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Sample records for cathelicidin peptide ll-37

  1. The human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 as a potential treatment for polymicrobial infected wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen J Duplantier

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic patients often have ulcers on their lower-limbs that are infected by multiple biofilm-forming genera of bacteria, and the elimination of the biofilm has proven highly successful in resolving such wounds in patients. To that end, antimicrobial peptides have shown potential as a new anti-biofilm approach. The single human cathelicidin peptide LL-37 has been shown to have antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against multiple gram-positive and gram-negative human pathogens, and have wound-healing effects on the host. The combination of the anti-biofilm effect and wound-healing properties of LL-37 may make it highly effective in resolving polymicrobially infected wounds when topically applied. Such a peptide or its derivatives could be a platform from which to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat biofilm-mediated infections of wounds. This review summarizes known mechanisms that regulate the endogenous levels of LL-37 and discusses the antibiofilm, antibacterial and immunological effects of deficient versus excessive concentrations of LL-37 within the wound environment. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the therapeutic potential of this peptide and other clinically advanced peptides as a potential topical treatment for polymicrobial infected wounds.

  2. The Role of Cathelicidin LL-37 in Cancer Development

    OpenAIRE

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Głuszek, Katarzyna; Góźdź, Stanisław; Levental, Ilya; Bucki, Robert

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a C-terminal peptide proteolytically released from 18 kDa human cathelicidin protein (hCAP18). Chronic infections, inflammation, tissue injury and tissue regeneration are all linked with neoplastic growth, and involve LL-37 antibacterial and immunomodulatory functions. Such a link points to the possible involvement of LL-37 peptide in carcinogenesis. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that LL-37 can have two different and contradictory effects—promotion or inhibition of tumor ...

  3. Stability of the cathelicidin peptide LL-37 in a non-healing wound environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönberg, Alvar; Zettergren, Louise; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus

    2011-01-01

    aeruginosa that produce elastase, which degrades LL-37. This study investigated the stability of synthetic LL-37 against two types of proteinases in the presence or absence of wound fluid samples (diluted to 10-20%) from nine non-healing venous leg ulcers. Incubation of LL-37 (10 µg/ml) at 37°C for 6 h...

  4. The Roles of Cathelicidin LL-37 in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lihua; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Yang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    Human cathelicidin LL-37, the only member of the cathelicidin family of host defense peptides expressed in humans, plays a crucial role in host defense against pathogen invasion, as well as in regulating the functions of anti-inflammation, antitumorigenesis, and tissue repair. It is primarily produced by phagocytic leukocytes and epithelial cells, and mediates a wide range of biological responses. Emerging evidence from several studies indicates that LL-37 plays a prominent and complex role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although overexpression of LL-37 has been implicated in the inflamed and noninflamed colon mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis, LL-37 expression was not changed in the inflamed or noninflamed colon or ileal mucosa in patients with Crohn's disease. Furthermore, studies in animal models and human patients further characterized the protective effect of cathelicidins both in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These data suggest the intricate functions of LL-37 in IBD. They will also create many strategies and opportunities for therapeutic intervention in IBD in the future. This review aims to elucidate the structure and bioactivity of LL-37 and also discuss the recent progress in understanding the relationship between LL-37 and IBD. PMID:27135484

  5. Killing efficacy and anti-biofilm activity of synthetic human cationic antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin hCAP-18/LL37 against urinary tract pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Safaa Toma Hanna Aka

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cathelicidin LL37 represents one of the chemical defence components of bladder epithelial cells that include antimicrobial peptides, which also shown to have an important role in the mucosal immunity of the urinary tract by preventing adhesion of bacteria. This study aimed to determine the killing efficacy of LL37 compared to anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Methods: The 96-flat well microtiter plates were used for evaluation of killing...

  6. Positive correlation between circulating cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18/LL-37) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, Brian M; Barker, Tyler; McKinnon, Toni;

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Transcription of the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene is induced by binding of the bioactive form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, to the vitamin D receptor. Significant levels of the protein hCAP18/LL-37 are found in the blood and may protect against...

  7. The Role of Cathelicidin LL-37 in Cancer Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wnorowska, Urszula; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Głuszek, Katarzyna; Góźdź, Stanisław; Levental, Ilya; Bucki, Robert

    2016-02-01

    LL-37 is a C-terminal peptide proteolytically released from 18 kDa human cathelicidin protein (hCAP18). Chronic infections, inflammation, tissue injury and tissue regeneration are all linked with neoplastic growth, and involve LL-37 antibacterial and immunomodulatory functions. Such a link points to the possible involvement of LL-37 peptide in carcinogenesis. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that LL-37 can have two different and contradictory effects--promotion or inhibition of tumor growth. The mechanisms are tissue-specific, complex, and depend mostly on the ability of LL-37 to act as a ligand for different membrane receptors whose expression varies on different cancer cells. Overexpression of LL-37 was found to promote development and progression of ovarian, lung and breast cancers, and to suppress tumorigenesis in colon and gastric cancer. This review explores and summarizes the current views on how LL-37 contributes to immunity, pathophysiology and cell signaling involved in malignant tumor growth. PMID:26395996

  8. Killing efficacy and anti-biofilm activity of synthetic human cationic antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin hCAP-18/LL37 against urinary tract pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa Toma Hanna Aka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cathelicidin LL37 represents one of the chemical defence components of bladder epithelial cells that include antimicrobial peptides, which also shown to have an important role in the mucosal immunity of the urinary tract by preventing adhesion of bacteria. This study aimed to determine the killing efficacy of LL37 compared to anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Methods: The 96-flat well microtiter plates were used for evaluation of killing rate by estimation of MIC-value to the clinical isolates of E. coli and S. aureus collected from patients with urinary tract infection. S. aureus ATCC 25923 and E.coli ATCC 25922 were investigated in this study. Biofilm formation on polystyrene surface was conducted by growing bacterial isolates on 96-flat well microtiter plates, stained with crystal violet. The bound bacteria were quantified by addition of ethanol 70% and measurement of the dissolved crystal violet absorbance at (OD630 nm using ELISA reader. Results: LL37 showed minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of 32 μg/ml against S. aureus and E. coli. The sub-MIC of LL37 was also able to eliminate about 31% and 34% of both S. aureus and E. coli, respectively. Anti-biofilm activity of LL37 showed biofilm inhibition at 1 μg/ml (1/32 MIC to 16 μg/ml (1/2 MIC, which exhibited significant difference (p<0.001 against E. coli, whereas LL37 beyond 1 μg/ml showed significant inhibition (p<0.001 of biofilm against S. aureus. Conclusion: The cathelicidin LL37 can be used as a broad-spectrum anti-biofilm agent rather than killing agent. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(1: 15-20

  9. Structural location determines functional roles of the basic amino acids of KR-12, the smallest antimicrobial peptide from human cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Biswajit; Epand, Raquel F; Epand, Richard M; Wang, Guangshun

    2013-11-14

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are recognized templates for developing a new generation of antimicrobials to combat superbugs. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is an essential host defense molecule in human innate immunity. Previously, we identified KR-12 as the smallest antibacterial peptide of LL-37. KR-12 has a narrow activity spectrum since it is active against Gram-negative Escherichia coli but not Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. The functional roles of the basic amino acids of KR-12, however, have not yet been elucidated. An alanine scan of cationic amino acids of KR-12 provided evidence for their distinct roles in the activities of the peptides. Bacterial killing and membrane permeation experiments indicate that the R23A and K25A mutants, as well as the lysine-to-arginine mutant, were more potent than KR-12. Another three cationic residues (K18, R19, and R29) of KR-12, which are located in the hydrophilic face of the amphiphathic helix, appeared to be more important in clustering anionic lipids or hemolysis than R23 and K25 in the interfacial region. While the loss of interfacial R23 or K25 reduced peptide helicity, underscoring its important role in membrane binding, the overall increase in peptide activity of KR-12 could be ascribed to the increased peptide hydrophobicity that outweighed the role of basic charge in this case. In contrast, the mutations of interfacial R23 or K25 reduced peptide bactericidal activity of GF-17, an overlapping, more hydrophobic and potent peptide also derived from LL-37. Thus, the hydrophobic context of the peptide determines whether an alanine substitution of an interfacial basic residue increases or decreases membrane permeation and peptide activity.

  10. Fungicidal mechanisms of cathelicidins LL-37 and CATH-2 revealed by live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez Alvarez, Soledad; Amarullah, Ilham H; Wubbolts, Richard W; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2014-01-01

    Antifungal mechanisms of action of two cathelicidins, chicken CATH-2 and human LL-37, were studied and compared with the mode of action of the salivary peptide histatin 5 (Hst5). Candida albicans was used as a model organism for fungal pathogens. Analysis by live-cell imaging showed that the peptide

  11. Role of urinary cathelicidin LL-37 and human β-defensin 1 in uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karen L; Dynesen, Pia; Larsen, Preben;

    2014-01-01

    Cathelicidin (LL-37) and human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) are important components of the innate defense in the urinary tract. The aim of this study was to characterize whether these peptides are important for developing uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections (UTIs). This was investiga......Cathelicidin (LL-37) and human β-defensin 1 (hBD-1) are important components of the innate defense in the urinary tract. The aim of this study was to characterize whether these peptides are important for developing uncomplicated Escherichia coli urinary tract infections (UTIs......). This was investigated by comparing urinary peptide levels of UTI patients during and after infection to those of controls, as well as characterizing the fecal flora of participants with respect to susceptibility to LL-37 and in vivo virulence. Forty-seven UTI patients and 50 controls who had never had a UTI were...

  12. LL-37抗菌肽及其与牙周病的关系%Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and its relationship between periodontal disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏瑞英; 陈珊珊

    2012-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to destruction of the periodontium. The abnormal innate immune defense and outcome of periodontal disease is closely related. Cathelicidin is one of endogenous peptide, hCAP-18 and LL-37 is the only member of the cathelicidin family known to exist in human. The former is regarded as an inactive precursor, and the latter is the active mature form. In this review, we emphasize on the hCAP-18, the function of LL-37 and its relationship between periodontal disease.%牙周病是一种微生物感染导致的牙周组织炎症破坏性疾病,先天性免疫防御功能正常与否与牙周炎的发展转归息息相关.组织蛋白酶抑制素cathelicidin 是一种内源性抗菌肽,人源阳离子抗菌肽(hCAP)-18和LL-37 是迄今发现的唯一的cathelicidin 家族成员,而前者是其前体形式,后者则是其有活性的成熟形式.本文就hCAP-18和LL-37,LL-37的功能,LL-37与牙周病的关系等研究进展作一综述.

  13. Research status of defensins and cathelicidins/LL-37 in pulmonary anti-infection immune defense%防御素和cathelicidins/LL-37在肺部抗感染防御中的研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭书真; 李昌崇; 林立

    2014-01-01

    抗菌肽是宿主防御系统的重要组成部分.在人气道上皮中主要表达2种阳离子小分子抗菌肽,即防御素和cathelicidins/LL-37,它们通过直接杀菌、调节天然或适应性免疫、损伤修复等生物学活性对抗肺部常见病原体的侵袭.本文就防御素和cathelicidins/LL-37的来源及结构特征、表达调节、在肺部抗感染免疫防御中的作用进行综述.%Antimicrobial protein/peptides (AMPs) are an important part of the defense system.Defensins and cathelicidins/LL-37 are the two main small cationic AMPs which are present in airway epithelial cells.AMPs play a critical role in resisting pathongens of invading lung through direct antimicrobial activity,modulating innate or adaptive immunity,and wound repair.The orign and architectural feature,expression regulation and research progress in pulmonary anti-infection immune defense of defensins and cathelicidins/LL-37 are reviewed here.

  14. Boswellic acids target the human immune system-modulating antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Arne; Tausch, Lars; Pillong, Max; Jauch, Johann; Karas, Michael; Schneider, Gisbert; Werz, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is the sole member of the human cathelicidin family with immune system-modulating properties and roles in autoimmune disease development. Small molecules able to interact with LL-37 and to modulate its functions have not been described yet. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids that are bioactive principles of frankincense extracts used as anti-inflammatory remedies. Although various anti-inflammatory modes of action have been proposed for BAs, the pharmacological profile of these compounds is still incompletely understood. Here, we describe the identification of human LL-37 as functional target of BAs. In unbiased target fishing experiments using immobilized BAs as bait and human neutrophils as target source, LL-37 was identified as binding partner assisted by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Thermal stability experiments using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirm direct interaction between BAs and LL-37. Of interest, this binding of BAs resulted in an inhibition of the functionality of LL-37. Thus, the LPS-neutralizing properties of isolated LL-37 were inhibited by 3-O-acetyl-β-BA (Aβ-BA) and 3-O-acetyl-11-keto-β-BA (AKβ-BA) in a cell-free limulus amoebocyte lysate assay with EC50=0.2 and 0.8 μM, respectively. Also, LL-37 activity was inhibited by these BAs in LL-37-enriched supernatants of stimulated neutrophils or human plasma derived from stimulated human whole blood. Together, we reveal BAs as inhibitors of LL-37, which might be a relevant mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of BAs and suggests BAs as suitable chemical tools or potential agents for intervention with LL-37 and related disorders. PMID:26361729

  15. Blastocystis Isolate B Exhibits Multiple Modes of Resistance against Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yason, John Anthony; Ajjampur, Sitara Swarna Rao; Tan, Kevin Shyong Wei

    2016-08-01

    Blastocystis is one of the most common eukaryotic organisms found in humans and many types of animals. Several reports have identified its role in gastrointestinal disorders, although its pathogenicity is yet to be clarified. Blastocystis is transmitted via the fecal-to-oral route and colonizes the large intestines. Epithelial cells lining the intestine secrete antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), including beta-defensins and cathelicidin, as a response to infection. This study explores the effects of host colonic antimicrobial peptides, particularly LL-37, a fragment of cathelicidin, on different Blastocystis subtypes. Blastocystis is composed of several subtypes that have genetic, metabolic, and biological differences. These subtypes also have various outcomes in terms of drug treatment and immune response. In this study, Blastocystis isolates from three different subtypes were found to induce intestinal epithelial cells to secrete LL-37. We also show that among the antimicrobial peptides tested, only LL-37 has broad activity on all the subtypes. LL-37 causes membrane disruption and causes Blastocystis to change shape. Blastocystis subtype 7 (ST7), however, showed relative resistance to LL-37. An isolate, ST7 isolate B (ST7-B), from this subtype releases proteases that can degrade the peptide. It also makes the environment acidic, which causes attenuation of LL-37 activity. The Blastocystis ST7-B isolate was also observed to have a thicker surface coat, which may protect the parasite from direct killing by LL-37. This study determined the effects of LL-37 on different Blastocystis isolates and indicates that AMPs have significant roles in Blastocystis infections. PMID:27217421

  16. Role of uropathogenic Escherichia coli OmpT in the resistance against human cathelicidin LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, John R; Thomassin, Jenny-Lee; Desloges, Isabelle; Gruenheid, Samantha; Le Moual, Hervé

    2013-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are among the most prevalent causative agents of urinary tract infections. To establish infection, UPEC must overcome the bactericidal action of host antimicrobial peptides. Previously, the enterohaemorrhagic E. coli outer membrane protease, OmpT, was shown to degrade and inactivate the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. This study aims to investigate the involvement of UPEC OmpT in LL-37 degradation. An ompT deletion mutant was generated in the prototypical UPEC strain CFT073. Western blot analysis showed that the OmpT protein level is moderate in CFT073. In agreement, OmpT was shown to partially cleave LL-37. However, no difference in the minimum inhibitory concentration of LL-37 was observed between CFT073 and the ompT mutant. Plasmid complementation of ompT, which led to increased OmpT levels, resulted in complete cleavage of LL-37 and a fourfold increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration. The analysis of other UPEC isolates showed similar OmpT activity levels as CFT073. Although UPEC OmpT can cleave LL-37, we conclude that the low level of OmpT limits its contribution to LL-37 resistance. Collectively, these data suggest that UPEC OmpT is likely accompanied by other LL-37 resistance mechanisms.

  17. Short KR-12 analogs designed from human cathelicidin LL-37 possessing both antimicrobial and antiendotoxic activities without mammalian cell toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Binu; Park, Il-Seon; Bang, Jeong-Kyu; Shin, Song Yub

    2013-11-01

    KR-12 (residues 18-29 of LL-37) was known to be the smallest peptide of human cathelicidin LL-37 possessing antimicrobial activity. In order to optimize α-helical short antimicrobial peptides having both antimicrobial and antiendotoxic activities without mammalian cell toxicity, we designed and synthesized a series of KR-12 analogs. Highest hydrophobic analogs KR-12-a5 and KR-12-a6 displayed greater inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-α production and higher LPS-binding activity. We have observed that antimicrobial activity is independent of charge, but LPS neutralization requires a balance of hydrophobicity and net positive charge. Among KR-12 analogs, KR-12-a2, KR-12-a3 and KR-12-a4 showed much higher cell specificity for bacteria over erythrocytes and retained antiendotoxic activity, relative to parental LL-37. KR-12-a5 displayed the strongest antiendotoxic activity but almost similar cell specificity as compared with LL-37. Also, these KR-12 analogs (KR-12-a2, KR-12-a3, KR-12-a4 and KR-12-a5) exhibited potent antimicrobial activity (minimal inhibitory concentration: 4 μM) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these KR-12 analogs have the potential for future development as a novel class of antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents.

  18. Spotlight on Human LL-37, an Immunomodulatory Peptide with Promising Cell-Penetrating Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Ferdinand Lensink

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cationic antimicrobial peptides are major components of innate immunity and help control the initial steps of the infectious process. They are expressed not only by immunocytes, but also by epithelial cells. They share an amphipathic secondary structure with a polar cationic site, which explains their tropism for prokaryote membranes and their hydrophobic site contributing to the destructuration of these membranes. LL-37 is the only cationic antimicrobial peptide derived from human cathelicidin. LL-37 can also cross the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, probably through special domains of this membrane called lipid rafts. This transfer could be beneficial in the context of vaccination: the activation of intracellular toll-like receptors by a complex formed between CpG oligonucleotides and LL-37 could conceivably play a major role in the building of a cellular immunity involving NK cells.

  19. Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 and IDR-1 Ameliorate MRSA Pneumonia in Vivo

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    Man Hou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The only human cathelicidin, LL-37, and the innate defense regulator peptide IDR-1, which have been proven to have antimicrobial activity, represent essential elements of immunity. Our previous study showed that the peptide LL-37 was protective in vitro to attenuate LTA-induced inflammatory effects. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA causes a multitude of serious and sometimes life-threatening diseases around the globe. However, the effect of LL-37 and IDR-1 in MRSA-induced pneumonia is unknown. In the present study, we explored the potential of LL-37 and IDR-1 in ameliorating MRSA-induced pneumonia in vivo. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into four groups and perfused intratracheally with PBS, peptide, MRSA and MRSA plus peptide, respectively. Pulmonary tissue pathology, ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR were employed. The relative signal pathways were further explored by western blot analysis. Results: Pathological analysis of the lung tissue sections demonstrated that, when compared with the MRSA-treated group, both the LL-37 and IDR-1 could ameliorate the MRSA-induced pneumonia. The phosphorylation of JNK and Akt were markedly decreased in the peptide plus MRSA-treated group compared with the MRSA-treated group. Furthermore, both of them also reduced TNF-α and IL-6 production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum in vivo. Conclusion: We report the first evidence of peptides inhibiting inflammation, decreasing the release of inflammatory cytokines and restoring pulmonary function in vivo. The antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and IDR-1 could ameliorate MRSA-induced pneumonia by exerting an anti-inflammatory property and attenuating pro-inflammatory cytokine release, thus providing support for the hypothesis that both innate and synthetic peptides could protect against MRSA in vivo.

  20. Candidacidal Activity of Selected Ceragenins and Human Cathelicidin LL-37 in Experimental Settings Mimicking Infection Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durnaś, Bonita; Wnorowska, Urszula; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Deptuła, Piotr; Wątek, Marzena; Piktel, Ewelina; Głuszek, Stanisław; Gu, Xiaobo; Savage, Paul B; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens, have become a serious public health problem due to the growing number of immunocompromised patients, including those subjected to anticancer treatment or suffering from HIV infection. In this study we assessed fungicidal activity of the ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-131 and CSA-192 against four fluconazole-resistant Candida strains. We found that ceragenins activity against planktonic Candida cells was higher than activity of human LL-37 peptide and synthetic cationic peptide omiganan. Compared to LL-37 peptide, ceragenins in the presence of DNase I demonstrated an increased ability to kill DNA-induced Candida biofilm. Microscopy studies show that treatment with LL-37 or ceragenins causes Candida cells to undergo extensive surface changes indicating surface membrane damage. This conclusion was substantiated by observation of rapid incorporation of FITC-labeled CSA-13, CSA-131 or LL-37 peptide into the more lipophilic environment of the Candida membrane. In addition to activity against Candida spp., ceragenins CSA-131 and CSA-192 display strong fungicidal activity against sixteen clinical isolates including Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus. These results indicate the potential of ceragenins for future development as new fungicidal agents. PMID:27315208

  1. Transformation of Human Cathelicidin LL-37 into Selective, Stable, and Potent Antimicrobial Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Guangshun; Hanke, Mark L.; Mishra, Biswajit; Lushnikova, Tamara; Heim, Cortney E.; Chittezham Thomas, Vinai; Bayles, Kenneth W; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports a family of novel antimicrobial compounds obtained by combining peptide library screening with structure-based design. Library screening led to the identification of a human LL-37 peptide resistant to chymotrypsin. This d-amino-acid-containing peptide template was active against Escherichia coli but not methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). It possesses a unique nonclassic amphipathic structure with hydrophobic defects. By repairing the hydrophobic defects, t...

  2. Human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 inhibits adhesion of Candida albicans by interacting with yeast cell-wall carbohydrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Wen Tsai

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the major fungal pathogen of humans. Fungal adhesion to host cells is the first step of mucosal infiltration. Antimicrobial peptides play important roles in the initial mucosal defense against C. albicans infection. LL-37 is the only member of the human cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides and is commonly expressed in various tissues and cells, including epithelial cells of both the oral cavity and urogenital tract. We found that, at sufficiently low concentrations that do not kill the fungus, LL-37 was still able to reduce C. albicans infectivity by inhibiting C. albicans adhesion to plastic surfaces, oral epidermoid OECM-1 cells, and urinary bladders of female BALB/c mice. Moreover, LL-37-treated C. albicans floating cells that did not adhere to the underlying substratum aggregated as a consequence of LL-37 bound to the cell surfaces. According to the results of a competition assay, the inhibitory effects of LL-37 on cell adhesion and aggregation were mediated by its preferential binding to mannan, the main component of the C. albicans cell wall, and partially by its ability to bind chitin or glucan, which underlie the mannan layer. Therefore, targeting of cell-wall carbohydrates by LL-37 provides a new strategy to prevent C. albicans infection, and LL-37 is a useful, new tool to screen for other C. albicans components involved in adhesion.

  3. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

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    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment. PMID:27234592

  4. Transformation of human cathelicidin LL-37 into selective, stable, and potent antimicrobial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshun; Hanke, Mark L; Mishra, Biswajit; Lushnikova, Tamara; Heim, Cortney E; Chittezham Thomas, Vinai; Bayles, Kenneth W; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-09-19

    This Letter reports a family of novel antimicrobial compounds obtained by combining peptide library screening with structure-based design. Library screening led to the identification of a human LL-37 peptide resistant to chymotrypsin. This d-amino-acid-containing peptide template was active against Escherichia coli but not methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). It possesses a unique nonclassic amphipathic structure with hydrophobic defects. By repairing the hydrophobic defects, the peptide (17BIPHE2) gained activity against the ESKAPE pathogens, including Enterococcus faecium, S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumanii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species. In vitro, 17BIPHE2 could disrupt bacterial membranes and bind to DNA. In vivo, the peptide prevented staphylococcal biofilm formation in a mouse model of catheter-associated infection. Meanwhile, it boosted the innate immune response to further combat the infection. Because these peptides are potent, cell-selective, and stable to several proteases, they may be utilized to combat one or more ESKAPE pathogens. PMID:25061850

  5. Prokaryotic Selectivity, Anti-endotoxic Activity and Protease Stability of Diastereomeric and Enantiomeric Analogs of Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Yong Hai; Lee, Bongju; Shin, Song Yub [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    LL-37 is the only antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the human cathelicidin family. In addition to potent antimicrobial activity, LL-37 is known to have the potential to inhibit lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxic effects. To provide the stability to proteolytic digestion and increase prokaryotic selectivity and/or anti-endotoxic activity of two Lys/Trp-substituted 19-meric anti-microbial peptides (a4-W1 and a4-W2) designed from IG-19 (residues 13-31 of LL-37), we synthesized the diastereomeric peptides (a4-W1-D and a4-W2-D) with D-amino acid substitution at positions 3, 7, 10, 13 and 17 of a4-W1 and a4-W2, respectively and the enantiomeric peptides (a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E) composed D-amino acids. The diastereomeric peptides exhibited the best prokaryotic selectivity and effective protease stability, but no or less anti-endotoxic activity. In contrast, the enantiomeric peptides had not only prokaryotic selectivity and anti-endotoxic activity but also protease stability. Our results suggest that the hydrophobicity and α-helicity of the peptide is important for anti-endotoxic activity. In particular, the enantiomeric peptides showed potent anti-endotoxic and LPS-neutralizing activities comparable to that of LL-37. Taken together, both a4-W1-E and a4-W2-E holds promise as a template for the development of peptide antibiotics for the treatment of endotoxic shock and sepsis.

  6. Core–shell magnetic nanoparticles display synergistic antibacterial effects against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus when combined with cathelicidin LL-37 or selected ceragenins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Piktel, Ewelina; Wilczewska, Agnieszka Z; Markiewicz, Karolina H; Durnaś, Bonita; Wątek, Marzena; Puszkarz, Irena; Wróblewska, Marta; Niklińska, Wiesława; Savage, Paul B; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Core–shell magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are promising candidates in the development of new treatment methods against infections, including those caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, the bactericidal activity of human antibacterial peptide cathelicidin LL-37, synthetic ceragenins CSA-13 and CSA-131, and classical antibiotics vancomycin and colistin, against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Xen 30 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5, was assessed alone and in combination with core–shell MNPs. Fractional inhibitory concentration index and fractional bactericidal concentration index were determined by microdilution methods. The potential of combined therapy using nanomaterials and selected antibiotics was confirmed using chemiluminescence measurements. Additionally, the ability of tested agents to prevent bacterial biofilm formation was evaluated using crystal violet staining. In most conditions, synergistic or additive effects were observed when combinations of core–shell MNPs with ceragenins or classical antibiotics were used. Our study revealed that a mixture of membrane-active agents such as LL-37 peptide or ceragenin CSA-13 with MNPs potentialized their antibacterial properties and might be considered as a method of delaying and overcoming bacterial drug resistance. PMID:27799768

  7. Activity of Cathelicidin Peptides against Simkania negevensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Donati

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro activity of six cathelicidin peptides against the reference strain Z of Simkania negevensis was investigated. Five peptides—PG-1, Bac7, SMAP-29, BMAP-27, and BMAP-28—proved to be active at very low concentrations (1 to 0.1 μg/mL, while LL-37 cathelicidin was ineffective even at a concentration of 100 μg/mL. In comparison to chlamydiae, S. negevensis proved to be more susceptible to the antimicrobial peptides tested.

  8. Skin Electroporation of a Plasmid Encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 Host Defense Peptide Promotes Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Lam, Martin C; Jacobsen, Frank; Porporato, Paolo E; Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Becerikli, Mustafa; Stricker, Ingo; Hancock, Robert EW; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Sonveaux, Pierre; Préat, Véronique; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides, in particular LL-37, are emerging as potential therapeutics for promoting wound healing and inhibiting bacterial growth. However, effective delivery of the LL-37 peptide remains limiting. We hypothesized that skin-targeted electroporation of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 would promote the healing of wounds. The plasmid was efficiently delivered to full-thickness skin wounds by electroporation and it induced expression of LL-37 in the epithelium. It significantly acce...

  9. Cathelicidin LL-37在创伤修复中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郁玲玲; 顾建英

    2010-01-01

    @@ 人体皮肤的表皮层和真皮层是抵御外来病原微生物侵入的重要屏障之一.外伤会破坏皮肤组织的完整性致使病原体侵入,增加人体感染的概率,甚至加大危重患者的死亡率.通常外伤皮肤邻近组织的再生、重建等可使创伤处自我修复.创伤的修复过程是由一系列细胞和分子共同参与和调节的病理生理过程,如促进上皮细胞再生和血管形成的细胞因子可促进创伤修复,但若创伤处被感染则会延迟修复.Carretero等[1] 研究发现,hCAP18/LL-37(以下简称为LL-37)在皮肤创伤的修复过程中起着重要作用.

  10. Expressions of Antimicrobial Peptides LL-37, Human Beta Defensin-2 and-3 in the Lesions of Cutaneous Tuberculosis and Tuberculids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhao; Zhang-Lei Mu; Xi-Wan Liu; Xiao-Jing Liu; Jun Jia; Lin Cai; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Antimicrobial peptides,including cathelicidin LL-37,human beta defensin (HBD)-2,and HBD-3,are important elements of the innate immune response and involved in modulation of the adaptive immunity,and they also play an important role in cutaneous defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.Methods:The fresh skin tissues and paraffin-embedded biopsy samples from three cutaneous tuberculosis,two tuberculids,and ten healthy individuals were collected.The expressions of LL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 mRNA in the lesions of three cutaneous tuberculosis and two tuberculids were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction;the protein expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting methods.Results:The expressions of LL-37 mRNA and protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.The expression of HBD-2 mRNA had an increasing trend in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids compared with that of normal skin;however,the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis had a decreasing trend compared with that of normal skin,and the expression of HBD-2 protein in the lesions of tuberculids was similar to that of normal skin.The expressions of HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids were similar to that of normal skin.Conclusions:Our study indicated that the expression of HBD-2 and HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis may be not consistent with that oftuberculids.However,an inherent limitation of the present study was that the sample size was small,and the roles and regulation mechanisms ofLL-37,HBD-2,and HBD-3 in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids need to be further investigated.

  11. Cathelicidins: peptides with antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, anticancer and procancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jack Ho; Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-09-01

    The family of peptides designated as cathelicidins was identified over a decade ago. Cathelicidins have since gained increasing recognition, both as endogenous antibiotics and as effector molecules of the innate immune system. The human cathelicidin LL-37 is widely expressed in human tissues and plays diverse biological roles. It contributes substantially to host defense and impacts multiple aspects of immunity. In view of the escalating importance of cathelicidins, the activities of LL-37 with an emphasis on antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, anticancer and procancer effects are discussed in this review article.

  12. LL37 peptide@silver nanoparticles: combining the best of the two worlds for skin infection control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoni, Mariana; de Alwis Weerasekera, Hasitha; Simpson, Madeline J.; Phopase, Jaywant; Mah, Thien-Fah; Griffith, May; Alarcon, Emilio I.; Scaiano, Juan C.

    2014-05-01

    Capping silver nanoparticles with LL37 peptide eradicates the antiproliferative effect of silver on primary skin cells, but retains the bactericidal properties of silver nanoparticles with activities comparable to silver nitrate or silver sulfadiazine. In addition, LL37 capped silver nanoparticles have anti-biofilm formation activity.Capping silver nanoparticles with LL37 peptide eradicates the antiproliferative effect of silver on primary skin cells, but retains the bactericidal properties of silver nanoparticles with activities comparable to silver nitrate or silver sulfadiazine. In addition, LL37 capped silver nanoparticles have anti-biofilm formation activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Changes on AgNP-SPB absorption; changes on AgNP-SPB as A/A0 measured in LB or DMEM media; number of survival colonies in the presence of LL37; human skin fibroblasts cell toxicity in the presence of different silver sources measured using MTS assay; effect of LL37@AgNP on the proliferation profile of human skin fibroblasts; effect of AgSD and AgNO3 on the proliferation profile of human skin fibroblasts in the presence of LL37 peptide; representative flow cytometry profiles for human skin fibroblasts stained with Alexa Fluor®488 annexin V/Dead cell apoptosis kit. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01284d

  13. Endotoxin, capsule, and bacterial attachment contribute to Neisseria meningitidis resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allison; Geörg, Miriam; Maudsdotter, Lisa; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2009-06-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have evolved numerous mechanisms to evade the human immune system and have developed widespread resistance to traditional antibiotics. We studied the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and present evidence of novel mechanisms of resistance to the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37. We found that bacteria attached to host epithelial cells are resistant to 10 microM LL-37 whereas bacteria in solution or attached to plastic are killed, indicating that the cell microenvironment protects bacteria. The bacterial endotoxin lipooligosaccharide and the polysaccharide capsule contribute to LL-37 resistance, probably by preventing LL-37 from reaching the bacterial membrane, as more LL-37 reaches the bacterial membrane on both lipooligosaccharide-deficient and capsule-deficient mutants whereas both mutants are also more susceptible to LL-37 killing than the wild-type strain. N. meningitidis bacteria respond to sublethal doses of LL-37 and upregulate two of their capsule genes, siaC and siaD, which further results in upregulation of capsule biosynthesis.

  14. Plasma Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 Level Is Inversely Associated with HDL Cholesterol Level in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Meguro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Relation between atherosclerosis and innate immunity has attracted attention. As the antimicrobial peptide, LL-37, could have an important role in atherosclerosis, we supposed that there could be a meaningful association of plasma LL-37 level with risk factors for cardiovascular disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods. We evaluated plasma LL-37 level and other clinical markers in Japanese subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (n=133, 115 men and 18 women; age 64.7±11.5 years; HbA1c 8.1±1.6%. Plasma level of LL-37 was measured by ELISA. Results. Mean plasma LL-37 level was 71.2±22.3 ng/mL. Plasma LL-37 level showed significant correlations with HDL cholesterol (r=−0.450, P<0.01, triglyceride (r=0.445, P<0.01, and high sensitive C-reactive protein (r=0.316, P<0.01 but no significant correlation with age, body mass index, HbA1c, estimated glomerular filtration rate, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, or vitamin D binding protein. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant correlations of plasma LL-37 level with HDL cholesterol (β=−0.411, P<0.01 and high sensitive C-reactive protein (β=0.193, P<0.05. Conclusion. Plasma LL-37 level was positively correlated with inflammatory markers and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Blower

    Full Text Available Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2 and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3 were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis.

  16. Snake Cathelicidin NA-CATH and Smaller Helical Antimicrobial Peptides Are Effective against Burkholderia thailandensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Ryan J; Barksdale, Stephanie M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis is a Gram-negative soil bacterium used as a model organism for B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis and an organism classified category B priority pathogen and a Tier 1 select agent for its potential use as a biological weapon. Burkholderia species are reportedly "highly resistant" to antimicrobial agents, including cyclic peptide antibiotics, due to multiple resistance systems, a hypothesis we decided to test using antimicrobial (host defense) peptides. In this study, a number of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) were tested in vitro against B. thailandensis for both antimicrobial activity and inhibition of biofilm formation. Here, we report that the Chinese cobra (Naja atra) cathelicidin NA-CATH was significantly antimicrobial against B. thailandensis. Additional cathelicidins, including the human cathelicidin LL-37, a sheep cathelicidin SMAP-29, and some smaller ATRA peptide derivatives of NA-CATH were also effective. The D-enantiomer of one small peptide (ATRA-1A) was found to be antimicrobial as well, with EC50 in the range of the L-enantiomer. Our results also demonstrate that human alpha-defensins (HNP-1 & -2) and a short beta-defensin-derived peptide (Peptide 4 of hBD-3) were not bactericidal against B. thailandensis. We also found that the cathelicidin peptides, including LL-37, NA-CATH, and SMAP-29, possessed significant ability to prevent biofilm formation of B. thailandensis. Additionally, we show that LL-37 and its D-enantiomer D-LL-37 can disperse pre-formed biofilms. These results demonstrate that although B. thailandensis is highly resistant to many antibiotics, cyclic peptide antibiotics such as polymyxin B, and defensing peptides, some antimicrobial peptides including the elapid snake cathelicidin NA-CATH exert significant antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity towards B. thailandensis. PMID:26196513

  17. LL-37 complexation with glycosaminoglycans in cystic fibrosis lungs inhibits antimicrobial activity, which can be restored by hypertonic saline.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergsson, Gudmundur

    2009-07-01

    There is an abundance of antimicrobial peptides in cystic fibrosis (CF) lungs. Despite this, individuals with CF are susceptible to microbial colonization and infection. In this study, we investigated the antimicrobial response within the CF lung, focusing on the human cathelicidin LL-37. We demonstrate the presence of the LL-37 precursor, human cathelicidin precursor protein designated 18-kDa cationic antimicrobial protein, in the CF lung along with evidence that it is processed to active LL-37 by proteinase-3. We demonstrate that despite supranormal levels of LL-37, the lung fluid from CF patients exhibits no demonstrable antimicrobial activity. Furthermore Pseudomonas killing by physiological concentrations of exogenous LL-37 is inhibited by CF bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid due to proteolytic degradation of LL-37 by neutrophil elastase and cathepsin D. The endogenous LL-37 in CF BAL fluid is protected from this proteolysis by interactions with glycosaminoglycans, but while this protects LL-37 from proteolysis it results in inactivation of LL-37 antimicrobial activity. By digesting glycosaminoglycans in CF BAL fluid, endogenous LL-37 is liberated and the antimicrobial properties of CF BAL fluid restored. High sodium concentrations also liberate LL-37 in CF BAL fluid in vitro. This is also seen in vivo in CF sputum where LL-37 is complexed to glycosaminoglycans but is liberated following nebulized hypertonic saline resulting in increased antimicrobial effect. These data suggest glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 complexes to be potential therapeutic targets. Factors that disrupt glycosaminoglycan-LL-37 aggregates promote the antimicrobial effects of LL-37 with the caveat that concomitant administration of antiproteases may be needed to protect the now liberated LL-37 from proteolytic cleavage.

  18. 人cathelicidin抗菌肽LL-37在宿主防御系统中的作用%Function of LL-37 in the host defense system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李方舟; 胡海峰

    2011-01-01

    Cathelicidin is a family of antimicrobial peptides found in mammalian and produced by epithelial cells and LL-37 is the only cathelicidin discoverd in human. As a defensin, LL-37 plays an important role in the human innate immunity. Besides its broad spectrum antibacterial activity, LL-37 possesses additional biological functions including immunomodulatory functions, induction of angiogenesis, neutralination of the lipopolysaccharide, wound repair mechanisms and induction of cells apoptosis. This review describes the expression and distribution of LL-37 as well as its biological feature and mechanism.%存在于哺乳动物中的一类抗菌肽cathelicidin由上皮细胞产生,LL-37为目前在人体内仅发现的一种cathelicidin.同防御素一样,LL-37为人免疫防御系统的重要组成部分,除了具有广谱抗菌活性外,还有免疫调节、诱导血管生成、抗内毒素、促进损伤修复、诱导细胞凋亡等生物学功能.本文综述LL-37的表达分布、生物学活性及其作用机制.

  19. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 along with peptidoglycan drive monocyte polarization toward CD14(high)CD16(+) subset and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis guttata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lei; Chen, Wei; Sun, Wen; Li, Ming; Zheng, Renshan; Qian, Qing; Lv, Lianzheng

    2015-01-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 peptide is overexpressed in psoriasis and has been demonstrated to be a multifunctional modulator of innate immune response elements, including monocytes. Monocytes, categorized into three populations based on the cell surface expression of CD14 and CD16, are activated in psoriasis guttate and are commonly triggered by streptococcal infections. Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a major cell-wall component of streptococcus, and an increasing number of PGN-containing cells have been detected in psoriasis. Since there are independent reports of both PGN and LL-37 influencing monocytes, we tried to evaluate the effect of human LL-37 on PGN-induced monocyte activity and differentiation and subsequently studied their correlation with the pathogenesis of psoriasis guttate. The results revealed that monocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals resulted in their polarization toward the CD14(high)CD16(+) subset, when cultured with PGN in the presence of the LL-37 peptide. This peptide further induced PGN-driven differentiated monocytes into immature dendritic cells (iDC), as evident by the increased expression of CD1a, CD86, and HLA-DR markers, resulting in the induction of T cell proliferation and Th17 polarization. Furthermore, our data suggested that psoriasis guttata patients have significantly higher percentages of CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes as well as circulating levels of LL-37, soluble form of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) levels, and anti-streptolysin O (ASO) levels, as compared to healthy controls. Psoriasis guttata patients also showed a positive correlation between the percentage of CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes and the serum levels of sTREM-1 as well as the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores. Therefore, we concluded that LL-37 in synergy with PGN directs monocyte polarization and differentiation into a proinflammatory phenotype, which might play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  20. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 promotes antigen-specific immune responses in mice by enhancing Th17-skewed mucosal and systemic immunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Yang, In-Young; Kim, Ju; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2015-05-01

    The human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 is known to have chemotactic and modulatory activities on various cells including monocytes, T cells, and epithelial cells. Given that LL-37 enhances chemotactic attraction and modulates the activity of DCs, it is conceivable that it might play a role as an immune adjuvant by skewing the immune environment toward immunostimulatory conditions. In this study, we characterized the mucosal adjuvant activity of LL-37 using model and pathogenic Ags. When LL-37-conjugated Ag was administered orally to mice, a tolerogenic Peyer's patch environment was altered to cell populations containing IL-6-secreting CD11c(+), CD11c(+) CD70(+), and Th17 cells capable of evoking a subsequent LL-37-conjugated Ag-specific immune response in both systemic and mucosal immune compartments. In addition, we showed presentation of formyl peptide receptor, an LL-37 receptor, on M cells, which may aid the initiation of an LL-37-mediated enhanced immune response through targeting and transcytosis of the conjugated Ag. Based on our findings, we conclude that LL-37 has potential as an oral mucosal adjuvant, not only by enhancing the delivery of LL-37-conjugated Ag to M cells, but also by triggering T-cell-mediated Ag-specific immune responses through modulation of the mucosal immune environment.

  1. The role of salivary histatin and the human cathelicidin LL-37 in wound healing and innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudhoff, M.J.; Blaauboer, M.E.; Nazmi, K.; Scheres, N.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional in innate immunity and wound repair of multicellular organisms. We were the first to discover that histatins, a family of salivary antimicrobial peptides, enhance epithelial cell migration, suggesting a role in oral wound healing. It is unknown whether hist

  2. The cationic peptide LL-37 binds Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) with a low dissociation rate and promotes phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianwei; Bajic, Goran; Andersen, Gregers R; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    As a broad-spectrum anti-microbial peptide, LL-37 plays an important role in the innate immune system. A series of previous reports implicates LL-37 as an activator of various cell surface receptor-mediated functions, including chemotaxis in integrin CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-expressing cells. However, evidence is scarce concerning the direct binding of LL-37 to these receptors and investigations on the associated binding kinetics is lacking. Mac-1, a member of the β2 integrin family, is mainly expressed in myeloid leukocytes. Its critical functions include phagocytosis of complement-opsonized pathogens. Here, we report on interactions of LL-37 and its fragment FK-13 with the ligand-binding domain of Mac-1, the α-chain I domain. LL-37 bound the I-domain with an affinity comparable to the complement fragment C3d, one of the strongest known ligands for Mac-1. In cell adhesion assays both LL-37 and FK-13 supported binding by Mac-1 expressing cells, however, with LL-37-coupled surfaces supporting stronger cell adhesion than FK-13. Likewise, in phagocytosis assays with primary human monocytes both LL-37 and FK-13 enhanced uptake of particles coupled with these ligands but with a tendency towards a stronger uptake by LL-37.

  3. Phenylbutyrate induces LL-37-dependent autophagy and intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Rokeya Sultana; Rao Muvva, S S V Jagadeeswara; Wan, Min; Raqib, Rubhana; Bergman, Peter; Brighenti, Susanna; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    LL-37 is a human antimicrobial peptide (AMP) of the cathelicidin family with multiple activities including a mediator of vitamin D-induced autophagy in human macrophages, resulting in intracellular killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In a previous trial in healthy volunteers, we have shown that LL-37 expression and subsequent Mtb-killing can be further enhanced by 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA), also an inducer of LL-37 expression. Here, we explore a potential mechanism(s) behind PBA and LL-37-induced autophagy and intracellular killing of Mtb. Mtb infection of macrophages downregulated the expression of both the CAMP transcript and LL-37 peptide as well as certain autophagy-related genes (BECN1 and ATG5) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, activation of LC3-II in primary macrophages and THP-1 cells was not detected. PBA and the active form of vitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3), separately or particularly in combination, were able to overcome Mtb-induced suppression of LL-37 expression. Notably, reactivation of autophagy occurred by stimulation of macrophages with PBA and promoted colocalization of LL-37 and LC3-II in autophagosomes. Importantly, PBA treatment failed to induce autophagy in Mtb-infected THP-1 cells, when the expression of LL-37 was silenced. However, PBA-induced autophagy was restored when the LL-37 knockdown cells were supplemented with synthetic LL-37. Interestingly, we have found that LL-37-induced autophagy was mediated via P2RX7 receptor followed by enhanced cytosolic free Ca(2+), and activation of AMPK and PtdIns3K pathways. Altogether, these results suggest a novel activity for PBA as an inducer of autophagy, which is LL-37-dependent and promotes intracellular killing of Mtb in human macrophages.

  4. Physiologically-Relevant Modes of Membrane Interactions by the Human Antimicrobial Peptide, LL-37, Revealed by SFG Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Soblosky, Lauren; Nguyen, Khoi; Geng, Junqing; Yu, Xinglong; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2013-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) could become the next generation antibiotic compounds which can overcome bacterial resistance by disrupting cell membranes and it is essential to determine the factors underlying its mechanism of action. Although high-resolution NMR and other biological studies have provided valuable insights, it has been a major challenge to follow the AMP-membrane interactions at physiologically-relevant low peptide concentrations. In this study, we demonstrate a novel approach to overcome this major limitation by performing Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic experiments on lipid bilayers containing an AMP, LL-37. Our results demonstrate the power of SFG to study non-linear helical peptides and also infer that lipid-peptide interaction and the peptide orientation depend on the lipid membrane composition. The observed SFG signal changes capture the aggregating process of LL-37 on membrane. In addition, our SFG results on cholesterol-containing lipid bilayers indicate the inhibition effect of cholesterol on peptide-induced membrane permeation process.

  5. Identification of peptides derived from the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 active against biofilms formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a library of truncated fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Nagant; B. Pitts; K. Nazmi; M. Vandenbranden; J.G. Bolscher; P.S. Stewart; J-P. Dehaye

    2012-01-01

    Persistent Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and are linked to the formation of a biofilm. The development of new biofilm inhibition strategies is thus a major challenge. LL-37 is the only human antimicrobial peptide deriv

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide LL37 and MAVS Signaling Drive Interferon-β Production by Epidermal Keratinocytes during Skin Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Sen, George L; Ward, Nicole L; Johnston, Andrew; Chun, Kimberly; Chen, Yifang; Adase, Christopher; Sanford, James A; Gao, Nina; Chensee, Melanie; Sato, Emi; Fritz, Yi; Baliwag, Jaymie; Williams, Michael R; Hata, Tissa; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-07-19

    Type 1 interferons (IFNs) promote inflammation in the skin but the mechanisms responsible for inducing these cytokines are not well understood. We found that IFN-β was abundantly produced by epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) in psoriasis and during wound repair. KC IFN-β production depended on stimulation of mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS) by the antimicrobial peptide LL37 and double stranded-RNA released from necrotic cells. MAVS activated downstream TBK1 (TANK-Binding Kinase 1)-AKT (AKT serine/threonine kinase 1)-IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3) signaling cascade leading to IFN-β production and then promoted maturation of dendritic cells. In mice, the production of epidermal IFN-β by LL37 required MAVS, and human wounded and/or psoriatic skin showed activation of MAVS-associated IRF3 and induction of MAVS and IFN-β gene signatures. These findings show that KCs are an important source of IFN-β and MAVS is critical to this function, and demonstrates how the epidermis triggers unwanted skin inflammation under disease conditions. PMID:27438769

  7. Regulation of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in primary immune cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowry, Malcolm B; Guo, Chunxiao; Borregaard, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Production of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene (hCAP18/LL-37), is regulated by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and is critical in the killing of pathogens by innate immune cells. In addition, secreted LL-37 binds extracellular receptors and modulates the recruitment and activity...... of both innate and adaptive immune cells. Evidence suggests that during infections activated immune cells locally produce increased levels of 1,25D3 thus increasing production of hCAP18/LL-37. The relative expression levels of hCAP18/LL-37 among different immune cell types are not well characterized...... type and lineage. Furthermore, potent induction of hCAP18 by 1,25D3 in macrophages and dendritic cells may modulate functions of both innate and adaptive immune cells at sites of infection....

  8. 抗菌肽LL37在银屑病发病机制中的研究现状%Antimicrobial peptides LL37 in the pathogenesis of psoriasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张翠; 刘彦群; 魏志平

    2012-01-01

    银屑病是一种常见的慢性炎症性皮肤病,与自身反应性T细胞的局部活化及表皮角质形成细胞的异常增殖分化密切相关.银屑病患者皮损中含有大量免疫活性物质,包括多种细胞因子、趋化因子以及抗菌肽LL37等.正常情况下,细胞凋亡产生的少量DNA/RNA可被自身降解,并不引起炎症反应,但角质形成细胞的过度增殖活化,可在皮损局部产生大量自体DNA及RNA.LL37可以破坏机体对自身DNA/RNA的天然免疫耐受,并与之结合形成免疫复合物.该复合物运送至浆细胞样树突细胞早期内体单元中,在Toll样受体的介导下,浆细胞样树突细胞产生大量干扰素-α,而干扰素-α是银屑病中的关键性炎症因子,可以导致银屑病的发病与持续.%Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory disease of the skin,which is closely associated with the local activation of autoimmune T cells followed by an abnormal differentiation/proliferation of epidermal keratinocytes.There are lots of immunologically active materials in psoriatic lesions,including various cytokines,chemotactic factors,antimicrobial peptides LL37,and so on.Normally,the quantity of DNA/RNA produced by cell apoptosis is small,which can be broken down by the cells themselves,and can not induce inflammatory reaction.However,abnormally activated and highly proliferative keratinocytes can produce a large quantity of self-DNA/RNA in local lesions.LL37 can break the innate tolerance of organisms to selfDNA/RNA,by binding to the DNA/RNA to form aggregated and condensed structures (immune complexes) which are delivered to early endocytic compartments in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs).Under stimulation of Tolllike receptors,pDCs can produce abundant interferon α,a key inflammatory factor which can cause the occurrence and development of psoriasis.

  9. Expression und Regulation des antimikrobiellen Cathelicidin-Peptids LL-37 in humanen Kolonepithelzellen, Monozyten und PBMC

    OpenAIRE

    Iffland, Konrad

    2005-01-01

    Butyrat ist die wichtigste kurzkettige Fettsäure im Kolon und dient der normalen Schleimhaut als trophischer Faktor. Butyrat hat paradoxe Effekte auf Epithelzellen des Kolons: Hauptenergieträger und Wachstumsstimulator normaler Mukosa einerseits, Proliferationshemmer und Apoptoseinduktor kolorektaler Karzinomzellen in vitro andererseits. Butyrat kann zudem die Immunfunktionen der Schleimhaut modulieren. Die einzellige Schicht des Dickdarmepithels ist eine aktive Barriere gegen die intestinale...

  10. Ciprofloxacin Affects Host Cells by Suppressing Expression of the Endogenous Antimicrobial Peptides Cathelicidins and Beta-Defensin-3 in Colon Epithelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protim Sarker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics exert several effects on host cells including regulation of immune components. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, e.g., cathelicidins and defensins display multiple functions in innate immunity. In colonic mucosa, cathelicidins are induced by butyrate, a bacterial fermentation product. Here, we investigated the effect of antibiotics on butyrate-induced expression of cathelicidins and beta-defensins in colon epithelial cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ciprofloxacin and clindamycin reduce butyrate-induced transcription of the human cathelicidin LL-37 in the colonic epithelial cell line HT-29. Suppression of LL-37 peptide/protein by ciprofloxacin was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that ciprofloxacin suppresses the rabbit cathelicidin CAP-18 in rectal epithelia of healthy and butyrate-treated Shigella-infected rabbits. Ciprofloxacin also down-regulated butyrate-induced transcription of the human beta-defensin-3 in HT-29 cells. Microarray analysis of HT-29 cells revealed upregulation by butyrate with subsequent down-regulation by ciprofloxacin of additional genes encoding immune factors. Dephosphorylation of histone H3, an epigenetic event provided a possible mechanism of the suppressive effect of ciprofloxacin. Furthermore, LL-37 peptide inhibited Clostridium difficile growth in vitro. In conclusion, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin exert immunomodulatory function by down-regulating AMPs and other immune components in colonic epithelial cells. Suppression of AMPs may contribute to the overgrowth of C. difficile, causing antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

  11. Expressions of Antimicrobial Peptides LL-37, Human Beta Defensin-2 and -3 in the Lesions of Cutaneous Tuberculosis and Tuberculids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study indicated that the expression of HBD-2 and HBD-3 mRNA and protein in lesions of cutaneous tuberculosis may be not consistent with that of tuberculids. However, an inherent limitation of the present study was that the sample size was small, and the roles and regulation mechanisms of LL-37, HBD-2, and HBD-3 in cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculids need to be further investigated.

  12. Biological characteristics of a human specifically targeted antimicrobial peptide C16LL-37 againstStreptococcus mutans%针对变异链球菌的人源特异性靶向抗菌肽C16LL-37的生物学特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    车春晓; 姜科宇; 马媛媛; 曾飒; 周建业; 李志强; 何祥一

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the biological characteristics of a human specifically targeted antimicrobial peptide C16LL-37 against Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans). Methods In this study, an antimicrobial peptide LL-37, a peptide derived from CSPC16 (S. mutans competence stimulating peptide), and recombinant peptide C16LL-37 were synthesized by Fmoc-chemistry-based strategy. The selectivity and antibacterial activity of C16LL-37 were identified by the colony counting method on microbial culture plates. After treatment of C16LL-37 at 32 μmol·L−1, the morphological changes in S. mutans were observed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate the hemolytic activity and antibacterial activity of C16LL-37 under different conditions. Results 1) The minimum inhibitory concentration of C16LL-37 was 16 μmol·L−1, and the minimum bactericidal concentration was 64 μmol·L−1. 2) The survival rate of S. mutans was 3.46% after C16LL-37 treatment at 64 μmol·L−1 for 30 min, whereas it was 0% at 64 μmol·L−1 for 60 min. The survival rates of four other kinds of bacteria were more than 60% at any time (P0.05). Conclusion C16LL-37 exhibited obvious specificity for S. mutans, strong antibacterial activity, low toxicity, and high stability. Thus, C16LL-37 has good potential in caries research and clinical application.%目的:研究针对变异链球菌(S. mutans)的人源特异性靶向抗菌肽C16LL-37的生物学特性。方法通过标准固相合成技术(Fmoc保护法)合成人源抗菌肽LL-37、S. mutans感受态刺激肽(CSP)C端16个氨基酸组成的多肽CSPC16及二者的重组多肽C16LL-37;以LL-37、CSPC16为对照组,采用平板菌落计数法检测C16LL-37对S. mutans、黏性放线菌、大肠埃希菌、嗜酸乳杆菌、金黄色葡萄球菌的抗菌活性及其对S. mutans的靶向性。通过扫描电子显微镜(SEM)观察,浓度为32

  13. Vipericidins: a novel family of cathelicidin-related peptides from the venom gland of South American pit vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, C B; de La Torre, B G; Pérez-Peinado, C; Barron, A E; Andreu, D; Rádis-Baptista, G

    2014-11-01

    Cathelicidins are phylogenetically ancient, pleiotropic host defense peptides-also called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs)-expressed in numerous life forms for innate immunity. Since even the jawless hagfish expresses cathelicidins, these genetically encoded host defense peptides are at least 400 million years old. More recently, cathelicidins with varying antipathogenic activities and cytotoxicities were discovered in the venoms of poisonous snakes; for these creatures, cathelicidins may also serve as weapons against prey and predators, as well as for innate immunity. We report herein the expression of orthologous cathelicidin genes in the venoms of four different South American pit vipers (Bothrops atrox, Bothrops lutzi, Crotalus durissus terrificus, and Lachesis muta rhombeata)-distant relatives of Asian cobras and kraits, previously shown to express cathelicidins-and an elapid, Pseudonaja textilis. We identified six novel, genetically encoded peptides: four from pit vipers, collectively named vipericidins, and two from the elapid. These new venom-derived cathelicidins exhibited potent killing activity against a number of bacterial strains (S. pyogenes, A. baumannii, E. faecalis, S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa), mostly with relatively less potent hemolysis, indicating their possible usefulness as lead structures for the development of new anti-infective agents. It is worth noting that these South American snake venom peptides are comparable in cytotoxicity (e.g., hemolysis) to human cathelicidin LL-37, and much lower than other membrane-active peptides such as mastoparan 7 and melittin from bee venom. Overall, the excellent bactericidal profile of vipericidins suggests they are a promising template for the development of broad-spectrum peptide antibiotics. PMID:25100358

  14. Vipericidins: a novel family of cathelicidin-related peptides from the venom gland of South American pit vipers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcao, C B; de La Torre, B G; Pérez-Peinado, C; Barron, A E; Andreu, D; Rádis-Baptista, G

    2014-11-01

    Cathelicidins are phylogenetically ancient, pleiotropic host defense peptides-also called antimicrobial peptides (AMPs)-expressed in numerous life forms for innate immunity. Since even the jawless hagfish expresses cathelicidins, these genetically encoded host defense peptides are at least 400 million years old. More recently, cathelicidins with varying antipathogenic activities and cytotoxicities were discovered in the venoms of poisonous snakes; for these creatures, cathelicidins may also serve as weapons against prey and predators, as well as for innate immunity. We report herein the expression of orthologous cathelicidin genes in the venoms of four different South American pit vipers (Bothrops atrox, Bothrops lutzi, Crotalus durissus terrificus, and Lachesis muta rhombeata)-distant relatives of Asian cobras and kraits, previously shown to express cathelicidins-and an elapid, Pseudonaja textilis. We identified six novel, genetically encoded peptides: four from pit vipers, collectively named vipericidins, and two from the elapid. These new venom-derived cathelicidins exhibited potent killing activity against a number of bacterial strains (S. pyogenes, A. baumannii, E. faecalis, S. aureus, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa), mostly with relatively less potent hemolysis, indicating their possible usefulness as lead structures for the development of new anti-infective agents. It is worth noting that these South American snake venom peptides are comparable in cytotoxicity (e.g., hemolysis) to human cathelicidin LL-37, and much lower than other membrane-active peptides such as mastoparan 7 and melittin from bee venom. Overall, the excellent bactericidal profile of vipericidins suggests they are a promising template for the development of broad-spectrum peptide antibiotics.

  15. Snake cathelicidin from Bungarus fasciatus is a potent peptide antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial peptides acting as multifunctional effector molecules of innate immunity, which are firstly found in mammalians. Recently, several cathelicidins have also been found from chickens and fishes. No cathelicidins from other non-mammalian vertebrates have been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, a cathelicidin-like antimicrobial peptide named cathelicidin-BF has been purified from the snake venoms of Bungarus fasciatus and its cDNA sequence was cloned from the cDNA library, which confirm the presence of cathelicidin in reptiles. As other cathelicidins, the precursor of cathelicidin-BF has cathelin-like domain at the N terminus and carry the mature cathelicidin-BF at the C terminus, but it has an atypical acidic fragment insertion between the cathelin-like domain and the C-terminus. The acidic fragment is similar to acidic domains of amphibian antimicrobial precursors. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the snake cathelicidin had the nearest evolution relationship with platypus cathelicidin. The secondary structure of cathelicidin-BF investigated by CD and NMR spectroscopy in the presence of the helicogenic solvent TFE is an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation as many other cathelicidins. The antimicrobial activities of cathelicidin BF against forty strains of microorganisms were tested. Cathelicidin-BF efficiently killed bacteria and some fungal species including clinically isolated drug-resistance microorganisms. It was especially active against Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, it could exert antimicrobial activity against some saprophytic fungus. No hemolytic and cytotoxic activity was observed at the dose of up to 400 microg/ml. Cathelicidin-BF could exist stably in the mice plasma for at least 2.5 hours. CONCLUSION: Discovery of snake cathelicidin with atypical structural and functional characterization offers new insights on the evolution of cathelicidins. Potent, broad

  16. Natural and synthetic cathelicidin peptides with anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activity against Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Hoek Monique L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic, infected wounds typically contain multiple genera of bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus, many of which are strong biofilm formers. Bacterial biofilms are thought to be a direct impediment to wound healing. New therapies that focus on a biofilm approach may improve the recovery and healing rate for infected wounds. In this study, cathelicidins and related short, synthetic peptides were tested for their anti-microbial effectiveness as well as their ability to inhibit the ability of S. aureus to form biofilms. Results The helical human cathelicidin LL-37 was tested against S. aureus, and was found to exhibit effective anti-microbial, anti-attachment as well as anti-biofilm activity at concentrations in the low μg/ml range. The effect of peptide chirality and associated protease-resistance was explored through the use of an all-D amino acid peptide, D-LL-37, and in turn compared to scrambled LL-37. Helical cathelicidins have been identified in other animals such as the Chinese cobra, Naja atra (NA-CATH. We previously identified an 11-residue imperfectly repeated pattern (ATRA motif within the sequence of NA-CATH. A series of short peptides (ATRA-1, -2, -1A, as well as a synthetic peptide, NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1, were designed to explore the significance of the conserved residues within the ATRA motif for anti-microbial activity. The CD spectrum of NA-CATH and NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 revealed the structural properties of these peptides and suggested that helicity may factor into their anti-microbial and anti-biofilm activities. Conclusions The NA-CATH:ATRA1-ATRA1 peptide inhibits the production of biofilm by S. aureus in the presence of salt, exhibiting anti-biofilm activity at lower peptide concentrations than NA-CATH, LL-37 and D-LL-37; and demonstrates low cytoxicity against host cells but does not affect bacterial attachment. The peptides utilized in this anti-biofilm approach may provide templates for a new group of

  17. Cathelicidin host defence peptide augments clearance of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by its influence on neutrophil function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula E Beaumont

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are multifunctional cationic host-defence peptides (CHDP; also known as antimicrobial peptides and an important component of innate host defence against infection. In addition to microbicidal potential, these peptides have properties with the capacity to modulate inflammation and immunity. However, the extent to which such properties play a significant role during infection in vivo has remained unclear. A murine model of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection was utilised, demonstrating cathelicidin-mediated enhancement of bacterial clearance in vivo. The delivery of exogenous synthetic human cathelicidin LL-37 was found to enhance a protective pro-inflammatory response to infection, effectively promoting bacterial clearance from the lung in the absence of direct microbicidal activity, with an enhanced early neutrophil response that required both infection and peptide exposure and was independent of native cathelicidin production. Furthermore, although cathelicidin-deficient mice had an intact early cellular inflammatory response, later phase neutrophil response to infection was absent in these animals, with significantly impaired clearance of P. aeruginosa. These findings demonstrate the importance of the modulatory properties of cathelicidins in pulmonary infection in vivo and highlight a key role for cathelicidins in the induction of protective pulmonary neutrophil responses, specific to the infectious milieu. In additional to their physiological roles, CHDP have been proposed as future antimicrobial therapeutics. Elucidating and utilising the modulatory properties of cathelicidins has the potential to inform the development of synthetic peptide analogues and novel therapeutic approaches based on enhancing innate host defence against infection with or without direct microbicidal targeting of pathogens.

  18. Human cathelicidin production by the cervix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Frew

    Full Text Available hCAP18/LL-37 is the sole human cathelicidin; a family of host defence peptides with key roles in innate host defence. hCAP18/LL-37 is expressed primarily by neutrophils and epithelial cells, but its production and function in the lower genital tract is largely uncharacterised. Despite the significant roles for cathelicidin in multiple organs and inflammatory processes, its impact on infections that could compromise fertility and pregnancy is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate cathelicidin production, regulation and function in the cervix. hCAP18/LL-37 was found to be present in cervicovaginal secretions collected from women in the first trimester of pregnancy and to be expressed at significantly higher levels in samples from women with alterations in vaginal bacterial flora characteristic of bacterial vaginosis. In endocervical epithelial cell lines, expression of the gene encoding hCAP18/LL-37 (CAMP was not affected by TLR agonists, but was found to be up-regulated by both 1, 25 hydroxyvitamin D3 and 25 hydroxyvitamin D3. However, no association was found between serum levels of vitamin D and hCAP18/LL-37 concentrations in cervicovaginal secretions (n = 116. Exposure to synthetic LL-37 had a pro-inflammatory effect on endocervical epithelial cell lines, increasing secretion of inflammatory cytokine IL-8. Together these data demonstrate inducible expression of hCAP18/LL-37 in the female lower reproductive tract in vivo and suggest the capacity for this peptide to modulate host defence to infection in this system. Further investigation will elucidate the effects of hCAP18/LL-37 on the physiology and pathophysiology of labour, and may lead to strategies for the prevention of infection-associated preterm birth.

  19. 抗菌肽LL-37的原核表达纯化及对假丝酵母菌的抑制作用%Prokaryotic expression and purification of antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the inhibiting effect against Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍彦; 王芳; 孙蓓; 尹利荣; 张萍萍; 张钰娟; 张步美

    2016-01-01

    peptide LL-37 on Candida albicans through its ability to promote the secretion of immune factors by vaginal epithelial cells. Methods (1) LL-37 prokaryotic expression vector pET-Duet/LL-37 was constructed and its expression was induced in Escherichia coli M15. The expressed LL-37 fusion protein was purified and identified by western blot. Antifungal activity of the purified protein was initially identified by Kirby-Bauer (K-B) method. (2) Purified LL-37 protein was added to human vaginal epithelial cells co-cultured with Candida, and inhibitory effect on Candida growth was determined by the glucose consumption method. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 10 (IL-10) concentration and IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio were measured by ELISA at different time points. Results (1) LL-37 fusion protein was purified to 96% purity at a concentration of 433.92 μg/ml, and was shown to possess anti-fungal activity confirmed by the K-B method. (2) A Candida-vaginal epithelial cells co-culture system was successfully constructed. LL-37 recombinant protein inhibited the growth of Candida with absorbance values significantly higher in the treatment group compared to the control group at all measured time points (12-hour:3.008±0.003 versus 2.967±0.003, 24-hour:2.941±0.003 versus 2.601±0.003, 48-hour:2.893 ± 0.004 versus 2.409 ± 0.003; all P<0.01). Furthermore, the rate of decrease was also much slower compared to the control group. In both control and experimental groups, IFN-γ and IL-10 secretion levels were observed to rise at first peaking at 24 hours and subsequently decrease. For each time period, IFN-γconcentration in the experimental group was significantly higher at 24 hours compared to the control group [(104.00 ± 1.07) versus (85.17 ± 0.28) pg/ml, P<0.01]. In contrast, IL-10 concentrations were significantly lower than the control group at all time points (P<0.01). IFN-γ/IL-10 ratio was also observed to be significantly higher than the control group at all measured time points (P

  20. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is a chemoattractant for eosinophils and neutrophils that acts via formyl-peptide receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjabringa, G.S.; Ninaber, D.K.; Drijfhout, J.W.; Rabe, K.F.; Hiemstra, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory lung diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are characterized by the presence of eosinophils and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms that mediate the influx of these cells are incompletely understood. Neutrophil products, including neutroph

  1. Vitamin D3 analog maxacalcitol (OCT) induces hCAP-18/LL-37 production in human oral epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Takamitsu; Nagaoka, Isao; Takada, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Maxacalcitol (22-oxacalcitriol: OCT) is a synthetic vitamin D3 analog with a limited calcemic effect. In this study, we investigated whether OCT increases the production of LL-37/CAP-18, a human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, in human gingival/oral epithelial cells. A human gingival epithelial cell line (Ca9-22) and human oral epithelial cell lines (HSC-2, HSC-3, and HSC-4) exhibited the enhanced expression of LL-37 mRNA upon stimulation with OCT as well as active metabolites of vitamins D3 and D2. Among the human epithelial cell lines, Ca9-22 exhibited the strongest response to these vitamin D-related compounds. OCT induced the higher production of CAP-18 (ng/mL order) until 6 days time-dependently in Ca9-22 cells in culture. The periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis was killed by treatment with the LL-37 peptide. These findings suggest that OCT induces the production of hCAP-18/LL-37 in a manner similar to that induced by the active metabolite of vitamin D3. PMID:27356607

  2. Carbamylated LL-37 as a modulator of the immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koro, Catalin; Hellvard, Annelie; Delaleu, Nicolas;

    2016-01-01

    Carbamylation of lysine residues and protein N-termini is an ubiquitous, non-enzymatic post-translational modification. Carbamylation at sites of inflammation is due to cyanate formation during the neutrophil oxidative burst and may target lysine residues within the antimicrobial peptide LL-37...... to investigate how this modification affects the bactericidal, cytotoxic and immunomodulatory function of the peptide. The results indicated that LL-37 undergoes rapid modification in the presence of physiological concentrations of cyanate, yielding a spectrum of diverse carbamylated peptides. Mass spectrometry...... analyses revealed that the N-terminal amino group of Leu-1 was highly reactive and was modified almost instantly by cyanate to generate the predominant form of the modified peptide, named LL-37(C1). This was followed by the sequential carbamylation of Lys-8 and Lys-12 to yield LL-37(C8), and Lys-15...

  3. Tissue expression and developmental regulation of chicken cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achanta Mallika

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathelicidins are a major family of antimicrobial peptides present in vertebrate animals with potent microbicidal and immunomodulatory activities. Four cathelicidins, namely fowlicidins 1 to 3 and cathelicidin B1, have been identified in chickens. As a first step to understand their role in early innate host defense of chickens, we examined the tissue and developmental expression patterns of all four cathelicidins. Real-time PCR revealed an abundant expression of four cathelicidins throughout the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts as well as in all primary and secondary immune organs of chickens. Fowlicidins 1 to 3 exhibited a similar tissue expression pattern with the highest expression in the bone marrow and lung, while cathelicidin B1 was synthesized most abundantly in the bursa of Fabricius. Additionally, a tissue-specific regulatory pattern was evident for all four cathelicidins during the first 28 days after hatching. The expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 showed an age-dependent increase both in the cecal tonsil and lung, whereas all four cathelicidins were peaked in the bursa on day 4 after hatching, with a gradual decline by day 28. An abrupt augmentation in the expression of fowlicidins 1 to 3 was also observed in the cecum on day 28, while the highest expression of cathelicidin B1 was seen in both the lung and cecal tonsil on day 14. Collectively, the presence of cathelicidins in a broad range of tissues and their largely enhanced expression during development are suggestive of their potential important role in early host defense and disease resistance of chickens.

  4. Cathelicidin-BF, a snake cathelicidin-derived antimicrobial peptide, could be an excellent therapeutic agent for acne vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Wang

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are a family of antimicrobial peptides acting as multifunctional effector molecules in innate immunity. Cathelicidin-BF has been purified from the snake venoms of Bungarus fasciatus and it is the first identified cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide in reptiles. In this study, cathelicidin-BF was found exerting strong antibacterial activities against Propionibacterium acnes. Its minimal inhibitory concentration against two strains of P. acnes was 4.7 µg/ml. Cathelicidin-BF also effectively killed other microorganisms including Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was possible pathogen for acne vulgaris. Cathelicidin-BF significantly inhibited pro-inflammatory factors secretion in human monocytic cells and P. acnes-induced O2.- production of human HaCaT keratinocyte cells. Observed by scanning electron microscopy, the surfaces of the treated pathogens underwent obvious morphological changes compared with the untreated controls, suggesting that this antimicrobial peptide exerts its action by disrupting membranes of microorganisms. The efficacy of cathelicidin-BF gel topical administering was evaluated in experimental mice skin colonization model. In vivo anti-inflammatory effects of cathelicidin-BF were confirmed by relieving P. acnes-induced mice ear swelling and granulomatous inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects combined with potent antimicrobial activities and O2.- production inhibition activities of cathelicidin-BF indicate its potential as a novel therapeutic option for acne vulgaris.

  5. Entinostat up-regulates the CAMP gene encoding LL-37 via activation of STAT3 and HIF-1α transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraglia, Erica; Nylén, Frank; Johansson, Katarina; Arnér, Elias; Cebula, Marcus; Farmand, Susan; Ottosson, Håkan; Strömberg, Roger; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta; Bergman, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial resistance against classical antibiotics is a growing problem and the development of new antibiotics is limited. Thus, novel alternatives to antibiotics are warranted. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of innate immunity that can be induced by several compounds, including vitamin D and phenyl-butyrate (PBA). Utilizing a luciferase based assay, we recently discovered that the histone deacetylase inhibitor Entinostat is a potent inducer of the CAMP gene encoding the human cathelicidin LL-37. Here we investigate a mechanism for the induction and also find that Entinostat up-regulates human β-defensin 1. Analysis of the CAMP promoter sequence revealed binding sites for the transcription factors STAT3 and HIF-1α. By using short hairpin RNA and selective inhibitors, we found that both transcription factors are involved in Entinostat-induced expression of LL-37. However, only HIF-1α was found to be recruited to the CAMP promoter, suggesting that Entinostat activates STAT3, which promotes transcription of CAMP by increasing the expression of HIF-1α. Finally, we provide in vivo relevance to our findings by showing that Entinostat-elicited LL-37 expression was impaired in macrophages from a patient with a STAT3-mutation. Combined, our findings support a role for STAT3 and HIF-1α in the regulation of LL-37 expression. PMID:27633343

  6. Mast cells are key mediators of cathelicidin-initiated skin inflammation in rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Yumiko; Wang, Zhenping; Vanderberghe, Matthieu; Two, Aimee; Gallo, Richard L; Di Nardo, Anna

    2014-11-01

    Rosacea is a chronic inflammatory skin disease whose pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear. However, it is known that mast cell (MC) numbers are increased in the dermis of rosacea patients. MC proteases not only recruit other immune cells, which amplify the inflammatory response, but also cause vasodilation and angiogenesis. MCs are also one of the primary sources of cathelicidin LL-37 (Cath LL-37), an antimicrobial peptide that has been shown to be an enabler of rosacea pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that MCs are key mediators of cathelicidin-initiated skin inflammation. After Cath LL-37 injection into the dermis, MC-deficient B6.Cg-Kit(W-sh)/HNihrJaeBsmJ (KitW-sh) mice did not develop rosacea-like features. Conversely, chymase (Prosacea subjects who showed a decrease in matrix metalloproteinase activity (Prosacea treatment.

  7. Cathelicidins from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana provides novel template for peptide antibiotic design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiying Ling

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins, a class of gene-encoded effector molecules of vertebrate innate immunity, provide a first line of defense against microbial invasions. Although cathelicidins from mammals, birds, reptiles and fishes have been extensively studied, little is known about cathelicidins from amphibians. Here we report the identification and characterization of two cathelicidins (cathelicidin-RC1 and cathelicidin-RC2 from the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. The cDNA sequences (677 and 700 bp, respectively encoding the two peptides were successfully cloned from the constructed lung cDNA library of R. catesbeiana. And the deduced mature peptides are composed of 28 and 33 residues, respectively. Structural analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 mainly assumes an amphipathic alpha-helical conformation, while cathelicidin-RC2 could not form stable amphipathic structure. Antimicrobial and bacterial killing kinetic analysis indicated that the synthetic cathelicidin-RC1 possesses potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial potency, while cathelicidin-RC2 exhibited very weak antimicrobial activity. Besides, the antimicrobial activity of cathelicidin-RC1 is salt-independent and highly stable. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis indicated that cathelicidin-RC1 kills microorganisms through the disruption of microbial membrane. Moreover, cathelicidin-RC1 exhibited low cytotoxic activity against mammalian normal or tumor cell lines, and low hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. The potent, broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity combined with the salt-independence, high stability, low cytotoxic and hemolytic activities make cathelicidin-RC1 an ideal template for the development of novel peptide antibiotics.

  8. Cathelicidin peptides as candidates for a novel class of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Margherita; Gennaro, Renato; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Tomasinsig, Linda; Circo, Raffaella

    2002-01-01

    Cathelicidin peptides are a numerous group of mammalian cationic antimicrobial peptides. Despite a common evolutionary origin of their genes, peptides display a remarkable variety of sizes, sequences and structures. Their spectra of antimicrobial activity are varied and cover a range of organisms that includes bacteria, fungi and enveloped viruses. In addition, they bind to and neutralize the effects of endotoxin. These features make this family of peptides good candidates in view of a therapeutic use. The most promising ones are currently under evaluation as leads for the development of novel anti-infectives, and synthetic variants are in an advanced stage of development for specific clinical applications. This review focuses on recent studies on the structure and in vitro and in vivo biological activities of these peptides. PMID:11945171

  9. Protein and lipid interactions of mammalian antibacterial peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yuqin

    2001-01-01

    Gene-encoded antibacterial peptides are multifunctional effector molecules and play an important role in host innate immunity. Upon stimulation, the mature active peptides are released from inactive precursors. Cathelicidins constitute a family of antibacterial peptides, which share a conserved N-terminal cathelin-like region followed by a variable C-terminal antibacterial domain. In addition to its antibacterial activity, LL-37, the only cathelicidin found in human, is ...

  10. Novel sulfated polysaccharides disrupt cathelicidins, inhibit RAGE and reduce cutaneous inflammation in a mouse model of rosacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxing Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rosacea is a common disfiguring skin disease of primarily Caucasians characterized by central erythema of the face, with telangiectatic blood vessels, papules and pustules, and can produce skin thickening, especially on the nose of men, creating rhinophyma. Rosacea can also produce dry, itchy eyes with irritation of the lids, keratitis and corneal scarring. The cause of rosacea has been proposed as over-production of the cationic cathelicidin peptide LL-37. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested a new class of non-anticoagulant sulfated anionic polysaccharides, semi-synthetic glycosaminoglycan ethers (SAGEs on key elements of the pathogenic pathway leading to rosacea. SAGEs were anti-inflammatory at ng/ml, including inhibition of polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN proteases, P-selectin, and interaction of the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE with four representative ligands. SAGEs bound LL-37 and inhibited interleukin-8 production induced by LL-37 in cultured human keratinocytes. When mixed with LL-37 before injection, SAGEs prevented the erythema and PMN infiltration produced by direct intradermal injection of LL-37 into mouse skin. Topical application of a 1% (w/w SAGE emollient to overlying injected skin also reduced erythema and PMN infiltration from intradermal LL-37. CONCLUSIONS: Anionic polysaccharides, exemplified by SAGEs, offer potential as novel mechanism-based therapies for rosacea and by extension other LL-37-mediated and RAGE-ligand driven skin diseases.

  11. Pulmonary tuberculosis patients with a vitamin D deficiency demonstrate low local expression of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 but enhanced FoxP3+ regulatory T cells and IgG-secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sayma; Rehn, Anders; Rahman, Jubayer; Andersson, Jan; Svensson, Mattias; Brighenti, Susanna

    2015-02-01

    Control of human tuberculosis (TB) requires induction and maintenance of both macrophage and T cell effector functions. We demonstrate that pulmonary TB patients with a vitamin D deficiency had significantly reduced local levels of the vitamin D-inducible antimicrobial peptide LL-37 in granulomatous lesions compared to distal parenchyma from the infected lung. Instead, TB lesions were abundant in CD3(+) T cells and FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells as well as IgG-secreting CD20(+) B cells, particularly in sputum-smear positive patients with cavitary TB. Mycobacteria-specific serum IgG titers were also elevated in patients with active TB. An up-regulation of the B cell stimulatory cytokine IL-21 correlated with mRNA expression of CD20, total IgG and also IL-10 in the TB lesions. Altogether, vitamin D-deficient TB patients expressed a weak antimicrobial response but an IL-21 associated expansion of IgG-secreting B cells combined with a rise in FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells at the local site of infection. PMID:25510482

  12. A fossil antibacterial peptide gives clues to structural diversity of cathelicidin-derived host defense peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shunyi; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins, a group of vertebrate- specific immune effector molecules, developed into a multigene family through gene duplication in the Cetartiodactyla lineage, in which structural changes of the antimicrobial domains (AMDs) among paralogs during evolution are clearly associated with functional diversification of cathelicidins. However, the evolutionary mechanism for such structural diversity remains largely unsolved. Although at the genomic level, the 3'-exon alone encoding the variable AMD repertoire would favor a role of exon shuffling, the observation that two structurally unrelated subfamilies of AMDs (protegrins and prophenins) display high similarity in some nucleotide regions of the 3'-exons of their genes provides evidence for postduplication sequence remodeling. This opinion is further strengthened by finding a proline-arginine-rich antibacterial peptide of 38 residues (named PR-38) encoded by an open reading frame located in the 3' untranslated region of protegrins, which is in frame with prophenins. The latter appears to have undergone internal motif repeats in the region corresponding to PR-38. PR-38 exhibits similar amino acid sequence and carboxyl-terminal amidation feature to PR-39s, a subfamily of cathelicidin peptides conserved across Cetartiodactyla. Functional assays of the chemically synthesized PR-38 confirmed its antibacterial activity with a similar action mode to PR-39 against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at micromolar concentrations, supporting an ancient functional link among cathelicidin members belonging to different subfamilies. Resurrecting the fossil peptide highlights the evolutionary position of PR-39 in generating structurally variable subfamilies of porcine cathelicidins through postduplication sequence remodeling. PMID:18796560

  13. Modulation of toll-like receptor 7 and LL-37 expression in colon and breast epithelial cells by human beta-defensin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroinigg, Nora; Srivastava, Maya D

    2005-01-01

    Breast-feeding decreases maternal breast cancer risk. Breast-fed infants have fewer infections and inflammatory-allergic diseases. We recently found inducible antimicrobial and immunomodulatory protein human beta3-defensin 2 (HBD-2) in significant amounts in human milk. We investigated if HBD-2 could contribute to benefits of breast-feeding for the mother and the child by immunomodulating effects on breast and gut epithelial cells. Human CaCo-2 colon and MCF-7 breast cell lines were cultured for 16-48 hours in RPMI 1640 5% fetal calf serum with and without HBD-2 at 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/mL. RNA was extracted and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and gel electrophoresis for toll-like receptor pathway members, antimicrobial peptides, and cytokines/receptors was performed. Primers were designed with www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov and www.broad. mit.edu/cgibin/primer/primer3 www.cgi. Based on RT-PCR results, cells were stained by immunohistochemistry using anti-toll-like receptor (TLR)-7 and anti-LL37 antibodies and DAKO EnVision Plus kits. Supernatants were analyzed for interleukin (IL)-8 and liver and activation-regulated chemokine (LARC) using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In CaCo-2, messenger RNA (mRNA) for TLR-7, IL-1R-associated kinase, alpha-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3), and IL-8 were down-regulated; cathelicidin/LL37 and NFkappaBp65 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA and protein were detected after 48 hours. TLR-7 protein, LARC, and IL-8 decreased with HBD-2; LL-37 protein greatly increased. In MCF-7, mRNA for LL37, inhibitor of kappaBalpha, NFkappaBp65, Tollip, MyD88, IL-1R-associated kinase, and TLR-7 were up-regulated. LARC mRNA was turned off. TLR-7 protein was induced. LARC was not detected. IL-8 was barely detectable with or without HBD-2. beta-Defensins 1 and 2; alpha-defensins 5 and 6; TLRs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 10; nucleotide binding oligomerization domain protein-2, and CCR6 mRNA were unaffected. HBD-2 profoundly

  14. LL-37 via EGFR transactivation to promote high glucose-attenuated epithelial wound healing in organ-cultured corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jia; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. Patients with diabetes are at higher risk for delayed corneal reepithelialization and infection. Previous studies indicated that high glucose (HG) impairs epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and attenuates ex vivo corneal epithelial wound healing. The authors investigated the effects of antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on HG-attenuated corneal epithelial EGFR signaling and wound closure. Methods. Human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) were stimulated with LL-37. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) shedding was assessed by measuring the release of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in a stable HCEC line expressing HB-EGF-AP. Activation of EGFR, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was determined by Western blot analysis. Corneal epithelial wound closure was assessed in cultured HCECs and porcine corneas. LL-37 expression was determined by immune dot blot. Results. LL-37 induced HB-EGF-AP release and EGFR activation in a dose-dependent manner. LL-37 prolonged EGFR signaling in response to wounding. LL-37 enhanced the closure of a scratch wound in cultured HCECs and partially rescued HG-attenuated wound healing in an EGFR- and a PI3K-dependent manner and restored HG-impaired EGFR signaling in cultured porcine corneas. HG attenuated wounding-induced LL-37 expression in cultured HCECs. Conclusions. LL-37 is a tonic factor promoting EGFR signaling and enhancing epithelial wound healing in normal and high glucose conditions. With both antimicrobial and regenerative capabilities, LL-37 may be a potential therapeutic for diabetic keratopathy.

  15. Epithelial antimicrobial peptides in host defense against infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bals Robert

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One component of host defense at mucosal surfaces seems to be epithelium-derived antimicrobial peptides. Antimicrobial peptides are classified on the basis of their structure and amino acid motifs. Peptides of the defensin, cathelicidin, and histatin classes are found in humans. In the airways, α-defensins and the cathelicidin LL-37/hCAP-18 originate from neutrophils. β-Defensins and LL-37/hCAP-18 are produced by the respiratory epithelium and the alveolar macrophage and secreted into the airway surface fluid. Beside their direct antimicrobial function, antimicrobial peptides have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with effects on epithelial and inflammatory cells, influencing such diverse processes as proliferation, immune induction, wound healing, cytokine release, chemotaxis, protease-antiprotease balance, and redox homeostasis. Further, antimicrobial peptides qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that might be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation.

  16. Expression of LL-37, Human beta Defensin-2, and CCR6 mRNA in Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李东升; 李家文; 段逸群; 周小勇

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether LL-37 and human beta defensin-2 (hBD-2) is related to the patients with psoriasis seldom having skin infections and explore the role of the two peptides and CCR6 (the receptor of hBD-2) in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the expression levels of mRNA of LL-37, hBD-2, and CCR6 in skin lesions of patients with psoriasis vulgaris were detected by using RT-PCR. The results showed that the mRNA expression levels of the two peptides and CCR6 in psoriatic lesions all increased compared with the normal skin (P<0. 001). It was suggested that upregulated expression of LL-37 and hBD-2 might be the main reason that result in the the skin of patients with psoriasis being seldom infected, and the two peptides and CCR6 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  17. Assessing the potential of four cathelicidins for the management of mouse candidiasis and Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haining; Liu, Xuelian; Wang, Chen; Qiao, Xue; Wu, Sijin; Wang, Hui; Feng, Lan; Wang, Yipeng

    2016-02-01

    As the most common fungal pathogen of humans, severe drug resistance has emerged in the clinically isolated Candida albicans, which lead to the urgency to develop novel antifungal agents. Here, four our previously characterized cathelicidins (cathelicidin-BF, Pc-CATH1, Cc-CATH2, Cc-CATH3) were selected and their antifungal activities against C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in vivo using amphotericin B and LL-37 as control. Results showed that all four cathelicidins could eradicate standard and clinically isolated C. albicans strains with most MIC values ranging from 1 to 16 μg/ml, in less than 0.5 h revealed by time-kill kinetic assay. Four peptides only exhibited slight hemolytic activity with most HC50 > 200 μg/ml, and retained potent anti-C. albicans activity at salt concentrations below and beyond physiological level. In animal experiment, 50 mg/kg administration of the four cathelicidins could significantly reduce the fungal counts in a murine oral candidiasis model induced by clinically isolated C. albicans. The antibiofilm activity of cathelicidin-BF, the most potent among the five peptides was evaluated, and result showed that cathelicidin-BF strongly inhibited C. albicans biofilm formation at 20 μg/ml. Furthermore, cathelicidin-BF also exhibited potent anti-C. albicans activity in established biofilms as measured by metabolic and fluorescent viability assays. Structure-function analyses suggest that they mainly adopt an α-helical conformations, which enable them to act as a membrane-active molecule. Altogether, the four cathelicidins display great potential for antifungal agent development against candidiasis. PMID:26656137

  18. Enhanced antitumor effects by docetaxel/LL37-loaded thermosensitive hydrogel nanoparticles in peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rangrang Fan,1,* Aiping Tong,1,* Xiaoling Li,1 Xiang Gao,1 Lan Mei,1 Liangxue Zhou,1 Xiaoning Zhang,2 Chao You,1 Gang Guo1 1State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, Department of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, and Collaborative Innovation Center for Biotherapy, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Intraperitoneal chemotherapy was explored in clinical trials as a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. In this work, we developed a biodegradable and injectable drug-delivery system by coencapsulation of docetaxel (Doc and LL37 peptide polymeric nanoparticles (Doc+LL37 NPs in a thermosensitive hydrogel system for colorectal peritoneal carcinoma therapy. Firstly, polylactic acid (PLA-Pluronic L35-PLA (PLA-L35-PLA was explored to prepare the biodegradable Doc+LL37 NPs using a water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion solvent-evaporation method. Then, biodegradable and injectable thermosensitive PLA-L64-PLA hydrogel with lower sol–gel transition temperature at around body temperature was also prepared. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Doc+LL37 NPs formed with the PLA-L35-PLA copolymer were spherical. Fourier-transform infrared spectra certified that Doc and LL37 were encapsulated successfully. X-ray diffraction diagrams indicated that Doc was encapsulated amorphously. Intraperitoneal administration of Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel significantly suppressed the growth of HCT116 peritoneal carcinomatosis in vivo and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results suggested that Doc+LL37 NPs–hydrogel may have potential clinical applications. Keywords: intraperitoneal chemotherapy, injectable, nanoparticles, hydrogel

  19. Interaction between Antimicrobial Peptide LL -37 and Bacterial Membrane POPG by Molecular Dynamics Simulation%抗菌肽 LL -37与细菌膜 POPG相互作用的分子动力学模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛文超; 赵立岭; 王吉华

    2016-01-01

    As a major component of the innate immune system ,human antimicrobial peptide LL -37 plays an important role in the protection of human resistance to disease .Residues 17-29 (FK -13) are consid‐ered as the core area of LL -37 antimicrobial activity .LL -37 can damage bacterial membrane with nega‐tive .LL -37 antimicrobial activity is closely related to secondary structure changes .In this work ,we studied the interaction between antimicrobial fragment FK -13 and of the bacterial membrane POPG by molecular dynamics simulation .The results show that the Coulomb interaction causes FK -13 close to the surface of the membrane rapidly and FK -13 can carpet the surface of the membrane .FK -13 has par‐tial helix structure when it interacts with membrane .In addition ,FK -13 can cause disturbance and de‐struction of the membrane and it is beneficial to exert antimicrobial activity .The residues 18 ~ 22 are key residues in the membrane function .So the work is useful for us not only understand the changes of FK -13 conformation and its damage to the membrane but also provide a theoretical basis for FK -13 as a ther‐apeutic application .%作为先天免疫系统的主要成分,人源抗菌肽L L -37在保护人类对抗疾病方面起了重要的角色。残基肽段17-29(FK -13)被认为是L L -37行使抗菌功能的核心区域,L L -37能对带负电的细菌膜产生破坏作用,其抗菌活性与二级结构的变化情况有关。用分子动力学模拟的方法研究了抗菌肽段 FK -13与带负电的细菌膜PO PG的相互作用。研究发现,库仑作用会使FK -13快速靠近膜的表面,然后像地毯一样覆盖在膜的表面;FK -13仍旧保持部分螺旋结构,并通过引起膜的扰动对膜产生破坏,以实现抗菌功能,而残基18~22是与膜作用的关键残基。研究FK -13与膜的相互作用,不仅可以从原子层面上了解L L -37对细菌膜作用的机理,也为基于L L -37

  20. In vitro effect on Cryptosporidium parvum of short-term exposure to cathelicidin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Del Prete, Maria Simona; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Circo, Raffaella; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2003-04-01

    Two laboratory methods, a cell culture system and double fluorogenic staining, were used to study the viability and infective ability of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites and oocysts after short-term exposure to four cathelicidin peptides. The compounds, SMAP-29, BMAP-28, PG-1 and Bac7(1-35), exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on sporozoites, but did not affect the viability and function of oocysts consistently. Overall, in the sporozoite series, a percentage of the viable population decreased rapidly to less than detectable levels after 15 and 60 min exposure to the peptides at concentrations of 100 and 10 micro g/mL, respectively. In the oocyst series, no compound produced complete inhibition of parasite growth: 60-85% of the oocyst population was viable after 180 min exposure at 100 micro g/mL. SMAP-29 exerted the highest activity against both sporozoites and oocysts. PMID:12654759

  1. Nanoparticles Encapsulated with LL37 and Serpin A1 Promotes Wound Healing and Synergistically Enhances Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumakia, Miral; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2016-07-01

    Wound care is a serious healthcare concern, often complicated by prolonged inflammation and bacterial infection, which contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity. Agents commonly used to treat chronic wound infections are limited due to toxicity of the therapy, multifactorial etiology of chronic wounds, deep skin infections, lack of sustained controlled delivery of drugs, and development of drug resistance. LL37 is an endogenous host defense peptide possessing antimicrobial activity and is involved in the modulation of wound healing. Serpin A1 (A1) is an elastase inhibitor and has been shown to demonstrate wound-healing properties. Hence, our goal was to develop a topical combination nanomedicine for the controlled sustained delivery of LL37 and A1 at precise synergistic ratio combinations that will significantly promote wound closure, reduce bacterial contamination, and enhance anti-inflammatory activity. We have successfully developed the first solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) formulation that can simultaneously deliver LL37 and A1 at specific ratios resulting in accelerated wound healing by promoting wound closure in BJ fibroblast cells and keratinocytes as well as synergistically enhancing antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli in comparison to LL37 or A1 alone. PMID:27182713

  2. Cathelicidin suppresses colon cancer development by inhibition of cancer associated fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michelle Cheng,1,* Samantha Ho,1,* Jun Hwan Yoo,1,2,* Deanna Hoang-Yen Tran,1,* Kyriaki Bakirtzi,1 Bowei Su,1 Diana Hoang-Ngoc Tran,1 Yuzu Kubota,1 Ryan Ichikawa,1 Hon Wai Koon1 1Center for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Digestive Disease Center, CHA University Bundang Medical Center, Seongnam, Republic of Korea *These authors share co-first authorship Background: Cathelicidin (LL-37 in humans and mCRAMP in mice represents a family of endogenous antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides. Cancer-associated fibroblasts can promote the proliferation of colon cancer cells and growth of colon cancer tumors. Methods: We examined the role of cathelicidin in the development of colon cancer, using subcutaneous human HT-29 colon-cancer-cell-derived tumor model in nude mice and azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-mediated colon cancer model in C57BL/6 mice. We also determined the indirect antitumoral mechanism of cathelicidin via the inhibition of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT of colon cancer cells and fibroblast-supported colon cancer cell proliferation. Results: Intravenous administration of cathelicidin expressing adeno-associated virus significantly reduced the size of tumors, tumor-derived collagen expression, and tumor-derived fibroblast expression in HT-29-derived subcutaneous tumors in nude mice. Enema administration of the mouse cathelicidin peptide significantly reduced the size and number of colonic tumors in azoxymethane- and dextran sulfate-treated mice without inducing apoptosis in tumors and the adjacent normal colonic tissues. Cathelicidin inhibited the collagen expression and vimentin-positive fibroblast expression in colonic tumors. Cathelicidin did not directly affect HT-29 cell viability, but did significantly reduce tumor growth factor-ß1-induced EMT of colon cancer cells. Media conditioned by the

  3. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanphaichitr, Nongnuj; Srakaew, Nopparat; Alonzi, Rhea; Kiattiburut, Wongsakorn; Kongmanas, Kessiri; Zhi, Ruina; Li, Weihua; Baker, Mark; Wang, Guanshun; Hickling, Duane

    2016-01-01

    The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI) demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9), into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women's body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI. PMID:26978373

  4. Potential Use of Antimicrobial Peptides as Vaginal Spermicides/Microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongnuj Tanphaichitr

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The concurrent increases in global population and sexually transmitted infection (STI demand a search for agents with dual spermicidal and microbicidal properties for topical vaginal application. Previous attempts to develop the surfactant spermicide, nonoxynol-9 (N-9, into a vaginal microbicide were unsuccessful largely due to its inefficiency to kill microbes. Furthermore, N-9 causes damage to the vaginal epithelium, thus accelerating microbes to enter the women’s body. For this reason, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, naturally secreted by all forms of life as part of innate immunity, deserve evaluation for their potential spermicidal effects. To date, twelve spermicidal AMPs have been described including LL-37, magainin 2 and nisin A. Human cathelicidin LL-37 is the most promising spermicidal AMP to be further developed for vaginal use for the following reasons. First, it is a human AMP naturally produced in the vagina after intercourse. Second, LL-37 exerts microbicidal effects to numerous microbes including those that cause STI. Third, its cytotoxicity is selective to sperm and not to the female reproductive tract. Furthermore, the spermicidal effects of LL-37 have been demonstrated in vivo in mice. Therefore, the availability of LL-37 as a vaginal spermicide/microbicide will empower women for self-protection against unwanted pregnancies and STI.

  5. Vitamin D nutritional status and vitamin D regulated antimicrobial peptides in serum and pleural fluid of patients with infectious and noninfectious pleural effusions

    OpenAIRE

    Amado, Carlos A.; García-Unzueta, María T; Fariñas, M. Carmen; Santos, Francisca; Ortiz, María; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Amado, José A

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D and vitamin D dependent antimicrobial peptides such as Cathelicidin (LL-37) and β-defensin 2 have an important role in innate and adaptative immunity, but their role in pleural effusions has not been studied before. Methods Serum and pleural fluid samples from 152 patients with pleural effusion were collected, corresponding to 45 transudates and 107 exudates, 51 infectious effusions (14 complicated and 37 non-complicated), 44 congestive heart failure effusions and 38 mali...

  6. 尖锐湿疣皮损中人β防御素(HDB)-2,3及LL-37的表达%The expression of human beta defensins (HBD)-2,3 and LL-37 in the patients with condyloma acu-minatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王薇; 肖敬川; 王泉江

    2014-01-01

    目的:检测尖锐湿疣患者皮损中抗菌肽HBD-2、HBD-3及LL-37mRNA的表达。方法应用逆转录(RT-PCR)方法检测56例尖锐湿疣患者皮损和30名正常人皮肤组织中HBD-2、HBD-3及LL-37mRNA的表达。结果:与正常人皮肤组织相比,尖锐湿疣患者皮损中HBD-2、HBD-3及LL-37mRNA的表达水平明显升高(P<0.05)。结论:尖锐湿疣患者皮损中HBD-2、HBD-3及LL-37mRNA表达水平的上调可能与尖锐湿疣患者局部产生免疫防御有关。%Objective:To investigate the mRNA expression of antimicrobial peptide HBD-2, HBD-3 and LL-37 in the patients with condyloma acuminatum ( CA) . Methods:The skin biopsies were taken from skin lesions in 56 patients with CA and 30 normal controls. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction ( RT-PCR) was used to semi-quantitatively analyze the mRNA expression of HBD-2, HBD-3 and LL-37 in the tissue samples. Results:The mRNA expressions of HBD-2, HBD-3 and LL-37 were significant higher in CA than in the normal controls ( P<0.05) . Conclusion:Up-regulated expression of HBD-2, HBD-3 and LL-37 may be related to local immune defense of CA.

  7. Cathelicidin peptide sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide-29 prevents endotoxin-induced mortality in rat models of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, Andrea; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Mocchegiani, Federico; D'Amato, Giuseppina; Circo, Raffaella; Orlando, Fiorenza; Skerlavaj, Barbara; Silvestri, Carmela; Saba, Vittorio; Zanetti, Margherita; Scalise, Giorgio

    2004-01-15

    The present study was designed to investigate the antiendotoxin activity and therapeutic efficacy of sheep myeloid antimicrobial peptide (SMAP)-29, a cathelicidin-derived peptide. The in vitro ability of SMAP-29 to bind LPS from Escherichia coli 0111:B4 was determined using a sensitive limulus chromogenic assay. Two rat models of septic shock were performed: (1) rats were injected intraperitoneally with 1 mg E. coli 0111:B4 LPS and (2) intraabdominal sepsis was induced via cecal ligation and single puncture. All animals were randomized to receive parenterally isotonic sodium chloride solution, 1 mg/kg SMAP-29, 1 mg/kg polymyxin B or 20 mg/kg imipenem. The main outcome measures were: abdominal exudate and plasma bacterial growth, plasma endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentrations, and lethality. The in vitro study showed that SMAP-29 completely inhibited the LPS procoagulant activity at approximately 10 microM peptide concentration. The in vivo experiments showed that all compounds reduced the lethality when compared with control animals. SMAP-29 achieved a substantial decrease in endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma concentrations when compared with imipenem and saline treatment and exhibited a slightly lower antimicrobial activity than imipenem. No statistically significant differences were noted between SMAP-29 and polymyxin B. SMAP-29, because of its double antiendotoxin and antimicrobial activities, could be an interesting compound for septic shock treatment. PMID:14563656

  8. The Effect of Calcipotriol on the Expression of Human β Defensin-2 and LL-37 in Cultured Human Keratinocytes

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    Beom Joon Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vitamin D has been reported to regulate innate immunity by controlling the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. Objective. We investigated the effect of calcipotriol on the expression of AMPs in human cultured keratinocytes. Methods. Keratinocytes were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TNF-α, Calcipotriol and irradiated with UVB, cultured, and harvested. To assess the expression of human beta defensin-2 and LL-37 in the control group, not exposed to any stimulants, the experimental group was treated with LPS, TNF-α, or UVB, and another group was treated again with calcipotriol; reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining were performed. Results. In the experimental group treated with LPS, UVB irradiation, and TNF-α, the expression of β-defensin and LL-37 was increased more than in the control group and then decreased in the experimental group treated with calcipotriol. Conclusions. Calcipotriol suppressed HBD-2 and LL-37, which were stimulated by UVB, LPS, and TNF-α.

  9. Cationic antimicrobial peptides promote microbial mutagenesis and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

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    Dominique H Limoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of adaptive mutations is essential for microbial persistence during chronic infections. This is particularly evident during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Thus far, mutagenesis has been attributed to the generation of reactive species by polymorphonucleocytes (PMN and antibiotic treatment. However, our current studies of mutagenesis leading to P. aeruginosa mucoid conversion have revealed a potential new mutagen. Our findings confirmed the current view that reactive oxygen species can promote mucoidy in vitro, but revealed PMNs are proficient at inducing mucoid conversion in the absence of an oxidative burst. This led to the discovery that cationic antimicrobial peptides can be mutagenic and promote mucoidy. Of specific interest was the human cathelicidin LL-37, canonically known to disrupt bacterial membranes leading to cell death. An alternative role was revealed at sub-inhibitory concentrations, where LL-37 was found to induce mutations within the mucA gene encoding a negative regulator of mucoidy and to promote rifampin resistance in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mechanism of mutagenesis was found to be dependent upon sub-inhibitory concentrations of LL-37 entering the bacterial cytosol and binding to DNA. LL-37/DNA interactions then promote translesion DNA synthesis by the polymerase DinB, whose error-prone replication potentiates the mutations. A model of LL-37 bound to DNA was generated, which reveals amino termini α-helices of dimerized LL-37 bind the major groove of DNA, with numerous DNA contacts made by LL-37 basic residues. This demonstrates a mutagenic role for antimicrobials previously thought to be insusceptible to resistance by mutation, highlighting a need to further investigate their role in evolution and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

  10. Alterations in vitamin D status and anti-microbial peptide levels in patients in the intensive care unit with sepsis

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    Ziegler Thomas R

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D insufficiency is common in hospitalized patients. Recent evidence suggests that vitamin D may enhance the innate immune response by induction of cathelicidin (LL-37, an endogenous antimicrobial peptide produced by macrophages and neutrophils. Thus, the relationship between vitamin D status and LL-37 production may be of importance for host immunity, but little data is available on this subject, especially in the setting of human sepsis syndrome and other critical illness. Methods Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD, vitamin D binding protein (DBP and LL-37 in critically ill adult subjects admitted to intensive care units (ICUs with sepsis and without sepsis were compared to healthy controls. Results Critically ill subjects had significantly lower plasma 25(OHD concentrations compared to healthy controls. Mean plasma LL-37 levels were significantly lower in critically ill subjects compared to healthy controls. Vitamin D binding protein levels in plasma were significantly lower in critically ill subjects with sepsis compared to critically ill subjects without sepsis. There was a significant positive association between circulating 25(OHD and LL-37 levels. Conclusion This study demonstrates an association between critical illness and lower 25(OHD and DBP levels in critically ill patients as compared to healthy controls. It also establishes a positive association between vitamin D status and plasma LL-37, which suggests that systemic LL-37 levels may be regulated by vitamin D status. Optimal vitamin D status may be important for innate immunity especially in the setting of sepsis. Further invention studies to examine this association are warranted.

  11. Serum Levels of LL-37 and Inflammatory Cytokines in Plaque and Guttate Psoriasis

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    Young Ji Hwang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. It is assumed that the plaque phenotype of psoriasis is associated with T helper (Th 1 immune response activation, while the guttate phenotype is associated with the Th17 immune response. Previous investigations of differences in the serum levels of cytokines relative to the clinical psoriatic phenotype have yielded conflicting results. This study compared the levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines and LL-37 relative to the morphological phenotype in patients with psoriasis. Seventy-four age-matched patients with psoriasis (32 with guttate psoriasis and 42 with plaque psoriasis and 12 healthy controls were included. A multiplex cytokine assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used to measure levels of Th1- and Th17-derived cytokines and LL-37, respectively. Circulating levels of interferon- (IFN-γ, interleukin- (IL-1RA, IL-2, and IL-23, and LL-37 were significantly higher in patients with psoriasis than in healthy controls. However, the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines (IL-7, IL-22, and IL-23 and LL-37 did not differ significantly between the guttate and plaque phenotypes of psoriasis. There was a positive correlation between serum inflammatory cytokine levels and the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score. The findings of this study suggest that the serum levels of inflammatory cytokines reflect the disease activity rather than determine the morphological phenotype.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

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    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  13. Immune regulatory activities of fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin host defense peptide.

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    Bommineni, Yugendar R; Pham, Giang H; Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Achanta, Mallika; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-05-01

    Appropriate modulation of immunity is beneficial in antimicrobial therapy and vaccine development. Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute critically important components of innate immunity with both antimicrobial and immune regulatory activities. We previously showed that a chicken HDP, namely fowlicidin-1(6-26), has potent antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we further revealed that fowl-1(6-26) possesses strong immunomodulatory properties. The peptide is chemotactic specifically to neutrophils, but not monocytes or lymphocytes, after injected into the mouse peritoneum. Fowl-1(6-26) also has the capacity to activate macrophages by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL3. However, unlike bacterial lipopolysaccharide that triggers massive production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, fowl-1(6-26) only marginally increased their expression in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, fowl-1(6-26) enhanced the surface expression of MHC II and CD86 on RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that it may facilitate development of adaptive immune response. Indeed, co-immunization of mice with chicken ovalbumin (OVA) and fowl-1(6-26) augmented both OVA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a titers, relative to OVA alone. We further showed that fowl-1(6-26) is capable of preventing a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection due to its enhancement of host defense. All mice survived from an otherwise lethal infection when the peptide was administered 1-2 days prior to MRSA infection, and 50% mice were protected if receiving the peptide 4 days before infection. Taken together, with a strong capacity to stimulate innate and adaptive immunity, fowl-1(6-26) may have potential to be developed as a novel antimicrobial and a vaccine adjuvant.

  14. Tuberculin skin test and interferon-gamma release assay values are associated with antimicrobial peptides expression in  polymorphonuclear cells during latent tuberculous infection

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    Julio E Castañeda-Delgado

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that patients with progressive tuberculosis (TB express abundant amounts of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs cathelicidin (LL-37 and human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1 in circulating cells, whereas latent TB infected donors showed no differences when compared with purified protein derivative (PPD and QuantiFERON®-TB Gold (QFT-healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether LL-37 and HNP-1 production correlates with higher tuberculin skin test (TST and QFT values in TB household contacts. Twenty-six TB household contact individuals between 26-58 years old TST and QFT positive with at last two years of latent TB infection were recruited. AMPs production by polymorphonuclear cells was determined by flow cytometry and correlation between TST and QFT values was analysed. Our results showed that there is a positive correlation between levels of HNP-1 and LL-37 production with reactivity to TST and/or QFT levels. This preliminary study suggests the potential use of the expression levels of these peptides as biomarkers for progression in latent infected individuals.

  15. 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 induces LL-37 and HBD-2 production in keratinocytes from diabetic foot ulcers promoting wound healing: an in vitro model.

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    Irma Gonzalez-Curiel

    Full Text Available Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH2 D3 and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU.

  16. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Induces LL-37 and HBD-2 Production in Keratinocytes from Diabetic Foot Ulcers Promoting Wound Healing: An In Vitro Model

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    Gonzalez-Curiel, Irma; Trujillo, Valentin; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rincon, Kublai; Rivas-Calderon, Bruno; deHaro-Acosta, Jeny; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; Lozano-Lopez, Daniel; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are one of the most common diabetes-related cause of hospitalization and often lead to severe infections and poor healing. It has been recently reported that patients with DFU have lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) at the lesion area, which contributes with the impairment of wound healing. The aim of this study was to determine whether 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25 (OH)2 D3) and L-isoleucine induced HBD-2 and LL-37 in primary cultures from DFU. We developed primary cell cultures from skin biopsies from 15 patients with DFU and 15 from healthy donors. Cultures were treated with 1,25 (OH)2D3 or L-isoleucine for 18 h. Keratinocytes phenotype was identified by western blot and flow cytometry. Real time qPCR for DEFB4, CAMP and VDR gene expression was performed as well as an ELISA to measure HBD-2 and LL-37 in supernatant. Antimicrobial activity, in vitro, wound healing and proliferation assays were performed with conditioned supernatant. The results show that primary culture from DFU treated with 1,25(OH)2D3, increased DEFB4 and CAMP gene expression and increased the production of HBD-2 and LL-37 in the culture supernatant. These supernatants had antimicrobial activity over E. coli and induced remarkable keratinocyte migration. In conclusion the 1,25(OH)2D3 restored the production of AMPs in primary cell from DFU which were capable to improve the in vitro wound healing assays, suggesting their potential therapeutic use on the treatment of DFU. PMID:25337708

  17. Shedding light on antibacterial activities of cathelicidins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, V.A.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is continuously increasing and has a tremendous impact on human and animal well-being. Attractive alternatives to conventional antibiotics are host defense peptides (HDP), such as chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) and porcine proline-rich PR-39. HDPs are small cationic molecules

  18. Database-Guided Discovery of Potent Peptides to Combat HIV-1 or Superbugs

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    Guangshun Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, small host defense proteins, are indispensable for the protection of multicellular organisms such as plants and animals from infection. The number of AMPs discovered per year increased steadily since the 1980s. Over 2,000 natural AMPs from bacteria, protozoa, fungi, plants, and animals have been registered into the antimicrobial peptide database (APD. The majority of these AMPs (>86% possess 11–50 amino acids with a net charge from 0 to +7 and hydrophobic percentages between 31–70%. This article summarizes peptide discovery on the basis of the APD. The major methods are the linguistic model, database screening, de novo design, and template-based design. Using these methods, we identified various potent peptides against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 or methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. While the stepwise designed anti-HIV peptide is disulfide-linked and rich in arginines, the ab initio designed anti-MRSA peptide is linear and rich in leucines. Thus, there are different requirements for antiviral and antibacterial peptides, which could kill pathogens via different molecular targets. The biased amino acid composition in the database-designed peptides, or natural peptides such as θ-defensins, requires the use of the improved two-dimensional NMR method for structural determination to avoid the publication of misleading structure and dynamics. In the case of human cathelicidin LL-37, structural determination requires 3D NMR techniques. The high-quality structure of LL-37 provides a solid basis for understanding its interactions with membranes of bacteria and other pathogens. In conclusion, the APD database is a comprehensive platform for storing, classifying, searching, predicting, and designing potent peptides against pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, and cancer cells.

  19. The specificity of protection against cationic antimicrobial peptides by lactoferrin binding protein B.

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    Morgenthau, Ari; Partha, Sarathy K; Adamiak, Paul; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2014-10-01

    A variety of Gram-negative pathogens possess host-specific lactoferrin (Lf) receptors that mediate the acquisition of iron from host Lf. The integral membrane protein component of the receptor, lactoferrin binding protein A specifically binds host Lf and is required for acquisition of iron from Lf. In contrast, the role of the bi-lobed surface lipoprotein, lactoferrin binding protein B (LbpB), in Lf binding and iron acquisition is uncertain. A common feature of LbpBs from most species is the presence of clusters of negatively charged amino acids in the protein's C-terminal lobe. Recently it has been shown that the negatively charged regions from the Neisseria meningitidis LbpB are responsible for protecting against an 11 amino acid cationic antimicrobial peptide (CAP), lactoferricin (Lfcin), derived from human Lf. In this study we investigated whether the LbpB confers resistance to other CAPs since N. meningitidis is likely to encounter other CAPs from the host. LbpB provided protection against the cathelicidin derived peptide, cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (mCRAMP), but did not confer protection against Tritrp 1 or LL37 under our experimental conditions. When tested against a range of rationally designed synthetic peptides, LbpB was shown to protect against IDR-1002 and IDR-0018 but not against HH-2 or HHC10. PMID:25038734

  20. Defense at the lung lining: antifungal activities of SP-D and LL-37

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonez, Soledad R

    2016-01-01

    Host defense proteins and peptides are part of the innate immune system of the lung. They constitute one of the first defenses against fungal pathogens during inhalation. Discerning how these molecular defenses act in concert to prevent infection in a healthy lung has proven to be difficult, due to

  1. Goat cathelicidin-2 is secreted by blood leukocytes regardless of lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisaikham, Supreena; Suksombat, Wisitiporn; Yoshimura, Yukinori; Isobe, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    It has been reported that goat cathelicidin-2, an antimicrobial peptide, localizes in leukocytes and is present in milk. Here, we examined whether cathelicidin-2 is secreted by leukocytes. Different concentrations (10(5) -10(8) cells/mL) of blood leukocytes were cultured for 0-48 h with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). After culture, the concentrations of cathelicidin-2 in the conditioned media were measured. Blood was collected from male goats 0-24 h after the intravenous injection of Escherichia coli O111:B4 LPS. The plasma cathelicidin-2 concentrations were determined and the blood leukocytes immunostained with anti-cathelicidin-2 antibody to calculate the proportion of cathelicidin-2-positive cells in the total leukocytes. When higher concentrations of leukocytes were cultured, the cathelicidin-2 concentrations in the media increased significantly, whereas the addition of LPS to the media caused no further increase. The plasma cathelicidin-2 concentrations did not increase with time after LPS infusion. The proportion of cathelicidin-2-positive cells in the total leukocytes was significantly reduced 1 h after LPS injection compared with that at 0 h, but increased again at 6 h and thereafter. These results suggest that cathlicidin-2 is secreted by leukocytes even without LPS stimulation, whereas LPS may be required for cathelicidin-2-containing leukocytes to be recruited from the blood to tissues showing inflammation. PMID:26212721

  2. 表皮抗菌肽的研究进展%Skin-derived antimicrobial peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈园园; 普雄明

    2012-01-01

    抗菌肽是在多种生物体中表达的具有抗菌活性的肽类物质总称.皮肤频繁与环境中的微生物接触而不被感染,表皮抗菌肽起了重要作用.人类表皮抗菌肽主要包括防御素和cathelicidin家族的LL-37,由于其具有普通抗生素所不具有的一系列优点,使其生物学活性和与皮肤屏障的关系成为目前研究的热点,对其深入研究为抵御疾病、延缓衰老、相关皮肤病的发病机制及治疗等方面带来了新的希望.%Antimicrobial peptides refer to all of the peptides with antimicrobial activity expressed in various types of organisms.Skin-derived antimicrobial peptides play an important role in the protection of skin against infection by frequently contacting microbes in the environment.They mainly consist of defensins and cathelicidin LL-37.Since skin-derived antimicrobial peptides possess a series of advantages which are lacked by common antibiotics,their biological activity and correlation with skin barrier have become a hot spot in present studies.Further researches into skin-derived antimicrobial peptides will provide new hopes for thedefense against diseases,delay of aging,disclosure of pathogenesis of and development of treatment for somedermatoses.

  3. Burkholderia cenocepacia zinc metalloproteases influence resistance to antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Cora; Sokol, Pamela A

    2009-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia secretes two zinc-dependent metalloproteases, designated ZmpA and ZmpB. Previously, ZmpA and ZmpB have been shown to cleave several proteins important in host defence. In this study, the ability of ZmpA and ZmpB to digest and inactivate antimicrobial peptides involved in innate immunity was examined. ZmpB but not ZmpA cleaved beta-defensin-1. ZmpA but not ZmpB cleaved the cathelicidin LL-37. Both enzymes cleaved elafin and secretory leukocyte inhibitor, which are antimicrobial peptides as well as neutrophil elastase inhibitors. Both ZmpA and ZmpB cleaved protamine, a fish antimicrobial peptide, and a zmpA zmpB mutant was more sensitive to protamine killing than the parental strain. ZmpA or ZmpB cleavage of elafin inactivated its anti-protease activity. The effect of ZmpA and ZmpB on the neutrophil proteases elastase and cathepsin G was also examined but neither enzyme was active against these host proteases. These studies suggest that ZmpA and ZmpB may influence the resistance of B. cenocepacia to host antimicrobial peptides as well as alter the host protease/anti-protease balance in chronic respiratory infections.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides present in mammalian skin and gut are multifunctional defence molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Boutigue, Marie-Hélène; Shooshtarizadeh, Peiman; Prevost, Gilles; Haikel, Youssef; Chich, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are major components of the innate immune defence. They are well conserved along evolution, non-toxic and they ensure potent defences against a large number of pathogens. They act by direct killing of microorganisms and they possess additional roles in the regulation of adaptive immune responses, by recruting or stimulating immune cells. Skin and gut are positioned at the interface of internal milieu and external environment. They represent a physical and chemical barrier against pathogens invasion and the antimicrobial peptides limit pathogen growth in normal conditions. During infection or injury, some of these peptides are overexpressed and disrupt microbial membranes and/or stimulate immune cell recruitment, allowing to return to homeostasis or to increase inflammation. Antimicrobial peptides expression is altered in several diseases: alpha-defensins deficiency is related with Crohn's disease and in skin, cathelicidin LL-37 and beta-defensin-2 are overexpressed in psoriasis, while in atopic dermatitis, their expression is decreased. The present review provides an up-to-date summary of the expression and the biological roles of the antimicrobial peptides found in the skin and gastrointestinal mucosa of the host, in normal and pathological conditions. The involvement of these natural antimicrobial peptides in inflammation, is also discussed.

  5. The role of mammalian antimicrobial peptides and proteins in awakening of innate host defenses and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D; Chertov, O; Oppenheim, J J

    2001-06-01

    Since we live in a dirty environment, we have developed many host defenses to contend with microorganisms. The epithelial lining of our skin, gastrointestinal tract and bronchial tree produces a number of antibacterial peptides, and our phagocytic neutrophils rapidly ingest and enzymatically degrade invading organisms, as well as produce peptides and enzymes with antimicrobial activities. Some of these antimicrobial moieties also appear to alert host cells involved in both innate host defense and adaptive immune responses. The epithelial cells are a source of constitutively produced beta defensin (HBD1) and proinflammatory cytokine-inducible beta defensins (HBD2 and -3) and cathelicidin (LL37). The neutrophils-derived antimicrobial peptides are released on demand from their cytoplasmic granules. They include the enzymes cathepsin G and chymase, azurocidin, a defensins and cathelicidin. In contrast, C5a and C3b are produced by activation of the serum complement cascade. The antimicrobial moieties direct the migration and activate target cells by interacting with selected G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors (GPCRs) on cell surfaces. The beta defensins interact with the CCR6 chemokine GPCRs, whereas cathelicidins interact with the low-affinity FPRL-1 receptors. The neutrophil-derived cathepsin G acts on the high-affinity FMLP receptor (GPCR) known as FPR, while the receptors for chymase and azurocidin have not been identified as yet. The serum-derived C5a uses a GPCR known as C5aR to mediate its chemotactic and cell-activating effects. Consequently, all these ligand-receptor interactions in addition to mediating chemotaxis also activate receptor-expressing cells to produce other mediators of inflammation.

  6. Differential activity of innate defense antimicrobial peptides against Nocardia species

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    Wagner Dirk

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the genus Nocardia are ubiquitous environmental saprophytes capable to cause human pulmonary, disseminated and cutaneous nocardiosis or bovine mastitis. Innate immunity appears to play an important role in early defense against Nocardia species. To elucidate the contribution of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs in innate defense against Nocardia, the activity of human α-defensins human neutrophil peptides (HNPs 1-3, human β-defensin (hBD-3 and cathelicidin LL-37 as well as bovine β-defensins lingual and tracheal antimicrobial peptides (LAP, TAP and bovine neutrophil-derived indolicidin against four important Nocardia species was investigated. Results Whereas N. farcinica ATCC 3318 and N. nova ATCC 33726 were found to be susceptible to all investigated human and bovine AMPs, N. asteroides ATCC 19247 was killed exclusively by neutrophil-derived human α-defensins HNP 1-3 and bovine indolicidin. N. brasiliensis ATCC 19296 was found to exhibit complete resistance to investigated human AMPs and to be susceptible only to bovine indolicidin. Conclusion Selected AMPs are capable to contribute to the first line of defense against Nocardia, yet, susceptibility appears to vary across different Nocardia species. Obtained results of neutrophil-derived AMPs to possess the broadest antinocardial spectrum are remarkable, since nocardiosis is characterized by a neutrophil-rich infiltrate in vivo.

  7. Epithelial Antimicrobial Peptides: Guardian of the Oral Cavity

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    Mayank Hans

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival epithelium provides first line of defence from the microorganisms present in dental plaque. It not only provides a mechanical barrier but also has an active immune function too. Gingival epithelial cells participate in innate immunity by producing a range of antimicrobial peptides to protect the host against oral pathogens. These epithelial antimicrobial peptides (EAPs include the β-defensin family, cathelicidin (LL-37, calprotectin, and adrenomedullin. While some are constitutively expressed in gingival epithelial cells, others are induced upon exposure to microbial insults. It is likely that these EAPs have a role in determining the initiation and progression of oral diseases. EAPs are broad spectrum antimicrobials with a different but overlapping range of activity. Apart from antimicrobial activity, they participate in several other crucial roles in host tissues. Some of these, for instance, β-defensins, are chemotactic to immune cells. Others, such as calprotectin are important for wound healing and cell proliferation. Adrenomedullin, a multifunctional peptide, has its biological action in a wide range of tissues. Not only is it a potent vasodilator but also it has several endocrine effects. Knowing in detail the various bioactions of these EAPs may provide us with useful information regarding their utility as therapeutic agents.

  8. Novel Cathelicidins from Pigeon Highlights Evolutionary Convergence in Avain Cathelicidins and Functions in Modulation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haining; Lu, Yiling; Qiao, Xue; Wei, Lin; Fu, Tingting; Cai, Shasha; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xuelian; Zhong, Shijun; Wang, Yipeng

    2015-07-21

    Cathelicidins are short cationic host defense peptides and play a central role in host innate immune system. Here we identified two novel cathelicidins, Cl-CATH2 and 3, from Columba livia. Evolutionary analysis of avian cathelicidins via phylogenetic tree and Ka/Ks calculations supported the positive selection that prompted evolution of CATH2 to CATH1 and 3, which originate from common ancestor and could belong to one superfamily. Cl-CATH2 and 3 both adopt amphipathic α-helical comformations identified by circular dichroism and the 3D structures built by Rosetta. Cl-CATH2 of CATH2 family with the most expression abundance in bird, exhibited relatively weak antimicrobial activity, but acted instead on the innate immune response without showing undesirable toxicities. In macrophages primed by LPS, Cl-CATH2 significantly down-regulated the gene and protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase and pro-inflammatory cytokines while enhancing the anti-inflammatory cytokine, acting through MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Molecular docking shows for the first time that cathelicidin binds to the opening region of LPS-binding pocket on myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) of toll-like receptor (TLR)4-MD-2 complex, which in turn inhibits the TLR4 pathway. Our results, therefore, provide new insight into the mechanism underlying the blockade of TLR4 signaling by cathelicidins.

  9. A member of the cathelicidin family of antimicrobial peptides is produced in the upper airway of the chinchilla and its mRNA expression is altered by common viral and bacterial co-pathogens of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivary, Glen; Ray, William C; Bevins, Charles L; Munson, Robert S; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2007-03-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a component of the innate immune system, play a major role in defense of mucosal surfaces against a wide spectrum of microorganisms such as viral and bacterial co-pathogens of the polymicrobial disease otitis media (OM). To further understand the role of AMPs in OM, we cloned a cDNA encoding a cathelicidin homolog (cCRAMP) from upper respiratory tract (URT) mucosae of the chinchilla, the predominant host used to model experimental OM. Recombinant cCRAMP exhibited alpha-helical secondary structure and killed the three main bacterial pathogens of OM. In situ hybridization showed cCRAMP mRNA production in epithelium of the chinchilla Eustachian tube and RT-PCR was used to amplify cCRAMP mRNA from several other tissues of the chinchilla URT. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of chinchilla middle ear epithelial cells (CMEEs) incubated with either viral (influenza A virus, adenovirus, or RSV) or bacterial (nontypeable H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, or S. pneumoniae) pathogens associated with OM demonstrated distinct microbe-specific patterns of altered expression. Collectively, these data showed that viruses and bacteria modulate AMP messages in the URT, which likely contributes to the disease course of OM.

  10. A Randomized Controlled Trial on the Effect of Vitamin D3 on Inflammation and Cathelicidin Gene Expression in Ulcerative Colitis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Amrollah; Hosseinzadeh-Attar, Mohammad Javad; Vahedi, Homayoon; Nedjat, Saharnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an intestinal chronic inflammatory condition and includes Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). It has been proposed that Vitamin D supplementation may have a beneficial role in IBD. Aim: To characterize the effects of Vitamin D on cathelicidin (hCAP/LL37) gene expression, ESR, and serum hs-CRP levels. Materials and Methods: Ninety UC patients on remission were randomized to receive 300,000 IU intramuscular Vitamin D or 1 mL normal saline as placebo, respectively. Before and 90 days after intervention, serum levels of 25 (OH)-Vitamin D3, PTH, Calcium, ESR, and hs-CRP were measured. Cathelicidin gene expression was also quantified using qRT-PCR. Results: Baseline serum 25-OH-Vitamin D3 levels were not different between the two groups and after intervention, increased only in Vitamin D group (P placebo group. (Mean ± SD: 3.13 ± 2.56 vs 1.09 ± 0.56; median ± interquartile range: 2.17 ± 3.81 vs 0.87 ± 0.53, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Decreases in ESR and hs-CRP levels and increase in LL37 gene expression support the hypothesis that Vitamin D supplementation may have a beneficial role in UC patients. PMID:27488327

  11. Diversity, Antimicrobial Action and Structure-Activity Relationship of Buffalo Cathelicidins.

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    Brahma, Biswajit; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Karri, Satyanagalakshmi; Chopra, Meenu; Mishra, Purusottam; De, Bidhan Chandra; Kumar, Sushil; Mahanty, Sourav; Thakur, Kiran; Poluri, Krishna Mohan; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; De, Sachinandan

    2015-01-01

    Cathelicidins are an ancient class of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with broad spectrum bactericidal activities. In this study, we investigated the diversity and biological activity of cathelicidins of buffalo, a species known for its disease resistance. A series of new homologs of cathelicidin4 (CATHL4), which were structurally diverse in their antimicrobial domain, was identified in buffalo. AMPs of newly identified buffalo CATHL4s (buCATHL4s) displayed potent antimicrobial activity against selected Gram positive (G+) and Gram negative (G-) bacteria. These peptides were prompt to disrupt the membrane integrity of bacteria and induced specific changes such as blebing, budding, and pore like structure formation on bacterial membrane. The peptides assumed different secondary structure conformations in aqueous and membrane-mimicking environments. Simulation studies suggested that the amphipathic design of buCATHL4 was crucial for water permeation following membrane disruption. A great diversity, broad-spectrum antimicrobial action, and ability to induce an inflammatory response indicated the pleiotropic role of cathelicidins in innate immunity of buffalo. This study suggests short buffalo cathelicidin peptides with potent bactericidal properties and low cytotoxicity have potential translational applications for the development of novel antibiotics and antimicrobial peptidomimetics.

  12. Diversity, Antimicrobial Action and Structure-Activity Relationship of Buffalo Cathelicidins.

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    Biswajit Brahma

    Full Text Available Cathelicidins are an ancient class of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs with broad spectrum bactericidal activities. In this study, we investigated the diversity and biological activity of cathelicidins of buffalo, a species known for its disease resistance. A series of new homologs of cathelicidin4 (CATHL4, which were structurally diverse in their antimicrobial domain, was identified in buffalo. AMPs of newly identified buffalo CATHL4s (buCATHL4s displayed potent antimicrobial activity against selected Gram positive (G+ and Gram negative (G- bacteria. These peptides were prompt to disrupt the membrane integrity of bacteria and induced specific changes such as blebing, budding, and pore like structure formation on bacterial membrane. The peptides assumed different secondary structure conformations in aqueous and membrane-mimicking environments. Simulation studies suggested that the amphipathic design of buCATHL4 was crucial for water permeation following membrane disruption. A great diversity, broad-spectrum antimicrobial action, and ability to induce an inflammatory response indicated the pleiotropic role of cathelicidins in innate immunity of buffalo. This study suggests short buffalo cathelicidin peptides with potent bactericidal properties and low cytotoxicity have potential translational applications for the development of novel antibiotics and antimicrobial peptidomimetics.

  13. Circulating Cathelicidin Concentrations in a Cohort of Healthy Children: Influence of Age, Body Composition, Gender and Vitamin D Status.

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    Taylor M Stukes

    Full Text Available Cathelicidin is an antimicrobial peptide whose circulating levels are related to vitamin D status in adults. This study sought to determine if circulating cathelicidin concentrations in healthy children are related to the age of the child, body composition and vitamin D status at birth and at the time of the study visit. Blood samples were obtained during yearly visits from 133 children, ages 2-7, whose mothers had participated in a pregnancy vitamin D supplementation RCT. Radioimmunoassay and ELISA were performed to analyze 25(OHD and cathelicidin, respectively. Statistical analyses compared cathelicidin concentrations with concentrations of 25(OHD at various time points (maternal levels throughout pregnancy, at birth, and child's current level; and with race/ethnicity, age, gender, BMI, percent fat, and frequency of infections using Student's t-test, χ2, Wilcoxon ranked-sum analysis, and multivariate regression. The cohort's median cathelicidin concentration was 28.1 ng/mL (range: 5.6-3368.6 and did not correlate with 25(OHD, but was positively correlated with advancing age (ρ = 0.236 & p = 0.005, respectively. Forty patients evaluated at two visits showed an increase of 24.0 ng/mL in cathelicidin from the first visit to the next (p<0.0001. Increased age and male gender were correlated with increased cathelicidin when controlling for race/ethnicity, percent fat, and child's current 25(OHD concentration (p = 0.028 & p = 0.047, respectively. This study demonstrated that as children age, the concentration of cathelicidin increases. Furthermore, male gender was significantly associated with increased cathelicidin concentrations. The lack of association between vitamin D status and cathelicidin in this study may be due to the narrow range in observed 25(OHD values and warrants additional studies for further observation.

  14. IL-4 and IL-13 exposure during mucociliary differentiation of bronchial epithelial cells increases antimicrobial activity and expression of antimicrobial peptides

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    Prins Frans A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The airway epithelium forms a barrier against infection but also produces antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and other inflammatory mediators to activate the immune system. It has been shown that in allergic disorders, Th2 cytokines may hamper the antimicrobial activity of the epithelium. However, the presence of Th2 cytokines also affects the composition of the epithelial layer which may alter its function. Therefore, we investigated whether exposure of human primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC to Th2 cytokines during mucociliary differentiation affects expression of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial protein (hCAP18/LL-37 and human beta defensins (hBD, and antimicrobial activity. PBEC were cultured at an air-liquid interface (ALI for two weeks in the presence of various concentrations of IL-4 or IL-13. Changes in differentiation and in expression of various AMPs and the antimicrobial proteinase inhibitors secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI and elafin were investigated as well as antimicrobial activity. IL-4 and IL-13 increased mRNA expression of hCAP18/LL-37 and hBD-2. Dot blot analysis also showed an increase in hCAP18/LL-37 protein in apical washes of IL-4-treated ALI cultures, whereas Western Blot analysis showed expression of a protein of approximately 4.5 kDa in basal medium of IL-4-treated cultures. Using sandwich ELISA we found that also hBD-2 in apical washes was increased by both IL-4 and IL-13. SLPI and elafin levels were not affected by IL-4 or IL-13 at the mRNA or protein level. Apical wash obtained from IL-4- and IL-13-treated cultures displayed increased antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to medium-treated cultures. In addition, differentiation in the presence of Th2 cytokines resulted in increased MUC5AC production as has been shown previously. These data suggest that prolonged exposure to Th2 cytokines during mucociliary differentiation contributes to antimicrobial defence by

  15. Tumor-produced versican V1 enhances hCAP18/LL-37 expression in macrophages through activation of TLR2 and vitamin D3 signaling to promote ovarian cancer progression in vitro.

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    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Tumor-associated macrophages have been shown to promote tumor growth. They may have an obligatory function in angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis through release of inflammatory mediators. Their presence in ovarian cancer has been correlated with poor prognosis in these patients. The human cationic antimicrobial protein-18 (hCAP18/LL-37 was originally identified as an effector molecule of the innate immune system. It is released by innate immune cells, such as macrophages, to combat microorganisms. Previous studies have characterized the hCAP18/LL-37 as a growth factor that has been shown to promote ovarian tumor progression. However, the role hCAP18/LL-37 has in macrophage-promoted ovarian tumor development and how its expression is controlled in this context remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate in co-culture experiments of macrophages and ovarian cancer cells a significant increase in the in vitro proliferation and invasiveness of the tumor cells is observed. These enhanced growth and invasion properties correlated with hCAP18/LL-37 induction. HCAP18/LL-37 expression was diminished by addition of two neutralizing antibodies, TLR2 or TLR6, as well as Cyp27B1 or VDR inhibitors. Furthermore, either the TLR2 or TLR6 antibody reduced vitamin D3 signaling and tumor cell progression in vitro. Addition of Cyp27B1 or VDR inhibitors abrogated TLR2/6 activation-induced expression of hCAP18/LL-37 in macrophages. Knockdown of tumor-produced versican V1 by RNAi in these tumor cells led to a decreased induction of hCAP18/LL-37 in macrophages. Versican V1 knockdown also inhibited TLR2 and vitamin D3 signaling, as well as growth and invasiveness of these tumor cells in the in vitro co-culture. In summary, we have found that versican V1 enhances hCAP18/LL-37 expression in macrophages through activation of TLR2 and subsequent vitamin D-dependent mechanisms which promote ovarian tumor progression in vitro.

  16. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

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    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  17. Chronic Ethanol Exposure Effects on Vitamin D Levels Among Subjects with Alcohol Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsakin, Olalekan; Hottor, Tete; Mehta, Ashish; Lichtveld, Maureen; McCaskill, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D has been previously recognized to play important roles in human immune system and function. In the pulmonary system, vitamin D regulates the function of antimicrobial peptides, especially cathelicidin/LL-37. Human cathelicidin/LL-37 is a bactericidal, bacteriostatic, and antiviral endogenous peptide with protective immune functions. Chronic exposure to excessive alcohol has the potential to reduce levels of vitamin D (inactive vitamin D [25(OH)D3] and active vitamin D [1, 25(OH)2D3]) and leads to downregulation of cathelicidin/LL-37. Alcohol-mediated reduction of LL-37 may be partly responsible for increased incidence of more frequent and severe respiratory infections among subjects with alcohol use disorder (AUD). The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which alcohol exerts its influence on vitamin D metabolism. In addition, the aim was to establish associations between chronic alcohol exposures, levels of pulmonary vitamin D, and cathelicidin/LL-37 using broncho-alveolar lavage fluid samples of subjects with AUD and healthy controls. Findings from the experiment showed that levels of inactive vitamin D (25(OH)D3), active vitamin D (1, 25(OH)2D3), cathelicidin/LL-37, and CYP27B1 proteins were significantly reduced (P vitamin D and results in subsequent downregulation of the antimicrobial peptide, LL-37, in the human pulmonary system.

  18. Azithromycin Synergizes with Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides to Exert Bactericidal and Therapeutic Activity Against Highly Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

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    Leo Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance poses an increasingly grave threat to the public health. Of pressing concern, rapid spread of carbapenem-resistance among multidrug-resistant (MDR Gram-negative rods (GNR is associated with few treatment options and high mortality rates. Current antibiotic susceptibility testing guiding patient management is performed in a standardized manner, identifying minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC in bacteriologic media, but ignoring host immune factors. Lacking activity in standard MIC testing, azithromycin (AZM, the most commonly prescribed antibiotic in the U.S., is never recommended for MDR GNR infection. Here we report a potent bactericidal action of AZM against MDR carbapenem-resistant isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii. This pharmaceutical activity is associated with enhanced AZM cell penetration in eukaryotic tissue culture media and striking multi-log-fold synergies with host cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide LL-37 or the last line antibiotic colistin. Finally, AZM monotherapy exerts clear therapeutic effects in murine models of MDR GNR infection. Our results suggest that AZM, currently ignored as a treatment option, could benefit patients with MDR GNR infections, especially in combination with colistin.

  19. Imaging the antimicrobial mechanism(s) of cathelicidin-2.

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    Schneider, Viktoria A F; Coorens, Maarten; Ordonez, Soledad R; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, Johanna L M; Posthuma, George; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2016-01-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) have the potential to become alternatives to conventional antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine. The HDP chicken cathelicidin-2 (CATH-2) has immunomodulatory and direct killing activities at micromolar concentrations. In this study the mechanism of action of CATH-2 against Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated in great detail using a unique combination of imaging and biophysical techniques. Live-imaging with confocal fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that FITC-labelled CATH-2 mainly localized at the membrane of E. coli. Upon binding, the bacterial membrane was readily permeabilized as was shown by propidium iodide influx into the cell. Concentration- and time-dependent effects of the peptide on E. coli cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). CATH-2 treatment was found to induce dose-dependent morphological changes in E. coli. At sub-minimal inhibitory concentrations (sub-MIC), intracellular granulation, enhanced vesicle release and wrinkled membranes were observed, while membrane breakage and cell lysis occurred at MIC values. These effects were visible within 1-5 minute of peptide exposure. Immuno-gold TEM showed CATH-2 binding to bacterial membranes. At sub-MIC values the peptide rapidly localized intracellularly without visible membrane permeabilization. It is concluded that CATH-2 has detrimental effects on E. coli at concentrations that do not immediately kill the bacteria. PMID:27624595

  20. Gene cloning, expression and characterization of avian cathelicidin orthologs, Cc-CATHs, from Coturnix coturnix.

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    Feng, Feifei; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Wenjuan; He, Weiyu; Guang, Huijuan; Li, Zheng; Wang, Duo; Liu, Jingze; Chen, Ming; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2011-05-01

    Cathelicidins comprise a family of antimicrobial peptides sharing a highly conserved cathelin domain, which play a central role in the early innate host defense against infection. In the present study, we report three novel avian cathelicidin orthologs cloned from a constructed spleen cDNA library of Coturnix coturnix, using a nested-PCR-based cloning strategy. Three coding sequences containing ORFs of 447, 465 and 456 bp encode three mature antimicrobial peptides (named Cc-CATH1, 2 and 3) of 26, 32 and 29 amino acid residues, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that precursors of Cc-CATHs are significantly conserved with known avian cathelicidins. Synthetic Cc-CATH2 and 3 displayed broad and potent antimicrobial activity against most of the 41 strains of bacteria and fungi tested, especially the clinically isolated drug-resistant strains, with minimum inhibitory concentration values in the range 0.3-2.5 μm for most strains with or without the presence of 100 mm NaCl. Cc-CATH2 and 3 showed considerable reduction of cytotoxic activity compared to other avian cathelicidins, with average IC(50) values of 20.18 and 17.16 μm, respectively. They also exerted a negligible hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes, lysing only 3.6% of erythrocytes at a dose up to 100 μg·mL(-1) . As expected, the recombinant Cc-CATH2 (rCc-CATH2) also showed potent bactericidal activity. All these features of Cc-CATHs encourage further studies aiming to estimate their therapeutic potential as drug leads, as well as coping with current widespread antibiotic resistance, especially the new prevalent and dangerous 'superbug' that is resistant to almost all antibiotics. PMID:21375690

  1. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariano, F S; Campanelli, A P; Nociti Jr, F H; Mattos-Graner, R O; Gonçalves, R B

    2012-11-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO) and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS), Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS) and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS). qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides and nitric oxide production by neutrophils from periodontitis subjects

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    F.S. Mariano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils play an important role in periodontitis by producing nitric oxide (NO and antimicrobial peptides, molecules with microbicidal activity via oxygen-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. It is unknown whether variation in the production of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3, and NO by neutrophils influences the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. We compared the production of these peptides and NO by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects and from patients with periodontitis. Peripheral blood neutrophils were cultured with or without Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-LPS (Aa-LPS, Porphyromonas gingivalis-LPS (Pg-LPS and Escherichia coli-LPS (Ec-LPS. qRT-PCR was used to determine quantities of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 mRNA in neutrophils. Amounts of HNP 1-3 and LL-37 proteins in the cell culture supernatants were also determined by ELISA. In addition, NO levels in neutrophil culture supernatants were quantitated by the Griess reaction. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured with Aa-LPS, Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS expressed higher HNP 1-3 mRNA than neutrophils from healthy subjects. LL-37 mRNA expression was higher in neutrophils from patients stimulated with Aa-LPS. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients produced significantly higher LL-37 protein levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects when stimulated with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS, but no difference was observed in HNP 1-3 production. Neutrophils from periodontitis patients cultured or not with Pg-LPS and Ec-LPS produced significantly lower NO levels than neutrophils from healthy subjects. The significant differences in the production of LL-37 and NO between neutrophils from healthy and periodontitis subjects indicate that production of these molecules might influence individual susceptibility to important periodontal pathogens.

  3. Cationic Peptides Facilitate Iron-induced Mutagenesis in Bacteria.

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    Alexandro Rodríguez-Rojas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the causative agent of chronic respiratory infections and is an important pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients. Adaptive mutations play an essential role for antimicrobial resistance and persistence. The factors that contribute to bacterial mutagenesis in this environment are not clear. Recently it has been proposed that cationic antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37 could act as mutagens in P. aeruginosa. Here we provide experimental evidence that mutagenesis is the product of a joint action of LL-37 and free iron. By estimating mutation rate, mutant frequencies and assessing mutational spectra in P. aeruginosa treated either with LL-37, iron or a combination of both we demonstrate that mutation rate and mutant frequency were increased only when free iron and LL-37 were present simultaneously. Colistin had the same effect. The addition of an iron chelator completely abolished this mutagenic effect, suggesting that LL-37 enables iron to enter the cells resulting in DNA damage by Fenton reactions. This was also supported by the observation that the mutational spectrum of the bacteria under LL-37-iron regime showed one of the characteristic Fenton reaction fingerprints: C to T transitions. Free iron concentration in nature and within hosts is kept at a very low level, but the situation in infected lungs of cystic fibrosis patients is different. Intermittent bleeding and damage to the epithelial cells in lungs may contribute to the release of free iron that in turn leads to generation of reactive oxygen species and deterioration of the respiratory tract, making it more susceptible to the infection.

  4. A randomized controlled trial on the effect of vitamin D3 on inflammation and cathelicidin gene expression in ulcerative colitis patients

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    Amrollah Sharifi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an intestinal chronic inflammatory condition and includes Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC. It has been proposed that Vitamin D supplementation may have a beneficial role in IBD. Aim: To characterize the effects of Vitamin D on cathelicidin (hCAP/LL37 gene expression, ESR, and serum hs-CRP levels. Materials and Methods: Ninety UC patients on remission were randomized to receive 300,000 IU intramuscular Vitamin D or 1 mL normal saline as placebo, respectively. Before and 90 days after intervention, serum levels of 25 (OH-Vitamin D3, PTH, Calcium, ESR, and hs-CRP were measured. Cathelicidin gene expression was also quantified using qRT-PCR. Results: Baseline serum 25-OH-Vitamin D3 levels were not different between the two groups and after intervention, increased only in Vitamin D group (P < 0.001. Hs-CRP levels were lower in Vitamin D group after intervention (Before: 3.43 ± 3.47 vs 3.86 ± 3.55 mg/L, P = 0.56; after: 2.31 ± 2.25 vs 3.90 ± 3.97 mg/L, P= 0.023. ESR decreased significantly in Vitamin D group (Before: 12.4 ± 6.1 vs 12.1 ± 5.3 mm/h, P= 0.77; after: 6.7 ± 4.5 vs 11.4 ± 5.5 mm/h, P< 0.001. The mean fold change in hCAP18 gene expression in Vitamin D group was significantly higher than placebo group. (Mean ± SD: 3.13 ± 2.56 vs 1.09 ± 0.56; median ± interquartile range: 2.17 ± 3.81 vs 0.87 ± 0.53, P< 0.001. Conclusion: Decreases in ESR and hs-CRP levels and increase in LL37 gene expression support the hypothesis that Vitamin D supplementation may have a beneficial role in UC patients.

  5. Evaluation of milk cathelicidin for detection of dairy sheep mastitis.

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    Addis, M F; Tedde, V; Dore, S; Pisanu, S; Puggioni, G M G; Roggio, A M; Pagnozzi, D; Lollai, S; Cannas, E A; Uzzau, S

    2016-08-01

    Mastitis due to intramammary infections is one of the most detrimental diseases in dairy sheep farming, representing a major cause of reduced milk productions and quality losses. In particular, subclinical mastitis presents significant detection and control problems, and the availability of tools enabling its timely, sensitive, and specific detection is therefore crucial. We have previously demonstrated that cathelicidins, small proteins implicated in the innate immune defense of the host, are specifically released in milk of mastitic animals by both epithelial cells and neutrophils. Here, we describe the development of an ELISA for milk cathelicidin and assess its value against somatic cell counts (SCC) and bacteriological culture for detection of ewe mastitis. Evaluation of the cathelicidin ELISA was carried out on 705 half-udder milk samples from 3 sheep flocks enrolled in a project for improvement of mammary health. Cathelicidin was detected in 35.3% of milk samples (249/705), and its amount increased with rising SCC values. The cathelicidin-negative (n=456) and cathelicidin-positive (n=249) sample groups showed a clear separation in relation to SCC, with median values of 149,500 and 3,300,000 cells/mL, respectively. Upon bacteriological culture, 20.6% (145/705) of the milk samples showed microbial growth, with coagulase-negative staphylococci being by far the most frequent finding. A significant proportion of all bacteriologically positive milk samples were positive for cathelicidin (110/145, 75.9%). Given the lack of a reliable gold standard for defining the true disease status, sensitivity (Se) and specificity (Sp) of the cathelicidin ELISA were assessed by latent class analysis against 2 SCC thresholds and against bacteriological culture results. At an SCC threshold of 500,000 cells/mL, Se and Sp were 92.3 and 92.3% for cathelicidin ELISA, 89.0 and 94.9% for SCC, and 39.4 and 93.6% for bacteriological culture, respectively. At an SCC threshold of 1

  6. Antimicrobial Peptide-Driven Colloidal Transformations in Liquid-Crystalline Nanocarriers.

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    Gontsarik, Mark; Buhmann, Matthias T; Yaghmur, Anan; Ren, Qun; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Salentinig, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Designing efficient colloidal systems for the delivery of membrane active antimicrobial peptides requires in-depth understanding of their structural and morphological characteristics. Using dispersions of inverted type bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes), we examine the effect of integrating the amphiphilic peptide LL-37 at different concentrations on the self-assembled structure and evaluate its bactericidal ability against Escherichia coli. Small-angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy show that LL-37 integrates into the bicontinuous cubic structure, inducing colloidal transformations to sponge and lamellar phases and micelles in a concentration-dependent manner. These investigations, together with in vitro evaluation studies using a clinically relevant bacterial strain, established the composition-nanostructure-activity relationship that can guide the design of new nanocarriers for antimicrobial peptides and may provide essential knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the bacterial membrane disruption with peptide-loaded nanostructures. PMID:27541048

  7. Identification and Characterization of the First Cathelicidin from Sea Snakes with Potent Antimicrobial and Anti-inflammatory Activity and Special Mechanism.

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    Wei, Lin; Gao, Jiuxiang; Zhang, Shumin; Wu, Sijin; Xie, Zeping; Ling, Guiying; Kuang, Yi-Qun; Yang, Yongliang; Yu, Haining; Wang, Yipeng

    2015-07-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of gene-encoded peptide effectors of innate immunity found exclusively in vertebrates. They play pivotal roles in host immune defense against microbial invasions. Dozens of cathelicidins have been identified from several vertebrate species. However, no cathelicidin from marine reptiles has been characterized previously. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel cathelicidin (Hc-CATH) from the sea snake Hydrophis cyanocinctus. Hc-CATH is composed of 30 amino acids, and the sequence is KFFKRLLKSVRRAVKKFRKKPRLIGLSTLL. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling analysis indicated that Hc-CATH mainly assumes an amphipathic α-helical conformation in bacterial membrane-mimetic solutions. It possesses potent broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity. Meanwhile, it is highly stable and shows low cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. The microbial killing activity of Hc-CATH is executed through the disruption of cell membrane and lysis of bacterial cells. In addition, Hc-CATH exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Hc-CATH directly binds with LPS to neutralize its toxicity, and it also binds to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD2 complex), which therefore inhibits the binding of LPS to TLR4/MD2 complex and the subsequent activation of LPS-induced inflammatory response pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Hc-CATH, the first cathelicidin from sea snake discovered to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity, is a potent candidate for the development of peptide antibiotics. PMID:26013823

  8. Identification and Characterization of the First Cathelicidin from Sea Snakes with Potent Antimicrobial and Anti-inflammatory Activity and Special Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Gao, Jiuxiang; Zhang, Shumin; Wu, Sijin; Xie, Zeping; Ling, Guiying; Kuang, Yi-Qun; Yang, Yongliang; Yu, Haining; Wang, Yipeng

    2015-07-01

    Cathelicidins are a family of gene-encoded peptide effectors of innate immunity found exclusively in vertebrates. They play pivotal roles in host immune defense against microbial invasions. Dozens of cathelicidins have been identified from several vertebrate species. However, no cathelicidin from marine reptiles has been characterized previously. Here we report the identification and characterization of a novel cathelicidin (Hc-CATH) from the sea snake Hydrophis cyanocinctus. Hc-CATH is composed of 30 amino acids, and the sequence is KFFKRLLKSVRRAVKKFRKKPRLIGLSTLL. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and structure modeling analysis indicated that Hc-CATH mainly assumes an amphipathic α-helical conformation in bacterial membrane-mimetic solutions. It possesses potent broad-spectrum and rapid antimicrobial activity. Meanwhile, it is highly stable and shows low cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells. The microbial killing activity of Hc-CATH is executed through the disruption of cell membrane and lysis of bacterial cells. In addition, Hc-CATH exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Hc-CATH directly binds with LPS to neutralize its toxicity, and it also binds to Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4/MD2 complex), which therefore inhibits the binding of LPS to TLR4/MD2 complex and the subsequent activation of LPS-induced inflammatory response pathways. Taken together, our study demonstrates that Hc-CATH, the first cathelicidin from sea snake discovered to have both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity, is a potent candidate for the development of peptide antibiotics.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  10. The formyl peptide receptor like-1 and scavenger receptor MARCO are involved in glial cell activation in bacterial meningitis

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    Jansen Sandra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have suggested that the scavenger receptor MARCO (macrophage receptor with collagenous structure mediates activation of the immune response in bacterial infection of the central nervous system (CNS. The chemotactic G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR formyl-peptide-receptor like-1 (FPRL1 plays an essential role in the inflammatory responses of host defence mechanisms and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD. Expression of the antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin CRAMP/LL-37 is up-regulated in bacterial meningitis, but the mechanisms underlying CRAMP expression are far from clear. Methods Using a rat meningitis model, we investigated the influence of MARCO and FPRL1 on rCRAMP (rat cathelin-related antimicrobial peptide expression after infection with bacterial supernatants of Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP and Neisseria meningitides (NM. Expression of FPRL1 and MARCO was analyzed by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in a rat meningitis model. Furthermore, we examined the receptor involvement by real-time RT-PCR, extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement in glial cells (astrocytes and microglia and transfected HEK293 cells using receptor deactivation by antagonists. Receptors were inhibited by small interference RNA and the consequences in NM- and SP-induced Camp (rCRAMP gene expression and signal transduction were determined. Results We show an NM-induced increase of MARCO expression by immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR in glial and meningeal cells. Receptor deactivation by antagonists and small interfering RNA (siRNA verified the importance of FPRL1 and MARCO for NM- and SP-induced Camp and interleukin-1β expression in glial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated a functional interaction between FPRL1 and MARCO in NM-induced signalling by real-time RT-PCR, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cAMP level measurement and show differences between

  11. A cathelicidin-2-derived peptide effectively impairs Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molhoek, E.M.; Dijk, A. van; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Haagsman, H.P.; Bikker, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of nosocomial infections owing to its ability to form biofilms on the surface of medical devices. Biofilms are surface-adhered bacterial communities. In mature biofilms these communities are encased in an extracellular matrix composed of bacterial polysacc

  12. Preparation, characterization, in vitro release and degradation of cathelicidin-BF-30-PLGA microspheres.

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    Lili Li

    Full Text Available Cathelicidin-BF-30 (BF-30, a water-soluble peptide isolated from the snake venom of Bungarus fasciatus containing 30 amino acid residues, was incorporated in poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA 75∶25 microspheres (MS prepared by a water in oil in water W/O/W emulsification solvent extraction method. The aim of this work was to investigate the stability of BF-30 after encapsulation. D-trehalose was used as an excipient to stabilize the peptide. The MS obtained were mostly under 2 µm in size and the encapsulation efficiency was 88.50±1.29%. The secondary structure of the peptide released in vitro was determined to be nearly the same as the native peptide using Circular Dichroism (CD. The ability of BF-30 to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli was also maintained. The cellular relative growth and hemolysis rates were 92.16±3.55% and 3.52±0.45% respectively.

  13. Chicken heterophils are recruited to the site of Salmonella infection and release antibacterial mature Cathelicidin-2 upon stimulation with LPS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van A.; Tersteeg-Zuiderveld, M.H.G.; Tjeerdsma-van Bokhoven, J.L.M.; Jansman, A.J.M.; Veldhuizen, E.J.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2009-01-01

    The biological functions of avian cathelicidins are poorly defined. In mammals, cathelicidins have shown to possess potent broad-range antimicrobial activity as well as immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, we investigated the microbicidal activities and localization of Cathelicidin-2 in non-infec

  14. Bordetella pertussis lipid A glucosamine modification confers resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides and increases resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nita R; Hancock, Robert E W; Fernandez, Rachel C

    2014-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many strategies for evading the human immune system. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an important Gram-negative bacterial surface structure that activates the immune system via Toll-like receptor 4 and enables susceptibility to cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs). We show modification of the lipid A region of LPS with glucosamine increased resistance to numerous CAMPs, including LL-37. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this glucosamine modification increased resistance to outer membrane perturbation.

  15. Hepcidin, Cathelicidin-1 and IL-8 as immunological markers of responsiveness in early developmental stages of rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Paula A; Guzmán, Fanny; Forero, Juan C; Luna, Omar F; Mercado, Luis

    2016-09-01

    During the early developmental stage of salmonids, high mortality occurs largely as a result of pathogens. These cause low immune competence in fry, producing disease, decreasing production and finally leading to economic losses. Therefore, the aim of this study was to characterise the developmental stages in which rainbow trout acquires immune response capability when challenged with LPS from Pseudomona aeruginosa for 8 h, studying the hepcidin, cathelicidin-1 and IL-8. Total RNA was extracted from fry at 34, 42, 56 and 66 days post hatching (dph). Hepcidin and cathelicidin-1 transcripts were detected only at days 34 and 42, whereas the IL-8 transcript was detected from day 34 to day 66. To analyse the protein expression in the fry, polyclonal anti-peptide antibodies were generated in rabbit. These three immune sera demonstrated the ability to recognise the whole molecule in biological samples. Immunofluorescence showed that skin, gills and intestine mainly responded to the LPS challenge, indicating that these portals of pathogen entry are capturing LPS. This study constitutes a valuable approach, since it has the potential to identify molecules with biological activity that can be used to evaluate the status of fry in culture. PMID:27106706

  16. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  17. Phenylbutyrate counteracts Shigella mediated downregulation of cathelicidin in rabbit lung and intestinal epithelia: a potential therapeutic strategy.

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    Protim Sarker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathelicidins and defensins are endogenous antimicrobial peptides (AMPs that are downregulated in the mucosal epithelia of the large intestine in shigellosis. Oral treatment of Shigella infected rabbits with sodium butyrate (NaB reduces clinical severity and counteracts the downregulation of cathelicidin (CAP-18 in the large intestinal epithelia. AIMS: To develop novel regimen for treating infectious diseases by inducing innate immunity, we selected sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PB, a registered drug for a metabolic disorder as a potential therapeutic candidate in a rabbit model of shigellosis. Since acute respiratory infections often cause secondary complications during shigellosis, the systemic effect of PB and NaB on CAP-18 expression in respiratory epithelia was also evaluated. METHODS: The readouts were clinical outcomes, CAP-18 expression in mucosa of colon, rectum, lung and trachea (immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR and release of the CAP-18 peptide/protein in stool (Western blot. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Significant downregulation of CAP-18 expression in the epithelia of rectum and colon, the site of Shigella infection was confirmed. Interestingly, reduced expression of CAP-18 was also noticed in the epithelia of lung and trachea, indicating a systemic effect of the infection. This suggests a causative link to acute respiratory infections during shigellosis. Oral treatment with PB resulted in reduced clinical illness and upregulation of CAP-18 in the epithelium of rectum. Both PB and NaB counteracted the downregulation of CAP-18 in lung epithelium. The drug effect is suggested to be systemic as intravenous administration of NaB could also upregulate CAP-18 in the epithelia of lung, rectum and colon. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that PB has treatment potential in human shigellosis. Enhancement of CAP-18 in the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory tract by PB or NaB is a novel discovery. This could mediate protection from

  18. Swiftly Decreasing Cerebrospinal Fluid Cathelicidin Concentration Predicts Improved Outcome in Childhood Bacterial Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savonius, Okko; Helve, Otto; Roine, Irmeli; Andersson, Sture; Fernández, Josefina; Peltola, Heikki; Pelkonen, Tuula

    2016-06-01

    We investigated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cathelicidin concentrations in childhood bacterial meningitis on admission and during antimicrobial treatment. CSF cathelicidin concentrations on admission correlated with CSF white cell counts and protein levels but not with bacterial etiology. A greater decrease in the concentration in response to treatment was associated with a better outcome. Since the CSF cathelicidin concentration reflects the degree of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, it may be used as a novel biomarker in childhood bacterial meningitis. An early decrease during treatment likely signals more rapid mitigation of the disease process and thus a better outcome. PMID:27008883

  19. A family of helminth molecules that modulate innate cell responses via molecular mimicry of host antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mark W; Donnelly, Sheila; Hutchinson, Andrew T; To, Joyce; Taylor, Nicole L; Norton, Raymond S; Perugini, Matthew A; Dalton, John P

    2011-05-01

    Over the last decade a significant number of studies have highlighted the central role of host antimicrobial (or defence) peptides in modulating the response of innate immune cells to pathogen-associated ligands. In humans, the most widely studied antimicrobial peptide is LL-37, a 37-residue peptide containing an amphipathic helix that is released via proteolytic cleavage of the precursor protein CAP18. Owing to its ability to protect against lethal endotoxaemia and clinically-relevant bacterial infections, LL-37 and its derivatives are seen as attractive candidates for anti-sepsis therapies. We have identified a novel family of molecules secreted by parasitic helminths (helminth defence molecules; HDMs) that exhibit similar biochemical and functional characteristics to human defence peptides, particularly CAP18. The HDM secreted by Fasciola hepatica (FhHDM-1) adopts a predominantly α-helical structure in solution. Processing of FhHDM-1 by F. hepatica cathepsin L1 releases a 34-residue C-terminal fragment containing a conserved amphipathic helix. This is analogous to the proteolytic processing of CAP18 to release LL-37, which modulates innate cell activation by classical toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that full-length recombinant FhHDM-1 and a peptide analogue of the amphipathic C-terminus bind directly to LPS in a concentration-dependent manner, reducing its interaction with both LPS-binding protein (LBP) and the surface of macrophages. Furthermore, FhHDM-1 and the amphipathic C-terminal peptide protect mice against LPS-induced inflammation by significantly reducing the release of inflammatory mediators from macrophages. We propose that HDMs, by mimicking the function of host defence peptides, represent a novel family of innate cell modulators with therapeutic potential in anti-sepsis treatments and prevention of inflammation.

  20. Protective effect of in ovo treatment with the chicken cathelicidin analog D-CATH-2 against avian pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Matthijs, Mieke G R; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A; Haagsman, Henk P

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance and ever stricter control on antibiotic use are a driving force to develop alternatives to antibiotics. One such strategy is the use of multifunctional Host Defense Peptides. Here we examined the protective effect of prophylactic treatment with the D analog of chicken cathelicidin-2 (D-CATH-2) against a respiratory E. coli infection. Chickens were treated with D-CATH-2 in ovo at day 18 of embryonic development or intramuscularly at days 1 and 4 after hatch. At 7 days of age, birds were challenged intratracheally with avian pathogenic E. coli. Protection was evaluated by recording mortality, morbidity (Mean Lesion Score) and bacterial swabs of air sacs at 7 days post-infection. In ovo D-CATH-2 treatment significantly reduced morbidity (63%) and respiratory bacterial load (>90%), while intramuscular treatment was less effective. D-CATH-2 increased the percentage of peripheral blood lymphocytes and heterophils by both administration routes. E. coli specific IgM levels were lower in in ovo treated animals compared to intramuscular D-CATH-2 treatment. In short, in ovo treatment with the Host Defense Peptide derived D-CATH-2 can partially protect chickens from E. coli infection, making this peptide an interesting starting point to develop alternatives to antibiotics for use in the poultry sector. PMID:27229866

  1. Nasal Levels of Antimicrobial Peptides in Allergic Asthma Patients and Healthy Controls: Differences and Effect of a Short 1,25(OH2 Vitamin D3 Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willemien Thijs

    Full Text Available Allergy is often accompanied by infections and lower levels of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs. Vitamin D has been shown to increase expression of selected AMPs. In this study we investigated whether antimicrobial peptide levels in nasal secretions of allergic asthma patients are lower than in healthy controls, and whether administration of the active form of vitamin D (1,25(OH2D3 affects these antimicrobial peptide levels.The levels of antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions were compared between 19 allergic asthma patients and 23 healthy controls. The effect of seven days daily oral treatment with 2 μg 1,25(OH2D3 on antimicrobial peptides in nasal secretions was assessed in a placebo-controlled cross-over clinical study.Levels of neutrophil α-defensins (human neutrophil peptides 1-3; HNP1-3 and lipocalin 2 (LCN2; also known as NGAL were significantly lower in asthmatics, but no differences in LL-37 and SLPI were detected. Treatment with a short-term 1,25(OH2D3 caused a small increase in HNP1-3, but not when the asthma and control groups were analyzed separately. LL-37, LCN2 and SLPI did not change after treatment with 1,25(OH2D3.Levels of the antimicrobial peptides HNP1-3 and LCN2 are lower in nasal secretions in asthmatics and are not substantially affected by a short-term treatment with active vitamin D.

  2. Defense peptides secreted by helminth pathogens: antimicrobial and/or immunomodulator molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eCotton

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune response found in all living species. They possess antimicrobial activities against a broad range of organisms including bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses. HDPs also have the ability to enhance immune responses by acting as immunomodulators. We discovered a new family of HDPs derived from pathogenic helminthes (worms that cause enormous disease in animals and humans worldwide. The discovery of these peptides was based on their similar biochemical and functional characteristics to the human defense peptide LL-37. We propose that these new peptides modulate the immune response via molecular mimicry of mammalian HDPs thus providing a mechanism behind the anti-inflammatory properties of helminth infections.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides in Innate Immunity against Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Min; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides/proteins are ancient and naturallyoccurring antibiotics in innate immune responses in a variety of organisms. Additionally, these peptides have been recognized as important signaling molecules in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. During mycobacterial infection, antimicrobial peptides including cathelicidin, defensin, and hepcidin have antimicrobial activities against mycobacteria, making them promising candidates for future drug development. Additionally, antimicrobial peptides act as immunomodulators in infectious and inflammatory conditions. Multiple crucial functions of cathelicidins in antimycobacterial immune defense have been characterized not only in terms of direct killing of mycobacteria but also as innate immune regulators, i.e., in secretion of cytokines and chemokines, and mediating autophagy activation. Defensin families are also important during mycobacterial infection and contribute to antimycobacterial defense and inhibition of mycobacterial growth both in vitro and in vivo. Hepcidin, although its role in mycobacterial infection has not yet been characterized, exerts antimycobacterial effects in activated macrophages. The present review focuses on recent efforts to elucidate the roles of host defense peptides in innate immunity to mycobacteria.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides important in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2011-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are present in all walks of life, from plants to animals, and they are considered to be endogenous antibiotics. In general, antimicrobial peptides are determinants of the composition of the microbiota and they function to fend off microbes and prevent infections. Antimicrobial peptides eliminate micro-organisms through disruption of their cell membranes. Their importance in human immunity, and in health as well as disease, has only recently been appreciated. The present review provides an introduction to the field of antimicrobial peptides in general and discusses two of the major classes of mammalian antimicrobial peptides: the defensins and the cathelicidins. The review focuses on their structures, their main modes of action and their regulation.

  5. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins in host-microbe interaction and immediate defense

    OpenAIRE

    Kai-Larsen, Ylva

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are effector molecules of innate immunity and are capable to kill a broad spectrum of microbes, i.e. bacteria, fungi and viruses. They are widespread in nature and have been found in almost all species of the animal kingdom, as well as in plants. The mammalian repertoire of antimicrobial peptides includes the defensins and the cathelicidins. Furthermore, several of the antimicrobial proteins are members of the S100 family. AMPs are ...

  6. Avian Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptides: From Biology to Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guolong Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Host defense peptides (HDPs are an important first line of defense with antimicrobial and immunomoduatory properties. Because they act on the microbial membranes or host immune cells, HDPs pose a low risk of triggering microbial resistance and therefore, are being actively investigated as a novel class of antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are two major families of HDPs in avian species. More than a dozen HDPs exist in birds, with the genes in each HDP family clustered in a single chromosomal segment, apparently as a result of gene duplication and diversification. In contrast to their mammalian counterparts that adopt various spatial conformations, mature avian cathelicidins are mostly α-helical. Avian β-defensins, on the other hand, adopt triple-stranded β-sheet structures similar to their mammalian relatives. Besides classical β-defensins, a group of avian-specific β-defensin-related peptides, namely ovodefensins, exist with a different six-cysteine motif. Like their mammalian counterparts, avian cathelicidins and defensins are derived from either myeloid or epithelial origin expressed in a majority of tissues with broad-spectrum antibacterial and immune regulatory activities. Structure-function relationship studies with several avian HDPs have led to identification of the peptide analogs with potential for use as antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Dietary modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis has also emerged as a promising alternative approach to disease control and prevention in chickens.

  7. Modulation of proinflammatory activity by the engineered cationic antimicrobial peptide WLBU-2 [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xq

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    Shruti M Paranjape

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Host-derived (LL-37 and synthetic (WLBU-2 cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs are known for their membrane-active bactericidal properties. LL-37 is an important mediator for immunomodulation, while the mechanism of action of WLBU-2 remains unclear. Objective: To determine if WLBU-2 induces an early proinflammatory response that facilitates bacterial clearance in cystic fibrosis (CF. Methods: C57BL6 mice were given intranasal or intraperitoneal 1×106 cfu/mL Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA and observed for 2h, followed by instillation of LL-37 or WLBU-2 (2-4mg/kg with subsequent tissue collection at 24h for determination of bacterial colony counts and quantitative RT-PCR measurement of cytokine transcripts. CF airway epithelial cells (IB3-1, ΔF508/W1282X were cultured in appropriate media with supplements. WLBU-2 (25μM was added to the media with RT-PCR measurement of TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts after 20, 30, and 60min. Flow cytometry was used to determine if WLBU-2 assists in cellular uptake of Alexa 488-labeled LPS. Results: In murine lung exposed to intranasal or intraperitoneal WLBU-2, there was a reduction in the number of surviving PA colonies compared to controls. Murine lung exposed to intraperitoneal WLBU-2 showed fewer PA colonies compared to LL-37. After 24h WLBU-2 exposure, PA-induced IL-1β transcripts from lungs showed a twofold decrease (p<0.05, while TNF-α levels were unchanged. LL-37 did not significantly change transcript levels. In IB3-1 cells, WLBU-2 exposure resulted in increased TNF-α and IL-1β transcripts that decreased by 60min. WLBU-2 treatment of IB3-1 cells displayed increased LPS uptake, suggesting a potential role for CAPs in inducing protective proinflammatory responses. Taken together, the cytokine response, LPS uptake, and established antimicrobial activity of WLBU-2 demonstrate its ability to modulate proinflammatory signaling as a protective mechanism to clear infection. Conclusions: The

  8. Avian cathelicidins: Paradigms for the development of anti-infectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, A. van; Molhoek, E.M.; Bikker, F.J.; Yu, P.L.; Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    The broad-spectrum defense system based on host defense peptides (HDPs) is evolutionary very old and many invertebrates rely on this system for protection from bacterial infections. However, in vertebrates the system remained important in spite of the superposition of a very sophisticated adaptive i

  9. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  10. Defensin Production by Human Limbo-Corneal Fibroblasts Infected with Mycobacteria

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    Julieta Luna-Herrera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells of the cornea and the conjunctiva constitutively produce antimicrobial peptides; however, the production of defensins by other cell types located around the eye has not been investigated. We analyzed the production of beta-defensins (hBD and cathelicidin LL-37 during the infection of primary limbo-corneal fibroblasts with M. tuberculosis (MTB, M. abscessus (MAB, and M. smegmatis (MSM. The intracellular survival of each mycobacterium, the production of cytokines and the changes on the distribution of the actin filaments during the infection were also analyzed. Fibroblasts produce basal levels of hBD1 and LL-37 and under PMA stimulation they produce hBD2, hBD3 and overexpress hBD1 and LL-37. MAB induced the highest levels of hBD1 and LL-37 and intermediate levels of IL-6; however, MAB was not eliminated. In addition, MAB induced the greatest change to the distribution of the actin filaments. MTB also produced changes in the structure of the cytoskeleton and induced low levels of hBD1 and IL-6, and intermediate levels of LL-37. The balance of these molecules induced by MTB appeared to contribute to the non-replicative state observed in the limbo-corneal cells. MSM induced the lowest levels of hBD1 and LL-37 but the highest levels of IL-6; MSM was eliminated. The results suggest that mycobacterial infections regulate the production of antimicrobial peptides and cytokines, which in conjunction can contribute to the control of the bacilli.

  11. Doxycycline Indirectly Inhibits Proteolytic Activation of Tryptic Kallikrein-Related Peptidases and Activation of Cathelicidin

    OpenAIRE

    Kanada, Kimberly N.; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Richard L Gallo

    2012-01-01

    The increased abundance and activity of cathelicidin and kallikrein 5 (KLK5), a predominant trypsin-like serine protease (TLSP) in the stratum corneum, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of rosacea, a disorder treated by the use of low-dose doxycycline. Here we hypothesized that doxycycline can inhibit activation of tryptic KLKs through an indirect mechanism by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in keratinocytes. The capacity of doxycycline to directly inhibit enzyme activit...

  12. Curcumin induces human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene expression through a vitamin D receptor-independent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Chunxiao; Rosoha, Elena; Lowry, Malcolm B;

    2013-01-01

    cancer cell line HT-29 and keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. We demonstrated that PUFAs failed to induce CAMP or CYP24A1 mRNA expression in all three cell lines, but curcumin up-regulated CAMP mRNA and protein levels in U937 cells. Curcumin treatment induced CAMP promoter activity from a luciferase reporter...

  13. Development of Cathelicidin-derived peptides for the treatment of infectious diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molhoek, E.M.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics has encouraged strong efforts to develop new antimicrobial agents. In addition, exposure to biological warfare agents may cause highly progressive, acute infections that may be lethal. Unfortunately, an attack by biological warfare ag

  14. 乌骨鸡 Cathelicidins 类抗菌肽基因在大肠杆菌中的融合表达与抑菌活性%Fusion expression of Silkie Cathelicidins genes in Escherichia coli and detection of their anti-bacterial activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴静; 梁永利; 史玉颖; 李玉峰; 马秀丽; 姜亦飞; 宋敏训

    2013-01-01

    Cathelicidins comprise a family of antimicrobial peptides sharing a highly conserved cathelin domain , they play a critical role in the innate immune system of chicken .In order to investigate the antibacterial activity of recom-binant Cathelicidins , the putative mature peptide coding fragments of CathL-1, CathL-2, CathL-3 genes were ampli-fied from the plasmid pMD-CathL containing Cathelicidins cDNA sequences , and then subcloned into pET-30a(+) plasmid respectively .The recombinant vectors named pET 30-CathL1S, pET30-CathL2S and pET30-CathL3S were transformed into the competent cell of E.coli Rosetta ( DE3 ) .The positive clones were cultured and induced to ex-press target protein by addition of 1.0 mmol· L-1 IPTG in LB.SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis demonstrated that cathelicidins genes were expressed in the form of fusion protein , and the apparent molecular weight of expression products were 7.0 kD, 8.0 kD, 7.5 kD, respectively.The recombinant Cathelicidins were able to kill both Gram negative bacteria and Gram positive bacteria by the means of agar well diffusion assay (AWDA), especially for the antibiotic-resistant strains .%Cathelicidins抗菌肽是含高度保守cathelin结构域的一大类抗菌肽,在家禽天然免疫系统中发挥重要作用。通过PCR方法,从含乌骨鸡Cathelicidins 抗菌肽基因( CathL-1,-2,-3) cDNA 完整序列的质粒pMD-CathL中分别扩增Cathelicidins-1,-2,-3成熟肽的编码序列,将其分别克隆至原核表达载体pET-30a(+)中,构建其重组表达质粒pET30-CathL1S,pET30-CathL2S,pET30-CathL3S,经测序验证的重组质粒转化大肠杆菌Rosetta(DE3)菌株。阳性克隆菌株在37℃,1.0 mmol· L-1 IPTG的条件下进行诱导表达。 SDS-PAGE和West-ern-blot分析表明,Cathelicidins成熟肽片段均在大肠杆菌中以融合形式成功表达,表达产物的表观分子量分别为7.0,8.0,7.5 kD。琼脂糖孔穴扩散法检测显示表达产物对

  15. The Alzheimer's disease-associated amyloid beta-protein is an antimicrobial peptide.

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    Stephanie J Soscia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta is believed to be the key mediator of Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Abeta is most often characterized as an incidental catabolic byproduct that lacks a normal physiological role. However, Abeta has been shown to be a specific ligand for a number of different receptors and other molecules, transported by complex trafficking pathways, modulated in response to a variety of environmental stressors, and able to induce pro-inflammatory activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we provide data supporting an in vivo function for Abeta as an antimicrobial peptide (AMP. Experiments used established in vitro assays to compare antimicrobial activities of Abeta and LL-37, an archetypical human AMP. Findings reveal that Abeta exerts antimicrobial activity against eight common and clinically relevant microorganisms with a potency equivalent to, and in some cases greater than, LL-37. Furthermore, we show that AD whole brain homogenates have significantly higher antimicrobial activity than aged matched non-AD samples and that AMP action correlates with tissue Abeta levels. Consistent with Abeta-mediated activity, the increased antimicrobial action was ablated by immunodepletion of AD brain homogenates with anti-Abeta antibodies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest Abeta is a hitherto unrecognized AMP that may normally function in the innate immune system. This finding stands in stark contrast to current models of Abeta-mediated pathology and has important implications for ongoing and future AD treatment strategies.

  16. Cytotoxicity and the effect of cationic peptide fragments against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreling, Paula Fernanda; Aida, Kelly Limi; Massunari, Loiane; Caiaffa, Karina Sampaio; Percinoto, Célio; Bedran, Telma Blanca Lombardo; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Abuna, Gabriel Flores; Cilli, Eduardo Maffud; Duque, Cristiane

    2016-10-01

    This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and effect of fragments derived from three oral cationic peptides (CP): LL-37, D6-17 and D1-23 against cariogenic bacteria under planktonic and biofilm conditions. For cytotoxicity analysis, two epithelial cell lines were used. The minimum inhibitory concentration and the minimal bactericidal concentration were determined for the CP fragments and the control (chlorhexidine-CHX) against cariogenic bacteria. The fractional inhibitory concentration was obtained for the combinations of CP fragments on Streptococcus mutans. Biofilm assays were conducted with the best antimicrobial CP fragment against S. mutans. The results indicated that D6-17 was not cytotoxic. D1-23, LL-37 and CHX were not cytotoxic in low concentrations. D1-23 presented the best bactericidal activity against S. mutans, S. mitis and S. salivarius. Combinations of CP fragments did not show a synergic effect. D1-23 presented a higher activity against S. mutans biofilm than CHX. It was concluded that D1-23 showed a substantial effect against cariogenic bacteria and low cytotoxicity. PMID:27538256

  17. Structural and functional characterization of CATH_BRALE, the defense molecule in the ancient salmonoid, Brachymystax lenok.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Zhang, Songyan; Gao, Jiuxiang; Guang, Huijuan; Tian, Yuanyong; Zhao, Zongmao; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2013-01-01

    Thick-lipped lenok, Brachymystax lenok is one of the ancient fish species in China and northeast Asia countries. Due to the overfishing, the population of lenok has been declined significantly. Cathelicidins are innate immune effectors that possess both bactericidal activities and immunomodulatory functions. This report identifies and characterizes the salmonoid cathelicidin (CATH_BRALE) from this ancient fish. It consists of open reading frame (ORF) of 886 bp encoding the putative peptide of 199 amino acids. Sequence alignment with other representative salmonid cathelicidins displayed two distinctive features of current lenok cathelicidin: high level of arginine, resulting in high positive charge and glycine residues, which is significantly different from most acknowledged types of cathelicidins; and the six-aminoacid tandem repeated sequence of RPGGGS detected in a variable number of copies among fish cathelicidins, suggesting the existence of a genetically unstable region similar to that found in some mammalian cathelicidins. Expression of CATH_BRALE is predominantly found in gill, with lower levels in the gastrointestinal tract and spleen. The homology modeled structure of CATH_BRALE exhibits structural features of antiparallel b-sheets flanked by a-helices that are representative of small cationic cathelicidin family peptides. CATH_BRALE possesses much stronger antimicrobial activity against gram-negative bacteria than that of the human ortholog, LL-37. The growth of two typical fish bacterial pathogens, gram-negative bacterium of Aeromonas salmonicida and Aeromonas hydrophila was substantially inhibited by synthetic CATH_BRALE, with both MICs as low as 9.38 mM.

  18. Amniotic fluid cathelicidin in PPROM pregnancies: from proteomic discovery to assessing its potential in inflammatory complications diagnosis.

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    Vojtech Tambor

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM complicated by microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC leading to histological chorioamnionitis (HCA significantly impacts perinatal morbidity. Unfortunately, no well-established tool for identifying PPROM patients threatened by these disorders is available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed an unbiased exploratory analysis of amniotic fluid proteome changes due to MIAC and HCA. From among the top five proteins that showed the most profound and significant change, we sought to confirm results concerning cathelicidin (P49913, CAMP_HUMAN, since an ELISA kit was readily available for this protein. In our exploratory proteomic study, cathelicidin showed a ∼6-fold higher concentration in PPROM patients with confirmed MIAC and HCA. We verified significantly higher levels of cathelicidin in exploratory samples (women without both MIAC and HCA: median 1.4 ng/ml; women with both conditions confirmed: median 3.6 ng/ml; p = 0.0003. A prospective replication cohort was used for independent validation and for assessment of cathelicidin potential to stratify women with MIAC leading to HCA from women in whom at least one of these conditions was ruled out. We confirmed the association of higher amniotic fluid cathelicidin levels with MIAC leading to HCA (the presence of both MIAC and HCA: median 3.1 ng/ml; other women: median 1.4 ng/ml; p<0.0001. A cathelicidin concentration of 4.0 ng/ml was found to be the best cut-off point for identifying PPROM women with both MIAC and HCA. When tested on the validation cohort, a sensitivity of 48%, a specificity of 90%, a likelihood ratio of 5.0, and an area under receiver-operating characteristic curve of 71% were achieved for identification of women with MIAC leading to HCA. CONCLUSIONS: Our multi-stage study suggests cathelicidin as a candidate marker that should be considered for a panel of amniotic fluid proteins permitting identification

  19. Characterization and performance of short cationic antimicrobial peptide isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juba, Melanie; Porter, Devin; Dean, Scott; Gillmor, Susan; Bishop, Barney

    2013-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) represent an ancient defense mechanism against invading bacteria, with peptides such as the cathelicidins being essential elements of vertebrate innate immunity. CAMPs are typically associated with broad-spectrum antimicrobial potency and limited bacterial resistance. The cathelicidin identified from the elapid snake Naja atra (NA-CATH) contains a semi-conserved repeated 11-residue motif (ATRA motif) with a sequence pattern consistent with formation of an amphipathic helical conformation. Short peptide amides (ATRA-1, -1A, -1P, and -2) generated based on the pair of ATRA motifs in NA-CATH exhibited varied antimicrobial potencies. The small size of the ATRA peptides, coupled with their varied antimicrobial performances, make them interesting models to study the impact various physico-chemical properties have on antimicrobial performance in helical CAMPs. Accordingly, the D- and L-enantiomers of the peptide ATRA-1A, which in earlier studies had shown both good antimicrobial performance and strong helical character, were investigated in order to assess the impact peptide stereochemistry has on antimicrobial performance and interaction with chiral membranes. The ATRA-1A isomers exhibit varied potencies against four bacterial strains, and their conformational properties in the presence of mixed zwitterionic/anionic liposomes are influenced by anionic lipid content. These studies reveal subtle differences in the properties of the peptide isomers. Differences are also seen in the abilities of the ATRA-1A isomers to induce liposome fusion/aggregation, bilayer rearrangement and lysing through turbidity studies and fluorescence microscopy. The similarities and differences in the properties of the ATRA-1A isomers could aid in efforts to develop D-peptide-based therapeutics using high-performing L-peptides as templates.

  20. IL-10 inhibits while calcitriol reestablishes placental antimicrobial peptides gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Noyola-Martínez, Nancy; Barrera, David; Zaga-Clavellina, Verónica; Avila, Euclides; Halhali, Ali; Biruete, Benjamín; Larrea, Fernando; Díaz, Lorenza

    2015-04-01

    IL-10 and calcitriol help to achieve a successful pregnancy by suppressing active maternal immunity; however, these factors exert opposite effects upon microbial infections. In the skin and immune cells, IL-10 downregulates β-defensins while calcitriol induces cathelicidin gene expression in various tissues including placenta. Though, the regulation of human placental β-defensins by IL-10 and calcitriol has not been studied. Therefore, we explored the regulation of these antimicrobial peptides expression in cultured placental cells by calcitriol and IL-10 alone and combined. Real time PCR showed that calcitriol stimulated, while IL-10 inhibited, β-defensins and cathelicidin gene expression (Pantimicrobial peptides gene expression above control values, overriding IL-10 inhibitory effects. Calcitriol downregulated endogenous IL-10 secretion. Interestingly, calcitriol and TNF-α cooperatively enhanced β-defensins, while TNF-α reduced basal and calcitriol-stimulated cathelicidin gene expression. In summary, calcitriol and IL-10 exerted opposite effects on antimicrobial peptides expression in the human placenta, suggesting that unbalanced production of IL-10 and calcitriol could be deleterious to innate immune responses during gestation. Our results suggest that calcitriol enhancement of placental defenses involves two mechanisms: (1) downregulation of IL-10 secretion and (2) direct upregulation of β-defensins and cathelicidin gene expression. Considering that IL-10 and calcitriol differentially regulate the innate immune response in the placenta, in the case of an infection, calcitriol might restrict IL-10 permissive actions towards microbial invasion while restrains inflammation, allowing for pregnancy to continue in quiescence. These results strongly advice maternal vitamin D sufficiency during pregnancy.

  1. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

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    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  2. Effect of BMAP-28 antimicrobial peptides on Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynn, Miriam A.; Kindrachuk, Jason; Marr, Alexandra K.;

    2011-01-01

    Background: Protozoan parasites, such as Leishmania, still pose an enormous public health problem in many countries throughout the world. Current measures are outdated and have some associated drug resistance, prompting the search into novel therapies. Several innovative approaches are under...... of the cathelicidin family of HDPs have demonstrated significant antimicrobial activities against various parasites including Leishmania. The cathelicidin bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 28 (BMAP-28) has broad antimicrobial activities and confers protection in animal models of bacterial infection or sepsis. We...... tested the effectiveness of the use of BMAP-28 and two of its isomers the D-amino acid form (D-BMAP-28) and the retro-inverso form (RI-BMAP-28), as anti-leishmanial agents against the promastigote and amastigote intracellular Leishmania major lifecycle stages. Methodology/Principal Findings: An MTS...

  3. Proteins, peptides, polysaccharides, and nucleotides with inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus and its enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Chan, Wai Yee

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, has claimed innumerable lives in the past. Many biomolecules which suppress HIV replication and also other biomolecules that inhibit enzymes essential to HIV replication have been reported. Proteins including a variety of milk proteins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, ribonucleases, antifungal proteins, and trypsin inhibitors; peptides comprising cathelicidins, defensins, synthetic peptides, and others; polysaccharides and polysaccharopeptides; nucleosides, nucleotides, and ribozymes, demonstrated anti-HIV activity. In many cases, the mechanism of anti-HIV action has been elucidated. Strategies have been devised to augment the anti-HIV potency of these compounds.

  4. Aliphatic acid-conjugated antimicrobial peptides--potential agents with anti-tumor, multidrug resistance-reversing activity and enhanced stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Wang, Xuekun; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-07-28

    Compared with traditional therapeutics, antimicrobial peptides as novel anti-tumor agents have prominent advantages of higher specificity and circumvention of multi-drug resistance. In a previous study, we found that B1, an antimicrobial peptide derived from Cathelicidin-BF15, presented specific anti-tumor activity against several tumor cells. Since aliphatic chain-conjugated peptides have shown ameliorative activity and stability, we conjugated aliphatic acids with different lengths to the amino terminal of B1. All the conjugated peptides exhibited improved anti-tumor activity over B1. Further investigations revealed that the peptides were capable of disrupting the cell membrane, stimulating cytochrome c release into the cytosol, which results in apoptosis. The peptides also acted against multidrug resistant cells and had multidrug resistance-reversing effects. Additionally, conjugation of aliphatic acid enhanced the peptide stability in plasma. In summary, aliphatic acid-modified peptides might be promising anti-tumor agents in the future. PMID:26083110

  5. Phosphoethanolamine Transferase LptA in Haemophilus ducreyi Modifies Lipid A and Contributes to Human Defensin Resistance In Vitro.

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    Michael P Trombley

    Full Text Available Haemophilus ducreyi resists the cytotoxic effects of human antimicrobial peptides (APs, including α-defensins, β-defensins, and the cathelicidin LL-37. Resistance to LL-37, mediated by the sensitive to antimicrobial peptide (Sap transporter, is required for H. ducreyi virulence in humans. Cationic APs are attracted to the negatively charged bacterial cell surface. In other gram-negative bacteria, modification of lipopolysaccharide or lipooligosaccharide (LOS by the addition of positively charged moieties, such as phosphoethanolamine (PEA, confers AP resistance by means of electrostatic repulsion. H. ducreyi LOS has PEA modifications at two sites, and we identified three genes (lptA, ptdA, and ptdB in H. ducreyi with homology to a family of bacterial PEA transferases. We generated non-polar, unmarked mutants with deletions in one, two, or all three putative PEA transferase genes. The triple mutant was significantly more susceptible to both α- and β-defensins; complementation of all three genes restored parental levels of AP resistance. Deletion of all three PEA transferase genes also resulted in a significant increase in the negativity of the mutant cell surface. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that LptA was required for PEA modification of lipid A; PtdA and PtdB did not affect PEA modification of LOS. In human inoculation experiments, the triple mutant was as virulent as its parent strain. While this is the first identified mechanism of resistance to α-defensins in H. ducreyi, our in vivo data suggest that resistance to cathelicidin LL-37 may be more important than defensin resistance to H. ducreyi pathogenesis.

  6. Low plasma level of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18) predicts increased infectious disease mortality in patients undergoing hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gombart, Adrian F; Bhan, Ishir; Borregaard, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    hemodialysis. Case patients (n = 81) were those who died of an infectious disease within 1 year; control patients (n = 198) were those who survived at least 1 year while undergoing dialysis. RESULTS: Mean (+/-SD) baseline levels of hCAP18 in case patients and control patients were 539 +/- 278 ng/mL and 650...

  7. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerkan, Louise; Sonesson, Andreas; Schenck, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP) that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP), that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs). lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR) and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34) that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes. PMID:27399723

  8. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP

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    Louise Bjerkan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP, that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs. lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34 that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes.

  9. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of LL-37 and its truncated variants against Burkholderia pseudomallei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kanthawong; J.G.M. Bolscher; E.C.I. Veerman; J. van Marle; H.J.J. de Soet; K. Nazmi; S. Wongratanacheewin; S. Taweechaisupapong

    2012-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei is the aetiological agent of melioidosis, which is an endemic disease in tropical areas of Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. Burkholderia pseudomallei has intrinsic resistance to a number of commonly used antibiotics and has also been report

  10. Gallinacin and Fowlicidin: Two Promising Antimicrobial Peptides in ChickensAND#8212;A Review

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    C. S. Mukhopadhyaya

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMP which have been identified in almost all groups of organisms, are the small cationic molecules that recognize the pathogen associated molecular patterns of the microbes. In chicken two main AMPs that play significant roles in bolstering the innate immunity are gallinacins and fowlicidins, which are the functional analogues of the mammalian beta-defensins and cathelicidins. Gallinacin identifies the Gram negative bacteria while fowlicidin exerts broad spectral activity. The basic mechanism of action is by far similar in both groups of AMPs. The ‘docking sites’ of these antimicrobial peptides includes the “lipid A” moiety of lipo polysaccharides, lipo-teichoic acids, anionic membrane phospholipids on bacterial surfaces. These AMPs block the DNA replication and protein synthesis in bacteria causing death of the microbe. Researchers have identified reproducible molecular markers of those peptides for selection of disease resistant stock of chickens. [Vet. World 2010; 3(6.000: 297-300

  11. Vitamin D analogs differentially control antimicrobial peptide/"alarmin" expression in psoriasis.

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    Mark Peric

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are strongly expressed in lesional skin in psoriasis and play an important role as proinflammatory "alarmins" in this chronic skin disease. Vitamin D analogs like calcipotriol have antipsoriatic effects and might mediate this effect by changing AMP expression. In this study, keratinocytes in lesional psoriatic plaques showed decreased expression of the AMPs beta-defensin (HBD 2 and HBD3 after topical treatment with calcipotriol. At the same time, calcipotriol normalized the proinflammatory cytokine milieu and decreased interleukin (IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-8 transcript abundance in lesional psoriatic skin. In contrast, cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression was increased by calcipotriol while psoriasin expression remained unchanged. In cultured human epidermal keratinocytes the effect of different vitamin D analogs on the expression of AMPs was further analyzed. All vitamin D analogs tested blocked IL-17A induced HBD2 expression by increasing IkappaB-alpha protein and inhibition of NF-kappaB signaling. At the same time vitamin D analogs induced cathelicidin through activation of the vitamin D receptor and MEK/ERK signaling. These studies suggest that vitamin D analogs differentially alter AMP expression in lesional psoriatic skin and cultured keratinocytes. Balancing AMP "alarmin" expression might be a novel goal in treatment of chronic inflammatory skin diseases.

  12. Ancient antimicrobial peptides kill antibiotic-resistant pathogens: Australian mammals provide new options.

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    Jianghui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To overcome the increasing resistance of pathogens to existing antibiotics the 10×'20 Initiative declared the urgent need for a global commitment to develop 10 new antimicrobial drugs by the year 2020. Naturally occurring animal antibiotics are an obvious place to start. The recently sequenced genomes of mammals that are divergent from human and mouse, including the tammar wallaby and the platypus, provide an opportunity to discover novel antimicrobials. Marsupials and monotremes are ideal potential sources of new antimicrobials because they give birth to underdeveloped immunologically naïve young that develop outside the sterile confines of a uterus in harsh pathogen-laden environments. While their adaptive immune system develops innate immune factors produced either by the mother or by the young must play a key role in protecting the immune-compromised young. In this study we focus on the cathelicidins, a key family of antimicrobial peptide genes. PRINCIPAL FINDING: We identified 14 cathelicidin genes in the tammar wallaby genome and 8 in the platypus genome. The tammar genes were expressed in the mammary gland during early lactation before the adaptive immune system of the young develops, as well as in the skin of the pouch young. Both platypus and tammar peptides were effective in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens. One potent peptide, expressed in the early stages of tammar lactation, effectively killed multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Marsupial and monotreme young are protected by antimicrobial peptides that are potent, broad spectrum and salt resistant. The genomes of our distant relatives may hold the key for the development of novel drugs to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens.

  13. High therapeutic efficacy of Cathelicidin-WA against postweaning diarrhea via inhibiting inflammation and enhancing epithelial barrier in the intestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongbo; Zhang, Lin; Gan, Zhenshun; Xiong, Haitao; Yu, Caihua; Du, Huahua; Wang, Yizhen

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a leading cause of death among young mammals, especially during weaning. Here, we investigated the effects of Cathelicidin-WA (CWA) on diarrhea, intestinal morphology, inflammatory responses, epithelial barrier and microbiota in the intestine of young mammals during weaning. Piglets with clinical diarrhea were selected and treated with saline (control), CWA or enrofloxacin (Enro) for 4 days. Both CWA and Enro effectively attenuated diarrhea. Compared with the control, CWA decreased IL-6, IL-8 and IL-22 levels and reduced neutrophil infiltration into the jejunum. CWA inhibited inflammation by down-regulating the TLR4-, MyD88- and NF-κB-dependent pathways. Additionally, CWA improved intestinal morphology by increasing villus and microvillus heights and enhancing intestinal barrier function by increasing tight junction (TJ) protein expression and augmenting wound-healing ability in intestinal epithelial cells. CWA also improved microbiota composition and increased short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) levels in feces. By contrast, Enro not only disrupted the intestinal barrier but also negatively affected microbiota composition and SCFA levels in the intestine. In conclusion, CWA effectively attenuated inflammation, enhanced intestinal barrier function, and improved microbiota composition in the intestines of weaned piglets. These results suggest that CWA could be an effective and safe therapy for diarrhea or other intestinal diseases in young mammals. PMID:27181680

  14. End-tagging of ultra-short antimicrobial peptides by W/F stretches to facilitate bacterial killing.

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    Mukesh Pasupuleti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to increasing resistance development among bacteria, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, are receiving increased attention. Ideally, AMP should display high bactericidal potency, but low toxicity against (human eukaryotic cells. Additionally, short and proteolytically stable AMPs are desired to maximize bioavailability and therapeutic versatility. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A facile approach is demonstrated for reaching high potency of ultra-short antimicrobal peptides through end-tagging with W and F stretches. Focusing on a peptide derived from kininogen, KNKGKKNGKH (KNK10 and truncations thereof, end-tagging resulted in enhanced bactericidal effect against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus. Through end-tagging, potency and salt resistance could be maintained down to 4-7 amino acids in the hydrophilic template peptide. Although tagging resulted in increased eukaryotic cell permeabilization at low ionic strength, the latter was insignificant at physiological ionic strength and in the presence of serum. Quantitatively, the most potent peptides investigated displayed bactericidal effects comparable to, or in excess of, that of the benchmark antimicrobial peptide LL-37. The higher bactericidal potency of the tagged peptides correlated to a higher degree of binding to bacteria, and resulting bacterial wall rupture. Analogously, tagging enhanced peptide-induced rupture of liposomes, particularly anionic ones. Additionally, end-tagging facilitated binding to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, both effects probably contributing to the selectivity displayed by these peptides between bacteria and eukaryotic cells. Importantly, W-tagging resulted in peptides with maintained stability against proteolytic degradation by human leukocyte elastase, as well as staphylococcal aureolysin and V8 proteinase. The biological relevance of these findings was demonstrated ex vivo for pig skin infected by S. aureus and

  15. Pancreatic β-Cells Limit Autoimmune Diabetes via an Immunoregulatory Antimicrobial Peptide Expressed under the Influence of the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia; Furio, Laetitia; Mecheri, Ramine; van der Does, Anne M; Lundeberg, Erik; Saveanu, Loredana; Chen, Yongquan; van Endert, Peter; Agerberth, Birgitta; Diana, Julien

    2015-08-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed by epithelial and immune cells are largely described for the defense against invading microorganisms. Recently, their immunomodulatory functions have been highlighted in various contexts. However how AMPs expressed by non-immune cells might influence autoimmune responses in peripheral tissues, such as the pancreas, is unknown. Here, we found that insulin-secreting β-cells produced the cathelicidin related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP) and that this production was defective in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. CRAMP administrated to prediabetic NOD mice induced regulatory immune cells in the pancreatic islets, dampening the incidence of autoimmune diabetes. Additional investigation revealed that the production of CRAMP by β-cells was controlled by short-chain fatty acids produced by the gut microbiota. Accordingly, gut microbiota manipulations in NOD mice modulated CRAMP production and inflammation in the pancreatic islets, revealing that the gut microbiota directly shape the pancreatic immune environment and autoimmune diabetes development. PMID:26253786

  16. The innate defense antimicrobial peptides hBD3 and RNase7 are induced in human umbilical vein endothelial cells by classical inflammatory cytokines but not Th17 cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgey, Christine; Kern, Winfried V; Römer, Winfried; Sakinc, Türkan; Rieg, Siegbert

    2015-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional effector molecules of innate immunity. In this study we investigated whether endothelial cells actively contribute to innate defense mechanisms by expression of antimicrobial peptides. We therefore stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with inflammatory cytokines, Th17 cytokines, heat-inactivated bacteria, bacterial conditioned medium (BCM) of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus sanguinis, and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Stimulation with single cytokines induced discrete expression of human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) by IFN-γ or IL-1β and of ribonuclease 7 (RNase7) by TNF-α without any effects on LL-37 gene expression. Stronger hBD3 and RNase7 induction was observed after combined stimulation with IL-1β, TNF-α and IFN-γ and was confirmed by high hBD3 and RNase7 peptide levels in cell culture supernatants. In contrast, Th17 cytokines or stimulation with LTA did not result in AMP production. Moreover, only BCM of an invasive S. aureus bacteremia isolate induced hBD3 in HUVEC. We conclude that endothelial cells actively contribute to prevent dissemination of pathogens at the blood-tissue-barrier by production of AMPs that exhibit microbicidal and immunomodulatory functions. Further investigations should focus on tissue-specific AMP induction in different endothelial cell types, on pathogen-specific induction patterns and potentially involved pattern-recognition receptors of endothelial cells.

  17. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafi eRashid

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs target anionic lipids (e.g. phosphatidylglycerol (PG and cardiolipins (CL in the cell membrane and anionic components (e.g. lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g. lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1 CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2 delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3 CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction.

  18. Focal Targeting of the Bacterial Envelope by Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Rafi; Veleba, Mark; Kline, Kimberly A

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are utilized by both eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. AMPs such as the human beta defensins, human neutrophil peptides, human cathelicidin, and many bacterial bacteriocins are cationic and capable of binding to anionic regions of the bacterial surface. Cationic AMPs (CAMPs) target anionic lipids [e.g., phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipins (CL)] in the cell membrane and anionic components [e.g., lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)] of the cell envelope. Bacteria have evolved mechanisms to modify these same targets in order to resist CAMP killing, e.g., lysinylation of PG to yield cationic lysyl-PG and alanylation of LTA. Since CAMPs offer a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are becoming less effective due to rapidly emerging antibiotic resistance, there is a strong need to improve our understanding about the AMP mechanism of action. Recent literature suggests that AMPs often interact with the bacterial cell envelope at discrete foci. Here we review recent AMP literature, with an emphasis on focal interactions with bacteria, including (1) CAMP disruption mechanisms, (2) delocalization of membrane proteins and lipids by CAMPs, and (3) CAMP sensing systems and resistance mechanisms. We conclude with new approaches for studying the bacterial membrane, e.g., lipidomics, high resolution imaging, and non-detergent-based membrane domain extraction. PMID:27376064

  19. Intestinal antimicrobial peptides during homeostasis, infection and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana R Muniz

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, including defensins and cathelicidins, constitute an arsenal of innate regulators of paramount importance in the gut. The intestinal epithelium is exposed to myriad of enteric pathogens and these endogenous peptides are essential to fend off microbes and protect against infections. It is becoming increasingly evident that AMPs shape the composition of the commensal microbiota and help maintain intestinal homeostasis. They contribute to innate immunity, hence playing important functions in health and disease. AMP expression is tightly controlled by the engagement of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and their impairment is linked to abnormal host responses to infection and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. In this review, we provide an overview of the mucosal immune barriers and the intricate crosstalk between the host and the microbiota during homeostasis. We focus on the AMPs and pay particular attention to how PRRs promote their secretion in the intestine. Furthermore, we discuss their production and main functions in three different scenarios, at steady state, throughout infection with enteric pathogens and IBD.

  20. The innate defense regulator peptides IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulate human neutrophil functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyonsaba, François; Madera, Laurence; Afacan, Nicole; Okumura, Ko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-07-01

    Although HDPs were originally hypothesized to act as antimicrobial agents, they also have been shown to broadly modulate the immune response through the activation of different cell types. We recently developed a series of novel, synthetic peptides, termed IDRs, which are conceptually based on a natural HDP, bovine bactenecin. We showed that IDR-1 and IDR-1002 protect the host against bacterial infections through the induction of chemokines. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of the IDRs on various functions of human neutrophils. Here, we demonstrated that IDR-HH2, IDR-1002, and IDR-1018 modulated the expression of neutrophil adhesion and activation markers. Moreover, these IDRs enhanced neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells in a β₂ integrin-dependent manner and induced neutrophil migration and chemokine production. The IDR peptides also increased the release of the neutrophil-generated HDPs (antimicrobial), human α-defensins, and LL-37 and augmented neutrophil-mediated killing of Escherichia coli. Notably, the IDRs significantly suppressed LPS-mediated neutrophil degranulation, the release of ROS, and the production of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-10, consistent with their ability to dampen inflammation. As evidenced by the inhibitory effects of MAPK-specific inhibitors, IDRs activated the MAPK pathway that was required for chemokine production. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence regarding the contribution of the IDR peptides to the innate immune response through the modulation of neutrophil functions. The results described here may aid in the development of IDRs as novel, anti-infective and immunomodulatory agents.

  1. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Monica; Lagatolla, Cristina; Dolzani, Lucilla; Milan, Annalisa; Pacor, Sabrina; Liut, Gianfranco; Tossi, Alessandro; Cescutti, Paola; Rizzo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1-35), was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation.

  2. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Benincasa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1–35, was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation.

  3. Biofilms from Klebsiella pneumoniae: Matrix Polysaccharide Structure and Interactions with Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Monica; Lagatolla, Cristina; Dolzani, Lucilla; Milan, Annalisa; Pacor, Sabrina; Liut, Gianfranco; Tossi, Alessandro; Cescutti, Paola; Rizzo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm matrices of two Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates, KpTs101 and KpTs113, were investigated for their polysaccharide composition and protective effects against antimicrobial peptides. Both strains were good biofilm producers, with KpTs113 forming flocs with very low adhesive properties to supports. Matrix exopolysaccharides were isolated and their monosaccharide composition and glycosidic linkage types were defined. KpTs101 polysaccharide is neutral and composed only of galactose, in both pyranose and furanose ring configurations. Conversely, KpTs113 polysaccharide is anionic due to glucuronic acid units, and also contains glucose and mannose residues. The susceptibility of the two strains to two bovine cathelicidin antimicrobial peptides, BMAP-27 and Bac7(1-35), was assessed using both planktonic cultures and biofilms. Biofilm matrices exerted a relevant protection against both antimicrobials, which act with quite different mechanisms. Similar protection was also detected when antimicrobial peptides were tested against planktonic bacteria in the presence of the polysaccharides extracted from KpTs101 and KpTs113 biofilms, suggesting sequestering adduct formation with antimicrobials. Circular dichroism experiments on BMAP-27 in the presence of increasing amounts of either polysaccharide confirmed their ability to interact with the peptide and induce an α-helical conformation. PMID:27681920

  4. Antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling-Juan; Gallo, Richard L

    2016-01-11

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are a diverse class of naturally occurring molecules that are produced as a first line of defense by all multicellular organisms. These proteins can have broad activity to directly kill bacteria, yeasts, fungi, viruses and even cancer cells. Insects and plants primarily deploy AMPs as an antibiotic to protect against potential pathogenic microbes, but microbes also produce AMPs to defend their environmental niche. In higher eukaryotic organisms, AMPs can also be referred to as 'host defense peptides', emphasizing their additional immunomodulatory activities. These activities are diverse, specific to the type of AMP, and include a variety of cytokine and growth factor-like effects that are relevant to normal immune homeostasis. In some instances, the inappropriate expression of AMPs can also induce autoimmune diseases, thus further highlighting the importance of understanding these molecules and their complex activities. This Primer will provide an update of our current understanding of AMPs. PMID:26766224

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Adem Bahar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics.

  6. Antimicrobial properties and membrane-active mechanism of a potential α-helical antimicrobial derived from cathelicidin PMAP-36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinfeng Lv

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, which present in the non-specific immune system of organism, are amongst the most promising candidates for the development of novel antimicrobials. The modification of naturally occurring AMPs based on their residue composition and distribution is a simple and effective strategy for optimization of known AMPs. In this study, a series of truncated and residue-substituted derivatives of antimicrobial peptide PMAP-36 were designed and synthesized. The 24-residue truncated peptide, GI24, displayed antimicrobial activity comparable to the mother peptide PMAP-36 with MICs ranging from 1 to 4 µM, which is lower than the MICs of bee venom melittin. Although GI24 displayed high antimicrobial activity, its hemolytic activity was much lower than melittin, suggesting that GI24 have optimal cell selectivity. In addition, the crucial site of GI24 was identified through single site-mutation. An amino acid with high hydrophobicity at position 23 played an important role in guaranteeing the high antimicrobial activity of GI24. Then, lipid vesicles and whole bacteria were employed to investigate the membrane-active mechanisms. Membrane-simulating experiments showed that GI24 interacted strongly with negatively charged phospholipids and weakly with zwitterionic phospholipids, which corresponded well with the data of its biological activities. Membrane permeabilization and flow cytometry provide the evidence that GI24 killed microbial cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane and damaging membrane integrity. GI24 resulted in greater cell morphological changes and visible pores on cell membrane as determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Taken together, the peptide GI24 may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against the frequently-encountered bacteria.

  7. Peptides with dual mode of action: Killing bacteria and preventing endotoxin-induced sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, Klaus; Heinbockel, Lena; Correa, Wilmar; Lohner, Karl

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections, with the most severe form being sepsis, can often not be treated adequately leading to high morbidity and lethality of infected patients in critical care units. In particular, the increase in resistant bacterial strains and the lack of new antibiotics are main reasons for the worsening of the current situation, As a new approach, the use of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) seems to be promising, combining the ability of broad-spectrum bactericidal activity and low potential of induction of resistance. Peptides based on natural defense proteins or polypeptides such as lactoferrin, Limulus anti-lipopolysaccharide factor (LALF), cathelicidins, and granulysins are candidates due to their high affinity to bacteria and to their pathogenicity factors, in first line lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) of Gram-negative origin. In this review, we discuss literature with the focus on the use of AMPs from natural sources and their variants as antibacterial as well as anti-endotoxin (anti-inflammatory) drugs. Considerable progress has been made by the design of new AMPs for acting efficiently against the LPS-induced inflammation reaction in vitro as well as in vivo (mouse) models of sepsis. Furthermore, the data indicate that efficient antibacterial compounds are not necessarily equally efficient as anti-endotoxin drugs and vice versa. The most important reason for this may be the different molecular geometry of LPS in bacteria and in free form. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26801369

  8. Absence of in vitro innate immunomodulation by insect-derived short proline-rich antimicrobial peptides points to direct antibacterial action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Stefanie; Knappe, Daniel; Berthold, Nicole; von Buttlar, Heiner; Hoffmann, Ralf; Alber, Gottfried

    2012-10-01

    Some antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been described to exert immunomodulatory effects, which may contribute to their in vivo antibacterial activity. Very recently, we could show that novel oncocin and apidaecin derivatives are potently antibacterially active in vivo. Therefore, we studied oncocin and apidaecin derivatives for their effects on murine dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages and compared them with well-known immunomodulatory activities of murine cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (CRAMP). To characterize the immunomodulatory activity of the peptides on key cells of the innate immune system, we stimulated murine DC and macrophages with the oncocin and apidaecin derivatives alone, or in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We analyzed the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, the expression of surface activation markers, and the chemotactic activity of the AMPs. In contrast to LPS, none of the oncocin and apidaecin derivatives alone has an influence on cytokine or surface marker expression by DC and macrophages. Furthermore, the tested oncocin and apidaecin derivatives do not modulate the immune response after LPS stimulation, whereas CRAMP shows a reduction of the LPS-mediated immune response as expected. All peptides tested are not chemotactic for DC. Together, lack of in vitro immunomodulatory effects by oncocin and apidaecin derivatives on key cells of the innate murine immune system suggests that their potent in vivo antibacterial activity relies on a direct antibacterial effect. This will simplify further pharmaceutical investigation and development of insect peptides as therapeutic compounds against bacterial infections.

  9. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...

  10. Effect of the antimicrobial peptide tritrpticin on the in vitro viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Veronica V; Miranda-Olvera, Alma D; De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Anaya-Velazquez, Fernando; Rodriguez, Mayra C; Avila, Eva E

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are widely distributed in nature; they play important roles in several aspects of innate immunity and may provide a basis for the design of novel therapeutic agents. In this study, C-amidated tritrpticin, a 13 amino acid tryptophan-rich antimicrobial peptide derived from a porcine cathelicidin, was tested against Trichomonas vaginalis, a protozoan that causes a serious non-viral sexually transmitted disease associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and high risk of HIV-1 infection. Tritrpticin was selected due to its reasonably easy synthesis and because analogs with lower toxicity may be designed. Our results show that tritrpticin-NH(2) at either 100 or 200 μg/ml (52.5 or 105 μM) clearly reduces the viability and growth of Trichomonas vaginalis. Together with tritrpticin-NH(2), sodium bicarbonate further limited trichomonad growth. Additionally, a low concentration of metronidazole (5.8 μM), the most commonly used medication for Trichomonas vaginalis, was more effective against the growth of the parasite when it was combined with tritrpticin-NH(2).

  11. Porcine antimicrobial peptides: new prospects for ancient molecules of host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G; Ross, C R; Blecha, F

    2000-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, endogenous, polycationic molecules that constitute a ubiquitous and significant component of innate immunity. These natural antibiotics have broad microbicidal activity against various bacteria, fungi, and enveloped viruses. Because most AMPs kill bacteria by physical disruption of cell membranes, which may prevent microorganisms from developing resistance against these agents, they are being explored as possible alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Pigs, like many other mammals, produce an impressive array of AMPs, which are synthesized predominantly by host leukocytic phagocytes or mucosal epithelial cells. Currently, more than a dozen distinct porcine AMPs have been identified and a majority belongs to the cathelicidin family. This review briefly summarizes recent advances in porcine AMP research with an emphasis on the diverse biological functions of each peptide. Mechanisms of action of these AMPs and their role in the resistance to infections are considered. Finally, the current status of pharmaceutical and agricultural uses of AMPs as well as future prospects for their application in the food animal industry is discussed.

  12. 皮肤抗菌肽的研究进展%Advances in skin-derived antimicrobial peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勇军; 夏照帆

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptides (AMP) are essential components of innate immunity.Human skin-derived antimicrobial peptides mainly include β-defensins and cathelicidins family and they are widely expressed in skin keratinocytes and inflammatory cells.Skin-derived antimicrobial peptides play important roles in skin,such as protecting skin from infection,regulating the immune response of skin,enhancing wound healing and angiogenesis.Their expressions are influenced by many factors in vivo and in vitro and closely related to various inflammatory diseases of skin.They may also play an important role in wound healing of diabetes.%抗菌肽是机体固有免疫的重要组成部分,人类皮肤抗菌肽主要包括cathelicidins家族和β-防御素家族,广泛表达于皮肤角质形成细胞及各种炎症细胞.皮肤抗菌肽除了直接杀菌作用外,还能调节免疫反应,促进伤口愈合和血管新生,其表达受到体内,体外多种因素的影响,与各种皮肤炎症性疾病发病密切相关,也可能在糖尿病创面愈合中发挥着重要作用.

  13. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  14. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  15. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  19. Peptide-Carrier Conjugation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    To produce antibodies against synthetic peptides it is necessary to couple them to a protein carrier. This chapter provides a nonspecialist overview of peptide-carrier conjugation. Furthermore, a protocol for coupling cysteine-containing peptides to bovine serum albumin is outlined....

  20. Antimicrobial Peptide P60.4Ac-Containing Creams and Gel for Eradication of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Cultured Skin and Airway Epithelial Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; Göblyös, Anikó; Ravensbergen, Bep; Adriaans, Alwin E; Cordfunke, Robert A; Schrumpf, Jasmijn; Limpens, Ronald W A L; Schimmel, Kirsten J M; den Hartigh, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2016-07-01

    We previously found the LL-37-derived peptide P60.4Ac to be effective against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on human epidermal models (EMs). The goal of this study was to identify the preferred carrier for this peptide for topical application on skin and mucosal surfaces. We prepared P60.4Ac in three formulations, i.e., a water-in-oil cream with lanolin (Softisan 649), an oil-in-water cream with polyethylene glycol hexadecyl ether (Cetomacrogol), and a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (hypromellose) 4000 gel. We tested the antimicrobial efficacy of the peptide in these formulations against mupirocin-resistant and -sensitive MRSA strains on EMs and bronchial epithelial models (BEMs). The cytotoxic effects of formulated P60.4Ac on these models were determined using histology and WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Moreover, we assessed the stability of the peptide in these formulations with storage for up to 3 months. Killing of MRSA by P60.4Ac in the two creams was less effective than that by P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel. In agreement with those findings, P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel was highly effective in eradicating the two MRSA strains from EMs. We found that even 0.1% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel killed >99% of the viable planktonic bacteria and >85% of the biofilm-associated bacteria on EMs. Hypromellose gels containing 0.1% and 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac effectively reduced the numbers of viable MRSA cells from BEMs by >90%. No cytotoxic effects of P60.4Ac in the hypromellose gel with up to 2% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on keratinocytes in EMs and in the hypromellose gel with up to 0.5% (wt/wt) P60.4Ac on epithelial cells in BEMs were observed. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that P60.4Ac was stable in the Softisan cream and the hypromellose gel but not in the Cetomacrogol cream. We conclude that P60.4Ac formulated in hypromellose gel is both stable and highly effective in eradicating MRSA from colonized EMs and

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL PEPTIDES: IMPORTANT ROLES IN HUMAN HEALTH AND DISEASES%抗菌肽:人类健康和疾病中的重要角色

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢雪梅; 金小宝; 黎运西; 朱家勇

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides(AMPs)are one kind of polypeptides produced by living organisms' defense system. Substantial evidence accumulated in recent years indicates that AMPs not only possess direct antimicrobial activities but also have multiple immunomodulatory activities. They play an important role in both the innate and adaptive immunity of the host. Their expressions are closely related to many human diseases. Thus, antimicrobial peptides may have potential applications as new therapeutics agents. The intent of this article is to review the structures, expression and bioactivities of defensins and cathelicidin, the main families of AMPs in human. Correlations between human diseases and antimicrobial peptides are also discussed.%抗菌肽是生物体防御系统产生的一类多肽.越来越多的研究表明抗菌肽不仅能够直接抑制和杀灭病原微生物,同时具有多种免疫调节活性,在宿主的天然和适应性免疫中起着重要的作用,因而具有广阔的应用前景.它们的表达水平与人类的许多疾病密切相关.本文对两类主要的人源抗菌肽:防御素和cathelicidin的结构特性、表达和生物活性及其与疾病的关系作一综述.

  2. Plant signalling peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Wiśniewska, Justyna; Trejgell, Alina; Tretyn, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    Biochemical and genetic studies have identified peptides that play crucial roles in plant growth and development, including defence mechanisms in response to wounding by pests, the control of cell division and expansion, and pollen self-incompatibility. The first two signalling peptides to be described in plants were tomato systemin and phytosulfokine (PSK). There is also biochemical evidence that natriuretic peptide-like molecules, immunologically-relatedt o those found ...

  3. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases. PMID:23355488

  4. Insulin C-peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-peptide ... the test depends on the reason for the C-peptide measurement. Ask your health care provider if ... C-peptide is measured to tell the difference between insulin the body produces and insulin someone injects ...

  5. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from...

  6. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.;

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  7. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  8. Introduction to Peptide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Stawikowski, Maciej; Fields, Gregg B.

    2002-01-01

    A number of synthetic peptides are significant commercial or pharmaceutical products, ranging from the dipeptide sugar-substitute aspartame to clinically used hormones, such as oxytocin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and calcitonin. This unit provides an overview of the field of synthetic peptides and proteins. It discusses selecting the solid support and common coupling reagents. Additional information is provided regarding common side reactions and synthesizing modified residues.

  9. The Expanding Family of Bone Marrow Homing Factors for Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Stromal Derived Factor 1 Is Not the Only Player in the Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Z. Ratajczak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-chemokine stromal derived factor 1 (SDF-1, which binds to the CXCR4 and CXCR7 receptors, directs migration and homing of CXCR4+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs to bone marrow (BM and plays a crucial role in retention of these cells in stem cell niches. However, this unique role of SDF-1 has been recently challenged by several observations supporting SDF-1-CXCR4-independent BM homing. Specifically, it has been demonstrated that HSPCs respond robustly to some bioactive lipids, such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P and ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P, and migrate in response to gradients of certain extracellular nucleotides, including uridine triphosphate (UTP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, the responsiveness of HSPCs to an SDF-1 gradient is enhanced by some elements of innate immunity (e.g., C3 complement cascade cleavage fragments and antimicrobial cationic peptides, such as cathelicidin/LL-37 or β2-defensin as well as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Since all these factors are upregulated in BM after myeloblative conditioning for transplantation, a more complex picture of homing emerges that involves several factors supporting, and in some situations even replacing, the SDF-1-CXCR4 axis.

  10. Lactose in human breast milk an inducer of innate immunity with implications for a role in intestinal homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederlund, Andreas; Kai-Larsen, Ylva; Printz, Gordana; Yoshio, Hiroyuki; Alvelius, Gunvor; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Strömberg, Roger; Jörnvall, Hans; Gudmundsson, Gudmundur H; Agerberth, Birgitta

    2013-01-01

    Postpartum, infants have not yet established a fully functional adaptive immune system and are at risk of acquiring infections. Hence, newborns are dependent on the innate immune system with its antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and proteins expressed at epithelial surfaces. Several factors in breast milk are known to confer immune protection, but which the decisive factors are and through which manner they work is unknown. Here, we isolated an AMP-inducing factor from human milk and identified it by electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR to be lactose. It induces the gene (CAMP) that encodes the only human cathelicidin LL-37 in colonic epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The induction was suppressed by two different p38 antagonists, indicating an effect via the p38-dependent pathway. Lactose also induced CAMP in the colonic epithelial cell line T84 and in THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. It further exhibited a synergistic effect with butyrate and phenylbutyrate on CAMP induction. Together, these results suggest an additional function of lactose in innate immunity by upregulating gastrointestinal AMPs that may lead to protection of the neonatal gut against pathogens and regulation of the microbiota of the infant.

  11. Lactose in human breast milk an inducer of innate immunity with implications for a role in intestinal homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Cederlund

    Full Text Available Postpartum, infants have not yet established a fully functional adaptive immune system and are at risk of acquiring infections. Hence, newborns are dependent on the innate immune system with its antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and proteins expressed at epithelial surfaces. Several factors in breast milk are known to confer immune protection, but which the decisive factors are and through which manner they work is unknown. Here, we isolated an AMP-inducing factor from human milk and identified it by electrospray mass spectrometry and NMR to be lactose. It induces the gene (CAMP that encodes the only human cathelicidin LL-37 in colonic epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The induction was suppressed by two different p38 antagonists, indicating an effect via the p38-dependent pathway. Lactose also induced CAMP in the colonic epithelial cell line T84 and in THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. It further exhibited a synergistic effect with butyrate and phenylbutyrate on CAMP induction. Together, these results suggest an additional function of lactose in innate immunity by upregulating gastrointestinal AMPs that may lead to protection of the neonatal gut against pathogens and regulation of the microbiota of the infant.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  14. Electron transfer in peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Afzal; Adhikari, Bimalendu; Martic, Sanela; Munir, Azeema; Shahzad, Suniya; Ahmad, Khurshid; Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard

    2015-02-21

    In this review, we discuss the factors that influence electron transfer in peptides. We summarize experimental results from solution and surface studies and highlight the ongoing debate on the mechanistic aspects of this fundamental reaction. Here, we provide a balanced approach that remains unbiased and does not favor one mechanistic view over another. Support for a putative hopping mechanism in which an electron transfers in a stepwise manner is contrasted with experimental results that support electron tunneling or even some form of ballistic transfer or a pathway transfer for an electron between donor and acceptor sites. In some cases, experimental evidence suggests that a change in the electron transfer mechanism occurs as a result of donor-acceptor separation. However, this common understanding of the switch between tunneling and hopping as a function of chain length is not sufficient for explaining electron transfer in peptides. Apart from chain length, several other factors such as the extent of the secondary structure, backbone conformation, dipole orientation, the presence of special amino acids, hydrogen bonding, and the dynamic properties of a peptide also influence the rate and mode of electron transfer in peptides. Electron transfer plays a key role in physical, chemical and biological systems, so its control is a fundamental task in bioelectrochemical systems, the design of peptide based sensors and molecular junctions. Therefore, this topic is at the heart of a number of biological and technological processes and thus remains of vital interest.

  15. Electromembrane extraction of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchen, Marte; Reubsaet, Léon; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2008-06-20

    Rapid extraction of eight different peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) was demonstrated for the first time. During an extraction time of 5 min, the model peptides migrated from a 500 microL aqueous acidic sample solution, through a thin supported liquid membrane (SLM) of an organic liquid sustained in the pores in the wall of a porous hollow fiber, and into a 25 microL aqueous acidic acceptor solution present inside the lumen of the hollow fiber. The driving force of the extraction was a 50 V potential sustained across the SLM, with the positive electrode in the sample and the negative electrode in the acceptor solution. The nature and the composition of the SLM were highly important for the EME process, and a mixture of 1-octanol and 15% di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate was found to work properly. Using 1mM HCl as background electrolyte in the sample and 100 mM HCl in the acceptor solution, and agitation at 1050 rpm, enrichment up to 11 times was achieved. Recoveries were found to be dependent on the structure of the peptide, indicating that the polarity and the number of ionized groups were important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency. The experimental findings suggested that electromembrane extraction of peptides is possible and may be a valuable tool for future extraction of peptides. PMID:18479691

  16. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity......Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... and hence adjuvants are included to enhance and direct the immune response. Although the vaccine has been tested in ART naïve individuals, we recommend future testing of the vaccine during (early started) ART that improves immune function and to select individuals likely to benefit. Peptides representing...

  17. Synthetic antibiofilm peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; Franco, Octavio Luiz; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-05-01

    Bacteria predominantly exist as multicellular aggregates known as biofilms that are associated with at least two thirds of all infections and exhibit increased adaptive resistance to conventional antibiotic therapies. Therefore, biofilms are major contributors to the global health problem of antibiotic resistance, and novel approaches to counter them are urgently needed. Small molecules of the innate immune system called host defense peptides (HDPs) have emerged as promising templates for the design of potent, broad-spectrum antibiofilm agents. Here, we review recent developments in the new field of synthetic antibiofilm peptides, including mechanistic insights, synergistic interactions with available antibiotics, and their potential as novel antimicrobials against persistent infections caused by biofilms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26724202

  18. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  19. Dicyclopropylmethyl peptide backbone protectant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-08-20

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106-126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit.

  20. Invertebrate FMRFamide related peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajniak, Kevin G

    2013-06-01

    In 1977 the neuropeptide FMRFamide was isolated from the clam, Macrocallista nimbosa. Since then several hundred FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) have been isolated from invertebrate animals. Precursors to the FaRPs likely arose in the cnidarians. With the transition to a bilateral body plan FaRPs became a fixture in the invertebrate phyla. They have come to play a critical role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. FaRPs regulate a variety of body functions including, feeding, digestion, circulation, reproduction, movement. The evolution of the molecular form and function of these omnipresent peptides will be considered.

  1. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth;

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...

  2. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class of ...

  3. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  4. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering. PMID:27479451

  5. Identification of genetic loci required for Campylobacter resistance to fowlicidin-1, a chicken host defense peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ky Van Hoang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are critical components of host defense limiting bacterial infections at the gastrointestinal mucosal surface. Bacterial pathogens have co-evolved with host innate immunity and developed means to counteract the effect of endogenous AMPs. However, molecular mechanisms of AMP resistance in Campylobacter, an important human food borne pathogen with poultry as a major reservoir, are still largely unknown. In this study, random transposon mutagenesis and targeted site-directed mutagenesis approaches were used to identify genetic loci contributing Campylobacter resistance to fowlicidin-1, a chicken AMP belonging to cathelicidin family. An efficient transposon mutagenesis approach (EZ::TNTM Transposome in conjunction with a microtiter plate screening identified three mutants whose susceptibilities to fowlicidin-1 were significantly increased. Backcrossing of the transposon mutations into parent strain confirmed that the AMP-sensitive phenotype in each mutant was linked to the specific transposon insertion. Direct sequencing showed that these mutants have transposon inserted in the genes encoding two-component regulator CbrR, transporter CjaB, and putative trigger factor Tig. Genomic analysis also revealed an operon (Cj1580c-1584c that is homologous to sapABCDF, an operon conferring resistance to AMP in other pathogens. Insertional inactivation of Cj1583c (sapB significantly increased susceptibility of Campylobacter to fowlicidin-1. The sapB as well as tig and cjaB mutants were significantly impaired in their ability to compete with their wild-type strain 81-176 to colonize the chicken cecum. Together, this study identified four genetic loci in Campylobacter that will be useful for characterizing molecular basis of Campylobacter resistance to AMPs, a significant knowledge gap in Campylobacter pathogenesis.

  6. Capsule expression in Streptococcus mitis modulates interaction with oral keratinocytes and alters susceptibility to human antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukke, H V; Engen, S A; Schenck, K; Petersen, F C

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus mitis is a colonizer of the oral cavity and the nasopharynx, and is closely related to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Both species occur in encapsulated and unencapsulated forms, but in S. mitis the role of the capsule in host interactions is mostly unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine how capsule expression in S. mitis can modulate interactions with the host with relevance for colonization. The S. mitis type strain, as well as two mutants of the type strain, an isogenic capsule deletion mutant, and a capsule switch mutant expressing the serotype 4 capsule of S. pneumoniae TIGR4, were used. Wild-type and capsule deletion strains of S. pneumoniae TIGR4 were included for comparison. We found that capsule production in S. mitis reduced adhesion to oral and lung epithelial cells. Further, exposure of oral epithelial cells to encapsulated S. mitis resulted in higher interleukin-6 and CXCL-8 transcription levels relative to the unencapsulated mutant. Capsule expression in S. mitis increased the sensitivity to human neutrophil peptide 1-3 but reduced the sensitivity to human β-defensin-3 and cathelicidin. This was in contrast with S. pneumoniae in which capsule expression has been generally associated with increased sensitivity to human antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Collectively, these findings indicate that capsule expression in S. mitis is important in modulating interactions with epithelial cells, and is associated with increased or reduced susceptibility to AMPs depending on the nature of the AMP.

  7. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in Echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Li

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are important immune effector molecules for invertebrates, including echinoderms, which lack a vertebrate-type adaptive immune system. Here we summarize the knowledge of such peptides in echinoderms. Strongylocins are a novel family of cysteine-rich AMPs, recently identified in the sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis and S. purpuratus. Although these molecules present diverse amino acid sequences, they share an identical cysteine arrangement pattern, dissimilar to other known AMPs. A family of heterodimeric AMPs, named centrocins, are also present in S. droebachiensis. Lysozymes and fragments of larger proteins, such as beta-thymocins, actin, histone 2A and filamin A have also been shown to display antimicrobial activities in echinoderms. Future studies on AMPs should be aimed in revealing how echinoderms use these AMPs in the immune response against microbial pathogens.

  10. The PeptideAtlas Project

    OpenAIRE

    Deutsch, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving g...

  11. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified ...

  12. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  13. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    sequences contain one or several NCAM homophilic binding sites involved in NCAM binding to itself, have been identified. By means of NMR titration analysis and molecular modeling a number of peptides derived from NCAM and targeting NCAM heterophilic ligands such as the fibroblast growth factor receptor...... and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) have been identified. The FGL, dekaCAM, FRM/EncaminA, BCL, EncaminC and EncaminE peptides all target the FGF receptor whereas the heparin binding peptide HBP targets HSPG. Moreover, a number of NCAM binding peptides have been identified employing screening...

  14. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology. PMID:26279082

  15. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  16. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  17. Killing of trypanosomatid parasites by a modified bovine host defense peptide, BMAP-18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee R Haines

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tropical diseases caused by parasites continue to cause socioeconomic devastation that reverberates worldwide. There is a growing need for new control measures for many of these diseases due to increasing drug resistance exhibited by the parasites and problems with drug toxicity. One new approach is to apply host defense peptides (HDP; formerly called antimicrobial peptides to disease control, either to treat infected hosts, or to prevent disease transmission by interfering with parasites in their insect vectors. A potent anti-parasite effector is bovine myeloid antimicrobial peptide-27 (BMAP-27, a member of the cathelicidin family. Although BMAP-27 is a potent inhibitor of microbial growth, at higher concentrations it also exhibits cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. We tested the anti-parasite activity of BMAP-18, a truncated peptide that lacks the hydrophobic C-terminal sequence of the BMAP-27 parent molecule, an alteration that confers reduced toxicity to mammalian cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BMAP-18 showed strong growth inhibitory activity against several species and life cycle stages of African trypanosomes, fish trypanosomes and Leishmania parasites in vitro. When compared to native BMAP-27, the truncated BMAP-18 peptide showed reduced cytotoxicity on a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells and on Sodalis glossindius, a bacterial symbiont of the tsetse vector. The fluorescent stain rhodamine 123 was used in immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry experiments to show that BMAP-18 at low concentrations rapidly disrupted mitochondrial potential without obvious alteration of parasite plasma membranes, thus inducing death by apoptosis. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that higher concentrations of BMAP-18 induced membrane lesions in the parasites as early as 15 minutes after exposure, thus killing them by necrosis. In addition to direct killing of parasites, BMAP-18 was shown to inhibit LPS

  18. Polyclonal Peptide Antisera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihl, Tina H; Illigen, Kristin E; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce and may supplement monoclonal antibodies for some applications or even have some advantages. The choice of species for production of (peptide) antisera is based on practical considerations, including availability of immunogen (vaccine) and animals. Two major factors govern the production of antisera: the nature of adaptive immune responses, which take place over days/weeks and ethical guidelines for animal welfare. Here, simple procedures for immunization of mice, rabbits, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, and chickens are presented. PMID:26424267

  19. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, P.; Sosabowski, J.K.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of resea

  20. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  1. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptide...

  2. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  3. Conus venom peptide pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Richard J; Dutertre, Sébastien; Vetter, Irina; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-04-01

    Conopeptides are a diverse group of recently evolved venom peptides used for prey capture and/or defense. Each species of cone snails produces in excess of 1000 conopeptides, with those pharmacologically characterized (≈ 0.1%) targeting a diverse range of membrane proteins typically with high potency and specificity. The majority of conopeptides inhibit voltage- or ligand-gated ion channels, providing valuable research tools for the dissection of the role played by specific ion channels in excitable cells. It is noteworthy that many of these targets are found to be expressed in pain pathways, with several conopeptides having entered the clinic as potential treatments for pain [e.g., pyroglutamate1-MrIA (Xen2174)] and one now marketed for intrathecal treatment of severe pain [ziconotide (Prialt)]. This review discusses the diversity, pharmacology, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic potential of cone snail venom peptide families acting at voltage-gated ion channels (ω-, μ-, μO-, δ-, ι-, and κ-conotoxins), ligand-gated ion channels (α-conotoxins, σ-conotoxin, ikot-ikot, and conantokins), G-protein-coupled receptors (ρ-conopeptides, conopressins, and contulakins), and neurotransmitter transporters (χ-conopeptides), with expanded discussion on the clinical potential of sodium and calcium channel inhibitors and α-conotoxins. Expanding the discovery of new bioactives using proteomic/transcriptomic approaches combined with high-throughput platforms and better defining conopeptide structure-activity relationships using relevant membrane protein crystal structures are expected to grow the already significant impact conopeptides have had as both research probes and leads to new therapies. PMID:22407615

  4. Potential of phage-displayed peptide library technology to identify functional targeting peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpe, Lauren RH; Mori, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    Combinatorial peptide library technology is a valuable resource for drug discovery and development. Several peptide drugs developed through phage-displayed peptide library technology are presently in clinical trials and the authors envision that phage-displayed peptide library technology will assist in the discovery and development of many more. This review attempts to compile and summarize recent literature on targeting peptides developed through peptide library technology, with special emphasis on novel peptides with targeting capacity evaluated in vivo. PMID:20150977

  5. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  6. Peptide primary messengers in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The peptide primary messengers regulate embryonic development,cell growth and many other activities in animal cells. But recent evidence verified that peptide primary messengers are also involved in plant defense responses, the recognition between pollen and stigma and keep the balance between cell proliferation and differentiations in shoot apical meristems. Those results suggest that plants may actually make wide use of peptide primary messengers, both in embryonic development and late life when they rally their cells to defend against pathogens and insect pests. The recent advance in those aspects is reviewed.

  7. The effect of 14 weeks of vitamin D3 supplementation on antimicrobial peptides and proteins in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cheng-Shiun; Fraser, William D; Tang, Jonathan; Brown, Kirsty; Renwick, Stephen; Rudland-Thomas, Jay; Teah, James; Tanqueray, Ellie; Gleeson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Heavy training is associated with increased respiratory infection risk and antimicrobial proteins are important in defence against oral and respiratory tract infections. We examined the effect of 14 weeks of vitamin D3 supplementation (5000 IU/day) on the resting plasma cathelicidin concentration and the salivary secretion rates of secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA), cathelicidin, lactoferrin and lysozyme in athletes during a winter training period. Blood and saliva were obtained at the start of the study from 39 healthy men who were randomly allocated to vitamin D3 supplement or placebo. Blood samples were also collected at the end of the study; saliva samples were collected after 7 and 14 weeks. Plasma total 25(OH)D concentration increased by 130% in the vitamin D3 group and decreased by 43% in the placebo group (both P = 0.001). The percentage change of plasma cathelicidin concentration in the vitamin D3 group was higher than in the placebo group (P = 0.025). Only in the vitamin D3 group, the saliva SIgA and cathelicidin secretion rates increased over time (both P = 0.03). A daily 5000 IU vitamin D3 supplement has a beneficial effect in up-regulating the expression of SIgA and cathelicidin in athletes during a winter training period, which could improve resistance to respiratory infections.

  8. Screening of TACE Peptide Inhibitors from Phage Display Peptide Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To obtain the recombinant tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE) ectodomain and use it as a selective molecule for the screening of TACE peptide inhibitors, the cDNA coding catalytic domain (T800) and full-length ectodomain (T1300) of TACE were amplified by RTPCR, and the expression plasmids were constructed by inserting T800 and T1300 into plasmid pET28a and pET-28c respectively. The recombinant T800 and T1300 were induced by IPTG, and SDSPAGE and Western blotting analysis results revealed that T800 and T1300 were highly expressed in the form of inclusion body. After Ni2+-NTA resin affinity chromatography, the recombinant proteins were used in the screening of TACE-binding peptides from phage display peptide library respectively. After 4 rounds of biopanning, the positive phage clones were analyzed by ELISA, competitive inhibition assay and DNA sequencing. A common amino acid sequence (TRWLVYFSRPYLVAT) was found and synthesized. The synthetic peptide could inhibit the TNF-α release from LPS-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) up to 60.3 %. FACS analysis revealed that the peptide mediated the accumulation of TNF-α on the cell surface. These results demonstrate that the TACE-binding peptide is an effective antagonist of TACE.

  9. New vasoactive peptides in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Goetze, Jens Peter; Bendtsen, Flemming;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cirrhosis have substantial circulatory imbalance between vasoconstrictive and vasodilating forces. The study of circulatory vasoactive peptides may provide important pathophysiological information. This study aimed to assess concentrations, organ extraction and relations...

  10. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte;

    2013-01-01

    properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...... improve biomolecular recognition by synthetic nucleic acid analogues. Circular dichroism (CD) measurements showed no distortion of the duplex structure by the incorporated peptide chains while studies in human serum indicated superior stability of the POCs compared to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA...

  11. Peptide nanostructures in biomedical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzizarnagh, Hamid; Yoon, Do-Young; Goltz, Mark; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2016-09-01

    Nanostructures of peptides have been investigated for biomedical applications due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties in addition to their excellent biocompatibility. Peptides may form fibrils, spheres and tubes in nanoscale depending on the formation conditions. These peptide nanostructures can be used in electrical, medical, dental, and environmental applications. Applications of these nanostructures include, but are not limited to, electronic devices, biosensing, medical imaging and diagnosis, drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. This review offers a discussion of basic synthesis methods, properties and application of these nanomaterials. The review concludes with recommendations and future directions for peptide nanostructures. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:730-743. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1393 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26846352

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of amphiphilic peptides as nanostructures and drug delivery tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayeh, Naser Ali

    the well-known, highly cationic CPPs, such as TAT and Arg9, which do not translocate across phospholipid bilayers, and enter cells mostly by active endocytosis. Alternatively, researchers have found that an effective cellular delivery vector can be improved developed by conjugating a CPP with a fatty acid chain. Amphiphilic peptides have also become a subject of major interest as potent antibacterial agents. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are produced naturally by bacteria and are considered as the first line of host defense protecting living organisms from microorganisms. Various types of AMPs has been discovered, such as defensins, cecropins, magainins and cathelicidins, with significant different structures and bioactivity profiles. The mechanism of actions for these peptides were reported as effectors and regulators of the innate immune system by increasing production and release of chemokine, and enhancing wound healing and angiogenesis. They were able to suppress biofilm formation and induce the dissolution of existing biofilms. Thus, design of new AMPs and more cost effective sequences with highly activity are urgently needed. Although a number of cyclic peptides were discovered and reported as efficient cellular delivery agents or antimicrobial agent, a more systematic investigation is required to identify design rules for optimal entrapment, drug loading, and stability. The balance of many small forces determines the overall morphology, size, and functionality of the structures. A deeper understanding of these factors is required for guiding future research, and for customizing cyclic peptides for drug loading and cellular delivery applications. Thus, additional amphiphilic cyclic and linear peptides were designed with variable electrostatic and hydrophobic residues to optimize drug encapsulation. The diversity in ring size, amino acid number, position and sequences, number of rings, net charge, and hydrophobicity of side chains in cyclic peptides will allow

  13. Targeting cancer with peptide aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Seigneuric, Renaud; Gobbo, Jessica; Colas, Pierre; Garrido, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    A major endeavour in cancer chemotherapy is to develop agents that specifically target a biomolecule of interest. There are two main classes of targeting agents: small molecules and biologics. Among biologics (e.g.: antibodies), DNA, RNA but also peptide aptamers are relatively recent agents. Peptide aptamers are seldom described but represent attractive agents that can inhibit a growing panel of oncotargets including Heat Shock Proteins. Potential pitfalls and coming challenges towards succe...

  14. Peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  15. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  16. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tasiemski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the characterization and/or the function of AMPs in the numerically and economically most representative group which are arthropods. Annelids are among the first coelomates and are therefore of special phylogenetic interest. Compared to other invertebrate groups, data on annelid’s immunity reveal heavier emphasis on the cellular than on the humoral response suggesting that immune defense of annelids seems to be principally developed as cellular immunity.This paper gives an overview of the variety of AMPs identified in the three classes of annelids, i.e. polychaetes, oligochaetes and achaetes. Their functions, when they have been studied, in the humoral or cellular response of annelids are also mentioned.

  17. Antimicrobial peptides in crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RD Rosa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Crustaceans are a large and diverse invertebrate animal group that mounts a complex and efficient innate immune response against a variety of microorganisms. The crustacean immune system is primarily related to cellular responses and the production and release of important immune effectors into the hemolymph. Antimicrobial proteins and/or peptides (AMPs are key components of innate immunity and are widespread in nature, from bacteria to vertebrate animals. In crustaceans, 15 distinct AMP families are currently recognized, although the great majority (14 families comes from members of the order Decapoda. Crustacean AMPs are generally cationic, gene-encoded molecules that are mainly produced by circulating immune-competent cells (hemocytes or are derived from unrelated proteins primarily involved in other biological functions. In this review, we tentatively classified the crustacean AMPs into four main groups based on their amino acid composition, structural features and multi-functionality. We also attempted to summarize the current knowledge on their implication both in an efficient response to microbial infections and in crustacean survival.

  18. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  19. Collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Ryo; Kudo, Masakazu; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2016-11-01

    Combinatorial library composed of rigid rod-like peptides with a triple-helical scaffold was constructed. The component peptides were designed to have various combinations of basic and neutral (or hydrophobic) amino acid residues based on collagen-like (Gly-Pro-Yaa)-repeating sequences, inspired from the basic and amphiphilic nature of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. Screening of the peptide pools resulted in identification of antimicrobial peptides. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that the position of Arg-cluster at N-terminus and cystine knots at C-terminus in the triple helix significantly contributed to the antimicrobial activity. The most potent peptide RO-A showed activity against Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis. In addition, Escherichia coli exposed to RO-A resulted in abnormal elongation of the cells. RO-A was also shown to have remarkable stability in human serum and low cytotoxicity to mammalian cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 453-459, 2016. PMID:27271210

  20. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  1. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  2. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  3. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  4. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs. PMID:26876881

  5. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidang Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines.

  6. Recent development of peptide self-assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiubo Zhao; Fang Pan; Jian R. Lu

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are the building blocks to build peptides and proteins. Recent development in peptide synthesis has however enabled us to mimic this natural process by preparing various long and short peptides possessing different conformations and biological functions. The self-assembly of short designed peptides into molecular nanostructures is becoming a growing interest in nanobiotechnology. Self-assembled peptides exhibit several attractive features for applications in tissue regeneration, drug delivery, biological surface engineering as well as in food science, cosmetic industry and antibiotics. The aim of this review is to introduce the readers to a number of representative studies on peptide self-assembly.

  7. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  8. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10-5 kDa, 5-1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10?5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  9. Radioactive labelling of peptidic hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of peptidic hormones requires stability, specificity and sensitivity of the label. Introduction of a radioactive atome is one way to satisfy these criteria. Several processes have been described to prepare radioactive TRF: synthesis of the peptide with labelled aminoacids or introduction of the label into the hormone. In that approach, tritium can be substituted in the imidazole ring, via precursors activating the proper carbon. Monoiodo TRF leads essentially to tritium labelling of the 5 positions whereas monoazo TRF allows the preparation of 3H TRF labelled in the 2 positions. Di-substituted TRF leads to labelling into the 2 and 5 carbons. Labelled analogs of TRF can be prepared with labelled iodine; further developments of peptide labelling, will be presented. In particular, the homolytic scission of the C-iodine, bond by photochemical activation. The nascent carbon radical can be stabilized by a tritiated scavenger. This approach eliminates the use of heavy metal catalysts

  10. Vitamin D receptor agonists inhibit pro-inflammatory cytokine production from the respiratory epithelium in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNally, P

    2011-07-22

    BACKGROUND: 1,25-Dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) has been shown to mitigate epithelial inflammatory responses after antigen exposure. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at particular risk for vitamin D deficiency. This may contribute to the exaggerated inflammatory response to pulmonary infection in CF. METHODS: CF respiratory epithelial cell lines were exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Pseudomonas conditioned medium (PCM) in the presence or absence of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) or a range of vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. Levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were measured in cell supernatants, and cellular total and phosphorylated IκBα were determined. Levels of human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP18) mRNA and protein were measured in cells after treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). RESULTS: Pretreatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was associated with significant reductions in IL-6 and IL-8 protein secretion after antigen exposure, a finding reproduced with a range of low calcaemic VDR agonists. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment led to a decrease in IκBα phosphorylation and increased total cellular IκBα. Treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) was associated with an increase in hCAP18\\/LL-37 mRNA and protein levels. CONCLUSIONS: Both 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and other VDR agonists significantly reduce the pro-inflammatory response to antigen challenge in CF airway epithelial cells. VDR agonists have significant therapeutic potential in CF.

  11. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus...... a cecropin-mellitin hybrid peptide and proved effective in killing colistin resistant Gram-negative A. baumannii in vitro. The molecule was improved with regard to toxicity, as measured by hemolytic ability. Further, this peptide is capable of specifically killing non-growing cells of colistin resistant A...

  12. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  13. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  14. An enhancer peptide for membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hong

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NP4P is a synthetic peptide derived from a natural, non-antimicrobial peptide fragment (pro-region of nematode cecropin P4 by substitution of all acidic amino acid residues with amides (i.e., Glu → Gln, and Asp → Asn. Results In the presence of NP4P, some membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides (ASABF-α, polymyxin B, and nisin killed microbes at lower concentration (e.g., 10 times lower minimum bactericidal concentration for ASABF-α against Staphylococcus aureus, whereas NP4P itself was not bactericidal and did not interfere with bacterial growth at ≤ 300 μg/mL. In contrast, the activities of antimicrobial agents with a distinct mode of action (indolicidin, ampicillin, kanamycin, and enrofloxacin were unaffected. Although the membrane-disrupting activity of NP4P was slight or undetectable, ASABF-α permeabilized S. aureus membranes with enhanced efficacy in the presence of NP4P. Conclusions NP4P selectively enhanced the bactericidal activities of membrane-disrupting antimicrobial peptides by increasing the efficacy of membrane disruption against the cytoplasmic membrane.

  15. Strategic approaches to optimizing peptide ADME properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Li

    2015-01-01

    Development of peptide drugs is challenging but also quite rewarding. Five blockbuster peptide drugs are currently on the market, and six new peptides received first marketing approval as new molecular entities in 2012. Although peptides only represent 2% of the drug market, the market is growing twice as quickly and might soon occupy a larger niche. Natural peptides typically have poor absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties with rapid clearance, short half-life, low permeability, and sometimes low solubility. Strategies have been developed to improve peptide drugability through enhancing permeability, reducing proteolysis and renal clearance, and prolonging half-life. In vivo, in vitro, and in silico tools are available to evaluate ADME properties of peptides, and structural modification strategies are in place to improve peptide developability. PMID:25366889

  16. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  17. Lipoxygenase inhibitor peptides and their use

    OpenAIRE

    Schurink, M.; Boeriu, C.G.; Berkel, van, A.M.; Wichers, H J

    2006-01-01

    The present invention is in the field of enzyme inhibition. In particular it relates to peptide inhibitors for lipoxygenases. The lipoxygenase peptide inhibitors of have the potential to be used as therapeutic drugs as well as food preservatives.

  18. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora Elisabeth; Bartels, Emil Daniel; Hunter, Ingrid;

    2014-01-01

    decade. Dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system has been associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and essential hypertension. Moreover, the natriuretic peptides have been implicated in the protection against atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and myocardial ischaemia. All...

  19. Purification, structure and function of bioactive peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Eriste, Elo

    2004-01-01

    Peptides are vitally important molecules and many evoke cellular responses. The completion of several genome sequencing projects has revealed a number of new genes. However, as functional peptides often contain posttranslational modifications and/or occur at various lengths, it is of great importance to detect, purify and characterize novel bioactive peptides. To achieve these goals, new methods for peptide detection, isolation and functional characterization have to be d...

  20. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de uitdagi

  1. Interpreting peptide mass spectra by VEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Rune; Lundsgaard, M.; Welinder, Karen G.;

    2003-01-01

    of peptide MS/MS spectra imported in text file format. Peaks are annotated, the monoisotopic peaks retained, and the b-and y-ion series identified in an interactive manner. The called peptide sequence is searched against a local protein database for sequence identity and peptide mass. The report compares...

  2. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Characterization of synthetic peptides by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Mirza, Osman Asghar; Højrup, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI-TOF-MS an...

  4. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Peptides and metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogan, M.J.; Olmedo, I.; Hosta, L.; Guerrero, A.R.; Cruz Ricondo, L.J.; Albericio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we describe the contribution of peptides to the biomedical applications of metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss strategies for the preparation of peptide-nanoparticle conjugates and the synthesis of the peptides and metallic nanoparticles. An overview of the techniques used for th

  6. Diversity of wheat anti-microbial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Tsezi A; Odintsova, Tatyana I; Pukhalsky, Vitaliy A; Grishin, Eugene V

    2005-11-01

    From seeds of Triticum kiharae Dorof. et Migusch., 24 novel anti-microbial peptides were isolated and characterized by a combination of three-step HPLC (affinity, size-exclusion and reversed-phase) with matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and Edman degradation. Based on sequence similarity and cysteine motifs, partially sequenced peptides were assigned to 7 families: defensins, thionins, lipid-transfer proteins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-like peptides, glycine-rich peptides, and MBP-1 homologs. A novel subfamily of defensins consisting of 6 peptides and a new family of glycine-rich (8 peptides with different repeat motifs) were identified. Three 6-cysteine knottin-like peptides represented by N- and C-terminally truncated variants revealed no sequence homology to any known plant anti-microbial peptides. A new 8-cysteine hevein-like peptide and three 4-cysteine peptides homologous to MBP-1 from maize were isolated. This is the first communication on the occurrence of nearly all families of plant anti-microbial peptides in a single species. PMID:16269343

  7. Bioactive peptides in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donata Marletta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive peptides are specific protein fragments that have a positive impact on body functions and conditions and may ultimately influence health. Most of the biological activities are encrypted within the primary sequence of the native protein and can be released by enzymatic hydrolysis and proteolysis or by food processing. Milk is a rich source of bioactive peptides which may contribute to regulate the nervous, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems as well as the immune system, confirming the added value of dairy products that, in certain cases, can be considered functional foods. The main biological activities of these peptides and their bioavailability in dairy products are reviewed. The natural concentration of these biomolecules is quite low and, to date one of the main goals has been to realize products enriched with bioactive peptides that have beneficial effects on human health and proven safety. Even though several health-enhancing products have already been launched and their integration in the diet could help in the prevention of chronic diseases such as hypertension, cancer and osteoporosis, more clinical trials are required in order to develop a deeper understanding of the activity of biopeptides on the human physiological mechanisms and also to assess the efficacy of their effects in a long term view. New scientific data are also needed to support their commercialisation in compliance with current regulations.

  8. Novel and Convenient Method for the Preparation of Phosphonate Peptides and Phosphonamidate Peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jia-Xi; FU Nan-Yan; GAO Yuan-He; ZHNAG Qi-Han; DUAN Li-Fang

    2003-01-01

    @@ Phosphonate and phosphonamidate peptides are phosphorus analogues of natural peptides. They have been great used as stable mimetics of tetrahedral transition states as enzyme inhibitors and as haptens for catalytic antibody research in recent years. Although several methods are available for the preparation of phosphonate peptides and phosphonamidate peptides, all of them use phosphonic acid derivatives as starting materials. The overall yields from the synthesis of phosphonic acid derivatives to desired peptides are not satisfactory in most cases.

  9. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  10. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    chemical parameters with biological activities of the peptide, using statistical methods. In this review we will discuss two different in silico strategies of computer-aided antibacterial peptide design, a linear correlation model build as an extension of traditional principal component analysis (PCA......) and a non-linear artificial neural network model. Studies on structurally diverse peptides, have concluded that the PCA derived model are able to guide the antibacterial peptide design in a meaningful way, however requiring rather a high homology between the peptides in the test-set and the in silico...

  11. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens;

    2013-01-01

    Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...... throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed...... that CPP-mediated translocation involves transcytosis and/or direct translocation through the epithelial cells; whereas TJMP-mediated translocation is dependent on interaction with transmembrane or peripheral TJ proteins. This review focuses on the CPPs and the TJMPs currently employed as excipients...

  12. Signal Transduction through CsrRS Confers an Invasive Phenotype in Group A Streptococcus

    OpenAIRE

    Tran-Winkler, Hien J.; Love, John F.; Ioannis Gryllos; Wessels, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    The CsrRS (or CovRS) two component system controls expression of up to 15% of the genome of group A Streptococcus (GAS). While some studies have suggested that the sensor histidine kinase CsrS responds to membrane perturbations as a result of various environmental stresses, other data have implicated the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and extracellular Mg(2+) as specific signals. We now report that Mg(2+) and LL-37 have opposite effects on expression of multiple genes that are activated or...

  13. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  14. Natural and synthetic peptides with antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Conti, Stefania; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Polonelli, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, the increase of invasive fungal infections and the emergence of antifungal resistance stressed the need for new antifungal drugs. Peptides have shown to be good candidates for the development of alternative antimicrobial agents through high-throughput screening, and subsequent optimization according to a rational approach. This review presents a brief overview on antifungal natural peptides of different sources (animals, plants, micro-organisms), peptide fragments derived by proteolytic cleavage of precursor physiological proteins (cryptides), synthetic unnatural peptides and peptide derivatives. Antifungal peptides are schematically reported based on their structure, antifungal spectrum and reported effects. Natural or synthetic peptides and their modified derivatives may represent the basis for new compounds active against fungal infections. PMID:27502155

  15. Flourescent Peptide-Stabilized Silver-Nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon

    for instance small molecules, DNA oligomers, and proteins. Peptides are an intriguing class of biomolecular ligands, due to the large combinatorial space these provide. Furthermore, as peptides have a propensity to fold up into well-defined and somewhat rigid secondary structures, they may serve as excellent...... throughput dramatically with regards to discovery of novel ligands. Our approach employs Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis on a PEGA resin which allows for on-resin screening of peptide ligands which, in turn, removes the tedious and labor-intensive work-up of synthesized peptides. The method allows for on......-resin formation of peptide-stabilized Ag-NCs in a reversible manner, which makes identification of novel lead compound from combinatorial peptide libraries possible with a few simple steps. This resulted in the discovery of at least one promising candidate (P262) showing brighter emission, spectral homogeneity...

  16. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco;

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited...... for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions...... determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide...

  17. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes. PMID:27451165

  18. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  19. Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome patient reveals species-dependent requirements for neutrophil defenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole E.; Clemmensen, Stine N; Dahl, Sara L;

    2014-01-01

    CAP-18 into the antibacterial peptide LL-37 in response to ionomycin. In immature myeloid cells from patient bone marrow, biosynthesis of CTSC and neutrophil serine proteases appeared normal along with initial processing and sorting to cellular storage. In contrast, these proteins were completely absent...

  20. Antibody Peptide Based Antifungal Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Giovati, Laura; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Sperindè, Martina; Ciociola, Tecla; Polonelli, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections still represent relevant human illnesses worldwide and some are accompanied by unacceptably high mortality rates. The limited current availability of effective and safe antifungal agents makes the development of new drugs and approaches of antifungal vaccination/immunotherapy every day more needed. Among them, small antibody(Ab)-derived peptides are arousing great expectations as new potential antifungal agents. In this topic, the search path from the study of the yeast kill...

  1. Antimicrobial peptides in human sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas eMartin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP 1-3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs 1-3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP -1-3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP-1-3, lactoferrin, BPI and heparin-binding protein (HBP are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1-11 (hLF 1-11 possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin (talactoferrin alpha, TLF has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides: Versatile Biological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides are diverse group of biologically active molecules with multidimensional properties. In recent past, a wide variety of AMPs with diverse structures have been reported from different sources such as plants, animals, mammals, and microorganisms. The presence of unusual amino acids and structural motifs in AMPs confers unique structural properties to the peptide that attribute for their specific mode of action. The ability of these active AMPs to act as multifunctional effector molecules such as signalling molecule, immune modulators, mitogen, antitumor, and contraceptive agent makes it an interesting candidate to study every aspect of their structural and biological properties for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, easy cloning and recombinant expression of AMPs in heterologous plant host systems provided a pipeline for production of disease resistant transgenic plants. Besides these properties, AMPs were also used as drug delivery vectors to deliver cell impermeable drugs to cell interior. The present review focuses on the diversity and broad spectrum antimicrobial activity of AMPs along with its multidimensional properties that could be exploited for the application of these bioactive peptides as a potential and promising drug candidate in pharmaceutical industries.

  3. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Vapaatalo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure.

  4. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  5. Molecular imaging probes derived from natural peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, C L; Hickey, J L; Nsiama, T K; Cruickshank, D R; Turnbull, W L; Luyt, L G

    2016-06-01

    Covering: up to the end of 2015.Peptides are naturally occurring compounds that play an important role in all living systems and are responsible for a range of essential functions. Peptide receptors have been implicated in disease states such as oncology, metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, natural peptides have been exploited as diagnostic and therapeutic agents due to the unique target specificity for their endogenous receptors. This review discusses a variety of natural peptides highlighting their discovery, endogenous receptors, as well as their derivatization to create molecular imaging agents, with an emphasis on the design of radiolabelled peptides. This review also highlights methods for discovering new and novel peptides when knowledge of specific targets and endogenous ligands are not available. PMID:26911790

  6. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  8. Interaction of small peptides with lipid bilayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Damodaran, K. V.; Merz, K M; Gaber, B P

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the tripeptide Ala-Phe-Ala-O-tert-butyl interacting with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers have been carried out. The lipid and aqueous environments of the peptide, the alkyl chain order, and the lipid and peptide dynamics have been investigated with use of density profiles, radial distribution functions, alkyl chain order parameter profiles, and time correlation functions. It appears that the alkyl chain region accommodates the peptides in the bi...

  9. Self-assembly of tetraphenylalanine peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Mayans Tayadella, Enric; Ballano Ballano, María Gema; Casanovas Salas, Jordi; Díaz Andrade, Angélica María; Pérez Madrigal, Maria del Mar; Estrany Coda, Francesc; Puiggalí Bellalta, Jordi; Cativiela Marín, Carlos A.; Alemán Llansó, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Three different tetraphenylalanine (FFFF) based peptides that differ at the N- and C-termini have been synthesized by using standard procedures to study their ability to form different nanoassemblies under a variety of conditions. The FFFF peptide assembles into nanotubes that show more structural imperfections at the surface than those formed by the diphenylalanine (FF) peptide under the same conditions. Periodic DFT calculations (M06L functional) were used to propose a model that consists o...

  10. Salt-resistant short antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanram, Harini; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising leads for the development of antibiotics against drug resistant bacterial pathogens. However, in vivo applications of AMPs remain obscure due to salt and serum mediated inactivation. The high cost of chemical synthesis of AMPs also impedes potential clinical application. Consequently, short AMPs resistant toward salt and serum inactivation are desirable for the development of peptide antibiotics. In this work, we designed a 12-residue amphipathic helical peptide RR12 (R-R-L-I-R-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide) and two Trp containing analogs of RR12 namely RR12Wpolar (R-R-L-I-W-L-I-L-R-L-L-R-amide), and RR12Whydro (R-R-L-I-R-L-W-L-R-L-L-R-amide). Designed peptides demonstrated potent antibacterial activity; MIC ranging from 2 to 8 μM, in the presence of sodium chloride (150 mM and 300 mM). Antibacterial activity of these peptides was also detected in the presence of human serum. Designed peptides, in particular RR12 and RR12Whydro, were only poorly hemolytic. As a mode of action; these peptides demonstrated efficient permeabilization of bacterial cell membrane and lysis of cell structure. We further investigated interactions of the designed peptides with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major component of the outer membrane permeability barrier of Gram-negative bacteria. Designed peptides adopted helical conformations in complex with LPS. Binding of peptides with LPS has yielded dissociation the aggregated structures of LPS. Collectively, these designed peptides hold ability to be developed for salt-resistant antimicrobial compounds. Most importantly, current work provides insights for designing salt-resistant antimicrobial peptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 345-356, 2016. PMID:26849911

  11. Genome-based peptide fingerprint scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Giddings, Michael C.; Shah, Atul A.; Gesteland, Ray; Moore, Barry

    2002-01-01

    We have implemented a method that identifies the genomic origins of sample proteins by scanning their peptide-mass fingerprint against the theoretical translation and proteolytic digest of an entire genome. Unlike previously reported techniques, this method requires no predefined ORF or protein annotations. Fixed-size windows along the genome sequence are scored by an equation accounting for the number of matching peptides, the number of missed enzymatic cleavages in each peptide, the number ...

  12. The Function and Development of Soybean Peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Caiyan; Song Junmei

    2009-01-01

    Soybean peptides are small molecules hydrolyzed soy protein,from three to six amino acid composition of the peptide mixture,in 1000Da molecular weight below.Because it has a lot of good physical and chemical properties and physiological functions,in many areas has been widely used.This paper reviews the soybean peptide physical and chemical characteristics,physiological functions,technology and applications in the food industry.

  13. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  14. Modulation of autoimmunity with artificial peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Cava, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The loss of immune tolerance to self antigens leads to the development of autoimmune responses. Since self antigens are often multiple and/or their sequences may not be known, one approach to restore immune tolerance uses synthetic artificial peptides that interfere or compete with self peptides in the networks of cellular interactions that drive the autoimmune process. This review describes the rationale behind the use of artificial peptides in autoimmunity and their mechanisms of action. Examples of use of artificial peptides in preclinical studies and in the management of human autoimmune diseases are provided. PMID:20807590

  15. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...... pocket, its carbonyl group aligning improperly relative to Ser195 and the oxyanion hole, explaining why the peptide is an inhibitor rather than a substrate. Substitution of the P1 Arg with novel unnatural Arg analogues with aliphatic or aromatic ring structures led to an increased affinity, depending...... of this peptidic inhibitor, a concept different from conventional attempts at improving inhibitor affinity by reducing the entropic burden....

  16. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by a thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.;

    1997-01-01

    or an amide bond. It was found that these S-palmitoylated peptides were much more immunogenic than N-palmitoylated peptides and at least similar to KLH-conjugated peptides with respect to appearance and magnitude of induced antibodies (canine parvovirus) or immunocastration effect (gonadotropin...

  17. Driving engineering of novel antimicrobial peptides from simulations of peptide-micelle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Langham, Allison A; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    peptides and their interaction with membrane mimics. In this article, we discuss the promise and the challenges of widely used models and detail our recent work on peptide-micelle simulations as an attractive alternative to peptide-bilayer simulations. We detail our results with two large structural...

  18. Peptide Nucleic Acids Complexes of Two Peptide Nucleic Acid Strands and One

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1999-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  19. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes from all-atom simulations of thermostable peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Doux, Jacques P F; Killian, J. Antoinette; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ulmschneider, Jakob P.

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required...

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is...... an incretin hormone which has a spectrum of activities which oppose the symptoms of diabetes. Of particular significance is the fact that these actions are glucose-dependent, meaning that the risk of severe hypoglycemia is practically eliminated. The recent elucidation of the key role of dipeptidyl...

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana;

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bogaerts

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most successful model species for experimental research because of its sequenced genome, the versatile genetic toolkit and the straightforward breeding among others. In natural conditions however, this tiny worm is constantly surrounded by micro-organisms, simultaneously a source of indispensable nutrition and inevitable pathogens. Lacking an adaptive immune system, the worm solely relies on its innate immune defence to cope with its challenging life style. Hence C. elegans is an excellent model to gain more insight in innate immunity, which is remarkably preserved between invertebrate and vertebrate animals. The innate defence consists of receptors to detect potential pathogens, a complex network of signalling pathways and last but not least, effector molecules to abolish harmful microbes. In this review, we focus on the antimicrobial peptides, a vital subgroup of effector molecules. We summarise the current knowledge of the different families of C. elegans antimicrobial peptides, comprising NLPs, caenacins, ABFs, caenopores, and a recently discovered group with antifungal activity among which thaumatin-like proteins.

  3. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans;

    1990-01-01

    not seem to increase the end point titre as tested in direct ELISA. The specificity of the antiserum was determined by competitive ELISA and histochemistry on pancreas sections. Only the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the homologous synthetic C-peptide 1 from mouse and rat competed efficiently in ELISA...... for antibody binding to the immunizing antigen. Antisera to C-peptide 2, stained islet beta-cells on mouse and rat, but not monkey pancreas sections in immunocytochemical analysis. Preabsorption to the synthetic C-peptide 2, but not the synthetic mouse and rat C-peptide 1 abolished staining. In conclusion we...

  4. Determination of peptide content of DOTA-peptides by metal titration and UPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiolabelled DOTA-peptides are in use for Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Scintigraphy (PRS) and Therapy (PRRT), e.g with 177Lu-DOTA-TATE or 90Y-DOTATOC. Labelling conditions are frequently critical. Therefore, the ingredients of the reaction, e.g. radiometal (90Y and 177Lu) and DOTA-peptide should be pure and the content known. Quality control of DOTA-peptide, can be performed with various methods, most commonly by UV. There are numerous conditions in which this is hampered, e.g. impurities may also have UV-absorption. The aim of the study was to quantify content and purity of DOTA-peptide

  5. Engineered Adhesion Peptides for Improved Silicon Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Jebors, Said; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Agarwal, Vivechana; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles; Gergely, Csilla

    2015-11-01

    Engineering peptides that present selective recognition and high affinity for a material is a major challenge for assembly-driven elaboration of complex systems with wide applications in the field of biomaterials, hard-tissue regeneration, and functional materials for therapeutics. Peptide-material interactions are of vital importance in natural processes but less exploited for the design of novel systems for practical applications because of our poor understanding of mechanisms underlying these interactions. Here, we present an approach based on the synthesis of several truncated peptides issued from a silicon-specific peptide recovered via phage display technology. We use the photonic response provided by porous silicon microcavities to evaluate the binding efficiency of 14 different peptide derivatives. We identify and engineer a short peptide sequence (SLVSHMQT), revealing the highest affinity for p(+)-Si. The molecular recognition behavior of the obtained peptide fragment can be revealed through mutations allowing identification of the preferential affinity of certain amino acids toward silicon. These results constitute an advance in both the engineering of peptides that reveal recognition properties for silicon and the understanding of biomolecule-material interactions.

  6. [Application on food preservative of antimicrobial peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyan; Mu, Yu; Zhao, Baohua

    2009-07-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an integral component of the innate immune system, it can counteract outer membrane pathogen such as bacteria, fungi, viruses, protozoan and so on. Owing to the sterilization and innocuity, it has the potential to be crude food preservative. In this paper the uses of antibacterial peptides in the food preservative were analyzed.

  7. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.;

    2005-01-01

    peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than...

  8. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies are...

  9. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  10. New Biodegradable Peptide-based Polymer Constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Peptide-based polymers are of increasing interest, since they can be applied for a variety of purposes such as drug delivery devices, scaffolds for tissue engineering and -repair, and as novel biomaterials. Peptide-based polymers are common in nature and often exhibit special characteristics. Howeve

  11. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating the s...

  12. Peptidomic Identification of Serum Peptides Diagnosing Preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaojun Wen

    Full Text Available We sought to identify serological markers capable of diagnosing preeclampsia (PE. We performed serum peptide analysis (liquid chromatography mass spectrometry of 62 unique samples from 31 PE patients and 31 healthy pregnant controls, with two-thirds used as a training set and the other third as a testing set. Differential serum peptide profiling identified 52 significant serum peptides, and a 19-peptide panel collectively discriminating PE in training sets (n = 21 PE, n = 21 control; specificity = 85.7% and sensitivity = 100% and testing sets (n = 10 PE, n = 10 control; specificity = 80% and sensitivity = 100%. The panel peptides were derived from 6 different protein precursors: 13 from fibrinogen alpha (FGA, 1 from alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT, 1 from apolipoprotein L1 (APO-L1, 1 from inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITIH4, 2 from kininogen-1 (KNG1, and 1 from thymosin beta-4 (TMSB4. We concluded that serum peptides can accurately discriminate active PE. Measurement of a 19-peptide panel could be performed quickly and in a quantitative mass spectrometric platform available in clinical laboratories. This serum peptide panel quantification could provide clinical utility in predicting PE or differential diagnosis of PE from confounding chronic hypertension.

  13. B-Type allatostatins and sex peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many species, mating induces a number of behavioral changes in the female. For Drosophila melanogaster, the sex peptide (SP) has been identified as the main molecular factor behind these responses. Recently, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), a GPCR activated by SP has also been characterized as res...

  14. Trandermal Peptides for Large Molecule Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A research team, led by Prof. WEN Longping from the University of Science and Technology of China under CAS,has successfully screened out a trandermal peptide, using biotechnology. The new peptide is able to deliver insulin into human body through skin, rendering an immediate therapeutic effect. The finding was published in the March 27 issue of the journal Natural Biotechnology.

  15. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang;

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  16. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... antioxidant activity in these fractions.......The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...

  17. Role of peptide bond in the realization of biological activity of short peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavinson, V Kh; Tarnovskaya, S I; Lin'kova, N S; Chervyakova, N A; Nichik, T E; Elashkina, E V; Chalisova, N I

    2015-02-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of biological activity of Lys-Glu peptide and its amino acid constituents. It was established that Lys-Glu stimulated proliferation of splenic cells in organotypic culture, while the mixture of glutamic acid and lysine inhibited culture growth. Using the method of molecular docking, we showed that glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide can interact with different DNA sequences. The energy of interaction and the most beneficial localization of glutamic acid, lysine, and Lys-Glu peptide in DNA molecule was calculated. We demonstrated the interaction of the peptide and amino acids with DNA along the minor groove. The energy of DNA interaction with the peptide is higher than with individual amino acids. The peptide bonds increase the interaction of Lys-Glu peptide with DNA, which potentiates the biological effect on cell proliferation in organotypic culture of splenic cells.

  18. Peptide nanospheres self-assembled from a modified β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Yusaku; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2016-11-01

    A novel β-annulus peptide of Sesbania mosaic virus bearing an FKFE sequence at the C terminus was synthesized, and its self-assembling behavior in water was investigated. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy showed that the β-annulus peptide bearing an FKFE sequence self-assembled into approximately 30 nm nanospheres in water at pH 3.8, whereas the β-annulus peptide without the FKFE sequence afforded only irregular aggregates. The peptide nanospheres possessed a definite critical aggregation concentration (CAC = 26 μM), above which the size of nanospheres were nearly unaffected by the peptide concentration. The formation of peptide nanospheres was significantly affected by pH; the peptide did not form any assemblies at pH 2.2, whereas larger aggregates were formed at pH 6.4-11.6. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 470-475, 2016. PMID:26573103

  19. Design of Asymmetric Peptide Bilayer Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Mehta, Anil K; Sidorov, Anton N; Orlando, Thomas M; Jiang, Zhigang; Anthony, Neil R; Lynn, David G

    2016-03-16

    Energetic insights emerging from the structural characterization of peptide cross-β assemblies have enabled the design and construction of robust asymmetric bilayer peptide membranes. Two peptides differing only in their N-terminal residue, phosphotyrosine vs lysine, coassemble as stacks of antiparallel β-sheets with precisely patterned charged lattices stabilizing the bilayer leaflet interface. Either homogeneous or mixed leaflet composition is possible, and both create nanotubes with dense negative external and positive internal solvent exposed surfaces. Cross-seeding peptide solutions with a preassembled peptide nanotube seed leads to domains of different leaflet architecture within single nanotubes. Architectural control over these cross-β assemblies, both across the bilayer membrane and along the nanotube length, provides access to highly ordered asymmetric membranes for the further construction of functional mesoscale assemblies.

  20. Intracellular signalling by C-peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes. PMID:18382618

  1. Intracellular Signalling by C-Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available C-peptide, a cleavage product of the proinsulin molecule, has long been regarded as biologically inert, serving merely as a surrogate marker for insulin release. Recent findings demonstrate both a physiological and protective role of C-peptide when administered to individuals with type I diabetes. Data indicate that C-peptide appears to bind in nanomolar concentrations to a cell surface receptor which is most likely to be G-protein coupled. Binding of C-peptide initiates multiple cellular effects, evoking a rise in intracellular calcium, increased PI-3-kinase activity, stimulation of the Na+/K+ ATPase, increased eNOS transcription, and activation of the MAPK signalling pathway. These cell signalling effects have been studied in multiple cell types from multiple tissues. Overall these observations raise the possibility that C-peptide may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment or prevention of long-term complications associated with diabetes.

  2. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  3. Encapsulation of Enzymes and Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesters, Gabrie M. H.

    A large part of formulated peptides and proteins, e.g., enzymes used as food ingredients, are formulated in a liquid form. Often, they are dissolved in water to which glycerol or sorbitol is added to reduce the water activity of the liquid, thus reducing the change of microbial growth. Still, there are reasons to formulate them in a solid form. Often, these reasons are stability, since a dry formulation is often much better than liquid formulations, and less transportation cost, since less mass is transported if one gets rid of the liquid; however, most of the times, the reason is that the product is mixed with a solid powder. Here, a liquid addition would lead to lump formation.

  4. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  5. Antimicrobial peptides in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanhua; Zhang, Kai; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2010-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune system of many species. The brain is an immunologically privileged organ but can produce a robust immune response against pathogens and cell debris, promoting rapid and efficient clearance. AMPs may be critically involved in the innate immune system of the brain. Though the mechanisms of AMPs' action in the brain still need further elucidation, many studies have shown that AMPs are multifunctional molecules in the brain. In addition to antimicrobial action, they take part in congenital and adaptive immune reactions (immunoregulation), function as signaling molecules in tissue repair, inflammation and other important processes through different mechanisms, and they might, in addition, become diagnostic markers of brain disease.

  6. The novel amyloid-beta peptide aptamer inhibits intracellular amyloid-beta peptide toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Wang; Yi Yang; Mingyue Jia; Chi Ma; Mingyu Wang; Lihe Che; Yu Yang; Jiang Wu

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β peptide binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) decoy peptide (DP) can competitively antagonize binding of amyloid β peptide to ABAD and inhibit the cytotoxic effects of amyloid β peptide. Based on peptide aptamers, the present study inserted ABAD-DP into the disulfide bond of human thioredoxin (TRX) using molecular cloning technique to construct a fusion gene that can express the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer. Moreover, adeno-associated virus was used to allow its stable expression. Immunofluorescent staining revealed the co-expression of the transduced fusion gene TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 and amyloid β peptide in NIH-3T3 cells, indicating that the TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 aptamer can bind amyloid β peptide within cells. In addition, cell morphology and MTT results suggested that TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 attenuated amyloid β peptide-induced SH-SY5Y cell injury and improved cell viability. These findings confirmed the possibility of constructing TRX-based peptide aptamer using ABAD-DP. Moreover, TRX1-ABAD-DP-TRX2 inhibited the cytotoxic effect of amyloid β peptide.

  7. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  8. Albumin-derived peptides efficiently reduce renal uptake of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vegt, Erik; Eek, Annemarie; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine (444), PO Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jong, Marion de [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    In peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), the maximum activity dose that can safely be administered is limited by high renal uptake and retention of radiolabelled peptides. The kidney radiation dose can be reduced by coinfusion of agents that competitively inhibit the reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, such as positively charged amino acids, Gelofusine, or trypsinised albumin. The aim of this study was to identify more specific and potent inhibitors of the kidney reabsorption of radiolabelled peptides, based on albumin. Albumin was fragmented using cyanogen bromide and six albumin-derived peptides with different numbers of electric charges were selected and synthesised. The effect of albumin fragments (FRALB-C) and selected albumin-derived peptides on the internalisation of {sup 111}In-albumin, {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide by megalin-expressing cells was assessed. In rats, the effect of Gelofusine and albumin-derived peptides on the renal uptake and biodistribution of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide was determined. FRALB-C significantly reduced the uptake of all radiolabelled peptides in vitro. The albumin-derived peptides showed different potencies in reducing the uptake of {sup 111}In-albumin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-minigastrin in vitro. The most efficient albumin-derived peptide (peptide 6), was selected for in vivo testing. In rats, 5 mg of peptide 6 very efficiently inhibited the renal uptake of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, by 88%. Uptake of {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide was reduced by 26 and 33%, respectively. The albumin-derived peptide 6 efficiently inhibited the renal reabsorption of {sup 111}In-minigastrin, {sup 111}In-exendin and {sup 111}In-octreotide and is a promising candidate for kidney protection in PRRT. (orig.)

  9. rapmad: Robust analysis of peptide microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothermel Andrée

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide microarrays offer an enormous potential as a screening tool for peptidomics experiments and have recently seen an increased field of application ranging from immunological studies to systems biology. By allowing the parallel analysis of thousands of peptides in a single run they are suitable for high-throughput settings. Since data characteristics of peptide microarrays differ from DNA oligonucleotide microarrays, computational methods need to be tailored to these specifications to allow a robust and automated data analysis. While follow-up experiments can ensure the specificity of results, sensitivity cannot be recovered in later steps. Providing sensitivity is thus a primary goal of data analysis procedures. To this end we created rapmad (Robust Alignment of Peptide MicroArray Data, a novel computational tool implemented in R. Results We evaluated rapmad in antibody reactivity experiments for several thousand peptide spots and compared it to two existing algorithms for the analysis of peptide microarrays. rapmad displays competitive and superior behavior to existing software solutions. Particularly, it shows substantially improved sensitivity for low intensity settings without sacrificing specificity. It thereby contributes to increasing the effectiveness of high throughput screening experiments. Conclusions rapmad allows the robust and sensitive, automated analysis of high-throughput peptide array data. The rapmad R-package as well as the data sets are available from http://www.tron-mz.de/compmed.

  10. Conus Peptides A Rich Pharmaceutical Treasure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng-Zhong WANG; Cheng-Wu CHI

    2004-01-01

    Marine predatory cone snails (genus Conus) with over 500 species represent what is arguably the largest single genus of marine animals alive today. All Conus are venomous and utilize a complex mixture of Conus peptides to capture their preys and for other biological purposes. Each component of Conus peptides selectively targets a specific subtype of ion channels, neurotransmitter receptors or transporters.Owing to their diversity, more than 50,000 distinct active peptides are theoretically estimated in Conus venoms. These diversified toxins are generally categorized into several superfamilies and/or families based on their characteristic arrangements of cysteine residues and pharmacological actions. Some mechanisms underlying the remarkable diversity of Conus peptides have been postulated: the distinctive gene structure, gene duplication and/or allelic selection, genus speciation, and sophisticated expression pattern and posttranslational modification of these peptides. Due to their highly pharmacological potency and target selectivity, Conus peptides have attracted extensive attention with their potentials to be developed as new research tools in neuroscience field and as novel medications in clinic for pain, epilepsy and other neuropathic disorders. Several instructive lessons for our drug development could be also learnt from these neuropharmacological "expertises". Conus peptides comprise a rich resource for neuropharmacologists, and most of them await to be explored.

  11. C-Peptide and its intracellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Claire E; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2009-01-01

    Although long believed to be inert, C-peptide has now been shown to have definite biological effects both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic animals and in patients with type 1 diabetes. These effects point to a protective action of C-peptide against the development of diabetic microvascular complications. Underpinning these observations is undisputed evidence of C-peptide binding to a variety of cell types at physiologically relevant concentrations, and the downstream stimulation of multiple cell signaling pathways and gene transcription via the activation of numerous transcription factors. These pathways affect such fundamental cellular processes as re-absorptive and/or secretory phenotype, migration, growth, and survival. Whilst the receptor remains to be identified, experimental data points strongly to the existence of a specific G-protein-coupled receptor for C-peptide. Of the cell types studied so far, kidney tubular cells express the highest number of C-peptide binding sites. Accordingly, C-peptide exerts major effects on the function of these cells, and in the context of diabetic nephropathy appears to antagonise the pathophysiological effects of major disease mediators such as TGFbeta1 and TNFalpha. Therefore, based on its cellular activity profile C-peptide appears well positioned for development as a therapeutic tool to treat microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes. PMID:20039003

  12. Novel pH-Sensitive Cyclic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika; Moshnikova, Anna; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Adochite, Ramona-Cosmina; Slaybaugh, Gregory; Golijanin, Jovana; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Andreev, Oleg A; Parang, Keykavous; Reshetnyak, Yana K

    2016-01-01

    A series of cyclic peptides containing a number of tryptophan (W) and glutamic acid (E) residues were synthesized and evaluated as pH-sensitive agents for targeting of acidic tissue and pH-dependent cytoplasmic delivery of molecules. Biophysical studies revealed the molecular mechanism of peptides action and localization within the lipid bilayer of the membrane at high and low pHs. The symmetric, c[(WE)4WC], and asymmetric, c[E4W5C], cyclic peptides translocated amanitin, a polar cargo molecule of similar size, across the lipid bilayer and induced cell death in a pH- and concentration-dependent manner. Fluorescently-labelled peptides were evaluated for targeting of acidic 4T1 mammary tumors in mice. The highest tumor to muscle ratio (5.6) was established for asymmetric cyclic peptide, c[E4W5C], at 24 hours after intravenous administration. pH-insensitive cyclic peptide c[R4W5C], where glutamic acid residues (E) were replaced by positively charged arginine residues (R), did not exhibit tumor targeting. We have introduced a novel class of cyclic peptides, which can be utilized as a new pH-sensitive tool in investigation or targeting of acidic tissue. PMID:27515582

  13. Creating functional peptide architectures at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirrell, Matthew

    2001-03-01

    Short peptide sequences, derived from whole proteins, can be useful synthetic agents for conferring a specific biological function to a material surface. Their ability to do this depends on delivering them to the surface in a biologically recognizable form, that is in a spatial configuration that is not too different from that adopted by the peptide in the whole protein. Most functional proteins have secondary and tertiary levels of structure that are essential to their activities; peptides have simpler but no less important structures. In our work, we have focussed on peptides derived from extracellular matrix proteins. We have found that attaching synthetic lipid tails to peptides fragments gives them two very useful properties for surface modification. The hydrophobic tails give rise to a self-assembly capacity enabling these molecules to organize into membrane, monolayer and bilayer structures. Less expected is that this level of self-assembly induces a second level in the peptide headgroup. Peptides from alpha-helical and triple-helical regions of protein are induced by the lipid tails to form protein-like secondary structures and therefore to have more effective biological activity.

  14. Peptide design for antimicrobial and immunomodulatory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Evan F; Hancock, Robert E W

    2013-11-01

    The increasing threat of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria and the dwindling supply of antibiotics available to combat these infections poses a significant threat to human health throughout the world. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have long been touted as the next generation of antibiotics capable of filling the anti-infective void. Unfortunately, peptide-based antibiotics have yet to realize their potential as novel pharmaceuticals, in spite of the immense number of known AMP sequences and our improved understanding of their antibacterial mechanism of action. Recently, the immunomodulatory properties of certain AMPs have become appreciated. The ability of small synthetic peptides to protect against infection in vivo has demonstrated that modulation of the innate immune response is an effective strategy to further develop peptides as novel anti-infectives. This review focuses on the screening methods that have been used to assess novel peptide sequences for their antibacterial and immunomodulatory properties. It will also examine how we have progressed in our ability to identify and optimize peptides with desired biological characteristics and enhanced therapeutic potential. In addition, the current challenges to the development of peptides as anti-infectives are examined and the strategies being used to overcome these issues are discussed.

  15. Immunocytochemical and Immunohistochemical Staining with Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Tina; Pedersen, Klaus Boberg; Hougaard, David; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies are particularly useful for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), where antigens may denature due to fixation of tissues and cells. Peptide antibodies can be made to any defined sequence, including unknown putative proteins and posttranslationally modified sequences. Moreover, the availability of large amounts of the antigen (peptide) allows inhibition/adsorption controls, which are important in ICC/IHC, due to the many possibilities for false-positive reactions caused by immunoglobulin Fc receptors, nonspecific reactions, and cross-reactivity of primary and secondary antibodies with other antigens and endogenous immunoglobulins, respectively. Here, simple protocols for ICC and IHC are described together with recommendations for appropriate controls.

  16. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  17. Asymmetric catalysis with short-chain peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Bartosz; Wennemers, Helma

    2014-10-01

    Within this review article we describe recent developments in asymmetric catalysis with peptides. Numerous peptides have been established in the past two decades that catalyze a wide variety of transformations with high stereoselectivities and yields, as well as broad substrate scope. We highlight here catalytically active peptides, which have addressed challenges that had thus far remained elusive in asymmetric catalysis: enantioselective synthesis of atropoisomers and quaternary stereogenic centers, regioselective transformations of polyfunctional substrates, chemoselective transformations, catalysis in-flow and reactions in aqueous environments.

  18. Peptides from milk proteins and their properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilara, Arun; Panyam, Dinakar

    2003-01-01

    This review has attempted to study the literature pertaining to peptides derived from milk proteins. Hydrolysis of milk proteins to generate peptides has been practiced for a long time and it was recognized early on in this process that the taste of hydrolyzates might hinder use of these products in food formulations. Modification of protein is necessary to form a more acceptable or utilizable product, to form a product that is less susceptible to deteriorative reactions and to form a product that is of higher nutritionall quality. Modifications may be achieved by a number of chemical and enzymatic means. This review has considered only enzymatic modification of dairy proteins. Modified proteins contain peptides and some of these peptides have been purified and their functionalities have been compared with unmodified proteins. This paper has examined the literature pertaining to improvement in functionality of enzyme-modified proteins. Improvements in solubility, emulsification, foaming and gelation were examined. There is limited information available on the sequence of the peptides necessary to improve the functional characteristics of proteins. Knowing the sequences of desirable functional peptides can lead to genetic alteration of proteins to improve functionality. Addition of synthetic peptides to intact proteins may be another way in which the functionality of proteins can be augmented. Some of the peptides in milk proteins are capable of affecting biological functions of an organism. These effects can be antimicrobial and probiotic, i.e., prevent the growth and proliferation of undesirable and pathogenic organisms, or they may promote the growth of desirable bacteria in the digestive tract of humans and animals. Peptides derived from milk protein have been shown to exert digestive and metabolic effects as well. They may also influence the immune system. These biological effects may play an important role in the development of medical foods that treat or

  19. Screening of a specific peptide binding to VPAC1 receptor from a phage display peptide library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: The VPAC1 receptor, a member of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs, is overexpressed in the most frequently occurring malignant tumors and plays a major role in the progression and angiogenesis of a number of malignancies. Recently, phage display has become widely used for many applications, including ligand generation for targeted imaging, drug delivery and therapy. In this work, we developed a panning procedure using a phage display peptide library to select a peptide that specifically binds to the VPAC1 receptor to develop a novel targeted probe for molecular imaging and therapy. METHODS: CHO-K1 cells stably expressing VPAC1 receptors (CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells were used to select a VPAC1-binding peptide from a 12-mer phage peptide library. DNA sequencing and homologous analysis of the randomly selected phage clones were performed. A cellular ELISA was used to determine the most selectively binding peptide for further investigation. Binding specificity to the VPAC1 receptor was analyzed by competitive inhibition ELISA and flow cytometry. The binding ability of the selected peptide to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells and colorectal cancer (CRC cell lines was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. RESULTS: A significant enrichment of phages that specifically bound to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells was obtained after four rounds of panning. Of the selected phage clones, 16 out of 60 shared the same peptide sequence, GFRFGALHEYNS, which we termed the VP2 peptide. VP2 and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP competitively bound to the VPAC1 receptor. More importantly, we confirmed that VP2 specifically bound to CHO-K1/VPAC1 cells and several CRC cell lines. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that the VP2 peptide could specifically bind to VPAC1 receptor and several CRC cell lines. And VP2 peptide may be a potential candidate to be developed as a useful diagnostic molecular imaging probe for early detection of CRC.

  20. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    OpenAIRE

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and functi...

  1. Collagen-like peptides and peptide-polymer conjugates in the design of assembled materials

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Tianzhi; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen is the most abundant protein in mammals, and there has been long-standing interest in understanding and controlling collagen assembly in the design of new materials. Collagen-like peptides (CLP), also known as collagen-mimetic peptides (CMP) or collagen-related peptides (CRP), have thus been widely used to elucidate collagen triple helix structure as well as to produce higher-order structures that mimic natural collagen fibers. This mini-review provides an overview of recent progress...

  2. A statistical approach to determining responses to individual peptides from pooled-peptide ELISpot data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Peter; Støer, Nathalie; Borthwick, Nicola; Dong, Tao; Hanke, Tomáš; Reilly, Marie

    2016-08-01

    To investigate in detail the effect of infection or vaccination on the human immune system, ELISpot assays are used to simultaneously test the immune response to a large number of peptides of interest. Scientists commonly use "peptide pools", where, instead of an individual peptide, a test well contains a group of peptides. Since the response from a well may be due to any or many of the peptides in the pool, pooled assays usually need to be followed by confirmatory assays of a number of individual peptides. We present a statistical method that enables estimation of individual peptide responses from pool responses using the Expectation Maximization (EM) algorithm for "incomplete data". We demonstrate the accuracy and precision of these estimates in simulation studies of ELISpot plates with 90 pools of 6 or 7 peptides arranged in three dimensions and three Mock wells for the estimation of background. In analysis of real pooled data from 6 subjects in a HIV-1 vaccine trial, where 199 peptides were arranged in 80 pools if size 9 or 10, our estimates were in very good agreement with the results from individual-peptide confirmatory assays. Compared to the classical approach, we could identify almost all the same peptides with high or moderate response, with less than half the number of confirmatory tests. Our method facilitates efficient use of the information available in pooled ELISpot data to avoid or reduce the need for confirmatory testing. We provide an easy-to-use free online application for implementing the method, where on uploading two spreadsheets with the pool design and pool responses, the user obtains the estimates of the individual peptide responses. PMID:27196788

  3. Peptide Internalization Enabled by Folding: Triple Helical Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Shinde, Aparna; Feher, Katie M.; Hu, Chloe; Slowinska, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Cell-Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) are known as efficient transporters of molecular cargo across cellular membranes. Their properties make them ideal candidates for in vivo applications. However, challenges in development of effective CPPs still exist: CPPs are often fast degraded by proteases and large concentration of CPPs required for cargo transporting can cause cytotoxicity. It was previously shown that restricting peptide flexibility can improve peptide stability against enzymatic degrada...

  4. Determination of peptide content and purity of DOTA-peptides by metal ion titration and UPLC. An alternative method to monitor quality of DOTA-peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRRT requires high specific activities, thus at low molar ratio between DOTA-peptide and radioactivity. Therefore, the ingredients of the reaction, including (radio)metals and DOTA-peptide must be pure and the content known. Our aim was to quantify content and purity of DOTA-peptide by a base-to-base separation of DOTA-peptide and metal-DOTA-peptide by UPLC and UV-detection. Quantification of these peaks reveals an accurate and sensitive method to quantify purity and content of DOTA-peptides. Moreover, this technique enables monitoring of the (radio)labeling process and co-introduction of impurities, including metal ions. (author)

  5. Charge Transport Phenomena in Peptide Molecular Junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Luchini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS is a valuable in situ spectroscopic analysis technique that provides a direct portrait of the electron transport properties of a molecular species. In the past, IETS has been applied to small molecules. Using self-assembled nanoelectronic junctions, IETS was performed for the first time on a large polypeptide protein peptide in the phosphorylated and native form, yielding interpretable spectra. A reproducible 10-fold shift of the I/V characteristics of the peptide was observed upon phosphorylation. Phosphorylation can be utilized as a site-specific modification to alter peptide structure and thereby influence electron transport in peptide molecular junctions. It is envisioned that kinases and phosphatases may be used to create tunable systems for molecular electronics applications, such as biosensors and memory devices.

  6. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.;

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  7. Ribosomally synthesized peptides from natural sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2014-04-01

    There are many antibiotic-resistant microbial pathogens that have emerged in recent years causing normal infections to become harder and sometimes impossible to treat. The major mechanisms of acquired resistance are the ability of the microorganisms to destroy or modify the drug, alter the drug target, reduce uptake or increase efflux of the drug and replace the metabolic step targeted by the drug. However, in recent years, resistant strains have been reported from almost every environment. New antimicrobial compounds are of major importance because of the growing problem of bacterial resistance, and antimicrobial peptides have been gaining a lot of interest. Their mechanism of action, however, is often obscure. Antimicrobial peptides are widespread and have a major role in innate immunity. An increasing number of peptides capable of inhibiting microbial growth are being reviewed here. In this article, we consider the possible use of antimicrobial peptides against pathogens.

  8. Evolution of Antimicrobial Peptides to Self-Assembled Peptides for Biomaterial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice P. McCloskey

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial-related infections are a persistent burden on patient health, recovery, mortality and healthcare budgets. Self-assembled antimicrobial peptides have evolved from the area of antimicrobial peptides. Peptides serve as important weapons in nature, and increasingly medicine, for combating microbial infection and biofilms. Self-assembled peptides harness a “bottom-up” approach, whereby the primary peptide sequence may be modified with natural and unnatural amino acids to produce an inherently antimicrobial hydrogel. Gelation may be tailored to occur in the presence of physiological and infective indicators (e.g. pH, enzymes and therefore allow local, targeted antimicrobial therapy at the site of infection. Peptides demonstrate inherent biocompatibility, antimicrobial activity, biodegradability and numerous functional groups. They are therefore prime candidates for the production of polymeric molecules that have the potential to be conjugated to biomaterials with precision. Non-native chemistries and functional groups are easily incorporated into the peptide backbone allowing peptide hydrogels to be tailored to specific functional requirements. This article reviews an area of increasing interest, namely self-assembled peptides and their potential therapeutic applications as innovative hydrogels and biomaterials in the prevention of biofilm-related infection.

  9. From a pro-apoptotic peptide to a lytic peptide: One single residue mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xi-Rui; Zhang, Qiang; Tian, Xi-Bo; Cao, Yi-Meng; Liu, Zhu-Qing; Fan, Ruru; Ding, Xiu-Fang; Zhu, Zhentai; Chen, Long; Luo, Shi-Zhong

    2016-08-01

    Further discovery and design of new anticancer peptides are important for the development of anticancer therapeutics, and study on the detailed acting mechanism and structure-function relationship of peptides is critical for anticancer peptide design and application. In this study, a novel anticancer peptide ZXR-1 (FKIGGFIKKLWRSKLA) derived from a known anticancer peptide mauriporin was developed, and a mutant ZXR-2 (FKIGGFIKKLWRSLLA) with only one residue difference at the 14th position (Lys→Leu) was also engineered. Replacement of the lysine with leucine made ZXR-2 more potent than ZXR-1 in general. Even with only one residue mutation, the two peptides displayed distinct anticancer modes of action. ZXR-1 could translocate into cells, target on the mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis, while ZXR-2 directly targeted on the cell membranes and caused membrane lysis. The variance in their acting mechanisms might be due to the different amphipathicity and positive charge distribution. In addition, the two Ile-Leu pairs (3-10 and 7-14) in ZXR-2 might also play a role in improving its cytotoxicity. Further study on the structure-function relationship of the two peptides may be beneficial for the design of novel anticancer peptides and peptide based therapeutics. PMID:27207743

  10. Gene Transfer with Poly-Melittin Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chang-Po; Kim, Ji-Seon; Steenblock, Erin; Liu, Dijie; Rice, Kevin G.

    2006-01-01

    The 26 amino acid hemolytic melittin peptide was converted into a gene transfer peptide that binds to DNA and polymerized through disulfide bond formation. Melittin analogues were synthesized by addition of one to four Lys repeats at either the C or N-subterminal end along with terminal Cys residues. Melittin analogues were able to bind and polymerize on plasmids resulting in the formation of DNA condensates. In the absence of DNA, melittin analogues retained their red blood cell hemolytic po...

  11. Bioactive peptides and proteins in disease

    OpenAIRE

    Refai, Essam

    2004-01-01

    Regulatory peptides and marker proteins are important to study in order to understand disease mechanisms. This applies of course also to our common diseases where all relationships are not yet known. Cancer and diabetes are two such complex diseases that affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. This thesis addresses particular aspects of these two diseases, regarding one regulatory peptide (VIP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide) that may be useful for tumor tracing ...

  12. Natriuretic peptides, obesity and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniel Castro-Torres

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, hypertension and heart failure are conditions commonly associated with each other. Recent investigations have demonstrated that low plasmatic levels of natriuretic peptides are linked with obesity. Thus, knowing the actions of these hormones in water and salt homeostasis, it is possible to establish that low levels of natriuretic peptides may be the common denominator among obesity, hypertension and heart failure. Knowledge on this topic is crucial to develop further investigation for definitive conclusions.

  13. Dietary fiber, gut peptides, and adipocytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, David; Miguel, Marta; Aleixandre, Amaya

    2012-01-01

    The consumption of dietary fiber (DF) has increased since it was related to the prevention of a range of illnesses and pathological conditions. DF can modify some gut hormones that regulate satiety and energy intake, thus also affecting lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. Among these gut hormones are ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1, peptide YY, and cholecystokinin. Adipose tissue is known to express and secrete a variety of products known as >adipocytokines,> which are also affected by ...

  14. Peptide oligomers for holographic data storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf Henrik; Hvilsted, Søren; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1996-01-01

    SEVERAL classes of organic materials (such as photoanisotropic liquid-crystalline polymers(1-4) and photorefractive polymers(5-7)) are being investigated for the development of media for optical data storage. Here we describe a new family of organic materials-peptide oligomers containing azobenze....... Straightforward extension of this peptide-based strategy to other molecular structures should allow the rational design of a wide range of organic materials with potentially useful optical properties....

  15. From antimicrobial to anticancer peptides. A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Diana eGaspar; A. Salomé eVeiga; Miguel A.R.B. eCastanho

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immune defense mechanism of many organisms. Although AMPs have been essentially studied and developed as potential alternatives for fighting infectious diseases, their use as anticancer peptides (ACPs) in cancer therapy either alone or in combination with other conventional drugs has been regarded as a therapeutic strategy to explore. As human cancer remains a cause of high morbidity and mortality worldwide, an urgent need of new, selective...

  16. Liquid-phase synthesis of bridged peptides using olefin metathesis of a protected peptide with a long aliphatic chain anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Keisuke; Komiya, Chiaki; Shigenaga, Akira; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takahashi, Daisuke; Otaka, Akira

    2015-02-01

    Bridged peptides including stapled peptides are attractive tools for regulating protein-protein interactions (PPIs). An effective synthetic methodology in a heterogeneous system for the preparation of these peptides using olefin metathesis and hydrogenation of protected peptides with a long aliphatic chain anchor is reported.

  17. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  18. Membrane manufacture for peptide separations

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, DooLi

    2016-06-07

    Nanostructured polymeric membranes are key tools in biomedical applications such as hemodialysis, protein separations, in the food industry, and drinking water supply from seawater. Despite of the success in different separation processes, membrane manufacture itself is at risk, since the most used solvents are about to be banned in many countries due to environmental and health issues. We propose for the first time the preparation of polyethersulfone membranes based on dissolution in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethylphosphate ([EMIM]DEP). We obtained a series of membranes tailored for separation of solutes with molecular weight of 30, 5, 1.3, and 1.25 kg mol-1 with respective water permeances of 140, 65, 30 and 20 Lm-2h-1bar-1. We demonstrate their superior efficiency in the separation of complex mixtures of peptides with molecular weights in the range of 800 to 3500 gmol-1. Furthermore, the thermodynamics and kinetics of phase separation leading to the pore formation in the membranes were investigated. The rheology of the solutions and the morphology of the prepared membranes were examed and compared to those of polyethersulfone in organic solvents currently used for membrane manufacture.

  19. Tryptophan rotamer distributions in amphipathic peptides at a lipid surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Clayton, A H; Sawyer, W. H.

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescence decay of tryptophan is a sensitive indicator of its local environment within a peptide or protein. We describe the use of frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy to determine the conformational and environmental changes associated with the interaction of single tryptophan amphipathic peptides with a phospholipid surface. The five 18-residue peptides studied are based on a class A amphipathic peptide known to associate with lipid bilayers. The peptides contain a single tryp...

  20. Stereo-separations of Peptides by Capillary Electrophoresis and Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Afzal Hussain, Iqbal Hussain, Mohamed F. Al-Ajmi & Imran Ali ### Abstract Small peptides (di-, tri-, tetra- penta- hexa etc. and peptides) control many chemical and biological processes. The biological importance of stereomers of peptides is of great value. The stereo-separations of peptides are gaining importance in biological and medicinal sciences and pharmaceutical industries. There is a great need of experimental protocols of stereo-separations of peptides. The vario...

  1. Relaxin family peptides and their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, R A D; Halls, M L; van der Westhuizen, E T; Callander, G E; Kocan, M; Summers, R J

    2013-01-01

    There are seven relaxin family peptides that are all structurally related to insulin. Relaxin has many roles in female and male reproduction, as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system, as a vasodilator and cardiac stimulant in the cardiovascular system, and as an antifibrotic agent. Insulin-like peptide-3 (INSL3) has clearly defined specialist roles in male and female reproduction, relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide involved in stress and metabolic control, and INSL5 is widely distributed particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. Although they are structurally related to insulin, the relaxin family peptides produce their physiological effects by activating a group of four G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), relaxin family peptide receptors 1-4 (RXFP1-4). Relaxin and INSL3 are the cognate ligands for RXFP1 and RXFP2, respectively, that are leucine-rich repeat containing GPCRs. RXFP1 activates a wide spectrum of signaling pathways to generate second messengers that include cAMP and nitric oxide, whereas RXFP2 activates a subset of these pathways. Relaxin-3 and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for RXFP3 and RXFP4 that are closely related to small peptide receptors that when activated inhibit cAMP production and activate MAP kinases. Although there are still many unanswered questions regarding the mode of action of relaxin family peptides, it is clear that they have important physiological roles that could be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23303914

  2. Confinement-dependent friction in peptide bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; Netz, Roland R

    2013-03-19

    Friction within globular proteins or between adhering macromolecules crucially determines the kinetics of protein folding, the formation, and the relaxation of self-assembled molecular systems. One fundamental question is how these friction effects depend on the local environment and in particular on the presence of water. In this model study, we use fully atomistic MD simulations with explicit water to obtain friction forces as a single polyglycine peptide chain is pulled out of a bundle of k adhering parallel polyglycine peptide chains. The whole system is periodically replicated along the peptide axes, so a stationary state at prescribed mean sliding velocity V is achieved. The aggregation number is varied between k = 2 (two peptide chains adhering to each other with plenty of water present at the adhesion sites) and k = 7 (one peptide chain pulled out from a close-packed cylindrical array of six neighboring peptide chains with no water inside the bundle). The friction coefficient per hydrogen bond, extrapolated to the viscous limit of vanishing pulling velocity V → 0, exhibits an increase by five orders of magnitude when going from k = 2 to k = 7. This dramatic confinement-induced friction enhancement we argue to be due to a combination of water depletion and increased hydrogen-bond cooperativity. PMID:23528088

  3. Peptide pheromone signaling in Streptococcus and Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Laura C; Federle, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Intercellular chemical signaling in bacteria, commonly referred to as quorum sensing (QS), relies on the production and detection of compounds known as pheromones to elicit coordinated responses among members of a community. Pheromones produced by Gram-positive bacteria are comprised of small peptides. Based on both peptide structure and sensory system architectures, Gram-positive bacterial signaling pathways may be classified into one of four groups with a defining hallmark: cyclical peptides of the Agr type, peptides that contain Gly-Gly processing motifs, sensory systems of the RNPP family, or the recently characterized Rgg-like regulatory family. The recent discovery that Rgg family members respond to peptide pheromones increases substantially the number of species in which QS is likely a key regulatory component. These pathways control a variety of fundamental behaviors including conjugation, natural competence for transformation, biofilm development, and virulence factor regulation. Overlapping QS pathways found in multiple species and pathways that utilize conserved peptide pheromones provide opportunities for interspecies communication. Here we review pheromone signaling identified in the genera Enterococcus and Streptococcus, providing examples of all four types of pathways.

  4. SPdb – a signal peptide database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tin

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signal peptide plays an important role in protein targeting and protein translocation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This transient, short peptide sequence functions like a postal address on an envelope by targeting proteins for secretion or for transfer to specific organelles for further processing. Understanding how signal peptides function is crucial in predicting where proteins are translocated. To support this understanding, we present SPdb signal peptide database http://proline.bic.nus.edu.sg/spdb, a repository of experimentally determined and computationally predicted signal peptides. Results SPdb integrates information from two sources (a Swiss-Prot protein sequence database which is now part of UniProt and (b EMBL nucleotide sequence database. The database update is semi-automated with human checking and verification of the data to ensure the correctness of the data stored. The latest release SPdb release 3.2 contains 18,146 entries of which 2,584 entries are experimentally verified signal sequences; the remaining 15,562 entries are either signal sequences that fail to meet our filtering criteria or entries that contain unverified signal sequences. Conclusion SPdb is a manually curated database constructed to support the understanding and analysis of signal peptides. SPdb tracks the major updates of the two underlying primary databases thereby ensuring that its information remains up-to-date.

  5. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides for plant disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Wan; Kim, Beom Seok

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  6. Antimicrobial Cyclic Peptides for Plant Disease Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wan Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial cyclic peptides derived from microbes bind stably with target sites, have a tolerance to hydrolysis by proteases, and a favorable degradability under field conditions, which make them an attractive proposition for use as agricultural fungicides. Antimicrobial cyclic peptides are classified according to the types of bonds within the ring structure; homodetic, heterodetic, and complex cyclic peptides, which in turn reflect diverse physicochemical features. Most antimicrobial cyclic peptides affect the integrity of the cell envelope. This is achieved through direct interaction with the cell membrane or disturbance of the cell wall and membrane component biosynthesis such as chitin, glucan, and sphingolipid. These are specific and selective targets providing reliable activity and safety for non-target organisms. Synthetic cyclic peptides produced through combinatorial chemistry offer an alternative approach to develop antimicrobials for agricultural uses. Those synthesized so far have been studied for antibacterial activity, however, the recent advancements in powerful technologies now promise to provide novel antimicrobial cyclic peptides that are yet to be discovered from natural resources.

  7. Self-Assembly of Tetraphenylalanine Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, Enric; Ballano, Gema; Casanovas, Jordi; Díaz, Angélica; Pérez-Madrigal, Maria M; Estrany, Francesc; Puiggalí, Jordi; Cativiela, Carlos; Alemán, Carlos

    2015-11-16

    Three different tetraphenylalanine (FFFF) based peptides that differ at the N- and C-termini have been synthesized by using standard procedures to study their ability to form different nanoassemblies under a variety of conditions. The FFFF peptide assembles into nanotubes that show more structural imperfections at the surface than those formed by the diphenylalanine (FF) peptide under the same conditions. Periodic DFT calculations (M06L functional) were used to propose a model that consists of three FFFF molecules defining a ring through head-to-tail NH3(+)⋅⋅⋅(-)OOC interactions, which in turn stack to produce deformed channels with internal diameters between 12 and 16 Å. Depending on the experimental conditions used for the peptide incubation, N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) protected FFFF self-assembles into a variety of polymorphs: ultra-thin nanoplates, fibrils, and star-like submicrometric aggregates. DFT calculations indicate that Fmoc-FFFF prefers a parallel rather than an antiparallel β-sheet assembly. Finally, coexisting multiple assemblies (up to three) were observed for Fmoc-FFFF-OBzl (OBzl = benzyl ester), which incorporates aromatic protecting groups at the two peptide terminals. This unusual and noticeable feature is attributed to the fact that the assemblies obtained by combining the Fmoc and OBzl groups contained in the peptide are isoenergetic. PMID:26419936

  8. Biomathematical description of synthetic peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Sieber

    Full Text Available Libraries of randomised peptides displayed on phages or viral particles are essential tools in a wide spectrum of applications. However, there is only limited understanding of a library's fundamental dynamics and the influences of encoding schemes and sizes on their quality. Numeric properties of libraries, such as the expected number of different peptides and the library's coverage, have long been in use as measures of a library's quality. Here, we present a graphical framework of these measures together with a library's relative efficiency to help to describe libraries in enough detail for researchers to plan new experiments in a more informed manner. In particular, these values allow us to answer-in a probabilistic fashion-the question of whether a specific library does indeed contain one of the "best" possible peptides. The framework is implemented in a web-interface based on two packages, discreteRV and peptider, to the statistical software environment R. We further provide a user-friendly web-interface called PeLiCa (Peptide Library Calculator, http://www.pelica.org, allowing scientists to plan and analyse their peptide libraries.

  9. Peptide Toxins in Solitary Wasp Venoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Katsuhiro; Kazuma, Kohei; Nihei, Ken-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Solitary wasps paralyze insects or spiders with stinging venom and feed the paralyzed preys to their larva. Accordingly, the venoms should contain a variety of constituents acting on nervous systems. However, only a few solitary wasp venoms have been chemically studied despite thousands of species inhabiting the planet. We have surveyed bioactive substances in solitary wasp venoms found in Japan and discovered a variety of novel bioactive peptides. Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs), in the venoms of the pompilid wasps Anoplius samariensis and Batozonellus maculifrons, are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids without a disulfide bond. PMTXs slowed Na+ channel inactivation, in particular against neuronal type Na+ channels, and were rather selective to the Nav1.6 channel. Mastoparan-like cytolytic and antimicrobial peptides are the major components of eumenine wasp venoms. They are rich in hydrophobic and basic amino acids, adopting a α-helical secondary structure, and showing mast cell degranulating, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. The venom of the spider wasp Cyphononyx fulvognathus contained four bradykinin-related peptides. They are hyperalgesic and, dependent on the structure, differently associated with B1 or B2 receptors. Further survey led to the isolation of leucomyosuppressin-like FMRFamide peptides from the venoms of the digger wasps Sphex argentatus and Isodontia harmandi. These results of peptide toxins in solitary wasp venoms from our studies are summarized. PMID:27096870

  10. Peptide Toxins in Solitary Wasp Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiro Konno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Solitary wasps paralyze insects or spiders with stinging venom and feed the paralyzed preys to their larva. Accordingly, the venoms should contain a variety of constituents acting on nervous systems. However, only a few solitary wasp venoms have been chemically studied despite thousands of species inhabiting the planet. We have surveyed bioactive substances in solitary wasp venoms found in Japan and discovered a variety of novel bioactive peptides. Pompilidotoxins (PMTXs, in the venoms of the pompilid wasps Anoplius samariensis and Batozonellus maculifrons, are small peptides consisting of 13 amino acids without a disulfide bond. PMTXs slowed Na+ channel inactivation, in particular against neuronal type Na+ channels, and were rather selective to the Nav1.6 channel. Mastoparan-like cytolytic and antimicrobial peptides are the major components of eumenine wasp venoms. They are rich in hydrophobic and basic amino acids, adopting a α-helical secondary structure, and showing mast cell degranulating, antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. The venom of the spider wasp Cyphononyx fulvognathus contained four bradykinin-related peptides. They are hyperalgesic and, dependent on the structure, differently associated with B1 or B2 receptors. Further survey led to the isolation of leucomyosuppressin-like FMRFamide peptides from the venoms of the digger wasps Sphex argentatus and Isodontia harmandi. These results of peptide toxins in solitary wasp venoms from our studies are summarized.

  11. Human C-peptide. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic human C-peptide bearing a tyrosine group at its amino end is labelled with 125iodine using chloramin T or hydrogen peroxide and lactoperoxidase. The results of the two methods are compared. Antiserum to synthetic human C-peptide (without tyrosine), which was partially coupled to rabbit albumin, is raised in guinea pigs and goats. Goats show to be superior to guinea pips concerning antibody production. The so-called 'hook effect' phenomenon is observed when setting up the standard curves for the radioimmunoassay. Monotonically decreasing standard curves are obtained on dilution of antiserum with a high antibody titer which was produced by repeated immunization in goats. Free C-peptide and C-peptide bound to antiserum are separated using the anion exchange resin amberlite. Using this separation technique we excluded unspecific binding of labelled C-peptide to protein fractions in serum of diabetics. The sensitivity of our radioimmunoassay is approx. 0.3 ng C-peptide/ml serum. Intra- and interassay variability are below 10%. Human proinsulin is the only substance found to crossreact with the antiserum. (orig.)

  12. Effects of opioid peptides on thermoregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, W.G.

    1981-11-01

    In a given species, injected opioid peptides usually cause changes in temperature similar to those caused by nonpeptide opioids. The main effect in those species most studied, the cat, rat, and mouse, is an increase in the level about which body temperature is regulated; there is a coordinated change in the activity of thermoregulatory effectors such that hyperthermia is produced in both hot and cold environments. Larger doses may depress thermoregulation, thereby causing body temperature to decrease in the cold. Elicitation of different patterns of response over a range of environmental temperatures and studies with naloxone and naltrexone indicate that stimulation of a number of different receptors by both peptide and nonpeptide opioids can evoke thermoregulatory responses. ..beta..-Endorphin is readily antagonized by naloxone whereas methionine-enkephalin can act on naloxone-insensitive receptors. Moreover, synthetic peptide analogs do not necessarily evoke the same response as does the related endogenous peptide. The lack of effect of naloxone on body temperature of subjects housed at usual laboratory temperature or on pyrogen-induced increases in body temperature indicates that an action of endogenous peptides on naloxone-sensitive receptors plays little, if any, role in normal thermoregulation or in fever. However, there is some evidence that such an action may be involved in responses to restraint or ambient temperature-induced stress. Further evaluation of possible physiological roles of endogenous opioid peptides will be facilitated when specific antagonists at other types of opioid receptors become available.

  13. A cocoa peptide protects Caenorhabditis elegans from oxidative stress and β-amyloid peptide toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Martorell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocoa and cocoa-based products contain different compounds with beneficial properties for human health. Polyphenols are the most frequently studied, and display antioxidant properties. Moreover, protein content is a very interesting source of antioxidant bioactive peptides, which can be used therapeutically for the prevention of age-related diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A bioactive peptide, 13L (DNYDNSAGKWWVT, was obtained from a hydrolyzed cocoa by-product by chromatography. The in vitro inhibition of prolyl endopeptidase (PEP was used as screening method to select the suitable fraction for peptide identification. Functional analysis of 13L peptide was achieved using the transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strain CL4176 expressing the human Aβ₁₋₄₂ peptide as a pre-clinical in vivo model for Alzheimer's disease. Among the peptides isolated, peptide 13L (1 µg/mL showed the highest antioxidant activity (P≤0.001 in the wild-type strain (N2. Furthermore, 13L produced a significant delay in body paralysis in strain CL4176, especially in the 24-47 h period after Aβ₁₋₄₂ peptide induction (P≤0.0001. This observation is in accordance with the reduction of Aβ deposits in CL4176 by western blot. Finally, transcriptomic analysis in wild-type nematodes treated with 13L revealed modulation of the proteosomal and synaptic functions as the main metabolic targets of the peptide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the cocoa 13L peptide has antioxidant activity and may reduce Aβ deposition in a C. elegans model of Alzheimer's disease; and therefore has a putative therapeutic potential for prevention of age-related diseases. Further studies in murine models and humans will be essential to analyze the effectiveness of the 13L peptide in higher animals.

  14. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  15. Interaction of antimicrobial peptides with lipid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanulova, Maria

    2008-12-15

    This study aims to investigate the difference in the interaction of antimicrobial peptides with two classes of zwitterionic peptides, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) and phosphatidylcholines (PC). Further experiments were performed on model membranes prepared from specific bacterial lipids, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) isolated from Salmonella minnesota. The structure of the lipid-peptide aqueous dispersions was studied by small-and wide-angle X-ray diffraction during heating and cooling from 5 to 85 C. The lipids and peptides were mixed at lipid-to-peptide ratios 10-10000 (POPE and POPC) or 2-50 (LPS). All experiments were performed at synchrotron soft condensed matter beamline A2 in Hasylab at Desy in Hamburg, Germany. The phases were identified and the lattice parameters were calculated. Alamethicin and melittin interact in similar ways with the lipids. Pure POPC forms only lamellar phases. POPE forms lamellar phases at low temperatures that upon heating transform into a highly curved inverse hexagonal phase. Insertion of the peptide induced inverse bicontinuous cubic phases which are an ideal compromise between the curvature stress and the packing frustration. Melittin usually induced a mixture of two cubic phases, Im3m and Pn3m, with a ratio of lattice parameters close to 1.279, related to the underlying minimal surfaces. They formed during the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition and persisted during cooling till the onset of the gel phase. The phases formed at different lipid-to-peptide ratios had very similar lattice parameters. Epitaxial relationships existed between coexisting cubic phases and hexagonal or lamellar phases due to confinement of all phases to an onion vesicle, a vesicle with several layers consisting of different lipid phases. Alamethicin induced the same cubic phases, although their formation and lattice parameters were dependent on the peptide concentration. The cubic phases formed during heating from the lamellar phase and their onset

  16. Peptide-membrane interactions of arginine-tryptophan peptides probed using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring.

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A

    2014-04-18

    Membrane-active peptides include peptides that can cross cellular membranes and deliver macromolecular cargo as well as peptides that inhibit bacterial growth. Some of these peptides can act as both transporters and antibacterial agents. It is desirable to combine the knowledge from these two different fields of membrane-active peptides into design of new peptides with tailored actions, as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances, targeting specific membranes. We have previously shown that the position of the amino acid tryptophan in the peptide sequence of three arginine-tryptophan peptides affects their uptake and intracellular localization in live mammalian cells, as well as their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. Here, we use quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring to assess the induced changes caused by binding of the three peptides to supported model membranes composed of POPC, POPC/POPG, POPC/POPG/cholesterol or POPC/lactosyl PE. Our results indicate that the tryptophan position in the peptide sequence affects the way these peptides interact with the different model membranes and that the presence of cholesterol in particular seems to affect the membrane interaction of the peptide with an even distribution of tryptophans in the peptide sequence. These results give mechanistic insight into the function of these peptides and may aid in the design of membrane-active peptides with specified cellular targets and actions.

  17. Urodilatin. A renal natriuretic peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and validation of a radioimmunoassay for endogenous URO in urine and synthetic URO in plasma is described. The first obstacle to overcome was to produce an antibody specific for URO. A polyclonal URO antibody with a cross-reactivity with the structural highly homologous atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was developed by immunization of rabbits with the whole URO(95-126). Purification of the polyclonal URO antiserum with CNBr-activated Sepharose affinity chromatography was a simple way of producing a URO-specific antibody without cross-reactivity with ANP analogues. A reliable 125I-labelled URO tracer was made with the Iodo-Gen method. Prior to the assay, the urine samples were prepared by ethanol with a recovery of unlabelled URO between 80 - 100% and the plasma samples were Sep-Pak C18 extracted with a recovery of about 50%. The radioimmunoassay is performed in 3 days, using polyethylene glycol for separation. The sensitivity of the assay was improved by sample preparation and concentration, reducing the amount of tracer and late addition, reducing the amount of antibody and increasing the incubation time and lowering the temperature of incubation. The infusion rate of 20 ng URO kg-1 min-1 was most potential and well tolerated in healthy subjects. The short-term natriuretic and diuretic effects were closely associated with a significant diminished sodium reabsorption in the distal nephron. Further studies are needed to exploit the therapeutical potential of URO, for example in patients with sodium-water retaining disorders. The therapeutical dose range will probably be narrow due to the blood pressure lowering effect of URO with infusion rates higher than 20-30 ng kg-1 min-1. (EHS)

  18. The non-peptidic part determines the internalization mechanism and intracellular trafficking of peptide amphiphiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Missirlis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Peptide amphiphiles (PAs are a class of amphiphilic molecules able to self-assemble into nanomaterials that have shown efficient in vivo targeted delivery. Understanding the interactions of PAs with cells and the mechanisms of their internalization and intracellular trafficking is critical in their further development for therapeutic delivery applications. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: PAs of a novel, cell- and tissue-penetrating peptide were synthesized possessing two different lipophilic tail architectures and their interactions with prostate cancer cells were studied in vitro. Cell uptake of peptides was greatly enhanced post-modification. Internalization occurred via lipid-raft mediated endocytosis and was common for the two analogs studied. On the contrary, we identified the non-peptidic part as the determining factor of differences between intracellular trafficking and retention of PAs. PAs composed of di-stearyl lipid tails linked through poly(ethylene glycol to the peptide exhibited higher exocytosis rates and employed different recycling pathways compared to ones consisting of di-palmitic-coupled peptides. As a result, cell association of the former PAs decreased with time. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Control over peptide intracellular localization and retention is possible by appropriate modification with synthetic hydrophobic tails. We propose this as a strategy to design improved peptide-based delivery systems.

  19. Peptide segment ligation:A new method for synthesis of peptide and protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ The protein structure-function relationships are always highlighted in the field of life science. Protein synthesis from genomic sequence data is gaining significance in the "post-genomic era" of biomedical research by providing direct access to functional proteins. The manually or automatically stepwise solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) allows peptide of up to 60 residues to be routinely constructed in good yield and high purity[1,2]. The assembly of longer proteins via the gene engineering technology (e.g. recombinant DNA-based molecular biology or site- directed mutagenesis) and convergent peptide synthesis are necessary. Although the current biosynthetic method allows unnatural amino acids to be incorporated into proteins or peptides[3], only ?-peptide in the protein backbone can be obtained. A lot of problems associated with the classic convergent peptide synthesis approach, such as the poor solubility, inadequate purification techniques, and limited characterization methods with the fully protected segment[6]. However, totally chemical synthetic method can easily obtain ?- or ?-peptide[4] and even branch peptide[5].

  20. Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Rasmussen, Michael; Nielsen, Morten;

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity Mikkel Harndahla, Michael Rasmussena, Morten Nielsenb, Soren Buusa,∗ a Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark b Center for Biological Seq...... al., 2007. J. Immunol. 178, 7890–7901. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2012.02.025...

  1. Clinical relevance of intestinal peptide uptake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine available information on an independent peptide transporter 1(Pep T1) and its potential relevance to treatment, this evaluation was completed.METHODS: Fully published English language literature articles sourced through Pub Med related to protein digestion and absorption, specifically human peptide and amino acid transport, were accessed and reviewed.Papers from 1970 to the present, with particular emphasis on the past decade, were examined. In addition,abstracted information translated to English in Pub Med was also included. Finally, studies and reviews relevant to nutrient or drug uptake, particularly in human intestine were included for evaluation. This work represents a summary of all of these studies with particular reference to peptide transporter mediated assimilation of nutrients and pharmacologically active medications.RESULTS: Assimilation of dietary protein in humans involves gastric and pancreatic enzyme hydrolysis to luminal oligopeptides and free amino acids. During the ensuing intestinal phase, these hydrolytic products are transported into the epithelial cell and, eventually, the portal vein. A critical component of this process is the uptake of intact di-peptides and tri-peptides by an independent Pep T1. A number of "peptide-mimetic" pharmaceutical agents may also be transported through this carrier, important for uptake of different antibiotics, antiviral agents and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. In addition, specific peptide products of intestinal bacteria may also be transported by Pep T1, with initiation and persistence of an immune response including increased cytokine production and associated intestinal inflammatory changes. Interestingly, these inflammatory changes may also be attenuated with orallyadministered anti-inflammatory tripeptides administered as site-specific nanoparticles and taken up by this Pep T1 transport protein. CONCLUSION: Further evaluation of the role of this transporter in treatment of

  2. New dendrimer - Peptide host - Guest complexes: Towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2002-01-01

    the NH- and CO-stretch signals of the peptide amide moieties shift towards lower wave-numbers upon complexation with the dendrimer. Spatial analysis of the complexes with NOESY spectroscopy generally shows close proximity of the N-terminal Boc group of the peptide to the peripheral adamantyl groups...... between the dendrimer outer shell tertiary amines and the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide, and also through host-urea to peptide-amide hydrogen bonding. The hydrogen-bonding nature of the peptide dendrimer interactions was further confirmed by using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, for which...... on the dendrimer host. The influence of side-chain motif on interactions with the host is analyzed by using seven different N-Boc-protected tripeptides as guests for the dendrimer, Downfield shifts of up to 1.3 ppm were observed for the guest amide NH-proton signals. These shifts decrease with increasing...

  3. A peptide & peptide nucleic acid synthesis technology for transporter molecules and theranostics--the SPPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  4. A Peptide & Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthesis Technology for Transporter Molecules and Theranostics - The SPPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipkorn, Ruediger; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Koch, Mario; Semmler, Wolfhard; Komljenovic, Dorde

    2014-01-01

    Advances in imaging diagnostics using magnetic resonance tomography (MRT), positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence imaging including near infrared (NIR) imaging methods are facilitated by constant improvement of the concepts of peptide synthesis. Feasible patient-specific theranostic platforms in the personalized medicine are particularly dependent on efficient and clinically applicable peptide constructs. The role of peptides in the interrelations between the structure and function of proteins is widely investigated, especially by using computer-assisted methods. Nowadays the solid phase synthesis (SPPS) chemistry emerges as a key technology and is considered as a promising methodology to design peptides for the investigation of molecular pharmacological processes at the transcriptional level. SPPS syntheses could be carried out in core facilities producing peptides for large-scale scientific implementations as presented here. PMID:24843319

  5. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungli Prakash

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary peptide levels in CRF patients and Urinary % peptides were significantly decreased in CRF patients as compared to healthy controls. Urinary % peptides correlated negatively with proteinuria. Conclusion: we have found decrease in urinary peptides and % urinary peptides in CRF patients and possibly measurement of % urinary peptides may possibly serve as better indicator in early detection of impairment in renal function.

  6. Peptide inhibition of human cytomegalovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Cindy A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the most prevalent congenital viral infection in the United States and Europe causing significant morbidity and mortality to both mother and child. HCMV is also an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV- infected patients with AIDS, and solid organ and allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. Current treatments for HCMV-associated diseases are insufficient due to the emergence of drug-induced resistance and cytotoxicity, necessitating novel approaches to limit HCMV infection. The aim of this study was to develop therapeutic peptides targeting glycoprotein B (gB, a major glycoprotein of HCMV that is highly conserved across the Herpesviridae family, that specifically inhibit fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane preventing HCMV entry and infection. Results Using the Wimley-White Interfacial Hydrophobicity Scale (WWIHS, several regions within gB were identified that display a high potential to interact with lipid bilayers of cell membranes and hydrophobic surfaces within proteins. The ability of synthetic peptides analogous to WWIHS-positive sequences of HCMV gB to inhibit viral infectivity was evaluated. Human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF were infected with the Towne-GFP strain of HCMV (0.5 MOI, preincubated with peptides at a range of concentrations (78 nm to 100 μM, and GFP-positive cells were visualized 48 hours post-infection by fluorescence microscopy and analyzed quantitatively by flow cytometry. Peptides that inhibited HCMV infection demonstrated different inhibitory concentration curves indicating that each peptide possesses distinct biophysical properties. Peptide 174-200 showed 80% inhibition of viral infection at a concentration of 100 μM, and 51% and 62% inhibition at concentrations of 5 μM and 2.5 μM, respectively. Peptide 233-263 inhibited infection by 97% and 92% at concentrations of 100

  7. Dinosaur Peptides Suggest Mechanisms of Protein Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Antonio, James D.; Schweitzer, Mary H.; Jensen, Shane T.; Kalluri, Raghu; Buckley, Michael; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O. (Harvard-Med); (IIT); (NCSU); (UPENN); (Manchester); (Orthovita)

    2011-09-16

    Eleven collagen peptide sequences recovered from chemical extracts of dinosaur bones were mapped onto molecular models of the vertebrate collagen fibril derived from extant taxa. The dinosaur peptides localized to fibril regions protected by the close packing of collagen molecules, and contained few acidic amino acids. Four peptides mapped to collagen regions crucial for cell-collagen interactions and tissue development. Dinosaur peptides were not represented in more exposed parts of the collagen fibril or regions mediating intermolecular cross-linking. Thus functionally significant regions of collagen fibrils that are physically shielded within the fibril may be preferentially preserved in fossils. These results show empirically that structure-function relationships at the molecular level could contribute to selective preservation in fossilized vertebrate remains across geological time, suggest a 'preservation motif', and bolster current concepts linking collagen structure to biological function. This non-random distribution supports the hypothesis that the peptides are produced by the extinct organisms and suggests a chemical mechanism for survival.

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Rowzee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 is a small peptide component of the prohormone, proglucagon, that is produced in the gut. Exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist originally isolated from the saliva of H. suspectum or Gila monster, is a peptide that shares sequence and functional homology with GLP-1. Both peptides have been demonstrated to stimulate insulin secretion, inhibit glucagon secretion, promote satiety and slow gastric emptying. As such, GLP-1 and Exendin-4 have become attractive pharmaceutical targets as an adjunctive therapy for individuals with type II diabetes mellitus, with several products currently available clinically. Herein we summarize the cell biology leading to GLP-1 production and secretion from intestinal L-cells and the endocrine functions of this peptide and Exendin-4 in humans. Additionally, gene therapeutic applications of GLP-1 and Exendin-4 are discussed with a focus on recent work using the salivary gland as a gene therapy target organ for the treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  9. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  10. Preparation of Soy Peptides by Liquid Fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiLi; YangXiaoqun; ZhaoMouming; LiangShizhong

    2002-01-01

    Many kinds of microorganism can produce a mount of protease which subsequently hydrolysis the protein of the medium into peptides when they grow in protein containing liquid medium.In the present investigation,the conditions of preparing soybean peptides by liquid fermentation were studied,following results were obtained:(1)SPI is a nice nitrogen source and meanwhile an inducible factor of protease production;its concentration can be as high as 3%-4%.(2)Sucrose is the best carbon source;its concentration is 1%-4%.(3)Under the conditions of 28℃,initial pH6.0,inoculum size 4%,cell age 36hr and fermentation time 24hr-30hr,we can obtain soybean peptides or fermentation liquor with good flavor,its DH reaches 25%-30% and the yield rate can be as high as 75%.(4)Mass spectrograph indicate the MW of the fermentation liquid or the soybean peptides mainly distribute at about 4000Dal,these imply a promising prospect of industrial application of submerged fermentation in producing soybean peptides.

  11. Peptide friction in water nanofilm on mica surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bo; Xiu Peng; Wang Chun-Lei; Fang Hai-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Peptide frictions in water nanofilms of various thicknesses on a mica surface are studied via molecular dynamics simulations.We find that the forced lateral motion of the peptide exhibits stick-slip behaviour at low water coverage;in contrast,the smooth gliding motion is observed at higher water coverage.The adsorbed peptide can form direct peptide-surface hydrogen bonds as well as indirect peptide-water-surface hydrogen bonds with the substrate. We propose that the stick-slip phenomenon is attributed to the overall effects of direct and indirect hydrogen bonds formed between the surface and the peptide.

  12. Insulin and C-peptide in human brain neurons (insulin/C-peptide/brain peptides/immunohistochemistry/radioimmunoassay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regional distribution and cellular localization of insulin and C-peptide immunoreactivities were studied in human cadaver brains using the indirect immunofluorescence method, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique, and radioimmunoassay. Products of the immune reactions to both polypeptides were observed in most nerve cells in all areas of the brain examined. Immunostaining was mainly restricted to the cell soma and proximal dendrites. Radioimmunoassay revealed that human brain contains insulin and C-peptide in concentrations much higher than the blood, the highest being in the hypothalamus. These findings support the hypothesis that the 'brain insulin' is - at least in part - produced in the CNS. (author)

  13. Anisotropic Membrane Curvature Sensing by Amphipathic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Elías-Wolff, Federico; Lindén, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe an approach to study curvature sensing by simulating the interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three amphipathic antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. Our findings provide evidence for direction-dependent curvature sensing mechanisms in amphipathic peptides and challenge existing theories of hydrophobic insertion. The buckling approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature-sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane proteins. PMID:26745422

  14. Peptide Based Radiopharmaceuticals: Specific Construct Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Som, P; Rhodes, B A; Sharma, S S

    1997-10-21

    The objective of this project was to develop receptor based peptides for diagnostic imaging and therapy. A series of peptides related to cell adhesion molecules (CAM) and immune regulation were designed for radiolabeling with 99mTc and evaluated in animal models as potential diagnostic imaging agents for various disease conditions such as thrombus (clot), acute kidney failure, and inflection/inflammation imaging. The peptides for this project were designed by the industrial partner, Palatin Technologies, (formerly Rhomed, Inc.) using various peptide design approaches including a newly developed rational computer assisted drug design (CADD) approach termed MIDAS (Metal ion Induced Distinctive Array of Structures). In this approach, the biological function domain and the 99mTc complexing domain are fused together so that structurally these domains are indistinguishable. This approach allows construction of conformationally rigid metallo-peptide molecules (similar to cyclic peptides) that are metabolically stable in-vivo. All the newly designed peptides were screened in various in vitro receptor binding and functional assays to identify a lead compound. The lead compounds were formulated in a one-step 99mTc labeling kit form which were studied by BNL for detailed in-vivo imaging using various animals models of human disease. Two main peptides usingMIDAS approach evolved and were investigated: RGD peptide for acute renal failure and an immunomodulatory peptide derived from tuftsin (RMT-1) for infection/inflammation imaging. Various RGD based metallopeptides were designed, synthesized and assayed for their efficacy in inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation. Most of these peptides displayed biological activity in the 1-100 µM range. Based on previous work by others, RGD-I and RGD-II were evaluated in animal models of acute renal failure. These earlier studies showed that after acute ischemic injury the renal cortex displays

  15. Spider-Venom Peptides as Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn F. King

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spiders are the most successful venomous animals and the most abundant terrestrial predators. Their remarkable success is due in large part to their ingenious exploitation of silk and the evolution of pharmacologically complex venoms that ensure rapid subjugation of prey. Most spider venoms are dominated by disulfide-rich peptides that typically have high affinity and specificity for particular subtypes of ion channels and receptors. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides, making them a valuable resource for drug discovery. Here we review the structure and pharmacology of spider-venom peptides that are being used as leads for the development of therapeutics against a wide range of pathophysiological conditions including cardiovascular disorders, chronic pain, inflammation, and erectile dysfunction.

  16. Amyloid fibrils compared to peptide nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganec, Matjaž; Zerovnik, Eva

    2014-09-01

    Prefibrillar oligomeric states and amyloid fibrils of amyloid-forming proteins qualify as nanoparticles. We aim to predict what biophysical and biochemical properties they could share in common with better researched peptide nanotubes. We first describe what is known of amyloid fibrils and prefibrillar aggregates (oligomers and protofibrils): their structure, mechanisms of formation and putative mechanism of cytotoxicity. In distinction from other neuronal fibrillar constituents, amyloid fibrils are believed to cause pathology, however, some can also be functional. Second, we give a review of known biophysical properties of peptide nanotubes. Finally, we compare properties of these two macromolecular states side by side and discuss which measurements that have already been done with peptide nanotubes could be done with amyloid fibrils as well.

  17. Anisotropic membrane curvature sensing by antibacterial peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Llobregat, Jordi; Lindén, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins and peptides have an intrinsic capacity to sense and induce membrane curvature, and play crucial roles for organizing and remodeling cell membranes. However, the molecular driving forces behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we describe a new approach to study curvature sensing, by simulating the direction-dependent interactions of single molecules with a buckled lipid bilayer. We analyze three antimicrobial peptides, a class of membrane-associated molecules that specifically target and destabilize bacterial membranes, and find qualitatively different sensing characteristics that would be difficult to resolve with other methods. These findings provide new insights into the microscopic mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides, which might aid the development of new antibiotics. Our approach is generally applicable to a wide range of curvature sensing molecules, and our results provide strong motivation to develop new experimental methods to track position and orientation of membrane p...

  18. Design and Application of Antimicrobial Peptide Conjugates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Reinhardt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are an interesting class of antibiotics characterized by their unique antibiotic activity and lower propensity for developing resistance compared to common antibiotics. They belong to the class of membrane-active peptides and usually act selectively against bacteria, fungi and protozoans. AMPs, but also peptide conjugates containing AMPs, have come more and more into the focus of research during the last few years. Within this article, recent work on AMP conjugates is reviewed. Different aspects will be highlighted as a combination of AMPs with antibiotics or organometallic compounds aiming to increase antibacterial activity or target selectivity, conjugation with photosensitizers for improving photodynamic therapy (PDT or the attachment to particles, to name only a few. Owing to the enormous resonance of antimicrobial conjugates in the literature so far, this research topic seems to be very attractive to different scientific fields, like medicine, biology, biochemistry or chemistry.

  19. Preparation of Soy Peptides by Liquid Fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Yang Xiaoqun; Zhao Mouming; Liang Shizhong

    2002-01-01

    Many kinds of microorganism canproduce a mount of protease which subsequentlyhydrolysis the protein of the medium into peptideswhen they grow in protein containing liquidmedium. In the present investigation, theconditions of preparing soybean peptides byliquid fermentation were studied following resultswere obtained: (1) SPI is a nice nitrogen sourceand meanwhile an inducible factor of proteaseproduction; its concentration can be as high as3%-4%. (2) Sucrose is the best carbon source;its concentration is 1%-4%. (3) Under theconditions of 28℃, initial pH 60, inoculum size4%, cell age 36hr and fermentation time 24hr-30hr, we can obtain soybean peptides orfermentation liquor with good flavor, its Dhreaches 25%-30% and the yield rate can be ashigh as 75%. (4) Mass spectrograph indicate theMW of the fermentation liquid or the soybeanpeptides mainly distribute at a Dal, theseimply a promising prospect of industrialapplication of submerged fermentation inproducing soybean peptides.

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides: Multifunctional Drugs for Different Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (APs are an important part of the innate immune system in epithelial and non-epithelial surfaces. So far, many different antimicrobial peptides from various families have been discovered in non-vertebrates and vertebrates. They are characterized by antibiotic, antifungal and antiviral activities against a variety of microorganisms. In addition to their role as endogenous antimicrobials, APs participate in multiple aspects of immunity. They are involved in septic and non-septic inflammation, wound repair, angiogenesis, regulation of the adaptive immune system and in maintaining homeostasis. Due to those characteristics AP could play an important role in many practical applications. Limited therapeutic efficiency of current antimicrobial agents and the emerging resistance of pathogens require alternate antimicrobial drugs. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent literature on functions and mechanisms of APs. It also shows their current practical applications as peptide therapeutics and bioactive polymers and discusses the possibilities of future clinical developments.

  1. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O.E.; Borregaard, N.; Cole, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de...... novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain...... diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  3. Interactions at the Peptide/Silicon Surfaces: Evidence of Peptide Multilayer Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pápa, Zsuzsanna; Ramakrishnan, Sathish Kumar; Martin, Marta; Cloitre, Thierry; Zimányi, László; Márquez, Jessica; Budai, Judit; Tóth, Zsolt; Gergely, Csilla

    2016-07-19

    Selective deposition of peptides from liquid solutions to n- and p-doped silicon has been demonstrated. The selectivity is governed by peptide/silicon adhesion differences. A noninvasive, fast characterization of the obtained peptide layers is required to promote their application for interfacing silicon-based devices with biological material. In this study we show that spectroscopic ellipsometry-a method increasingly used for the investigation of biointerfaces-can provide essential information about the amount of adsorbed peptide material and the degree of coverage on silicon surfaces. We observed the formation of peptide multilayers for a strongly binding adhesion peptide on p-doped silicon. Application of the patterned layer ellipsometric evaluation method combined with Sellmeier dispersion led to physically consistent results, which describe well the optical properties of peptide layers in the visible spectral range. This evaluation allowed the estimation of surface coverage, which is an important indicator of adsorption quality. The ellipsometric findings were well supported by atomic force microscopy results. PMID:27315212

  4. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  5. Selection of trkB-binding peptides from a phage-displayed random peptide library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Zhongcai; (马仲才); WU; Xiaolan; (吴晓兰); CAO; Mingmei; (曹明媚); PAN; Wei; (潘; 卫); ZHU; Fenlu; (朱分禄); CHEN; Jingshan; (陈景山); QI; Zhongtian; (戚中田)

    2003-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) shows potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, but the therapeutic application of BDNF has been greatly limited because it is too large in molecular size to permeate blood-brain barrier. To develop low-molecular-weight BDNF-like peptides, we selected a phage-displayed random peptide library using trkB expressed on NIH 3T3 cells as target in the study. With the strategy of peptide library incubation with NIH 3T3 cells and competitive elution with 1 υg/mL of BDNF in the last round of selection, the specific phages able to bind to the natural conformation of trkB and antagonize BDNF binding to trkB were enriched effectively. Five trkB-binding peptides were obtained, in which a core sequence of CRA/TXφXXφXXC (X represents the random amino acids, φ represents T, L or I) was identified. The BDNF-like activity of these five peptides displayed on phages was not observed, though all of them antagonized the activity of BDNF in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were obtained with the synthetic peptide of C1 clone, indicating that the 5 phage-derived peptides were trkB antagonists. These low-molecular-weight antagonists of trkB may be of potential application in the treatment of neuroblastoma and chronic pain. Meanwhile, the obtained core sequence also could be used as the base to construct the secondary phage-displayed peptide library for further development of small peptides mimicking BDNF activity.

  6. Peptoid-Peptide hybrid backbone architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Christian Adam

    2010-01-01

    -amino acids (alpha/beta-peptides) have been investigated in some detail as well. The present Minireview is a survey of the literature concerning hybrid structures of alpha-amino acids and peptoids, including beta-peptoids (N-alkyl-beta-alanine oligomers), and is intended to give an overview of this area......Peptidomimetic oligomers and foldamers have received considerable attention for over a decade, with beta-peptides and the so-called peptoids (N-alkylglycine oligomers) representing prominent examples of such architectures. Lately, hybrid or mixed backbones consisting of both alpha- and beta...

  7. The Dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) Peptide Backbone Protectant†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpino, Louis A.; Nasr, Khaled; Abdel-Maksoud, Adel Ali; El-Faham, Ayman; Ionescu, Dumitru; Henklein, Peter; Wenschuh, Holger; Beyermann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Bienert, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The N-dicyclopropylmethyl (Dcpm) residue, introduced into amino acids via reaction of dicyclopropylmethanimine hydrochloride with an amino acid ester followed by sodium cyanoborohydride or triacetoxyborohydride reduction, can be used as an amide bond protectant for peptide synthesis. Examples which demonstrate the amelioration of aggregation effects include syntheses of the alanine decapeptide and the prion peptide (106–126). Avoidance of cyclization to the aminosuccinimide followed substitution of Fmoc-(Dcpm)Gly-OH for Fmoc-Gly-OH in the assembly of sequences containing the sensitive Asp-Gly unit. PMID:19719204

  8. Dissecting and Exploiting Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Tao SHEN; Xiu-Lan CHEN; Cai-Yun SUN; Yu-Zhong ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A large number of therapeutically useful cyclic and linear peptides of bacteria or fungal origin are synthesized via a template-directed, nucleic-acid-independent nonribosomal mechanism. This process is carried out by mega-enzymes called nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). NRPSs contain repeated coordinated groups of active sites called modules, and each module is composed of several domains with different catalytic activities. The familiarity to these domains lays base for the future genetic engineering of NRPSs to generate entirely "unnature" Products. The details about NRPSs domain structures and the exploitation of NRPSs are described in this review.

  9. Minimizing acylation of peptides in PLGA microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ying; Schwendeman, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to characterize and find mechanisms to prevent acylation of therapeutic peptides encapsulated in glucose-star poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres. The effect of addition of divalent cation salts CaCl2, MnCl2 as well as carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) on inhibition of acylation of octreotide (Oct), salmon calcitonin (sCT), and human parathyroid hormone (hPTH) was evaluated. Peptide content and integrity inside the degrading microspheres was ...

  10. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly...... increased. Finally, the effect of multivalent display of upain-2 was investigated. Several dimers of upain-2 were made and the attachment of upain-2 via the Copper-catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) onto an alkyne functionalized carbohydrate scaffold was investigated. Besides the synthesis...

  11. Radioimmunoassay for C-peptide and proinsulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proinsulin, the biosynthetic precursor of insulin, was discovered by Steiner et al. (1967) and shown to be converted to insulin and C-peptide in the β-cell. The first part of this paper deals with aspects of the radioimmunoassay for C-peptide with special emphasis on the development and the sources of errors encountered in our laboratory (Heding, 1975; Naithani et al., 1975). The second part deals with the many problems involved in the determination of human proinsulin and describes a direct and specific radioimmunoassay developed for measuring proinsulin in serum with a detection limit of less than 0.01 pmol/ml. (Auth.)

  12. Glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kissow, Hannelouise

    2015-01-01

    -effects. RECENT FINDINGS: The intestinal glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is secreted from the intestinal endocrine L cells after nutrient intake, but recent findings show that the peptide concentration in the plasma also rises after intestinal injury and that GLP-2 receptor activation is crucial for intestinal...... for therapeutic use. In type 2 diabetic and obese patients, GLP secretion is impaired. Elucidating the role of these endogenous hormones could lead to the identification of mucositis risk factors and an alternative preventive therapy for these patients....

  13. Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in Anopheles gambiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, Michael A.; Garczynski, Stephen F.; Crim, Joe W.; Hill, Catherine A.; Brown, Mark R.

    2002-10-01

    The African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is specialized for rapid completion of development and reproduction. A vertebrate blood meal is required for egg production, and multiple feedings subsequently allow transmission of malaria parasites, Plasmodium spp. Regulatory peptides from 35 genes annotated from the A. gambiae genome likely coordinate these and other physiological processes. Plasmodium parasites may affect actions of newly identified insulin-like peptides, which coordinate growth and reproduction of its vector, A. gambiae, as in Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals. This genomic information provides a basis to expand understanding of hematophagy and pathogen transmission in this mosquito.

  14. [Antimicrobial peptide in dentisty. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, F Simain; Rompen, E; Heinen, E

    2009-12-01

    The use of antimicrobial substances has contributed to the development of multiple antimicrobial resistances (1), challenging the pharmaceutical industry to develop with new, innovative, and effective molecules. Discovered around 1980, molecules called natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) appear to hold great potential for the treatment of infections. These cationic peptides are able to stop the bacterial development and to control infections. The purpose of this review is to help improve the understanding of the way AMPs operate in the context of the development of new cures against viruses, bacteria, and mushrooms found in the human body in general and in the oral cavity in particular. PMID:20143750

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), peptide YY (PYY) gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and others in hamster lung and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit antisera to CGRP, PYY, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and GRP were used for immunocytochemical localization of these peptides in lungs of neonate hamsters at birth and 6 d of age and young (70 gm) and adult (107 gm) hamsters. The peroxidase-antiperoxidase method was applied to paraffin sections of tissue fixed in Bouin's or Zamboni's solution. Furthermore, radioimmunoassay (RIA) was used to quantify these peptides in lung tissue and plasma from the young hamsters (n=13). Distinct CGRP-like immunoreactivity (IR) was noted in grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells at all ages including all airways from trachea (NECs only) to alveoli. In some NEBs this IR coexisted with 5-HT-like IR. PYY- and NPY-like Ir was mainly noted in NEBs and NECs at the level of bronchioles and alveoli, and weak GRP-like IR was present in neuroendocrine-like cells of small airways. Measurable quantities of all peptides were recorded by RIA. Females had higher lung and plasma levels of CGRP and plasma levels of PYY than males and tended to have higher lung levels of GRP. The neuropeptides CGRP, PYY and the analog NPY are putative regulators of local pulmonary blood flow by vasodilation (CGRP) and constriction (PYY, NPY), and GRP is known to regulate peptide release

  16. Current trends in the clinical development of peptide therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladin, Pauline M; Zhang, Bodi D; Reichert, Janice M

    2009-12-01

    The development of peptides as drugs is attracting increasing attention from the pharmaceutical industry. This interest is at least partially a consequence of the widespread acceptance of therapeutic proteins by physicians and patients, and because of improvements to problems such as a short half-life and delivery issues. The markets for peptide-based compounds can be substantial, with six peptide drugs attaining global sales of more than US $750 million in 2008. To track trends in the clinical development and marketing approval of peptides, Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development and Ferring Research Institute compiled publically available data for peptides that entered clinical trials sponsored by commercial firms, with a focus on peptide therapeutics, but also including peptide vaccines and diagnostics. The results provide an historical overview of the development of peptide therapeutics, and may inform strategic planning in this area.

  17. A peptide antagonist disrupts NK cell inhibitory synapse formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhis, Gwenoline; Ahmed, Parvin S; Mbiribindi, Bérénice; Naiyer, Mohammed M; Davis, Daniel M; Purbhoo, Marco A; Khakoo, Salim I

    2013-03-15

    Productive engagement of MHC class I by inhibitory NK cell receptors depends on the peptide bound by the MHC class I molecule. Peptide:MHC complexes that bind weakly to killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) can antagonize the inhibition mediated by high-affinity peptide:MHC complexes and cause NK cell activation. We show that low-affinity peptide:MHC complexes stall inhibitory signaling at the step of Src homology protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 recruitment and do not go on to form the KIR microclusters induced by high-affinity peptide:MHC, which are associated with Vav dephosphorylation and downstream signaling. Furthermore, the low-affinity peptide:MHC complexes prevented the formation of KIR microclusters by high-affinity peptide:MHC. Thus, peptide antagonism of NK cells is an active phenomenon of inhibitory synapse disruption.

  18. Evaluation of MAP-specific peptides following vaccination of goats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lybeck, Kari; Sjurseth, Siri K.; Melvang, Heidi Mikkelsen;

    Our aim is to develop a subunit MAP vaccine not interfering with the diagnosis of paratuberculosis or bovine tuberculosis. This study’s objective was to evaluate MAP-specific peptides defined by in silico analysis. Peptides were picked by 1) comparing MAP genomes to that of other mycobacterium...... species or 2) selected based on “experience”. Peptides predicted to bind bovine MHC II by in silico analysis were included in further studies, resulting in two panels 1) genome-based and 2) selected. Initially, two groups of 15 healthy goats were vaccinated with one of the two panels (50 µg/peptide in CAF......01 adjuvant/CAF04 for boosting). Four MAP-infected goats were also vaccinated. In a second vaccination trail, groups of 8 healthy goat kids were vaccinated with genome-based peptides, selected peptides or selected peptides linked together in a recombinant protein (20 µg/peptide or 50 µg protein...

  19. Self-Assembly and Hydrogelation of Peptide Amphiphiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Priyono Suwarso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Seven peptide amphiphiles were successfully synthesized using solid phase peptide synthesis method. Peptide amphiphiles were characterized using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI. Atomic force microscopy (AFM study showed that peptide amphiphiles having glycine, valine, or proline as linker, self-assembled into 100-200 nm nanofibers structure. According to our research, both peptide amphiphile with positive and negative charges bear similar self-assembly properties. Peptide amphiphile also showed its capability as low molecular weight gelator (LMWG. Peptide amphiphiles bearing C-16 and C-12 as alkyl showed better hydrogelation properties than C-8 alkyl. Five out of seven peptide amphiphiles have minimum gelation concentration (MGC lower than 1% (w/v.

  20. B-type natriuretic peptide secretion following scuba diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passino, Claudio; Franzino, Enrico; Giannoni, Alberto;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor....

  1. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Jyothi Thundimadathil

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to convent...

  2. A Newcomer’s Guide to Peptide Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Ryan K.; Nowick, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Here we provide a guide for adapting the tools developed for protein X-ray crystallography to study the structures and supramolecular assembly of peptides. Peptide crystallography involves selecting a suitable peptide, crystallizing the peptide, collecting X-ray diffraction data, processing the diffraction data, determining the crystallographic phases and generating an electron density map, building and refining models, and depositing the crystallographic structure in the Protein Data Bank (P...

  3. Atrial secretion of B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Rehfeld, Jens F;

    2006-01-01

    In the normal heart, the endocrine capacity resides in the atria. Atrial myocytes express and secrete natriuretic hormones that regulate fluid homeostasis and blood pressure. But in ventricular disease, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) gene expression is also...... activated in ventricular myocytes. Plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides and their biosynthetic precursors are accordingly increased in patients with marked ventricular dysfunction. In contrast, atrial peptide secretion in ventricular disease has received less attention, and our present...

  4. Post-Translational Modifications in Secreted Peptide Hormones in Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2010-01-01

    More than a dozen secreted peptides are now recognized as important hormones that coordinate and specify cellular functions in plants. Recent evidence has shown that secreted peptide hormones often undergo post-translational modification and proteolytic processing, which are critical for their function. Such ‘small post-translationally modified peptide hormones’ constitute one of the largest groups of peptide hormones in plants. This short review highlights recent progress in research on post...

  5. Targeting and Therapeutic Peptides in Nanomedicine for Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eun Ji

    2016-01-01

    Peptides in atherosclerosis nanomedicine provide structural, targeting, and therapeutic functionality, and can assist in overcoming delivery barriers of traditional pharmaceuticals. Moreover, their inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability make them especially attractive as materials intended for use in vivo. In this review, an overview of nanoparticle-associated targeting and therapeutic peptides for atherosclerosis are provided, including peptides designed for cellular targets such as ...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of human salivary mucin-derived peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, G.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated: a) relationships between molecular properties and antimicrobial functions of MUC7 peptides, b) effects of host physiological factors on the antimicrobial activity of MUC7 peptides, c) enhancement of antifungal activity by combination of MUC7 peptides with EDTA or other agents, d) an

  7. Nanostructure formation enhances the activity of LPS-neutralizing peptides.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mas-Moruno, C.; Cascales, L.; Cruz, L.J.; Mora, P.; Perez-Paya, E.; Albericio, F.

    2008-01-01

    Peptides that interact with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can provide the basis for the development of new antisepsis agents. In this work, several LPS-neutralizing acyl peptides derived from LALF, BPI, and SAP were prepared, structurally characterized, and biologically evaluated. In all cases, peptides

  8. Synthetic Peptide libraries for T-cell epitope identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, H S; Drijfhout, J W; Koning, F

    2000-01-01

    This chapter describes a methodology for elucidating immunogenic epitopes stimulatory for CD4(+) T-cell clones (Fig. 1). The methodology makes use of synthetic peptide libraries and must be regarded as an alternative to other approaches, such as peptide elution or the application of genetic libraries. The methodology only requires knowledge about the restriction element of the T-cell clone. The restriction element determines which major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-binding anchor motif must be built into the library peptides. A synthetic peptide library is prepared comprising approx 8 million peptides. The synthesis proceeds via a mix-and-split protocol using a solidphase approach on a hybrid resin (1,2). On a hybrid resin, most of the peptide material (84%) is attached via an acid-labile linker whereas the remaining part of the peptide material is acid-stable attached (3). During synthesis, resinbound peptides comprising 14 amino acid residues are produced, with each resin bead containing one unique peptide (4,5). The beads are split into 384 pools, with each pool containing 20,000 beads. From each pool, about 28% of the peptide material is cleaved from every bead. Subsequently, in the first screening round, the 384 pools, each containing 20,000 solubilized peptides, are tested in a proliferation assay with the T-cell clone. Fig. 1. Flow diagram of the complete procedure for the identification of T-cell epitopes using synthetic peptide libraries (1).

  9. Facilitating protein solubility by use of peptide extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Paul I; Zhang, Yian-Biao; Howitt, Jason

    2013-09-17

    Expression vectors for expression of a protein or polypeptide of interest as a fusion product composed of the protein or polypeptide of interest fused at one terminus to a solubility enhancing peptide extension are provided. Sequences encoding the peptide extensions are provided. The invention further comprises antibodies which bind specifically to one or more of the solubility enhancing peptide extensions.

  10. Cleaving Double-Stranded DNA with Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids and analogues of peptide nucleic acids are used to form duplex, triplex, and other structures with nucleic acids and to modify nucleic acids. The peptide nucleic acids and analogues thereof also are used to modulate protein activity through, for example, transcription arrest...

  11. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens Peter; B. Andersen, Claus;

    2010-01-01

    diagnostic tools. Natriuretic peptide measurements could be that extra tool. We discuss and suggest N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide reference intervals for children without cardiovascular disease and cut-off points for the four specific paediatric heart conditions. We...

  12. Immunodiagnosis of parasitic diseases with synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noya, O; Patarroyo, M E; Guzmán, F; Alarcón de Noya, B

    2003-08-01

    Parasitic diseases remain as a major public health problem worldwide, not only based on their historically high morbidity and mortality rates, but also because risk factors associated with their transmission are increasing. Laboratory diagnosis and particularly immunodiagnosis is a basic tool for the demonstration, clinical management and control of these infections. Classically, the serological tests for the detection of antibodies or antigens are based on the use of crude and purified antigens. Synthetic peptides have opened a new field and perspectives, as the source of pure epitopes and molecules for diagnosis of malaria, Chagas' disease, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, hidatidosis, cysticercosis and fasciolosis based on the detection of antibodies and circulating antigens. Herein, are critically reviewed the relevant advances and applications of the synthetic peptides on immunodiagnosis of parasitic diseases. A variety of sequences, constructs (monomers, polymers, MAPs), immunological methods and samples have been used, demonstrating their diagnostic potential. However, in most parasitic infections it is necessary to use more than a single peptide in order to avoid the genetic restriction against certain epitopes, as well as to test them in well characteized groups of patients, in order to confirm their sensitivity and specificity. The concept of multidiagnosis with synthetic peptides, using a novel multi-dot blot assay is introduced. Finally, the chemical imitation of antigens, offers a tremendous posibilities in the diagnosis of parasitic infections in developing countries since this strategy is cheaper, simpler, reproducible, useful for large scale testing and in most cases, specific and sensitive. PMID:14529537

  13. Peptide conjugation: before or after nanoparticle formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Sabrina; Mura, Simona; Noiray, Magali; Arpicco, Silvia; Dosio, Franco; Vergnaud, Juliette; Desmaële, Didier; Stella, Barbara; Couvreur, Patrick

    2014-11-19

    We report herein a detailed study concerning the impact of different bioconjugation and nanoformulation strategies on the in vitro targeting ability of peptide-decorated squalenoyl gemcitabine (SQdFdC) nanoparticles (NPs). NPs have been functionalized with the CKAAKN peptide, previously identified as an efficient homing device within the pancreatic pathological microenvironment. Two approaches have been followed: (i) either the CKAAKN peptide was directly conjugated at the surface of preformed SQdFdC nanoparticles (conjugation after NP formation) or (ii) it was first reacted with a maleimide squalenoyl derivative before the resulting bioconjugate was co-nanoprecipitated with SQdFdC to form the peptide-decorated NPs (conjugation before NP formation). NPs were characterized with respect to mean diameter, zeta potential, and stability over time. Then, their specific interaction with the sFRP-4 protein was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance. Although both synthetic strategies allowed us to formulate NPs able to interact with the corresponding receptor, enhanced target binding and better specific avidity were observed with CKAAKN-NPs functionalized before NP formation. These NPs displayed the highest cell uptake and cytotoxicity in an in vitro model of human MIA Paca-2 pancreatic cancer cells.

  14. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of Methyl Silanediol Peptide Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lone; Lindsay, Karl; Faber, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    methanolic HCl and the resulting amine extended into peptide chains accordingly. The diphenylsilyl moiety is a resilient protecting group for the corresponding silanediol, which can be unmasked via treatment with TfOH, followed by aqueous hydrolysis. The crude silanediol may be isolated and purified as its...

  15. Classification of antimicrobial peptides with imbalanced datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Francy L.; Torres, Rodrigo; Ramos Pollán, Raúl

    2015-12-01

    In the last years, pattern recognition has been applied to several fields for solving multiple problems in science and technology as for example in protein prediction. This methodology can be useful for prediction of activity of biological molecules, e.g. for determination of antimicrobial activity of synthetic and natural peptides. In this work, we evaluate the performance of different physico-chemical properties of peptides (descriptors groups) in the presence of imbalanced data sets, when facing the task of detecting whether a peptide has antimicrobial activity. We evaluate undersampling and class weighting techniques to deal with the class imbalance with different classification methods and descriptor groups. Our classification model showed an estimated precision of 96% showing that descriptors used to codify the amino acid sequences contain enough information to correlate the peptides sequences with their antimicrobial activity by means of learning machines. Moreover, we show how certain descriptor groups (pseudoaminoacid composition type I) work better with imbalanced datasets while others (dipeptide composition) work better with balanced ones.

  16. A caged substrate peptide for matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaneto, Elena; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Heise, Inge; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Viappiani, Cristiano; Knipp, Markus

    2015-02-01

    Based on the widely applied fluorogenic peptide FS-6 (Mca-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2; Mca = methoxycoumarin-4-acetyl; Dpa = N-3-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)l-α,β-diaminopropionyl) a caged substrate peptide Ac-Lys-Pro-Leu-Gly-Lys*-Lys-Ala-Arg-NH2 (*, position of the cage group) for matrix metalloproteinases was synthesized and characterized. The synthesis implies the modification of a carbamidated lysine side-chain amine with a photocleavable 2-nitrobenzyl group. Mass spectrometry upon UV irradiation demonstrated the complete photolytic cleavage of the protecting group. Time-resolved laser-flash photolysis at 355 nm in combination with transient absorption spectroscopy determined the biphasic decomposition with τa = 171 ± 3 ms (79%) and τb = 2.9 ± 0.2 ms (21%) at pH 6.0 of the photo induced release of the 2-nitrobenzyl group. The recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of human membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP or MMP-14) was used to determine the hydrolysis efficiency of the caged peptide before and after photolysis. It turned out that the cage group sufficiently shields the peptide from peptidase activity, which can be thus controlled by UV light.

  17. Metal Ion Controlled Polymorphism of a Peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Lars Bo Stegeager; Jancso, Attila; Szunyogh, Daniel;

    2011-01-01

    , …) in the peptide, and the ligand and structural preferences of the metal ion (in our studies Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Cu+/2+). Simultaneously, new species such as metal ion bridged ternary complexes or even oligomers may be formed. In recent previous studies we have observed similar polymorphism of zinc finger model...

  18. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon as...

  19. Peptide Amphiphiles in Corneal Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Miotto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing interest in effort towards creating alternative therapies have led to exciting breakthroughs in the attempt to bio-fabricate and engineer live tissues. This has been particularly evident in the development of new approaches applied to reconstruct corneal tissue. The need for tissue-engineered corneas is largely a response to the shortage of donor tissue and the lack of suitable alternative biological scaffolds preventing the treatment of millions of blind people worldwide. This review is focused on recent developments in corneal tissue engineering, specifically on the use of self-assembling peptide amphiphiles for this purpose. Recently, peptide amphiphiles have generated great interest as therapeutic molecules, both in vitro and in vivo. Here we introduce this rapidly developing field, and examine innovative applications of peptide amphiphiles to create natural bio-prosthetic corneal tissue in vitro. The advantages of peptide amphiphiles over other biomaterials, namely their wide range of functions and applications, versatility, and transferability are also discussed to better understand how these fascinating molecules can help solve current challenges in corneal regeneration.

  20. Chemical labeling of electrochemically cleaved peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeser, Julien; Alting, Niels F. A.; Permentier, Hjalmar P.; Bruins, Andries P.; Bischoff, Rainer P. H.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Cleavage of peptide bonds C-terminal to tyrosine and tryptophan after electrochemical oxidation may become a complementary approach to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. A chemical labeling approach specifically targeting reactive cleavage products is presented here and constitutes a promisi

  1. Apelin is a novel islet peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringström, Camilla; Nitert, Marloes Dekker; Bennet, Hedvig;

    2010-01-01

    Apelin, a recently discovered peptide with wide tissue distribution, regulates feeding behavior, improves glucose utilization, and inhibits insulin secretion. We examined whether apelin is expressed in human islets, as well as in normal and type 2 diabetic (T2D) animal islets. Further, we studied...

  2. Release of opioid peptides in anaesthetized cats?

    OpenAIRE

    Dashwood, M. R.; Feldberg, W.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effect on arterial blood pressure of intravenous injections of naloxone (200 μg) was examined in cats anaesthetized with chloralose. Usually these injections have no effect on blood pressure unless morphine or opioid peptides have been injected, when they produce a pressor response with tachycardia.

  3. An introduction to peptide nucleic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P E; Egholm, M

    1999-01-01

    Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) is a powerful new biomolecular tool with a wide range of important applications. PNA mimics the behaviour of DNA and binds complementary nucleic acid strands. The unique chemical, physical and biological properties of PNA have been exploited to produce powerful...

  4. Microbial production of thioether-stabilized peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Anneke

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the successful biological production and secretion of thioether-stabilized therapeutic peptides. The lantibiotic modification- and transport enzymes NisBTC and LtnM2T involved in the synthesis of the lantibiotics nisin and lacticin 3147, respectively, were exploited for the int

  5. Behavioural actions of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloet, E.R.; Cottrell, G.A.; Veldhuis, H.D.; Rostene, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied on fear-motivated behaviours, exploration of a novel environment and on novelty and ACTH-induced grooming. VIP was administered via a plastic cannula into the lateral ventricle. Retention of a step-through passive avoidance task was inhib

  6. Ultrafast Hemithioindigo-based peptide-switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordes, Thorben; Elsner, Cord; Herzog, Teja T.; Hoppmann, Christian; Schadendorf, Torsten; Summerer, Wolfram; Rück-Braun, Karola; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Four newly synthesized Hemithioindigo-based peptide-switches with changing meta/para-substitution-pattern within the stilbene-part of the molecule are characterized with time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The different substances undergo a light-induced Z/E-isomerization: the reaction proceeds o

  7. Isolated Gramicidin Peptides Probed by IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Kabelac, M.; Abo-Riziq, A.; Hobza, P.; de Vries, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    We report double-resonant IR/UV ion-dip spectroscopy of neutral gramicidin peptides in the gas phase. The IR spectra of gramicidin A and C, recorded in both the 1000 cm(-1) to 1800 cm(-1) and the 2700 to 3750 cm(-1) region, allow structural analysis. By studying this broad IR range, various local in

  8. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  9. Structural pattern matching of nonribosomal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leclère Valérie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs, bioactive secondary metabolites produced by many microorganisms, show a broad range of important biological activities (e.g. antibiotics, immunosuppressants, antitumor agents. NRPs are mainly composed of amino acids but their primary structure is not always linear and can contain cycles or branchings. Furthermore, there are several hundred different monomers that can be incorporated into NRPs. The NORINE database, the first resource entirely dedicated to NRPs, currently stores more than 700 NRPs annotated with their monomeric peptide structure encoded by undirected labeled graphs. This opens a way to a systematic analysis of structural patterns occurring in NRPs. Such studies can investigate the functional role of some monomeric chains, or analyse NRPs that have been computationally predicted from the synthetase protein sequence. A basic operation in such analyses is the search for a given structural pattern in the database. Results We developed an efficient method that allows for a quick search for a structural pattern in the NORINE database. The method identifies all peptides containing a pattern substructure of a given size. This amounts to solving a variant of the maximum common subgraph problem on pattern and peptide graphs, which is done by computing cliques in an appropriate compatibility graph. Conclusion The method has been incorporated into the NORINE database, available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/norine. Less than one second is needed to search for a pattern in the entire database.

  10. Method of producing a peptide mixture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for industrial production of a peptide preparation having specific specifications by hydrolysis of a protein material, preferably based on whey. The method comprises several steps, which makes it easy to control the method so as to obtain a product which, e...

  11. Exhaustively sampling peptide adsorption with metadynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deighan, Michael; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2013-06-25

    Simulating the adsorption of a peptide or protein and obtaining quantitative estimates of thermodynamic observables remains challenging for many reasons. One reason is the dearth of molecular scale experimental data available for validating such computational models. We also lack simulation methodologies that effectively address the dual challenges of simulating protein adsorption: overcoming strong surface binding and sampling conformational changes. Unbiased classical simulations do not address either of these challenges. Previous attempts that apply enhanced sampling generally focus on only one of the two issues, leaving the other to chance or brute force computing. To improve our ability to accurately resolve adsorbed protein orientation and conformational states, we have applied the Parallel Tempering Metadynamics in the Well-Tempered Ensemble (PTMetaD-WTE) method to several explicitly solvated protein/surface systems. We simulated the adsorption behavior of two peptides, LKα14 and LKβ15, onto two self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces with carboxyl and methyl terminal functionalities. PTMetaD-WTE proved effective at achieving rapid convergence of the simulations, whose results elucidated different aspects of peptide adsorption including: binding free energies, side chain orientations, and preferred conformations. We investigated how specific molecular features of the surface/protein interface change the shape of the multidimensional peptide binding free energy landscape. Additionally, we compared our enhanced sampling technique with umbrella sampling and also evaluated three commonly used molecular dynamics force fields. PMID:23706011

  12. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Soren; Thorn, Mette;

    2009-01-01

    in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood...... effect of new stimulatory cocktails, e.g. cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules, by use of the present rapid and easy-to-use method of expanding peptide specific T cells.......Development of methods for efficient in vitro stimulation and expansion of peptide specific CD8(+) T cells is compelling not only with respect to adoptive T cell therapy but also regarding analysis of T cell responses and search for new immunogenic peptides. In the present study, a new approach to...

  13. Metabolism and pharmacokinetic of cyclo-peptides and peptides. Use of radioelement and stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More and more peptides and proteins are used in therapeutic. Three mainly techniques are used for pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies: immunoassay, radioactively labeled molecules and mass spectrometry. In the first part of this work, we have used uniformly labelled peptides (C-peptide and insulin) with stables (13C, 15N, and 13C/15N) or radioactive (14C) isotopes to investigated these kind of studies. These works are based on isotope dilution mass spectrometry assay. In a second time we have investigated the metabolism of a particular cyclo-peptides families composed of two amino acids: the diketo-piperazine. These compounds are found in mammals and in microorganisms. There are not recognized by proteolytic enzymes. We have estimated if the main enzymes implicated in the metabolism of xenobiotics, the P450 cytochrome mono-oxygenases, were able to recognized them

  14. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  15. Selection of a peptide mimicking neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus with phage peptide display technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Gu; Jun Zhang; Ying-Bing Wang; Shao-Wei Li; Hai-Jie Yang; Wen-Xin Luo; Ning-Shao Xia

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To select the peptide mimicking the neutralization epitope of hepatitis E virus which bound to non-type-specific and conformational monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) 8C11 and 8H3 fromed 7-peptide phage display library, and expressed the peptide recombinant with HBcAg in E.coli, and to observe whether the recombinant HBcAg could still form virus like particle (VLP) and to test the activation of the recombinant polyprotein and chemo-synthesized peptide that was selected by mAb 8H3.METHODS: 8C11 and 8H3 were used to screen for binding peptides through a 7-peptide phage display library. After 4rounds of panning, monoclonal phages were selected and sequenced. The obtained dominant peptide coding sequences was then synthesized and inserted into amino acid 78 to 83 of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg), and then expressed in E. coli. Activity of the recombinant proteins was detected by Western blotting, VLPs of the recombinant polyproteins were tested by transmission electron microscopy and binding activity of the chemo-synthesized peptide was confirmed by BIAcore biosensor.RESULTS: Twenty-one positive monoclonal phages (10for 8CL1, and 11 for 8H3) were selected and the inserted fragments were sequenced. The DNA sequence coding for the obtained dominant peptides 8C11 (N′-His-Pro-Thr-LeuLeu-Arg-Ile-C′, named 8C11A) and 8H3 (N′-Ser-Ile-LeuPro- Tyr-Pro-Tyr-C′, named 8H3A) were then synthesized and cloned to the HBcAg vector, then expressed in E. coli.The recombinant proteins aggregated into homodimer or polymer on SDS-PAGE, and could bind to mAb 8C11 and 8H3 in Western blotting. At the same time, the recombinant polyprotein could form virus like particles (VLPs), which could be visualized on electron micrograph. The dominant peptide 8H3A selected by mAb 8H3 was further chemosynthesized, and its binding to mAb 8H3 could be detected by BIAcore biosensor.CONCLUSION: These results implicate that conformational neutralizing epitope can be partially modeled by a short

  16. Antimicrobial peptides: a review of how peptide structure impacts antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Jason W.; Mello, Charlene M.

    2004-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been discovered in insects, mammals, reptiles, and plants to protect against microbial infection. Many of these peptides have been isolated and studied exhaustively to decipher the molecular mechanisms that impart protection against infectious bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms are still being debated within the scientific community but valuable clues have been obtained through structure/function relationship studies1. Biophysical studies have revealed that cecropins, isolated from insects and pigs, exhibit random structure in solution but undergo a conformational change to an amphipathic α-helix upon interaction with a membrane surface2. The lack of secondary structure in solution results in an extremely durable peptide able to survive exposure to high temperatures, organic solvents and incorporation into fibers and films without compromising antibacterial activity. Studies to better understand the antimicrobial action of cecropins and other AMPs have provided insight into the importance of peptide sequence and structure in antimicrobial activities. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of how peptide structure imparts function may result in customized peptide sequences tailored for specific applications such as targeted cell delivery systems, novel antibiotics and food preservation additives. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge with respect to cell binding and antimicrobial activity of AMPs focusing primarily upon cecropins.

  17. Preparation of peptide thioesters through fmoc-based solid-phase peptide synthesis by using amino thioesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuhr-Hansen, N.; Wilbek, T.S.; Strømgaard, K.

    2013-01-01

    An effective procedure for the synthesis of peptide alkyl thioesters by 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc) solid-phase peptide synthesis was developed. The free C terminus of a fully protected peptide was coupled in solution with the free amino group of an amino thioester. This furnished the fully...

  18. Synthesis of peptide thioacids at neutral pH using bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido peptide precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira, Silvain L; Boll, Emmanuelle; Melnyk, Oleg

    2013-10-18

    Reaction of bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amido (SEA) peptides with triisopropylsilylthiol in water at neutral pH yields peptide thiocarboxylates. An alkylthioester derived from β-alanine was used to trap the released bis(2-sulfanylethyl)amine and displace the equilibrium toward the peptide thiocarboxylate. PMID:24073852

  19. A cardioactive peptide from the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, K; Hackett, M; Cirelli, M A; Schegg, K M; Wang, H; Shabanowitz, J; Hunt, D F; Schooley, D A

    1999-01-01

    A cardioactive peptide was isolated from extracts of whole heads of the southern armyworm, Spodoptera eridania. This peptide has the sequence ENFAVGCTPGYQRTADGRCKPTF (Mr = 2516.8), determined from both Edman sequencing and tandem mass spectrometry in combination with off-line micropreparative capillary liquid chromatography. This peptide, termed Spoer-CAP23, has excitatory effects on a semi-isolated heart from larval Manduca sexta, causing an inotropic effect at low concentrations of peptide and chronotropic and inotropic effects at high doses. The threshold concentration for stimulatory effects of the synthetic peptide on the semi-isolated heart was about 1 nM, suggesting a physiological role as a neuropeptide. PMID:10098624

  20. Peptide-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Prepared through Coacervation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Gallarate

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stearic acid solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared according to a new technique, called coacervation. The main goal of this experimental work was the entrapment of peptide drugs into SLN, which is a difficult task, since their chemical characteristics (molecular weight, hydrophilicity, and stability hamper peptide-containing formulations. Insulin and leuprolide, chosen as model peptide drugs, were encapsulated within nanoparticles after hydrophobic ion pairing with anionic surfactants. Peptide integrity was maintained after encapsulation, and nanoparticles can act in vitro as a sustained release system for peptide.

  1. Morphogenic Peptides in Regeneration of Load Bearing Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeinzadeh, Seyedsina; Jabbari, Esmaiel

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenic proteins due to their short half-life require high doses of growth factors in regeneration of load bearing tissues which leads to undesirable side effects. These side effects include bone overgrowth, tumor formation and immune reaction. An alternative approach to reduce undesirable side effects of proteins in regenerative medicine is to use morphogenic peptides derived from the active domains of morphogenic proteins or soluble and insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of mineralized load bearing tissues to induce differentiation of progenitor cells, mineralization, maturation and bone formation. In that regard, many peptides with osteogenic activity have been discovered. These include peptides derived from bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs), those based on interaction with integrin and heparin-binding receptors, collagen derived peptides, peptides derived from other soluble ECM proteins such as bone sialoprotein and enamel matrix proteins, and those peptides derived from vasculoinductive and neuro-inductive proteins. Although these peptides show significant osteogenic activity in vitro and increase mineralization and bone formation in animal models, they are not widely used in clinical orthopedic applications as an alternative to morphogenic proteins. This is partly due to the limited availability of data on structure and function of morphogenic peptides in physiological medium, particularly in tissue engineered scaffolds. Due to their amphiphilic nature, peptides spontaneously self-assemble and aggregate into micellar structures in physiological medium. Aggregation alters the sequence of amino acids in morphogenic peptides that interact with cell surface receptors thus affecting osteogenic activity of the peptide. Aggregation and micelle formation can dramatically reduce the active concentration of morphogenic peptides with many-fold increase in peptide concentration in physiological medium. Other factors that affect bioactivity are the non

  2. Peptide-based Biopolymers in Biomedicine and Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Dominic; Nunalee, Michelle L.; Lim, Dong Woo; Simnick, Andrew J.; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2008-01-01

    Peptides are emerging as a new class of biomaterials due to their unique chemical, physical, and biological properties. The development of peptide-based biomaterials is driven by the convergence of protein engineering and macromolecular self-assembly. This review covers the basic principles, applications, and prospects of peptide-based biomaterials. We focus on both chemically synthesized and genetically encoded peptides, including poly-amino acids, elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polymers and other biopolymers based on repetitive peptide motifs. Applications of these engineered biomolecules in protein purification, controlled drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosurface engineering are discussed. PMID:19122836

  3. Molecular imaging of cancer with radiolabeled peptides and PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vāvere, Amy L; Rossin, Raffaella

    2012-06-01

    Radiolabeled peptides hold promise for diagnosis and therapy of cancer as well as for early monitoring of therapy outcomes, patient stratification, etc. This manuscript focuses on the development of peptides labeled with 18F, 64Cu, 68Ga and other positron-emitting radionuclides for PET imaging. The major techniques for radionuclide incorporation are briefly discussed. Then, examples of positron-emitting peptides targeting somatostatin receptors, integrins, gastrin-releasing peptide receptors, vasointestinal peptide receptors, melanocortin 1 receptors and others are reviewed. PMID:22292762

  4. Fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide, and urinary C-peptide in relation to clinical type of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Faber, O K;

    1989-01-01

    Many patients with Type 2 (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus are treated with insulin in order to control hyperglycaemia. We studied fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide, and 24 h urinary C-peptide in relation to clinical type of diabetes in 132 insulin treated...... with a fasting plasma C-peptide value less than 0.20 nmol/l, a glucagon stimulated plasma C-peptide value less than 0.32 nmol/l, and a urinary C-peptide value less than 3.1 nmol/l, or less than 0.54 nmol/mmol creatinine/24 h, or less than 5.4 nmol/24 h mainly were Type 1 diabetic patients; while patients with C...

  5. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I.; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J.; Calixto-Romo, M. Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  6. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica González-Magaldi

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2 that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7 sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target.

  7. Development of peptide-based patterns by laser transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, V.; Kasotakis, E.; Catherine, J.; Mourka, A.; Mitraki, A.; Popescu, A.; Dinescu, M.; Farsari, M.; Fotakis, C.

    2007-12-01

    Peptide-based arrays and patterns have provided a powerful tool in the study of protein recognition and function. A variety of applications have been identified, including the interactions between peptides-enzymes, peptides-proteins, peptides-DNA, peptides-small molecules and peptides-cells. One of the main and most critical unresolved issues is the generation of high-density arrays which maintain the biological function of the peptides. In this study, we employ nanosecond laser-induced forward transfer for the generation of high-density peptide arrays and patterns on modified glass surfaces. We show that peptide-based microarrays can be fabricated on solid surfaces and specifically recognized by appropriate fluorescent tags, with the transfer not affecting the ability of the peptides to form fibrils. These initial results are poised to the construction of larger peptide patterns as scaffolds for the incorporation and display of ligands critical for cell attachment and growth, or for the templating of inorganic materials.

  8. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J; Calixto-Romo, M Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  9. De-novo design of antimicrobial peptides for plant protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Zeitler

    Full Text Available This work describes the de-novo design of peptides that inhibit a broad range of plant pathogens. Four structurally different groups of peptides were developed that differ in size and position of their charged and hydrophobic clusters and were assayed for their ability to inhibit bacterial growth and fungal spore germination. Several peptides are highly active at concentrations between 0,1 and 1 µg/ml against plant pathogenic bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Xanthomonas vesicatoria. Importantly, no hemolytic activity could be detected for these peptides at concentrations up to 200 µg/ml. Moreover, the peptides are also active after spraying on the plant surface demonstrating a possible way of application. In sum, our designed peptides represent new antimicrobial agents and with the increasing demand for antimicrobial compounds for production of "healthy" food, these peptides might serve as templates for novel antibacterial and antifungal agents.

  10. Review seed biopharmaceutical cyclic peptides: From discovery to applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatmanto, Tunjung

    2015-11-01

    Mini-proteins (or peptides) with disulfide bond/s and a cyclic backbone offer exciting opportunities for applications in medicine, as these ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides are exceptionally stable and amenable to grafting epitopes with desirable activities. Here I discuss important aspects of the discovery and applications of disulfide-bonded cyclic peptides from seeds, i.e., the trypsin inhibitor cyclotides and the preproalbumin with sunflower trypsin inhibitor-derived peptides, focusing on bioanalytical methods for and insights generated from their discovery as well as their potential use as engineering scaffolds for peptide-based drug design. The recent discovery of their precursors and processing enzymes could potentially enable in planta production of designer disulfide-bonded cyclic peptides, preferably in edible seeds, and address the demand for new biopharmaceutical peptides in a cost-effective manner. PMID:26385189

  11. Short peptides allowing preferential detection of Candida albicans hyphae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, Hani E J; Pölderl, Antonia; Bilitewski, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    Whereas the detection of pathogens via recognition of surface structures by specific antibodies and various types of antibody mimics is frequently described, the applicability of short linear peptides as sensor molecules or diagnostic tools is less well-known. We selected peptides which were previously reported to bind to recombinant S. cerevisiae cells, expressing members of the C. albicans Agglutinin-Like-Sequence (ALS) cell wall protein family. We slightly modified amino acid sequences to evaluate peptide sequence properties influencing binding to C. albicans cells. Among the selected peptides, decamer peptides with an "AP"-N-terminus were superior to shorter peptides. The new decamer peptide FBP4 stained viable C. albicans cells more efficiently in their mature hyphal form than in their yeast form. Moreover, it allowed distinction of C. albicans from other related Candida spp. and could thus be the basis for the development of a useful tool for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

  12. PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR OF YERSINIA PESTIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evseeva

    2015-01-01

    fibrin clots preventing bacteria dissemination after bites of infected fleas or subcutaneous challenge is believed to be the main Y. pestis factor responsible for generalization of infectious process. Pla-mediated ability of Y. pestis for selective binding with extracellular matrix and basal membranes may promote further hydrolysis of these structures by the host’s plasmin and overcoming tissue barriers by the pathogen. Y. pestis plasminogen activator also hydrolyses C3 complement component, human antimicrobial peptidecathelicidin LL-37 and such cytokines as tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 8 and protein 1 of monocyte chemotaxis. The main endogenic TFPI tissue factor pathway inhibitor also highly susceptible to proteolytic action of Pla, and efficiency of TFPI inactivation is much higher than efficacy of plasminogen activation. The review also debates the possibility of using Pla as a molecular target for prophylaxis and treatment of plague. 

  13. Adding energy minimization strategy to peptide-design algorithm enables better search for RNA-binding peptides: Redesigned λ N peptide binds boxB RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingqing; Hung, Michelle E; Leonard, Joshua N; Hall, Carol K

    2016-10-15

    Our previously developed peptide-design algorithm was improved by adding an energy minimization strategy which allows the amino acid sidechains to move in a broad configuration space during sequence evolution. In this work, the new algorithm was used to generate a library of 21-mer peptides which could substitute for λ N peptide in binding to boxB RNA. Six potential peptides were obtained from the algorithm, all of which exhibited good binding capability with boxB RNA. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were then conducted to examine the ability of the λ N peptide and three best evolved peptides, viz. Pept01, Pept26, and Pept28, to bind to boxB RNA. Simulation results demonstrated that our evolved peptides are better at binding to boxB RNA than the λ N peptide. Sequence searches using the old (without energy minimization strategy) and new (with energy minimization strategy) algorithms confirm that the new algorithm is more effective at finding good RNA-binding peptides than the old algorithm. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inhibition of aggregation of amyloid peptides by beta-sheet breaker peptides and their binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viet, Man Hoang; Ngo, Son Tung; Lam, Nguyen Sy; Li, Mai Suan

    2011-06-01

    The effects of beta-sheet breaker peptides KLVFF and LPFFD on the oligomerization of amyloid peptides were studied by all-atom simulations. It was found that LPFFD interferes the aggregation of Aβ(16-22) peptides to a greater extent than does KLVFF. Using the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we found that the former binds more strongly to Aβ(16-22). Therefore, by simulations, we have clarified the relationship between aggregation rates and binding affinity: the stronger the ligand binding, the slower the oligomerization process. The binding affinity of pentapeptides to full-length peptide Aβ(1-40) and its mature fibrils has been considered using the Autodock and MM-PBSA methods. The hydrophobic interaction between ligands and receptors plays a more important role for association than does hydrogen bonding. The influence of beta-sheet breaker peptides on the secondary structures of monomer Aβ(1-40) was studied in detail, and it turns out that, in their presence, the total beta-sheet content can be enhanced. However, the aggregation can be slowed because the beta-content is reduced in fibril-prone regions. Both pentapeptides strongly bind to monomer Aβ(1-40), as well as to mature fibrils, but KLVFF displays a lower binding affinity than LPFFD. Our findings are in accord with earlier experiments that both of these peptides can serve as prominent inhibitors. In addition, we predict that LPFFD inhibits/degrades the fibrillogenesis of full-length amyloid peptides better than KLVFF. This is probably related to a difference in their total hydrophobicities in that the higher the hydrophobicity, the lower the inhibitory capacity. The GROMOS96 43a1 force field with explicit water and the force field proposed by Morris et al. (Morris et al. J. Comput. Chem. 1998, 19, 1639 ) were employed for all-atom molecular dynamics simulations and Autodock experiments, respectively. PMID:21563780

  15. Synthesis of biologically important neutral amylo-β peptide by using improved Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthetic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, R; Sudha, E; Rajkumar, P R; Subashchandran, K P

    2015-04-01

    The 10 amino acid sequence of the biologically important neutral amylo-β peptide has equally hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, which reduces the coupling efficiency during its synthesis and reduces the final yield of the peptide, and is therefore classified as a "difficult peptide sequence." The method presented here minimizes the synthetic problems by the introduction of improved Fmoc chemistry and effective hydroxybenzotriazole (HoBt), diisopropylcarbodiimide (DIC)-coupling and activation strategies. In addition, we developed a PS-TPGD resin as a solid support for the synthesis of specific neutral peptides, which is still a challenge to peptide chemistry. The most essential biologically active neutral amylo-β peptide (KVKRIILARS) was successfully synthesized, and some synthetic modification was performed using the Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) method for purity and yield improvement. Graphical abstractᅟ.

  16. Exhaustive extraction of peptides by electromembrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Chuixiu; Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig

    2015-01-01

    trifluoroacetate, and leu-enkephalin were extracted from 600 μL of 25 mM phosphate buffer (pH 3.5), through a supported liquid membrane (SLM) containing di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphate (DEHP) dissolved in an organic solvent, and into 600 μL of an acidified aqueous acceptor solution using a thin flat membrane-based EME......This fundamental work illustrates for the first time the possibility of exhaustive extraction of peptides using electromembrane extraction (EME) under low system-current conditions (... device. Mass transfer of peptides across the SLM was enhanced by complex formation with the negatively charged DEHP. The composition of the SLM and the extraction voltage were important factors influencing recoveries and current with the EME system. 1-nonanol diluted with 2-decanone (1:1 v/v) containing...

  17. Biodegradable Polyphosphazene Based Peptide-Polymer Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Linhardt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel series of peptide based hybrid polymers designed to undergo enzymatic degradation is presented, via macrosubstitution of a polyphosphazene backbone with the tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly. Further co-substitution of the hybrid polymers with hydrophilic polyalkylene oxide Jeffamine M-1000 leads to water soluble and biodegradable hybrid polymers. Detailed degradation studies, via 31P NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering and field flow fractionation show the polymers degrade via a combination of enzymatic, as well as hydrolytic pathways. The peptide sequence was chosen due to its known property to undergo lysosomal degradation; hence, these degradable, water soluble polymers could be of significant interest for the use as polymer therapeutics. In this context, we investigated conjugation of the immune response modifier imiquimod to the polymers via the tetrapeptide and report the self-assembly behavior of the conjugate, as well as its enzymatically triggered drug release behavior.

  18. Secondary structure of fluorescence labelled synthetic peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A S

    2000-01-01

    A series of eight synthetic oligopeptides has been prepared and their secondary structures investigated using various techniques. The project represents a continuation of an investigation into thermally induced changes in secondary structure. Following the previously reported results, the change in structure was initially thought to represent a change from an alpha-helix at low temperature to 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix at high temperature. However, the results reported herein suggest the peptides retain an alpha-helical configuration at all temperatures studied, but that this helix can adopt at least two related forms. The difference in the structures relates to the nature of the H-bonds which may or may not involve an additional interaction from water molecules or side-chains. The peptides were encouraged to adopt a helical configuration by the inclusion of alpha- aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Also, modified forms of glutamic acid were included in the sequences. These had pendant donor (4-methoxy naphthalen...

  19. Therapeutic antimicrobial peptides may compromise natural immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habets, Michelle G J L; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2012-06-23

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as a promising new class of antimicrobials despite warnings that therapeutic use could drive the evolution of pathogens resistant to our own immunity peptides. Using experimental evolution, we demonstrate that Staphylococcus aureus rapidly evolved resistance to pexiganan, a drug-candidate for diabetic leg ulcer infections. Evolved resistance was costly in terms of impaired growth rate, but costs-of-resistance were completely ameliorated by compensatory adaptation. Crucially, we show that, in some populations, experimentally evolved resistance to pexiganan provided S. aureus with cross-resistance to human-neutrophil-defensin-1, a key component of the innate immune response to infection. This unintended consequence of therapeutic use could drastically undermine our innate immune system's ability to control and clear microbial infections. Our results therefore highlight grave potential risks of AMP therapies, with implications for their development.

  20. Separation of Peptides by Pressurized Capillary Electrochromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A novel gradient pressurized capillary electrochromatography (pCEC) instrument wasdeveloped to separate peptides. Two gradient elution modes, hydrophobic and hydrophilicinteraction mode in pCEC, were performed on this instrument. Baseline separation of sixpeptides was obtained on two gradient modes with C18 column and strong cationic exchangecolumn respectively. The effects of mixer volume and total flow rate of pumps on resolutionwere also discussed.