team development related to problems identified in central venous catheter care. Descrever a aplicação do Positive Deviance como estratégia na prevenção e no controle da infecção de corrente sanguínea. Estudo de intervenção realizado na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva de um hospital universitário, com os membros das equipes de enfermagem e médica, de junho a dezembro de 2014. Foram aplicados os quatro passos da metodologia Positive Deviance: Definir, Determinar, Descobrir e Desenhar. Em 90 dias 188 ações foram observadas, destas, 36,70% (n=69) estavam relacionadas aos curativos dos cateteres. Em 81,15% (n=56) desses curativos, o uso da haste flexível estéril para realização da antissepsia do local de inserção do cateter e de sua placa de fixação foi a ação de maior adesão. O Positive Deviance auxiliou na implementação de propostas de melhorias de processo de trabalho e no desenvolvimento da equipe para os problemas identificados no cuidado com o cateter venoso central.

  16. [Relation between the viscosity of enteral diets and mechanical complications in their administration according to the nasogastric catheters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, O; Alba, G; Cardona, D; Estelrich, J; Mangues, M A

    2001-01-01

    The use of enteral nutrition has increased enormously over the last few years and at the same time the standard indications for parenteral nutrition, whether in hospitals or at home, have gradually been defined. The most common way to administer enteral nutrition is intermittently and using gravity, through a nasogastric catheter or through gastrostomy. In our daily practice it has been observed that there was at times a considerable delay in the administration of the diet by means of a nasogastric catheter and the tube was sometimes blocked due to its small calibre and/or the excessive viscosity of the formula. It was therefore proposed to study the viscosities of polymeric enteral diets with and without fibre at this hospital to identify the relationship with the time taken for their intermittent, gravity-driven administration through different calibres of nasogastric catheter at the maximum flow rate. Some of the enteral diets under study exceeded the recommended time for intermittent administration by gravity (20-40 minutes). We feel it is essential for the product label to provide information on the optimal calibre of the nasogastric catheter required for administration of the product.

  17. CATHETER DURATION AND THE RISK OF SEPSIS IN PREMATURE BABIES WITH UMBILICAL VEIN CATHETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartojo Hartojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical catheters are frequently required in the management of severely ill premature babies. The risk of complications may increase with duration of UVC use. Objective: To determine whether the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs and sepsis remained constant over the duration of umbilical vein catheters (UVCs in high-risk premature neonates. Methods:retrospective analysis. The data were collected from the medical record of high risk premature neonates who had a UVC placed in neonatal care unit of Husada Utama Hospital between April 1st 2008 to April 30th 2011 with purposive sampling. Catheter duration was observed before and after 14 days on placement. Blood and UVC culture was performed to establish the risk of CLA-BSIs and sepsis. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were performed in the laboratorium data. Result: A total 44 high risk premature babies with UVCs were enrolled (sepsis group: n = 23 and non sepsis group: n = 21. Baseline demographics were similar between the groups. 15 babies in sepsis group have UVCs duration > 14 days, and 8 babies have UVCs 14 days show blood culture performance in 11 babies with positive evidence, UVCs culture performance is negative in 18 babies (p = 0.456. Burkholderia cepacia and Klebsiella pneumonia mostly appeared in blood culture performance. 25% of UVC culture performance shows Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Conclusions: The catheter duration have no significant difference in risk of sepsis in premature babies with Umbilical Vein Catheters.

  18. Effect of an acrylic terpolymer barrier film beneath transparent catheter dressings on skin integrity, risk of dressing disruption, catheter colonisation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkina, A I; Gusarov, V G; Blot, S I; Zhivotneva, I V; Pasko, N V; Zamyatin, M N

    2018-03-23

    We assessed the effect of a skin-protective terpolymer barrier film around the catheter insertion site on frequency of dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues (hyperaemia, skin irritation, residues of adhesives and moisture under the dressing). Secondary outcomes included colonisation of the central venous catheter (CVC) and rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection. A monocentric, open-label, randomised controlled trial was performed comparing a control group receiving standard transparent catheter dressings without the skin-protecting barrier film and an intervention group receiving a transparent chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing with use of the skin-protective acrylic terpolymer barrier film (3M™ Cavilon™ No - Sting Barrier Film, 3 M Health Care, St. Paul, MN, USA). Sixty patients were enrolled and randomised in the study accounting for 60 central venous catheters and a total of 533 catheter days. Dressing disruptions occurred more frequently and at sooner time point in the control group. Skin integrity issues were significantly less observed in the intervention group. No differences in CVC colonisation or central line-associated bloodstream infection were observed. The application of a barrier film creating a skin-protective polymer layer beneath transparent catheter dressings is associated with less dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues without altering the risk of infectious complications if used in combination with a chlorhexidine-impregnated catheter dressing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  20. Safety related to the implantation of jugular catheters for haemodialysis and usefulness of PA chest X rays post procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Cesar A; Chacon, Jose Arnob; Mauricio Villota, Duvan

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to determine how safe the implantation of transient double lumen jugular catheters is for hemodialysis in patients with renal disease, and who require dialysis therapy and Posterior Anterior (PA) chest X-Ray post procedure. Design: observational descriptive study. Site: renal units at RTS Ltda. Sucursal Caldas (Hospital Santa Sofia y Hospital Infantil Rafael Henao Toro de la Cruz Roja). Patients: all patients with renal disease in whom it was necessary to do hemodyalitic therapy with implantation of a jugular catheter, with medical records of the events and complications that occurred during the procedure, with subsequent control AP chest X Ray and that showed reports made by the radiologist or physician who carried out the procedure, about the findings in the chest X Ray. Patients with renal disease, in whom jugular catheters had been inserted: Methods: variables such as age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI) etiology of the renal failure,time of evolution of the disease, indications for insertion, priority of catheter insertion, type of catheter inserted, amount of punctures, physician who carried out the procedure and patient's co-morbidities were analyzed. The events considered as complicated were analyzed as well as if there was any relationship with co-morbidities and the analyzed variables. Findings in the PA chest X-Ray were recorded and their relationship with the difficulties encountered during the procedure. A bi-variance analysis was done. The dependent and independent variables were classified in the nominal measurement scale. Results: 774 clinical histories were reviewed. 562 were excluded due to lack of variables and impossibility to read the notes. Men older than de 55 (45,7%). 212 (97.1%) patients with diagnosis of chronic renal disease (CRD) and in whom 238 procedures were carried out. seven patients (2,85%) had acute renal failure (ARF). The fi rst indication for central catheter insertion was in patients with chronic uremia

  1. A Study of Use of “PORT” Catheter in Patients with Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irappa Madabhavi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective and reliable venous access is one of the cornerstones of modern medical therapy in oncology. Materials and methods: This is a prospective observational study, which collected data of patients who require “PORT” catheter insertion for any cancer, at a tertiary care oncology hospital in Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India, during a 2-year period. Aims and objectives: The main objective of this study was to study the various complications and outcomes related to “PORT” catheters. Results: “PORT” catheter was inserted in 100 patients and was most commonly used in solid malignancies (n = 86, 86%, followed by hematologic malignancies (n = 14, 14%. Among the solid malignancies, breast cancer (38, 38% was the most common underlying disease, whereas among the hematologic malignancies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (6, 6% was the most common underlying disease for “PORT” catheter insertion. Chemotherapy was started on the first day of “PORT” catheter in 74% of patients in the “PORT” study group. The various complications developed in the “PORT” study group in the descending order are as follows: 4 patients (4% developed early infection (⩽30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% late infection (⩾30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% bloodstream infection, 2 (2% local skin infection at the “PORT” insertion site, 2 (2% dislodgment of the “PORT” catheter, 2 (2% fracture of the “PORT” catheter, and 1 recurrent pleural effusion. One patient (1% developed thrombosis as the complication of “PORT” catheter insertion. Conclusions: The most disturbing aspect of treatment for a patient with cancer is multiple painful venipunctures made for administration of cytotoxic agents, antibiotics, blood products, and nutritional supplements. The focus of this prospective observational research is to study the various underlying diseases for which “PORT” catheter is needed in different solid and hematologic

  2. Analyses of cerebral microdialysis in patients with traumatic brain injury: relations to intracranial pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure and catheter placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanecek Michael

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral microdialysis (MD is used to monitor local brain chemistry of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Despite an extensive literature on cerebral MD in the clinical setting, it remains unclear how individual levels of real-time MD data are to be interpreted. Intracranial pressure (ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP are important continuous brain monitors in neurointensive care. They are used as surrogate monitors of cerebral blood flow and have an established relation to outcome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relations between MD parameters and ICP and/or CPP in patients with TBI. Methods Cerebral MD, ICP and CPP were monitored in 90 patients with TBI. Data were extensively analyzed, using over 7,350 samples of complete (hourly MD data sets (glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol to seek representations of ICP, CPP and MD that were best correlated. MD catheter positions were located on computed tomography scans as pericontusional or nonpericontusional. MD markers were analyzed for correlations to ICP and CPP using time series regression analysis, mixed effects models and nonlinear (artificial neural networks computer-based pattern recognition methods. Results Despite much data indicating highly perturbed metabolism, MD shows weak correlations to ICP and CPP. In contrast, the autocorrelation of MD is high for all markers, even at up to 30 future hours. Consequently, subject identity alone explains 52% to 75% of MD marker variance. This indicates that the dominant metabolic processes monitored with MD are long-term, spanning days or longer. In comparison, short-term (differenced or Δ changes of MD vs. CPP are significantly correlated in pericontusional locations, but with less than 1% explained variance. Moreover, CPP and ICP were significantly related to outcome based on Glasgow Outcome Scale scores, while no significant relations were found between outcome and MD. Conclusions The

  3. Development of a 96-well catheter-based microdilution method to test antifungal susceptibility of Candida biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nweze, Emeka I; Ghannoum, Adam; Chandra, Jyotsna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A; Mukherjee, Pranab K

    2012-01-01

    Candida biofilms, which are often associated with device-related infections, including catheter-related bloodstream infections, are resistant to commonly used antifungal agents. Current microtitre (96-well) plate-based methods to determine the antifungal susceptibility of these biofilms do not involve clinically relevant substrates (e.g. catheters), and are not well suited for evaluating the surface topography and three-dimensional architecture of biofilms. We describe a simple, reproducible catheter-based microtitre plate method to form biofilms and evaluate their antifungal susceptibility. Biofilms were formed by Candida species on 5 mm catheter discs placed in microtitre plates and quantified using metabolic conversion of a formazan dye (XTT). The morphology, surface topography and three-dimensional architecture of these biofilms were evaluated by fluorescence, confocal scanning laser and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The optimized XTT method was used to evaluate the antifungal susceptibility of formed Candida biofilms to fluconazole, voriconazole, itraconazole and anidulafungin. Maximum XTT activity was achieved within 90 min. All tested Candida strains formed robust biofilms on catheter discs at both 24 and 48 h (P = 0.66). Biofilms exhibited typical gross morphology, surface topography and architecture, and no difference in biofilm thickness (P = 0.37). The three tested azoles were not active against the biofilms (MIC ≥ 64 mg/L), but anidulafungin possessed potent activity against them (MIC = 0.063-0.125 mg/L). The developed method is simple, rapid and reproducible, and requires relatively small amounts of drug. It can be used to perform both high-resolution microscopic analysis of the topography and architecture of biofilms, and evaluation of their antifungal susceptibility.

  4. Response of high-sensitive C-reactive protein to catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation and its relation with rhythm outcome.

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    Jelena Kornej

    Full Text Available AIMS: This study investigated the possible association between hs-CRP as well as hs-CRP changes and rhythm outcome after AF catheter ablation. METHODS: We studied 68 consecutive patients with AF undergoing catheter ablation. hs-CRP levels were measured using commercially available assays before and 6 months after catheter ablation. Serial 7-day Holter ECGs were used to detect AF recurrences. RESULTS: Early AF recurrence (ERAF, within one week was observed in 38%, while late AF recurrence (LRAF, between 3 and 6 months occurred in 18% of the patients. None of the baseline clinical or echocardiographic variables was predictive of ERAF or LRAF. Baseline hs-CRP measured 2.07 ± 1.1 µg/ml and was not associated with ERAF and LRAF. At 6 months, hs-CRP levels were comparable with baseline values (2.14±1.19 µg/ml, p = 0.409 and were also not related with LRAF. However, patients with LRAF showed an hs-CRP increase from 2.03 ± 0.61 to 2.62 ± 1.52 µg/ml (p = 0.028. Patients with an hs-CRP change in the upper tertile (>0.2 µg/ml had LRAF in 32% as opposed to 11% (p = 0.042 in patients in the lower (<-0.3 µg/ml or intermediate (-0.3-0.2 µg/ml tertile. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in hs-CRP but not baseline hs-CRP are associated with rhythm outcome after AF catheter ablation. This finding points to a link between an inflammatory response and AF recurrence in this setting.

  5. Prevention of Device-Related Healthcare-Associated Infections [version 1; referees: 2 approved

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    Edward J. Septimus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Up to 15% of patients develop an infection while hospitalized in the United States, which accounts for approximately 1.7 million HAIs, 99,000 deaths annually and over 10 billion dollars in costs per year. A significant percentage of HAIs are preventable using evidenced-based strategies. In terms of device-related HAIs it is estimated that 65-70% of catheter-line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs are preventable. To prevent CLABSIs a bundle which includes hand hygiene prior to insertion and catheter manipulation, use of chlorhexidene alcohol for site preparation and maintenance, use of maximum barrier for catheter insertion, site selection, removing nonessential lines, disinfect catheter hubs before assessing line, and dressing changes are essential elements of basic practices. To prevent CAUTIs a bundle that includes hand hygiene for insertion and catheter or bag manipulation, inserting catheters for appropriate indications, insert using aseptic technique, remove catheters when no longer needed, maintain a close system keeping bag and tubing below the bladder are the key components of basic practices.

  6. Candida Infection of the Bloodstream - Candidemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candida Infection of the Bloodstream– Candidemia Fungal Disease Series #4 Candida is the single most important cause of fungal infections worldwide. In the U.S., Candida is the 4th most common cause of bloodstream ...

  7. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  8. Tsukamurella hongkongensis sp. nov. and Tsukamurella sinensis sp. nov., isolated from patients with keratitis, catheter-related bacteraemia and conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Jade L L; Tang, Ying; Wong, Samson S Y; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Huang, Yi; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Choi, Garnet K Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Three bacterial strains, HKU51T, HKU52T and HKU53, were isolated from a conjunctival swab, corneal scraping and blood culture of three patients in Hong Kong with conjunctivitis, keratitis and catheter-related bacteraemia, respectively. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, non-sporulating and non-motile bacilli. The three strains had unique biochemical profiles that were distinguishable from those of closely related species of the genus Tsukamurella. Fatty acids, mycolic acids, cell-wall sugars and peptidoglycan analyses showed that they were typical of members of Tsukamurella. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 100 % sequence identity between HKU52T and HKU53, and the two strains shared 99.5 % sequence identity with Tsukamurella sunchonensis JCM 15929T and Tsukamurella pseudospumae JCM 13375T; HKU51T shared 99.6 % sequence identity with Tsukamurella pulmonis CCUG 35732T. The DNA G+C contents of strains HKU51T, HKU52T and HKU53 were 70.9 ± 2.2, 71.3 ± 2.1 and 71.2 ± 2.3 mol% (mean ± sd; n = 3), respectively. DNA-DNA hybridization confirmed that the novel strains were distinct from other known species of the genus Tsukamurella ( ≤ 50.1 ± 3.7 % DNA-DNA relatedness); two of the isolates, HKU52T and HKU53, represented the same species ( ≥ 94.6 ± 5.6 % DNA-DNA relatedness), while the third isolate, HKU51T, represented another species. The novel species Tsukamurella hongkongensis sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate strains HKU52T and HKU53, with HKU52T ( = JCM 30715T = DSM 100208T) as the type strain; whilst another novel species, Tsukamurella sinensis sp. nov., is proposed to accommodate the third isolate, HKU51T ( = JCM 30714T = DSM 100207T), which is designated the type strain.

  9. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    : three patients had UTI out of 37 catheterized patients (8% at 10 days LOS, while 42 patients had UTI out of 49 catheterized patients (85.7% at 18 days LOS. The longer the LOS, the higher the UTI rate: LOS for each patient (median 18 days for infected patients versus 10 days for noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, and number of hospital-acquired catheter-related UTI (100 patients had UTI out of 250 catheterized patients, P=0.04.Conclusion: Reduction of the duration of catheterization and LOS of the patient have a positive impact in reduction of catheter-related UTI.Keywords: urinary catheters, catheter duration, adult

  10. Bladder catheter protocol: technical modification for the change of Long-Term bladder catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Rueda Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of urinary catheters is a common practice in chronic patients for both outpatients and inpatients. This action involves a large number of nursing interventions either planned or caused by emergency (obstruction, incorrect implantation, etc.... This modification of the catheter technique tries to improve the patient’s quality of life by minimizing the stress produced by urethral catheter replacements and reducing malpractice risks. This change in the urinary catheter technique also intends to alleviate some of the side effects of permanent urethral catheterization. By filling the bladder with saline prior to the change of catheter, it is possible to get a quick and safe implantation, dragging possible sediment and microorganisms and thereby reducing the number of nursing actions related to the process of the urinary catheter replacement (obstruction or incorrect catheter implantations etc.

  11. A Rare Case of Aeromonas Hydrophila Catheter Related Sepsis in a Patient with Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Steroids and Dialysis: A Case Report and Review of Aeromonas Infections in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abdul Mabood Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas hydrophila (AH is an aquatic bacterium. We present a case of fifty-five-year-old gentleman with chronic kidney disease (CKD due to crescentic IgA nephropathy who presented to us with fever. He was recently pulsed with methyl prednisolone followed by oral prednisolone and discharged on maintenance dialysis through a double lumen dialysis catheter. Blood culture from peripheral vein and double lumen dialysis catheter grew AH. We speculate low immunity due to steroids and uremia along with touch contamination of dialysis catheter by the patient or dialysis nurse could have led to this rare infection. Dialysis catheter related infection by AH is rare. We present our case here and take the opportunity to give a brief review of AH infections in CKD patients.

  12. Comparative Efficacies of Tedizolid Phosphate, Linezolid, and Vancomycin in a Murine Model of Subcutaneous Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Due to Methicillin-Susceptible and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Arnold S; Abdelhady, Wessam; Li, Liang; Gonzales, Rachelle; Xiong, Yan Q

    2016-08-01

    Tedizolid, a novel oxazolidinone, exhibits bacteriostatic activity through inhibition of protein synthesis. The efficacies of tedizolid, linezolid, and vancomycin were compared in a murine catheter-related biofilm infection caused by methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA and MRSA, respectively) strains engineered for bioluminescence. We observed significantly improved efficacy in terms of decreased S. aureus densities and bioluminescent signals in the tedizolid-treated group versus the linezolid- and vancomycin-treated groups in the model of infection caused by the MSSA and MRSA strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Effect of Catheter Gauge on the Success of Intravenous Catheter Placement by Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane

    2017-11-03

    The purposes of this study were to determine if senior veterinary students find it easier to place a smaller-bore catheter, and to relate patient variables with student success in catheter placement. For dogs between 10 kg and 20 kg, the catheter size options were 20 gauge or 22 gauge. For dogs larger than 20 kg, the catheter size options were 18 gauge or 20 gauge. Variables recorded included time for catheter placement, number of catheterization attempts, number of catheters used, number of legs used, difficulty of catheterization, student success, and patient characteristics including signalment, weight, body condition score, premedication drugs given, tentative diagnosis, and procedure. If the student could not place an IV catheter after three attempts, it was graded as a student catheter placement failure. For the 55 students participating in the study over 28 months, we recorded 192 individual catheterization attempts. In small patients, students were successful in 19/20 attempts with 22-gauge catheters and in 24/30 with 20-gauge catheters. In large patients, students were successful in 59/68 attempts with 20-gauge catheters and 61/74 with 18-gauge catheters. The overall success rate was 164/192 (85%). Students were more likely to be successful when attempting placement in those dogs receiving acepromazine than in those not receiving acepromazine (p=.02). There were no significant differences among any of the other variables for difficulty, placement time, number of attempts, or student success. Clinicians and educators may select a size catheter for the patient without concern for the effects on student catheter placement success.

  14. Postoperative coagulopathy after live related donor hepatectomy: Incidence, predictors and implications for safety of thoracic epidural catheter

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    S T Karna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coagulopathy after living donor hepatectomy (LDH may endanger donor safety during removal of thoracic epidural catheter (TEC. The present study was conducted to evaluate the extent and duration of immediate postoperative coagulopathy after LDH. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of perioperative record of LDH over three years was conducted after IRB approval. Variables such as age, gender, BMI, ASA classification, liver volume on CT scan, preoperative and postoperative INR, platelet count (PC and ALT of each donor for five days was noted. In addition, duration of surgery, remnant as percentage total liver volume (Remnant%, blood loss, day of peak in PC and INR were also noted. Coagulopathy was defined as being present if INR exceeded 1.5 or platelet count fell below 1 × 10 5 /mm 3 on any day. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20 for Windows. Between group comparison was made using the Student ′t′ test for continuous variables and chi square test for categorical variables. Univariate analysis was done. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to find independent factor associated with coagulopathy. Results: Eighty four (84 donors had coagulopathy on second day (mean INR 1.9 ± 0.42. Low BMI, % of remnant liver and duration of surgery were independent predictors of coagulopathy. Right lobe hepatectomy had more coagulopathy than left lobe and low BMI was the only independent predictor. There was no correlation of coagulopathy with age, gender, blood loss, presence of epidural catheter, postoperative ALT or duration of hospital stay. High INR was the main contributor for coagulopathy. Conclusions: Coagulopathy is seen after donor hepatectomy. We recommend removal of the epidural catheter after the fifth postoperative day when INR falls below 1.5.

  15. [Antibiofilm activity of agents for disinfection of skin, mucosa, and wound on microorganisms isolated from patients with catheter-related infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodníková, L; Hupková, H; Koreň, J; Záborská, M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the activity of four disinfectious agents used for skin, mucosa and wound disinfection (chlorhexidine digluconate, povidone-iodine, octenidine hydrochloride, super oxygenated water) on the biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida sp. strains, isolated from patients with catheter-related infections. The tested agents were applied on 24-hours biofilm in the microtiter plate wells. After 20-minutes exposition, the wells were washed, and the microbial vitality was tested by regrowth method after 24-hours cultivation in fresh culture medium. Biofilm formation was confirmed in a parallel microtiter plate; the quantity of produced biofilm was measured after crystal violet staining spectrophotometrically at 570 nm. All four tested disinfectious agents inactivated the biofilm of all S. aureus, E. coli, C. albicans, C. krusei and C. glabrata strains, without respect to the intensity of biofilm production. Three strains of C. tropicalis with intensive biofilm production partially preserved their vitality after exposition to chlorhexidine and povidone-iodine, and 2 strains to octenidine. Super oxygenated water had no effect on yeasts associated with massive biofilm of one C. tropicalis strain, and only partially decreased the vitality of additional two strains. The tested disinfectious agents proved in-vitro antibiofilm activity on all microbial strains from catheter-related infections, with exception of three C. tropicalis strains with intensive biofilm production. Octenidine was found to be the most active agent. The results enable to assume, that the tested disinfectious agents, when applied to patients, will inactivate not only the individual microorganisms not protected by biofilm, but also the biofilm on the catheter surfaces approachable by local application. However, C. tropicalis strains producing massive biofilm, protecting them partially from effects of disinfectious agents tested in the present study, still remain a challenge.

  16. Comparison of complications in midlines versus central venous catheters: Are midlines safer than central venous lines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Ammara; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Kaur, Maninder; Krishna, Amar; Saleem, Aleena; Rana, Natasha; Gera, Sonia; Chandramohan, Suganya; Surapaneni, Malini; Chopra, Teena

    2018-03-07

    With the rising use of midline catheters (MCs), validation of their safety is essential. Our study aimed to evaluate the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and other complications related to the use of MCs and central venous catheters (CVCs). A retrospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary care hospital in Detroit, Michigan, from March-September 2016. Adult patients with either MC or CVC were included. Outcomes assessed were catheter-related BSI (CRBSI), mechanical complications, hospital length of stay, readmission within 90 days of discharge (RA), and mortality. Statistical analysis was performed using SAS software. A total of 411 patients with MC and 282 patients with CVC were analyzed. More CRBSIs were seen in patients with CVC (10/282) than MC (1/411) (3.5% vs 0.2%, respectively; P = .0008). More mechanical complications were seen in patients with MC (2.6%) than CVC (0.3%; P = .03). Patients with CVC had a higher crude mortality (17.3% vs 5.3%; P < .0001), RA (58% vs 35%; P ≤ .0001), line-related RA (2.8% vs 0.2%; P = .0041), and transfer to intensive care unit after line placement (9% vs 5%; P = .01). CVC was a significant exposure for a composite of mortality, CRBSI, mechanical issues, thrombosis, and readmission because of a line-related complication (odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-5.8). Our findings show use of MC is safer than CVC, but larger studies are needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term catheterization: current approaches in the diagnosis and treatment of port-related infections

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    Bustos C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cesar Bustos,1 Aitziber Aguinaga,1 Francisco Carmona-Torre,2 Jose Luis Del Pozo1,3 1Department of Clinical Microbiology, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain Abstract: Since the first description in 1982, totally implanted venous access ports have progressively improved patients' quality of life and medical assistance when a medical condition requires the use of long-term venous access. Currently, they are part of the standard medical care for oncohematologic patients. However, apart from mechanical and thrombotic complications, there are also complications associated with biofilm development inside the catheters. These biofilms increase the cost of medical assistance and extend hospitalization. The most frequently involved micro-organisms in these infections are gram-positive cocci. Many efforts have been made to understand biofilm formation within the lumen catheters, and to resolve catheter-related infection once it has been established. Apart from systemic antibiotic treatment, the use of local catheter treatment (ie, antibiotic lock technique is widely employed. Many different antimicrobial options have been tested, with different outcomes, in clinical and in in vitro assays. The stability of antibiotic concentration in the lock solution once instilled inside the catheter lumen remains unresolved. To prevent infection, it is mandatory to perform hand hygiene before catheter insertion and manipulation, and to disinfect catheter hubs, connectors, and injection ports before accessing the catheter. At present, there are still unresolved questions regarding the best antimicrobial agent for catheter-related bloodstream infection treatment and the duration of concentration stability of the antibiotic solution within the lumen of the port. Keywords: catheter-related infection, bacteremia, biofilm

  18. The Changing Epidemiology of Bloodstream Infections and Resistance in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients

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    Mücahit Yemişen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patients receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT are exposed to highly immunosuppressive conditions and bloodstream infections (BSIs are one of the most common major complications within this period. Our aim, in this study, was to evaluate the epidemiology of BSIs in these patients retrospectively. Materials and Methods: The epidemiological properties of 312 patients with HSCT were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 312 patients, followed between 2000 and 2011, who underwent autologous (62% and allogeneic (38% HSCT were included in the study. The most common underlying malignancies were multiple myeloma (28% and Hodgkin lymphoma (21.5%. A total of 142 (45% patients developed at least 1 episode of BSI and 193 separate pathogens were isolated from the blood cultures. There was a trend of increase in the numbers of BSIs in 2005-2008 and a relative increase in the proportion of gram-positive infections in recent years (2009-2011, and central venous catheter-related BSI was found to be most common source. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (49.2% and Acinetobacter baumannii (8.8% were the most common pathogens. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing strains were 23% and 22% among Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, respectively. Quinolone resistance was detected in 10% of Enterobacteriaceae. Resistance to carbapenems was not detected in Enterobacteriaceae, while it was seen at 11.1% and 23.5% in Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains, respectively. Conclusion: A shift was detected from gram-negative bacteria to gram-positive in the etiology over the years and central lines were the most common sources of BSIs.

  19. Antiseptic barrier cap effective in reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voor In 't Holt, Anne F; Helder, Onno K; Vos, Margreet C; Schafthuizen, Laura; Sülz, Sandra; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Ista, Erwin

    2017-04-01

    Microorganisms can intraluminally access a central venous catheter via the catheter hub. The catheter hub should be appropriately disinfected to prevent central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). However, compliance with the time-consuming manual disinfection process is low. An alternative is the use of an antiseptic barrier cap, which cleans the catheter hub by continuous passive disinfection. To compare the effects of antiseptic barrier cap use and manual disinfection on the incidence of CLABSIs. Systematic review and meta-analysis. We systematically searched Embase, Medline Ovid, Web-of-science, CINAHL EBSCO, Cochrane Library, PubMed Publisher and Google Scholar until May 10, 2016. The primary outcome, reduction in CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days, expressed as an incidence rate ratio (IRR), was analyzed with a random effects meta-analysis. Studies were included if 1) conducted in a hospital setting, 2) used antiseptic barrier caps on hubs of central lines with access to the bloodstream and 3) reported the number of CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days when using the barrier cap and when using manual disinfection. A total of 1537 articles were identified as potentially relevant and after exclusion of duplicates, 953 articles were screened based on title and abstract; 18 articles were read full text. Eventually, nine studies were included in the systematic review, and seven of these nine in the random effects meta-analysis. The pooled IRR showed that use of the antiseptic barrier cap was effective in reducing CLABSIs (IRR=0.59, 95% CI=0.45-0.77, Pantiseptic barrier cap is associated with a lower incidence CLABSIs and is an intervention worth adding to central-line maintenance bundles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  1. Potential In Vivo UVC Disinfection of Catheter Lumens: Estimation of the Doses Received by the Blood Flow Outside the Catheter Tip Hole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Helfmann, Jurgen

    2011-01-01

    hole for administration of drugs, bloods or nutrients into the bloodstream. Even if the UVC light is strongly attenuated during its propagation through the catheter tube a fraction of the UVC launched into the catheter will escape through the exit hole and irradiate the blood. We demonstrate...... by calculations that very small effective doses are exposed to the blood (ca 10(-4) J m(-2) ). This dosage level is very low compared with UVC doses reported from other therapeutic applications. The very short residence time of the blood constituents in the irradiated volume in front of the exit hole is the main...... reason why the UVC exposure to the blood in the catheter application is so low. The very low dose received by the blood through the catheter tip indicated that possible side effects are negligible and makes the UV disinfection technique feasible in a clinical setting....

  2. Bloodstream infections by Malassezia and Candida species in critical care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Cafarchia, Claudia; Cuna, Teresa; Montagna, Osvaldo; Laforgia, Nicola; Gentile, Ottavio; Rizzo, Antonino; Boekhout, Teun; Otranto, Domenico; Montagna, Maria Teresa

    2014-04-01

    Despite being considered an emerging yeast related to immunocompromised individuals, severe infections by Malassezia furfur have not been evaluated. During a one-year survey on yeasts fungemia, 290 neonatal and 17 pediatric patients with intravascular catheters, lipid parenteral nutrition, prolonged ward stay, and surgery were enrolled. In addition, the origin of the infection was investigated by swabbing hand skin of patients, parents, and healthcare workers and medical devices. All biological specimens and swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and Dixon agar. The yeasts identification was based on morphological and biochemical features and by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and confirmed by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA. A higher prevalence of M. furfur (2.1%) over Candida spp. (1.4%) caused bloodstream infections (BSIs). Twelve fungemia episodes were recorded: 2 by M. furfur in a pediatric ward and 10 in a neonatal intensive care unit (6 caused by M. furfur and 4 by Candida spp.). M. furfur was also isolated from the skin of all patients with BSIs, from the hand skin of a parent, and from an incubator surface and sheet. Patients with Candida spp. and M. furfur BSIs were successfully treated with intravenous liposomal Amphotericin B. These findings highlight the need for a more accurate etiological diagnosis in high-risk patients by adding lipid-supplemented culture media for Malassezia in the current mycological routine as the clinical features, patient management, and outcomes in both Candida and Malassezia fungemia do not differ.

  3. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... Survey Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... Contrast Materials CT Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting MR Angiography (MRA) Contrast ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... angiography exam View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting MR Angiography ( ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  6. A prospective survey on incidence and outcome of Broviac/Hickman catheter-related complications in pediatric patients affected by hematological and oncological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Simone; Corrò, Roberta; Pelosin, Anna; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Zadra, Nicola; Fusaro, Fabio; Pillon, Marta; Cusinato, Riccardo; Zampieri, Chiara; Magagna, Laura; Cavaliere, Mara; Tridello, Gloria; Zanon, Gianfranco; Zanesco, Luigi

    2004-03-01

    A prospective pediatric survey on the incidence of central venous catheter (CVC) complications was performed aimed at identifying risk factors of premature CVC removal. The study comprised 129 Broviac-Hickman CVCs inserted during a 13-month period in 112 children. The total number of CVC days was 19,328 (median: 122 days, range: 1-385). The overall rate of complications was 6.2/1000 CVC days, i.e., 4.5/1000 and 1.7/1000 CVC days for mechanical and infectious complications, respectively. Interestingly, only two CVC-related cases of septicemia and no thrombotic events were documented. At the end of the study period, 38 of 129 CVC (29.5%) had been removed: 20 due to CVC-related complications (dislocation18, rupture 2), 10 due to the patient's death, and 8 due to completion of therapy. Age at CVC insertion pediatric patients to reduce accidental dislocations.

  7. Outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection among patients at an oncology clinic, West Virginia, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Isaac; Nguyen, Duc B; Chatterjee, Somu; Shwe, Thein; Scott, Melissa; Ibrahim, Sherif; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; McNulty, Steven; Noble-Wang, Judith; Price, Cindy; Schramm, Kim; Bixler, Danae; Guh, Alice Y

    2014-03-01

    To determine the source and identify control measures of an outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infections at an outpatient oncology facility. Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak with a case-control study. A case was an infection in which Tsukamurella species was isolated from a blood or catheter tip culture during the period January 2011 through June 2012 from a patient of the oncology clinic. Laboratory records of area hospitals and patient charts were reviewed. A case-control study was conducted among clinic patients to identify risk factors for Tsukamurella species bloodstream infection. Clinic staff were interviewed, and infection control practices were assessed. Fifteen cases of Tsukamurella (Tsukamurella pulmonis or Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens) bloodstream infection were identified, all in patients with underlying malignancy and indwelling central lines. The median age of case patients was 68 years; 47% were male. The only significant risk factor for infection was receipt of saline flush from the clinic during the period September-October 2011 (P = .03), when the clinic had been preparing saline flush from a common-source bag of saline. Other infection control deficiencies that were identified at the clinic included suboptimal procedures for central line access and preparation of chemotherapy. Although multiple infection control lapses were identified, the outbreak was likely caused by improper preparation of saline flush syringes by the clinic. The outbreak demonstrates that bloodstream infections among oncology patients can result from improper infection control practices and highlights the critical need for increased attention to and oversight of infection control in outpatient oncology settings.

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... further information please consult the ACR Manual on Contrast Media and its references. The risk of serious allergic ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting MR Angiography (MRA) Contrast Materials CT Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × ... Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting MR Angiography (MRA) Contrast ...

  10. Neonatal bloodstream infections in a pediatric hospital in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Alexandra Yasmin; Thieu Chuong, Do Huu; Phuong, Cam Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Septicemia and bloodstream infections (BSIs) are major causes of neonatal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. We prospectively recorded all positive blood cultures (BSI) among neonates admitted consecutively to a tertiary pediatric hospital in Vietnam during a 12-month period. Among...... 5763 neonates, 2202 blood cultures were performed, of which 399 were positive in 385 neonates. Among these, 64 died, 62 in relation to septicemia. Of the BSI isolates, 56% was known pathogenic and 48% was gram-negative bacteria, most frequently Klebsiella spp. (n = 78), Acinetobacter spp. (n = 58...

  11. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  12. Outcome of Radiologically Placed Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayani, R.; Anwar, M.; Haq, T.U.; Qamari, N.A.; Bilal, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the outcome of radiologically placed double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheters for the management of renal failure. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Interventional Suite of Radiology Department at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from April 2010 to June 2011. Methodology: All consecutive patients who were referred to the department of radiology by the nephrologists for double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheter (Permacath) placement during the study period were included. Patients with septicemia, those for whom follow-up was not available, those coming for catheter exchange or who died due to a noncatheter related condition were excluded. A radio-opaque, soft silicone double lumen catheter was inserted through a subcutaneous tunnel created over the anterior chest wall. The catheter tip was placed in the right atrium via the internal jugular vein. Ultrasound guidance was used for initial venous puncture. The rest of the procedure was carried out under fluoroscopic guidance. Technical success, catheter related bacteremia rates, adequacy of dialysis, patency, and adverse events were analyzed. Results: Overall 88 tunneled haemodialysis catheters were placed in 87 patients. Patients were followed-up for duration of 1 - 307 days with mean follow-up period of 4 months. Immediate technical success was 100%. The procedural complication rate was 5.6% (5 catheters). Eight patients died during the study period, seven from causes unrelated to the procedure. One patient died due to septicemia secondary to catheter related infection. Of the remaining 69 patients, 50 (72.4%) predominantly had uneventful course during the study period. Twelve patients developed infection (17.3%); two were successfully treated conservatively while in 10 patients catheter had to be removed. Seven catheters (10.1%) failed due to mechanical problems. In 3 patients the internal jugular veins got partially thrombosed. One catheter was

  13. Antimicrobial activity and cytocompatibility of silver nanoparticles coated catheters via a biomimetic surface functionalization strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ke Wu,1 Yun Yang,2,3 Yanmei Zhang,2,3 Jiexi Deng,1 Changjian Lin2,31Department of Cardiology, The Affiliated Dongnan Hospital of Xiamen University, Zhangzhou, 2Department of Medical Materials, Beijing Medical Implant Engineering Research Center, Beijing Naton Technology Group, Beijing, 3State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Catheter-related bloodstream infections are a significant problem in the clinic and may result in a serious infection. Here, we developed a facile and green procedure for buildup of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs on the central venous catheters (CVCs surface. Inspired by mussel adhesive proteins, dopamine was used to form a thin polydopamine layer and induce AgNPs formation without additional reductants or stabilizers. The chemical and physicochemical properties of AgNPs coated CVCs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle. The Staphylococcus aureus culture experiment was used to study the antibacterial properties. The cytocompatibility was assessed by water soluble tetrazolium salts (WST-1 assay, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopy analysis. The results indicated that the CVCs surface was successfully coated with compact AgNPs. AgNPs were significantly well separated and spherical with a size of 30–50 nm. The density of AgNPs could be modulated by the concentration of silver nitrate solution. The antibacterial activity was dependent on the AgNPs dose. The high dose of AgNPs showed excellent antibacterial activity while associated with increased cytotoxicity. The appropriate density of AgNPs coated CVCs could exhibit improved biocompatibility and maintained evident sterilization effect. It is promising to design mussel-inspired silver releasing CVCs with both

  14. Medically Attended Catheter Complications Are Common in Patients With Outpatient Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spires, Steven S; Rebeiro, Peter F; Miller, Mickie; Koss, Katie; Wright, Patty W; Talbot, Thomas R

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Outpatient central venous catheters (CVCs) are being used more frequently; however, data describing mechanical complications and central-line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in the outpatient setting are limited. We performed a retrospective observational cohort study to understand the burden of these complications to elucidate their impact on the healthcare system. METHODS Data were retrospectively collected on patients discharged from Vanderbilt University Medical Center with a CVC in place and admitted into the care of Vanderbilt Home Care Services. Risk factors for medically attended catheter-associated complications (CACs) and outpatient CLABSIs were analyzed. RESULTS A CAC developed in 143 patients (21.9%), for a total of 165 discrete CAC events. Among these, 76 (46%) required at least 1 visit to the emergency department or an inpatient admission, while the remaining 89 (54%) required an outpatient clinic visit. The risk for developing a CAC was significantly increased in female patients, patients with a CVC with >1 lumen, and patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. The absolute number of CLABSIs identified in the study population was small at 16, or 2.4% of the total cohort. CONCLUSIONS Medically attended catheter complications were common among outpatients discharged with a CVC, and reduction of these events should be the focus of outpatient quality improvement programs. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:439-444.

  15. Diferença de tempo de positividade: método útil no diagnóstico de infecção de corrente sanguínea relacionada com cateter? Differential time to positivity: a useful tool for the diagnosis of catheter-related infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline de Lemes Giuntini Corrêa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: As infecções de corrente sanguínea relacionadas com cateter (ICSRCs apresentam impacto significativo na morbidade e na mortalidade de pacientes internados, além de elevar custos hospitalares. A utilização de equipamentos automatizados no processamento de hemoculturas gerou uma alternativa para diagnóstico de ICSRC por meio da análise da diferença de tempo de positividade (DTP entre hemoculturas pareadas (coletadas simultaneamente de sangue periférico e sangue de cateter. Um diagnóstico acurado e rápido dessas infecções pode otimizar as condutas clínicas e terapêuticas, poupando a retirada precoce dos cateteres. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar na rotina a DTP como ferramenta auxiliar no diagnóstico de ICSRC e determinar os principais microrganismos isolados. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas retrospectivamente hemoculturas coletadas no complexo do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC/FMUSP de maio a agosto de 2008. Somente amostras que apresentaram DTP maior que 120 minutos foram consideradas possíveis ICSRCs pelo critério laboratorial. RESULTADOS: A seção processou 11.017 hemoculturas aeróbias durante o período de estudo; somente 5% foram coletadas de forma pareada. Destas, 148 (28% foram positivas, sendo 9% com crescimento somente em sangue periférico, 41% somente em sangue de cateter e 50% em ambas as amostras com 88% de homologia de microrganismos identificados. A DTP apresentou valores acima de 120 minutos em 50% dos casos e os microrganismos mais isolados foram Staphylococcus aureus (22%, Candida spp. (18%, Klebsiella spp. (7% e Enterobacter spp. (7%. CONCLUSÃO: A determinação da DTP como ferramenta auxiliar no diagnóstico de ICSRC é viável e fácil de ser executada em laboratórios de rotina com automação, porém o processo de coleta das amostras pareadas deve ser rigidamente padronizado.INTRODUCTION: Not only do catheter related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs have

  16. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  17. 2016 Expert consensus document on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of short-term peripheral venous catheter-related infections in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep A. Capdevila

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of endovascular catheters is a routine practice in secondary and tertiary care level hospitals. The short-term use of peripheral catheters has been found to be associated with the risk of nosocomial bacteraemia, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Staphylococcus aureus is mostly associated with peripheral catheter insertion. This Consensus Document has been prepared by a panel of experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiovascular Infections, in cooperation with experts from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Chemotherapy, and the Spanish Society of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery, and aims to define and establish guidelines for the management of short duration peripheral vascular catheters. The document addresses the indications for insertion, catheter maintenance, registering, diagnosis and treatment of infection, indications for removal, as well as placing an emphasis on continuous education as a drive toward quality. Implementation of these guidelines will allow uniformity in use, thus minimizing the risk of infections and their complications.

  18. Antimicrobial Efficacy of a New Chlorhexidine-based Device Against Staphylococcus aureus Colonization of Venous Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewska, Paulina M.; Petrik, Shawn M.; Di Fiore, Attilio E.; Fox-Robichaud, Alison E.

    2018-01-01

    Vascular catheters are a major cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. ChloraLock (ATTWILL Medical Solutions, Inc, West Jordan, UT, and ICU Medical, Inc, San Clemente, CA) is a novel antimicrobial device containing chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) that is fitted onto a syringe and infuses CHG into the catheter lumen during locking. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial efficacy of ChloraLock with in vitro tests and its ability to reduce Staphylococcus aureus contamination of catheters in the external jugular veins of Yorkshire swine. ChloraLock significantly reduced the bacterial load in the in vitro tests by up to 6 log10 colony-forming units (CFU) and by 3 to 4 log10 CFU/lumen in vivo in a swine model with 0.9% NaCl catheter locks. PMID:29489705

  19. NEOnatal Central-venous Line Observational study on Thrombosis (NEOCLOT): evaluation of a national guideline on management of neonatal catheter-related thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jeanine J; van de Loo, Moniek; Boerma, Marit; Bergman, Klasien A; Donker, Albertine E; van der Hoeven, Mark A H B M; Hulzebos, Christiaan V; Knol, Ronny; Djien Liem, K; van Lingen, Richard A; Lopriore, Enrico; Suijker, Monique H; Vijlbrief, Daniel C; Visser, Remco; Veening, Margreet A; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M; van Ommen, C Heleen

    2018-02-23

    In critically ill (preterm) neonates, central venous catheters (CVCs) are increasingly used for administration of medication or parenteral nutrition. A serious complication, however, is the development of catheter-related thrombosis (CVC-thrombosis), which may resolve by itself or cause severe complications. Due to lack of evidence, management of neonatal CVC-thrombosis varies among neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). In the Netherlands an expert-based national management guideline has been developed which is implemented in all 10 NICUs in 2014. The NEOCLOT study is a multicentre prospective observational cohort study, including 150 preterm and term infants (0-6 months) admitted to one of the 10 NICUs, developing CVC-thrombosis. Patient characteristics, thrombosis characteristics, risk factors, treatment strategies and outcome measures will be collected in a web-based database. Management of CVC-thrombosis will be performed as recommended in the protocol. Violations of the protocol will be noted. Primary outcome measures are a composite efficacy outcome consisting of death due to CVC-thrombosis and recurrent thrombosis, and a safety outcome consisting of the incidence of major bleedings during therapy. Secondary outcomes include individual components of primary efficacy outcome, clinically relevant non-major and minor bleedings and the frequency of risk factors, protocol variations, residual thrombosis and post thrombotic syndrome. The NEOCLOT study will evaluate the efficacy and safety of the new, national, neonatal CVC-thrombosis guideline. Furthermore, risk factors as well as long-term consequences of CVC-thrombosis will be analysed. Trial registration: Nederlands Trial Register NTR4336 . Registered 24 December 2013.

  20. Implementing a multifaceted intervention to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections in SEHA (Abu Dhabi Health Services Company) intensive care units: the Abu Dhabi experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Asad; Kelly, Bernadette; Edrees, Hanan; Kent, Paula S; Weaver, Sallie J; Jovanovic, Branislava; Attallah, Hadeel; de Grouchy, Kristin K; Al-Obaidli, Ali; Goeschel, Christine A; Berenholtz, Sean M

    2015-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether implementation of a multifaceted intervention would significantly reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections. DESIGN Prospective cohort collaborative. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS Intensive care units of the Abu Dhabi Health Services Company hospitals in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. INTERVENTIONS A bundled intervention consisting of 3 components was implemented as part of the program. It consisted of a multifaceted approach that targeted clinician use of evidence-based infection prevention recommendations, tools that supported the identification of local barriers to these practices, and implementation ideas to help ensure patients received the practices. Comprehensive unit-based safety teams were created to improve safety culture and teamwork. Finally, the measurement and feedback of monthly infection rate data to safety teams, senior leaders, and staff in participating intensive care units was encouraged. The main outcome measure was the quarterly rate of central line-associated bloodstream infections. RESULTS Eighteen intensive care units from 7 hospitals in Abu Dhabi implemented the program and achieved an overall 38% reduction in their central line-associated bloodstream infection rate, adjusted at the hospital and unit level. The number of units with a quarterly central line-associated bloodstream infection rate of less than 1 infection per 1,000 catheter-days increased by almost 40% between the baseline and postintervention periods. CONCLUSION A significant reduction in the global morbidity and mortality associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections is possible across intensive care units in disparate settings using a multifaceted intervention.

  1. Incidence of bloodstream infections in small bowel transplant recipients receiving selective decontamination of the digestive tract: A single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, David; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Goldschmidt, Monique; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Courter, Joshua; Nathan, Jaimie D; Alonso, Maria; Tiao, Greg; Fei, Lin; Kocoshis, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing small bowel transplantation are susceptible to postoperative CLABSI. SDD directed against enteric microbes is a strategy for reducing CLABSI. We hypothesized that SDD reduces the frequency of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and allograft rejection during the first 30 days following transplant. A retrospective chart review of 38 pediatric small bowel transplant recipients at CCHMC from 2003 to 2011 was conducted. SDD antimicrobials were oral colistin, tobramycin, and amphotericin B. The incidence of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and rejection episodes were compared between study periods. The incidence of CLABSI did not differ between study periods (6.9 CLABSI vs. 4.6 CLABSI per 1000 catheter days; p = 0.727), but gram positives and Candida predominated in the first 30 days. Incidence of bacterial infections outside the bloodstream did not differ (p = 0.227). Rejection occurred more frequently during the first month following transplant (p = 0.302). SDD does not alter the incidence of CLABSI, bacterial infections outside the bloodstream, or allograft rejection in the immediate 30 days post-transplantation. However, SDD does influence CLABSI organism types (favoring gram positives and Candida) and Candidal infections outside the bloodstream. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Incidence of postoperative implant-related bacterial endocarditis in dogs that underwent trans-catheter embolization of a patent ductus arteriosus without intra- and post-procedural prophylactic antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szatmári, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Intra- and post-procedural prophylactic antibiotics are routinely administered by veterinary cardiologists to dogs that undergo trans-catheter embolization of a patent ductus arteriosus for prevention of implant-related infective endocarditis. The hypothesis of our study was that primary antibiotic

  3. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  4. Peritoneal catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position to prevent catheter malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyan; Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Xia, Yangyang; Tang, Tianfeng; Wan, Cheng; Shao, Qiuyuan; Liu, Jing; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    Catheter malfunction is the main reason for early peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique failure. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a new surgery technique with catheter fixation to the lower abdominal wall combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position in reducing catheter malfunction. Patients with end stage renal disease who received PD in our centre from January 2013 to December 2015 were involved in this study. They were randomly divided into three groups according to surgical technique: traditional open surgery group, modified open surgery group and modified open surgery with catheter fixation group. All patients were followed up for six months after surgery. Catheter- related complications were analyzed. A total of 152 patients were involved. Among them, 49 received traditional open surgery (TOS group), 49 received modified open surgery (MOS group), and 54 received modified open surgery with catheter fixation (MOS-F group). During follow-up, no patients (0%) in MOS-F group developed catheter malfunction which was significantly lower than that of the TOS group (0 vs 16.33%, P = 0.002). Although not statistically significant, the incidence of catheter malfunction was lower in MOS-F group than that in MOS group (0 vs 4.08%, P = 0.134). No significant difference was observed in the episodes of infection, bleeding, leakage, inflow or outflow pain, hernia and delayed wound healing among the three groups (all P > 0.05). Catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position can effectively prevent catheter malfunction in PD catheter placement. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Closing the Translation Gap: Toolkit-based Implementation of Universal Decolonization in Adult Intensive Care Units Reduces Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infections in 95 Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septimus, Edward; Hickok, Jason; Moody, Julia; Kleinman, Ken; Avery, Taliser R; Huang, Susan S; Platt, Richard; Perlin, Jonathan

    2016-07-15

    Challenges exist in implementing evidence-based strategies, reaching high compliance, and achieving desired outcomes. The rapid adoption of a publicly available toolkit featuring routine universal decolonization of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may affect catheter-related bloodstream infections. Implementation of universal decolonization-treatment of all ICU patients with chlorhexidine bathing and nasal mupirocin-used a prerelease version of a publicly available toolkit. Implementation in 136 adult ICUs in 95 acute care hospitals across the United States was supported by planning and deployment tactics coordinated by a central infection prevention team using toolkit resources, along with coaching calls and engagement of key stakeholders. Operational and process measures derived from a common electronic health record system provided real-time feedback about performance. Healthcare-associated central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs), using National Healthcare Safety Network surveillance definitions and comparing the preimplementation period of January 2011 through December 2012 to the postimplementation period of July 2013 through February 2014, were assessed via a Poisson generalized linear mixed model regression for CLABSI events. Implementation of universal decolonization was completed within 6 months. The estimated rate of CLABSI decreased by 23.5% (95% confidence interval, 9.8%-35.1%; P = .001). There was no evidence of a trend over time in either the pre- or postimplementation period. Adjusting for seasonality and number of beds did not materially affect these results. Dissemination of universal decolonization of ICU patients was accomplished quickly in a large community health system and was associated with declines in CLABSI consistent with published clinical trial findings. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Changing of bloodstream infections in a medical center neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ling Chen

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Through the years, the overall mortality rate of BSIs in our NICU decreased. Maternal GBS screening is an important issue for avoiding early onset GBS mortality. Fungal infection rate decreased after antifungal prophylaxis policy for VLBW infants, but we should be aware of resistant strains. Restriction of the catheter duration may decrease the incidence of catheter-related BSI.

  7. Complications with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs used in hospitalized patients and outpatients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Grau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs are widely used for hospitalized patients and among outpatients. Despite many advantages, PICC-related complications can occur such as infection, thrombosis or mechanical complications. We aimed to evaluate rates and nature of PICC-related complications from insertion to removal and analyze risk factors of complications at baseline and during healthcare. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study looking at PICC-related complication rates in the inpatient and outpatient settings of 163 patients over a 7-month period. Pertinent patient demographics as well as catheter-related factors were collected. The data were analyzed to identify catheter-related complications using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results One hundred ninety-two PICCs were monitored for a total of 5218 PICC-days (3337 PICC-days for inpatients, 1881 PICC-days for outpatients. The overall complication rate was 30.2% (11.1 per 1000 PICC-days with a mean time to onset of 16.1 days. Complications included occlusion (8.9%, accidental withdrawal (8.9%, infections (6.3% including 9 local infections (4.7% and 3 bloodstream infections (1.6%, venous thrombosis (1.6% and hematoma (1%. Complication rate was higher in the hospitalization setting (36.1%; 14.38 per 1000 PICC-days than in the outpatient setting (19.4%; 3.19 per 1000 PICC-days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of occlusion was significantly associated with an age > 65 years (OR = 4.19; 95% CI [1.1–15.81] and the presence of a pre-occlusive event the week before PICC removal (OR = 76.35; 95% CI [9.36–622.97]. Conclusions PICCs appear safe in the inpatient and outpatient settings with low rates of infectious or thrombotic complications. Occlusion and accidental withdrawal were the most common complications, with age > 65 and catheter pre-occlusive event associated with an increased likelihood of

  8. Comparison of health-related quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic drug therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, Katherine S; Henry, Shaunattonie; Aves, Theresa; Banfield, Laura; Victor, J Charles; Dorian, Paul; Healey, Jeff S; Andrade, Jason; Carroll, Sandra; McGillion, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and causes patients considerable burden; symptoms such as palpitations and dyspnoea are common, leading to frequent emergency room visits. Patients with AF report reduced health-related quality of life (HQOL) compared with the general population; thus, treatments focus on the restoration of sinus rhythm to improve symptoms. Catheter ablation (CA) is a primary treatment strategy to treat AF-related burden in select ...

  9. Inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertion in hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang-Wen; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Ching-Huey; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and rationale for inappropriate reinsertion of urinary catheters and elucidated whether reinsertion is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. A longitudinal study was adopted. Patients aged ≥65 years with urinary catheters placed within 24 hours of hospitalization were enrolled. Data collection, including demographic variables and health conditions, was conducted within 48 hours after admission. Patients with catheters in place were followed-up every day. If the patient had catheter reinsertion, the reinsertion information was reviewed from medical records. Adverse outcomes were collected at discharge. A total of 321 patients were enrolled. Urinary catheters were reinserted in 66 patients (20.6%), with 95 reinsertions; 49.5% of catheter reinsertions were found to be inappropriate. "No evident reason for urinary catheter use" was the most common rationale for inappropriate reinsertion. Inappropriate reinsertion was found to be a significant predictor for prolonged length of hospital stay, development of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and catheter-related complications, and decline in activities of daily living. This study indicates a considerable percentage of inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertions in hospitalized older patients. Inappropriate reinsertion was significantly associated with worsening outcomes. Efforts to improve appropriateness of reinsertion and setting clinical policies for catheterization are necessary to reduce the high rate of inappropriate reinsertion. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Weather parameters and nosocomial bloodstream infection: a case-referent study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Silvia Maria; da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro; Akazawa, Renata Tamie; Moreira, Rayana Gonçalves; de Souza, Lenice do Rosário; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if temperature and humidity influenced the etiology of bloodstream infections in a hospital from 2005 to 2010. METHODS The study had a case-referent design. Individual cases of bloodstream infections caused by specific groups or pathogens were compared with several references. In the first analysis, average temperature and humidity values for the seven days preceding collection of blood cultures were compared with an overall “seven-days moving average” for the study period. The second analysis included only patients with bloodstream infections. Several logistic regression models were used to compare different pathogens and groups with respect to the immediate weather parameters, adjusting for demographics, time, and unit of admission. RESULTS Higher temperatures and humidity were related to the recovery of bacteria as a whole (versus fungi) and of gram-negative bacilli. In the multivariable models, temperature was positively associated with the recovery of gram-negative bacilli (OR = 1.14; 95%CI 1.10;1.19) or Acinetobacter baumannii (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.16;1.37), even after adjustment for demographic and admission data. An inverse association was identified for humidity. CONCLUSIONS The study documented the impact of temperature and humidity on the incidence and etiology of bloodstream infections. The results correspond with those from ecological studies, indicating a higher incidence of gram-negative bacilli during warm seasons. These findings should guide policies directed at preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections. PMID:25830871

  11. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  12. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shufeng Li Zheng; Gu Weizhong; Ru Fuming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  13. Electronic health record solutions to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections by enhancing documentation of central line insertion practices, line days, and daily line necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Kathleen A; Cousins, Sarah M; Porter, Darlene D; O'Brien, Margaret; Rudkin, Scott; Lambertson, Brian; Hoang, Dennis; Dangodara, Amish A; Huang, Susan S

    2016-04-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) continue to cause preventable morbidity and mortality, but methods for tracking and ensuring consistency of CLABSI-prevention activities remain underdeveloped. We created an integrated electronic health record solution to prompt sterile central venous catheter (CVC) insertion, CVC tracking, and timely line removal. The system embedded central line insertion practices (CLIP) elements in inserter procedure notes, captured line days and new lines, matching each with its CLIP form and feeding back compliance, and enforced daily documentation of line necessity in physician progress notes. We examined changes in CLIP compliance and form submission, number of new line insertions captured, and necessary documentation. Standard reporting of CLIP compliance, which measures compliance per CLIP form received, artificially inflated CLIP compliance relative to compliance measured using CVC placements as the denominator; for example, 99% per CLIP form versus 55% per CVC placement. This system established a higher threshold for CLIP compliance using this denominator. Identification of CVCs increased 35%, resulting in a decrease in CLABSI rates. The system also facilitated full compliance with daily documentation of line necessity. Integrated electronic health records systems can help realize the full benefit of CLABSI prevention strategies by promoting, tracking, and raising the standard for best practices behavior. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Outbreak of Tsukamurella spp. Bloodstream Infections among Patients of an Oncology Clinic—West Virginia, 2011–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Isaac; Nguyen, Duc B.; Chatterjee, Somu; Shwe, Thein; Scott, Melissa; Ibrahim, Sherif; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; McNulty, Steven; Noble-Wang, Judith; Price, Cindy; Schramm, Kim; Bixler, Danae; Guh, Alice Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the source and identify control measures of an outbreak of Tsukamurella species bloodstream infections at an outpatient oncology facility. Design Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak with a case control study. Methods A case was an infection in which Tsukamurella spp. was isolated from a blood or catheter tip culture during January 2011–June 2012 from a patient of the oncology clinic. Laboratory records of area hospitals and patient charts were reviewed. A case-control study was conducted among clinic patients to identify risk factors for Tsukamurella spp. bloodstream infection. Clinic staff were interviewed and infection control practices were assessed. Results Fifteen cases of Tsukamurella (T. pulmonis or T. tyrosinosolvens) bloodstream infection were identified, all in patients with underlying malignancy and indwelling central lines. Median age of case-patients was 68 years; 47% were male. The only significant risk factor for infection was receipt of saline flush from the clinic during September–October 2011 (P=0.03), when the clinic had been preparing saline flush from a common-source bag of saline. Other infection control deficiencies that were identified at the clinic included suboptimal procedures for central line access and preparation of chemotherapy. Conclusion Although multiple infection control lapses were identified, the outbreak was likely caused by improper preparation of saline flush syringes by the clinic. The outbreak demonstrates that bloodstream infections among oncology patients can result from improper infection control practices and highlights the critical need for increased attention to and oversight of infection control in outpatient oncology settings. PMID:24521597

  15. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  16. Adjunctive management of central line-associated bloodstream infections with 70% ethanol-lock therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, David W; Gilmore, Erin T; Buckley, Mary W; Lynch, Robert; Marty, Francisco M; Koo, Sophia

    2014-06-01

    Ethanol is bactericidal against most pathogens implicated in central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) and biofilms. Current Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines cite insufficient evidence to support adjunctive ethanol-lock therapy (ELT) for central venous catheter (CVC) salvage in patients with CLABSI in combination with systemic antimicrobial treatment. We evaluated the safety and potential efficacy of 70% ELT for CLABSI at our institution after implementation of a hospital ELT protocol. We collected data on all patients treated with adjunctive 70% ELT for catheter salvage from September 2009 to September 2011 and assessed clinical outcomes and adverse events associated with ELT. Sixty-eight hospitalized patients received 70% ELT for CVC salvage: 45 (66%) met the criteria for CLABSI. Five (11%) had persistent or recurrent bacteraemia triggering CVC removal; 28 (62%) preserved their CVC long term. There were no documented adverse events associated with ELT. Adjunctive 70% ELT is an inexpensive, well-tolerated option for CVC salvage in patients with CLABSI and warrants further investigation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  18. Incidence of postoperative implant-related bacterial endocarditis in dogs that underwent trans-catheter embolization of a patent ductus arteriosus without intra- and post-procedural prophylactic antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmári, Viktor

    2017-08-01

    Intra- and post-procedural prophylactic antibiotics are routinely administered by veterinary cardiologists to dogs that undergo trans-catheter embolization of a patent ductus arteriosus for prevention of implant-related infective endocarditis. The hypothesis of our study was that primary antibiotic prophylaxis is not necessary to prevent bacterial endocarditis. In this retrospective case series 54 client-owned dogs that underwent trans-catheter occlusion of a patent ductus arteriosus in a single tertiary veterinary referral center between 2004 and 2016 were evaluated. Follow-up information was gained by telephone interviews with the owners or the referring veterinarians, or from the digital archives of the authors' clinic. Inclusion criteria were that at least one metal implant (a coil or an Amplatz duct occluder) had to be delivered in the ductal ampulla, no local or systemic antibiotics were given on the day of the intervention or the week thereafter, at least 3 months of postoperative follow-up information was available, and the author was performing the procedure either as the primary or as the supervising cardiology specialist. None of the 54 dogs developed infective endocarditis in the postoperative 3 months. A study describing a similar population reports 2 of the included 47 dogs having developed infective endocarditis in the postoperative period despite the administration of intra- and post-procedural prophylactic antibiotics. We conclude that intra- and post-procedural antibiotic prophylaxis is not justified in dogs that undergo trans-catheter closure of a patent ductus arteriosus. Proper surgical technique and the use of new sterile catheters and implants are sufficient to prevent infective endocarditis in these dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neonatal bloodstream infections in a Ghanaian Tertiary Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labi, Appiah-Korang; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Bjerrrum, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of bloodstream infections (BSI) in neonates is usually difficult due to minimal symptoms at presentation; thus early empirical therapy guided by local antibiotic susceptibility profile is necessary to improve therapeutic outcomes. Methods: A review of neonatal blood cultures...

  20. ESRD QIP - NHSN Bloodstream Infection - Payment Year 2018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes facility details, performance ratio, measure score, and the state and national average measure scores for the NHSN bloodstream infection...

  1. Devices and dressings to secure peripheral venous catheters to prevent complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Nicole; Webster, Joan; Mihala, Gabor; Rickard, Claire M

    2015-06-12

    A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) is typically used for short-term delivery of intravascular fluids and medications. It is an essential element of modern medicine and the most frequent invasive procedure performed in hospitals. However, PVCs often fail before intravenous treatment is completed: this can occur because the device is not adequately attached to the skin, allowing the PVC to fall out, leading to complications such as phlebitis (irritation or inflammation to the vein wall), infiltration (fluid leaking into surrounding tissues) or occlusion (blockage). An inadequately secured PVC also increases the risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), as the pistoning action (moving back and forth in the vein) of the catheter can allow migration of organisms along the catheter and into the bloodstream. Despite the many dressings and securement devices available, the impact of different securement techniques for increasing PVC dwell time is still unclear; there is a need to provide guidance for clinicians by reviewing current studies systematically. To assess the effects of PVC dressings and securement devices on the incidence of PVC failure. We searched the following electronic databases to identify reports of relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs): the Cochrane Wounds Group Register (searched 08 April 2015): The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to March 7 2015); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, March 7 2015); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to March 7 2015); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March 8 2015). RCTs or cluster RCTs comparing different dressings or securement devices for the stabilisation of PVCs. Cross-over trials were ineligible for inclusion, unless data for the first treatment period could be obtained. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for missing information. We used standard

  2. Bloodstream Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among HIV patients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-23

    This podcast looks at bloodstream infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogens among outpatients infected with HIV in Southeast Asia. CDC health scientist Kimberly McCarthy discusses the study and why bloodstream infections occur in HIV-infected populations.  Created: 9/23/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 9/23/2010.

  3. Bacteriemia relacionada a catéter por Ochrobactrum anthropi Catheter-associated bacteremia caused by Ochrobactrum anthropi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Soloaga

    2009-12-01

    perspiration and sensorium deterioration. He had type 2 diabetes and antecedent of cerebrovascular accident. A double-lumen dialysis catheter was present due to chronic renal insufficiency. An episode of catheter-related bloodstream infection was documented by using Bact-Alert Blood Culture System and Differential-Time-to-Positivity Method for central venous catheter versus peripheral blood cultures (>120 min. Once removed, it was confirmed through Maki semi quantitative technique (>15 FCU. The microorganism was identified by API 20NE and Vitek 1 as Ochrobactrum anthropi.

  4. Pacientes assintomáticos apresentam infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral Asymptomatic patients present infection related to the central venous catheter used for total parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Deh Carvalho Machado

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a freqüência de infecção relacionada ao cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos a terapia nutricional parenteral. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados os cateteres venosos centrais de pacientes em terapia nutricional parenteral que tiveram a indicação de retirada do cateter venoso central por infecção, alta hospitalar, ou trombose. Os pacientes com infecção foram denominados de Grupo 1 e os demais de Grupo 2. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante quanto ao estado nutricional dos 18 pacientes analisados. Foram analisados 28 cateteres e destes 68% estavam infectados, sendo 72% do Grupo 1 e 28% do Grupo 2 (assintomáticos. No Grupo 1, houve infecção sistêmica em 70% dos casos, já no Grupo 2 a hemocultura foi positiva em 17% dos casos. A colonização por Staphylococcus sp. ocorreu em 48% dos casos, seguida de Candida sp. (21%, Enterococcus faecalis (16%, Pseudomonas aerurginosa (10% e Proteus sp.(5%. CONCLUSÃO: A contaminação de cateter venoso central utilizado para terapia nutricional parenteral é freqüente. Mesmo pacientes assintomáticos recebendo nutrição parenteral têm uma incidência maior de infecção por Candida sp. Portanto é necessária a criação de barreiras que impeçam a colonização destes cateteres venosos centrais, a fim de diminuir a morbimortalidade de pacientes dependentes deste tipo de terapia.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of central venous catheter-related infections in hospitalized patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. METHODS: Central venous catheters were analyzed immediately after removal due to infection, hospital discharge or thrombosis. The patients with catheter-related infection were named Group 1 and the other patients were named Group 2. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were studied. There was no statistically significant difference in nutritional status between the two groups. A total of 28 catheters were analyzed

  5. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  6. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  7. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in Brazilian pediatric patients: microbiology, epidemiology, and clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Pires Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. METHODS: We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project. RESULTS: In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age. Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS (21.3%, Klebsiella spp. (15.7%, Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%, and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%. The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342. Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU. The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%. Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%. Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%. Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. CONCLUSIONS: In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients.

  8. Efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in acute cardiac care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Fabrizio; Coccino, Claudio; Monolo, Davide; Crespi, Paolo; Ciccioli, Giorgio; Cordio, Giuseppe; Seveso, Giovanni; De Servi, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    Patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit need administration of drugs intravenously often in concomitance of therapeutic techniques such as non-invasive ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation. Therefore, the insertion of central venous catheters provides a reliable access for delivering medications, laboratory testing and hemodynamic monitoring, but it is associated with the risk of important complications. In our study, we tested the efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central catheters to manage cardiac intensive care. All patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit with indication for elective central venous access were checked by venous arm ultrasound for peripherally inserted central catheter's implantation. Peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted by ultrasound-guided puncture. After 7 days from the catheter's placement and at the removal, vascular ultrasound examination was performed searching signs of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. In case of sepsis, blood cultures peripherally from the catheter and direct culture of the tip of the catheter were done to establish a catheter-related blood stream infection. In our cardiac intensive care unit, 137 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed: 80.3% of patients eligible for a peripherally inserted central catheter were implanted. The rate of symptomatic catheter-related peripheral venous thrombosis was 1.4%. Catheter-related blood stream infection was diagnosed in one patient (0.7%; 5.7 × 1000 peripherally inserted central catheter days). All peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted successfully without other major complications. In patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit, peripherally inserted central catheters' insertion was feasible in a high percentage of patients and was associated with low infective complications and clinical thrombosis rate.

  9. Chlorhexidine 2% and choice of transparent dressing increase skin reactions at central venous catheter insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Mark; Dobson, Pauline; Boyle, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Infection at central venous catheter (CVC) sites remains a common problem, particularly with long-term use. This report discusses the influence of choice of transparent dressing type and chlorhexidine concentration on skin reactions at CVC insertion sites. A concentration of 2% chlorhexidine is associated with a higher rate of skin reactions than either 0.5% or 1% chlorhexidine. Higher chlorhexidine concentrations may not decrease the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  11. Transient bacteremia induced by dental cleaning is not associated with infection of central venous catheters in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Saad; Choquette, Linda; Bona, Robert; Feinn, Richard; Shahid, Zainab; Lalla, Rajesh V

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia resulting from dental cleaning and of subsequent established bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by oral microorganisms in patients with cancer with central venous catheters (CVCs). Twenty-six patients with cancer with CVCs and absolute neutrophil count over 1000 cells/µL received dental cleaning without antibiotic prophylaxis. Periodontal status was assessed at baseline by using the Periodontal Screening and Recording (PSR) score. Blood cultures were drawn via the CVCs at baseline, 20 minutes into cleaning, and 30 minutes and 24 hours after cleaning. Medical records were monitored for 6 months. Baseline blood culture results were negative in 25 patients. Nine of 25 patients (36%) had positive blood culture 20 minutes into cleaning, all associated with at least 1 microorganism typically found in the mouth. These 9 patients had significantly higher mean PSR score (3.22) compared with the other 16 (2.56; P = .035). These expected bacteremias did not persist, with blood culture results (0/25) at 30 minutes and 24 hours after cleaning showing no positivity (P = .001). There were no cases of CVC-related infection or BSI attributable to dental cleaning. Bacteremia resulting from dental cleaning is transient and unlikely to cause CVC-related infection or BSI in patients with absolute neutrophil count greater than 1000 cells/µL. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A rat model of central venous catheter to study establishment of long-term bacterial biofilm and related acute and chronic infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Chauhan

    Full Text Available Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections.

  13. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, K.B.; Lyytikäinen, O.; Søgaard, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) has been changing, international comparisons are lacking. We sought to determine the incidence of S. aureus BSI and assess trends over time and by region. Population-based surveillance...... episodes of S. aureus BSI were identified. The overall annual incidence rate for S. aureus BSI was 26.1 per 100 000 population, and those for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were 24.2 and 1.9 per 100 000, respectively. Although the overall incidence...... of community-onset MSSA BSI (15.0 per 100 000) was relatively similar across regions, the incidence rates of hospital-onset MSSA (9.2 per 100 000), community-onset MRSA (1.0 per 100 000) and hospital-onset MRSA (0.8 per 100 000) BSI varied substantially. Whereas the overall incidence of S. aureus BSI did...

  14. Study of Candida Bloodstream Infections in Surgical Intensive Care Unit Patients and Susceptibility Profile of the Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya S. Rajmane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increased incidence of fungal infections in the past two decades has been overwhelming. Despite the fact that invasive fungal infections are still under-diagnosed and underreported, bloodstream infection due to Candida is now being recognized as an important public health problem especially in ICU patients with considerable morbidity, mortality and health care costs. Objective: To study the incidence, risk factors and antifungal susceptibility of Candida bloodstream infection in our hospital. Material and Methods: In the present study, the blood samples were collected from patients admitted in Surgical ICU. Samples were processed and antifungal susceptibility of the isolates was performed using standard protocol. Results: Out of total 93 patients, 14 (15.05% were positive for candidemia with equal distribution of both C. albicans and nonalbicans Candida spp. The risk factors associated with candidemia showing statistical significance were length of ICU stay > 7 days, mechanical ventilation, central venous catheters and uncontrolled diabetes. Among the patients with candidemia the mortality rate was 78.57 %. Resistance to Amphotericin B was seen in 33.33 % isolates of C. tropicalis and 100 % isolates of C. rugosa. 33.33 % of C. tropicalis and 50 % of C. rugosa showed dose dependent susceptibility to Fluconazole. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and antifungal susceptibility testing is very important in the treatment of candidemia for reducing the mortality rate.

  15. Bloodstream infection in patients with end-stage renal disease in a teaching hospital in central-western Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Trelha Gauna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular access in patients undergoing hemodialysis is considered a critical determinant of bloodstream infection (BSI and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of BSI in patients with end-stage renal disease using central venous catheters for hemodialysis. Methods A cohort study was conducted in a public teaching hospital in central-western Brazil from April 2010 to December 2011. For every patient, we noted the presence of hyperemia/exudation upon catheter insertion, as well as fever, shivering, and chills during hemodialysis. Results Fifty-nine patients were evaluated. Thirty-five (59.3% patients started dialysis due to urgency, 37 (62.7% had BSI, and 12 (20% died. Hyperemia at the catheter insertion site (64.9% was a significant clinical manifestation in patients with BSI. Statistical analysis revealed 1.7 times more cases of BSI in patients with hypoalbuminemia compared with patients with normal albumin levels. The principal infective agents identified in blood cultures and catheter-tip cultures were Staphylococcus species (24 cases, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli (7 cases of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and 5 cases of Chryseobacterium indologenes, and Candida species (6. Among the Staphylococci identified, 77.7% were methicillin-resistant, coagulase-negative Staphylococci. Of the bacteria isolated, the most resistant were Chryseobacterium indologenes and Acinetobacter baumannii. Conclusions Blood culture was demonstrated to be an important diagnostic test and identified over 50% of positive BSI cases. The high frequency of BSI and the isolation of multiresistant bacteria were disturbing findings. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated microorganism, although Gram-negative bacteria predominated overall. These results highlight the importance of infection prevention and control measures in dialysis units.

  16. Massive hydrothorax with malpositioned central venous catheter – Ultrasound detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Hasija

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioimaging is the gold standard for confirmation of the position of central venous catheter as well as its related complications. Use of ultrasound has been proven in guiding central venous cannulations, and it can also be used in detecting related complications. We report a case of a 2 year old child with hydrothorax causing desaturation due to malpositioned central venous catheter diagnosed by ultrasound in the delay for getting a radiograph.

  17. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  18. Is zero central line-associated bloodstream infection rate sustainable? A 5-year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Carmina; McAvoy, Linda L; Gupta, Munish; Pereira, Sunita; McGowan, Elisabeth C

    2015-06-01

    Adoption and implementation of evidence-based measures for catheter care leads to reductions in central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates in the NICU. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether this rate reduction is sustainable for at least 1 year and to identify key determinants of this sustainability at the NICU of the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center. We reviewed the incidence of CLABSIs in the NICU temporally to the implementation of new practice policies and procedures, from July 2008 to December 2013. Adoption of standardized care practices, including bundles and checklists, was associated with a significant reduction of the CLABSI rate to zero for >370 consecutive days in our NICU in 2012. Overall, our CLABSI rates decreased from 4.1 per 1000 line days in 2009 (13 infections; 3163 line days) to 0.94 in 2013 (2 infections; 2115 line days), which represents a 77% reduction over a 5-year period. In the first quarter of 2013, there was a brief increase in CLABSI rate to 3.3 per 1000 line days; after a series of interventions, the CLABSI rate was maintained at zero for >600 days. Ongoing training, surveillance, and vigilance with catheter insertion and maintenance practices and improved documentation were identified as key drivers for success. High-quality training, strict compliance with evidence-based guidelines, and thorough documentation is associated with significant reductions in CLABSIs. Mindful organizing may lead to a better understanding of what goes into a unit's ability to handle peak demands and sustain extraordinary performance in the long-term. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Burn-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric burn patients: Time distribution of etiologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, İlker; Kara, Ahu; Düzgöl, Mine; Karkıner, Aytaç; Bayram, Nuri; Temir, Günyüz; Şencan, Arzu; Sorguç, Yelda; Gülfidan, Gamze; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-02-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with burns in burn units. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with burns may result from burn wound infection, use of invasive devices such as central venous catheters, and translocation of the gastrointestinal flora. In this study, we investigated the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance of causative pathogens in children with burns and the durational changes of microorganisms in the distribution of BSIs in children. This study was conducted at the Pediatric Burn Unit (PBU) of Dr. Behçet Uz Children Research and Training Hospital during the period of November 2008-April 2015. The study subjects were all the patients admitted to the PBU, in whom microorganisms were isolated at least from one of the cultures, including blood and catheter cultures. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common causative agents of BSI in patients with burns (66.4%), followed by gram-negative bacteria (22.1%) and fungi (11.5%). The median duration of development of BSIs caused by gram-positive bacteria from the time of burn was 5 days (ranging from 2 to 54 days of burn), which was significantly shorter than that of BSIs caused by gram-negative bacteria (12 days) and fungal pathogens (13 days). The etiologic agents of BSIs in children may differ from those in adults. Gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria such as multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were important agents of BSI in patients with burns, especially in the long term; however, gram-positive bacteria should also be considered while deciding the antimicrobial therapy, especially in the early periods of burn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Usefulness of multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for colorectal stent placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae [Asan Medical Center, Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Song, Ho-Young [Asan Medical Center - Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea); Park, In Kook [Dongguk University, Life Science, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Eugene K. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for stent placement in 98 patients with colorectal strictures. The catheter was used in 98 consecutive patients for stent placement in the rectum (n = 24), recto-sigmoid (n = 13), sigmoid (n = 38), descending (n = 6), transverse (n = 11), splenic flexure (n = 3), hepatic flexure (n = 2), and ascending (n = 1) colon. The catheter was made of a stainless steel coil (1.3 mm in inner diameter), a 0.4-mm nitinol wire, a polyolefin tube, and a hemostasis valve. Usefulness of the catheter was evaluated depending on whether the catheter could pass a stricture over a guide wire and whether measurement of the stricture length was possible. The passage of the catheter over a guide wire beyond the stricture was technically successful and well tolerated in 93 (94.9%) of 98 patients. In the failed five patients, it was not possible to negotiate the guide wire due to presence of nearly complete small bowel obstruction. The average length of stricture was 6.15 cm (range, 3 cm to 20 cm) in patients with the colorectal stricture. There were no procedure-related complications. In conclusion, the multifunctional coil catheter seems to be useful in colorectal stent placement. (orig.)

  1. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intraabdominal abscesses and fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Tae Hee; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Lee, Young Ho

    1986-01-01

    Percutaneous catheter drainage has been reported to be an effective method in the management of selected patients with abscess and fluid collection. Its high success rate and relatively low complications make the procedure an alternative to surgery in the individual cases. During past two years percutaneous catheter drainage in 25 patients with intraabdominal abscesses and fluid collection was performed at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of medicine. Here the technique and author's results were summarized. 1. The total 25 patients who had percutaneous catheter drainage are 10 liver abscesses, 3 subphrenic, one subhepatic, 4 renal and perirenal, 2 pelvic, one psoas, one anterior pararenal fluid from acute pancreatitis, one pancreas pseudocyst and 2 malignant tumor necrosis. 2. The modified Seldinger technique used for all cases of abscess and fluid drainage under guidance of ultrasound scan. The used catheters were 10F. Pigtail and 14F. Malecot (Cook c/o) catheters. 3. The abscesses and fluid of 17 patients among 25 were cured by the percutaneous catheter drainage and 4 patients were clinically improved. The catheter drainage was failed in 2 patients and 3 complication were developed. 4. The success rate of this procedure was 91.3%, failure rate was 8.7% and complication rate was 12%.

  2. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  3. Mortality in enterococcal bloodstream infections increases with inappropriate antimicrobial therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, M.; Aabenhus, R.; Harboe, Z.B.

    2010-01-01

    Enterococcus species are common in nosocomial bloodstream infections and their incidence is rising. Although well recognized in several serious bacterial infections, the influence of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in enterococcal bacteraemia has not been fully settled. The aim of the study.......7-10), thrombocytopenia (3.9, 1.6-9.3), chronic liver failure (3.3, 1.1-10) and age >/=60 years (2.2, 0.99-5.0). Antibiotics not appropriately covering enterococci are frequently administered empirically in suspected bloodstream infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was an independent risk factor for mortality...

  4. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia due to Tsukamurella species in the immunocompromised host: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, M A; Tabet, S R; Collier, A C; Wallis, C K; Carlson, L C; Nguyen, T T; Kattar, M M; Coyle, M B

    2002-10-01

    We report 6 cases of bacteremia due to Tsukamurella species, all of which were in immunosuppressed patients with indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs). Fewer than 20 cases of serious illness due to these gram-positive bacilli have been reported in the medical literature; these cases have mostly been ascribed to the species Tsukamurella paurometabola. Tsukamurella species are frequently misidentified as Rhodococcus or Corynebacterium species. We used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify these organisms to the genus level and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and DNA-DNA dot blots for species identification. Three of our isolates were identified as Tsukamurella pulmonis, 1 was identified as Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvans, and 1 was identified as a unique species. One isolate was not maintained long enough for species identification. All patients were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and CVC removal. Infection with this organism should be considered in the immunosuppressed patient with an indwelling CVC and gram-positive bacilli in the blood.

  5. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Vedran Premuzic; Lea Katalinic; Marijan Pasalic; Hrvoje Jurin

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumo...

  6. Ten-year surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections: trends of aetiology and antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, R; Ghezzi, Tl; Sandri, Mt; Radice, D; Biffi, R

    2011-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infectious conditions in cancer patients and are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs and significant mortality. Several clinical trials have reported an improved survival in patients treated with appropriate empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Early detection of pathogens and determination of their susceptibility are essential for the optimization of treatment. Variability between hospitals is substantial and requires the individual analysis of local trends. The aim of this study is to assess the local epidemiology of BSI in a single cancer centre over a 10-year period. Retrospective microbiological surveillance of all febrile/infective episodes occurring in oncological and surgical patients in a high-volume cancer centre between January 1999 and December 2008 were considered. Patients' data were collected, processed and analyzed using the epidemiological resource of the Virtuoso Plus software (Metafora Informatica Srl, Milano, Italy). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, including the two-tailed test of significance, was used to investigate trends of incidence and rate of antibiotic resistance over the 10-year period. A total of 13,058 blood cultures (BCs) were performed in 2,976 patients. BCs were positive in 2,447 tests, representing 740 infective/febrile episodes: 358 (48%) in medical oncology and 382 (52%) in surgical wards. Gram-positives were responsible for the majority of episodes in oncological and surgical divisions (about 63% and 55%, respectively). Gram-positives were also the most common organism in non-catheter-related BSIs (CRBSIs) both in medical oncology (75%) and in surgical divisions (50%). Enterococci showed an increased resistance to levofloxacin, from 5.6% to 25.7% (p = 0.02) and to erythromycin, from 41.7% to 61.4%, (p = 0.05). Similarly, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) developed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin

  7. Sustained reduction of central line-associated bloodstream infections outside the intensive care unit with a multimodal intervention focusing on central line maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumyati, Ghinwa; Concannon, Cathleen; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Love, Tanzy M T; Graman, Paul; Pettis, Ann Marie; Greene, Linda; El-Daher, Nayef; Farnsworth, Donna; Quinlan, Gail; Karr, Gloria; Ward, Lynnette; Knab, Robin; Shelly, Mark

    2014-07-01

    Central venous catheter use is common outside the intensive care units (ICUs), but prevention in this setting is not well studied. We initiated surveillance for central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) outside the ICU setting and studied the impact of a multimodal intervention on the incidence of CLABSIs across multiple hospitals. This project was constructed as a prospective preintervention-postintervention design. The project comprised 3 phases (preintervention [baseline], intervention, and postintervention) over a 4.5-year period (2008-2012) and was implemented through a collaborative of 37 adult non-ICU wards at 6 hospitals in the Rochester, NY area. The intervention focused on engagement of nursing staff and leadership, nursing education on line care maintenance, competence evaluation, audits of line care, and regular feedback on CLABSI rates. Quarterly rates were compared over time in relation to intervention implementation. The overall CLABSI rate for all participating units decreased from 2.6/1000 line-days preintervention to 2.1/1,000 line-days during the intervention and to 1.3/1,000 line-days postintervention, a 50% reduction (95% confidence interval, .40-.59) compared with the preintervention period (P .0179). A multipronged approach blending both the adaptive and technical aspects of care including front line engagement, education, execution of best practices, and evaluation of both process and outcome measures may provide an effective strategy for reducing CLABSI rates outside the ICU. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predictive factors for mortality in patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: impact on outcome of host, microorganism and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, O; Camoez, M; Dominguez, M A; Padilla, B; Pintado, V; Almirante, B; Molina, J; Lopez-Medrano, F; Ruiz, E; Martinez, J A; Bereciartua, E; Rodriguez-Lopez, F; Fernandez-Mazarrasa, C; Goenaga, M A; Benito, N; Rodriguez-Baño, J; Espejo, E; Pujol, M

    2013-11-01

    Mortality related to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection (BSI) remains high, despite changes in the epidemiology. To analyze the current predictive factors for mortality we conducted a prospective study in a large cohort of patients with MRSA-BSI from 21 Spanish hospitals. Epidemiology, clinical data, therapy and outcome were recorded. All MRSA strains were analysed, including susceptibility to antibiotics and molecular characterization. Vancomycin MICs (V-MIC) were tested by the E-test and microdilution methods. Time until death was the dependent variable in a Cox regression analysis. Overall, 579 episodes were included. Acquisition was nosocomial in 59% and vascular catheter was the most frequent source (38%). A dominant PFGE genotype was found in 368 (67%) isolates, which belonged to Clonal Complex (CC)5 and carried SCCmecIV and agr2. Microdilution V-MIC50 and V-MIC90 were 0.7 and 1.0 mg/L, respectively. Initial therapy was appropriate in 66% of episodes. Overall mortality was observed in 179 (32%) episodes. The Cox-regression analysis identified age >70 years (HR 1.88), previous fatal disease (HR 2.16), Pitt score >1 (HR 3.45), high-risk source (HR 1.85) and inappropriate initial treatment (HR 1.39) as independent predictive factors for mortality. CC5 and CC22 (HR 0.52 and 0.45) were associated with significantly lower mortality rates than CC8. V-MIC ≥1.5 did not have a significant impact on mortality, regardless of the method used to assess it. © 2012 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  10. Pathogenicity of bloodstream and cerebrospinal fluid forms of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, it is not clear whether bloodstream forms (BSF) of T.b.rhodesiense differ in biological characteristics from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) forms. The present study was carried out to compare the pathogenicity of CSF and BSF of T.b. rhodesiense parasites in Swiss white mice following intraperitoneal inoculation with ...

  11. What controls glycolysis in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, B.M.; Michels, P.A.M.; Opperdoes, F.R.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of the experimentally determined kinetic properties of the trypanosomal enzymes, the question is addressed of which step limits the glycolytic flux in bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei. There appeared to be no single answer; in the physiological range, control shifted between the

  12. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  13. Trans-sialidase-like gene from the bloodstream form of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trans-sialidase-like gene from the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma evansi conserves most of the active site residues and motifs found in Trypanosomal sialidases and trans-sialidases. ... Unique amino acids motifs found to occur in all African trypanosomes TS genes were identified in the TeTS gene. Catalytic site ...

  14. Next generation of ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus based on parametric designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, M; Giménez, A; Amigó, J M; Schuhmann, M; Gazzeri, R; Thomale, U; McAllister, J P

    2018-02-01

    The flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid is probably the most important factor related to obstruction of ventricular catheters during the normal treatment of hydrocephalus. To better comprehend the flow pattern, we have carried out a parametric study via numerical models of ventricular catheters. In previous studies, the flow was studied under steady and, recently, in pulsatile boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in three-dimensional catheter models. This study aimed to bring in prototype models of catheter CFD flow solutions as well to introduce the theory behind parametric development of ventricular catheters. A preceding study allowed deriving basic principles which lead to designs with improved flow patterns of ventricular catheters. The parameters chosen were the number of drainage segments, the distances between them, the number and diameter of the holes on each segment, as well as their relative angular position. CFD results of previously unreleased models of ventricular catheter flow solutions are presented in this study. Parametric development guided new designs with better flow distribution while lowering the shear stress of the catheters holes. High-resolution 3D printed catheter solutions of three models and basic benchmark testing are introduced as well. The next generation of catheter with homogeneous flow patterns based on parametric designs may represent a step forward for the treatment of hydrocephalus, by possibly broadening their lifespan.

  15. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections in an endemic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchaim, Dror; Levit, Dana; Zigron, Roy; Gordon, Michal; Lazarovitch, Tsillia; Carrico, Joao A; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Moran-Gilad, Jacob

    2017-03-01

    The transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in endemic settings, and the relation between microbial properties and patients' clinical outcomes, are yet obscure and hampered by insufficient metadata. Of 20 consecutive patients with A. baumannii bloodstream infection that were thoroughly analyzed at a single center, at least one transmission opportunity was evident for 85% of patients. This implies that patient-to-patient transmission is the major mode of A. baumannii acquisitions in health facilities. Moreover, all patients who died immediately (baumannii ST457 lineage compared with other strains.

  16. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - insertion ... A PICC is a long, thin tube (called a catheter) that goes into your body through a vein in ... into a large vein near your heart. The PICC helps carry nutrients and medicines into your body. ...

  17. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  18. Effect of a vascular access team on central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legemaat, Monique M; Jongerden, Irene P; van Rens, Roland M F P T; Zielman, Marjanne; van den Hoogen, Agnes

    2015-05-01

    To review the effect of a vascular access team on the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, Web-of-Science and the Cochrane Library were searched until December 2013. Studies that evaluated the implementation of a vascular access team, and focused on the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit, were selected. Incidence rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections were extracted, as well as information on vascular access team tasks and team composition. The quality of studies was critically appraised using the McMaster tool for quantitative studies. Seven studies involving 136 to 414 participants were included. In general, the implementation of a vascular access team coincided with the implementation of concurrent interventions. All vascular access teams included nurses, and occasionally included physicians. Main tasks included insertion and maintenance of central lines. In all studies, a relative decrease of 45-79% in central line-associated bloodstream infections was reported. A vascular access team is a promising intervention to decrease central line-associated bloodstream infections in infants admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. However, level of evidence for effectiveness is low. Future research is required to improve the strength of evidence for vascular access teams. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bloodstream infections by Malassezia and Candida species in critical care patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iatta, R.; Cafarchia, C.; Cuna, T.; Montagna, M.T.; Laforgia, N.; Gentile, O.; Rizzo, A.; Boekhout, T.; Otranto, D.

    2013-01-01

    Despite being considered an emerging yeast related to immunocompromised individuals, severe infections by Malassezia furfur have not been evaluated. During a one-year survey on yeasts fungemia, 290 neonatal and 17 pediatric patients with intravascular catheters, lipid parenteral nutrition, prolonged

  20. Central Venous Catheter-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S

    2018-02-01

    The presence of a central venous catheter and admission to the intensive care unit are the most important risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children. At least 18% of critically ill children with a catheter develop radiologically confirmed catheter-associated thrombosis. Clinically apparent thrombosis occurs in 3% of critically ill children with a catheter and is associated with 8 additional days of mechanical ventilation. Even when the thrombus is initially asymptomatic, 8 to 18% of critically ill children with catheter-associated thrombosis develop postthrombotic syndrome. Thrombosis is uncommon within 24 hours after insertion of a nontunneled catheter in critically ill children, but nearly all thrombi have developed by 4 days after insertion. Hypercoagulability during or immediately after insertion of the catheter plays an essential role in the development of thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis, including local anticoagulation with heparin-bonded catheter, has not been shown to reduce the risk of catheter-related thrombosis in children. Systemic anticoagulation in critically ill children started soon after the insertion of the catheter, however, may be beneficial. A multicenter clinical trial that is testing this hypothesis is currently underway. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  1. Interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters : results and complications in 557 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Kyo; Do, Young Soo; Paik, Chul H. [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate prospectively the results of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters, and subsequent complications. Between April 1997 and April 1998, a total of 557 tunneled central venous catheters were percutaneously placed in 517 consecutive patients in an interventional radiology suite. The indications were chemotherapy in 533 cases, total parenteral nutrition in 23 and transfusion in one. Complications were evaluated prospectively by means of a chart review, chest radiography, central vein angiography and blood/catheter culture. The technical success rate for tunneled central venous catheter placement was 100% (557/557 cases). The duration of catheter placement ranged from 4 to 356 (mean, 112{+-}4.6) days; Hickman catheters were removed in 252 cases during follow-up. Early complications included 3 cases of pneumothorax(0.5%), 4 cases of local bleeding/hematoma(0.7%), 2 cases of primary malposition(0.4%), and 1 case of catheter leakage(0.2%). Late complications included 42 cases of catheter-related infection(7.5%), 40 cases of venous thrombosis (7.2%), 18 cases of migration (3.2%), 5 cases of catheter / pericatheter of occlusion(0.8%), and 1 case of pseudoaneurysm(0.2%). The infection rate and thrombosis rate per 1000 days were 1.57 and 1.50, respectively. The technical success rate of interventional radiologic placement of tunneled central venous catheters was high. In comparison to conventional surgical placement, it is a more reliable method and leads to fewer complications.

  2. Surveillance Provinciale des Infections Nosocomiales (SPIN) Program: implementation of a mandatory surveillance program for central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontela, Patricia S; Platt, Robert W; Rocher, Isabelle; Frenette, Charles; Moore, Dorothy; Fortin, Élise; Buckeridge, David; Pai, Madhukar; Quach, Caroline

    2011-05-01

    In 2003, the Surveillance Provinciale des Infections Nosocomiales (SPIN) program was launched to gather data on incidence rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) in the Province of Quebec. To improve the generalizability of SPIN benchmarks, in 2007 participation in SPIN became mandatory for all ICUs with ≥10 beds. To describe the implementation process, surveillance methods, and overall results of the SPIN program between 2003 and 2009. SPIN surveillance methods are based on the National Healthcare Safety Network. Participation is open to all Quebec ICUs and as of January 2007 is mandatory for all units with ≥10 beds. Data include CLABSI incidence rates for 2003-2009 and the epidemiology of CLABSI cases. Mandatory participation in the SPIN program increased the number of ICUs by 100% (from 30 to 60 units). For 2003-2009, the overall CLABSI incidence rates were 1.67 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for adult ICUs, 2.24 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for pediatric ICUs, and 4.40 CLABSIs/1,000 catheter-days for neonatal ICUs. The patients with CLABSI were predominately female (60%), mean patient age was 44 ± 32 years, and 64% of the patients had a regular central venous line in place. The implementation of mandatory participation was essential to increase the generalizability of SPIN CLABSI incidence rates, which also improved the quality of these data for use as provincial benchmarks. Copyright © 2011 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  4. Feasibility of virtual 3-Fr percutaneous coronary intervention using standard guiding catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuteru; Miyao, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the efficacy of sheathless percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using hydrophilic-coated 5-Fr guiding catheters that are one to two Fr sizes smaller in diameter than the corresponding introducer sheath (virtual 3-Fr PCI). However, the limited number of shapes of hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters occasionally makes them difficult to engage and control. To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters of various shapes. We identified 35 consecutive patients with stable angina, who underwent virtual 3-Fr PCI using either hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters (Works™, Medikit, Japan) or standard guiding catheters (Heartrail™, Terumo, Japan). Thirty-five patients were identified (63% men; mean age 70 ±13 years). In 2 cases, hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters were exchanged to standard guiding catheters because of difficulty in engaging the target coronary arteries. Ultimately, standard guiding catheters were used in 20 patients (57%) and hydrophilic-coated catheters were used in 15 (43%). One of 20 patients treated with standard guiding catheters and 1 of 15 treated with hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters underwent the 4-in-3 "slender mother and child" PCI technique due to difficulty of stent deployment. There were no differences between the two groups in PCI procedural variables such as procedural time, fluoroscopy time, radiation dose, or contrast dye volume. There were no access site-related complications in this study. These findings indicate that virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding catheters is as efficient and safe as virtual 3-Fr PCI using hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters.

  5. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  6. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  7. Host response to Candida albicans bloodstream infection and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Seána; Leonhardt, Ines; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major cause of bloodstream infection which may present as sepsis and septic shock - major causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. After invasion of the pathogen, innate mechanisms govern the early response. Here, we outline the models used to study these mechanisms and summarize our current understanding of innate immune responses during Candida bloodstream infection. This includes protective immunity as well as harmful responses resulting in Candida induced sepsis. Neutrophilic granulocytes are considered principal effector cells conferring protection and recognize C. albicans mainly via complement receptor 3. They possess a range of effector mechanisms, contributing to elimination of the pathogen. Neutrophil activation is closely linked to complement and modulated by activated mononuclear cells. A thorough understanding of these mechanisms will help in creating an individualized approach to patients suffering from systemic candidiasis and aid in optimizing clinical management. PMID:25785541

  8. Bacterial capture efficiency in fluid bloodstream improved by bendable nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhi; Chen, Sheng; Xue, Zhenjie; Zhang, Zhen; Qiao, Xuezhi; Nie, Zongxiu; Han, Dong; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Tie

    2018-02-06

    Bacterial infectious diseases, such as sepsis, can lead to impaired function in the lungs, kidneys, and other vital organs. Although established technologies have been designed for the extracorporeal removal of bacteria, a high flow velocity of the true bloodstream might result in low capture efficiency and prevent the realization of their full clinical potential. Here, we develop a dialyzer made by three-dimensional carbon foam pre-grafted with nanowires to isolate bacteria from unprocessed blood. The tip region of polycrystalline nanowires is bent readily to form three-dimensional nanoclaws when dragged by the molecular force of ligand-receptor, because of a decreasing Young's moduli from the bottom to the tip. The bacterial capture efficiency was improved from ~10% on carbon foam and ~40% on unbendable single-crystalline nanowires/carbon foam to 97% on bendable polycrystalline nanowires/carbon foam in a fluid bloodstream of 10 cm s -1 velocity.

  9. Malfunctioning and infected tunneled infusion catheters: over-the-wire catheter exchange versus catheter removal and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, David M; Trerotola, Scott O; Clark, Timothy W; Dagli, Mandeep; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Itkin, Maxim; Soulen, Michael C; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Stavropoulos, S William

    2011-05-01

    To compare the safety and effectiveness of over-the-wire catheter exchange (catheter-exchange) with catheter removal and replacement (removal-replacement) at a new site for infected or malfunctioning tunneled infusion catheters. Using a quality assurance database, 61 patients with tunneled infusion catheters placed during the period July 2001 to June 2009 were included in this study. Patients receiving hemodialysis catheters were excluded. Catheter-exchange was performed in 25 patients, and same-day removal-replacement was performed in 36 patients. Data collected included demographic information, indication for initial catheter placement and replacement, dwell time for the new catheter, and ultimate fate of the new device. Statistical comparisons between the two cohorts were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and Fisher exact test. Catheters exchanged over the wire remained functional without infection for a median of 102 days (range, 2-570 days), whereas catheters removed and replaced were functional for a median 238 days (range, 1-292 days, P = .12). After catheter replacement, there were 11 instances of subsequent infection in the catheter-exchange group and 7 instances in the removal-replacement cohort, accounting for infection rates of 4.4 and 2.3 per 1,000 catheter days (P = .049). Patients in the catheter-exchange group had 3.2 greater odds of infection compared with patients in the removal-replacement group. Five malfunction events occurred in each group, accounting for 2.0 and 1.7 malfunctions per 1,000 catheter days in the catheter-exchange and removal-replacement groups (P = .73). Catheter-exchange of tunneled infusion catheters results in a higher infection rate compared with removal-replacement at a new site. The rate of catheter malfunction is not significantly different between the two groups. Catheter-exchange is an alternative for patients with tunneled infusion catheters who have limited venous access, but this technique should not be

  10. Ionizing radiation effect on central venous catheters (CVC) of polyurethane coatings with silver nanoparticles; Efeito da radiacao ionizante nos revestimentos de cateteres venosos centrais (CVC) de poliuretano com nanoparticulas de prata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman, Sonia; Silva, Leonardo G.A., E-mail: sheilman@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hewer, Thiago L.R.; Souza, Michele L. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2015-07-01

    The present work aimed to study the use of ionizing radiation for coating of silver nanoparticles on central polyurethane catheters, providing reduction of infections associated with contamination of catheters introduced into the bloodstream. Silver nanoparticles have physical, chemical and biological properties only when compared to metal on a macroscopic scale, and have been used in the medical field because of its remarkable antimicrobial activity. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles obtained by the sol gel method were used as the coating catheters for subsequent impregnation of silver nanoparticles with ionizing radiation at doses of 25 and 50 kGy. A Raman spectrometry was used to identify the polymorph of titanium oxide, rutile. In trials with (ICP OES) were evaluated amounts of titanium and silver coated catheters in titanium oxide and silver.(author)

  11. Translumbar aortography by catheter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Honemeyer, U.; Meier-Duis, H.

    1982-01-01

    400 examinations performed during the last three years by TLA (only catheter technique) were subjected to critical analysis and studied particularly in respect to the rate of complications. We observed 13 complications (3.25%) of moderate severity, including 3 large hematomas (documented by CT), 3 paravasations and 7 dissections, but no fatal complication. Two (0.5%) of these complications had clinical evidence. The advantages of the catheter technique of TLA are described. Injections through rigid metal cannula should be avoided because of the high incidence of complications (mainly the increased risk of dissection). Downstream injection resulted in excellent visualization of peripheral occluding vascular disease. Upstream injection should be preferred to demonstrate the major abdominal arteries as well as supraceliac collateral circulation in the case of high Leriche syndrome. The low or intermediate puncture of the aorta is preferable to facilitate caudad direction of the catheter and to diminish the risk of damaging other vessels or puncturing an organ. (orig.) [de

  12. Catheter Dwell Time and CLABSIs in Neonates With PICCs: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Nicholas G.; Advani, Sonali; Yuan, Guoshu; Bryant, Kristina; Coffin, Susan E.; Huskins, W. Charles; Livingston, Robyn; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, P. Brian; Song, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the daily risk of central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) increases over the dwell time of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in high-risk neonates. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective cohort including NICU patients with a PICC inserted between January 2005 and June 2010. We calculated incidence rates and used Poisson regression models to assess the risk of developing CLABSI as a function of PICC dwell time. RESULTS: A total of 4797 PICCs placed in 3967 neonates were included; 149 CLABSIs occurred over 89 946 catheter-days (incidence rate 1.66 per 1000 catheter-days). In unadjusted analysis, PICCs with a dwell time of 8 to 13 days, 14 to 22 days, and ≥23 days each had an increased risk of infection compared with PICCs in place for ≤7 days (P PICC insertion increased during the first 2 weeks after PICC insertion and remained elevated for the dwell time of the catheter. There was an increased risk of CLABSIs in neonates with concurrent PICCs (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.04, 1.12–3.71). The incidence of Gram-negative CLABSIs was greater in PICCs with dwell times >50 days (incidence rate ratio 5.26, 2.40–10.66). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of CLABSIs increased during the 2 weeks after PICC insertion and then remained elevated until PICC removal. Clinicians should review PICC necessity daily, optimize catheter maintenance practices, and investigate novel CLABSI prevention strategies in PICCs with prolonged dwell times. PMID:24218474

  13. Peripherally InSerted CEntral catheter dressing and securement in patients with cancer: the PISCES trial. Protocol for a 2x2 factorial, superiority randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Claire M; Marsh, Nicole M; Webster, Joan; Gavin, Nicole C; Chan, Raymond J; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Mollee, Peter; Ullman, Amanda J; Kleidon, Tricia; Chopra, Vineet; Zhang, Li; McGrail, Matthew R; Larsen, Emily; Choudhury, Md Abu; Keogh, Samantha; Alexandrou, Evan; McMillan, David J; Mervin, Merehau Cindy; Paterson, David L; Cooke, Marie; Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Castillo, Maria Isabel; Hallahan, Andrew; Corley, Amanda; Geoffrey Playford, E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Around 30% of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) fail from vascular, infectious or mechanical complications. Patients with cancer are at highest risk, and this increases morbidity, mortality and costs. Effective PICC dressing and securement may prevent PICC failure; however, no large randomised controlled trial (RCT) has compared alternative approaches. We designed this RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of dressing and securements to prevent PICC failure. Methods and analysis Pragmatic, multicentre, 2×2 factorial, superiority RCT of (1) dressings (chlorhexidine gluconate disc (CHG) vs no disc) and (2) securements (integrated securement dressing (ISD) vs securement device (SED)). A qualitative evaluation using a knowledge translation framework is included. Recruitment of 1240 patients will occur over 3 years with allocation concealment until randomisation by a centralised service. For the dressing hypothesis, we hypothesise CHG discs will reduce catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) compared with no CHG disc. For the securement hypothesis, we hypothesise that ISD will reduce composite PICC failure (infection (CABSI/local infection), occlusion, dislodgement or thrombosis), compared with SED. Secondary outcomes: types of PICC failure; safety; costs; dressing/securement failure; dwell time; microbial colonisation; reversible PICC complications and consumer acceptability. Relative incidence rates of CABSI and PICC failure/100 devices and/1000 PICC days (with 95% CIs) will summarise treatment impact. Kaplan-Meier survival curves (and log rank Mantel-Haenszel test) will compare outcomes over time. Secondary end points will be compared between groups using parametric/non-parametric techniques; p values <0.05 will be considered to be statistically significant. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval from Queensland Health (HREC/15/QRCH/241) and Griffith University (Ref. No. 2016/063). Results will be published

  14. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  15. KREX2 is not essential for either procyclic or bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Carnes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei require RNA editing for maturation and translation. The edited RNAs primarily encode proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. These parasites undergo extensive changes in energy metabolism between the insect and bloodstream stages which are mirrored by alterations in RNA editing. Two U-specific exonucleases, KREX1 and KREX2, are both present in protein complexes (editosomes that catalyze RNA editing but the relative roles of each protein are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The requirement for KREX2 for RNA editing in vivo was assessed in both procyclic (insect and bloodstream form parasites by methods that use homologous recombination for gene elimination. These studies resulted in null mutant cells in which both alleles were eliminated. The viability of these cells demonstrates that KREX2 is not essential in either life cycle stage, despite certain defects in RNA editing in vivo. Furthermore, editosomes isolated from KREX2 null cells require KREX1 for in vitro U-specific exonuclease activity. CONCLUSIONS: KREX2 is a U-specific exonuclease that is dispensable for RNA editing in vivo in T. brucei BFs and PFs. This result suggests that the U deletion activity, which is required for RNA editing, is primarily mediated in vivo by KREX1 which is normally found associated with only one type of editosome. The retention of the KREX2 gene implies a non-essential role or a role that is essential in other life cycle stages or conditions.

  16. Factors associated with suitability of empiric antibiotic therapy in hospitalized patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Chagai; Keller, Nathan; Bornstein, Gil; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Koren-Morag, Nira; Rahav, Galia

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Initiation of inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy is associated with a worse outcome. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence and the factors associated with inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized with bacteremia. A cross-sectional study was conducted during January 2010-December 2011 at the medical wards of the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Israel. The records of all patients with bacteremia were reviewed. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, bacteremic pathogens and antimicrobial agents were retrieved from the medical records. Factors associated with appropriateness of empiric antibiotic therapy were assessed. A total of 681 eligible adults were included in the study. Antibiotic therapy was found to be inappropriate in 138 (20.2%) patients (95% C.I. 17.2-23.2). The rate of appropriateness was not related to the type of antibiotic regimen and the type of bacteria. Patients with healthcare-associated infections were more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Patients with primary bloodstream infections were also more likely to be administrated inappropriate antibiotic therapy. Empiric combination therapy was more likely to be appropriate than monotherapy, except for an aminoglycosides-based combination. Combination empiric antibiotic therapy should be considered in patients with healthcare-associated infections and in those with primary bloodstream infections.

  17. Should we use closed or open infusion containers for prevention of bloodstream infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez-Soto Jose

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalized patients in critical care settings are at risk for bloodstream infections (BSI. Most BSIs originate from a central line (CL, and they increase length of stay, cost, and mortality. Open infusion containers may increase the risk of contamination and administration-related (CLAB because they allow the entry of air into the system, thereby also providing an opportunity for microbial entry. Closed infusion containers were designed to overcome this flaw. However, open infusion containers are still widely used throughout the world. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of switching from open (glass, burettes, and semi-rigid infusion containers to closed, fully collapsible, plastic infusion containers (Viaflex® on the rate and time to onset of central line-associated bloodstream infections CLABs. Methods An open label, prospective cohort, active healthcare-associated infection surveillance, sequential study was conducted in four ICUs in Mexico. Centers for Disease Control National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Systems definitions were used to define device-associated infections. Results A total of 1,096 adult patients who had a central line in place for >24 hours were enrolled. The CLAB rate was significantly higher during the open versus the closed container period (16.1 versus 3.2 CLAB/1000 central line days; RR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.11-0.36, P Conclusions Closed infusion containers significantly reduced CLAB rate, the probability of acquiring CLAB, and mortality.

  18. Coiled versus straight peritoneal dialysis catheters: a randomized controlled trial and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingyuan; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Ren, Hong; Zhu, Ping; Huang, Xiaomin; Shen, Pingyan; Xu, Tian; Chen, Xiaonong; Chen, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Variations in peritoneal dialysis catheter design include differences in numbers of cuffs, shapes of subcutaneous paths (swan neck vs Tenckhoff), and shapes of intra-abdominal segments (straight vs coiled). The relative benefits of these designs have not been studied adequately. The objective of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of coiled- versus straight-end swan neck peritoneal dialysis catheters. Prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT); results were meta-analyzed with other RCTs of coiled versus straight catheters. 80 consecutive continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients were enrolled in the RCT. The meta-analysis considers data for 242 patients with coiled and 251 patients with straight catheters. Patients were randomly assigned to a coiled-end swan neck catheter (n = 40) or a straight-end swan neck catheter (n = 40) group. Catheter tip migration with dysfunction (primary outcome) and catheter failure, catheter-related infection, technique failure, and all-cause mortality (secondary outcomes). The primary outcome occurred in 18 patients in the coiled group and 9 in the straight group. This difference was not statistically significant (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.88-4.37; P = 0.09). Although rates of early (coiled design with increased risk of late (>8 weeks) catheter tip migration (HR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.45-28.6; P = 0.005). The increased risk of overall catheter failure in the coiled group was not statistically significant (P = 0.06). In the meta-analysis, coiled catheters were associated significantly with increased risk of catheter tip migration (based on 4 trials: RR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.30-3.33; P = 0.002). Single-center open-label experimental study powered to detect differences in only the most common complication of catheter tip migration with dysfunction. Our RCT examines only swan neck catheters, whereas the meta-analysis considers both swan neck and Tenckhoff designs. Although we were unable to show statistically significant differences

  19. Catheter Migration After Implantationan Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Pump for Severe Spasticity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Chou Li

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intrathecal baclofen infusion pump implantation complicated by migration of the catheter tip. A 55-year-old man required an intrathecal baclofen infusion for severe spasticity 4 years after a cervical spinal cord injury with incomplete tetraparesis. Twelve months after initial implantation of the device, the patient began to experience a recurrence of trunk tightness and spasticity. Subsequent X-ray and computed tomography evaluations of the catheter system revealed pooling of contrast medium outside of the intrathecal distribution in the lumbar subcutaneous region of the back and therefore migration of the pump catheter tip. At surgical revision, emphasis was placed on minimizing the length of catheter outside of the spine and securing the catheter in the supraspinous fascia with a right-angled anchor. The distance between the anchors and the entry point of the catheter into the supraspinous fascia was also reduced to prevent slipping when the patient bends forward. After surgery, the patient's spasticity improved and, 1 year later, he has experienced no further complications during follow-up, requiring an average baclofen dose of 150 mg/day. Here, we describe several surgical methods intended to secure the intrathecal catheter and prevent catheter migration. Other complications related to catheter failure are also highlighted.

  20. Evaluation of percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: technical aspects, results, and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Pyo; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yub; Lee, Tae Won; Ihm, Chun Gyoo [Kyunghee University Hospital, seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of the percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters. Between December 1999 and April 2001, 26 peritoneal dialysis catheters were placed percutaneously in 26 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The patient group consisted of 16 men and ten women with a mean age of 55 (range, 30-77) years. The results and complications arising were reviewed, and the expected patency of the catheters was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The technical success rate for catheter placement was 100% (26/26 patients). Severe local bleeding occurred in one patient due to by inferior epigastric artery puncture, and was treated by compression and electronic cautery. The duration of catheter implantation ranged from 1 to 510 days and the patency rate was 416{+-}45 days. Catheter malfunction occurred in four patients. In two, this was restored by manipulation in the intervention room, and in one, through the use of urokinase. In three patients, peritonitis occurred. Catheters were removed from four patients due to malfunction (n=2), peritonitis (n=1), and death (n=1). Percutaneous radiologic placement of a peritoneal dialysis catheter is a relatively simple procedure that reduces the complication rate and improves catheter patency.

  1. Multiple Coaxial Catheter System for Reliable Access in Interventional Stroke Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcsar, Zsolt; Yilmaz, Hasan; Bonvin, Christophe; Lovblad, Karl O.; Ruefenacht, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    In some patients with acute cerebral vessel occlusion, navigating mechanical thrombectomy systems is difficult due to tortuous anatomy of the aortic arch, carotid arteries, or vertebral arteries. Our purpose was to describe a multiple coaxial catheter system used for mechanical revascularization that helps navigation and manipulations in tortuous vessels. A triple or quadruple coaxial catheter system was built in 28 consecutive cases presenting with acute ischemic stroke. All cases were treated by mechanical thrombectomy with the Penumbra System. In cases of unsuccessful thrombo-aspiration, additional thrombolysis or angioplasty with stent placement was used for improving recanalization. The catheter system consisted of an outermost 8-Fr and an intermediate 6-Fr guiding catheter, containing the inner Penumbra reperfusion catheters. The largest, 4.1-Fr, reperfusion catheter was navigated over a Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. The catheter system provided access to reach the cerebral lesions and provided stability for the mechanically demanding manipulations of thromboaspiration and stent navigation in all cases. Apart from their mechanical role, the specific parts of the system could also provide access to different types of interventions, like carotid stenting through the 8-Fr guiding catheter and intracranial stenting and thrombolysis through the Prowler Select Plus microcatheter. In this series, there were no complications related to the catheter system. In conclusion, building up a triple or quadruple coaxial system proved to be safe and efficient in our experience for the mechanical thrombectomy treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; de Araújo, Lúcio Borges; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45 h (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under these study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Rising charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M; Evans, Frank; Pearson, Gail D; Berul, Charles I; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2013-02-01

    Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. We used the 1997-2009 Kids' Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P charges. The same factors also predicted increased costs. Charges and costs varied considerably by region, particularly for high-volume centers (P Charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Rising Charges and Costs for Pediatric Catheter Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BURNS, KRISTIN M.; EVANS, FRANK; PEARSON, GAIL D.; BERUL, CHARLES I.; KALTMAN, JONATHAN R.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. Methods We used the 1997-2009 Kids’ Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. Results There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. PMID:23066833

  5. Outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans Bloodstream Infections at an Oncology Clinic-Illinois, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Brian R; Dantes, Raymund; Tsai, Victoria; Lim, Rachel; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Arduino, Matthew; Jensen, Bette; Patel, Megan Toth; Vernon, Michael O; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Christiansen, Demian; Conover, Craig; Kallen, Alexander; Guh, Alice Y

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the source of a healthcare-associated outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans bloodstream infections. DESIGN Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak. SETTING Oncology clinic (clinic A). METHODS Cases were defined as Pantoea isolation from blood or catheter tip cultures of clinic A patients during July 2012-May 2013. Clinic A medical charts and laboratory records were reviewed; infection prevention practices and the facility's water system were evaluated. Environmental samples were collected for culture. Clinical and environmental P. agglomerans isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RESULTS Twelve cases were identified; median (range) age was 65 (41-78) years. All patients had malignant tumors and had received infusions at clinic A. Deficiencies in parenteral medication preparation and handling were identified (eg, placing infusates near sinks with potential for splash-back contamination). Facility inspection revealed substantial dead-end water piping and inadequate chlorine residual in tap water from multiple sinks, including the pharmacy clean room sink. P. agglomerans was isolated from composite surface swabs of 7 sinks and an ice machine; the pharmacy clean room sink isolate was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from 7 of 9 available patient isolates. CONCLUSIONS Exposure of locally prepared infusates to a contaminated pharmacy sink caused the outbreak. Improvements in parenteral medication preparation, including moving chemotherapy preparation offsite, along with terminal sink cleaning and water system remediation ended the outbreak. Greater awareness of recommended medication preparation and handling practices as well as further efforts to better define the contribution of contaminated sinks and plumbing deficiencies to healthcare-associated infections are needed. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:314-319.

  6. Chlorhexidine and gauze and tape dressings for central venous catheters: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivane Pedrolo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the effectiveness of the chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing in comparison to the gauze and tape dressing in the use of central venous catheters.METHOD: a randomized clinical trial was conducted in the intensive care and adult semi intensive care units of a university hospital in the south of Brazil. The subjects were patients using short-term central venous catheters, randomly assigned to the intervention (chlorhexidine antimicrobial dressing or control (gauze and micro porous tape groups.RESULTS: a total of 85 patients were included: 43 in the intervention group and 42 in the control group. No statistically significant differences were found between dressings in regard to the occurrence of: primary bloodstream infections (p-value = 0.5170; local reactions to the dressing (p-value = 0.3774; and dressing fixation (p-value = 0.2739.CONCLUSION: both technologies are effective in covering central venous catheters in regard to the investigated variables and can be used for this purpose. Registry ECR: RBR-7b5ycz.

  7. A computational fluid dynamics simulation framework for ventricular catheter design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberg, Sofy H; TerMaath, Stephanie C; Barbier, Charlotte N; Hill, Judith C; Killeffer, James A

    2017-11-10

    the standard catheter hole configuration as a baseline. While the standard ventricular catheter design featuring uniform inlet hole diameters and hole spacing has a standard deviation of 14.27% for the inlet flow rates, the optimized design has a standard deviation of 0.30%. CONCLUSIONS This customizable framework, paired with high-performance computing, provides a rapid method of design testing to solve complex flow problems. While a relatively simplified ventricular catheter model was used to demonstrate the framework, the computational approach is applicable to any baseline catheter model, and it is easily adapted to optimize catheters for the unique needs of different patients as well as for other fluid-based medical devices.

  8. Role of tolterodine in the management of postoperative catheter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, information on the use of these drugs in the management of the postoperative catheter-related bladder discomfort (CRBD) in sub-Saharan Africa is still relatively sparse. ... Methods: This was a double-blind placebo-controlled study consisting of 56 patients in each arm who underwent general anesthesia.

  9. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  10. Peripherally inserted central catheters in the treatment of children with cancer: Results of a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykov, Maxim Yu; Zaborovskij, Sergei V; Shvecov, Alexander N; Shukin, Vladimir V

    2018-03-01

    To review our experience with peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric cancer patients. The analysis included 353 patients (3 months up to 17 years, mean age 11.2 years) with a variety of cancers diseases, which in 2011-2016, 354 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed. All settings are carried out using ultrasound guidance. In 138 (39%) patients, external anatomical landmarks were used and in 216 (61%) intraoperative fluoroscopy. Maximal duration of the line was 1.3 years, the lowest 1.5 months, and average 6.3 months. Among the technical difficulties during placement, most frequently have been the migration of the distal end of the catheter into the internal jugular vein against blood flow-32 (9%) patients. In one (0.3%) case, we were unable to catheterize the patient's vein. Among the most common complications of operation were marked peripherally inserted central catheter clot occlusion of the lumen-26 (7.3%) cases. Symptomatic catheter-related thrombosis was observed in 16 (4.5%) cases. Catheter-related blood stream infections were not reported. Removal of peripherally inserted central catheters related to the complications was performed in 30 (8.5%) patients who were later implanted venous ports. Peripherally inserted central catheters are recommend to use in the treatment of children with cancer. There should be trained nursing staff to minimize the risk of complications.

  11. Eventos adversos e motivos de descarte relacionados ao reuso de produtos médicos hospitalares em angioplastia coronária Adverse events and reasons for discard related to the reuse of cardiac catheters in percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarete Ártico Batista

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever os eventos adversos ocorridos durante e após angioplastia coronária (ATC, possivelmente relacionados ao reuso de produtos médico-hospitalares, além de quantificar e identificar os motivos de descarte em relação ao primeiro uso e ao reuso. MÉTODO: Foram estudados 60 pacientes, sendo que 29 (48,3% apresentavam angina instável, 27 (45% IAM e quatro (6,7% outros diagnósticos. Durante o procedimento e na permanência na Unidade Intensiva Coronariana, atentou-se à possibilidade de ocorrência dos eventos adversos febre, hipertensão, hipotensão, calafrios, sudorese, sangramento, náuseas e vômitos. Foram avaliados sete produtos médico-hospitalares: introdutor, cateter-guia, fio-guia 0.35, fio-guia 0.014, cateter- balão para angioplastia, seringa com manômetro para insuflar balão (indeflator e torneira de três vias (manifold. No total de produtos (76 de primeiro uso e 410 reprocessados, verificou-se se houve descarte e se isto ocorreu antes ou durante o procedimento e quais os motivos para tanto. Utilizou-se o teste Qui Quadrado, admitindo-se erro alfa de 5%. RESULTADOS: Vinte e seis pacientes apresentaram eventos adversos. A hipotensão foi o evento mais prevalente e ocorreu em 11(18,3% casos. Não houve, porém, significância estatística entre o evento adverso hipotensão e reuso ou não dos produtos médico-hospitalares. Por não estarem íntegros, foram descartados três produtos de primeiro uso e 55 produtos dos reutilizados. CONCLUSÃO: Os eventos adversos apresentados pelos pacientes submetidos à angioplastia não estão associados ao reuso dos produtos médico-hospitalares. A integridade e funcionalidade foram os motivos principais de descarte.OBJECTIVE: To describe the adverse effects that occur during and after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA possibly related to the reuse of medical equipment. An additional objective is to quantify and identify the reasons of discard in respect to

  12. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, James G.; Hawkins, Irvin F.; Akins, E. William; Young, Ronald S.

    1997-01-01

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  13. Robotic positioning of standard electrophysiology catheters: a novel approach to catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bradley; Ayers, Gregory M; Cohen, Todd J

    2008-05-01

    Robotic systems have been developed to manipulate and position electrophysiology (EP) catheters remotely. One limitation of existing systems is their requirement for specialized catheters or sheaths. We evaluated a system (Catheter Robotics Remote Catheter Manipulation System [RCMS], Catheter Robotics, Inc., Budd Lake, New Jersey) that manipulates conventional EP catheters placed through standard introducer sheaths. The remote controller functions much like the EP catheter handle, and the system permits repeated catheter disengagement for manual manipulation without requiring removal of the catheter from the body. This study tested the hypothesis that the RCMS would be able to safely and effectively position catheters at various intracardiac sites and obtain thresholds and electrograms similar to those obtained with manual catheter manipulation. Two identical 7 Fr catheters (Blazer II; Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, Massachusetts) were inserted into the right femoral veins of 6 mongrel dogs through separate, standard 7 Fr sheaths. The first catheter was manually placed at a right ventricular endocardial site. The second catheter handle was placed in the mating holder of the RCMS and moved to approximately the same site as the first catheter using the Catheter Robotics RCMS. The pacing threshold was determined for each catheter. This sequence was performed at 2 right atrial and 2 right ventricular sites. The distance between the manually and robotically placed catheters tips was measured, and pacing thresholds and His-bundle recordings were compared. The heart was inspected at necropsy for signs of cardiac perforation or injury. Compared to manual positioning, remote catheter placement produced the same pacing threshold at 7/24 sites, a lower threshold at 11/24 sites, and a higher threshold at only 6/24 sites (p > 0.05). The average distance between catheter tips was 0.46 +/- 0.32 cm (median 0.32, range 0.13-1.16 cm). There was no difference between right atrial

  14. Nursing care for patients carrying indwelling catheter in target vessel for continuous chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lihong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. Methods: (1)To enhance the propaganda,education and guidance to patients. (2) To standardize the nursing care operations. (3) To establish the reasonable care rules and procedures. (4) The nurses should take the daily nursing care,observations and recording work seriously. Results: Through the analysis of a variety of problems occurred in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy the nursing care experience was summed up. Conclusion: Proper and effective care can reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. (authors)

  15. Acetate oxidation by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, R; Cruz, F S; Leon, W; Schmunis, G A

    1979-05-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi had a substantial increase in respiration in the presence of acetate. Oxidation of acetate took place via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and involved an antimycin A-sensitive respiratory pathway. Oxygen uptake in the presence of acetate was a sensitive to antimycin A inhibition as was CO2 production. There was a 6--7% residual O2 uptake which was not inhibited by high antimycin concentrations. Human anti-T. cruzi sera had no effect on oxygen uptake.

  16. Changing profile of excimer laser coronary angioplasty: refinements in catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittl, John A.

    1994-07-01

    During more than five years of investigation with excimer laser angioplasty, several changes have been made in patient selection and laser catheters. It is unclear, however, whether these changes have improved the outcome of excimer laser angioplasty. A total of 2041 patients underwent treatment with excimer laser coronary angioplasty for 2324 lesions with clinical success in 89%, ischemic complications in 7.5%, and vessel perforation in 2.1%. When the entire 5-year period of investigation was divided into four discrete phases, as defined by the successive release of improved laser catheters (prototype, flexible, extremely flexible, and eccentric), clinical success was seen to improve from 86% to 95% (page (pequals0.01) and unstable angina (pdecreased complications. Reduced catheter size relative to vessel size was associated with decreased risk of vessel perforation. Thus, refinements in patient selection and in laser technique have been associated with enhanced safety and efficacy of excimer laser angioplasty.

  17. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H.; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  18. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steve.amerasekera@nhs.net; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  19. In vitro activity of two amphotericin B formulations against Malassezia furfur strains recovered from patients with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Immediato, Davide; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Although guidelines for the treatment of Malassezia furfur fungemia are not yet defined, clinical data suggest that amphotericin B (AmB) is effective for treating systemic infections. In the absence of clinical breakpoints for Malassezia yeasts, epidemiological cut-off values (ECVs) are useful to discriminate between isolates with and without drug resistance. This study aimed to compare the distribution of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the ECVs for AmB of both deoxycholate (d-AmB) and liposomal (l-AmB) formulations of M. furfur isolates. The 84 M. furfur strains analyzed, which included 56 from blood, sterile sites and catheters, and 28 from skin, were isolated from patients with bloodstream infections. MICs were determined by the modified broth microdilution method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The l-AmB MIC and the ECVs were two-fold lower than those of d-AmB and a lower l-AmB mean MIC value was found for blood isolates than from skin. The ECVs for l-AmB and d-AmB were 8 mg/l and 32 mg/l, respectively. Three strains (3.6%) showed l-AmB MIC higher than ECV (MIC > 8 mg/l) of which two were isolated from the catheter tip of patients treated with micafugin, l-Amb and fluconazole, and one from skin. The results showed that the l-AmB might be employed for assessing the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of M. furfur by a modified CLSI protocol and that ECVs might be useful for detecting the emergence of resistance. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Types of indwelling urinary catheters for long-term bladder drainage in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Patrick; Beutner, Katrin; Langer, Gero

    2012-10-17

    Prolonged urinary catheterization is common amongst people in long-term care settings and this carries a high risk of developing a catheter-related urinary tract infection and associated complications. A variety of different kinds of urethral catheters are available. Some have been developed specifically to lower the risk of catheter-associated infection, for example antiseptic or antibiotic impregnated catheters. Ease of use, comfort and handling for the caregivers and patients, and cost-effectiveness are also important factors influencing choice. The primary objective was to determine which type of indwelling urinary catheter is best to use for long-term bladder drainage in adults. We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (last searched 31 March 2011), which includes searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings, and the reference lists of relevant articles. All randomised trials comparing types of indwelling urinary catheters for long-term catheterization in adults. Long-term catheterization was defined as more than 30 days. Data extraction has been undertaken by two review authors working independently and simultaneously. Any disagreement has been resolved by a third review author. The included trial data were handled according to the methods of the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Three trials were included, involving 102 adults in various settings. Two trials had a parallel group design and one was a randomised cross-over trial.Only two of the six targeted comparisons were assessed by these trials: antiseptic impregnated catheters versus standard catheters (one trial) and one type of standard catheter versus another standard catheter (two trials).The single small cross-over trial was inadequate to assess the value of silver alloy (antiseptic) impregnated catheters. In the two trials comparing different types of standard catheters, estimates of differences were all

  1. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: Catheter Maintenance Practices and Beliefs of Pediatric Oncology Patients and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinke, Michael L.; Chen, Allen R.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Hebert, Lindsay C.; Bundy, David G.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Fratino, Lisa; Herpst, Cynthia; Kokoszka, Michelle; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate (1) the extent to which best-practice central line maintenance practices were employed in the homes of pediatric oncology patients and by whom, (2) caregiver beliefs about central line care and central line–associated blood stream infection (CLABSI) risk, (3) barriers to optimal central line care by families, and (4) educational experiences and preferences regarding central line care. Methods Researchers administered a survey to patients and families in a tertiary care pediatric oncology clinic that engaged in rigorous ambulatory and inpatient CLABSI prevention efforts. Results Of 110 invited patients and caregivers, 105 participated (95% response rate) in the survey (March–May 2012). Of the 50 respondents reporting that they or another caregiver change central line dressings, 48% changed a dressing whenever it was soiled as per protocol (many who did not change dressings per protocol also never personally changed dressings); 67% reported the oncology clinic primarily cares for their child’s central line, while 29% reported that an adult caregiver or the patient primarily cares for the central line. Eight patients performed their own line care “always” or “most of the time.” Some 13% of respondents believed that it was “slightly likely” or “not at all likely” that their child will get an infection if caregivers do not perform line care practices perfectly every time. Dressing change practices were the most difficult to comply with at home. Some 18% of respondents wished they learned more about line care, and 12% received contradictory training. Respondents cited a variety of preferences regarding line care teaching, although the majority looked to clinic nurses for modeling line care. Conclusions Interventions aimed at reducing ambulatory CLABSIs should target appropriate educational experiences for adult caregivers and patients and identify ways to improve compliance with best-practice care. PMID:25977202

  2. Encysted Fluid Collections after Catheter Removal for Peritonitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Peritonitis is a frequent complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). This case series describes episodes of peritoneal dialysis (PD) related fungal or Pseudomonas peritonitis that were complicated by the formation of encysted intra abdominal fluid collections despite prompt catheter ...

  3. Timing for Removal of Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters in Pediatric Renal Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melek, Engin; Baskın, Esra; Gülleroğlu, Kaan Savaş; Kırnap, Mahir; Moray, Gökhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Peritoneal dialysis, the preferred long-term renal replacement modality in the pediatric population, can also be used during the post transplant period. Although it is well known that peritonitis or other complications may occur related to the peritoneal dialysis catheter, less is known about complications related to the peritoneal dialysis during the posttransplant period. Our objective was to evaluate the complications related to use of a peritoneal dialysis catheter during the posttransplant period and to determine the optimum time for removal of the peritoneal dialysis catheter. We retrospectively analyzed 33 chronic peritoneal dialysis patients. Pretransplant and posttransplant demographics and clinical and laboratory data for each patient were recorded, including incidence of peritonitis and incidence of peritoneal dialysis catheter requirement after transplant. Mean age of patients at transplant was 12.8 ± 4.0 years (range, 3.5-18.0 y). Mean catheter removal time was 81.1 ± 36.2 days (range, 22.0-152.0 d). The peritoneal dialysis catheter was used in 6 of 33 patients (18.2%); none of these patients developed peritonitis. In contrast, 2 of the 27 patients who did not use the peritoneal dialysis catheter developed peritonitis. Our data suggest that the need for catheter use occurs predominantly during the first month, and infectious complications usually happen later. Previously, the trend was to not remove the peritoneal dialysis catheter at the time of transplant. However, in light of recent literature and our present study, we recommend that the time of catheter removal should be modified and decided for each patient on an individual basis.

  4. Multicenter experience with the new SOFIA Plus catheter as a primary local aspiration catheter for acute stroke thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlenbruch, M A; Kabbasch, C; Kowoll, A; Broussalis, E; Sonnberger, M; Müller, M; Wiesmann, M; Trenkler, J; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M; Weber, W; Mpotsaris, A; Bendszus, M; Stampfl, S

    2017-12-01

    The direct aspiration first pass technique (ADAPT) has been introduced as a rapid and safe endovascular treatment strategy in patients with ischemic stroke. To determine the technical feasibility, safety, and functional outcome with ADAPT using the new large-bore 6F SOFIA Plus catheter. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from six university hospitals was performed. The following parameters of all acute stroke procedures (June 2015- January 2016) using the SOFIA Plus catheter were analyzed: accessibility of the thrombus with the catheter, recanalization success (Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction ≥2b), time to recanalization, procedure-related complications. Furthermore, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores at presentation and discharge and the modified Rankin scale (mRS) score at 90 days were recorded. 85 patients were treated using the SOFIA Plus catheter. The occlusion site was the anterior circulation in 94.1%. Median baseline NIHSS score was 18. In 64.7%, ADAPT alone was successful after a median procedure time of 21 min. With additional use of stent retrievers in the remaining cases, the recanalization rate was 96.5%. No catheter-related complications such as dissections were observed. Thrombus migration to a new vascular territory occurred in 4.7% and symptomatic hemorrhage in 4.7%. After 3 months, mRS 0-2 was achieved in 49.4%. Mortality rate was 20%. In the majority of cases, thrombus aspiration using the SOFIA Plus catheter results in successful recanalization after a short procedure time. With additional use of stent retrievers, a high recanalization rate can be achieved (96.5%). The complication rate was in line with those of previous publications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Laparoscopic omentectomy for peritoneal dialysis catheter flow obstruction: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, J H; Fishman, A

    1999-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis catheter outflow dysfunction frequently is caused by omentum or epiploic appendices blocking the side holes of the catheter tubing. Laparoscopy has been utilized increasingly to remedy mechanical blockage of the peritoneal device. This obviates the need for catheter replacement, permits early return to dialysis, and lowers the patient dropout rate from peritoneal dialysis as a modality for renal replacement therapy. We report a case of laparoscopic subtotal omentectomy to successfully resolve recurrent catheter obstruction that failed previous omentolysis and omentopexy. Using four port sites, the omental resection was accomplished using the harmonic scalpel. The procedure was performed on an ambulatory basis, dialysis was resumed after 1 week, and there were no infectious complications or port site leaks. We define terminology to standardize reporting of omentectomy. Our technique of laparoscopic omentectomy is described and compared to those of previously published reports. The role of laparoscopic omentectomy relative to other commonly used laparoscopic approaches to the obstructed peritoneal dialysis catheter is reviewed.

  6. POLYCLONAL OUTBREAK OF BLOODSTREAM INFECTIONS CAUSED BY Burkholderia cepacia COMPLEX IN HEMATOLOGY AND BONE MARROW TRANSPLANT OUTPATIENT UNITS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boszczowski, Icaro; do Prado, Gladys Villas Boas; Dalben, Mirian F.; Telles, Roberto C. P.; Freire, Maristela Pinheiro; Guimarães, Thaís; Oliveira, Maura S.; Rosa, Juliana F.; Soares, Robson E.; Llacer, Pedro Enrique Dorlhiac; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Costa, Silvia F.; Levin, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The objective was to describe an outbreak of bloodstream infections by Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) in bone marrow transplant and hematology outpatients. Methods: On February 15, 2008 a Bcc outbreak was suspected. 24 cases were identified. Demographic and clinical data were evaluated. Environment and healthcare workers' (HCW) hands were cultured. Species were determined and typed. Reinforcement of hand hygiene, central venous catheter (CVC) care, infusion therapy, and maintenance of laminar flow cabinet were undertaken. 16 different HCWs had cared for the CVCs. Multi-dose heparin and saline were prepared on counter common to both units. Findings: 14 patients had B. multivorans (one patient had also B. cenopacia), six non-multivorans Bcc and one did not belong to Bcc. Clone A B. multivorans occurred in 12 patients (from Hematology); in 10 their CVC had been used on February 11/12. Environmental and HCW cultures were negative. All patients were treated with meropenem, and ceftazidime lock-therapy. Eight patients (30%) were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. After control measures (multidose vial for single patient; CVC lock with ceftazidime; cleaning of laminar flow cabinet; hand hygiene improvement; use of cabinet to store prepared medication), no new cases occurred. Conclusions: This polyclonal outbreak may be explained by a common source containing multiple species of Bcc, maybe the laminar flow cabinet common to both units. There may have been contamination by B. multivorans (clone A) of multi-dose vials. PMID:24553612

  7. Surveillance of bloodstream infections in pediatric cancer centers – what have we learned and how do we move on?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon, Arne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients receiving conventional chemotherapy for malignant disease face an increased risk of bloodstream infection (BSI. Since BSI may represent an acute life-threatening event in patients with profound immunosuppression, and show further negative impact on quality of life and anticancer treatment, the prevention of BSI is of paramount importance to improve and guarantee patients’ safety during intensive treatment. The great majority of all pediatric cancer patients (about 85% have a long-term central venous access catheter in use (type Broviac or Port; CVAD. Referring to the current surveillance definitions a significant proportion of all BSI in pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia is categorized as CVAD- BSI. This state of the art review summarizes the epidemiology and the distinct pathogen profile of BSI in pediatric cancer patients from the perspective of infection surveillance. Problems in executing the current surveillance definition in this patient population are discussed and a new concept for the surveillance of BSI in pediatric cancer patients is outlined.

  8. Implementation of central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention bundles in a surgical intensive care unit using peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Won; Ko, Suhui; An, Hye-Sun; Bang, Ji Hwan; Chung, Woo-Young

    2017-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) can be prevented through well-coordinated, multifaceted programs. However, implementation of CLABSI prevention programs requires individualized strategies for different institutional situations, and the best strategy in resource-limited settings is uncertain. Peer tutoring may be an efficient and effective method that is applicable in such settings. A prospective intervention was performed to reduce CLABSIs in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU) at a tertiary hospital. The core interventions consisted of implementation of insertion and maintenance bundles for CLABSI prevention. The overall interventions were guided and coordinated by active educational programs using peer tutoring. The CLABSI rates were compared for 9 months pre-intervention, 6 months during the intervention and 9 months post-intervention. The CLABSI rate was further observed for three years after the intervention. The rate of CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days decreased from 6.9 infections in the pre-intervention period to 2.4 and 1.8 in the intervention (6 m; P  = 0.102) and post-intervention (9 m; P  = 0.036) periods, respectively. A regression model showed a significantly decreasing trend in the infection rate from the pre-intervention period ( P  peer tutoring in a resource-limited setting was useful and effectively reduced CLABSIs. However, maintaining the reduced CLABSI rate will require further strategies.

  9. Cateter venoso profundo recoberto com antibiótico para reduzir infecção: estudo piloto Antibiotic coated catheter to decrease infection: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Kurtz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A bacteremia associada a cateter venoso central (CVC aumenta a morbidade e mortalidade hospitalar em pacientes internados em unidade de terapia intensiva (UTI. Os cateteres recobertos com rifampicina e minociclina (RM reduzem a freqüência de colonização e bacteremia. No entanto, resultados de estudos recentes questionaram o seu impacto clínico. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a incidência de colonização e bacteremia associada à CVC recobertos com RM e não recobertos numa coorte de pacientes admitidos em UTI. METODO: Estudo prospectivo, controlado em UTI mista clínico-cirúrgica. Os pacientes receberam um CVC recobertos com RM ou não recoberto. Após remoção do CVC, foi feita cultura de ponta do cateter e hemoculturas foram coletadas. Avaliou-se a freqüência de colonização e bacteremia. RESULTADOS: Cento e vinte CVC foram inseridos e 100 puderam ser avaliados, 49 no grupo não recobertos e 51 no grupo recoberto. As características clínicas foram similares nos 2 grupos. Dois casos de bacteremia associada ao cateter (BAC (3,9% ocorreram em pacientes que receberam CVC recobertos com RM comparado a 5 (10,2% casos de BAC no grupo não recobertos (p = 0,26. Seis (11,8% cateteres recobertos foram colonizados, comparados a 14 (28,6% no grupo não recoberto (p = 0,036. A análise de Kaplan-Meier não demonstrou diferença no risco de colonização ou BAC entre os dois grupos estudados. A taxa de BAC foi de 4,7 por 1000 cateteres-dia no grupo com CVC recobertos e 11,4 por 1000 cateteres-dia no grupo que recebeu cateteres não recobertos (p = 0,45. CONCLUSÕES: Neste estudo piloto, demonstrou-se menor freqüência de colonização em cateteres recobertos com RM, quando comparados a cateteres não recobertos. A freqüência de BAC não foi diferente entre os dois grupos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Nosocomial catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI increase morbidity and mortality in critically ill

  10. Klebsiella variicola is a frequent cause of bloodstream infection in the stockholm area, and associated with higher mortality compared to K. pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatallah, Makaoui; Vading, Malin; Kabir, Muhammad Humaun; Bakhrouf, Amina; Kalin, Mats; Nauclér, Pontus; Brisse, Sylvain; Giske, Christian G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae are divided into three phylogroups and differ in their virulence factor contents. The aim of this study was to determine an association between phylogroup, virulence factors and mortality following bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates from all adult patients with BSI caused by K. pneumoniae admitted to Karolinska University Hospital, Solna between 2007 and 2009 (n = 139) were included in the study. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST) data. Testing for mucoid phenotype, multiplex PCR determining serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57, and testing for virulence factors connected to more severe disease in previous studies, was also performed. Data was retrieved from medical records including age, sex, comorbidity, central and urinary catheters, time to adequate treatment, hospital-acquired infection, and mortality, to identify risk factors. The primary end-point was 30- day mortality. The three K. pneumoniae phylogroups were represented: KpI (n = 96), KpII (corresponding to K. quasipneumoniae, n = 9) and KpIII (corresponding to K. variicola, n = 34). Phylogroups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 24/139 (17.3%). Isolates belonging to KpIII were associated with the highest 30-day mortality (10/34 cases, 29.4%), whereas KpI isolates were associated with mortality in 13/96 cases (13.5%). This difference was significant both in univariate statistical analysis (P = 0.037) and in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and comorbidity (OR 3.03 (95% CI: 1.10-8.36). Only three of the isolates causing mortality within 30 days belonged to any of the virulent serotypes (K54, n = 1), had a mucoid phenotype (n = 1) and/or contained virulence genes (wcaG n = 1 and wcaG/allS n = 1). In conclusion, the results indicate higher mortality among patients infected with

  11. Klebsiella variicola is a frequent cause of bloodstream infection in the stockholm area, and associated with higher mortality compared to K. pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makaoui Maatallah

    Full Text Available Clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae are divided into three phylogroups and differ in their virulence factor contents. The aim of this study was to determine an association between phylogroup, virulence factors and mortality following bloodstream infection (BSI caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolates from all adult patients with BSI caused by K. pneumoniae admitted to Karolinska University Hospital, Solna between 2007 and 2009 (n = 139 were included in the study. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST data. Testing for mucoid phenotype, multiplex PCR determining serotypes K1, K2, K5, K20, K54 and K57, and testing for virulence factors connected to more severe disease in previous studies, was also performed. Data was retrieved from medical records including age, sex, comorbidity, central and urinary catheters, time to adequate treatment, hospital-acquired infection, and mortality, to identify risk factors. The primary end-point was 30- day mortality. The three K. pneumoniae phylogroups were represented: KpI (n = 96, KpII (corresponding to K. quasipneumoniae, n = 9 and KpIII (corresponding to K. variicola, n = 34. Phylogroups were not significantly different in baseline characteristics. Overall, the 30-day mortality was 24/139 (17.3%. Isolates belonging to KpIII were associated with the highest 30-day mortality (10/34 cases, 29.4%, whereas KpI isolates were associated with mortality in 13/96 cases (13.5%. This difference was significant both in univariate statistical analysis (P = 0.037 and in multivariate analysis adjusting for age and comorbidity (OR 3.03 (95% CI: 1.10-8.36. Only three of the isolates causing mortality within 30 days belonged to any of the virulent serotypes (K54, n = 1, had a mucoid phenotype (n = 1 and/or contained virulence genes (wcaG n = 1 and wcaG/allS n = 1. In conclusion, the results indicate higher mortality among patients infected with

  12. Multidisciplinary team review of best practices for collection and handling of blood cultures to determine effective interventions for increasing the yield of true-positive bacteremias, reducing contamination, and eliminating false-positive central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Robert A; Spitzer, Eric D; Beaudry, Josephine; Beck, Cindy; Diblasi, Regina; Gilleeny-Blabac, Michelle; Haugaard, Carol; Heuschneider, Stacy; Kranz, Barbara P; McLean, Karen; Morales, Katherine L; Owens, Susan; Paciella, Mary E; Torregrosa, Edwin

    2015-11-01

    A literature search was conducted using keywords for articles published in English from January 1990 to March 2015. Using criteria related to blood culture collection and handling, the search yielded 101 articles. References used also included Microbiology Laboratory standards, guidelines, and textbook information. The literature identified diverse and complex issues surrounding blood culture practices, including the impact of false-positive results, laboratory definition of contamination, effect on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) reporting, indications for collecting blood cultures, drawing from venipuncture sites versus intravascular catheters, selection of antiseptics, use of needleless connectors, inoculation of blood culture bottles, and optimizing program management in emergency departments, education, and implementation of bundled practice initiatives. Hospitals should optimize best practice in the collection, handling, and management of blood culture specimens, an often overlooked but essential component in providing optimal care of patients in all settings and populations, reducing financial burdens, and increasing the accuracy of reportable CLABSI. Although universal concepts exist in blood culture practices, some issues require further research to determine benefit. Institutions undertaking a review of their blood culture programs are encouraged to use a checklist that addresses elements that encompass the research contained in this review. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Malposition of catheters during voiding cystourethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathaus, V.; Konen, O.; Shapiro, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba and Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Veteran Pediatric Radiologist, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report catheter malposition during voiding cystourethrography. Eight hundred forty-three voiding cystourethrography (265 males and 578 females, aged 1 week to 12 years, mean age 2 years) were performed during a period of 4 years. The conventional standard procedure was applied. In 3 cases with passed history of urinary tract infection the catheter entered directly into the ureter. In all these cases the uretero-vesical reflux was present on the same side where the catheter entered. It appears that insertion of a catheter into the ureter is possible only in the presence of an anomaly or pathology at the vesicoureteric junction. (orig.)

  14. Clinical features and complications of viridans streptococci bloodstream infection in pediatric hemato-oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ting; Chang, Luan-Yin; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lu, Chun-Yi; Shao, Pei-Lan; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Lee, Ping-Ing; Chen, Chun-Ming; Lee, Chin-Yun; Huang, Li-Min

    2007-08-01

    Viridans streptococci (VS) are part of the normal flora of humans, but are fast emerging as pathogens causing bacteremia in neutropenic patients. The clinical features, outcomes, and antibiotic susceptibilities of VS bloodstream infections in children with hemato-oncological diseases are reported in this study. A retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (pediatric patients, the incidence rate of VS bacteremia was found to be significantly higher in pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared with other hemato-oncological conditions. Most of the patients had profound neutropenia related to chemotherapy for a median of 5 days on the day of positive blood culture. Eight of the 25 patients had undergone stem cell transplantations. Streptococcus mitis was the most common bloodstream isolate and only 12 (44%) of the 27 isolated strains of VS were penicillin-susceptible. Empirical antibiotic treatments were not effective in half of the episodes, but did not affect overall mortality. Isolated bacteremia (63%) and pneumonia (22%) were the two leading clinical presentations. Complications were recognized more frequently in patients with pneumonia. Hypotension and mechanical ventilation each developed in 8 patients (31%). The overall mortality rate was 23%. Penicillin non-susceptible VS infection has emerged as a threat in children with hemato-oncological diseases, especially those with acute myeloid leukemia. S. mitis is the most common spp. of VS causing bacteremia in children and is associated with serious complications. The development of pneumonia resulted in clinical complications and higher mortality. Empirical antibiotic treatments with activity against the infecting strains did not reduce the overall mortality rate in this study.

  15. Should we use closed or open infusion containers for prevention of bloodstream infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Frausto, Manuel S; Higuera-Ramirez, Francisco; Martinez-Soto, Jose; Rosenthal, Victor D

    2010-02-02

    Hospitalized patients in critical care settings are at risk for bloodstream infections (BSI). Most BSIs originate from a central line (CL), and they increase length of stay, cost, and mortality. Open infusion containers may increase the risk of contamination and administration-related (CLAB) because they allow the entry of air into the system, thereby also providing an opportunity for microbial entry. Closed infusion containers were designed to overcome this flaw. However, open infusion containers are still widely used throughout the world.The objective of the study was to determine the effect of switching from open (glass, burettes, and semi-rigid) infusion containers to closed, fully collapsible, plastic infusion containers (Viaflex) on the rate and time to onset of central line-associated bloodstream infections CLABs. An open label, prospective cohort, active healthcare-associated infection surveillance, sequential study was conducted in four ICUs in Mexico. Centers for Disease Control National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance Systems definitions were used to define device-associated infections. A total of 1,096 adult patients who had a central line in place for >24 hours were enrolled. The CLAB rate was significantly higher during the open versus the closed container period (16.1 versus 3.2 CLAB/1000 central line days; RR = 0.20, 95% CI = 0.11-0.36, P container period (1.4% Days 2-4 to 0.5% Days 8-10), but increased in the open container period (4.9% Days 2-4 to 5.4% Days 8-10). The chance of acquiring a CLAB was significantly decreased (81%) in the closed container period (Cox proportional hazard ratio 0.19, P container period (23.4% versus 16.1%; RR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54-0.88, P containers significantly reduced CLAB rate, the probability of acquiring CLAB, and mortality.

  16. A survey of preventive measures used and their impact on central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in intensive care units (SPIN-BACC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Milagros; Rocher, Isabelle; Fortin, Elise; Fontela, Patricia; Kaouache, Mohammed; Tremblay, Claude; Frenette, Charles; Quach, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    The Quebec central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in intensive care units (ICUs) Surveillance Program saw a decrease in CLABSI rates in most ICUs. Given the surveillance trends observed in recent years, we aimed to determine what preventive measures have been implemented, if compliance to measures was monitored and its impact on CLABSI incidence rates. All hospitals participating in the Quebec healthcare-associated infections surveillance program (SPIN-BACC - n = 48) received a 77-question survey about preventive measures implemented and monitored in their ICU. The questionnaire was validated for construct, content, face validity, and reliability. We used Poisson regression to measure the association between compliance monitoring to preventive measures and CLABSI rates. Forty-two (88%) eligible hospitals completed the survey. Two components from the maximum barrier precautions were used less optimally: cap (88%) and full sterile body drape (71%). Preventive measures reported included daily review of catheter need (79%) and evaluation of insertion site for the presence of inflammation (90%). Two hospitals rewired lines even if an infection was suspected or documented.In adult ICUs, there was a statistically significant greater decrease in CLABSI rates in ICUs that monitored compliance to preventive insertion measures, after adjusting for teaching status and the number of hospital beds (p = 0.036). Hospitals participating to the SPIN-BACC program follow recommendations for CLABSI prevention, but only a minority locally monitor their application. Compliance monitoring of preventive measures for catheter insertion was associated with a decrease in CLABSI incidence rates.

  17. Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation-High success and low complication rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; El-Sheik, Michael; Vogt, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate peri-procedural, early and late complications as well as patients' acceptance of combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided radiological port catheter implantation. Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, all consecutive radiological port catheter implantations (n = 299) between August 2002 and December 2004 were analyzed. All implantations were performed in an angio suite under analgosedation and antibiotic prophylaxis. Port insertion was guided by ultrasonographic puncture of the jugular (n = 298) or subclavian (n = 1) vein and fluoroscopic guidance of catheter placement. All data of the port implantation had been prospectively entered into a database for interventional radiological procedures. To assess long-term results, patients, relatives or primary physicians were interviewed by telephone; additional data were generated from the hospital information system. Patients and/or the relatives were asked about their satisfaction with the port implantion procedure and long-term results. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (298/299). There were no major complications according to the grading system of SIR. A total of 23 (0.33 per 1000 catheter days) complications (early (n = 4), late (n = 19)) were recorded in the follow-period of a total of 72,727 indwelling catheter days. Infectious complications accounted for 0.15, thrombotic for 0.07 and migration for 0.04 complications per 1000 catheter days. Most complications were successfully treated by interventional measures. Twelve port catheters had to be explanted due to complications, mainly because of infection (n = 9). Patients' and relatives' satisfaction with the port catheter system was very high, even if complications occurred. Conclusion: Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation is a very safe and reliable procedure with low peri-procedural, early and late complication rate. The intervention achieves very high acceptance by the patients and

  18. Comparison of health-related quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic drug therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Shaunattonie; Aves, Theresa; Banfield, Laura; Victor, J Charles; Dorian, Paul; Healey, Jeff S; Andrade, Jason; Carroll, Sandra; McGillion, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent cardiac arrhythmia and causes patients considerable burden; symptoms such as palpitations and dyspnoea are common, leading to frequent emergency room visits. Patients with AF report reduced health-related quality of life (HQOL) compared with the general population; thus, treatments focus on the restoration of sinus rhythm to improve symptoms. Catheter ablation (CA) is a primary treatment strategy to treat AF-related burden in select patient populations; however, repeat procedures are often needed, there is a risk of major complications and the procedure is quite costly in comparison to medical therapy. As the outcomes after CA are mixed, an updated review that synthesises the available literature, on outcomes that matter to patients, is needed so that patients and their healthcare providers can make quality treatment decisions. The purpose of this review protocol is to extend previous findings by systematically analysing randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of CA in patients with AF and using meta-analytic techniques to identify the benefits and risks of CA with respect to HQOL and AF-related symptoms. Methods and analysis We will include all RCTs that compare CA with antiarrhythmic drugs, or radiofrequency CA with cryoballoon CA, in patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF. To locate studies we will perform comprehensive electronic database searches from database inception to 4 April 2017, with no language restrictions. We will conduct a quantitative synthesis of the effect of CA on HQOL as well as AF-related symptoms and the number of CA procedures needed for success, using meta-analytic techniques. Ethics and dissemination No ethical issues are foreseen and ethical approval is not required given that this is a protocol. The findings of the study will be reported at national and international conferences, and in a peer-reviewed journal using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta

  19. Antimicrobial resistance predicts death in Tanzanian children with bloodstream infections: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Msangi Viola

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infection is a common cause of hospitalization, morbidity and death in children. The impact of antimicrobial resistance and HIV infection on outcome is not firmly established. Methods We assessed the incidence of bloodstream infection and risk factors for fatal outcome in a prospective cohort study of 1828 consecutive admissions of children aged zero to seven years with signs of systemic infection. Blood was obtained for culture, malaria microscopy, HIV antibody test and, when necessary, HIV PCR. We recorded data on clinical features, underlying diseases, antimicrobial drug use and patients' outcome. Results The incidence of laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection was 13.9% (255/1828 of admissions, despite two thirds of the study population having received antimicrobial therapy prior to blood culture. The most frequent isolates were klebsiella, salmonellae, Escherichia coli, enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Furthermore, 21.6% had malaria and 16.8% HIV infection. One third (34.9% of the children with laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection died. The mortality rate from Gram-negative bloodstream infection (43.5% was more than double that of malaria (20.2% and Gram-positive bloodstream infection (16.7%. Significant risk factors for death by logistic regression modeling were inappropriate treatment due to antimicrobial resistance, HIV infection, other underlying infectious diseases, malnutrition and bloodstream infection caused by Enterobacteriaceae, other Gram-negatives and candida. Conclusion Bloodstream infection was less common than malaria, but caused more deaths. The frequent use of antimicrobials prior to blood culture may have hampered the detection of organisms susceptible to commonly used antimicrobials, including pneumococci, and thus the study probably underestimates the incidence of bloodstream infection. The finding that antimicrobial resistance, HIV-infection and malnutrition predict fatal

  20. How to optimize the use of blood cultures for the diagnosis of bloodstream infections? A state-of-the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte eLamy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream infection (BSI is a major cause of death in developed countries and the detection of microorganisms is essential in managing patients. Despite major progress has been made to improve identification of microorganisms, blood culture remains the gold standard and the first line tool for detecting BSIs. Consensus guidelines are available to ensure optimal BSI procedures, but blood culture practices often deviate from the recommendations. This review provides an update on clinical and technical issues related to blood collection and to blood culture performance, with a special focus on the blood sample strategy to optimize the sensitivity and specificity of blood cultures.

  1. Transparent polyurethane film as an intravenous catheter dressing. A meta-analysis of the infection risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, K K; Weber, D J; Samsa, G P; Rutala, W A

    1992-04-15

    To obtain a quantitative estimate of the impact on infectious complications of using transparent dressings with intravenous catheters. Meta-analysis of all studies published in the English literature, including abstracts, letters, and reports that examined the primary research question of infection risks associated with transparent compared with gauze dressings for use on central and peripheral venous catheters. Studies were identified by use of the MEDLINE database using the indexing terms occlusive dressings, transparent dressings, and infection and by review of referenced bibliographies. Seven of the 15 studies (47%) of central venous catheters and seven of 12 studies (58%) of peripheral catheters met our inclusion criteria for analysis. All studies used a prospective cohort design, utilized hospitalized patients, and reported at least one of our defined outcomes. Data for each study were abstracted independently by three investigators. At least three studies were used in the analysis of each outcome. Applying a Mantel-Haenszel chi 2 analysis, use of transparent dressings on central venous catheters was significantly associated with an elevated relative risk (RR) of catheter tip infection (RR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 2.30). Catheter-related sepsis (RR = 1.69; 95% CI, 0.97 to 2.95) and bacteremia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI, 0.76 to 3.47) were both associated with an elevated RR. Use of transparent dressings on peripheral catheters was associated with an elevated RR of catheter-tip infection (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.99) but not phlebitis (RR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.20), infiltration (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.37), or skin colonization (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.09). The results demonstrated a significantly increased risk of catheter-tip infection with the use of transparent compared with gauze dressings when used with either central or peripheral catheters. An increased risk of bacteremia and catheter sepsis associated with the use of

  2. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal [Medisys Research Group, Philips Healthcare, Paris 92156 (France); Gijsbers, Geert [Interventional X-ray, Philips Healthcare, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands); Cooklin, Michael; O' Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo [Department of Cardiology, Guys and St. Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  3. Blood culture procedures and diagnosis of Malassezia furfur bloodstream infections: Strength and weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Battista, Michela; Miragliotta, Giuseppe; Boekhout, Teun; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2017-12-27

    The occurrence of Malassezia spp. bloodstream infections (BSIs) in neonatal intensive care unit was evaluated by using pediatric Isolator, BacT/Alert systems and central venous catheter (CVC) culture. The efficacy of BacT/Alert system in detecting Malassezia was assessed by conventional procedures, culturing 1 ml of bottle content before incubation and by studying the survival of Malassezia spp. strains in BacT/Alert bottles. Of the 492 neonates enrolled, blood was collected by pediatric Isolator (290 patients; group I) or by BacT/Alert bottles (202 patients; group II). The survival of Malassezia furfur and Malassezia pachydermatis in BacT/Alert bottles was evaluated by culturing the inoculum suspension (from 106 to 10 colony-forming units, cfu/ml) and assessing the cfu/ml for 15 days. In total, 15 Malassezia BSIs were detected, of which six (2.1%) from both blood and CVC culture in Dixon agar (DixA) in patients belong to group I (blood collected by paediatric Isolator tube) and nine (4.4%) only from CVC culture in DixA in patients of group II (blood collected by BacT/Alert bottle). Only one patient (0.5%) from group II scored positive for M. furfur also by culturing in DixA 1 ml blood content of BacT/Alert bottle before incubation in BacT/Alert system.M. furfur population size in BacT/Alert bottles decreased during the incubation time, whereas that of M. pachydermatis increased. The BacT/Alert system detected M. pachydermatis even at very low concentration (i.e., 10 cfu/ml) but not any positive blood culture for M. furfur. For a correct diagnosis of Malassezia furfur BSI, the blood should be culture in lipid-enriched fungal medium, and the BacT/Alert system implemented by adding lipid substrates to increase the method sensibility. Finally, CVC cultures on lipid-supplemented media may be proposed as a routine procedure to diagnose the Malassezia fungemia. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and

  4. Peripherally inserted central catheter in extremely preterm infants: Characteristics and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J; Lööf Åström, J; Olofsson, J; Fridlund, M; Farooqi, A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the duration of catheter stay, incidence of non-elective removal and rates of complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in relation to different catheter positions in extremely preterm infants (EPT, position, and 259 PICCs (56%) were removed electively after fulfilment of the treatment. Significantly more PICCs in the lower extremities compared to the upper extremities were in central positions (86% vs 61%, p position compared to a non-central position (p position compared to PICC lines inserted in the upper extremities.

  5. Prevention of intravenous bacterial injection from health care provider hands: the importance of catheter design and handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Randy W; Patel, Hetal M; Huysman, Bridget C; Kispert, David P; Koff, Matthew D; Gallagher, John D; Jensen, Jens T; Rowlands, John; Reddy, Sundara; Dodds, Thomas M; Yeager, Mark P; Ruoff, Kathryn L; Surgenor, Stephen D; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2012-11-01

    Device-related bloodstream infections are associated with a significant increase in patient morbidity and mortality in multiple health care settings. Recently, intraoperative bacterial contamination of conventional open-lumen 3-way stopcock sets has been shown to be associated with increased patient mortality. Intraoperative use of disinfectable, needleless closed catheter devices (DNCCs) may reduce the risk of bacterial injection as compared to conventional open-lumen devices due to an intrinsic barrier to bacterial entry associated with valve design and/or the capacity for surface disinfection. However, the relative benefit of DNCC valve design (intrinsic barrier capacity) as compared to surface disinfection in attenuation of bacterial injection in the clinical environment is untested and entirely unknown. The primary aim of the current study was to investigate the relative efficacy of a novel disinfectable stopcock, the Ultraport zero, with and without disinfection in attenuating intraoperative injection of potential bacterial pathogens as compared to a conventional open-lumen stopcock intravascular device. The secondary aims were to identify risk factors for bacterial injection and to estimate the quantity of bacterial organisms injected during catheter handling. Four hundred sixty-eight operating room environments were randomized by a computer generated list to 1 of 3 device-injection schemes: (1) injection of the Ultraport zero stopcock with hub disinfection before injection, (2) injection of the Ultraport zero stopcock without prior hub disinfection, and (3) injection of the conventional open-lumen stopcock closed with sterile caps according to usual practice. After induction of general anesthesia, the primary anesthesia provider caring for patients in each operating room environment was asked to perform a series of 5 injections of sterile saline through the assigned device into an ex vivo catheter system. The primary outcome was the incidence of bacterial

  6. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  7. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.J. van den; Wille, J.C.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Perenboom, R.J.M.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Nielen, A.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to

  8. Automated Pointing of Cardiac Imaging Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschak, Paul M; Brattain, Laura J; Howe, Robert D

    2013-12-31

    Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters enable high-quality ultrasound imaging within the heart, but their use in guiding procedures is limited due to the difficulty of manually pointing them at structures of interest. This paper presents the design and testing of a catheter steering model for robotic control of commercial ICE catheters. The four actuated degrees of freedom (4-DOF) are two catheter handle knobs to produce bi-directional bending in combination with rotation and translation of the handle. An extra degree of freedom in the system allows the imaging plane (dependent on orientation) to be directed at an object of interest. A closed form solution for forward and inverse kinematics enables control of the catheter tip position and the imaging plane orientation. The proposed algorithms were validated with a robotic test bed using electromagnetic sensor tracking of the catheter tip. The ability to automatically acquire imaging targets in the heart may improve the efficiency and effectiveness of intracardiac catheter interventions by allowing visualization of soft tissue structures that are not visible using standard fluoroscopic guidance. Although the system has been developed and tested for manipulating ICE catheters, the methods described here are applicable to any long thin tendon-driven tool (with single or bi-directional bending) requiring accurate tip position and orientation control.

  9. Development of a New Coaxial Balloon Catheter System for Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoue, Shuichi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Matsumoto, Shunro; Hori, Yuzo; Okahara, Mika; Kashiwagi, Junji; Mori, Hiromu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a new coaxial balloon catheter system and evaluate its clinical feasibility for balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Methods. A coaxial balloon catheter system was constructed with 9 Fr guiding balloon catheter and 5 Fr balloon catheter. A 5 Fr catheter has a high flexibility and can be coaxially inserted into the guiding catheter in advance. The catheter balloons are made of natural rubber and can be inflated to 2 cm (guiding) and 1 cm (5 Fr) maximum diameter. Between July 2003 and April 2005, 8 consecutive patients (6 men, 2 women; age range 33-72 years, mean age 55.5 years) underwent B-RTO using the balloon catheter system. Five percent ethanolamine oleate iopamidol (EOI) was used as sclerosing agent. The procedures, including maneuverability of the catheter, amount of injected sclerosing agent, necessity for coil embolization of collateral draining veins, and initial clinical results, were evaluated retrospectively. The occlusion rate was assessed by postcontrast CT within 2 weeks after B-RTO. Results. The balloon catheter could be advanced into the proximal potion of the gastrorenal shunt beyond the collateral draining vein in all cases. The amount of injected EOI ranged from 3 to 34 ml. Coil embolization of the collateral draining vein was required in 2 cases. Complete obliteration of gastric varices on initial follow-up CT was obtained in 7 cases. The remaining case required re-treatment that resulted in complete obstruction of the varices after the second B-RTO. No procedure-related complications were observed. Conclusion. B-RTO using the new coaxial balloon catheter is feasible. Gastric varices can be treated more simply by using this catheter system

  10. The Impact of Tunneled Catheters for Ascites and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis on Patient Rehospitalizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu, Chuanxing [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Xing, Minzhi [Yale University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Yale Cancer Center (United States); Ghodadra, Anish; McCluskey, Kevin M.; Santos, Ernesto; Kim, Hyun S., E-mail: kevin.kim@yale.edu [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2016-05-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study is to assess patient outcomes, complications, impact on rehospitalizations, and healthcare costs in patients with malignant ascites treated with tunneled catheters.Materials and MethodsA total of 84 patients with malignant ascites (mean age, 60 years) were treated with tunneled catheters. Patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant ascites treated with tunneled drain catheter placement over a 3-year period were studied. Overall survival from the time of ascites and catheter placement were stratified by primary cancer and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Complications were graded by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE). The differences between pre- and post-catheter admissions, hospitalizations, and Emergency Department (ED) visits, as well as related inpatient expenses were compared using paired t tests.ResultsThere were no significant differences in gender, age, or race between different primary cancer subgroups. One patient (1 %) developed bleeding (CTCAE-2). Four patients (5 %) developed local cellulitis (CTCAE-2). Three patients (4 %) had prolonged hospital stay (between 7 and 10 days) to manage ascites-related complications such as abdominal distention, discomfort, or pain. Comparison between pre- and post-catheter hospitalizations showed significantly lower admissions (−1.4/month, p < 0.001), hospital stays (−4.2/month, p = 0.003), and ED visits (−0.9/month, p = 0.002). The pre- and post-catheter treatment health care cost was estimated using MS-DRG IPPS payment system and it demonstrated significant cost savings from decreased inpatient admissions in post-treatment period (−$9535/month, p < 0.001).ConclusionsTunneled catheter treatment of malignant ascites is safe, feasible, well tolerated, and cost effective. Tunneled catheter treatment may play an important role in improving patients’ quality of life and outcomes while controlling health care expenditures.

  11. The Impact of Tunneled Catheters for Ascites and Peritoneal Carcinomatosis on Patient Rehospitalizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu, Chuanxing; Xing, Minzhi; Ghodadra, Anish; McCluskey, Kevin M.; Santos, Ernesto; Kim, Hyun S.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe aim of the study is to assess patient outcomes, complications, impact on rehospitalizations, and healthcare costs in patients with malignant ascites treated with tunneled catheters.Materials and MethodsA total of 84 patients with malignant ascites (mean age, 60 years) were treated with tunneled catheters. Patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis and malignant ascites treated with tunneled drain catheter placement over a 3-year period were studied. Overall survival from the time of ascites and catheter placement were stratified by primary cancer and analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Complications were graded by the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE). The differences between pre- and post-catheter admissions, hospitalizations, and Emergency Department (ED) visits, as well as related inpatient expenses were compared using paired t tests.ResultsThere were no significant differences in gender, age, or race between different primary cancer subgroups. One patient (1 %) developed bleeding (CTCAE-2). Four patients (5 %) developed local cellulitis (CTCAE-2). Three patients (4 %) had prolonged hospital stay (between 7 and 10 days) to manage ascites-related complications such as abdominal distention, discomfort, or pain. Comparison between pre- and post-catheter hospitalizations showed significantly lower admissions (−1.4/month, p < 0.001), hospital stays (−4.2/month, p = 0.003), and ED visits (−0.9/month, p = 0.002). The pre- and post-catheter treatment health care cost was estimated using MS-DRG IPPS payment system and it demonstrated significant cost savings from decreased inpatient admissions in post-treatment period (−$9535/month, p < 0.001).ConclusionsTunneled catheter treatment of malignant ascites is safe, feasible, well tolerated, and cost effective. Tunneled catheter treatment may play an important role in improving patients’ quality of life and outcomes while controlling health care expenditures.

  12. SURVIVAL OF CONTINUOUS AMBULATORY PERITONEAL DIALYSIS CATHETERS: AN EVALUATION OF SURGICAL AND NON-SURGICAL FACTORS (SINGLE CENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keshvari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis is an established form of renal replacement therapy used in many patients with end-stage renal disease. The key to a successful chronic peritoneal dialysis is a permanent and safe access to the peritoneal cavity. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the catheter survival and its related factors in Imam Khomeini Hospital. A total of 80 catheters were inserted into 69 patients (52 men and 28 women with end-stage chronic renal failure during a period of 84 months. Retrospectively the correlation between catheter survival (overall and event free with demographic factors (sex and age, surgical factors (surgeons and surgical methods, nephrologic factors (the causes of peritoneal dialysis selection and the history of hemodialysis and peritonitis factors (the history and number of peritonitis has been evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 48.35 years (16 to 79 years. The overall survival of catheters or the probability of having a functioning catheter after one, two and three years was 53%, 41%, 22%, respectively. The event free survival of the catheter or the probability of having a functioning catheter without any problems after one year was 14%. It has been found out that among all factors in this study only history of hemodialysis had statistically significant effect on the overall survival of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter (P = 0.04. It seems that the overall survival of catheters is better when CAPD is started before any other attempts for hemodialysis.

  13. [Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of the epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Filho, Augusto Diogo; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; Araújo, Lúcio Borges de; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45hours (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under this study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbial contamination of haemodialysis catheter connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorke, A

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial contamination and colonisation of the haemodialysis catheter is a reason for infection in dialysis patients. One reason for contamination may be frequent routine connections at the beginning, during and end of dialysis. Higher infection rates observed with double lumen catheters may be due to the absence of the sterile, disposable device that is fitted between the blood tubing and the catheter hubs with single lumen catheters. A sterile, disposable extension was implemented at the author's unit for use in dialysis with double lumen catheters. The proximal and distal ends of the extension were assessed for microbial contamination after standard dialysis. Results show microbial contamination in almost 30% of the samples retrieved from the extensions. Experiences in PD and the behaviour of skin bacteria on polymers, suggest that disposable extensions might have the potential to serve as a barrier or absorber for bacterial contamination.

  15. Protein adsorption on ex vivo catheters and polymers exposed to peritoneal dialysis effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Naoko; Li, Dai-Qing; Ljungh, Asa

    2004-01-01

    Deposition of proteins on surfaces of medical devices has been recognized to putatively relate to the process of regulation of biomaterial-associated complications by attachment of fibrin clots, eukaryotic cells, and microbes. The molecules adsorb to a varying extent, depending not only on the physicochemical properties of the biomaterial, but also on the composition of the host fluid. Adsorption of proteins on catheters exposed both ex vivo and in vitro to dialysate of patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) was studied. Peritoneal dialysis effluent was collected from 5 patients with end-stage renal disease on continuous ambulatory PD. Tenckhoff catheters were obtained from 16 patients. Deposition of proteins on excised Tenckhoff catheters and tubing of different materials exposed to PD effluent in vitro was studied using 125iodine-labeled antibodies. Adhesion of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains was quantified on tubing exposed to PD effluent in vitro. The presence of albumin, transferrin, immunoglobulin G, fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, vitronectin, and thrombospondin was determined at various concentrations in PD effluent. All proteins analyzed were detected on PD catheters removed from patients. The extent of protein deposition on Tenckhoff catheters exposed to PD effluent, in vitro, rapidly reached a plateau and remained constant, as it did on polyvinyl chloride and polyethylene tubing. Adhesion of staphylococci was enhanced on Tenckhoff catheters exposed to PD effluent compared to unused PD solution. The data identify surface exposed proteins that may serve as adhesion sites for microbes on peritoneal catheters indwelled in patients undergoing PD.

  16. The value of percutaneous catheter cholangiography in postoperative diagnostics after biliobiliary and biliodigestive anastomoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhausen, J.; Bidlingmaier, J.; Mueller, R.D.; Langer, R.

    1996-01-01

    Aim of study: To examine the relative importance of percutaneous catheter cholangiography in postoperative diagnostics after biliary reconstruction. Methods: 55 patients (33 males, 22 females) were subjected to 101 catheter cholangiographies. 30-50 ml of a water-soluble, iodic contrast medium were administered via an infusion system. Initial examinations were performed between the 3nd and 7th day following operation, while follow-up examinations were executed between the 8th and 145th day after surgery. The position of the catheter, the function of the anastomosis, the filling of the biliary ducts and the discharge of the contrast medium were assessed. Results: 45 examinations were inconspicuous. Drainage obstruction of the contrast medium was observed in 24 cases. Filling defects were observed in 8 examinations. A dislocation of the catheter was encountered in 5 cholangiographies while 19 examinations displayed a bile leak. Conclusion: Percutaneous catheter cholangiographies can be used to detect postoperative complications following biliary reconstruction in an easy, reliable, and cost-effective manner that also does not put too much strain on the patient. Indications for the inplementation of catheter cholangiographies are the occurrence of abdominal complaints, the clinical appearance of a peritonitis, or an increase of the serum bilirubin value. Routine examinations are recommended in conditions following liver transplantations. In addition to this, a cholangiography should be carried out prfor to the removal of the catheter. (orig.) [de

  17. Secular Trends in Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections : Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Increase the Total Burden of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Harbarth, S.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Crook, D. W.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Hanberger, H.; Herwaldt, L. A.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Kola, A.; Kuchenbecker, R. S.; Lingaas, E.; Meessen, N.; Morris-Downes, M. M.; Pottinger, J. M.; Rohner, P.; dos Santos, R. P.; Seifert, H.; Wisplinghoff, H.; Ziesing, S.; Walker, A. S.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. Methods. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence

  18. Tsukamurella pulmonis Bloodstream Infection Identified by secA1 Gene Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez del Molino Bernal, Inmaculada C.; Cano, María E.; García de la Fuente, Celia; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; López, Mónica; Fernández-Mazarrasa, Carlos; Agüero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent bloodstream infections caused by a Gram-positive bacterium affected an immunocompromised child. Tsukamurella pulmonis was the microorganism identified by secA1 gene sequencing. Antibiotic treatment in combination with removal of the subcutaneous port healed the patient.

  19. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER AS A VASCULAR APPROACH TO HEMODIALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Djordjevic

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of the central venous catheter (CVC as a temporary orpermanent vascular approach to hemodialysis has been practiced in our Center since1994. So far 30 (12,6% patients have been thus treated. The primary application hasbeen done in 25 patients, namely: the first making of the A V fistula has been done in16, the ABT in 6, while the vascular approach correction in 3 patients. The secondaryapplication has been done in 5 patients. The infection episode incidence concerningthe CVC application is 20 infections per 1.000 patients. This is the upper limitaccording to the data given in the literature (5, rang 3-20. The average duration of thecatheter is 21 + - 13 days (rang 1-47. Two-volume catheters have been used for ajugular approach though less often for a femoral one. The unsuccessful placing due tothe catheter thrombosis has occurred in 4 patients, the catheter drop-out and itsreplacing have been done in 2 patients, while no replacement has happened in onečaše. The treatment has been stopped in one patient. Tn four patients the cerebrovascularinsult has happened after placing the CVC. The mortality rate is 26,6%,that is, K patients, namely: 4 due to cerebrovascular insult, one due to lung emboly,one due to heart weakness and one due to the sepsis from the V fistula. One patientdied at home for unknown reason. A high infection episode incidence rate is related toinadequate patients' placing so that their location in the rooms for intensive care is away of reducing it. It is necessary to provide for general aseptic procedure at work aswell as for betterment of the accompanying procedures (hemoculture, antibiograms,sterilization in order to maintain a safe catheter function.

  20. Knowledge, attitudes, and practice on the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections among nurses in oncological care: A cross-sectional study in an area of southern Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Esposito

    Full Text Available The objectives of the cross-sectional study were to delineate the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior among nurses regarding the prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs and to identify their predisposing factors. A questionnaire was self-administered from September to November 2011 to nurses in oncology and outpatient chemotherapy units in 16 teaching and non-teaching public and private hospitals in the Campania region (Italy. The questionnaire gathered information on demographic and occupational characteristics; knowledge about evidence-based practices for the prevention of CLABSIs; attitudes towards guidelines, the risk of transmitting infections, and hand-washing when using central venous catheter (CVC; practices about catheter site care; and sources of information. The vast majority of the 335 nurses answered questions correctly about the main recommendations to prevent CLABSIs (use sterile gauze or sterile transparent semipermeable dressing to cover the catheter site, disinfect the needleless connectors before administer medication or fluid, disinfect with hydrogen peroxide the catheter insertion site, and use routinely anticoagulants solutions. Nurses aged 36 to 50 years were less likely to know these main recommendations to prevent CLABSIs, whereas this knowledge was higher in those who have received information about the prevention of these infections from courses. Nurses with lower education and those who do not know two of the main recommendations on the site's care to prevent the CLABSIs, were more likely to perceive the risk of transmitting an infection. Higher education, attitude toward the utility allow to dry antiseptic, and the need of washing hands before wearing gloves for access to port infusion were predictors of performing skin antiseptic and aseptic technique for dressing the catheter insertion site. Educational interventions should be implemented to address the gaps regarding knowledge and

  1. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; Teichgraeber, Ulf Karl; Podrabsky, Petr; Werk, Michael; Haenninen, Enrique Lopez; Felix, Roland

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  2. Prevalence of infection in patients with temporary catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmiane de Rezende Ramim Borges

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the prevalence of infection related to the provisional catheter for hemodialysis in a teaching hospital and evaluate the risk factors associated with these infections.  A cross-sectional study analyzed by descriptive statistics and parametric tests. It was found that out of 129 patients, 48.8 % had catheter-related infection in hemodialysis, 65 % were male, 33.3 % were 60 years old and over, and 88 % of patients were admitted to intensive care unit. The prevalence of infection in this group was high, and the vast majority of diagnoses of infection were empirical. Given this, it is suggested to establish the routine culture of the catheter tip in all cases of suspected catheter infection to improve the quality of patient care, and the relentless pursuit of the causes that trigger the infection process in line with good practice from across the healthcare team.

  3. Accuracy of chest radiography for positioning of the umbilical venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana F.M. Guimarães

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks - diaphragm, cardiac silhouette, and vertebral bodies - in determining the position of the umbilical venous catheter distal end using echocardiography as a reference standard. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study, with the prospective inclusion of data from all neonates born in a public reference hospital, between April 2012 and September 2013, submitted to umbilical venous catheter insertion as part of their medical care. The position of the catheter distal end, determined by the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks, was compared with the anatomical position obtained by echocardiography; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Results: Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16% had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or at the junction of the inferior vena cava with the right atrium. The catheters were located in the left atrium and interatrial septum in 54 (33.33% newborns, in the right atrium in 26 (16.05%, intra-hepatic in 37 (22.84%, and intra-aortic in-one newborn (0.62%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the radiography to detect the catheter in the target area were 56%, 71%, and 67.28%, respectively. Conclusion: Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of the catheter tip in relation to vascular structures and, whenever possible, should be considered to identify the location of the umbilical venous catheter.

  4. Accuracy of chest radiography for positioning of the umbilical venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Adriana F M; Souza, Aline A C G de; Bouzada, Maria Cândida F; Meira, Zilda M A

    To evaluate the accuracy of the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks - diaphragm, cardiac silhouette, and vertebral bodies - in determining the position of the umbilical venous catheter distal end using echocardiography as a reference standard. This was a cross-sectional, observational study, with the prospective inclusion of data from all neonates born in a public reference hospital, between April 2012 and September 2013, submitted to umbilical venous catheter insertion as part of their medical care. The position of the catheter distal end, determined by the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks, was compared with the anatomical position obtained by echocardiography; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16%) had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or at the junction of the inferior vena cava with the right atrium. The catheters were located in the left atrium and interatrial septum in 54 (33.33%) newborns, in the right atrium in 26 (16.05%), intra-hepatic in 37 (22.84%), and intra-aortic in-one newborn (0.62%). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the radiography to detect the catheter in the target area were 56%, 71%, and 67.28%, respectively. Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of the catheter tip in relation to vascular structures and, whenever possible, should be considered to identify the location of the umbilical venous catheter. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiological and genetic diversity of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection in Shanghai, 2009-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Staphylococcus aureus or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been an important pathogen causing bloodstream infections. Our study aimed to investigate the epidemiological and genetic diversity of clinical S. aureus isolates from patients with bloodstream infection in four hospitals of Shanghai from 2009 to 2011. METHODS: A collection of S. aureus isolates causing bloodstream infection from four hospitals in the central part of Shanghai was carried out. Antimicrobial susceptibility testings of collected isolates were performed according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines, and spa-type, multi-locus sequence typing, agr type and toxin gene profiling were performed to explore the molecular diversity. Moreover, MRSA strains were also characterized by Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing. RESULTS: The drugs such as linezolid, teicoplanin and vancomycin were efficacious for treating S. aureus including MRSA bloodstream infection. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA strains displayed distinct diversity in molecular characterization and toxin genes, and three virulent MSSA strains encoding at least five toxins were detected. Five community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA strains were found, but the majority (88.7% of MRSA strains belonged to two epidemic clones (ST239-MRSA- III and ST5-MRSA- II with different toxin gene profiles among patients with bloodstream infection. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA strains were still the main pathogen causing bloodstream infections in spite of the emergence of CA-MRSA strains in hospital setting.

  6. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada); Stephens, Derek [University of Toronto, Child Health Evaluative Sciences (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  7. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa; Stephens, Derek; Connolly, Bairbre

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  8. The mechanistic causes of peripheral intravenous catheter failure based on a parametric computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Russell; Carr, Peter J.; Kelsey, Lachlan J.; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Keogh, Samantha; Doyle, Barry J.

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are the most commonly used invasive medical device, yet up to 50% fail. Many pathways to failure are mechanistic and related to fluid mechanics, thus can be investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Here we used CFD to investigate typical PIVC parameters (infusion rate, catheter size, insertion angle and tip position) and report the hemodynamic environment (wall shear stress (WSS), blood damage, particle residence time and venous stasis vo...

  9. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps.Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology. A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback, followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention.Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test. Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after. Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68

  10. Bloodstream Amyloid-beta (1-40) Peptide, Cognition, and Outcomes in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Barallat, Jaume; de Antonio, Marta; Domingo, Mar; Zamora, Elisabet; Vila, Joan; Subirana, Isaac; Gastelurrutia, Paloma; Pastor, M Cruz; Januzzi, James L; Lupón, Josep

    2017-11-01

    In the brain, amyloid-beta generation participates in the pathophysiology of cognitive disorders; in the bloodstream, the role of amyloid-beta is uncertain but may be linked to sterile inflammation and senescence. We explored the relationship between blood levels of amyloid-beta 1-40 peptide (Aβ40), cognition, and mortality (all-cause, cardiovascular, and heart failure [HF]-related) in ambulatory patients with HF. Bloodstream Aβ40 was measured in 939 consecutive patients with HF. Cognition was evaluated with the Pfeiffer questionnaire (adjusted for educational level) at baseline and during follow-up. Multivariate Cox regression analyses and measurements of performance (discrimination, calibration, and reclassification) were used, with competing risk for specific causes of death. Over 5.1 ± 2.9 years, 471 patients died (all-cause): 250 from cardiovascular causes and 131 HF-related. The median Aβ40 concentration was 519.1 pg/mL [Q1-Q3: 361.8-749.9 pg/mL]. The Aβ40 concentration correlated with age, body mass index, renal dysfunction, and New York Heart Association functional class (all P < .001). There were no differences in Aβ40 in patients with and without cognitive impairment at baseline (P = .97) or during follow-up (P = .20). In multivariable analysis, including relevant clinical predictors and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, Aβ40 remained significantly associated with all-cause death (HR, 1.22; 95%CI, 1.10-1.35; P < .001) and cardiovascular death (HR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.03-1.36; P = .02), but not with HF-related death (HR, 1.13; 95%CI, 0.93-1.37; P = .22). Circulating Aβ40 improved calibration and patient reclassification. Blood levels of Aβ40 are not associated with cognitive decline in HF. Circulating Aβ40 was predictive of mortality and may indicate systemic aging. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream Candida isolates in Sfax hospital: Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, A; Sellami, H; Néji, S; Makni, F; Abbes, S; Cheikhrouhou, F; Chelly, H; Bouaziz, M; Hammami, B; Ben Jemaa, M; Khaled, S; Ayadi, A

    2011-06-01

    Invasive candidiasis has emerged as an important nosocomial infection, causing significant morbidity and mortality especially among critically ill patients. The aim of our study was to determine specie distribution and resistance profiles of Candida species isolated from blood cultures. We conducted a retrospective study of all episodes of candidemia diagnosed in our laboratory from January 2006 to May 2009. The susceptibility to antifungal agents of all Candida isolates was tested by using a Sensititre(®) YeastOne panel. A total of 130 Candida isolates were recovered from blood cultures. Candida tropicalis was the most frequent specie (37.7%), followed by C. albicans (22.3%), C. glabrata (19.2%), and C. parapsilosis (12.2%). All the isolates were inhibited by ≤1 μg/ml of amphotericin B and ≤2 μg/ml of caspofungin. For fluconazole, 7.3% of clinical isolates were resistant. It was most active against C. parapsilosis (100% susceptible), C. albicans (95.8% susceptible), and C. tropicalis (94% susceptible). All of the fluconazole-susceptible isolates were susceptible to voriconazole, as were 83.3% of the fluconazole-susceptible-dose-dependent isolates. Among fluconazole-resistant isolates, 85.7% were susceptible to voriconazole. In our institution, C. tropicalis was the most frequent specie isolated from the bloodstream. Caspofungin had an excellent in vitro activity against Candida isolates and was the drug of choice among fluconazole-resistant isolates. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010

  12. Vaccine Protection of Leukopenic Mice against Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Sabine; Gough, Portia; Kim, Hwan Keun; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    The risk for Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) is increased in immunocompromised individuals, including patients with hematologic malignancy and/or chemotherapy. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains, designated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), staphylococcal BSI in cancer patients is associated with high mortality; however, neither a protective vaccine nor pathogen-specific immunotherapy is currently available. Here, we modeled staphylococcal BSI in leukopenic CD-1 mice that had been treated with cyclophosphamide, a drug for leukemia and lymphoma patients. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice were highly sensitive to S. aureus BSI and developed infectious lesions lacking immune cell infiltrates. Virulence factors of S. aureus that are key for disease establishment in immunocompetent hosts—α-hemolysin (Hla), iron-regulated surface determinants (IsdA and IsdB), coagulase (Coa), and von Willebrand factor binding protein (vWbp)—are dispensable for the pathogenesis of BSI in leukopenic mice. In contrast, sortase A mutants, which cannot assemble surface proteins, display delayed time to death and increased survival in this model. A vaccine with four surface antigens (ClfA, FnBPB, SdrD, and SpAKKAA), which was identified by genetic vaccinology using sortase A mutants, raised antigen-specific immune responses that protected leukopenic mice against staphylococcal BSI. PMID:25183728

  13. Bloodstream Infections in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Sah Ižpek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the pattern of bloodstream infections (BSIs and antimicrobial susceptibility of pathogens in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU.Material and Method: Positive hemoculture of neonates diagnosed with nosocomial sepsis from March 2011 to March 2014 in the NICU of Diyarbakir Maternity and Children%u2019s Hospital, in the southeastern region of Anatolia, Turkey, were retrospectively reviewed. Results: A total of 148 pathogens were isolated in 142 neonates. The most common microorganisms isolated were Klebsiella pneumoniae (40.5% and Acinetobacter baumannii (29.7% which was a result of a hospital outbreak. Multi-drug resistant (MDR strains accounted for 20.0% of K. pneumoniae isolates and 93.2% of A. baumannii isolates. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was higher in cases infected with MDR strains than in cases infected without MDR strains or Candida spp (24% vs. 9.7%, p=0.032. Discussion: In our unit, BSIs were more often caused by Gram negative bacteria. BSIs caused by MDR strains were associated with a higher rate of sepsis-attributable mortality.

  14. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complication following fracture of a central venous catheter can be catastrophic to both the patient and the attending doctor. Catheter fracture has been attributed to several factors namely prolong mechanical force acting on the catheter, and forceful removal or insertion of the catheter. CASE DETAILS: In ...

  15. 21 CFR 870.1290 - Steerable catheter control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Steerable catheter control system. 870.1290... catheter control system. (a) Identification. A steerable catheter control system is a device that is connected to the proximal end of a steerable guide wire that controls the motion of the steerable catheter...

  16. Prolonged use of indwelling urinary catheter following acute urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.O. Bello

    duration of catheter use and median out-of-pocket payment per catheter change was 65 years (range 20–90 years), 12 months (range .... pocket payments per catheter change and reasons for prolonged catheter use was collected. ... ing almost half (44.7%) of the average annual income of an adult in the study region of ...

  17. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  18. Percutaneous catheter dilatation of carotid stenoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, K.; Mittermayer, C.; Ensinger, H.; Neff, W.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-one carotid artery stenoses were produced in thirty dogs by three different techniques. Twenty-three of these could be cured by transfemoral percutaneous catheter dilatation. High grade tight stenoses may present resistance which cannot be overcome by the catheter. Histological examination of the dilated vessels showed circumscribed changes in the vessel wall, with destruction of elastic membranes. From our experience of catheter dilatation of pelvic and lower limb arteries and of renal arteries, we consider it feasible to use this technique in selected patients with carotid stenosis. (orig.) [de

  19. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  20. Permanent catheters for recurrent ascites-a critical and systematic review of study methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars; Wildgaard, Lorna Elizabeth; Wildgaard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Management of refractory ascites traditionally includes medical treatment with diuretics or intermittent paracentesis. Patients with recurrent ascites may benefit from the use of permanent intra-abdominal catheters with more frequent drainage without hospitalization. The objective...... was to systematically asses the methodology of factors and endpoints reported in studies investigating permanent catheters for recurrent ascites treatment. Methods Using a systematic search strategy, we critically assessed the methodology when treating refractory ascites using a permanent catheter. Studies critically...... is limited because complications and outcomes are poorly defined. The expected increase in catheter treatment of refractory ascites necessitates comparative studies, using validated patient-related outcomes, and the reporting of unambiguous complications. A proposal of variables to include in future studies...

  1. Clonal distribution of bone sialoprotein-binding protein gene among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Katarzyna; Piórkowska, Anna; Kasprzyk, Joanna; Bronk, Marek; Świeć, Krystyna

    2014-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bloodstream infections (BSI) and diseases that may be caused by hematogenous spread. The staphylococcal adhesin, for which the association with the infections emerging as a complication of septicemia has been well documented, is a bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp). The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence of a bbp gene in S. aureus bloodstream isolates associated with BSI and to investigate to what degree the distribution of this gene is linked to the clonality of the population. Spa typing, used in order to explore the genetic population structure of the isolates, yielded 29 types. Six spa clusters and seven singletons were identified. The most frequent was spa clonal complex CC021 associated with MLST CC30 (38%). The bbp gene was found in 47% of isolates. Almost all isolates (95%) clustered in spa clonal complex CC021 were positive for this gene. All isolates carrying the bbp gene were sensitive to methicillin, and if clustered in the spa CC021, belonged to agr group III. Our study shows that Bbp is not strictly associated with BSI. However, one may conclude that for clonally related S. aureus strains most commonly causing BSI, the risk of Bbp-mediated complications of septicemia is expected to be higher than for other strains.

  2. Implementation of central line-associated bloodstream infection prevention bundles in a surgical intensive care unit using peer tutoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Won Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs can be prevented through well-coordinated, multifaceted programs. However, implementation of CLABSI prevention programs requires individualized strategies for different institutional situations, and the best strategy in resource-limited settings is uncertain. Peer tutoring may be an efficient and effective method that is applicable in such settings. Methods A prospective intervention was performed to reduce CLABSIs in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU at a tertiary hospital. The core interventions consisted of implementation of insertion and maintenance bundles for CLABSI prevention. The overall interventions were guided and coordinated by active educational programs using peer tutoring. The CLABSI rates were compared for 9 months pre-intervention, 6 months during the intervention and 9 months post-intervention. The CLABSI rate was further observed for three years after the intervention. Results The rate of CLABSIs per 1000 catheter-days decreased from 6.9 infections in the pre-intervention period to 2.4 and 1.8 in the intervention (6 m; P = 0.102 and post-intervention (9 m; P = 0.036 periods, respectively. A regression model showed a significantly decreasing trend in the infection rate from the pre-intervention period (P < 0.001, with incidence-rate ratios of 0.348 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98–1.23 in the intervention period and 0.257 (95% CI, 0.07–0.91 in the post-intervention period. However, after the 9-month post-intervention period, the yearly CLABSI rates reverted to 3.0–5.4 infections per 1000 catheter-days over 3 years. Conclusions Implementation of CLABSI prevention bundles using peer tutoring in a resource-limited setting was useful and effectively reduced CLABSIs. However, maintaining the reduced CLABSI rate will require further strategies.

  3. THE KISSING BALLOON TECHNIQUE WITH 2 OVER-THE-WIRE BALLOON CATHETERS THROUGH A SINGLE 8-FRENCH GUIDING CATHETER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENHEIJER, P; BERNINK, PJLM; VANDIJK, RB; TWISK, SPM; LIE, KI

    Some of the newer over-the-wire coronary angioplasty catheters have shaft sizes of 3.0 French (F) or less. The inner diameter of modern 8-F guiding catheters is large enough to accommodate two of such balloon catheters. We report a kissing balloon procedure with two over-the-wire catheters through a

  4. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  5. Multistate outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens bloodstream infection after exposure to contaminated heparinized saline flush prepared by a compounding pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Mark D; Kennedy, Donald J; Noble-Wang, Judith; Kim, Curi; Gullion, Jessica; Kacica, Marilyn; Jensen, Bette; Pascoe, Neil; Saiman, Lisa; McHale, Jean; Wilkins, Melinda; Schoonmaker-Bopp, Dianna; Clayton, Joshua; Arduino, Matthew; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2008-12-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding, the manipulation of ingredients to create a customized medication, is a widespread practice. In January 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was notified of 4 cases of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteremia that were traced to contaminated heparinized saline intravenous flush syringes prepared as a compounded medical product. We reviewed medical records of symptomatic patients with P. fluorescens-positive cultures of blood specimens or sections of explanted catheters, reviewed the production process of syringes, performed syringe cultures, compared isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and examined catheters by scanning electron microscopy. We identified 80 patients in 6 states with P. fluorescens-positive cultures during December 2004-March 2006. Sixty-four patients (80%) had received a diagnosis of cancer. Seventy-four (99%) of 75 patients for whom information about catheter type was available had long-term indwelling catheters. Thirty-three (41%) of 80 cases were diagnosed 84-421 days after the patient's last potential exposure to a contaminated flush (delayed-onset cases). Compared with patients with early infection onset, more patients with delayed infection onset had venous ports (100% versus 50%; P <.001). By PFGE, clinical isolates from 50 (98%) of 51 patients were related to isolates cultured from unopened syringes. Scanning electron microscopy of explanted catheters revealed biofilms containing organisms morphologically consistent with P. fluorescens. This outbreak underscores important challenges in ensuring the safety of compounded pharmaceuticals and demonstrates the potential for substantially delayed infections after exposures to contaminated infusates. Exposures to compounded products should be considered when investigating outbreaks. Patients exposed to contaminated infusates require careful follow-up, because infections can occur long after exposure.

  6. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is ... an incision above the pubis. What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection ...

  7. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  8. Indwelling cecal catheters for fluid administration in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, R H; Carter, G K; Roussel, A J; Ruoff, W W

    1995-01-01

    Two different fluid solutions were infused through percutaneous cecal catheters in 6 healthy ponies to determine the effects on body weight; CBC; packed cell volume (PCV); total plasma protein concentration; plasma fibrinogen concentration; abdominal fluid analysis; concentrations of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine, Ca, total CO2 (TCO2), Na, Cl, K, and P; and fractional clearance (FC) of Na, Cl, K, and P. During intracecal administration of solution 1, FCNa and FCCl were significantly increased, whereas FCK and BUN were significantly decreased. During administration of solution 2, FCNa and serum P were significantly increased, while PCV was significantly decreased. All ponies developed peritonitis during the study. Complications included catheter-related problems, diarrhea, laminitis, and hypocalcemia. We concluded that hydration and electrolyte balance could be maintained by administration of crystalloid solutions intracecally, but that complications were associated with the procedure.

  9. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Vedran; Katalinic, Lea; Pasalic, Marijan; Jurin, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumothorax. Thorough diagnostics outruled immediate life-threatening conditions, such as myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. However, not previously seen, 2 cm thick pericardial effusion without repercussion on the blood flow was visualized during echocardiography, predominantly reclining the free surface of the right atrium, with fibrin scar tissue covering the epicardium - it was the spot of spontaneously recovered cardiac wall perforation. Follow-up echocardiogram performed before the discharge showed regression of the previously found pericardial effusion.

  10. Persistent left superior vena cava with thrombus formed in the catheter lumen 4 h after dialysis catheter placed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oba, Miki; Takada, Megumi; Tanaka, Haruna; Suda, Shin

    2018-02-17

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is one of the most common thoracic venous anomaly and rarely noticed, because it is asymptomatic. However, for nephrologists, it is frequent enough to be encountered while placing hemodialysis catheters through the jugular vein. We report the case of 66-year-old patient with PLSVC presenting intrinsic thrombosis formation 4 h after dialysis catheter placed. Dialysis catheter was placed in the left internal jugular vein without resistance and any complication. PLSVC was detected after dialysis catheter insertion. We decided to remove the catheter, because the patient has other veins in which the catheter can be placed. When it was removed 4 h after catheter placing, thrombus was recognized in the catheter lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed and no thrombus formation was observed in the heart chamber. For patients with PLSVC, if there were other veins in which the catheter can be placed, catheter replacement should be considered.

  11. Heparin Versus Normal Saline: Flushing Effectiveness in Managing Central Venous Catheters in Patients Undergoing Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, John; Jepsen, Amelia; Patterson, Amy; Reich, Richard R; Mason, Tina M

    2018-04-01

    Patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) use a central venous catheter (CVC); heparin is often employed to maintain patency but may increase the risk of complications. Research has not provided conclusive differences in efficacy and safety regarding heparin flushing versus normal saline flushing in CVC maintenance. Minimal research is specific to this patient population. This study aimed to determine if differences exist in CVC patency, tissue plasminogen activator usage, and the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections when flushing with normal saline only versus heparin and normal saline among patients undergoing BMT. A convenience sample of 30 patients undergoing allogeneic or autologous transplantation with a new non-port/non-peripherally inserted CVC were evaluated. Elimination of routine heparin use could positively affect outcomes in this patient population.

  12. A functionalized surface modification with vanadium nanoparticles of various valences against implant-associated bloodstream infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Jiaxing Wang,1,* Huaijuan Zhou,2,* Geyong Guo,1 Tao Cheng,1 Xiaochun Peng,1 Xin Mao,1 Jinhua Li,2–4 Xianlong Zhang1 1Department of Orthopaedics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 3Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 4University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Bloodstream infection, especially with implants involved, is an often life-threatening condition with high mortality rates, imposing a heavy burden on patients and medical systems. Herein, we firstly deposited homogeneous vanadium metal, V2O3, VO2, and V2O5 nanofilms on quartz glass by magnetron sputtering. Using these platforms, we further investigated the potential antimicrobial efficiency of these nano-VOx films and the interactions of human erythrocytes and bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with our samples in a novel cell–bacteria coculture model. It was demonstrated that these nano-VOx precipitated favorable antibacterial activity on both bacteria, especially on S. aureus, and this effect increased with higher vanadium valence. A possible mechanism accountable for these results might be elevated levels of vanadium-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species. More importantly, based on hemolysis assays, our nano-VOx films were found to be able to kill prokaryotic cells but were not toxic to mammalian cells, holding the potential for the prevention of implant-related hematogenous infections. As far as we know, this is the first report wherein such nano-VOx films have assisted human erythrocytes to combat bacteria in a valence-dependent manner. Additionally, vanadium

  13. In vitro antifungal susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatta, Roberta; Figueredo, Luciana A; Montagna, Maria Teresa; Otranto, Domenico; Cafarchia, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Fungaemia caused by Malassezia spp. in hospitalized patients requires prompt and appropriate therapy, but standard methods for the definition of the in vitro antifungal susceptibility have not been established yet. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of Malassezia furfur from bloodstream infections (BSIs) to amphotericin B (AMB), fluconazole (FLC), itraconazole (ITC), posaconazole (POS) and voriconazole (VRC) was assessed using the broth microdilution (BMD) method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) with different media such as modified Sabouraud dextrose broth (SDB), RPMI and Christensen's urea broth (CUB). Optimal broth media that allow sufficient growth of M. furfur, and produce reliable and reproducible MICs using the CLSI BMD protocol were assessed. Thirty-six M. furfur isolates collected from BSIs of patients before and during AMB therapy, and receiving FLC prophylaxis, were tested. A good growth of M. furfur was observed in RPMI, CUB and SDB at 32 °C for 48 and 72 h. No statistically significant differences were detected between the MIC values registered after 48 and 72 h incubation. ITC, POS and VRC displayed lower MICs than FLC and AMB. These last two antifungal drugs showed higher and lower MICs, respectively, when the isolates were tested in SDB. SDB is the only medium in which it is possible to detect isolates with high FLC MICs in patients receiving FLC prophylaxis. A large number of isolates showed high AMB MIC values regardless of the media used. In conclusion, SDB might be suitable to determine triazole susceptibility. However, the media, the drug formulation or the breakpoints herein applied might not be useful for assessing the AMB susceptibility of M. furfur from BSIs. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Pediatric bloodstream infections in Cambodia, 2007 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Nicole; Moore, Catrin E; Pocock, Joanna M; An, Khun Peng; Emary, Kate; Carter, Michael; Sona, Soeng; Poda, Sar; Day, Nicholas; Kumar, Varun; Parry, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    Pediatric bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Epidemiological data from resource-limited settings in southeast Asia, such as Cambodia, are sparse but have important implications for treatment and public health strategies. We retrospectively investigated BSI in children at a pediatric hospital and its satellite clinic in Siem Reap, Cambodia, from January 1, 2007, to July 31, 2011. The range of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were analyzed in conjunction with demographic, clinical and outcome data. Of 7682 blood cultures with results (99.9% of cultures taken), 606 (7.9%) episodes of BSI were identified in 588 children. The incidence of BSI increased from 14 to 50/1000 admissions (P < 0.001); this was associated with an increased sampling rate. Most BSI were community acquired (89.1%). Common pathogens included Salmonella Typhi (22.8% of all isolates), Staphylococcus aureus (12.2%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (10.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.4%) and Escherichia coli (6.3%). 21.5% of BSI were caused by a diverse group of uncommon organisms, the majority of which were environmental Gram-negative species. No Listeria monocytogenes or Group B streptococcal BSI were identified. Antimicrobial resistance, particularly among the Enterobacteriaceae, was common. Overall mortality was substantial (19.0%), higher in neonates (36.9%) and independently associated with meningitis/meningoencephalitis and K. pneumoniae infection. BSI is a common problem in Cambodian children attending hospital and associated with significant mortality. Further studies are needed to clarify the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis, the contribution of atypical organisms and the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease before the introduction of vaccine.

  15. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  16. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  17. Percutaneous versus laparoscopic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: Simplicity and favorable outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla K Al-Hwiesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of peritoneal dialysis (PD catheters via the laparoscopic technique is expanding, but none of the studies concerning this technique have compared its outcome with the percutaneous insertion done by the nephrologist. We compared the technical survival and outcome of 52 PD catheters placed in 43 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD in our center from March 2006 to October 2007. Of these, 27 PD catheters were inserted percutaneously by a nephrologist (group 1 and 25 were placed by a surgeon using the conventional laparoscopic technique (group 2. Very obese patients, those with previous abdominal surgery, and those who refused local anesthesia were excluded from the study. All catheters were evaluated for mechanical and infectious complications and the overall technique survival was analyzed. The incidence of complications in PD catheters did not largely differ between the two groups. Early catheter-related infection episodes (within two weeks of catheter placement occurred in three of 22 (13.6% patients in group 1, versus three of 21 (14.3% patients in group 2 (P >0.05. The incidence of exit site leak was higher in group 2 (19.0% compared to (4.5% group 1 (P 0.05. We conclude that in our study, the percutaneous bedside placements of PD catheters done by nephrologists were comparable with the laparoscopic insertions performed by surgeons where the high-risk patients were avoided, and the former provided a safer and more reliable access that allowed a rapid initiation of PD.

  18. Trypanin, a component of the flagellar Dynein regulatory complex, is essential in bloodstream form African trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Ralston

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The Trypanosoma brucei flagellum is a multifunctional organelle with critical roles in motility, cellular morphogenesis, and cell division. Although motility is thought to be important throughout the trypanosome lifecycle, most studies of flagellum structure and function have been restricted to the procyclic lifecycle stage, and our knowledge of the bloodstream form flagellum is limited. We have previously shown that trypanin functions as part of a flagellar dynein regulatory system that transmits regulatory signals from the central pair apparatus and radial spokes to axonemal dyneins. Here we investigate the requirement for this dynein regulatory system in bloodstream form trypanosomes. We demonstrate that trypanin is localized to the flagellum of bloodstream form trypanosomes, in a pattern identical to that seen in procyclic cells. Surprisingly, trypanin RNA interference is lethal in the bloodstream form. These knockdown mutants fail to initiate cytokinesis, but undergo multiple rounds of organelle replication, accumulating multiple flagella, nuclei, kinetoplasts, mitochondria, and flagellum attachment zone structures. These findings suggest that normal flagellar beat is essential in bloodstream form trypanosomes and underscore the emerging concept that there is a dichotomy between trypanosome lifecycle stages with respect to factors that contribute to cell division and cell morphogenesis. This is the first time that a defined dynein regulatory complex has been shown to be essential in any organism and implicates the dynein regulatory complex and other enzymatic regulators of flagellar motility as candidate drug targets for the treatment of African sleeping sickness.

  19. Multiple versus single lumen umbilical venous catheters for newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, N S; Kumar, M; Shah, S S

    2005-07-20

    needed to treat (NNT) or number needed to harm (NNH) was calculated. Three studies qualified for inclusion in this review (Khilnani 1991; Loisel 1996; Soupre 1998). There was a decrease in the ML-UVCs group in the number of additional PIVs used in the first week of life [WMD -1.42, (95% CI -1.74, -1.10), pcatheter malfunction in the ML-UVCs group [typical RR 3.69 (95% CI 0.99, 13.81), p=0.05; RD 0.15 (95% CI 0.03, 0.27), p=0.01; NNH was 7, 95% CI 4, 33; n=99]. The following outcomes were not significantly different in the two groups: clinical sepsis, catheter related blood stream infection, catheter-associated thrombosis, complications related to catheter malposition in heart and great vessels, NEC and early neonatal mortality. The use of ML-UVCs in comparison to SL-UVCs in neonates is associated with decrease in the usage of PIVs in first week of life, but an increase in catheter malfunctions. As the quality of included randomized studies is poor and the estimates of clinically important complications are imprecise, no firm recommendations can be made regarding the choice of UVC. Adequately powered, properly randomized and properly blinded controlled trials are needed that address the effectiveness and safety of ML-UVCs (double and triple lumen) in comparison to SL-UVCs. These studies should also address the impact of type of catheter material.

  20. Hemodialysis catheter insertion: is increased PO2 a sign of arterial cannulation? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio C; Neyra, Javier A; Patel, Jiten; Rodan, Aylin R

    2014-07-29

    Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) for temporary vascular access, preferably using the right internal jugular vein, is widely accepted by nephrologists. However CVC is associated with numerous potential complications, including death. We describe the finding of a rare left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary vein connection during central venous catheterization for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Ultrasound-guided cannulation of a large bore temporary dual-lumen Quinton-Mahurkar catheter into the left internal jugular vein was performed for CRRT initiation in a 66 year old African-American with sepsis-related oliguric acute kidney injury. The post-procedure chest X-ray suggested inadvertent left carotid artery cannulation. Blood gases obtained from the catheter showed high partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) of 140 mmHg and low partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) of 22 mmHg, suggestive of arterial cannulation. However, the pressure-transduced wave forms appeared venous and Computed Tomography Angiography located the catheter in the left internal jugular vein, but demonstrated that the tip of the catheter was lying over a left pulmonary vein which was abnormally draining into the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein rather than into the left atrium. Although several mechanical complications of dialysis catheters have been described, ours is one of the few cases of malposition into an anomalous pulmonary vein, and highlights a sequential approach to properly identify the catheter location in this uncommon clinical scenario.

  1. Comparison of Diverting Colostomy and Bowel Management Catheter Applications in Fournier Gangrene Cases Requiring Fecal Diversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eray, Ismail Cem; Alabaz, Omer; Akcam, Atilgan Tolga; Ulku, Abdullah; Parsak, Cem Kaan; Sakman, Gurhan; Seydaoglu, Gulsah

    2015-12-01

    In some patients of Fournier gangrene originated from perianal region, it is important to prevent fecal contamination in order to provide healing without wound infection. For this purposes, diverting colostomy or bowel management catheter methods were performed. In this study, it is aimed to carry out a comparison of prognosis and cost efficiency between diverting colostomy and bowel management catheter methods applied for preventing fecal contamination in Fournier's gangrene patients. Fourty-eight patients with diagnosis of Fournier's gangrene, serious perianal infections, and preserved sphincters and without rectum injury after debridement were included in the study. The cases were divided into two groups as patients who were subjected to colostomy for fecal diversion and who were subjected to bowel management catheter without colostomy. Then, the groups were compared in terms of age, predisposing factors, duration of hospital stay, mortality, additional surgery requirements, and cost. Fourty-eight patients were included the study. Sixteen patients were treated without colostomy. Decreased duration of total hospital stay, additional surgery requirements, and hospital expense in bowel management catheter group has determined. It is thought that preferring bowel management catheter method instead of colostomy in patients without rectum injury, who require diverting colostomy and have undamaged anal sphincters, can relieve patients, patients' relatives, healthcare organizations, and the national economy of a serious burden. In addition, although patients' satisfaction and workforce loss factors are not taken into consideration in this study, the bowel management catheter method is thought to have positive effects also on these parameters.

  2. Disease Burden, Characteristics, and Outcomes of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Joyce H S; Choi, Kin-Wing; Wong, Tin-Yau; Ip, Margaret; Ming, Wai-Kit; Wong, Rity Yee-Kwan; Chan, Sze-Ngai; Tse, Hoi-Tung; Chau, Carrie T S; Lee, Nelson L S

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to describe disease burden, characteristics, and outcomes of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection (BSI) in Hong Kong. A retrospective, observational study was conducted in 26 Hong Kong public hospitals between January 2010 and December 2012. The primary outcome measures were 30-day mortality rate and infection-related hospital cost. Of 1133 patients reviewed, 727 (64.17%) were male, 1075 (94.88%) had health care-associated community-onset and 44 (3.88%) had hospital-onset MRSA infection. The mean age of patients was 76 (SD = 15) years, including 172 (15.18%) aged 20 to 59 years and 961 (84.8%) aged ≥60 years. The annual incidence rates in age groups of 20 to 59 years and ≥60 years were 0.96 to 1.148 per 100 000 and 22.7 to 24.8 per 100 000, respectively. The 30-day mortality was 367 (32.39%). Older patients (>79 years), chronic lung disease, and prior hospitalization were associated with increased mortality. The mean cost was US$10 565 (SD = 11 649; US$1 = HK$7.8). MRSA BSI was a significant burden in Hong Kong.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa May Accumulate Drug Resistance Mechanisms without Losing Its Ability To Cause Bloodstream Infections▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocquet, Didier; Berthelot, Philippe; Roussel-Delvallez, Micheline; Favre, Roger; Jeannot, Katy; Bajolet, Odile; Marty, Nicole; Grattard, Florence; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Bingen, Edouard; Husson, Marie-Odile; Couetdic, Gérard; Plésiat, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we systematically investigated the resistance mechanisms to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones of 120 bacteremic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis genotyping showed that 97 of these strains were represented by a single isolate, 10 by 2 and 1 by 3 clonally related isolates, respectively. Seventy-five percent (90 out of 120) of the bacteremic P. aeruginosa strains displayed a significant resistance to one or more of the tested antimicrobials (up to 11 for 1 strain). These strains were found to harbor a great diversity of resistance mechanisms (up to 7 in 1 strain), leading to various levels of drug resistance. Interestingly, 11 and 36% of the isolates appeared to overproduce the MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM efflux systems, respectively. Altogether, our results show that P. aeruginosa may accumulate intrinsic (overproduction of cephalosporinase AmpC, increased drug efflux, fluoroquinolone target mutations, and deficient production of porin OprD) and exogenous (production of secondary β-lactamases and aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes) resistance mechanisms without losing its ability to generate severe bloodstream infections. Consequently, clinicians should be aware that multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa may remain fully pathogenic. PMID:17682106

  4. Infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a case report on an occupational pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofseth, Kristine; Dalen, Håvard; Kibsgaard, Leif; Nebb, Solrun; Kümmel, Angela; Mehl, Arne

    2017-01-05

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is an established animal pathogen, which may cause infections in humans. It is a gram-positive rod and found in the tonsils or the digestive tracts of animals. The bacterium is occupationally related, as usually only people with frequent animal contacts are infected. We report a case of a patient who was admitted with an infectious tenosynovitis with bloodstream infection due to E. rhusiopathiae, and to our knowledge, this is the first report of a tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation associated with this bacterium. A 52-year old Norwegian man, who worked with transportation of swine cadavers, was admitted to the local hospital with sepsis and unknown focus of infection. A few days earlier he had an injury to the skin of one of his fingers that later proved to be infected with E. rhusiopathiae. There were no other causes for his symptoms than the infectious tenosynovitis with systemic manifestation. The infection resolved on treatment with antibiotics and surgery. A transoesophageal echocardiogram was performed to exclude endocarditis, which may be associated with this pathogen. This case report highlights the importance of clinicians being aware of this bacterium, and we describe risk factors for infection, differences in the clinical manifestations of the disease, challenges with diagnosing the bacterium and adverse effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Recommended treatment is appropriate antibiotic therapy and adequate debridement and surgical drainage of the tendon sheath.