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Sample records for cataplexy

  1. [Narcolepsy-cataplexy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflandre, E; Roelants, F; Cambron, L; Poirrier, R

    2002-08-01

    The diagnosis of narcolepsy-cataplexy is based on three axes: 1) the medical history is strongly suggestive when diurnal sleep attacks (narcolepsy) and drop attacks (cataplexy) are reported or observed; 2) the polysomnography is mandatory and shows nocturnal and diurnal (multiple sleep latency test) REM sleep onsets; 3) HLA typing, practically helps to exclude the diagnosis when HLA DR15-DQB1*0602 is not present. New pathogenetic hypotheses have been proposed, mostly based the absence of hypocretin in narcoleptic cerebrospinal fluid. This neurotransmitter was previously known exclusively by its involvement in alimentary behaviours. The new therapies remain symptomatic, but they are powerful to prevent somnolence, daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and insomnia associated with this syndrome.

  2. [Narcolepsy-cataplexy today].

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    Depierreux-Lahaye, F; Fanielle, J; Martin-Lecomte, M; Hans, G; Maquet, P; Poirrier, R

    2014-02-01

    Diagnostic criteria and pathophysiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy have evolved considerably over the last 10 years. The main cause, already mentioned in a previous paper, in the Revue Médicale de Liège (65), in 2002, is based, in human beings, on a destruction of specific cells located in the lateral and posterior part of the hypothalamus (the perifornical nuclei, containing some 70,000 neurons), producing peptides which stimulate the central nervous system; they are called hypocretins or orexins. The role of autoimmunity in their disappearance becomes more evident. The treatment is simplified, but remains symptomatic. It is mainly based on Sodium Oxybate or Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate, syrup, prescribed for the night. The authors report on their own experience in this regard and on future therapeutics more targeted towards the cause of the disease.

  3. Baclofen for narcolepsy with cataplexy: two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee EK

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Elliott Kyung Lee,1,2 Alan Bruce Douglass1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, 2Royal Ottawa Mental Health Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by daytime hypersomnolence. Those with cataplexy have spells of muscle weakness precipitated by strong emotions, especially laughter or surprise. Cataplexy treatments include antidepressants or a GABA-B agonist, gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB. GHB is the most effective treatment for cataplexy, but is expensive and can have significant side effects. A recent report of a murine model of narcolepsy-cataplexy suggests R-baclofen has potential efficacy against cataplexy. We report on two narcolepsy patients with multiple daily cataplexy episodes, one of whom had been effectively treated with GHB, but had to discontinue it for unrelated medical reasons. Both subsequently tried baclofen and experienced almost complete resolution of cataplexy. This report suggests baclofen can be an effective treatment for cataplexy in humans and warrants further study. Keywords: hypersomnolence, gamma hydroxybutyrate, excessive daytime sleepiness

  4. Narcolepsy/Cataplexy and Occult Neuroblastoma

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the University of Chicago and Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; University Hospital Southampton, UK; and Kiev Paediatric Hospital, Ukraine, report three children with narcolepsy and cataplexy subsequently diagnosed with neuroblastoma.

  5. Narcolepsy and cataplexy: a pediatric case report

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    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Habeşoğlu, Mehmet Ali

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis during the rapid eye movement period of sleep. Herein, we present a boy aged eight years who was diagnosed as having narcolepsy and cataplexy about thirteen months after his first presentation. He was admitted with symptoms of daytime sleepiness. In the follow-up, cataplexy in the form of head dropping attacks developed seven months after the first admission. The patient was investigated for different prediagnoses and was eventually diagnosed as having narcolepsy and cataplexy through polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests thirteen months after the first presentation. He is being followed up and is under drug therapy; his symptoms have improved substantially. PMID:28123336

  6. Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy.

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    Allan L Reiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataplexy is observed in a subset of patients with narcolepsy and affects approximately 1 in 2,000 persons. Cataplexy is most often triggered by strong emotions such as laughter, which can result in transient, yet debilitating, muscle atonia. The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we showed ten narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and ten healthy controls humorous cartoons. In addition, we examined the brain activity of one subject while in a full-blown cataplectic attack. Behavioral results showed that participants with cataplexy rated significantly fewer humorous cartoons as funny compared to controls. Concurrent fMRI showed that patients, when compared to controls and in the absence of overt cataplexy symptoms, showed pronounced activity in the emotional network including the ventral striatum and hypothalamus while viewing humorous versus non-humorous cartoons. Increased activity was also observed in the right inferior frontal gyri--a core component of the inhibitory circuitry. In comparison, the one subject who experienced a cataplectic attack showed dramatic reductions in hypothalamic activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest an overdrive of the emotional circuitry and possible compensatory suppression by cortical inhibitory regions in cataplexy. Moreover, during cataplectic attacks, the hypothalamus is characterized by a marked decrease in activity similar to that observed during sleep. One possible explanation for these findings is an initial overdrive and compensatory shutdown of the hypothalamus resulting in full cataplectic symptoms.

  7. [NARCOLEPSY WITH CATAPLEXY: TYPE 1 NARCOLEPSY].

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    Dauvilliers, Yves; Lopez, Régis

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy or narcolepsy type 1 in a rare, disabling sleep disorder, with a prevalence of 20 to 30 per 100,000. Its onset peaks in the second decade. The main features are excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy or sudden less of muscle tone triggered by emotional situations. Other less consistent symptoms include hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, and weight gain. Narcolepsy with cataplexy remains a clinical diagnosis but nighttime and daytime polysomnography (multiple sleep latency tests) are useful to document mean sleep latency below 8 min and at least two sleep-onset REM periods. HLA typing shows an association with HLA DQB1*0602 in more than 92% of cases but was not included in the new diagnostic criteria. In contrast, a low hypocretin-1/orexin-A levels (values below 110 pg/mL) in the cerebrospinal fluid was highly specific for narcolepsy with cataplexy and was included in the recent diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy. The deficiency of the hypocretin system is well-established in human narcoleptics with a reduction of cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels in relation with an early loss of hypocretin neurons. The cause of human narcolepsy remains unknown, however an autoimmune process in most probable acting on a highly genetic background with environmental factors such as streptococcal infections, and H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine named Pandemrix.

  8. Treatment paradigms for cataplexy in narcolepsy: past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swick TJ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Todd J Swick1–4 1Department of Neurology, University of Texas School of Medicine-Houston, Houston; 2The Sleep Center at North Cypress Medical Center, Cypress; 3Apnix Sleep Diagnostics, Houston; 4Neurology and Sleep Medicine Consultants, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Cataplexy is defined as episodes of sudden loss of voluntary muscle tone triggered by emotions generally lasting <2 minutes. Cataplexy is most commonly associated with and considered pathognomonic for narcolepsy, a sleep disorder affecting ~0.05% of the general population. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of cataplexy has advanced through study of canine, murine, and human models. It is now generally considered that loss of signaling by hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin-producing neurons plays a key role in the development of cataplexy. Although the cause of hypocretin/orexin neuron loss in narcolepsy with cataplexy is unknown, an autoimmune etiology is widely hypothesized. Despite these advances, a literature review shows that treatment of cataplexy remains limited. Multiple classes of antidepressants have been commonly used off-label for cataplexy in narcolepsy and are suggested for this use in expert consensus guidelines based on traditional practice, case reports, and small trials. However, systematic research evidence supporting antidepressants for cataplexy is lacking. The single pharmacotherapy indicated for cataplexy and the guideline-recommended first-line treatment in Europe and the US is sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. Clinical trial evidence of its efficacy and safety in cataplexy is robust, and it is hypothesized that its therapeutic effects may occur through gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type B-mediated effects at noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and thalamocortical neurons. Additional possible mechanisms for cataplexy therapy suggested by preliminary research include antagonism of the histamine H3 autoreceptor with pitolisant and intravenous

  9. Treatment paradigms for cataplexy in narcolepsy: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2015-01-01

    Cataplexy is defined as episodes of sudden loss of voluntary muscle tone triggered by emotions generally lasting narcolepsy, a sleep disorder affecting ~0.05% of the general population. Knowledge of the pathophysiology of cataplexy has advanced through study of canine, murine, and human models. It is now generally considered that loss of signaling by hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin-producing neurons plays a key role in the development of cataplexy. Although the cause of hypocretin/orexin neuron loss in narcolepsy with cataplexy is unknown, an autoimmune etiology is widely hypothesized. Despite these advances, a literature review shows that treatment of cataplexy remains limited. Multiple classes of antidepressants have been commonly used off-label for cataplexy in narcolepsy and are suggested for this use in expert consensus guidelines based on traditional practice, case reports, and small trials. However, systematic research evidence supporting antidepressants for cataplexy is lacking. The single pharmacotherapy indicated for cataplexy and the guideline-recommended first-line treatment in Europe and the US is sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gamma-hydroxybutyrate. Clinical trial evidence of its efficacy and safety in cataplexy is robust, and it is hypothesized that its therapeutic effects may occur through gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor type B-mediated effects at noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and thalamocortical neurons. Additional possible mechanisms for cataplexy therapy suggested by preliminary research include antagonism of the histamine H3 autoreceptor with pitolisant and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for amelioration of the presumed autoimmune-mediated hypocretin/orexin cell loss. Further research and development of therapeutic approaches to cataplexy are needed.

  10. Cataplexy and the switch process of multiple personality disorder.

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    La Via, M C; Brewerton, T D

    1996-07-31

    A case history is presented of an 18-year-old male with dissociative disorder and polysubstance abuse. The patient was observed to switch between three personalities, and the personality changes were often associated with symptoms of cataplexy. Both dissociative episodes and cataplexy are associated with strong affective stimuli. Similar reports in the literature are briefly reviewed.

  11. Hypocretin deficiency develops during onset of human narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savvidou, Andri; Knudsen, Stine; Olsson-Engman, Mia;

    2013-01-01

    Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans.......Although hypothesized through animal studies, a temporal and causal association between hypocretin deficiency and the onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) has never been proven in humans....

  12. Challenges in Diagnosing Narcolepsy without Cataplexy: A Consensus Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, C.R.; Mignot, E.; Lammers, G.J.; Overeem, S.; Arnulf, I.; Rye, D.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Honda, M.; Owens, J.A.; Plazzi, G.; Scammell, T.E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy is often a challenge as the symptoms are nonspecific, current diagnostic tests are limited, and there are no useful biomarkers. In this report, we review the clinical and physiological aspects of narcolepsy without cataplexy, the limitations of ava

  13. GHB for cataplexy: Possible mode of action.

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    Szabadi, Elemer

    2015-06-01

    The sleep disorder narcolepsy is caused by the loss of orexinergic neurones in the lateral hypothalamus. A troublesome symptom of narcolepsy is cataplexy, the sudden loss of muscle tone in response to strong emotions. It can be alleviated by antidepressants and sodium oxybate (γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB)). It is likely that the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is involved since it is essential for the maintenance of muscle tone, and ceases to fire during cataplectic attacks. Furthermore, alpha-2 adrenoceptors proliferate in the LC in cataplexy, probably due to 'heterologous denervation supersensitivity' resulting from the loss/weakening of the orexinergic input to the LC. This would lead to the sensitization of the autoinhibition mechanism of LC neurones mediated by inhibitory alpha-2 adrenoceptors ('autoreceptors'). Thus the excitatory input from the amygdala to the LC, activated by an emotional stimulus, would lead to the 'switching off' of LC activity via the supersensitive auto-inhibition mechanism. GHB is an agonist at both γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) GABA (B) and GHB receptors that may be a subtype of an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor. GHB may prevent a cataplectic attack by dampening the tone of LC neurones via the stimulation of inhibitory extrasynaptic GABA receptors in the LC, and thus increasing the threshold for autoinhibition.

  14. [Narcolepsy with cataplexy: an autoimmune disease?].

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    Jacob, Louis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 (also named narcolepsy-cataplexy or hypocretin deficiency syndrome) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, plus frequently hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and nocturnal sleep disturbances. Narcolepsy type 1 is an immune system-associated disease linked with the destruction of 70.000-90.000 hypocretin neurons notably involved in wakefulness. Among narcoleptic patients, 98% are positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02, a HLA class II allele, against 20-25% in general population. Individuals carrying HLA-DQB1*06:02 have an extraordinary risk to develop narcolepsy (odd ratio: 251). Other genes involved in CD4+ T cells and immune system activation as T-cell receptor α are also associated with narcolepsy. The development of the disease is linked with environmental factors such as influenza and streptococcal infections. Narcolepsy type 1 incidence also increased in Europe following the use of Pandemrix, a 2009 H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Interestingly, such increase was not observed with Arepanrix, another vaccine developed by GSK very similar to Pandemrix.

  15. Predictors of hypocretin (orexin) deficiency in narcolepsy without cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andlauer, Olivier; Moore, Hyatt; Hong, Seung-Chul;

    2012-01-01

    To compare clinical, electrophysiologic, and biologic data in narcolepsy without cataplexy with low (≤ 110 pg/ml), intermediate (110-200 pg/ml), and normal (> 200 pg/ml) concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1.......To compare clinical, electrophysiologic, and biologic data in narcolepsy without cataplexy with low (≤ 110 pg/ml), intermediate (110-200 pg/ml), and normal (> 200 pg/ml) concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1....

  16. Treatment paradigms for cataplexy in narcolepsy: past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Swick TJ

    2015-01-01

    Todd J Swick1–4 1Department of Neurology, University of Texas School of Medicine-Houston, Houston; 2The Sleep Center at North Cypress Medical Center, Cypress; 3Apnix Sleep Diagnostics, Houston; 4Neurology and Sleep Medicine Consultants, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Cataplexy is defined as episodes of sudden loss of voluntary muscle tone triggered by emotions generally lasting <2 minutes. Cataplexy is most commonly associated with and considered pathognomonic for narcolepsy, a s...

  17. Clinical and polysomnographic course of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy.

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    Pizza, Fabio; Franceschini, Christian; Peltola, Hanna; Vandi, Stefano; Finotti, Elena; Ingravallo, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J; Partinen, Markku; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the natural evolution of cataplexy and polysomnographic features in untreated children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. To this end, clinical, polysomnographic, and cataplexy-video assessments were performed at diagnosis (mean age of 10 ± 3 and disease duration of 1 ± 1 years) and after a median follow-up of 3 years from symptom onset (mean age of 12 ± 4 years) in 21 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin 1 deficiency (tested in 19 subjects). Video assessment was also performed in two control groups matched for age and sex at first evaluation and follow-up and was blindly scored for presence of hypotonic (negative) and active movements. Patients' data at diagnosis and at follow-up were contrasted, compared with controls, and related with age and disease duration. At diagnosis children with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed an increase of sleep time during the 24 h; at follow-up sleep time and nocturnal sleep latency shortened, in the absence of other polysomnographic or clinical (including body mass index) changes. Hypotonic phenomena and selected facial movements decreased over time and, tested against disease duration and age, appeared as age-dependent. At onset, childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by an abrupt increase of total sleep over the 24 h, generalized hypotonia and motor overactivity. With time, the picture of cataplexy evolves into classic presentation (i.e., brief muscle weakness episodes triggered by emotions), whereas total sleep time across the 24 h decreases, returning to more age-appropriate levels.

  18. Complex Movement Disorders at Disease Onset in Childhood Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

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    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Pizza, Fabio; Palaia, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Christian; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan K.; Cortelli, Pietro; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Dauvilliers, Yves; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of bilateral muscle tone triggered by emotions), sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disturbed nocturnal sleep. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is most often associated with human leucocyte antigen-DQB1*0602 and is caused by the loss of…

  19. HLA dosage effect in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

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    van der Heide, Astrid; Verduijn, Willem; Haasnoot, Geert W; Drabbels, Jos J M; Lammers, Gert J; Claas, Frans H J

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. It is tightly associated with a specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-allele: HLA-DQB1*06:02. Based on this, an autoimmune process has been hypothesized. A functional HLA-DQ molecule consists of a DQα and a DQβ chain. HLA-DQB1*06:02 (DQβ) has a strong preference for binding to HLA-DQA1*01:02 (DQα), and together they form the functional DQ0602 dimer. A dosage effect would be expected if the HLA-DQ0602 dimer itself is directly involved in the aetiology. An increased expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer is expected in individuals homozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02, but is also hypothesized in individuals heterozygous for HLA-DQB1*06:02 and homozygous for HLA-DQA1*01:02. To study the impact of the expression of the HLA-DQ0602 dimer on narcolepsy susceptibility, 248 Dutch narcolepsy patients and 1272 Dutch control subjects, all of them positive for DQB1*06:02 (heterozygous and homozygous), were HLA-genotyped with attention not only to DQB1 but also to DQA1*01:02. DQB1*06:02-DQA1*01:02 homozygosity was significantly more often seen in patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.29) confirming previous observations. More importantly, a significantly higher prevalence of homozygosity for DQA1*01:02 was found in HLA-DQB1*06:02 heterozygous patients compared to controls (O.R. 2.37, p < 0.001). The latter finding clearly supports a direct role of the HLA-DQ molecule in the development of disease.

  20. Isolated Cataplexy in the Differential Diagnosis of Drop Attacks: A Case of Successful Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment

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    Robert T. Egel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Drop attacks are sudden spontaneous falls that are not accompanied by alteration of consciousness and are followed by immediate recovery. Cataplexy, which is usually associated with narcolepsy, is one of the causes of drop attacks. We report a patient with the rare condition of cataplexy without associated narcolepsy (isolated cataplexy. Isolated cataplexy should be included in the differential diagnosis when a patient presents with recurrent drop attacks and normal diagnostic test results.

  1. Clinical, polysomnographic and genome-wide association analyses of narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luca, Gianina; Haba-Rubio, José; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and PSG characteristics of narcolepsy with cataplexy and their genetic predisposition by using the retrospective patient database of the European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN). We have analysed retrospective data of 1099 patients with narcolepsy...... diagnostic delay were young age at diagnosis, cataplexy as the first symptom and higher frequency of cataplexy attacks. The mean multiple sleep latency negatively correlated with Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and with the number of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs), but none...

  2. Pharmacological management of narcolepsy and cataplexy in pediatric patients.

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    Lecendreux, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder frequently occurring from childhood and persisting through adolescence and adulthood. Individuals suffering from narcolepsy exhibit excessive daytime somnolence, sleep attacks, cataplexy, dysomnia, metabolic perturbations including weight gain, and problems in social interaction and academic performance. The prevalence of narcolepsy in childhood is not known but can be estimated from adult studies to be greater than 20-60 per 100,000 in Western countries. The 2009 (A) H1N1 vaccination campaign led to an increase of narcoleptic cases both in children and in adults, supporting the autoimmune hypothesis of the disease. This article focuses on the epidemiology, etiology, and particularities of treatment in pediatric narcolepsy and details the effects of the drugs used to treat this condition, including recent trends in the field. Future therapeutic directions are also discussed. At present, medications used to treat children or adolescents have shown efficacy mostly based on clinical experience, given the lack of level 1 evidence-based studies in the pediatric population. Therefore, most compounds used in adult narcolepsy to target clinical symptoms such as wake-promoting or anticataplectic agents are prescribed off-label in pediatric patients. Published research shows the benefit of drug therapy for narcoleptic children, but these must be dispensed with caution in the absence of well conducted clinical trials.

  3. Hypocretin (orexin) biology and the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy.

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    Liblau, Roland S; Vassalli, Anne; Seifinejad, Ali; Tafti, Mehdi

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of hypocretins (orexins) and their causal implication in narcolepsy is the most important advance in sleep research and sleep medicine since the discovery of rapid eye movement sleep. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by hypocretin deficiency owing to destruction of most of the hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Ablation of hypocretin or hypocretin receptors also leads to narcolepsy phenotypes in animal models. Although the exact mechanism of hypocretin deficiency is unknown, evidence from the past 20 years strongly favours an immune-mediated or autoimmune attack, targeting specifically hypocretin neurons in genetically predisposed individuals. These neurons form an extensive network of projections throughout the brain and show activity linked to motivational behaviours. The hypothesis that a targeted immune-mediated or autoimmune attack causes the specific degeneration of hypocretin neurons arose mainly through the discovery of genetic associations, first with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele and then with the T-cell receptor α locus. Guided by these genetic findings and now awaiting experimental testing are models of the possible immune mechanisms by which a specific and localised brain cell population could become targeted by T-cell subsets. Great hopes for the identification of new targets for therapeutic intervention in narcolepsy also reside in the development of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cell systems.

  4. The clinical features of cataplexy: a questionnaire study in narcolepsy patients with and without hypocretin-1 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, S.; Nues, S.J. van; Zande, W.L. van der; Donjacour, C.E.; Mierlo, P. van; Lammers, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy is often not recognized or accurately diagnosed. This may be due to the fact that cataplexy, a core symptom which is virtually 100% specific, can-in practice-only be diagnosed based on the patient's history. However, the current definition of cataplexy is not very precise and

  5. Impaired circadian waking arousal in narcolepsy-cataplexy.

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    Broughton, R; Krupa, S; Boucher, B; Rivers, M; Mullington, J

    1998-01-01

    The 24-hour sleep/wake distributions of untreated patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and matched normal habitual nappers were compared using home ambulatory monitoring. Subjects followed their usual sleep patterns including, for the habitual nappers, a self-selected daytime nap. There were no differences in 24-hour totals of sleep between groups other than a small increase in SWS in narcolepsy. Narcolepsy showed greater amounts of day sleep (stages 2, SWS, REM and total sleep) and less night sleep (stage 2, total sleep). Data were collapsed into 5 min epochs and entered into a matrix. The data in the two groups were then "wrapped" (re-aligned) around the 24 hours with phase 0 as each of the times of: evening sleep onset, onset of SWS, mid-point of night sleep and moment of morning awakening. In habitual nappers alignment beginning at morning wake-up produced the highest amplitude, least temporal dispersion and greatest kurtosis of daytime sleep (naps). The 24-hour sleep/wake distribution curves of both subject groups (data aligned at morning wake-up) based on collapsed data into 5 min bins then underwent curve fitting using 15th order polynomial regression. As with visual analyses of the raw data, the curve fits confirmed that the peak in daytime sleep propensity in narcoleptics was earlier by about 40 (2.66 hours). It was concluded that decreased daytime amplitude of a circadian arousal system was the most parsimonious explanation for the increased amount, broader temporal distribution and relative phase advance of day sleep in narcolepsy and that, as well, such a mechanism could explain a number of other features of the disease.

  6. Treatment cost of narcolepsy with cataplexy in Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maresova P

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Petra Maresova,1 Michal Novotny,2,3 Blanka Klímová,4 Kamil Kuča3,51Department of Economics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, 2Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Králové, 3Biomedical Research Center, University Hospital Hradec Králové, 4Department of Applied Linguistics, Faculty of Informatics and Management, 5Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic Background: Narcolepsy is a lifelong, rare neurological sleep disorder characterized by chronic, excessive attacks of daytime sleepiness. This disease is often extremely incapacitating, interfering with every aspect of life, in work and social settings.Objective: The purpose of this study is to specify the treatment costs of patients in the Central Europe (Czech Republic, while the attention is mainly paid to the drugs that were fully or partially covered by public health insurance. Furthermore, concomitant therapy is also evaluated, since it incurs a certain financial burden for patients and their family members. On the basis of the calculated costs, impact on the public budget is evaluated.Patients and methods: This study monitors the direct costs of the drugs for 13 patients, who represent ~1.3% of the total number of diagnosed patients in the Czech Republic, and evaluates the costs associated with their treatment during the period from January 9, 2011 to April 23, 2013.Results: Most of the treatment costs (~80% were covered by publicly available sources. This finding is also true for the concomitant therapy of comorbidities. Additional payments for the drugs constitute about 20% of the total costs. Keywords: cataplexy, cost, narcolepsy, orphan drug, rare disease, sodium oxybate

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum cytokine profiles in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

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    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Cristol, Jean Paul; Blain, Hubert; Dupuy, Anne-Marie

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide strong support that narcolepsy-cataplexy is an immune-mediated disease. Only few serum cytokine studies with controversial results were performed in narcolepsy and none in the cerebrospinal fluid. We measured a panel of 12 cytokines by a proteomic approach in the serum of 35 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 156 healthy controls, and in the cerebrospinal fluid of 34 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to 17 non-narcoleptic patients; and analyzed the effect of age, duration and severity of disease on the cytokine levels. After multiple adjustments we reported lower serum IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, MCP-1 and EGF levels, and a tendency for higher IL-4 level in narcolepsy compared to controls. Significant differences were only found for IL-4 in cerebrospinal fluid, being higher in narcolepsy. Positive correlations were found in serum between IL-4, daytime sleepiness, and cataplexy frequency. The expression of some pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, VEGF, EGF, IL2, IL-1β, IFN-γ) in either serum or CSF was negatively correlated with disease severity and duration. No correlation was found for any specific cytokine in 18 of the patients with narcolepsy with peripheral and central samples collected the same day. Significant decreased pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine profiles were found at peripheral and central levels in narcolepsy, together with a T helper 2/Th1 serum cytokine secretion imbalance. To conclude, we showed some evidence for alterations in the cytokine profile in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls at peripheral and central levels, with the potential role of IL-4 and significant Th1/2 imbalance in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy.

  8. Bispectral index monitoring of a narcolepsy-cataplexy episode during regional anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahaba, Ashraf A; Xu, Guo Xun; Liu, Qing Hai; Xue, Ji Xiu; Metzler, Helfried

    2009-02-01

    Narcolepsy or Gélineau syndrome is an extremely incapacitating chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiology that is characterized by uncontrollable attacks of deep sleep and is typically associated with cataplexy sudden loss of muscle tone. The Bispectral Index (BIS), an electroencephalographic-derived cerebral monitor, used for monitoring the effects of anesthetic/hypnotic drugs was shown to correlate to various conditions that could influence the eletroencephalogram. We assessed the utility of using BIS for monitoring a possible narcolepsy-cataplexy episode and whether a distinctive BIS profile might offer an early warning of an impending narcoleptic/cataplectic spell. We recorded both hemispheres, using two synchronized BIS-XP monitors, during a narcolepsy-cataplexy episode in a 57-yr-old male patient undergoing lower limb surgery under femoral nerve block regional anesthesia. The patient went through three stages: first a prodromal "intermittent low-vigilance" phase interrupted by high electromyographic activity. This was followed by a second "continuous low-vigilance" phase of BIS around 75 with low electromyographic activity, ending with a third "nonresponsive vigilance" phase of a full-blown narcolepsy-cataplexy episode of BIS around 45 with complete loss of muscle power. The purpose of presenting this report is to emphasize the fact that narcoleptic patients can still run the risk of loss of consciousness with atonia under regional anesthesia, and such an undesirable complication cannot be under-estimated. BIS monitoring is a simple method that could offer an early warning of an imminent episode, with its associated hazards, in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy undergoing surgery under regional anesthesia.

  9. Narcolepsy with cataplexy after A/H1N1 vaccination – A case reported from Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaimi Rosales Mesa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare sleep disorder with a neurological basis which has been recently linked to H1N1 vaccination either in children or adults. Cases from Europe, United States and Brasil were registered. Authors describe a case report of a 15 years old boy who developed narcolepsy with cataplexy after H1N1 vaccination in Havana. As far as it is concerned this is the first case reported from Cuba.

  10. High amplitude theta wave bursts: a novel electroencephalographic feature of rem sleep and cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Martire, Viviana Carmen; Bastianini, Stefano; Berteotti, Chiara; Silvani, Alessandro; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    High amplitude theta wave bursts (HATs) were originally described during REMS and cataplexy in ORX-deficient mice as a novel neurophysiological correlate of narcolepsy (Bastianini et al., 2012). This finding was replicated the following year by Vassalli et al. in both ORX-deficient narcoleptic mice and narcoleptic children during cataplexy episodes (Vassalli et al., 2013). The relationship between HATs and narcolepsy-cataplexy in mice and patients indicates that the lack of ORX peptides is responsible for this abnormal EEG activity, the physiological meaning of which is still unknown. This review aimed to explore different phasic EEG events previously described in the published literature in order to find analogies and differences with HATs observed in narcoleptic mice and patients. We found similarities in terms of morphology, frequency and duration between HATs and several physiological (mu and wicket rhythms, sleep spindles, saw-tooth waves) or pathological (SWDs, HVSs, bursts of polyphasic complexes EEG complexes reported in a mouse model of CJD, and BSEs) EEG events. However, each of these events also shows significant differences from HATs, and thus cannot be equaled to them. The available evidence thus suggests that HATs are a novel neurophysiological phenomenon. Further investigations on HATs are required in order to investigate their physiological meaning, to individuate their brain structure(s) of origin, and to clarify the neural circuits involved in their manifestation.

  11. Orexin gene transfer into the amygdala suppresses both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy in orexin-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Konadhode, Roda Rani; Luan, Liju; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2016-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder linked to the loss of orexin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Cataplexy, a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking, is an important distinguishing symptom of narcolepsy and it is often triggered by strong emotions. The neural circuit underlying cataplexy attacks is not known, but is likely to involve the amygdala, a region implicated in regulating emotions. In mice models of narcolepsy, transfer of the orexin gene into surrogate neurons has been successful in ameliorating narcoleptic symptoms. However, it is not known whether this method also blocks cataplexy triggered by strong emotions. To examine this possibility, the gene encoding mouse prepro-orexin was transferred into amygdala neurons of orexin-knockout (KO) mice (rAAV-orexin; n = 8). Orexin-KO mice that did not receive gene transfer (no-rAAV; n = 7) or received only the reporter gene (rAAV-GFP; n = 7) served as controls. Three weeks later, the animal's sleep and behaviour were recorded at night (no-odour control night), followed by another recording at night in the presence of predator odour (odour night). Orexin-KO mice given the orexin gene transfer into surrogate amygdala neurons had significantly less spontaneous bouts of cataplexy, and predator odour did not induce cataplexy compared with control mice. Moreover, the mice with orexin gene transfer were awake more during the odour night. These results demonstrate that orexin gene transfer into amygdala neurons can suppress both spontaneous and emotion-induced cataplexy attacks in narcoleptic mice. It suggests that manipulating amygdala pathways is a potential strategy for treating cataplexy in narcolepsy.

  12. Intravenous immunoglobulin treatment and screening for hypocretin neuron-specific autoantibodies in recent onset childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, S; Mikkelsen, J D; Bang, B

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is caused by substantial loss of hypocretin neurons. NC patients carry the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggesting that hypocretin neuron loss is due to an autoimmune attack. We tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in early onset NC.......Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is caused by substantial loss of hypocretin neurons. NC patients carry the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggesting that hypocretin neuron loss is due to an autoimmune attack. We tested intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment in early onset NC....

  13. Reward-based behaviors and emotional processing in human with narcolepsy-cataplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eBayard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ajor advances in the past decade have led a better understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy caused by the early loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons. Although a role for hypocretin in the regulation of sleep/wakefulness state is widely recognized, other functions, not necessarily related to arousal, have been identified. Hence, the hypocretin system enhances signaling in the mesolimbic pathways regulating reward processing, emotion and mood regulation, and addiction. Although studies on hypocretin-deficient mice have shown that hypocretin plays an essential role in reward-seeking, depression-like behavior and addiction, results in human narcolepsy remained subject to debate. Most of studies revealed that hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy patients either drug-free or medicated with psychostimulant had preferences towards risky choices in a decision-making task under ambiguity together with higher frequency of depressive symptoms and binge eating disorder compared to controls. However, human studies mostly reported the lack of association with pathological impulsivity and gambling, and substance and alcohol abuse in the context of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Prospective larger studies are required to confirm these findings in drug-free and medicated patients with narcolepsy. Inclusion of patients with other central hypersomnias without hypocretin deficiency will provide answer to the major question of the role of the hypocretin system in reward-based behaviors and emotional processing in humans.

  14. DQB1 locus alone explains most of the risk and protection in narcolepsy with cataplexy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Hor, H.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Lammers, G.J.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Javidi, S.; Iranzo, A.; Santamaria, J.; Peraita-Adrados, R.; Vicario, J.L.; Arnulf, I.; Plazzi, G.; Bayard, S.; Poli, F.; Pizza, F.; Geisler, P.; Wierzbicka, A.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Donjacour, C.E.; Heide, A. van der; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Hogl, B.; Frauscher, B.; Beneto, A.; Khatami, R.; Canellas, F.; Pfister, C.; Scholz, S.; Billiard, M.; Baumann, C.R.; Ercilla, G.; Verduijn, W.; Claas, F.H.; Dubois, V.; Nowak, J.; Eberhard, H.P.; Pradervand, S.; Hor, C.N.; Testi, M.; Tiercy, J.M.; Kutalik, Z.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Prior research has identified five common genetic variants associated with narcolepsy with cataplexy in Caucasian patients. To replicate and/or extend these findings, we have tested HLA-DQB1, the previously identified 5 variants, and 10 other potential variants in a large European s

  15. Clinical, polysomnographic and genome-wide association analyses of narcolepsy with cataplexy: a European Narcolepsy Network study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luca, G. De; Haba-Rubio, J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Lammers, G.J.; Overeem, S.; Donjacour, C.E.; Mayer, G.; Javidi, S.; Iranzo, A.; Santamaria, J.; Peraita-Adrados, R.; Hor, H.; Kutalik, Z.; Plazzi, G.; Poli, F.; Pizza, F.; Arnulf, I.; Lecendreux, M.; Bassetti, C.; Mathis, J.; Heinzer, R.; Jennum, P.; Knudsen, S.; Geisler, P.; Wierzbicka, A.; Feketeova, E.; Pfister, C.; Khatami, R.; Baumann, C.; Tafti, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and PSG characteristics of narcolepsy with cataplexy and their genetic predisposition by using the retrospective patient database of the European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN). We have analysed retrospective data of 1099 patients with narcolepsy diagno

  16. Narcolepsy with cataplexy in a child with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Feixia; Wang, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy diagnosed with both CMT1 and narcolepsy, which were not reported simultaneously presenting in one person. The boy presented with a history of increased suddenly falling frequency and excessive daytime sleepiness for 3 months. CMT1 was diagnosed by electrophysiology and genetic testing. Narcolepsy had not been diagnosed until the frequently falling caused by sudden and transient episodes of legs weakness triggered by emotion was found. Multiple sleep latency test showed multiple sleep onset REM periods with reduced sleep latency. When CMT1 and narcolepsy were coexist in an individual, the latter might be overlooked. Cataplexy caused by narcolepsy might be disregard as distal muscle weakness of CMT1. The daytime sleepiness might also be ignored. Therefore, we recommend that patients with sleep disorders should be queried about the symptoms of narcolepsy.

  17. Case of early childhood-onset narcolepsy with cataplexy: comparison with a monozygotic co-twin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromichi; Mori, Kenji; Mori, Tatsuo; Goji, Aya; Kagami, Shoji

    2014-10-01

    We describe here a rare case of early childhood-onset (5 years of age) narcolepsy. This case was interesting because of the ability to compare the patient's symptoms to the condition of her healthy monozygotic co-twin sister. The only environmental difference between the co-twins was head injury, which may be associated with the presence of narcolepsy. The co-twin was extroverted, sociable, reliable, and dexterous. In contrast, the patient could be described as introverted, gentle, honest and persevering, but was weak at conversation, assessment of a situation, memory, planning, activity (she was inactive), a sense of time, understanding of an analog clock, operating efficiency, and physical education (due to obesity). The sisters showed the same degree of appetite and dexterity with their fingers. Narcolepsy is often under-recognized or underdiagnosed, especially when the onset occurs in childhood. When we observe preschoolers with excessive daytime sleepiness, we should consider the possibility of narcolepsy with cataplexy.

  18. A Case of REM Sleep Behavior Disorder, Narcolepsy-Cataplexy, Parkinsonism, and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena I. I. Cosentino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient is reported in whom signs and symptoms of REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD and narcolepsy have been associated for almost two decades with a late development of parkinsonism and rheumatoid arthritis. A 78-year-old male patient in whom RBD was first diagnosed was followed-up by clinical examination, video-polysomnography, multiple sleep latency test, cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, and dopamine transporter imaging by single-photon emission computerized tomography. The patient was found to present for almost two decades, in addition to RBD, also narcolepsy. Moreover, a late development of parkinsonism and the occurrence of rheumatoid arthritis were detected and clinically and instrumentally characterized. Patients predisposed to RBD and later parkinsonism might be susceptible to a variety of triggers that, in our patient, might have been represented by a possible latent autoimmune process leading to the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy and rheumatoid arthritis, later.

  19. Neocortical 40 Hz oscillations during carbachol-induced rapid eye movement sleep and cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torterolo, Pablo; Castro-Zaballa, Santiago; Cavelli, Matías; Chase, Michael H; Falconi, Atilio

    2016-02-01

    Higher cognitive functions require the integration and coordination of large populations of neurons in cortical and subcortical regions. Oscillations in the gamma band (30-45 Hz) of the electroencephalogram (EEG) have been involved in these cognitive functions. In previous studies, we analysed the extent of functional connectivity between cortical areas employing the 'mean squared coherence' analysis of the EEG gamma band. We demonstrated that gamma coherence is maximal during alert wakefulness and is almost absent during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) is critical for REM sleep generation. The NPO is considered to exert executive control over the initiation and maintenance of REM sleep. In the cat, depending on the previous state of the animal, a single microinjection of carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) into the NPO can produce either REM sleep [REM sleep induced by carbachol (REMc)] or a waking state with muscle atonia, i.e. cataplexy [cataplexy induced by carbachol (CA)]. In the present study, in cats that were implanted with electrodes in different cortical areas to record polysomnographic activity, we compared the degree of gamma (30-45 Hz) coherence during REMc, CA and naturally-occurring behavioural states. Gamma coherence was maximal during CA and alert wakefulness. In contrast, gamma coherence was almost absent during REMc as in naturally-occurring REM sleep. We conclude that, in spite of the presence of somatic muscle paralysis, there are remarkable differences in cortical activity between REMc and CA, which confirm that EEG gamma (≈40 Hz) coherence is a trait that differentiates wakefulness from REM sleep.

  20. Articles Safety and efficacy of pitolisant on cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Szakacs, Zoltan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mikhaylov, Vladimir; Poverennova, Irina; Krylov, Sergei; Jankovic, Slavko; Sonka, Karel; Lehert, Philippe; Lecomte, Isabelle; Lecomte, Jeanne-Marie; Schwartz, Jean-Charles

    2017-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND:Histaminergic neurons are crucial to maintain wakefulness, but their role in cataplexy is unknown. We assessed the safety and efficacy of pitolisant, a histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist, for treatment of cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy.METHODS:For this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial we recruited patients with narcolepsy from 16 sleep centres in nine countries (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Russia, Serbia,...

  1. Heart rate variability during carbachol-induced REM sleep and cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torterolo, Pablo; Castro-Zaballa, Santiago; Cavelli, Matías; Velasquez, Noelia; Brando, Victoria; Falconi, Atilio; Chase, Michael H; Migliaro, Eduardo R

    2015-09-15

    The nucleus pontis oralis (NPO) exerts an executive control over REM sleep. Cholinergic input to the NPO is critical for REM sleep generation. In the cat, a single microinjection of carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) into the NPO produces either REM sleep (REMc) or wakefulness with muscle atonia (cataplexy, CA). In order to study the central control of the heart rate variability (HRV) during sleep, we conducted polysomnographic and electrocardiogram recordings from chronically prepared cats during REMc, CA as well as during sleep and wakefulness. Subsequently, we performed statistical and spectral analyses of the HRV. The heart rate was greater during CA compared to REMc, NREM or REM sleep. Spectral analysis revealed that the low frequency band (LF) power was significantly higher during REM sleep in comparison to REMc and CA. Furthermore, we found that during CA there was a decrease in coupling between the RR intervals plot (tachogram) and respiratory activity. In contrast, compared to natural behavioral states, during REMc and CA there were no significant differences in the HRV based upon the standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN) and the mean squared difference of successive intervals (rMSSD). In conclusion, there were differences in the HRV during naturally-occurring REM sleep compared to REMc. In addition, in spite of the same muscle atonia, the HRV was different during REMc and CA. Therefore, the neuronal network that controls the HRV during REM sleep can be dissociated from the one that generates the muscle atonia during this state.

  2. Para neoplastic cataplexy: evolution of PET with [{sup 18}F] -F.D.G. imaging; Cataplexie paraneoplasique: evolution de l'imagerie TEP au [18F]-FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farida, K.; Fernandez, P.; Guyot, M.; Jeandot, R.; Allard, M. [Service de medecine nucleaire, CHU de Bordeaux, (France); Sibon, I. [service de neurologie, CHU de Bordeaux, (France)

    2009-05-15

    Cataplexy is sudden and transient episode of loss of muscle tone, often triggered by emotions. We find it in the Gelineau disease but it can be constitutes an exceptional clinical expression of para-neoplasic syndromes. We report the evolution of the PET imaging for a patient during a para-neoplasic syndrome secondary to a testes teratoma associated to the presence of antibodies anti-Ma2. Different aspects of the {sup 18}F-F.D.G. fixation can be observed during the para-neoplasic syndromes affecting the central nervous system. Their values in term of prognosis and help to the therapy decision are still to define. (N.C.)

  3. Association of narcolepsy-cataplexy with HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 in Mexican patients: A relationship between HLA and gender is suggested

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haro Reyes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Narcolepsy-cataplexy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with recurrent episodes of irresistible sleep, cataplexy, hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Its aetiology is unknown, but it is positively associated with the human leukocyte antigens (HLA in all studied populations. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association of HLA class II DRB1/DQB1 alleles with narcolepsy-cataplexy in Mexican Mestizo patients. Methods This is a case-control study of consecutive patients and ethnically matched controls. We included 32 patients diagnosed with typical narcolepsy-cataplexy, of the National Institute of Neurology, of the Institute of Psychiatry and at the Center of Narcolepsy at Stanford University. As healthy controls, 203 Mexican Mestizos were included. DRB1 alleles were identified using sequence based typing. A PCR-SSOP reverse dot blot was used for DQB1 typing. Allele frequency was calculated by direct counting and the significance of the differences was assessed using the Yates Chi square. Odds ratio and confidence intervals were evaluated. Results HLA-DRB1*1501 (OR = 8.2; pc DQB1*0602 (OR = 8.4; pc DQB1*0602+ patients from the analysis, DQB1*0301 was also found increased (OR = 2.7; p = 0.035; pc = NS. DQB1*0602/DQB1*0301 genotype was present in 15.6% of the cases (OR = 11.5; p = 0.00035, conferring a high risk. DRB1*0407 (OR = 0.2; p = 0.016 pc = NS and DQB1*0302(OR = 0.4; p = 0.017, pc = NS were found decreased in the patients. The gender stratification analysis showed a higher risk in females carrying DRB1*1501 (OR = 15.8, pc DQB1*0602 (OR = 19.8, pc DRB1 & p = 0.0012, pc = 0.017 for DQB1. The susceptibility alleles found in Mexicans with narcolepsy are also present in Japanese and Caucasians; DRB1*04 linked protection has also been shown in Koreans. A stronger HLA association is suggested in females, in accordance with the sexual dimorphism claimed previously. Conclusion This knowledge may

  4. An association analysis of HLA-DQB1 with narcolepsy without cataplexy and idiopathic hypersomnia with/without long sleep time in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Takami, Masanori; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Omata, Naoto; Masuya, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Hideaki; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Ishigooka, Jun; Wada, Yuji; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy without cataplexy (NA w/o CA) (narcolepsy type 2) is a lifelong disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities, but no cataplexy. In the present study, we examined the human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1 in 160 Japanese patients with NA w/o CA and 1,418 control subjects. Frequencies of DQB1*06:02 were significantly higher in patients with NA w/o CA compared with controls (allele frequency: 16.6 vs. 7.8%, P=1.1×10(-7), odds ratio (OR)=2.36; carrier frequency: 31.3 vs. 14.7%, P=7.6×10(-8), OR=2.64). Distributions of HLA-DQB1 alleles other than DQB1*06:02 were compared between NA w/o CA and narcolepsy with cataplexy (NA-CA) to assess whether the genetic backgrounds of the two diseases have similarities. The distribution of the HLA-DQB1 alleles in DQB1*06:02-negative NA w/o CA was significantly different from that in NA-CA (P=5.8×10(-7)). On the other hand, the patterns of the HLA-DQB1 alleles were similar between DQB1*06:02-positive NA w/o CA and NA-CA. HLA-DQB1 analysis was also performed in 186 Japanese patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (IHS) with/without long sleep time, but no significant associations were observed.

  5. 发作性睡病患者呼吸中枢低氧反应性与临床表现的相关性%Decreased hypoxic ventilatory chemoresponsiveness and clinical features in patients with narcolepsy cataplexy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓喆; 董霄松; 李静; 韩芳; 闫涵; 安培; 赵龙; 高占成

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between hypoxic responsiveness of the patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and their clinical features.Methods A total of 113 patients with narcolepsycataplexy (narcolepsy group) at Peking University People's Hospital from June 2007 to May 2008 and 128 gender-age matched volunteers (control group) were recruited.And their status of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQB1 * 0602 was examined to differentiate hypercapnic and hypoxic responsiveness.Among them,93 patients with severe hypersomnolence had hypercapnic and hypoxic responsiveness tested before and after the treatment of methylphenidate and another 20 with severe cataplexy did the same before and after the treatment of chlorimiopramine.Results Compared with the control group,the narcolepsy group had depressed hypoxic responsiveness ((-0.135 ± 0.105) vs (-0.223 ± 0.136) L · min-1 · % SpO2-1,P < 0.001).After the treatment of methylphenidate,sleepiness improved significantly in all 93 patients,but their low hypoxic responsiveness did not change ((-0.151 ±0.111) vs (-0.149 ±0.105) L · min-1 · % SpO2-1,P =0.780).After the treatment of chlorimiopramine,cataplexy also improved in 20 patients.However their low hypoxic responsiveness had no change ((-0.114 ±0.054) vs (-0.115 ±0.065) L · min-1 · % SpO2-1,P =0.949).Conclusion Lower hypoxic responsiveness in narcolepsy group is not related with the clinical features of disease.%目的 探讨猝倒型发作性睡病患者呼吸中枢低氧反应性与临床表现的相关性.方法 选择2007年6月至2008年5月北京大学人民医院睡眠中心就诊的伴猝倒且人类白细胞组织相容性抗原(HLA) DQB1* 0602阳性的113例典型发作性睡病患者(发作性睡病组)和128名年龄和性别匹配的健康志愿者(对照组)作为研究对象.分别测定其HLA-DQB1*0602状态、高CO2反应性[分钟通气量(VE)降低量与CO2分压(PCO2)下降量的比值]和低O2反应性[VE降

  6. Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies/Twin Research: Differentiating MZ Co-twins Via SNPs; Mistaken Infant Twin-Singleton Hospital Registration; Narcolepsy With Cataplexy; Hearing Loss and Language Learning/Media Mentions: Broadway Musical Recalls Conjoined Hilton Twins; High Fashion Pair; Twins Turn 102; Insights From a Conjoined Twin Survivor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nancy L

    2015-02-01

    Highlights from the 15th International Congress of Twin Studies are presented. The congress was held November 16-19, 2014 in Budapest, Hungary. This report is followed by summaries of research addressing the differentiation of MZ co-twins by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), an unusual error in infant twin-singleton hospital registration, twins with childhood-onset narcolepsy with cataplexy, and the parenting effects of hearing loss in one co-twin. Media interest in twins covers a new Broadway musical based on the conjoined twins Violet and Daisy Hilton, male twins becoming famous in fashion, twins who turned 102 and unique insights from a conjoined twin survivor. This article is dedicated to the memory of Elizabeth (Liz) Hamel, DZA twin who met her co-twin for the first time at age seventy-eight years. Liz and her co-twin, Ann Hunt, are listed in the 2015 Guinness Book of Records as the longest separated twins in the world.

  7. Treatment cost of narcolepsy with cataplexy in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresova, Petra; Novotny, Michal; Klímová, Blanka; Kuča, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy is a lifelong, rare neurological sleep disorder characterized by chronic, excessive attacks of daytime sleepiness. This disease is often extremely incapacitating, interfering with every aspect of life, in work and social settings. Objective The purpose of this study is to specify the treatment costs of patients in Central Europe (Czech Republic), while the attention is mainly paid to the drugs that were fully or partially covered by public health insurance. Furthermore, concomitant therapy is also evaluated, since it incurs a certain financial burden for patients and their family members. On the basis of the calculated costs, impact on the public budget is evaluated. Patients and methods This study monitors the direct costs of the drugs for 13 patients, who represent ~1.3% of the total number of diagnosed patients in the Czech Republic, and evaluates the costs associated with their treatment during the period from January 9, 2011 to April 23, 2013. Results Most of the treatment costs (~80%) were covered by publicly available sources. This finding is also true for the concomitant therapy of comorbidities. Additional payments for the drugs constitute about 20% of the total costs. PMID:27920540

  8. Environmental factors in the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy. A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraita-Adrados, R; del Rio-Villegas, R; Vela-Bueno, A

    2015-06-16

    Introduccion. Los estudios epidemiologicos subrayan la importancia de los factores ambientales en la etiologia de la narcolepsia con cataplejia en pacientes geneticamente predispuestos. Objetivo. Evaluar el papel de los factores ambientales en la etiologia de la narcolepsia-cataplejia utilizando un diseño de casos y controles comparados por edad y etnia. Pacientes y metodos. Todos los pacientes fueron diagnosticados en nuestras unidades de sueño, segun los criterios de la Clasificacion Internacional de los Trastornos del Sueño de 2005. Utilizamos un cuestionario consistente en 54 preguntas relacionadas con acontecimientos psicologicos estresantes y 42 enfermedades infecciosas en 54 pacientes. Evaluamos especificamente la presencia de factores estresantes y/o infecciosos en el año previo al comienzo del primer sintoma de narcolepsia-cataplejia (somnolencia excesiva diurna y/o cataplejia). El mismo cuestionario se administro a 84 controles, miembros de la misma comunidad, sin relacion de parentesco. Resultados. Respondieron el cuestionario 54 pacientes (55,6%, hombres) (edad media del primer sintoma: 21,6 ± 9,3 años; edad media del diagnostico: 36,5 ± 12,4 años) y 84 controles. El principal hallazgo fue un cambio importante en el 'numero de discusiones con la pareja, la familia o los amigos' (odds ratio: 5,2; intervalo de confianza al 95%: 1,8-14,5) en los narcolepticos, lo que sugiere que los mecanismos psicologicos estan presentes desde el comienzo de la enfermedad con una funcion protectora. La varicela fue el factor infeccioso mas frecuente. No se obtuvieron diferencias significativas en el numero de factores psicologicos estresantes e infecciosos entre los pacientes narcolepticos y los controles. Conclusion. Estudios prospectivos epidemiologicos en series de individuos susceptibles geneticamente estan justificados para aclarar la implicacion de los factores ambientales en la etiopatogenia de la narcolepsia-cataplejia.

  9. High prevalence of eating disorders in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fortuyn, H.A.; Swinkels, S.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Renier, W.O.; Furer, J.W.; Rijnders, C.A.; Hodiamont, P.P.; Overeem, S.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of and symptoms of eating disorders in patients with narcolepsy. DESIGN: We performed a case-control study comparing symptoms of eating disorders in patients with narcolepsy versus healthy population controls, using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in N

  10. High prevalence of eating disorders in narcolepsy with cataplexy: a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogleever Fortuyn, H.A.; Swinkels, S.H.N.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Renier, W.O.; Furer, J.W.; Rijnders, C.A.T.H.; Hodiamont, P.P.G.; Overeem, S.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study the prevalence of and symptoms of eating disorders in patients with narcolepsy. Design: We performed a case-control study comparing symptoms of eating disorders in patients with narcolepsy versus healthy population controls, using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment i

  11. Anti-Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) autoantibodies in narcolepsy are associated with recent onset of cataplexy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawashima, Minae; Lin, Ling; Tanaka, Susumu;

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have found increased autoantibodies against Tribbles homolog 2 (anti-TRIB2) and anti-streptolysin O (ASO) in narcolepsy. In this study, we replicated this finding with a primary focus on recent onset cases.......Recent studies have found increased autoantibodies against Tribbles homolog 2 (anti-TRIB2) and anti-streptolysin O (ASO) in narcolepsy. In this study, we replicated this finding with a primary focus on recent onset cases....

  12. Effects of startle and laughter in cataplectic subjects : a neurophysiological study between attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, GJ; Overeem, S; Tijssen, MAJ; van Dijk, JG

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: Cataplexy, when unequivocally present together with excessive daytime sleepiness, is diagnostic for narcolepsy. Unfortunately, it is difficult to induce cataplexy during consultation. In this study we tried to assess presumed subclinical expressions of cataplexy using neurophysiological

  13. Sodium Oxybate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium oxybate is used to prevent attacks of cataplexy (episodes of muscle weakness that begin suddenly and ... urge to sleep during daily activities, and cataplexy). Sodium oxybate is in a class of medications called ...

  14. Etiopathogenesis and Neurobiology of Narcolepsy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Swarup; Sagili, Haritha

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic lifelong sleep disorder and it often leaves a debilitating effect on the quality of life of the sufferer. This disorder is characterized by a tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (brief loss of muscle tone following strong emotion), hypnogogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct subgroups of Narcolepsy: Narcolepsy with cataplexy and Narcolepsy without cataplexy. For over 100 years, clinicians have recognised narcolepsy, but only in t...

  15. A rare presentation of hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Mathew

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, we have brought out a very rare presentation of hypothyroidism in the form of cataplexy and this case is of significance because there have been no similar case reports of hypothyroidism presenting as cataplexy so far. The other highlight of the case is that treatment of hypothyroidism alone resulted in complete freedom from cataplexy without the need for agrypnotic drugs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(1.000: 328-329

  16. Narcolepsy and pregnancy: a retrospective European evaluation of 249 pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Kemlink, David; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Geisler, Peter; Ettenhuber, Katharina; Mayer, Geert; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Calvo, Elena; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van der Heide, Astrid; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Poli, Francesca; Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Leonthin, Helle; Mathis, Johannes; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Puertas, Francisco J; Beitinger, Pierre A; Arnulf, Isabelle; Riha, Renata L; Tormášiová, Maria; Slonková, Jana; Nevšímalová, Sona; Sonka, Karel

    2013-10-01

    In a retrospective cohort study undertaken in 12 European countries, 249 female narcoleptic patients with cataplexy (n = 216) and without cataplexy (n = 33) completed a self-administrated questionnaire regarding pregnancy and childbirth. The cohort was divided further into patients whose symptoms of narcolepsy started before or during pregnancy (308 pregnancies) and those in whom the first symptoms of narcolepsy appeared after delivery (106 pregnancies). Patients with narcolepsy during pregnancy were older during their first pregnancy (P narcolepsy-cataplexy during pregnancy had impaired glucose metabolism and anaemia. Three patients experienced cataplexy during delivery. The rate of caesarean sections was higher in the narcolepsy-cataplexy group compared to the narcolepsy group (P narcolepsy in 60.1% of those with narcolepsy during pregnancy. This study reports more obstetric complications in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy during pregnancy; however, these were not severe. This group also had a higher BMI and higher incidence of impaired glucose metabolism during pregnancy. Caesarian section was conducted more frequently in narcolepsy-cataplexy patients, despite cataplexy being a rare event during delivery. Furthermore, symptoms of narcolepsy may render care of the infant more difficult.

  17. Pseudocataplexy and transient functional paralysis: a spectrum of psychogenic motor disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Rohit; Jalihal, Virupakshi; Walker, Matthew; Zeman, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe and discuss a syndrome of transient psychogenic weakness usually mistaken for cataplexy but which has a close association with a depressive mental state. Four patients were referred to the authors with suspected neurological causes of transient weakness, including cataplexy in three cases, for whom the eventual diagnosis was of a functional or psychogenic motor disorder, related in most cases to depression. This variety of transient functional weakness is related to conditions such as nonepileptic attack disorder, persistent functional weakness, catatonia, and depressive motor retardation. These cases point to the existence of a syndrome of transient motor weakness which resembles cataplexy and has features in common with other forms of mood induced psychogenic weakness such as psychomotor retardation and catatonia. Psychogenic "pseudocataplexy" is a diagnostic consideration in patients with atypical cataplexy, especially in the context of mood disturbance. Despite its close resemblance to cataplexy, pseudocataplexy has a different pathogenesis and requires a different approach to management.

  18. Status cataplecticus as initial presentation of late onset narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Samhita

    2014-02-15

    Narcolepsy, one of the important causes of hypersomnia, is an under diagnosed sleep disorder. It has a bimodal age of onset around 15 and 35 years. It is characterized by the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic/ hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Cataplexy is by far the most predictive feature of narcolepsy. Status cataplecticus is the occurrence of cataplexy repeatedly for hours or days, a rare presentation of narcolepsy. This report describes an elderly gentleman with late onset narcolepsy in the sixth decade of life presenting with initial and chief symptom of status cataplecticus.

  19. Disease: H01293 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01293 Narcolepsy Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by irresis...tible excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, a condition triggered by strong emotions leading to a sudd

  20. Narcolepsy: Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have made considerable progress in understanding narcolepsy-cataplexy pathogenesis and in identifying genes strongly associated with the ... Stroke Information Page Todd's Paralysis Information Page NINDS Autism Spectrum Disorder Information Page Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Information ...

  1. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder in patients with narcolepsy is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Stine; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul J

    2010-01-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by dream-enacting behaviour and impaired motor inhibition during rapid eye movement sleep. Rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, but also reported in narcolepsy with cataplexy....... Most narcolepsy with cataplexy patients lack the sleep-wake, and rapid eye movement sleep, motor-regulating hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. In contrast, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder and hypocretin deficiency are rare in narcolepsy without cataplexy. We hypothesized...... that rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder coexists with cataplexy in narcolepsy due to hypocretin deficiency. In our study, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder was diagnosed by the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (2nd edition) criteria in 63 narcolepsy patients with or without...

  2. Sleep–Wake Transition in Narcolepsy and Healthy Controls Using a Support Vector Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Julie B; Sorensen, Helge B D; Kempfner, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    transformation and were given as input to a support vector machine classifier. The classification algorithm was assessed by hold-out validation and 10-fold cross-validation. The data used to validate the classifier were derived from polysomnographic recordings of 47 narcoleptic patients (33 with cataplexy and 14...... without cataplexy) and 15 healthy controls. Compared with manual scorings, an accuracy of 90% was achieved in the hold-out validation, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 95%. Sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 88%, respectively. The 10-fold cross-validation procedure...... yielded an accuracy of 88%, an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 92%, a sensitivity of 87%, and a specificity of 87%. Narcolepsy with cataplexy patients experienced significantly more sleep-wake transitions during night than did narcolepsy without cataplexy patients (P = 0...

  3. Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hallucinations , you may feel afraid or under attack. SLEEP PARALYSIS This is when you can't move your ... Antidepressant medicines can help reduce episodes of cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hallucinations. Sodium oxybate (Xyrem) works well to ...

  4. How Is Narcolepsy Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These medicines also help prevent cataplexy, hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Some prescription and over-the-counter medicines can interfere with your sleep. Ask your doctor about these medicines and how ...

  5. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataplexy (a weakness or paralysis of the muscles), sleep paralysis, and hallucinations are common symptoms of narcolepsy (Neurology Channel, 2005). Hypersomnia: Hypersomnia’s symptoms include excessive ... by extended sleep episodes or by daytime sleep episodes that occur ...

  6. Narcolepsy and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Kemlink, David; Högl, Birgit;

    2013-01-01

    In a retrospective cohort study undertaken in 12 European countries, 249 female narcoleptic patients with cataplexy (n = 216) and without cataplexy (n = 33) completed a self-administrated questionnaire regarding pregnancy and childbirth. The cohort was divided further into patients whose symptoms...... of narcolepsy started before or during pregnancy (308 pregnancies) and those in whom the first symptoms of narcolepsy appeared after delivery (106 pregnancies). Patients with narcolepsy during pregnancy were older during their first pregnancy (P ...

  7. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a ...

  8. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however, a distinct phenotype with respect to other RBD patients and characterized also by absence of gender predominance, elementary rather than complex movements, less violent behavior and earlier age at onset of motor events, and strong association to narcolepsy with cataplexy/hypocretin deficiency. Patients with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic motor activities in REM sleep and dream-enacting behavior are mostly reported in presence of cataplexy. Narcolepsy without cataplexy is a condition rarely associated with hypocretin deficiency. We proposed that hypocretin neurons are centrally involved in motor control during wakefulness and sleep in humans, and that hypocretin deficiency causes a functional defect in the motor control involved in the development of cataplexy during wakefulness and RBD/RSWA/phasic motor activity during REM sleep.

  9. Narcolepsy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akintomide GS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gbolagade Sunmaila Akintomide1, Hugh Rickards21Department of Neuropsychiatry, University of Birmingham, 2Department of Neuropsychiatry, The Barberry, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UKAbstract: Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by a classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks, cataplexy (sudden bilateral loss of muscle tone, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct groups of patients, ie, those having narcolepsy with cataplexy and those having narcolepsy without cataplexy. Narcolepsy affects 0.05% of the population. It has a negative effect on the quality of life of its sufferers and can restrict them from certain careers and activities. There have been advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. It is thought that narcolepsy with cataplexy is secondary to loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons in those genetically predisposed to the disorder by possession of human leukocyte antigen DQB1*0602. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy are based on symptoms, laboratory sleep tests, and serum levels of hypocretin. There is no cure for narcolepsy, and the present mainstay of treatment is pharmacological treatment along with lifestyle changes. Some novel treatments are also being developed and tried. This article critically appraises the evidence for diagnosis and treatment of narcolepsy.Keywords: narcolepsy, cataplexy, hypocretin, modafinil, gamma hydroxybutyrate

  10. Neuropsychological findings in childhood narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posar, Annio; Pizza, Fabio; Parmeggiani, Antonia; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-10-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a severely disabling disorder very often arising in childhood. Data on neuropsychological impairment in children are scant. We administered standardized neuropsychological tests to 13 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. Overall, our patients displayed multiple patterns of cognitive and behavioral dysfunction, and often academic failure (7 cases out of 13). All children had a normal full intelligence quotient (IQ), but 3 patients presented a significantly higher and 2 a significantly lower Verbal IQ compared to Performance IQ, respectively. Mean sleep latency was significantly correlated (P emotional symptoms and conduct problems prevailed. Childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy represents a risk factor for subtle and heterogeneous cognitive impairments potentially resulting in academic failure, despite the normal IQ. These children also have a certain psychopathological risk. All this seems to be at least partially detached from the direct effects of daytime sleepiness.

  11. Pitolisant: First Global Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Yahiya Y

    2016-09-01

    Pitolisant (Wakix™) is an inverse agonist of the histamine H3 receptor that is being developed by Bioproject. Oral pitolisant is approved in the EU for the treatment of narcolepsy with or without cataplexy in adults. Pitolisant has received a Temporary Authorization of Use in France for this indication in case of treatment failure, intolerance or contraindication to currently available treatment. Pitolisant has orphan drug designation in the EU and the USA. In the pivotal HARMONY I trial, pitolisant significantly decreased excessive daytime sleepiness versus placebo in adults with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy (primary endpoint). Pitolisant also significantly decreased cataplexy rate versus placebo in these patients. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of pitolisant leading to this first approval for narcolepsy.

  12. Genome-wide association study of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative essential hypersomnia

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Seik-Soon; Miyagawa, Taku; TOYODA, HIROMI; Yamasaki, Maria; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tanii, Hisashi; Okazaki, Yuji; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Rico, Tom; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Essential hypersomnia (EHS), a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, can be divided into two broad classes based on the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele. HLA-DQB1*06:02-positive EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy are associated with the same susceptibility genes. In contrast, there are fewer studies of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS which, we hypothesized, involves a different pathophysiological pathway than does narcolepsy with cataplexy. In order to ident...

  13. Sleep Transitions in Hypocretin-Deficient Narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by instability of sleep-wake, tonus, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep regulation. It is associated with severe hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, especially in patients with cataplexy (loss of tonus). As the hypocretin neurons coordinate and stabilize the brain......'s sleep-wake pattern, tonus, and REM flip-flop neuronal centers in animal models, we set out to determine whether hypocretin deficiency and/or cataplexy predicts the unstable sleep-wake and REM sleep pattern of the human phenotype....

  14. Integrative physiology of orexins and orexin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieda, Michihiro; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies have established that the orexin system is a critical regulator of sleep/wake states. Deficiency of orexin signaling results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy-cataplexy in humans, dogs, and rodents. These findings have brought about the possibility of novel therapies for sleep disorders including narcolepsy-cataplexy. Furthermore, accumulating evidence has indicated that the orexin system regulates sleep and wakefulness through interactions with neuronal systems that regulate emotion, reward, and energy homeostasis. This review presents and discusses the current understanding of the integrative physiology of the orexin system.

  15. The Psychosocial Problems of Children with Narcolepsy and Those with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness of Uncertain Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stores, Gregory; Montgomery, Paul; Wiggs, Luci

    2007-01-01

    Background: Narcolepsy is a predominantly rapid eye movement sleep disorder with onset usually in the second decade but often in earlier childhood. Classically it is characterized by combinations of excessive sleepiness especially sleep attacks, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. The psychosocial effects of this lifelong…

  16. Narcolepsy: immunological aspects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overeem, S.; Black, JL3rd; Lammers, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a debilitating sleep disorder with an estimated prevalence of about 0.05%. Narcolepsy is caused by a selective loss of hypocretin (orexin) producing neurons in the perifornical hypothalamus. Based on the very strong association with the HLA subtype DQB1*0602, it is curre

  17. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoi

  18. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naive Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders--A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taeko Sasai-Sakuma

    Full Text Available This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h(-1 (10.2% and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9% were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients.

  19. Narcolepsy with hypocretin/orexin deficiency, infections and autoimmunity of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Faraco, Juliette; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    The loss of hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin (hcrt) producing neurons causes narcolepsy with cataplexy. An autoimmune basis for the disease has long been suspected and recent results have greatly strengthened this hypothesis. Narcolepsy with hcrt deficiency is now known to be associated with a Human...... narcolepsy....

  20. Narcolepsy beyond sleepiness : endocrine, metabolic and other aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donjacour, Claire Elisabeth Henrica Maria

    2014-01-01

    The thesis contains a large study in which eight male hypocretin deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and eight matched controls were enrolled. Blood was sampled before and on the 5th day of SXB administration. SXB was taken 2 times 3g per night for 5 consecutive nights. Both groups underwen

  1. Narcolepsy: Autoimmunity, Effector T Cell Activation Due to Infection, or T Cell Independent, Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Induced Neuronal Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Adriano; Gast, Heidemarie; Reith, Walter; Recher, Mike; Birchler, Thomas; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2010-01-01

    Human narcolepsy with cataplexy is a neurological disorder, which develops due to a deficiency in hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus. There is a strong association with human leucocyte antigens HLA-DR2 and HLA-DQB1*0602. The disease typically starts in adolescence. Recent developments in narcolepsy research support the hypothesis of…

  2. Polysomnographic Assessment of Sleep Comorbidities in Drug-Naïve Narcolepsy-Spectrum Disorders--A Japanese Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai-Sakuma, Taeko; Kinoshita, Akihiko; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    This is a large cross-sectional study which aimed to investigate comorbidity rate, degree of sleep-related breathing disorder, polysomnigraphically diagnosible rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder/rapid eye movement sleep without atonia and periodic limb movements during sleep in Japanese drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy-spectrum disorders. A total of 158 consecutive drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 295 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 395 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time were enrolled. From retrospectively analyzed data of nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test, higher rates of periodic limb movements during sleep (> = 15 h(-1)) (10.2%) and polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (1.9%) were found in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. They had more severe periodic limb movements during sleep especially during rapid eye movement sleep and higher percentages of rapid eye movement sleep without atonia than the other two patient groups. In the present large sample study, Japanese drug naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed the highest comorbidity rates of periodic limb movements during sleep, polysomnographically diagnosable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia among those with the other narcolepsy-spectrum disorders; the rates were lower than those for Western patients.

  3. ▼Pitolisant for narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ▼Pitolisant (Wakix-Bioprojet Pharma) is a new treatment for adults with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. It was licensed for use in the EU in March last year and has orphan drug status.(1) Here, we consider the evidence for pitolisant for the treatment of narcolepsy in adults and how it fits with current management strategies.

  4. The European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN) database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatami, R.; Luca, G. De; Baumann, C.R.; Bassetti, C.L.; Bruni, O.; Canellas, F.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Rio-Villegas, R. Del; Feketeova, E.; Ferri, R.; Geisler, P.; Hogl, B.; Jennum, P.; Kornum, B.R.; Lecendreux, M.; Martins-da-Silva, A.; Mathis, J.; Mayer, G.; Paiva, T.; Partinen, M.; Peraita-Adrados, R.; Plazzi, G.; Santamaria, J.; Sonka, K.; Riha, R.; Tafti, M.; Wierzbicka, A.; Young, P.; Lammers, G.J.; Overeem, S.

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of 0.02% in European populations. Narcolepsy shares many features of rare disorders, in particular the lack of awareness of the disease with serious consequences for healthcare supply. Similar to other rare diseases, only a few

  5. Increased risk of narcolepsy in children and adults after pandemic H1N1 vaccination in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Monaca Charley, Christelle; Franco, Patricia; Drouot, Xavier; d'Ortho, Marie-Pia; Launois, Sandrine; Lignot, Séverine; Bourgin, Patrice; Nogues, Béatrice; Rey, Marc; Bayard, Sophie; Scholz, Sabine; Lavault, Sophie; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Saussier, Cristel; Pariente, Antoine

    2013-08-01

    An increased incidence of narcolepsy in children was detected in Scandinavian countries where pandemic H1N1 influenza ASO3-adjuvanted vaccine was used. A campaign of vaccination against pandemic H1N1 influenza was implemented in France using both ASO3-adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted vaccines. As part of a study considering all-type narcolepsy, we investigated the association between H1N1 vaccination and narcolepsy with cataplexy in children and adults compared with matched controls; and compared the phenotype of narcolepsy with cataplexy according to exposure to the H1N1 vaccination. Patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included from 14 expert centres in France. Date of diagnosis constituted the index date. Validation of cases was performed by independent experts using the Brighton collaboration criteria. Up to four controls were individually matched to cases according to age, gender and geographic location. A structured telephone interview was performed to collect information on medical history, past infections and vaccinations. Eighty-five cases with narcolepsy-cataplexy were included; 23 being further excluded regarding eligibility criteria. Of the 62 eligible cases, 59 (64% males, 57.6% children) could be matched with 135 control subjects. H1N1 vaccination was associated with narcolepsy-cataplexy with an odds ratio of 6.5 (2.1-19.9) in subjects agednarcolepsy-cataplexy exposed to H1N1 vaccination (n=32; mostly AS03-adjuvanted vaccine, n=28) to non-exposed cases (n=30), including shorter delay of diagnosis and a higher number of sleep onset rapid eye movement periods for exposed cases. No difference was found regarding history of infections. In this sub-analysis, H1N1 vaccination was strongly associated with an increased risk of narcolepsy-cataplexy in both children and adults in France. Even if, as in every observational study, the possibility that some biases participated in the association cannot be completely ruled out, the associations appeared robust to

  6. Depression: relationships to sleep paralysis and other sleep disturbances in a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szklo-Coxe, Mariana; Young, Terry; Finn, Laurel; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are important correlates of depression, with epidemiologic research heretofore focused on insomnia and sleepiness. This epidemiologic study's aim was to investigate, in a community sample, depression's relationships to other sleep disturbances: sleep paralysis (SP), hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations (HH), cataplexy - considered rapid eye movement-related disturbances - and automatic behavior (AB). Although typical of narcolepsy, these disturbances are prevalent, albeit under-studied, in the population. Cross-sectional analyses (1998-2002), based on Wisconsin Sleep Cohort Study population-based data from 866 participants (mean age 54, 53% male), examined: depression (Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale), trait anxiety (Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, STAI-T >or= 75th percentile), and self-reported sleep disturbances. Descriptive sleep data were obtained by overnight polysomnography. Adjusted logistic regression models estimated depression's associations with each (>few times ever) outcome - SP, HH, AB, and cataplexy. Depression's associations with self-reported SP and cataplexy were not explained by anxiety. After anxiety adjustment, severe depression (Zung >or=55), vis-à-vis Zung or=50), after stratification by anxiety given an interaction (P = 0.02), increased self-reported cataplexy odds in non-anxious (OR 8.9, P = 0.0008) but not anxious (OR 1.1, P = 0.82) participants. Insomnia and sleepiness seemed only partial mediators or confounders for depression's associations with self-reported cataplexy and SP. Anxiety (OR 1.9, P = 0.04) partially explained depression's (Zung >or=55) association with HH (OR 2.2, P = 0.08). Anxiety (OR 1.6, P = 0.02) was also more related than depression to AB. Recognizing depression's relationships to oft-neglected sleep disturbances, most notably SP, might assist in better characterizing depression and the full range of its associated sleep problems in the population. Longitudinal studies are warranted

  7. miRNA profiles in plasma from patients with sleep disorders reveal dysregulation of miRNAs in narcolepsy and other central hypersomnias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases including neurological disorders. The aim is to address the involvement of miRNAs in the pathophysiology of central hypersomnias including autoimmune narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency...... (type 1 narcolepsy), narcolepsy without cataplexy (type 2 narcolepsy), and idiopathic hypersomnia. DESIGN: We conducted high-throughput analysis of miRNA in plasma from three groups of patients-with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively-in comparison with healthy...... controls using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels. SETTING: University hospital based sleep clinic and research laboratories. PATIENTS: Twelve patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 12 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 12 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, and 12 healthy controls...

  8. A child with narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvério Macedo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Narcolepsy is a chronic disease characterized by sleep attacks, excessive daytime sleepiness and nocturnal sleep fragmentation. It can be associated cataplexy and other disturbance of REM sleep (sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations and hypnopompic. Case report: A 10-year old boy was referred to Pedopsychiatry because of behavioural disturbance, irritability, sleepiness and distraction, being interpreted as an “ill-mannered child.” After clinical evaluation and comprehensive laboratory studies we concluded that he presented narcolepsy with cataplexy. Discussion/conclusion: Patients with narcolepsy face several problems due to the disease which, if left untreated or ineffectively treated, cause embarrassing or distressing symptoms, affecting their quality of life. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to this problem since it is a rare condition and therefore seldom not recognized by the general public or even by health professionals.

  9. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder and rapid eye movement sleep without atonia in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Jennum, Poul; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare disabling hypersomnia disorder that may include cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) periods, but also disrupted nighttime sleep by nocturnal awakenings, and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is characterized...... by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinsonisms, but is also reported in narcolepsy in up to 60% of patients. RBD in patients with narcolepsy is, however...... with narcolepsy often present dissociated sleep features including RSWA, increased density of phasic chin EMG and frequent shift from REM to NREM sleep, with or without associated clinical RBD. Most patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy lack the hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Tonic and phasic...

  10. Animal models of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lichao; Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; McCarley, Robert W

    2009-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a debilitating sleep disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as its two major symptoms. Although this disease was first described about one century ago, an animal model was not available until the 1970s. With the establishment of the Stanford canine narcolepsy colony, researchers were able to conduct multiple neurochemical studies to explore the pathophysiology of this disease. It was concluded that there was an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic systems in canine narcolepsy. In 1999, two independent studies revealed that orexin neurotransmission deficiency was pivotal to the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy. This scientific leap fueled the generation of several genetically engineered mouse and rat models of narcolepsy. To facilitate further research, it is imperative that researchers reach a consensus concerning the evaluation of narcoleptic behavioral and EEG phenomenology in these models.

  11. Sleeping Beauty Gets an Eye Exam: A Case Report and Literature Review on Narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Jenna Liechty, OD

    2014-01-01

    Background: Narcolepsy, a neurological sleep disorder that affects both adults and children, is caused by the inability of the brain to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. The common tetrad of symptoms includes excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Ocular symptoms such as blurred vision, diplopia, ptosis, and ocular pain have been reported. Case Report: A ten-year-old female who was diagnosed with narcolepsy at an early age prese...

  12. Narcolepsy and Orexins: An Example of Progress in Sleep Research

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto K De La Herrán-Arita; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Drucker-Colín, René

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. It is clinically characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and by intrusions into wakefulness of physiological aspects of rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations. The major pathophysiology of narcolepsy has been recently described on the bases of the discovery of the neuropeptides named orexins (hypocretins) in...

  13. HYPOCRETIN/OREXIN AND NARCOLEPSY NEW BASIC AND CLINICAL INSIGHTS

    OpenAIRE

    Nishino, Seiji; Okuro, Masashi; Kotorii, Nozomu; ANEGAWA, Emiko; ISHIMARU, Yuji; MATSUMURA, Mari; KANBAYASHI, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Both sporadic (95%) and familial (5%) forms of narcolepsy exist in humans. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently discovered based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals; the genes involved in the pathology of the hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in huma...

  14. Narcolepsy and Orexins: An Example of Progress in Sleep Research

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto K De La Herrán-Arita; Magdalena eGuerra-Crespo; René eDrucker-Colin

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH). It is clinically characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and by intrusions into wakefulness of physiological aspects of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations. The major pathophysiology of narcolepsy has been recently described on the bases of the discovery of the neuropeptides named orexins (hypoc...

  15. Narcolepsy in pediatric age – Experience of a tertiary pediatric hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Filipa Dias Costa; Maria Inês Barreto; Vanda Clemente; Mónica Vasconcelos; Maria Helena Estêvão; Núria Madureira

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep–wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between...

  16. An inverse agonist of the histamine H(3) receptor improves wakefulness in narcolepsy: studies in orexin-/- mice and patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jian Sheng; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Bastuji, Hélène; Anaclet, Christelle; Parmentier, Régis; Kocher, Laurence; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Lehert, Philippe; Ligneau, Xavier; Perrin, David; Robert, Philippe; Roux, Michel; Lecomte, Jeanne-Marie; Schwartz, Jean-Charles

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, direct onsets of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep from wakefulness (DREMs) and deficiency of orexins, neuropeptides that promote wakefulness largely via activation of histamine (HA) pathways. The hypothesis that the orexin defect can be circumvented by enhancing HA release was explored in narcoleptic mice and patients using tiprolisant, an inverse H(3)-receptor agonist. In narcoleptic orexin(-/...

  17. Sleep disorders in neurology French consensus. Management of patients with hypersomnia: Which strategy?

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Régis; Arnulf, Isabelle; Drouot, Xavier; Lecendreux, Michel; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Available online xxx Keywords: Narcolepsy Idiopathic hypersomnia Cataplexy Excessive daytime sleepiness Treatment Stimulant Sodium oxybate Antidepressants a b s t r a c t Central hypersomnias principally involves type 1 narcolepsy (NT1), type 2 narcolepsy (NT2) and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH). Despite great progress made in understanding the phy-siopathology of NT1 with low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels, current treatment remains symptomatic. The same applies...

  18. Narcolepsie chez l'enfant : caractéristiques cliniques et approches thérapeutiques

    OpenAIRE

    Inocente, Clara Odilia

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare neurological disease and it starts, in 50% of cases, before adulthood. It is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnologic hallucinations, events that affect the psychological, social and school children. This pathophysiology is described by the loss of neurons in the posterior hypothalamus hypocretin, probably due to an autoimmune attack, and by histamine systems. Instead of narcolepsy adult, pediatric studies aren’t numerous an...

  19. Activation of the Basal Forebrain by the Orexin/Hypocretin Neurons: Orexin International Symposium

    OpenAIRE

    Arrigoni, Elda; Mochizuki, Takatoshi; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The orexin neurons play an essential role in driving arousal and in maintaining normal wakefulness. Lack of orexin neurotransmission produces a chronic state of hypoarousal characterized by excessive sleepiness, frequent transitions between wake and sleep, and episodes of cataplexy. A growing body of research now suggests that the basal forebrain (BF) may be a key site through which the orexin-producing neurons promote arousal. Here we review anatomical, pharmacological and electrophysiologic...

  20. Animal Models of Narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lichao; Brown, Ritchie E.; McKenna, James T.; McCarley, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a debilitating sleep disorder with excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy as its two major symptoms. Although this disease was first described about one century ago, an animal model was not available until the 1970s. With the establishment of the Stanford canine narcolepsy colony, researchers were able to conduct multiple neurochemical studies to explore the pathophysiology of this disease. It was concluded that there was an imbalance between monoaminergic and cholinergic sy...

  1. The hypocretin/orexin system in sleep disorders: preclinical insights and clinical progress

    OpenAIRE

    Chow M; Cao M

    2016-01-01

    Matthew Chow, Michelle CaoDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Much of the understanding of the hypocretin/orexin (HCRT/OX) system in sleep–wake regulation came from narcolepsy–cataplexy research. The neuropeptides hypocretin-1 and -2/orexin-A and -B (HCRT-1 and -2/OX-A and -B, respectively), as we know, are intimately involved in the regulation wakefulness. The HCRT...

  2. Conditional ablation of orexin/hypocretin neurons: a new mouse model for the study of narcolepsy and orexin system function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Sawako; Tsunematsu, Tomomi; Black, Sarah W; Tominaga, Makoto; Maruyama, Megumi; Takagi, Kazuyo; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Takeshi; Kilduff, Thomas S; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    2014-05-07

    The sleep disorder narcolepsy results from loss of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. Although narcolepsy onset is usually postpubertal, current mouse models involve loss of either orexin peptides or orexin neurons from birth. To create a model of orexin/hypocretin deficiency with closer fidelity to human narcolepsy, diphtheria toxin A (DTA) was expressed in orexin neurons under control of the Tet-off system. Upon doxycycline removal from the diet of postpubertal orexin-tTA;TetO DTA mice, orexin neurodegeneration was rapid, with 80% cell loss within 7 d, and resulted in disrupted sleep architecture. Cataplexy, the pathognomic symptom of narcolepsy, occurred by 14 d when ∼5% of the orexin neurons remained. Cataplexy frequency increased for at least 11 weeks after doxycycline. Temporary doxycycline removal followed by reintroduction after several days enabled partial lesion of orexin neurons. DTA-induced orexin neurodegeneration caused a body weight increase without a change in food consumption, mimicking metabolic aspects of human narcolepsy. Because the orexin/hypocretin system has been implicated in the control of metabolism and addiction as well as sleep/wake regulation, orexin-tTA; TetO DTA mice are a novel model in which to study these functions, for pharmacological studies of cataplexy, and to study network reorganization as orexin input is lost.

  3. Polymorphism located between CPT1B and CHKB, and HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype confer susceptibility to CNS hypersomnias (essential hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Miyagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SNP rs5770917 located between CPT1B and CHKB, and HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype were previously identified as susceptibility loci for narcolepsy with cataplexy. This study was conducted in order to investigate whether these genetic markers are associated with Japanese CNS hypersomnias (essential hypersomnia: EHS other than narcolepsy with cataplexy. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: EHS was significantly associated with SNP rs5770917 (P(allele = 3.6x10(-3; OR = 1.56; 95% c.i.: 1.12-2.15 and HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype (P(positivity = 9.2x10(-11; OR = 3.97; 95% c.i.: 2.55-6.19. No interaction between the two markers (SNP rs5770917 and HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype was observed in EHS. CONCLUSION: CPT1B, CHKB and HLA are candidates for susceptibility to CNS hypersomnias (EHS, as well as narcolepsy with cataplexy.

  4. Gray Matter Concentration Abnormality in Brains of Narcolepsy Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sung Tae; Hong, Seung Bong [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To investigate gray matter concentration changes in the brains of narcoleptic patients. Twenty-nine narcoleptic patient with cataplexy and 29 age and sex-matched normal subjects (mean age, 31 years old) underwent volumetric MRIs. The MRIs were spatially normalized to a standard T1 template and subdivided into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). These segmented images were then smoothed using a 12-mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) isotropic Gaussian kernel. An optimized voxel-based morphometry protocol was used to analyze brain tissue concentrations using SPM2 (statistical parametric mapping). A one-way analysis of variance was applied to the concentration analysis of gray matter images. Narcoleptics with cataplexy showed reduced gray matter concentration in bilateral thalami, left gyrus rectus, bilateral frontopolar gyri, bilateral short insular gyri, bilateral superior frontal gyri, and right superior temporal and left inferior temporal gyri compared to normal subjects (uncorrected p < 0.001). Furthermore, small volume correction revealed gray matter concentration reduction in bilateral nuclei accumbens, hypothalami, and thalami (false discovery rate corrected p < 0.05). Gray matter concentration reductions were observed in brain regions related to excessive daytime sleepiness, cognition, attention, and memory in narcoleptics with cataplexy

  5. French consensus. Management of patients with hypersomnia: Which strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R; Arnulf, I; Drouot, X; Lecendreux, M; Dauvilliers, Y

    Central hypersomnias principally involves type 1 narcolepsy (NT1), type 2 narcolepsy (NT2) and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH). Despite great progress made in understanding the physiopathology of NT1 with low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels, current treatment remains symptomatic. The same applies to NT2 and IH, for which the physiopathology is still largely unknown. Controlling excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and disturbed night-time sleep are key therapeutic targets in NT1. For IH and NT2, reducing EDS is the main objective. Based on European and American directives for the treatment of narcolepsy, we propose French recommendations for managing central hypersomnias as well as strategies in the case of drug-resistance. Stimulating treatments target EDS, and Modafinil is the first-line treatment. Other stimulants such as methylphenidate, pitolisant, and exceptionally dextro-amphetamine can be prescribed. Selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor antidepressants are effective for the management of cataplexy in NT1. Sodium oxybate is an effective treatment for several symptoms, including EDS, cataplexy and disturbed night-time sleep. Treatment of central hypersomnia must also take into consideration frequent cardiovascular, metabolic and psychiatric comorbidities, particularly in NT1. New therapies are currently under study with the development of new stimulants and anti-cataplectics. The next few years will see innovative emerging therapies, based on a physiopathological approach, aiming to restore hypocretinergic transmission or to interrupt the autoimmune processes causing the loss of hypocretin neurons.

  6. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a single drug that targets several symptoms, or multiple medications that each treats a specific symptom. In recent years, narcolepsy treatment has changed with the widespread use of modafinil/armodafinil for daytime sleepiness, antidepressants (selective serotonin and dual serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) for cataplexy, and sodium oxybate for both symptoms. Other psychostimulants can also be used, such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and rarely amphetamines, as third-line therapy. Importantly, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness are required to monitor the treatment efficacy and to provide guidance on whether the treatment goals are met. Associated symptoms and comorbid conditions, such as hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, REM- and non REM-related parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea, should also be taken into account and managed, if required. In the near future, the efficacy of new wake-promoting drugs, anticataplectic agents, hypocretin replacement therapy and immunotherapy at the early stages of the disease should also be evaluated.

  7. Narcolepsy: etiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta B. Zawilska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available [u][/u] Narcolepsy is a chronic hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and manifestations of disrupted rapid eye movement sleep stage (cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations. Mechanisms underlying narcolepsy are not fully understood. Experimental data indicate that the disease is caused by a loss of hypocretin neurons in the hypothalamus, likely due to an autoimmune process triggered by environmental factors in susceptible individuals. Most patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy have very low hypocretin-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. An appropriate clinical history, polysomnogram, and multiple sleep latency test are necessary for diagnosis of the disease. Additionally, two biological markers, i.e., cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels and expression of the DQB1*0602 gene, are used. The treatment of narcolepsy is aimed at the different symptoms that the patient manifests. Excessive daytime sleepiness is treated with psychostimulants (amphetamine-like, modafinil and armodafinil. Cataplexy is treated with sodium oxybate (GHB, tricyclic antidepressants, or selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors. Sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and fragmented sleep may be treated with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy should follow proper sleep hygiene and avoid strong emotions.

  8. Narcolepsy Following Yellow Fever Vaccination: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosch, Richard E; Farquhar, Michael; Gringras, Paul; Pal, Deb K

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the pediatric age group probably linked to the use of the Pandemrix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can "trigger" narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population. Here, we describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM) latency of 47 min, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 min with sleep onset REM in four out of four nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder.

  9. Selective REM sleep deprivation in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Manh Hoang; Hurni, Christoph; Mathis, Johannes; Roth, Corinne; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2011-03-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities, including cataplexy. The aim of this study was to assess REM sleep pressure and homeostasis in narcolepsy. Six patients with narcolepsy and six healthy controls underwent a REM sleep deprivation protocol, including one habituation, one baseline, two deprivation nights (D1, D2) and one recovery night. Multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs) were performed during the day after baseline and after D2. During D1 and D2 REM sleep was prevented by awakening the subjects at the first polysomnographic signs of REM sleep for 2 min. Mean sleep latency and number of sleep-onset REM periods (SOREMs) were determined on all MSLT. More interventions were required to prevent REM sleep in narcoleptics compared with control subjects during D1 (57 ± 16 versus 24 ± 10) and D2 (87 ± 22 versus 35 ± 8, P = 0.004). Interventions increased from D1 to D2 by 46% in controls and by 53% in narcoleptics (P REM sleep deprivation was successful in both controls (mean reduction of REM to 6% of baseline) and narcoleptics (11%). Both groups had a reduction of total sleep time during the deprivation nights (P = 0.03). Neither group had REM sleep rebound in the recovery night. Narcoleptics had, however, an increase in the number of SOREMs on MSLT (P = 0.005). There was no increase in the number of cataplexies after selective REM sleep deprivation. We conclude that: (i) REM sleep pressure is higher in narcoleptics; (ii) REM sleep homeostasis is similar in narcoleptics and controls; (iii) in narcoleptics selective REM sleep deprivation may have an effect on sleep propensity but not on cataplexy.

  10. Genome-wide association study of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative essential hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Seik-Soon; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Maria; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Tanii, Hisashi; Okazaki, Yuji; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Rico, Tom; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2013-01-01

    Essential hypersomnia (EHS), a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, can be divided into two broad classes based on the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele. HLA-DQB1*06:02-positive EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy are associated with the same susceptibility genes. In contrast, there are fewer studies of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS which, we hypothesized, involves a different pathophysiological pathway than does narcolepsy with cataplexy. In order to identify susceptibility genes associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 125 unrelated Japanese EHS patients lacking the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele and 562 Japanese healthy controls. A comparative study was also performed on 268 HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative Caucasian hypersomnia patients and 1761 HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative Caucasian healthy controls. We identified three SNPs that each represented a unique locus- rs16826005 (P = 1.02E-07; NCKAP5), rs11854769 (P = 6.69E-07; SPRED1), and rs10988217 (P = 3.43E-06; CRAT) that were associated with an increased risk of EHS in this Japanese population. Interestingly, rs10988217 showed a similar tendency in its association with both HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS and narcolepsy with cataplexy in both Japanese and Caucasian populations. This is the first GWAS of HLA-DQB1*06:02 negative EHS, and the identification of these three new susceptibility loci should provide additional insights to the pathophysiological pathway of this condition.

  11. Hypocretin-2 saporin lesions of the ventrolateral periaquaductal gray (vlPAG increase REM sleep in hypocretin knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satvinder Kaur

    Full Text Available Ten years ago the sleep disorder narcolepsy was linked to the neuropeptide hypocretin (HCRT, also known as orexin. This disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, inappropriate triggering of rapid-eye movement (REM sleep and cataplexy, which is a sudden loss of muscle tone during waking. It is still not known how HCRT regulates REM sleep or muscle tone since HCRT neurons are localized only in the lateral hypothalamus while REM sleep and muscle atonia are generated from the brainstem. To identify a potential neuronal circuit, the neurotoxin hypocretin-2-saporin (HCRT2-SAP was used to lesion neurons in the ventral lateral periaquaductal gray (vlPAG. The first experiment utilized hypocretin knock-out (HCRT-ko mice with the expectation that deletion of both HCRT and its target neurons would exacerbate narcoleptic symptoms. Indeed, HCRT-ko mice (n = 8 given the neurotoxin HCRT2-SAP (16.5 ng/23nl/sec each side in the vlPAG had levels of REM sleep and sleep fragmentation that were considerably higher compared to HCRT-ko given saline (+39%; n = 7 or wildtype mice (+177%; n = 9. However, cataplexy attacks did not increase, nor were levels of wake or non-REM sleep changed. Experiment 2 determined the effects in mice where HCRT was present but the downstream target neurons in the vlPAG were deleted by the neurotoxin. This experiment utilized an FVB-transgenic strain of mice where eGFP identifies GABA neurons. We verified this and also determined that eGFP neurons were immunopositive for the HCRT-2 receptor. vlPAG lesions in these mice increased REM sleep (+79% versus saline controls and it was significantly correlated (r = 0.89 with loss of eGFP neurons. These results identify the vlPAG as one site that loses its inhibitory control over REM sleep, but does not cause cataplexy, as a result of hypocretin deficiency.

  12. Type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Matilda; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with unintentional sleep attacks and cataplexy. The disorder is caused by a loss of hypocretinergic neurons in the brain. The specific loss of these neurons in narcolepsy is thought to result from an autoimmune...... attack, and this is supported by evidence of both environmental and genetic factors pointing toward an involvement of the immune system. However, definitive proof of an autoimmune etiology is still missing. Several different immune-mediated disorders targeting neurons are known, and many...

  13. Mutations in DNMT1 cause autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkelmann, Juliane; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia, deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) is characterized by late onset (30-40 years old) cerebellar ataxia, sensory neuronal deafness, narcolepsy-cataplexy and dementia. We performed exome sequencing in five individuals from three ADCA-DN kindreds and identified DNMT.......GLY605Ala mutation was subsequently identified. Narcolepsy and deafness were the first symptoms to appear in all pedigrees, followed by ataxia. DNMT1 is a widely expressed DNA methyltransferase maintaining methylation patterns in development, and mediating transcriptional repression by direct binding...

  14. Characteristics of rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Frandsen, Rune Asger Vestergaard; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream-enacting behavior and impaired motor inhibition during REM sleep (REM sleep without atonia, RSWA). RBD is commonly associated with Parkinsonian disorders, but is also reported in narcolepsy. Most patients...... of hypocretin deficiency. Thus, hypocretin deficiency is linked to the two major disturbances of REM sleep motor regulation in narcolepsy: RBD and cataplexy. Moreover, it is likely that hypocretin deficiency independently predicts periodic limb movements in REM and NREM sleep, probably via involvement...

  15. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response.

  16. A new DRB1*1202 allele (DRB1*12022) found in association with DQA1*0102 and DQB1*0602 in two Black narcoleptic subjects

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    Behar, E.; Grumet, F.C. [Stanford Univ. Blood Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Lin, X.; Mignot, E. [Stanford Univ. Sleep Disorders Center, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    DQB1*0602 is a better genetic marker than DR2 for narcolepsy susceptibility across all ethnic groups; for instance, only 75% of African American narcoleptics are DR2+ compared with 96% DQB1*0602+. We studied DRB1 genes of DR2- but DQB1*0602+ African American patients with cataplexy and observed two with an unusual DR12, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0602 haplotype; a new allelic variant of DRB1*1202 has been designated DRB*12022. 8 refs.

  17. New developments in the management of narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad VC

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Vivien C Abad, Christian Guilleminault Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University Outpatient Center, Redwood City, CA, USA Abstract: Narcolepsy is a life-long, underrecognized sleep disorder that affects 0.02%–0.18% of the US and Western European populations. Genetic predisposition is suspected because of narcolepsy’s strong association with HLA DQB1*06-02, and genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in T-cell receptor loci. Narcolepsy pathophysiology is linked to loss of signaling by hypocretin-producing neurons; an autoimmune etiology possibly triggered by some environmental agent may precipitate hypocretin neuronal loss. Current treatment modalities alleviate the main symptoms of excessive daytime somnolence (EDS and cataplexy and, to a lesser extent, reduce nocturnal sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Sodium oxybate (SXB, a sodium salt of γ hydroxybutyric acid, is a first-line agent for cataplexy and EDS and may help sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Various antidepressant medications including norepinephrine serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants are second-line agents for treating cataplexy. In addition to SXB, modafinil and armodafinil are first-line agents to treat EDS. Second-line agents for EDS are stimulants such as methylphenidate and extended-release amphetamines. Emerging therapies include non-hypocretin-based therapy, hypocretin-based treatments, and immunotherapy to prevent hypocretin neuronal death. Non-hypocretin-based novel treatments for narcolepsy include pitolisant (BF2.649, tiprolisant; JZP-110 (ADX-N05 for EDS in adults; JZP 13-005 for children; JZP-386, a deuterated sodium oxybate oral suspension; FT 218 an extended-release formulation of SXB; and JNJ-17216498, a new formulation of modafinil. Clinical trials are

  18. Orexins and orexin receptors: from molecules to integrative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Taizo; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated the orexin system as a critical regulator of sleep/wake states, feeding behavior, and reward processes. Orexin deficiency results in narcolepsy-cataplexy in humans, dogs, and rodents, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for maintenance of wakefulness. Orexin agonists and antagonists are thought to be promising avenues toward the treatment of sleep disorders, eating disorders, and drug addiction. In this chapter, we discuss the current understanding of the physiological roles of orexins in regulation of arousal, sleep/wake states, energy homeostasis, and reward systems.

  19. Successful treatment of post-traumatic narcolepsy with methylphenidate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, G E; Ivanhoe, C B

    1996-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sequela of brain injury. We report the case of a 27-yr-old male with post-traumatic narcolepsy who was successfully treated with methylphenidate. This patient sustained moderate brain injury from a motorcycle accident. Subsequently, he manifested the classic tetrad of narcolepsy: cataplexy, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, and hypnogogic hallucinations. There was no premorbid seizure or sleep disorder. There was no family history of sleep disorders. Polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test confirmed the diagnosis of narcolepsy. Sleep latency (time to sleep onset), rapid eye movement sleep latency (time from sleep onset to rapid eye movement sleep onset), and mean multiple sleep latency were all pathologically shortened (2.5, 66, and 1.2 min, respectively). Twenty-four hour electroencephalographic monitoring and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal, as were serum chemistries. Treatment with caffeine was unsuccessful. He was then started on methylphenidate, 10 mg twice daily, which was increased to 30 mg twice daily over a 4-mo period. Cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness started to improve 1 mo after adjustments in methylphenidate dosing. Six months after the initiation of methylphenidate therapy, the patient is completely asymptomatic.

  20. Clinical and Genetic Characteristics of Mexican Patients with Juvenile Presentation of Niemann-Pick Type C Disease

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    Raul E. Piña-Aguilar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC is a rare lysosomal disease with a protean presentation, ranging from a fatal neonatal course with visceromegaly to an adult presentation with only neurological or psychiatric symptomatology. In this report we describe the genetic and clinical characteristics of 3 Mexican patients from different families with juvenile presentation of NPC. Clinical examination, imaging of central nervous and gastrointestinal system, and EEG were performed. Genetic studies include sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of NPC1 and NPC2 genes. All patients presented with cognitive impairment, ataxia, and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy; one case had gelastic cataplexy. Also they developed epilepsy and cortical atrophy and two patients had thinning of corpus callosum. The 3 patients were compound heterozygotes for NPC1 sequence variants, including 5 missense and 1 nonsense mutations: p.P1007A and p.F1087L in Case 1; p.Q921P and p.G992R in Case 2; and p.R348* and p.V1165M in case 3. Mexican patients with juvenile NPC presented with a variable clinical phenotype and compound heterozygosity. This suggests a relative high frequency of mutation carriers as it is reported for European population. Consequently, clinicians should consider NPC as a diagnosis possibility in any adolescent or young adult patient with juvenile dementia and/or ataxia, even in absence of gelastic cataplexy and supranuclear vertical gaze palsy.

  1. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy.

  2. Clinical effect of venlafaxine combined with methylphenidate hydrochloride on narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Bin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the clinical effect of venlafaxine sustained-release capsules combined with methylphenidate hydrochloride tablets on narcolepsy. Thirty-eight cases of narcoleptic patients were randomly divided into venlafaxine combined with methylphenidate hydrochloride treatment group (observation group, N = 19 and methylphenidate hydrochloride and clomipramine treatment group (control group, N = 19. After a total of 12-week treatment, clinical curative effect and adverse drug reactions were observed in 2 groups of patients. The results showed that effective rate of the treatment for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS in observation group was higher than that of the control group (15/19 vs 8/19, P = 0.044, and effective rate of the treatment for cataplexy in observation group was higher than that of the control group (13/19 vs 6/19, P = 0.048. The rate of adverse drug reactions in observation group was lower than that in the control group (χ2 = 8.889, P = 0.003. It was indicated that venlafaxine combined with methylphenidate had good curative effect on narcolepsy with EDS and cataplexy symptoms.

  3. REM sleep at its core—Circuits, neurotransmitters and pathophysiology

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    John ePeever

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available REM sleep is generated and maintained by the interaction of a variety of neurotransmitter systems in the brainstem, forebrain and hypothalamus. Within these circuits lies a core region that is active during REM sleep, known as the subcoeruleus nucleus (SubC or sublaterodorsal nucleus. It is hypothesized that glutamatergic SubC neurons regulate REM sleep and its defining features such as muscle paralysis and cortical activation. REM sleep paralysis is initiated when glutamatergic SubC activate neurons in the ventral medial medulla (VMM, which causes release of GABA and glycine onto skeletal motoneurons. REM sleep timing is controlled by activity of GABAergic neurons in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG and dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi as well as melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH neurons in the hypothalamus and cholinergic cells in the laterodorsal (LDT and pedunculo-pontine tegmentum (PPT in the brainstem. Determining how these circuits interact with the SubC is important because breakdown in their communication is hypothesized to underlie cataplexy/narcolepsy and REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD. This review synthesizes our current understanding of mechanisms generating healthy REM sleep and how dysfunction of these circuits contributes to common REM sleep disorders such as cataplexy/narcolepsy and RBD.

  4. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system.

  5. Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    The central disorders of hypersomnolence are characterized by severe daytime sleepiness, which is present despite normal quality and timing of nocturnal sleep. Recent reclassification distinguishes three main subtypes: narcolepsy type 1, narcolepsy type 2, and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), which are the focus of this review. Narcolepsy type 1 results from loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons, while the pathophysiology underlying narcolepsy type 2 and IH remains to be fully elucidated. Treatment of all three disorders focuses on the management of sleepiness, with additional treatment of cataplexy in those patients with narcolepsy type 1. Sleepiness can be treated with modafinil/armodafinil or sympathomimetic CNS stimulants, which have been shown to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy and, quite recently, IH. In those patients with narcolepsy type 1, sodium oxybate is effective for the treatment of both sleepiness and cataplexy. Despite these treatments, there remains a subset of hypersomnolent patients with persistent sleepiness, in whom alternate therapies are needed. Emerging treatments for sleepiness include histamine H3 antagonists (eg, pitolisant) and possibly negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor (eg, clarithromycin and flumazenil). PMID:26149554

  6. Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence: Focus on the Narcolepsies and Idiopathic Hypersomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Zeeshan; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2015-07-01

    The central disorders of hypersomnolence are characterized by severe daytime sleepiness, which is present despite normal quality and timing of nocturnal sleep. Recent reclassification distinguishes three main subtypes: narcolepsy type 1, narcolepsy type 2, and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), which are the focus of this review. Narcolepsy type 1 results from loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons, while the pathophysiology underlying narcolepsy type 2 and IH remains to be fully elucidated. Treatment of all three disorders focuses on the management of sleepiness, with additional treatment of cataplexy in those patients with narcolepsy type 1. Sleepiness can be treated with modafinil/armodafinil or sympathomimetic CNS stimulants, which have been shown to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy and, quite recently, IH. In those patients with narcolepsy type 1, sodium oxybate is effective for the treatment of both sleepiness and cataplexy. Despite these treatments, there remains a subset of hypersomnolent patients with persistent sleepiness, in whom alternate therapies are needed. Emerging treatments for sleepiness include histamine H3 antagonists (eg, pitolisant) and possibly negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor (eg, clarithromycin and flumazenil).

  7. [MANAGEMENT OF CENTRAL HYPERSOMNIAS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Lopez, Régis

    2016-06-01

    Central hypersomnias include narcolepsy type 1, type 2 and idiopathic hypersomnia with daytime sleepiness excessive in the foreground of the clinical symptoms. Despite major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of the narcolepsy type 1 with a low level of hypocretin-1 in cerebrospinal fluid, its current management is only symptomatic. The current management is also only symptomatic for type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia with an unknown pathophysiology. Treatment options may vary from a single drug targeting several symptoms or several drugs treating a specific symptom. The treatment of daytime sleepiness is based on modafinil in first intention. Other psychostimulants such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and exceptionally dextro-amfetamine may be considered. In narcolepsy type 1, antidepressants such as inhibitors of the reuptake of serotonin and noradrenaline will be considered to improve cataplexy. Sodium oxybate is an effective treatment on sleepiness, cataplexy and bad night sleep in narcolepsy. The management for other symptoms or comorbidities should be considered it necessary such as hallucinations, sleep paralysis, the disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, cardiovascular disease and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Important therapeutic perspectives are to be expected concerning new psychostimulant and anticataplectiques, but mainly on immune-based therapies administered as early as possible after disease onset and on hypocretin replacement therapy for patients with severe symptoms.

  8. The hypocretin/orexin system in sleep disorders: preclinical insights and clinical progress

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    Chow M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Matthew Chow, Michelle CaoDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Division of Sleep Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USAAbstract: Much of the understanding of the hypocretin/orexin (HCRT/OX system in sleep–wake regulation came from narcolepsy–cataplexy research. The neuropeptides hypocretin-1 and -2/orexin-A and -B (HCRT-1 and -2/OX-A and -B, respectively, as we know, are intimately involved in the regulation wakefulness. The HCRT/OX system regulates sleep–wake control through complex interactions between monoaminergic/cholinergic (wake-promoting and gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic (sleep-promoting neuronal systems. Deficiency of HCRT/OX results in loss of sleep–wake control or stability with consequent unstable transitions between wakefulness to nonrapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep. This manifests clinically as abnormal daytime sleepiness with sleep attacks and cataplexy. Research on the development of HCRT/OX agonists and antagonists for the treatment of sleep disorders has dramatically increased with the US Food and Drug Administration approval of the first-in-class dual HCRT/OX receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia. This review focuses on the origin, mechanisms of HCRT/OX receptors, clinical progress, and applications for the treatment of sleep disorders.Keywords: hypocretin, orexin, narcolepsy, insomnia, orexin antagonist, orexin agonist

  9. Prevalence of the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia patients seen at a sleep disorders outpatient unit in São Paulo Prevalência do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 em pacientes com narcolepsia e hipersonolência idiopática atendidos em ambulatório de sonolência em São Paulo

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    Fernando Morgadinho Santos Coelho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Narcolepsy (with and without cataplexy and idiopathic hypersomnia, are disorders with common features but with different HLA-DQB1*0602 allele prevalence. The present study describes the prevalence of HLA-DQB1*0602 allele in narcoleptics with and without cataplexy and in patients with idiopathic hypersomnia. METHOD: Subjects comprised 68 patients who were diagnosed for narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia and 23 healthy controls according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2. Subjects comprised 43 patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy, 11 patients with narcolepsy but without cataplexy, 14 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia and 23 healthy controls. Genotyping of HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was performed for all subjects. RESULTS: The prevalence of the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was increased in idiopathic hypersomnia and in narcoleptic patients with and without cataplexy when compared to healthy subjects (p = 0.04; p = 0.03 and p OBJETIVO: Narcolepsia (com e sem cataplexia e hipersonolência idiopática são transtornos com características clínicas comuns, mas com prevalências do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 diferentes. Este estudo descreve a prevalência do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 em pacientes narcolépticos com e sem cataplexia e em pacientes com hipersonolência idiopática. MÉTODO: A amostra consistiu de 68 pacientes com diagnóstico de narcolepsia ou hipersonolência idiopática e 23 controles saudáveis segundo o International Classification of Sleep Disorders-2. A amostra foi composta de 43 pacientes com narcolepsia e cataplexia, 11 pacientes com narcolepsia e sem cataplexia, 14 pacientes com hipersonolência idiopática e 23 controles saudáveis. A análise da presença do alelo HLA-DQ*0602 foi realizada em todos os sujeitos. RESULTADOS: A prevalência do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 foi maior nos grupos de pacientes com hipersonolência idiopática e em pacientes narcolépticos com e sem cataplexia quando comparada com a dos sujeitos

  10. Diretrizes brasileiras para o diagnóstico de narcolepsia Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis of narcolepsy

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    Flávio Alóe

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo relata as conclusões da reunião de consenso com médicos especialistas sobre diagnóstico de narcolepsia baseada na revisão dos artigos sobre narcolepsia listados no Medline entre 1980 e 2010. A narcolepsia é uma doença crônica de início entre a primeira e segunda décadas de vida do indivíduo. Os sintomas essenciais são cataplexia e sonolência excessiva. A cataplexia é definida como episódios súbitos, recorrentes e reversíveis de fraqueza da musculatura esquelética desencadeados por situações de conteúdo emocional. Os sintomas acessórios são alucinações hipnagógicas, paralisia do sono e sono fragmentado. Critérios de diagnóstico clínico de acordo com a Classificação Internacional dos Transtornos do Sono são de sonolência excessiva e cataplexia. Recomenda-se a realização de polissonografia seguida do teste de latência múltipla do sono em um laboratório de sono para confirmação e diagnóstico de comorbidades. Quando não houver cataplexia, deve haver duas ou mais sonecas com sono REM no teste de latência múltipla do sono. Tipagem HLA-DQB1*0602 positiva com níveis de hipocretina-1 abaixo de 110pg/mL devem estar presentes para o diagnóstico de narcolepsia sem cataplexia e sem sonecas com sono REM.This manuscript contains the conclusion of the consensus meeting on the diagnosis of narcolepsy based on the review of Medline publications between 1980-2010. Narcolepsy is a chronic disorder with age at onset between the first and second decade of life. Essential narcolepsy symptoms are cataplexy and excessive sleepiness. Cataplexy is defined as sudden, recurrent and reversible attacks of muscle weakness triggered by emotions. Accessory narcolepsy symptoms are hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and nocturnal fragmented sleep. The clinical diagnosis according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders is the presence of excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. A full in-lab polysomnography

  11. Narcolepsia Narcolepsy

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    Fernando Morgadinho Santos Coelho

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Narcolepsia é uma síndrome neurológica crônica com prevalência entre 0,018% e 0,040% da população, sem diferenciações étnicas importantes. Caracteriza-se por sonolência e cataplexia. A fisiopatologia da doença não é totalmente conhecida, embora possua marcador genético (alelo HLA DQB1 *0602 e anormalidades na neurotransmissão de hipocretina descritos recentemente. OBJETIVOS: Resumir as recentes descobertas na narcolepsia e expor possibilidades diagnósticas e terapêuticas. METODOLOGIA: Revisão bibliográfica. RESULTADOS E DISCUSSÃO: O diagnóstico deve seguir os critérios da Classificação Internacional de Sono. A dosagem de hipocretina é o melhor exame para confirmar narcolepsia em pacientes com cataplexia típica. O tratamento deve ser realizado com medidas comportamentais e drogas sintomáticas que promovem a vigília e controlam a cataplexia. Diagnósticos diferenciais como esquizofrenia, epilepsia, depressão e doenças do sono devem ser descartados.BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological syndrome with prevalence between 0.018% and 0.040% without important ethnic differences. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. The pathophysiology of the illness is not known; even so it possesses genetic marker (allele HLA DQB1 *0602 and with abnormalities in the neurotransmission of hypocretin has been described in patients with narcolepsy. OBJECTIVES: Resume news discoveries in narcolepsy and show diagnoses and treatment options. METHODS: Bibliographic review. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The diagnoses of narcolepsy must be done with The International Classification of Sleep Disorders criteria. The hypocretin dosage is the best exam to confirm diagnose in narcoleptic patients with typical cataplexy. The treatment is carried through with behavior actions and symptomatic drugs that promote the vigil and control the cataplexy. Differential diagnoses as schizophrenia, epilepsy

  12. Niemann-Pick disease type C

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    Vanier Marie T

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Niemann-Pick C disease (NP-C is a neurovisceral atypical lysosomal lipid storage disorder with an estimated minimal incidence of 1/120 000 live births. The broad clinical spectrum ranges from a neonatal rapidly fatal disorder to an adult-onset chronic neurodegenerative disease. The neurological involvement defines the disease severity in most patients but is typically preceded by systemic signs (cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period or isolated spleno- or hepatosplenomegaly in infancy or childhood. The first neurological symptoms vary with age of onset: delay in developmental motor milestones (early infantile period, gait problems, falls, clumsiness, cataplexy, school problems (late infantile and juvenile period, and ataxia not unfrequently following initial psychiatric disturbances (adult form. The most characteristic sign is vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. The neurological disorder consists mainly of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and progressive dementia. Cataplexy, seizures and dystonia are other common features. NP-C is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations of either the NPC1 (95% of families or the NPC2 genes. The exact functions of the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins are still unclear. NP-C is currently described as a cellular cholesterol trafficking defect but in the brain, the prominently stored lipids are gangliosides. Clinical examination should include comprehensive neurological and ophthalmological evaluations. The primary laboratory diagnosis requires living skin fibroblasts to demonstrate accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in perinuclear vesicles (lysosomes after staining with filipin. Pronounced abnormalities are observed in about 80% of the cases, mild to moderate alterations in the remainder ("variant" biochemical phenotype. Genotyping of patients is useful to confirm the diagnosis in the latter patients and essential for future prenatal diagnosis. The differential

  13. Niemann-Pick disease type C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanier, Marie T

    2010-06-03

    Niemann-Pick C disease (NP-C) is a neurovisceral atypical lysosomal lipid storage disorder with an estimated minimal incidence of 1/120,000 live births. The broad clinical spectrum ranges from a neonatal rapidly fatal disorder to an adult-onset chronic neurodegenerative disease. The neurological involvement defines the disease severity in most patients but is typically preceded by systemic signs (cholestatic jaundice in the neonatal period or isolated spleno- or hepatosplenomegaly in infancy or childhood). The first neurological symptoms vary with age of onset: delay in developmental motor milestones (early infantile period), gait problems, falls, clumsiness, cataplexy, school problems (late infantile and juvenile period), and ataxia not unfrequently following initial psychiatric disturbances (adult form). The most characteristic sign is vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. The neurological disorder consists mainly of cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, dysphagia, and progressive dementia. Cataplexy, seizures and dystonia are other common features. NP-C is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations of either the NPC1 (95% of families) or the NPC2 genes. The exact functions of the NPC1 and NPC2 proteins are still unclear. NP-C is currently described as a cellular cholesterol trafficking defect but in the brain, the prominently stored lipids are gangliosides. Clinical examination should include comprehensive neurological and ophthalmological evaluations. The primary laboratory diagnosis requires living skin fibroblasts to demonstrate accumulation of unesterified cholesterol in perinuclear vesicles (lysosomes) after staining with filipin. Pronounced abnormalities are observed in about 80% of the cases, mild to moderate alterations in the remainder ("variant" biochemical phenotype). Genotyping of patients is useful to confirm the diagnosis in the latter patients and essential for future prenatal diagnosis. The differential diagnosis may include

  14. Narcolepsia: actualización en etiología, manifestaciones clínicas y tratamiento Narcolepsy: update on etiology, clinical features and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Pabón

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La narcolepsia es una enfermedad que consiste en una alteración en la generación y organización del sueño. Los principales síntomas son la excesiva somnolencia diurna y la cataplejía así como las alucinaciones hipnagógicas, parálisis del sueño y fragmentación del sueño nocturno. La prevalencia de la narcolepsia típica oscila entre el 25 y 50 por cada 100.000 habitantes. Recientemente se ha observado un pico de incidencia en pacientes nacidos en el mes de marzo. Según la nueva clasificación, el test de latencias múltiples de sueño (TLMS es imprescindible para el diagnóstico de narcolepsia sin cataplejía y aconsejable para el diagnóstico de la narcolepsia típica. Hasta ahora se trataban de forma independiente los síntomas, aunque actualmente las más recientes directrices de tratamiento proponen nuevos fármacos que actúan en todo el grupo de síntomas de forma global. La aplicación de nuevos criterios diagnósticos y terapéuticos permitirá un diagnóstico precoz y mejores opciones de tratamiento en esta patología.Narcolepsy is a disease that involves an alteration in the generation and organisation of sleep. The main symptoms are excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, followed by hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and disrupted nocturnal sleep. The prevalence of typical narcolepsy oscillates between 25-50: 100.000 in general. Recently there has been a peak incidence in patients born in the month of March. According to the new classification, the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT is mandatory for diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy, and advisable for diagnosing narcolepsy with cataplexy. Until now, the attempt has been made to control each symptom by its own specific treatment. At present, new American and European treatment guidelines propose new drugs that act on all the symptoms. The application of new criteria of diagnosis and treatment has improved the diagnosis, giving better options of treatment.

  15. Pathophysiology, Clinical, and Therapeutic Aspects of Narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Guzel Ozdemir

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis. The exact cause remains unknown, but there is significant evidence that hypocretin deficiency plays an integral role. There have been advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. It has a negative effect on the quality of life and can restrict the patients from certain careers and activities. Diagnosis relies on patient history and objective data gathered from polysomnography and multiple sleep latency testing. Treatment focuses on symptom relief through medication, education, and behavioral modification. Both classic pharmacological treatments as well as newer options have significant problems, especially because of side effects and abuse potential. Some novel modalities are being examined to expand options for treatment. In this review, the pathophysiological, clinical, and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(3.000: 271-283

  16. Unmet needs of patients with narcolepsy: perspectives on emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wozniak DR

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dariusz R Wozniak, Timothy G Quinnell Respiratory Support and Sleep Centre, Papworth Hospital, Cambridge, UK Abstract: The treatment options currently available for narcolepsy are often unsatisfactory due to suboptimal efficacy, troublesome side effects, development of drug tolerance, and inconvenience. Our understanding of the neurobiology of narcolepsy has greatly improved over the last decade. This knowledge has not yet translated into additional therapeutic options for patients, but progress is being made. Some compounds, such as histaminergic H3 receptor antagonists, may prove useful in symptom control of narcolepsy. The prospect of finding a cure still seems distant, but hypocretin replacement therapy offers some promise. In this narrative review, we describe these developments and others which may yield more effective narcolepsy treatments in the future. Keywords: cataplexy, hypocretin, H3 antagonist, GABA-B agonists, immunotherapy 

  17. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek;

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...... in peripheral white blood cells of 50 narcolepsy versus 47 controls (half of whom were DQB1*06:02 positive) and observed the largest differences between the groups in the signal from HLA probes. Further studies of HLA-DQ expression (mRNA and protein in a subset) in 125 controls and 147 narcolepsy cases did...... indicate that allelic dosage is transmitted into changes in heterodimer availability, a phenomenon that may explain the increased risk for narcolepsy in DQB1*06:02 homozygotes versus heterozygotes....

  18. Common variants in P2RY11 are associated with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Kawashima, Minae; Faraco, Juliette;

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that narcolepsy with cataplexy is an autoimmune disease. We here report genome-wide association analyses for narcolepsy with replication and fine mapping across three ethnic groups (3,406 individuals of European ancestry, 2,414 Asians and 302 African...... Americans). We identify a SNP in the 3' untranslated region of P2RY11, the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y₁₁ gene, which is associated with narcolepsy (rs2305795, combined P = 6.1 × 10⁻¹⁰, odds ratio = 1.28, 95% CI 1.19-1.39, n = 5689). The disease-associated allele is correlated with reduced expression.......0007) and natural killer cells (P = 0.001). These results identify P2RY11 as an important regulator of immune-cell survival, with possible implications in narcolepsy and other autoimmune diseases....

  19. Sleep-stage transitions during polysomnographic recordings as diagnostic features of type 1 narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Carrillo, Oscar; Leary, Eileen B.;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Type 1 narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep fragmentation, and cataplexy. Short rapid eye movement (REM) latency (≤15 min) during nocturnal polysomnography (PSG) or during naps of the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) defines a sleep......-onset REM sleep period (SOREMP), a diagnostic hallmark. We hypothesized that abnormal sleep transitions other than SOREMPs can be identified in type 1 narcolepsy. Methods: Sleep-stage transitions (one to 10 epochs to one to five epochs of any other stage) and bout length features (one to 10 epochs) were...... ≥2.5 min of W/N1 into REM are specifically diagnostic for narcolepsy independent of a nocturnal SOREMP....

  20. Common variants in P2RY11 are associated with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Kawashima, Minae; Faraco, Juliette;

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that narcolepsy with cataplexy is an autoimmune disease. We here report genome-wide association analyses for narcolepsy with replication and fine mapping across three ethnic groups (3,406 individuals of European ancestry, 2,414 Asians and 302 African...... Americans). We identify a SNP in the 3' untranslated region of P2RY11, the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y11 gene, which is associated with narcolepsy (rs2305795, combined P = 6.1 × 10¿¹°, odds ratio = 1.28, 95% CI 1.19-1.39, n = 5689). The disease-associated allele is correlated with reduced expression.......0007) and natural killer cells (P = 0.001). These results identify P2RY11 as an important regulator of immune-cell survival, with possible implications in narcolepsy and other autoimmune diseases....

  1. HLA DQB1*06:02 negative narcolepsy with hypocretin/orexin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Fang; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara;

    2014-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: To identify rare allelic variants and HLA alleles in narcolepsy patients with hypocretin (orexin, HCRT) deficiency but lacking DQB1*06:02. SETTINGS: China (Peking University People's Hospital), Czech Republic (Charles University), Denmark (Golstrup Hospital), Italy (University...... of Bologna), Korea (Catholic University), and USA (Stanford University). DESIGN: CSF hypocretin-1, DQB1*06:02, clinical and polysomnographic data were collected in narcolepsy patients (552 with and 144 without cataplexy) from 6 sites. Numbers of cases with and without DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were...... compiled. HLA class I (A, B, C), class II (DRBs, DQA1, DQB1, DPA1, and DPB1), and whole exome sequencing were conducted in 9 DQB1*06:02 negative cases with low CSF hypocretin-1. Sanger sequencing of selected exons in DNMT1, HCRT, and MOG was performed to exclude mutations in known narcolepsy...

  2. A case of primary hypersomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Dinesh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary hypersomnia (PH is a disorder of presumed central nervous system etiology that is associated with a normal or prolonged major sleep episode and excessive sleepiness consisting of prolonged (one or two hour episodes of non-rapid eye movement sleep. It has a similar presentation to narcolepsy, but is not generally associated with cataplexy or sleep-onset rapid eye movement. Although PH is a chronic disorder, fluctuations and spontaneous remissions are known to occur. Treatment with stimulants is beneficial in most patients. We present the case of a 32-year-old Caucasian woman with the classical features of PH. Her condition has progressed over the years and she sleeps for days on end or until aroused. She has been treated with multiple stimulants, with limited success. This case highlights the clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria and treatment modalities of this rare condition.

  3. National narcolepsy survey

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, L.

    2010-04-01

    Narcolepsy is characterised by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and has a prevalence of 25 per 100,000. We suspect this is higher than presently seen in the Republic of Ireland. We aimed to calculate the Irish prevalence of Narcolepsy and to examine current management practices. We conducted an online survey of respiratory physicians, neurologists, paediatric neurologists, and psychiatrists with an interest in sleep disorders (73% response rate). Of this group, a total of 16 physicians managed 180 patients prior to January 2009. A clinical diagnosis alone was reached in 67 (41%) patients, the remainder by polysomnography or multiple sleep latency testing. No patients were diagnosed by cerebro-spinal fluid analysis of hypocretin levels. While 70 (42%) patients received modafanil, only 7 (4%) were treated with sodium oxybate. Even allowing for missing data it is apparent that Narcolepsy is hugely under-diagnosed in Ireland, however, current practises adhere with new international guidelines.

  4. A multi-drug intoxication fatality involving Xyrem (GHB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Brianne E; Miranda, Estuardo; Lacy, J Matthew; Logan, Barry K

    2009-03-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is best known as a recreational depressant drug, whose use has also been implicated in drug facilitated sexual assault cases. It is also available as a therapeutic agent (Xyrem) used for the treatment of daytime sleepiness or cataplexy associated with narcolepsy. This is a report of a case of a 53-year-old woman undergoing treatment with Xyrem for narcolepsy. The decedent was also prescribed tramadol, gabapentin, cetirizine, modafinil, carisoprodol, and Xyrem. Toxicological analysis of the blood revealed GHB 165.6 mg/L, and 90.7 mg/L in the urine. Blood GHB concentrations in the range 156-260 mg/L have been reported to induce moderately sound sleep. The combined use of central nervous system depressant drugs, together with her problematic sleep apnea, and snoring (both contraindications for GHB use) were determined to have caused this subject's death. The manner of death was determined to be accidental.

  5. Narcolepsy in pediatric age – Experience of a tertiary pediatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Dias Costa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the sleep–wake cycle of multifactorial etiology, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, often associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Both early clinical suspicion and therapeutic approach are essential for promotion of cognitive development and social integration of these children. The authors present a descriptive retrospective study of a series of eight children in whom symptoms first started between 6.8 and 10.5 years of age. Diagnostic delay ranged from 4 months to 2 years. One child had H1N1 flu vaccination eight months before the clinical onset. The first multiple sleep latency test was positive in 6 of 8 cases. All cases were treated with methylphenidate, and venlafaxine was associated in 4 of them. In one case the initial therapy was exclusively behavioral. In all cases, symptomatic improvement, better school performance and social integration were achieved after therapeutic adjustment.

  6. Narcolepsy in a hypocretin/orexin-deficient chihuahua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonokura, M; Fujita, K; Morozumi, M; Yoshida, Y; Kanbayashi, T; Nishino, S

    2003-06-21

    A two-year-old male chihuahua suffered attacks of muscle weakness and immobility, although it had no family history of paroxysmal attacks. No neurological or blood biochemical abnormalities were recorded when it was first examined. The attacks were typically elicited by stimulation, such as feeding, and a case of sporadic narcolepsy-cataplexy was therefore suspected. Treatment orally three times a day with 1 mg/kg imipramine, was effective in reducing the attacks. The concentration of hypocretin-1/orexin A in the dog's cerebrospinal fluid was less than 80 pg/ml (22.5 pmol/litre), compared with normal canine levels of 250 to 350 pg/ml (70.0 to 98.3 pmol/litre), supporting a diagnosis of hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy.

  7. Central functions of the orexinergic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yang Zhang; Lei Yu; Qian-Xing Zhuang; Jing-Ning Zhu; Jian-Jun Wang

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptide orexin is synthesized by neurons exclusively located in the hypothalamus.However,these neurons send axons over virtually the entire brain and spinal cord and therefore constitute a unique central orexinergic system.It is well known that central orexin plays a crucial role in the regulation of various basic non-somatic and somatic physiological functions,including feeding,energy homeostasis,the sleep/wake cycle,reward,addiction,and neuroendocrine,as well as motor control.Moreover,the absence of orexin results in narcolepsy-cataplexy,a simultaneous somatic and non-somatic dysfunction.In this review,we summarize these central functions of the orexinergic system and associated diseases,and suggest that this system may hold a key position in somatic-non-somatic integration.

  8. Increased serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in patients with narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Anders B; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine

    2013-01-01

    in hypocretin neurons in hypothalamus in post-mortem tissue. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are important for activity-dependent neuronal function and synaptic modulation and it is considered that these mechanisms are important in sleep regulation. We hypothesised......Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy), fragmentation of nocturnal sleep and sleep paralysis. The symptoms of the disease strongly correlate with a reduction in hypocretin levels in CSF and a reduction...... that serum levels of these factors are altered in patients with narcolepsy compared to healthy controls without sleep disturbances. Polysomnography data was obtained and serum BDNF and NGF levels measured using ELISA, while hypocretin was measured using RIA. Serum BDNF levels were significantly higher...

  9. Clinical applications of sodium oxybate (GHB): from narcolepsy to alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, F P; Kyriakou, C; Napoletano, S; Marinelli, E; Zaami, S

    2015-12-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a short chain fatty acid endogenously produced within the central nervous system (CNS) and acts as a precursor and metabolite of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Although, it is an illegal recreational drug of abuse, its sodium salt (sodium oxybate) has been utilized as a medication for a number of medical conditions. The first aim of this review was to focus on current applications of sodium oxybate for the treatment of narcolepsy, with a particular emphasis on the key symptoms of this disorder: cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Secondly, the effectiveness of sodium oxybate therapy for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) and the maintenance of alcohol abstinence has been assessed. Nowadays, sodium oxybate is the first-line treatment for narcolepsy and it is highly effective in meliorating sleep architecture, decreasing EDS and the frequency of cataplexy attacks in narcoleptic patients. Sodium oxybate currently finds also application in the treatment of AWS and the maintenance of alcohol abstinence in alcoholics. Most of the studies evaluating the efficacy of GHB in the treatment of AWS use a dosage of 50 mg/kg divided in three or four administrations per day. Human studies showed that GHB (dose of 50 mg/kg, divided in three administrations per day) is capable to increase the number of abstinent days, reduce alcohol craving and decrease the number of drinks per day. However, there is limited randomized evidence and, thus, GHB cannot be reliably compared to clomethiazole or benzodiazepines. Some randomized data suggest that GHB is better than naltrexone and disulfiram regarding abstinence maintenance and prevention of craving in the medium term i.e. 3-12 months. It is recommended that GHB should be used only under strict medical supervision, since concerns about the abuse/misuse of the drug and the addiction potential have been arisen.

  10. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Billiard

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Michel BilliardDepartment of Neurology, Gui de Chauliac Hospital, Montpellier, FranceAbstract: The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1 Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2 The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3 A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy.Keywords: narcolepsy, treatment, conventional drugs, modafinil, sodium oxybate, future treatments

  11. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, glucose metabolism and TNF-α in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurovich-Horvat, Eszter; Keckeis, Marietta; Lattová, Zuzana; Kemlink, David; Wetter, Thomas-Christian; Schuld, Andreas; Sonka, Karel; Pollmächer, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is caused by a deficiency in the production of hypocretin/orexin, which regulates sleep and wakefulness, and also influences appetite, neuroendocrine functions and metabolism. In this case-control study, 11 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy and 11 healthy adults underwent an oral glucose tolerance test, and dexamethasone suppression/corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test. The average age of patients and controls was 35.1 ± 13.2 and 41.0 ± 2.9 years, respectively, body mass index was 28.1 ± 6.6 and 25.5 ± 4.7 kg m(-2) . We did not find evidence of a significantly increased prevalence of disturbed glucose tolerance in patients with narcolepsy. After hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression, the number of non-suppressors did not differ between the groups, indicating normal negative feedback sensitivity. The level of cortisol after dexamethasone suppression was significantly lower in patients with narcolepsy, suggesting a slight basal downregulation and/or a slightly increased negative feedback sensitivity of the major endocrine stress system in narcolepsy. Following corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation, there were no significant differences in levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone or cortisol, and in adrenocortical responsivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Finally, patients with narcolepsy displayed significantly higher plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor p55, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor p75 and interleukin 6 after adjustment for body mass index. The present study confirms that narcolepsy by itself is not associated with disturbances of glucose metabolism, but goes along with a subtle dysregulation of inflammatory cytokine production. We also found that dynamic hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system response is not altered, whereas negative feedback to dexamethasone might be slightly enhanced.

  12. Risk of narcolepsy associated with inactivated adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 (2009 pandemic influenza vaccine in Quebec.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Montplaisir

    Full Text Available An association between an adjuvanted (AS03 A/H1N1 pandemic vaccine and narcolepsy has been reported in Europe.To assess narcolepsy risk following administration of a similar vaccine in Quebec.Retrospective population-based study.Neurologists and lung specialists in the province were invited to report narcolepsy cases to a single reference centre.Patients were interviewed by two sleep experts and standard diagnostic tests were performed. Immunization status was verified in the provincial pandemic influenza vaccination registry.Confirmed narcolepsy with or without cataplexy with onset of excessive daytime sleepiness between January 1st, 2009, and December 31st, 2010. Relative risks (RRs were calculated using a Poisson model in a cohort analysis, by a self-controlled case series (SCCS and a case-control method.A total of 24 cases were included and overall incidence rate was 1.5 per million person-years. A cluster of 7 cases was observed among vaccinated persons in the winter 2009-2010. In the primary cohort analysis, 16-week post-vaccination RR was 4.32 (95% CI: 1.50-11.12. RR was 2.07 (0.70-6.17 in the SCCS, and 1.48 (0.37-7.03 using the case-control method. Estimates were lower when observation was restricted to the period of pandemic influenza circulation, and tended to be higher in persons <20 years old and for cataplexy cases.Results are compatible with an excess risk of approximately one case per million vaccine doses, mainly in persons less than 20 years of age. However, a confounding effect of the influenza infection cannot be ruled out.

  13. The Roles of Dopamine and Hypocretin in Reward: A Electroencephalographic Study.

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    Armand Mensen

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of the mesolimbic reward system is largely dependent on the neurotransmitter dopamine. Recent evidence suggests that the hypocretin system has significant projections to this reward system. We examined the distinct effects of reduced dopamine or reduced hypocretin levels on reward activity in patients with Parkinson's disease, dopamine deficient, as well as patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy, hypocretin depleted, and healthy controls. Participants performed a simple game-like task while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Topography and timing of event-related potentials for both reward cue, and reward feedback was examined across the entire dataset. While response to reward cue was similar in all groups, two distinct time points were found to distinguish patients and controls for reward feedback. Around 160 ms both patient groups had reduced ERP amplitude compared to controls. Later at 250 ms, both patient groups also showed a clear event-related potential (ERP, which was absent in controls. The initial differences show that both patient groups show a similar, blunted response to reward delivery. The second potential corresponds to the classic feedback-related negativity (FRN potential which relies on dopamine activity and reflects reward prediction-error signaling. In particular the mismatch between predicted reward and reward subsequently received was significantly higher in PD compared to NC, independent of reward magnitude and valence. The intermediate FRN response in NC highlights the contribution of hypocretin in reward processing, yet also shows that this is not as detrimental to the reward system as in Parkinson's. Furthermore, the inability to generate accurate predictions in NC may explain why hypocretin deficiency mediates cataplexy triggered by both positive and negative emotions.

  14. Genome-wide analysis of CNV (copy number variation) and their associations with narcolepsy in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Maria; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Koike, Asako; Nitta, Aino; Akiyama, Kumi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2014-05-01

    In humans, narcolepsy with cataplexy (narcolepsy) is a sleep disorder that is characterized by sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities. Narcolepsy is caused by a reduction in the number of neurons that produce hypocretin (orexin) neuropeptide. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of narcolepsy.Rare and large copy number variations (CNVs) reportedly play a role in the etiology of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Narcolepsy is considered a neurological disorder; therefore, we sought to investigate any possible association between rare and large CNVs and human narcolepsy. We used DNA microarray data and a CNV detection software application, PennCNV-Affy, to detect CNVs in 426 Japanese narcoleptic patients and 562 healthy individuals. Overall, we found a significant enrichment of rare and large CNVs (frequency ≤1%, size ≥100 kb) in the patients (case-control ratio of CNV count=1.54, P=5.00 × 10(-4)). Next, we extended a region-based association analysis by including CNVs with its size ≥30 kb. Rare and large CNVs in PARK2 region showed a significant association with narcolepsy. Four patients were assessed to carry duplications of the gene region, whereas no controls carried the duplication, which was further confirmed by quantitative PCR assay. This duplication was also found in 2 essential hypersomnia (EHS) patients out of 171 patients. Furthermore, a pathway analysis revealed enrichments of gene disruptions by rare and large CNVs in immune response, acetyltransferase activity, cell cycle regulation and regulation of cell development. This study constitutes the first report on the risk association between multiple rare and large CNVs and the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. In the future, replication studies are needed to confirm the associations.

  15. Executive control of attention in narcolepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bayard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by early loss of hypocretin neurons that project to areas involved in the attention network. We characterized the executive control of attention in drug-free patients with NC to determine whether the executive deficits observed in patients with NC are specific to the disease itself or whether they reflect performance changes due to the severity of excessive daytime sleepiness. METHODOLOGY: Twenty-two patients with NC compared to 22 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy (NwC matched for age, gender, intellectual level, objective daytime sleepiness and number of sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs were studied. Thirty-two matched healthy controls were included. All participants underwent a standardized interview, completed questionnaires, and neuropsychological tests. All patients underwent a polysomnography followed by multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT, with neuropsychological evaluation performed the same day between MSLT sessions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Irrespective of diagnosis, patients reported higher self-reported attentional complaints associated with the intensity of depressive symptoms. Patients with NC performed slower and more variably on simple reaction time tasks than patients with NwC, who did not differ from controls. Patients with NC and NwC generally performed slower, reacted more variably, and made more errors than controls on executive functioning tests. Individual profile analyses showed a clear heterogeneity of the severity of executive deficit. This severity was related to objective sleepiness, higher number of SOREMPs on the MSLT, and lower intelligence quotient. The nature and severity of the executive deficits were unrelated to NC and NwC diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that drug-free patients with NC and NwC complained of attention deficit, with altered executive control of attention being explained by the severity of objective

  16. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastianini, Stefano; Silvani, Alessandro; Berteotti, Chiara; Lo Martire, Viviana; Cohen, Gary; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Zoccoli, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO). Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM) to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R) during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  17. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  18. CD8 T cell-mediated killing of orexinergic neurons induces a narcolepsy-like phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Yshii, Lidia; Quériault, Clémence; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Arthaud, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Magda; Canivet, Astrid; Morel, Anne-Laure; Matthys, Arthur; Bauer, Jan; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dauvilliers, Yves; Peyron, Christelle; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-09-27

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin(+) neuron loss and narcolepsy development. We generated mice expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) as a "neo-self-antigen" specifically in hypothalamic orexin(+) neurons (called Orex-HA), which were transferred with effector neo-self-antigen-specific T cells to assess whether an autoimmune process could be at play in narcolepsy. Given the tight association of narcolepsy with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, we first tested the pathogenic contribution of CD4 Th1 cells. Although these T cells readily infiltrated the hypothalamus and triggered local inflammation, they did not elicit the loss of orexin(+) neurons or clinical manifestations of narcolepsy. In contrast, the transfer of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) led to both T-cell infiltration and specific destruction of orexin(+) neurons. This phenotype was further aggravated upon repeated injections of CTLs. In situ, CTLs interacted directly with MHC class I-expressing orexin(+) neurons, resulting in cytolytic granule polarization toward neurons. Finally, drastic neuronal loss caused manifestations mimicking human narcolepsy, such as cataplexy and sleep attacks. This work demonstrates the potential role of CTLs as final effectors of the immunopathological process in narcolepsy.

  19. Histamine Transmission Modulates the Phenotype of Murine Narcolepsy Caused by Orexin Neuron Deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bastianini

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy type 1 is associated with loss of orexin neurons, sleep-wake derangements, cataplexy, and a wide spectrum of alterations in other physiological functions, including energy balance, cardiovascular, and respiratory control. It is unclear which narcolepsy signs are directly related to the lack of orexin neurons or are instead modulated by dysfunction of other neurotransmitter systems physiologically controlled by orexin neurons, such as the histamine system. To address this question, we tested whether some of narcolepsy signs would be detected in mice lacking histamine signaling (HDC-KO. Moreover, we studied double-mutant mice lacking both histamine signaling and orexin neurons (DM to evaluate whether the absence of histamine signaling would modulate narcolepsy symptoms produced by orexin deficiency. Mice were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram and a telemetric arterial pressure transducer. Sleep attacks fragmenting wakefulness, cataplexy, excess rapid-eye-movement sleep (R during the activity period, and enhanced increase of arterial pressure during R, which are hallmarks of narcolepsy in mice, did not occur in HDC-KO, whereas they were observed in DM mice. Thus, these narcolepsy signs are neither caused nor abrogated by the absence of histamine. Conversely, the lack of histamine produced obesity in HDC-KO and to a greater extent also in DM. Moreover, the regularity of breath duration during R was significantly increased in either HDC-KO or DM relative to that in congenic wild-type mice. Defects of histamine transmission may thus modulate the metabolic and respiratory phenotype of murine narcolepsy.

  20. A study of T CD4, CD8 and B lymphocytes in narcoleptic patients Estudo dos linfócitos T CD4, CD8 e B em pacientes com narcolepsia

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    Fernando Morgadinho Santos Coelho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleep and cataplexy. Little is known about the possible difference in pathophysiology between patients with or without cataplexy. OBJECTIVE: To quantify T CD4, T CD8 and B lymphocytes in subgroups of patients with narcolepsy and the presence or absence of the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele between groups. METHOD: Our study was prospective and controlled (transversal with 22 narcoleptic patients and 23 health control subjects. Patients underwent an all-night polysomnographic recording (PSG and a multiple sleep latency Test (MSLT. The histocompatibility antigen allele (HLA-DQB1*0602, T CD4, CD8 and B lymphocytes were quantified in control subjects and in narcoleptics. RESULTS: The HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was identified in 10 (62.5% of our 16 cataplexic subjects and in 2 (33.3% of the 6 patients without cataplexy (p=0.24. In control subjects, HLA-DQB1*0602 allele was identified in 5 (20%. A significant decrease in T CD4 and B lymphocytes was found in narcoleptic patients with recurrent cataplexy when compared with our patients without cataplexy. CONCLUSION: Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis were associated with a decrease in sub-group of T CD4 and B lymphocytes. A drop in B lymphocytes count in reumathoid arthritis might, it is posited, be correlated to the presence of HLA-DRB1 allele along with an overall worsened outcome of the affliction. The theory of an increase in consumption of B lymphocytes over the maturation phase has likewise been put forward. Our study reinforces the view that narcolepsy should be considered from an immunological perspective.A narcolepsia é caracterizada por sonolência excessiva diurna e cataplexia. Pouco se sabe sobre as diferenças fisiopatológicas entre pacientes com e sem cataplexia. OBJETIVO: Quantificar os linfócitos T CD4, T CD8 e B e a presença do alelo HLA-DQB1*0602 nos subgrupos de pacientes com narcolepsia. MÉTODO: O

  1. Revisiting Narcolepsy: The Practical Diagnosis and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon M Neppe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological condition with impairments of the sleep-wake cycle. Narcolepsy manifests with four symptoms, the socalled classical tetrad: a Episodic irrepressible uncontrollable Day-Time Sleepiness (DTS is the key feature, and b Abnormal bilateral episodes of muscle tone loss with clear consciousness (cataplexy make the diagnosis definitive. Common but not necessarily required symptoms are c Sleep onset distortions (hypnagogic hallucinations, and d Awareness of being paralyzed when waking during the night (sleep paralysis. a This series of articles focuses on the areas where the mythology may need to be broken and where limitations may not necessarily be recognized. This article has several parts, each interrelated yet independent. As with all publications, information such as this must be considered only after consultation with physicians and any medical information recorded here should not substitute for such consultations. Diplopia and nocturnal insomnia are two other often ignored common symptoms. The classical standard narcolepsy research criteria confirming a narcolepsy diagnosis consist of either a positive multiple sleep-latency tests (MSLT, or an abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Orexin (hypocretin level. I focus on some controversies: a First, the genes for narcolepsy have been largely ignored when applying the recognized criteria for diagnosing narcolepsy. These genes include particularly DQB1*0602. However, the DQA1*0102 gene should also be measured. b Secondly, the multiple sleep-latency test (MSLT may be overemphasized for definitive diagnosis, because the genetic test is as important or even more relevant. This is pertinent because, in the USA, insurance approval of costly medications such as modafinil, armodafinil and sodium oxybate are often dependent on the insurances applying a positive MSLT as a requirement; when it is negative, the insurances might tragically deny coverage of these medications

  2. Clinical features of early-onset narcolepsy%早发型发作性睡病的临床特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马秀伟; 封志纯; 任晓暾; 侯豫; 王三梅; 张晓妹; 周细中

    2012-01-01

    Ohjective To summarize clinical and electrophysiological manifestations of early-onset narcolepsy in children for improving its clinical diagnosis and management. Methods The clinical record, laboratory test, and management of 9 pediatrie patients with early onset narcolepsy were collected and reviewed. Results Among 9 pediatric patients, five were male and four were female. The onset age ranged from 3 years 4 months to 8 years 5 months (average 5 years 8 months). All patients presented with excessive day time somnolence. Cataplexy appeared in eight patients. No patients complained of hypnagogic hallucinations. Eight patients had mood disorders. All patients had weight gain. Electroencephalogram showed slow background in 3 patients, occasionally spike waves in 4 patients, and normal in 2 patients. Multiple sleep latency test demonstrated a short mean sleep latency ( < 5 min) and two or more sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs) in 8 patients. Methylphenidate was administered in 8 patients. The excessive daytime sleepiness had been improved in 6 patients but no changes in cataplexy. Conclusions Early on-set narcolepsy might be misdiagnosed easily. Excessive daytime somnolence and cataplexy are the main clinical features. Multiple sleep latency test is important in early diagnosis of narcolepsy. Methylphenidate therapy is effective in some patients.%目的 总结早发型发作性睡病患儿的临床及电生理检查特征,提高临床诊疗水平.方法 对2009年8月至2010年12月期间诊治的9例早发型发作性睡病患儿的临床资料、辅助检查及治疗情况进行回顾性分析.结果 男5例、女4例,发病年龄3岁4个月~8岁5个月(平均5岁8个月).9例患儿均有白天过度睡眠;8例患儿曾出现猝倒;9例患儿均未诉入睡幻觉;8例患儿发病后情绪改变;9例患儿体质量均明显增加.脑电图检查示背景波偏慢3例,偶发尖波4例,正常2例.睡眠潜伏期试验,8例平均睡眠潜伏期<5 min,有2

  3. Orexin in sleep, addiction and more: is the perfect insomnia drug at hand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Daniel; Jacobson, Laura H

    2013-12-01

    Orexins A and B (hypocretins 1 and 2) and their two receptors (OX1R and OX2R) were discovered in 1998 by two different groups. Orexin A and B are derived from the differential processing of a common precursor, the prepro-orexin peptide. The neuropeptides are expressed in a few thousand cells located in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), but their projections and receptor distribution are widespread throughout the brain. Remarkably, prepro peptide and double (OX1R/OX2R) receptor knock out (KO) mice reproduce a sleep phenotype known in humans and dogs as narcolepsy/cataplexy. In humans, this disease is characterized by the absence of orexin producing cells in the LH, and severely depleted levels of orexin the cerebrospinal fluid. Null mutation of the individual OX1R or OX2R in mice substantially ameliorates the narcolepsy/cataplexy phenotype compared to the OX1R/OX2R KO, and highlights specific roles of the individual receptors in sleep architecture, the OX1R KO demonstrating an a attenuated sleep phenotype relative to the OX2R KO. It has therefore been suggested that orexin is a master regulator of the sleep-wake cycle, with high activity of the LH orexin cells during wake and almost none during sleep. Less than 10years later, the first orexin antagonist, almorexant, a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA), was reported to be effective in inducing sleep in volunteers and insomnia patients. Although development was stopped for almorexant and for Glaxo's DORA SB-649868, no less than 4 orexin receptor antagonists have reached phase II for insomnia, including Filorexant (MK-6096) and Suvorexant (MK-4305) from Merck. Suvorexant has since progressed to Phase III and dossier submission to the FDA. These four compounds are reported as DORAs, however, they equilibrate very slowly at one and/or the other orexin receptor, and thus at equilibrium may show more or less selectivity for OX1R or OX2R. The appropriate balance of antagonism of the two receptors for sleep is a point of

  4. Clarifying the association of genes within the major histocompatibility complex with narcolepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acton, R.T.; Watson, B.; Rivers, C. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    HLA-DR2 and DQwl has been reported to be strongly associated with narcolepsy. The particular phenotype and strength of these associations varies between races. For example DQB*0601 has been reported associated with some African American (AA) narcoleptics while some Caucasian American (CA) narcoleptics do not possess DR2 or DQw1. We have sought to clarify the relationship of MHC genes with narcolepsy in the local CA and AA population. There was no significant difference in the frequency of DR phenotypes in CA or AA narcoleptics compared to race, age, sex and geographic region-matched controls. DR2 was increased in CA cataplexy positive (Cat+) narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.028, odds ratio (OR)=2.4) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=<0.001, OR=8.8). DR11 was increased in AA Cat+ narcoleptics compared to controls (p=0.004, OR=11.2) and to Cat- narcoleptics (p=0.002). DQB1*0601 was not significantly associated with narcolepsy in our AA population. We have assessed the frequency of the TNFa (13 alleles, 1.1Mb telomeric to DQ{alpha}), D6S105 (13 alleles, 1kb telomeric of HLA-A), and GLP-1R (19 alleles, 18.5 Mb centromeric of DQ{alpha}), dinucleotide repeats in narcoleptics compared to controls. The TNFa allele 117 was increased in CA Cat+ vs. controls (p=0.003). The GLP-1R allele 144 was increased in CA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.02). In AA narcoleptics, the TNFa allele 109 was significantly increased (p=0.04) along with the D6S105 allele 130 (p=0.02) compared to controls. The D6S105 allele 130 was increased in AA Cat- vs. controls (p=0.03). The GLP-1R allele 154 was significantly decreased in AA Cat+ vs. Cat- (p=0.04). These data suggest that DR and/or DQ genes are not responsible for narcolepsy and that cataplexy is associated with different regions around the MHC in various racial groups.

  5. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  6. Modafinil as a catecholaminergic agent: empirical evidence and unanswered questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Wisor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Modafinil, in its two clinical formulations (Provigil® and Nuvigil®, is a widely prescribed wake-promoting therapeutic agent. It binds competitively to the cell membrane dopamine transporter and is dependent on catecholaminergic (dopaminergic and adrenergic signaling for its wake-promoting effects. The clinical spectrum of effects for modafinil is distinct from the effects seen with other catecholaminergic agents. Relative to other commonly used agents that act through catecholaminergic mechanisms, modafinil has a relatively low abuse potential, produces wakefulness with an attenuated compensatory sleep recovery thereafter, and does not ameliorate cataplexy in narcolepsy. These clinically relevant phenomenological differences between modafinil and agents such as amphetamines and cocaine do not eliminate catecholaminergic effects as a possible mediator of its wake-promoting action; they merely reflect its unique pharmacological profile. Modafinil is an exceptionally weak, but apparently very selective, dopamine transporter inhibitor. The pharmacodynamic response to modafinil, as measured by dopamine levels in brain microdialysate, is protracted relative to other agents that act via catecholaminergic mechanisms. The conformational constraints on the interaction of modafinil with the dopamine transporter—and probably, as a consequence, its effects on trace amine receptor signaling in the catecholaminergic cell—are unique among catecholaminergic agents. These unique pharmacological properties of modafinil should be considered both in seeking to thoroughly understand its putatively elusive mechanism of action and in the design of novel therapeutic agents.

  7. Dante's description of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Sleep, sleepiness, and dreaming are expressed throughout Dante Alighieri's (1265-1321) the Divine Comedy from the start of his journey through the afterlife. In the book, Dante complains that he is "full of sleep," and he experiences sudden wake-dreaming transitions, short and refreshing naps, visions and hallucinations, unconscious behaviors, episodes of muscle weakness, and falls which are always triggered by strong emotions. Taken together these signs are highly reminiscent of narcolepsy, a term coined in 1880 by Gélineau to define a disease consisting of daytime irresistible sleep episodes with remarkable dream mentation, sleep paralysis, hallucinations, and cataplexy (falls triggered by strong emotions). Sleep, sleepiness, and episodes of sudden weakness triggered by emotions are Dante's literary fingerprints from his earliest works, pointing to a lifelong autobiographic trait. In the 19th century, Cesare Lombroso speculated that Dante had epilepsy, as he had suffered from frequent spells and hallucinations. However, the multiple emotionally triggered falls Dante experienced in the Divine Comedy contrast with the epileptic seizure he depicted in one of the damned individuals. It is possible that Dante may have intuitively grasped the main features of narcolepsy, but it also is plausible that Dante's sleep, dreams, hallucinations, and falls are clues to a lifelong pathologic trait and that Dante may have known of or had narcolepsy.

  8. Crystal structure of the human OX2 orexin receptor bound to the insomnia drug suvorexant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Kolb, Peter; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.

    2015-03-01

    The orexin (also known as hypocretin) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to orexin neuropeptides in the central nervous system to regulate sleep and other behavioural functions in humans. Defects in orexin signalling are responsible for the human diseases of narcolepsy and cataplexy; inhibition of orexin receptors is an effective therapy for insomnia. The human OX2 receptor (OX2R) belongs to the β branch of the rhodopsin family of GPCRs, and can bind to diverse compounds including the native agonist peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and the potent therapeutic inhibitor suvorexant. Here, using lipid-mediated crystallization and protein engineering with a novel fusion chimaera, we solved the structure of the human OX2R bound to suvorexant at 2.5 Å resolution. The structure reveals how suvorexant adopts a π-stacked horseshoe-like conformation and binds to the receptor deep in the orthosteric pocket, stabilizing a network of extracellular salt bridges and blocking transmembrane helix motions necessary for activation. Computational docking suggests how other classes of synthetic antagonists may interact with the receptor at a similar position in an analogous π-stacked fashion. Elucidation of the molecular architecture of the human OX2R expands our understanding of peptidergic GPCR ligand recognition and will aid further efforts to modulate orexin signalling for therapeutic ends.

  9. Heterogeneity and frequency of movement disorders in juvenile and adult-onset Niemann-Pick C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheim, Mathieu; Lagha-Boukbiza, Ouhaïd; Fleury-Lesaunier, Marie-Céline; Valenti-Hirsch, Maria-Paola; Hirsch, Edouard; Gervais-Bernard, Hélène; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Thobois, Stéphane; Vanier, Marie T; Latour, Philippe; Tranchant, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C disease (NPC) is a recessive neurolipidosis. We report five adolescent and adult NPC cases to underscore the frequency and heterogeneity of movement disorders in NPC. Clinical, morphologic, biochemical and genetic study was performed in the five patients. Disease onset was between 8 and 50 years. Movement disorders were present in all cases, were heterogeneous and often combined [cerebellar ataxia (5/5), myoclonus (3/5), dystonia (2/5), chorea (1/5) and tremor (1/5)] and were the first sign in 4/5. Two patients were reported to have no vertical supranuclear gaze palsy (VSGP) at the first examination. Two patients experienced acute neuropsychiatric signs leading to death in one case due to myoclonic storm. Filipin staining was always positive. Two NPC1 mutations were identified in three patients, only one in two siblings. NPC should be considered in case of unexplained movement disorders, even when VSGP or cataplexy are not reported. Filipin staining remains a strong support for the diagnosis. Treatment with miglustat should be considered which is currently the only approved disease-specific treatment of NPC in children and adults.

  10. ApoE polymorphisms in narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasten Meike

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Narcolepsy is a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by increased daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations. Deficiency of the hypocretin neurotransmitter system was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy in animals and men. There are several hints that neurodegeneration of hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus is the pathological correlate of narcolepsy. The ApoE4 allele is a major contributing factor to early-onset neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases as well. Methods To clarify whether the ApoE4 phenotype predisposes to narcolepsy or associates with an earlier disease onset, we have genotyped the ApoE gene in 103 patients with narcolepsy and 101 healthy controls. Results The frequency of the E4 allele of the ApoE gene was 11% in the patient and 15% in the control groups. Furthermore, the mean age of onset did not differ between the ApoE4+ and ApoE4- patient groups. Conclusion Our results exclude the ApoE4 allele as a major risk factor for narcolepsy.

  11. Dopamine D[sub 2]-receptors in human narcolepsy. A SPECT study with [sup 123]I-IB. [Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography. Iodobenzamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hublin, C. (Department of Ullanlinna Sleep Research Centre, Kivelae Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)); Launes, J. (Department of Neurology, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)); Nikkinen, P. (Department of Clinical Chemistry, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital (Finland)); Partinen, M. (Department of Neurological Unit of Kivelae Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    1994-09-01

    Increased dopamine D[sub 2] receptor binding in basal ganglia has been reported in human narcolepsy. These studies have been based on post-mortem material of 8 patients, most of them also medicated for narcolepsy. We studied six narcoleptics without stimulant or anticataplectic medication. The patients had an unambiguous history of cataplexy, and they were also studied polygraphically. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging was performed. The D[sub 2] receptor density wad determined by using [sup 123]I-iodobenzamide (IBZM). The control subjects were 8 unmedicated Parkinson patients with one-sided (hemiparkinsonian) clinical symptoms. The D[sub 2] receptor density in them is known to be normal or somewhat increased compared to healthy normals. The striatum/frontal D[sub 2] activity ratio was 1.331 [+-] 0.084 (with phantom study correction 2.101 [+-] 0.300) in the narcoleptic patients, and in the parkinsonian controls 1.321 [+-] 0.052 (2.067 [+-] 0.185) for the asymptomatic side and 1.335 [+-] 0.025 (2.117 [+-] 0.090) for the symptomatic side (i.e. contralateral to the side with the clinical extrapyramidal signs). There was no statistical difference between the groups or between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side in the Parkinson patients. Thus, our results differ from the earlier post-mortem studies. (au) (28 refs.).

  12. Sleeping Beauty Gets an Eye Exam: A Case Report and Literature Review on Narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Liechty, OD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Narcolepsy, a neurological sleep disorder that affects both adults and children, is caused by the inability of the brain to regulate sleep-wake cycles normally. The common tetrad of symptoms includes excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Ocular symptoms such as blurred vision, diplopia, ptosis, and ocular pain have been reported. Case Report: A ten-year-old female who was diagnosed with narcolepsy at an early age presented for a comprehensive eye examination. She was taking Xyrem BID. Entering visual acuity was 20/30 OD, 20/70 OS, 20/25 OU at distance and 20/20 OD, OS, OU at near. Extraocular motilities, confrontation fields, and pupils were unremarkable with the exception of the patient continually falling asleep. A distance pair of glasses was issued: -0.50 DS, -1.25 DS. Conclusions: Narcolepsy is a chronic disorder that can severely affect a patient’s quality of life. Most control their symptoms with a wake-promoting drug. The disease itself, as well as its pharmacological treatment, can produce a range of ocular effects that optometrists should recognize and manage.

  13. The European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN) database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Ramin; Luca, Gianina; Baumann, Christian R; Bassetti, Claudio L; Bruni, Oliviero; Canellas, Francesca; Dauvilliers, Yves; Del Rio-Villegas, Rafael; Feketeova, Eva; Ferri, Raffaele; Geisler, Peter; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Kornum, Birgitte R; Lecendreux, Michel; Martins-da-Silva, Antonio; Mathis, Johannes; Mayer, Geert; Paiva, Teresa; Partinen, Markku; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Plazzi, Guiseppe; Santamaria, Joan; Sonka, Karel; Riha, Renata; Tafti, Mehdi; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Young, Peter; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of 0.02% in European populations. Narcolepsy shares many features of rare disorders, in particular the lack of awareness of the disease with serious consequences for healthcare supply. Similar to other rare diseases, only a few European countries have registered narcolepsy cases in databases of the International Classification of Diseases or in registries of the European health authorities. A promising approach to identify disease-specific adverse health effects and needs in healthcare delivery in the field of rare diseases is to establish a distributed expert network. A first and important step is to create a database that allows collection, storage and dissemination of data on narcolepsy in a comprehensive and systematic way. Here, the first prospective web-based European narcolepsy database hosted by the European Narcolepsy Network is introduced. The database structure, standardization of data acquisition and quality control procedures are described, and an overview provided of the first 1079 patients from 18 European specialized centres. Due to its standardization this continuously increasing data pool is most promising to provide a better insight into many unsolved aspects of narcolepsy and related disorders, including clear phenotype characterization of subtypes of narcolepsy, more precise epidemiological data and knowledge on the natural history of narcolepsy, expectations about treatment effects, identification of post-marketing medication side-effects, and will contribute to improve clinical trial designs and provide facilities to further develop phase III trials.

  14. Narcolepsy in childhood and adolescence

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    Rubens Reimão

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical, polysomnography and the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT features in young narcoleptics. We evaluated 14 patients with mean age of 13.6 years old (ranging from 6 to 18 years ; 11 were males and 3 females. Daytime sleepiness was the main complaint in all cases and started at the ages of 6 to 17 years. Cataplexy was described in 10 cases and it was considered mild to moderate in all but one case. Sleep paralysis was present in 6 cases and hypnagogic hallucinations in 7 cases. The main polysomnography characteristics were the short sleep latency in 9 cases and the sudden onset of REM periods in 7 cases. The MSLT showed short or borderline sleep latencies in 13 cases, with a mean of 4.9 min; 2 or more REM periods were present in 13 cases. Clinical, polysomnographic and MSLT characteristics in the age bracket focused were remarkably similar to those of adult narcoleptics suggesting the stability of these psysiopa-thological markers.

  15. Narcolepsy as an Immune-Mediated Disease

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    Alberto K. De la Herrán-Arita

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagonic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. This disease is secondary to the specific loss of hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. An autoimmune basis for the disease has long been suspected based on its strong association with the genetic marker DQB1*06:02, and current studies greatly support this hypothesis. Narcolepsy with hypocretin deficiency is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA and T cell receptor (TCR polymorphisms, suggesting that an autoimmune process targets a peptide unique to hypocretin-producing neurons via specific HLA-peptide-TCR interactions. This concept has gained a lot of notoriety after the increase of childhood narcolepsy in 2010 following the 2009 H1N1 pandemic (pH1N1 in China and vaccination with Pandemrix, an adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine that was used in Scandinavia. The surge of narcolepsy cases subsequent to influenza A H1N1 infection and H1N1 vaccination suggests that processes such as molecular mimicry or bystander activation might be crucial for disease development.

  16. Psychosis in patients with narcolepsy as an adverse effect of sodium oxybate

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    Tomi eSarkanen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are characteristic symptoms of narcolepsy, as are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis. Narcolepsy patients may also experience daytime hallucinations unrelated to sleep-wake transitions. The effect of medication on hallucinations is of interest since treatment of narcolepsy may provoke psychotic symptoms. We aim to analyze the relation between sodium oxybate (SXB treatment and psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy patients. Furthermore, we analyze the characteristics of hallucinations to determine their nature as mainly psychotic or hypnagogic and raise a discussion about whether SXB causes psychosis or if psychosis occurs as an endogenous complication in narcolepsy.Method: We present altogether four patients with narcolepsy who experienced psychotic symptoms during treatment with SXB. In addition, we searched the literature for descriptions of hallucinations in narcolepsy and similarities and differences with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia.Results: Three out of four patients had hallucinations typical for psychosis and one had symptoms that resembled aggravated hypnagogic hallucinations. Two patients also had delusional symptoms primarily associated with mental disorders. Tapering down SXB was tried and helped in two out of four cases. Adding antipsychotic treatment (risperidone alleviated psychotic symptoms in two cases. Conclusion: Psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy may appear during SXB treatment. Hallucinations resemble those seen in schizophrenia however the insight that symptoms are delusional is usually preserved. In case of SXB-induced psychotic symptoms or hallucinations, reducing SXB dose or adding antipsychotic medication can be tried.

  17. From state dissociation to status dissociatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelmi, Elena; Ferri, Raffaele; Iranzo, Alex; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves; Bhatia, Kailash P; Liguori, Rocco; Schenck, Carlos H; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    The states of being are conventionally defined by the simultaneous occurrence of behavioral, neurophysiological and autonomic descriptors. State dissociation disorders are due to the intrusion of features typical of a different state into an ongoing state. Disorders related to these conditions are classified according to the ongoing main state and comprise: 1) Dissociation from prevailing wakefulness as seen in hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, automatic behaviors, sleep drunkenness, cataplexy and sleep paralysis 2) Dissociation from rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as seen in REM sleep behavior disorder and lucid dreaming and 3) Dissociation from NREM sleep as seen in the disorders of arousal. The extreme expression of states dissociation is characterized by the asynchronous occurrence of the various components of the different states that prevents the recognition of any state of being. This condition has been named status dissociatus. According to the underlying disorders/diseases and to their severity, among status dissociatus we may recognize disorders in which such an extreme dissociation occurs only at night time or intermittently (i.e., autoimmune encephalopathies, narcolepsy type 1 and IgLON5 parasomnia), and others in which it occurs nearly continuously with complete loss of any conventionally defined state of being, and of the circadian pattern (agrypnia excitata). Here, we render a comprehensive review of all diseases/disorders associated with state dissociation and status dissociatus and propose a critical classification of this complex scenario.

  18. Autonomic disturbances in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Maggi, Leonardo Serra; Donadio, Vincenzo; Vetrugno, Roberto; Liguori, Rocco; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Poli, Francesca; Pizza, Fabio; Pagotto, Uberto; Ferri, Raffaele

    2011-06-01

    Narcolepsy is a clinical condition characterized mainly by excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis complete the narcoleptic tetrad; disrupted night sleep, automatic behaviors and weight gain are also usual complaints. Different studies focus on autonomic changes or dysfunctions among narcoleptic patients, such as pupillary abnormalities, fainting spells, erectile dysfunction, night sweats, gastric problems, low body temperature, systemic hypotension, dry mouth, heart palpitations, headache and extremities dysthermia. Even if many studies lack sufficient standardization or their results have not been replicated, a non-secondary involvement of the autonomic nervous system in narcolepsy is strongly suggested, mainly by metabolic and cardiovascular findings. Furthermore, the recent discovery of a high risk for overweight and for metabolic syndrome in narcoleptic patients represents an important warning for clinicians in order to monitor and follow them up for their autonomic functions. We review here studies on autonomic functions and clinical disturbances in narcoleptic patients, trying to shed light on the possible contribute of alterations of the hypocretin system in autonomic pathophysiology.

  19. High-accuracy imputation for HLA class I and II genes based on high-resolution SNP data of population-specific references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, S-S; Yang, W; Kawashima, M; Kamitsuji, S; Zheng, X; Nishida, N; Sawai, H; Toyoda, H; Miyagawa, T; Honda, M; Kamatani, N; Tokunaga, K

    2015-12-01

    Statistical imputation of classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles is becoming an indispensable tool for fine-mappings of disease association signals from case-control genome-wide association studies. However, most currently available HLA imputation tools are based on European reference populations and are not suitable for direct application to non-European populations. Among the HLA imputation tools, The HIBAG R package is a flexible HLA imputation tool that is equipped with a wide range of population-based classifiers; moreover, HIBAG R enables individual researchers to build custom classifiers. Here, two data sets, each comprising data from healthy Japanese individuals of difference sample sizes, were used to build custom classifiers. HLA imputation accuracy in five HLA classes (HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DPB1) increased from the 82.5-98.8% obtained with the original HIBAG references to 95.2-99.5% with our custom classifiers. A call threshold (CT) of 0.4 is recommended for our Japanese classifiers; in contrast, HIBAG references recommend a CT of 0.5. Finally, our classifiers could be used to identify the risk haplotypes for Japanese narcolepsy with cataplexy, HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*06:02, with 100% and 99.7% accuracy, respectively; therefore, these classifiers can be used to supplement the current lack of HLA genotyping data in widely available genome-wide association study data sets.

  20. GABAA receptor-mediated input change on orexin neurons following sleep deprivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, T; Takasu, M; Hirose, Y; Murakoshi, N; Sinton, C M; Motoike, T; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-01-22

    Orexins are bioactive peptides, which have been shown to play a pivotal role in vigilance state transitions: the loss of orexin-producing neurons (orexin neurons) leads to narcolepsy with cataplexy in the human. However, the effect of the need for sleep (i.e., sleep pressure) on orexin neurons remains largely unknown. Here, we found that immunostaining intensities of the α1 subunit of the GABAA receptor and neuroligin 2, which is involved in inhibitory synapse specialization, on orexin neurons of mouse brain were significantly increased by 6-h sleep deprivation. In contrast, we noted that immunostaining intensities of the α2, γ2, and β2/3 subunits of the GABAA receptor and Huntingtin-associated protein 1, which is involved in GABAAR trafficking, were not changed by 6-h sleep deprivation. Using a slice patch recording, orexin neurons demonstrated increased sensitivity to a GABAA receptor agonist together with synaptic plasticity changes after sleep deprivation when compared with an ad lib sleep condition. In summary, the GABAergic input property of orexin neurons responds rapidly to sleep deprivation. This molecular response of orexin neurons may thus play a role in the changes that accompany the need for sleep following prolonged wakefulness, in particular the decreased probability of a transition to wakefulness once recovery sleep has begun.

  1. Lorsqu’un cas de narcolepsie met à l’épreuve la lutte antidopage When narcolepsy challenges anti-doping programs. Time of controversy as a reconfiguration of argumentation processes

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    Julie Demeslay

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cycliste professionnel depuis plusieurs années, Franck Bouyer voit son quotidien changer en 2003, quand il apprend qu’il est atteint du syndrome de Gélineau. Cette maladie contraint le sportif à prendre tous les jours un traitement stimulant pour stopper la répétition de crises de narcolepsie, de cataplexie et d’hallucinations dont il est victime. Toutefois, le médicament qui lui permet de retrouver un état physiologique « normal » est répertorié par l’Agence mondiale antidopage parmi les produits interdits en compétition. Dans le cadre du processus naissant d’harmonisation des procédures de lutte contre le dopage, il apparaît alors que la réalité de son métier et celle de sa maladie ne sont plus en adéquation. Les demandes d’Autorisations d’usage à des fins thérapeutiques formulées par le sportif donnent à lire une dispute dont la clôture est singulière et provisoire. L’article aborde la manière dont se transforme et se reconfigure cette dispute, qui bascule au fil du temps dans le régime de la controverse puis celui de l’affaire, mais il rend compte aussi des logiques d’actions, des jeux d’acteurs et d’arguments déployés pour juger de la suite à donner à la carrière professionnelle du cycliste.As a professional cyclist with a long career, Franck Bouyer saw his life change in 2003 when he learned that he was suffering from Gelineau’s syndrome. The disease forced the athlete to take a stimulating treatment every day to stop the recurrence of attacks of narcolepsy, cataplexy and hallucinations. However, the medicine which allows him to experience a “normal” physiological state is listed with the World Anti-Doping Agency among prohibited substances in competition. As part of the emerging process of harmonization of procedures for the fight against doping, an inadequacy appears between the realities of his job and his disease. His requests for Therapeutic Use Exemptions, in order to be

  2. Analysis of Clinical Characteristic of 5 Patients with Narcolepsy%发作性睡病5例临床特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    直玉秋; 张玉霜; 欧阳取平

    2011-01-01

    [Objective] To explore the clinical characteristics of narcolepsy. [ Methods] Clinical data of 5 patients with narcolepsy were analyzed respectively, [ Results] Five patients had no definite inducement and positive familial history. All patients manifested with excessive daytime sleepiness. Cataplexy appeared in 3 cases. Hypnagogic hallucination appeared in 2 cases. The first symptom was excessive daytime sleepiness in 2 cases and cataplexy accompanied by excessive daytime sleepiness in 3 cases. All patients showed no specific changes in the chemical examinations and image examinations. One night polysomnography(PSG) and multiple sleep latency test(MSLT) were done in all the 5 patients. The PSG results showed that sleep latency was less than 10 minutes and rapid eye movement latency was less than 20 minutes in all cases. The MSLT results showed that the average sleep latency was less than 5 minutes in all cases. And three out of the 5 patients had two or more sleep onset rapid eye movement(REM) periods (SOREMPs). Two cases had no SOREMPs. But their mean REM sleep latency was less than 10 minutes. [Conclusion] Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder. One night PSG and MSLT may be useful in the diagnosis of atypical narcolepsy. Long-term drug thera-py, psychosocial treatment and health education should be taken to improve the quality of life.%[目的]探讨发作性睡病的临床特征.[方法]对本院5例发作性睡病患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析.[结果]5例患者均无明显诱因及阳性家族史,均有白天过度嗜睡,其中3例伴猝倒,2例有入睡前幻觉.首发症状为白天过度嗜睡2例,猝倒伴白天过度嗜睡3例.实验室及影像学检查均无特殊改变.5例患者均进行整夜多导睡眠图(PSG)检查及多次小睡潜伏期试验(MSLT)检查.PSG结果显示睡眠潜伏期<10 min,快速眼动睡眠(REM)潜伏期<20 min.MSLT结果显示所有患者平均睡眠潜伏期<5 min,其中3例出现2次或2

  3. Clinical features of Chinese children with narcolepsy: a report of 32 cases%32例儿童发作性睡病临床特征分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠俊; 赵建波; 李晓燕; 石秀玉; 张玮娜; 邹丽萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To raise the awareness of childhood narcolepsy. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 32 children with narcolepsy and review the literature. Results All the patients manifested as excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks.Cataplexy appeared in 26 cases (81.3%),hypnagogic hallucination in 11 cases (34.4%),and sleep paralysis in merely 2 cases (6.25%).Daytime sleepiness was the first symptom in most cases.Common features included night sleep disorder,emotional disorder,excessive weight gain,and earlier puberty.Owing to the young age and short duration,a few children could have the false negative multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) results.Conclusion Excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks and cataplexy are the typical clinical manifestations of Chinese narcoleptic children. A definite diagnosis is established on the comprehensive analysis of symptoms and assistant examination.%目的 加强对儿童发作性睡病临床特征及诊断方法的认识. 方法 回顾性分析自2008年9月至2011年9月北京市儿童医院神经科和解放军总医院儿童医学中心收治的32例发作性睡病患儿资料,同时对相关文献进行回顾分析. 结果 32例发作性睡病患儿均有日间不可抗拒的入睡发作,26例(81.3%)存在猝倒发作,11例(34.4%)存在睡眠幻觉,仅2例(6.25%)存在睡眠瘫痪表现.患儿多以日间睡眠增多为起病症状,大多数患儿有夜间睡眠紊乱、易激惹的临床表现,性格改变、食欲及体重增加、青春期提前也是常见的临床症状.多次小睡睡眠潜伏期试验(MSLT)检查在患儿中阳性率较低,可能与患儿年龄小、病程短等因素有关. 结论 不可抗拒的入睡发作、猝倒发作是中国儿童发作性睡病典型的临床表现,结合多导睡眠图和MSLT可明确诊断.

  4. Diretrizes brasileiras para o tratamento da narcolepsia Brazilian guidelines for the treatment of narcolepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Alóe

    2010-09-01

    -controlled trials and to issue consensus opinions on the use of other available medications as well as to inform about safety and adverse effects of these medications. Management of narcolepsy relies on several classes of drugs, namely, stimulants for excessive sleepiness, antidepressants for cataplexy and hypnotics for disturbed nocturnal sleep. Behavioral measures are likewise valuable and universally recommended. All therapeutic trials were analyzed according to their class of evidence. Recommendations concerning the treatment of each single symptom of narcolepsy as well as general recommendations were made. Modafinil is the first-line pharmacological treatment of excessive sleepiness. Second-line choices for the treatment of excessive sleepiness are slow-release metylphenidate followed by mazindol. The first-line treatments of cataplexy are the antidepressants, reboxetine, clomipramine, venlafaxine, desvenlafaxine or high doses of selective serotonin reuptake inibitors antidepressants. As for disturbed nocturnal sleep the best option is still hypnotics. Antidepressants and hypnotics are used to treat hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis.

  5. Effects of oral L-carnitine administration in narcolepsy patients: a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial.

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    Taku Miyagawa

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and rapid eye movement (REM sleep abnormalities. A genome-wide association study (GWAS identified a novel narcolepsy-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, which is located adjacent to the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B gene encoding an enzyme involved in β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The mRNA expression levels of CPT1B were associated with this SNP. In addition, we recently reported that acylcarnitine levels were abnormally low in narcolepsy patients. To assess the efficacy of oral L-carnitine for the treatment of narcolepsy, we performed a clinical trial administering L-carnitine (510 mg/day to patients with the disease. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial. Thirty narcolepsy patients were enrolled in our study. Two patients were withdrawn and 28 patients were included in the statistical analysis (15 males and 13 females, all with HLA-DQB1*06:02. L-carnitine treatment significantly improved the total time for dozing off during the daytime, calculated from the sleep logs, compared with that of placebo-treated periods. L-carnitine efficiently increased serum acylcarnitine levels, and reduced serum triglycerides concentration. Differences in the Japanese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 vitality and mental health subscales did not reach statistical significance between L-carnitine and placebo. This study suggests that oral L-carnitine can be effective in reducing excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN UMIN000003760.

  6. Sustained attention to response task (SART) shows impaired vigilance in a spectrum of disorders of excessive daytime sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schie, Mojca K M; Thijs, Roland D; Fronczek, Rolf; Middelkoop, Huub A M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van Dijk, J Gert

    2012-08-01

    The sustained attention to response task comprises withholding key presses to one in nine of 225 target stimuli; it proved to be a sensitive measure of vigilance in a small group of narcoleptics. We studied sustained attention to response task results in 96 patients from a tertiary narcolepsy referral centre. Diagnoses according to ICSD-2 criteria were narcolepsy with (n=42) and without cataplexy (n=5), idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (n=37), and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (n=12). The sustained attention to response task was administered prior to each of five multiple sleep latency test sessions. Analysis concerned error rates, mean reaction time, reaction time variability and post-error slowing, as well as the correlation of sustained attention to response task results with mean latency of the multiple sleep latency test and possible time of day influences. Median sustained attention to response task error scores ranged from 8.4 to 11.1, and mean reaction times from 332 to 366ms. Sustained attention to response task error score and mean reaction time did not differ significantly between patient groups. Sustained attention to response task error score did not correlate with multiple sleep latency test sleep latency. Reaction time was more variable as the error score was higher. Sustained attention to response task error score was highest for the first session. We conclude that a high sustained attention to response task error rate reflects vigilance impairment in excessive daytime sleepiness irrespective of its cause. The sustained attention to response task and the multiple sleep latency test reflect different aspects of sleep/wakefulness and are complementary.

  7. Hypocretin and brain β-amyloid peptide interactions in cognitive disorders and narcolepsy

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    Yves A Dauvilliers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF Alzheimer’ disease (AD biomarkers and hypocretin-1 levels in patients with cognitive abnormalities and hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy-cataplexy (NC, estimate diagnostic accuracy, and determine correlations with sleep disturbances. Background: Sleep disturbances are frequent in AD. Interactions between brain β-amyloid (Aβ aggregation and a wake-related neurotransmitter hypocretin have been reported in a mouse model of AD. Methods: Ninety-one cognitive patients (37 AD, 16 mild cognitive impairment – MCI that converts to AD, 38 other dementias and 15 elderly patients with NC were recruited. Patients were diagnosed blind to CSF results. CSF A42, total tau, ptau181, and hypocretin-1 were measured. Sleep disturbances were assessed with questionnaires in 32 cognitive patients. Results: Lower CSF Aβ42 but higher tau and P-tau levels were found in AD and MCI compared to other dementias. CSF hypocretin-1 levels were higher in patients with MCI due to AD compared to other dementias, with a similar tendency for patients with advanced AD. CSF hypocretin-1 was significantly and independently associated with AD/MCI due to AD, with an OR of 2.70 after full adjustment, exceeding that for Aβ42. Aβ42 correlated positively with hypocretin-1 levels in advanced stage AD. No association was found between sleep disturbances and CSF biomarkers. No patients with NC achieved pathological cutoffs for Aβ42, with respectively one and four patients with NC above tau and P-tau cutoffs and no correlations between hypocretin-1 and other biomarkers. Conclusions: Our results suggest a pathophysiological relationship between Aβ42 and hypocretin-1 in the AD process, with higher CSF hypocretin-1 levels in early disease stages. Further longitudinal studies are needed to validate these biomarker interactions and to determine the cause-effect relationship and the role of wake/sleep behavior in amyloid

  8. Narcolepsy Type 1 Is Associated with a Systemic Increase and Activation of Regulatory T Cells and with a Systemic Activation of Global T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoiset, Fabien; Regnault, Armelle; Tran, Tu Anh; Liblau, Roland; Klatzmann, David; Rosenzwajg, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and disturbed nocturnal sleep patterns. Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) has been shown to result from a selective loss of hypothalamic hypocretin-secreting neurons with patients typically showing low CSF-hypocretin levels (<110 pg/ml). This specific loss of hypocretin and the strong association with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele led to the hypothesis that NT1 could be an immune-mediated pathology. Moreover, susceptibility to NT1 has recently been associated with several pathogens, particularly with influenza A H1N1 virus either through infection or vaccination. The goal of this study was to compare peripheral blood immune cell populations in recent onset pediatric NT1 subjects (post or non-post 2009-influenza A H1N1 vaccination) to healthy donors. We demonstrated an increased number of central memory CD4+ T cells (CD62L+ CD45RA-) associated to an activated phenotype (increase in CD69 and CD25 expression) in NT1 patients. Percentage and absolute count of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in NT1 patients were increased associated with an activated phenotype (increase in GITR and LAP expression), and of activated memory phenotype. Cytokine production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells after activation was not modified in NT1 patients. In H1N1 vaccinated NT1 patients, absolute counts of CD3+, CD8+ T cells, and B cells were increased compared to non-vaccinated NT1 patients. These results support a global T cell activation in NT1 patients and thus support a T cell-mediated autoimmune origin of NT1, but do not demonstrate the pathological role of H1N1 prophylactic vaccination. They should prompt further studies of T cells, particularly of Tregs (such as suppression and proliferation antigen specific assays, and also T-cell receptor sequencing), in NT1. PMID:28107375

  9. Reduced expression of TAC1, PENK and SOCS2 in Hcrtr-2 mutated narcoleptic dog brain

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    Mignot Emmanuel

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Narcolepsy causes dramatic behavioral alterations in both humans and dogs, with excessive sleepiness and cataplexy triggered by emotional stimuli. Deficiencies in the hypocretin system are well established as the origin of the condition; both from studies in humans who lack the hypocretin ligand (HCRT and in dogs with a mutation in hypocretin receptor 2 (HCRTR2. However, little is known about molecular alterations downstream of the hypocretin signals. Results By using microarray technology we have screened the expression of 29760 genes in the brains of Doberman dogs with a heritable form of narcolepsy (homozygous for the canarc-1 [HCRTR-2-2] mutation, and their unaffected heterozygous siblings. We identified two neuropeptide precursor molecules, Tachykinin precursor 1 (TAC1 and Proenkephalin (PENK, that together with Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2, showed reduced expression in narcoleptic brains. The difference was particularly pronounced in the amygdala, where mRNA levels of PENK were 6.2 fold lower in narcoleptic dogs than in heterozygous siblings, and TAC1 and SOCS2 showed 4.4 fold and 2.8 fold decrease in expression, respectively. The results obtained from microarray experiments were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR. Interestingly, it was previously shown that a single dose of amphetamine-like stimulants able to increase wakefulness in the dogs, also produce an increase in the expression of both TAC1 and PENK in mice. Conclusion These results suggest that TAC1, PENK and SOCS2 might be intimately connected with the excessive daytime sleepiness not only in dogs, but also in other species, possibly including humans.

  10. A polymorphism in CCR1/CCR3 is associated with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Miyagawa, Taku; Koike, Asako; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kirino, Yohei; Meguro, Akira; Remmers, Elaine F; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Otowa, Takeshi; Miyashita, Akinori; Kashiwase, Koichi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Kuwano, Ryozo; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-10-01

    Etiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy involves multiple genetic and environmental factors. While the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotype is strongly associated with narcolepsy, it is not sufficient for disease development. To identify additional, non-HLA susceptibility genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Japanese samples. An initial sample set comprising 409 cases and 1562 controls was used for the GWAS of 525,196 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located outside the HLA region. An independent sample set comprising 240 cases and 869 controls was then genotyped at 37 SNPs identified in the GWAS. We found that narcolepsy was associated with a SNP in the promoter region of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1 (CCR1) (rs3181077, P=1.6×10(-5), odds ratio [OR]=1.86). This rs3181077 association was replicated with the independent sample set (P=0.032, OR=1.36). We measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in peripheral blood samples of 38 cases and 37 controls. CCR1 and CCR3 mRNA levels were significantly lower in patients than in healthy controls, and CCR1 mRNA levels were associated with rs3181077 genotypes. In vitro chemotaxis assays were also performed to measure monocyte migration. We observed that monocytes from carriers of the rs3181077 risk allele had lower migration indices with a CCR1 ligand. CCR1 and CCR3 are newly discovered susceptibility genes for narcolepsy. These results highlight the potential role of CCR genes in narcolepsy and support the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy have impaired immune function.

  11. Sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset REM periods in MSLT predicts treatment response in patients with narcolepsy.

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    Drakatos, Panagis; Patel, Kishankumar; Thakrar, Chiraag; Williams, Adrian J; Kent, Brian D; Leschziner, Guy D

    2016-04-01

    Current treatment recommendations for narcolepsy suggest that modafinil should be used as a first-line treatment ahead of conventional stimulants or sodium oxybate. In this study, performed in a tertiary sleep disorders centre, treatment responses were examined following these recommendations, and the ability of sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test to predict treatment response. Over a 3.5-year period, 255 patients were retrospectively identified in the authors' database as patients diagnosed with narcolepsy, type 1 (with cataplexy) or type 2 (without) using clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Eligible patients were examined in detail, sleep study data were abstracted and sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods were analysed. Response to treatment was graded utilizing an internally developed scale. Seventy-five patients were included (39% males). Forty (53%) were diagnosed with type 1 narcolepsy with a mean follow-up of 2.37 ± 1.35 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were initially started on modafinil, and overall 59% reported complete response on the last follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (39%) had the sequence of sleep stage 1 or wake to rapid eye movement in all of their sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods, with most of these diagnosed as narcolepsy type 1 (72%). The presence of this specific sleep-stage sequence in all sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods was associated with worse treatment response (P = 0.0023). Sleep-stage sequence analysis of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test may aid the prediction of treatment response in narcoleptics and provide a useful prognostic tool in clinical practice, above and beyond their classification as narcolepsy type 1 or 2.

  12. AS03 adjuvanted AH1N1 vaccine associated with an abrupt increase in the incidence of childhood narcolepsy in Finland.

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    Hanna Nohynek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with strong genetic predisposition causing excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. A sudden increase in childhood narcolepsy was observed in Finland soon after pandemic influenza epidemic and vaccination with ASO3-adjuvanted Pandemrix. No increase was observed in other age groups. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study. From January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010 we retrospectively followed the cohort of all children living in Finland and born from January 1991 through December 2005. Vaccination data of the whole population was obtained from primary health care databases. All new cases with assigned ICD-10 code of narcolepsy were identified and the medical records reviewed by two experts to classify the diagnosis of narcolepsy according to the Brighton collaboration criteria. Onset of narcolepsy was defined as the first documented contact to health care because of excessive daytime sleepiness. The primary follow-up period was restricted to August 15, 2010, the day before media attention on post-vaccination narcolepsy started. FINDINGS: Vaccination coverage in the cohort was 75%. Of the 67 confirmed cases of narcolepsy, 46 vaccinated and 7 unvaccinated were included in the primary analysis. The incidence of narcolepsy was 9.0 in the vaccinated as compared to 0.7/100,000 person years in the unvaccinated individuals, the rate ratio being 12.7 (95% confidence interval 6.1-30.8. The vaccine-attributable risk of developing narcolepsy was 1:16,000 vaccinated 4 to 19-year-olds (95% confidence interval 1:13,000-1:21,000. CONCLUSIONS: Pandemrix vaccine contributed to the onset of narcolepsy among those 4 to 19 years old during the pandemic influenza in 2009-2010 in Finland. Further studies are needed to determine whether this observation exists in other populations and to elucidate potential underlying immunological mechanism. The role of the adjuvant in particular warrants further research before drawing

  13. Advance in Etiopathogenesis of Narcolepsy%Medical Recapitulate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝茂林; 郝苗清(综述); 杜怡峰(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic lifelong sleep disorder and it often leaves a debilitating effect on the quality of life of the sufferer.This disorder is characterized by a tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness ,cata-plexy,hypnogogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis.For over 100 years,clinicians have recognized narcolepsy, but only in the last few decades have scientists been able to shed light on the true cause and pathogenesis of narcolepsy.In the majority of subjects,typeⅠnarcolepsy is caused by autoimmune-mediated loss of hypocre-tin-secreting neurons in genetically predisposed individuals.The basic neural mechanisms behind sleepiness and cataplexy,the two defining symptoms of narcolepsy have started to become clearer .The pathophysiology of type Ⅱ narcolepsy is less well understood.%发作性睡病是一种慢性睡眠障碍性疾病,严重影响患者的生活质量。其临床症状包括日间过度睡眠、猝倒发作、睡前幻觉和睡眠瘫痪等。自该病发现至今已有100多年,但近年科学家才阐明其发病机制。Ⅰ型发作性睡病是由易患个体经免疫介导下视丘分泌素神经元丢失造成的;猝倒发作和过度睡眠的神经机制也越来越清晰,而Ⅱ型发作性睡病的发病机制尚不清楚。

  14. Use of miglustat in a child with late-infantile-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C and frequent seizures: a case report

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    Skorpen Johannes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Niemann-Pick disease type C is a rare genetic lysosomal storage disease associated with impaired intracellular lipid trafficking and a range of progressive neurological manifestations. The influence of seizure activity on disease course and response to miglustat therapy is not currently clear. Case presentation Niemann-Pick disease type C homozygous for NPC1 mutation p.S940L [c. 2819 C>T] was diagnosed in a four-and-a-half-year-old Norwegian Caucasian girl. The patient, who died at eight years and seven months of age, had a history of prolonged neonatal jaundice and subsequently displayed progressive neurological manifestations that started with delayed speech, ataxia, and gelastic cataplexy. A regimen of 100mg of miglustat three times a day was initiated when she was four years and 11 months old. She showed decreased neurological deterioration during about three and a half years of treatment. However, she displayed periods of distinct worsening that coincided with frequent epileptic seizures. Anti-epileptic therapy reduced seizure frequency and severity and allowed re-stabilization of her neurological function. Prior to her death, which was possibly due to acute cardiac arrest, seizure activity was well controlled. Conclusions Miglustat delayed the expected deterioration of neurological function in this patient with p.S940L-homozygous late-infantile-onset Niemann-Pick disease type C and provided important quality-of-life benefits. This case demonstrates the importance of effective seizure control therapy in achieving and maintaining neurological stabilization in Niemann-Pick disease type C.

  15. The clinical diagnosis and therapy process of pediatric narcolepsy and diagnostic value of video-electroencephalogram%儿童发作性睡病的临床诊治进展及视频脑电图的诊断价值探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓瑶

    2016-01-01

    发作性睡病是一种儿童或青少年时期起病的常见慢性睡眠障碍性疾病,临床常表现为经典的四联症:白天不可控制的睡眠增多、猝倒发作、睡眠瘫痪和睡眠幻觉,由于本病一旦发生,则终身伴随,可严重影响儿童的精神心理及生活方面,因此早期诊断及治疗尤为关键.目前对本病的诊断主要是依靠视频脑电图完成多次睡眠潜伏期试验来协助诊治.该文就儿童发作性睡病取得的诊治进展及视频脑电图的诊断价值作一综述.%Narcolepsy is a common chronic sleep disorder attacking adolescence,characterized by a typical tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness,cataplexy,sleep paralysis and hypnagonic/hypnopompic hallucinations,affecting both mental and psychological aspects of children.Thus,making an early diagnosis and therapy is of great importance.Clinical diagnosis mainly depends on the multiple sleep latency test across the video electroencephalogram.In this article,we mainly describe the diagnosis and treatment progress of pediatric narcolepsy and clinical value of video-electroencephalogram.

  16. 269例发作性睡病临床特征及中医证候特征研究%Clinical feature and TCM syndrome patterns analysis of 269 cases with narcolepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨嘉颐; 戴中; 白文; 王春玲; 王今芳; 郭静; 彭朗; 盖聪; 柳洪胜

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the clinical feature and TCM syndrome patterns of Narcolepsy.Methods:269 cases with narcolepsy from March of 2008 to September of 2010 were analyzed.Clinical conditions,core symptoms and surrounding symptom information were collected.Clinical feature and TCM syndrome patterns in patients of different age were compared and summarized.Results:The main core symptoms included daytime sleepiness,cataplexy,sleep paralysis,hypnogogic hallucination,and disturbed noctumal sleep.The main TCM syndrome patterns were stagnation of liver-qi and spleen asthenic fluid-retention.Conclusion:The clinical feature and TCM syndrome patterns of narcolepsy were analyzed and the study provided evidence for the treatment of Narcolepsy.%目的:探讨发作性睡病的临床特征及中医证候特征.方法:观察269例2008年3月至2010年9月于我院确诊的发作性睡病病例,收集患者一般情况、核心症状及周边症状信息,对比并总结不同发病年龄患者的临床特征及中医证候特征.结果:发作性睡病以白天嗜睡、发作性猝倒、睡瘫、入睡幻觉及夜间睡眠紊乱为主要核心症状;肝郁、脾虚湿困是发作性睡病的主要中医证候.结论:发作性睡病的临床特征及中医证候特征具有一定规律,为中医辨治发作性睡病提供依据.

  17. Narcolepsy and Orexins: An Example of Progress in Sleep Research

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    Alberto K De La Herrán-Arita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy is a chronic neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus (LH. It is clinically characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and by intrusions into wakefulness of physiological aspects of rapid eye movement (REM sleep such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations. The major pathophysiology of narcolepsy has been recently described on the bases of the discovery of the neuropeptides named orexins (hypocretins in 1998; considerable evidence, summarized below, demonstrates that narcolepsy is the result of alterations in the genes involved in the pathology of the orexin ligand or its receptor. Deficient orexin transmission is sufficient to produce narcolepsy, as we describe here, animal models with dysregulated orexin signaling exhibit a narcolepsy-like phenotype. Remarkably, these narcoleptic models have different alterations of the orexinergic circuit, this diversity provide us with the means for making comparison, and have a better understanding of orexin cell physiology.It is of particular interest that the most remarkable findings regarding this sleep disorder were fortuitous and due to keen observations. Sleep is a highly intricate and regulated state, and narcolepsy is a disorder that still remains as one of the unsolved mysteries in science. Nevertheless, advances and development of technology in neuroscience will provide us with the necessary tools to unravel the narcolepsy puzzle in the near future.Through an evaluation of the scientific literature we traced an updated picture of narcolepsy and orexins in order to provide insight into the means by which neurobiological knowledge is constructed.

  18. New susceptibility variants to narcolepsy identified in HLA class II region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Hirataka, Akane; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Omata, Naoto; Kojima, Hiroto; Kashiwase, Koichi; Saji, Hiroh; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Wada, Yuji; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-02-01

    Narcolepsy, a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement sleep abnormalities, is tightly associated with human leukocyte antigen HLA-DQB1*06:02. DQB1*06:02 is common in the general population (10-30%); therefore, additional genetic factors are needed for the development of narcolepsy. In the present study, HLA-DQB1 in 664 Japanese narcoleptic subjects and 3131 Japanese control subjects was examined to determine whether HLA-DQB1 alleles located in trans of DQB1*06:02 are associated with narcolepsy. The strongest association was with DQB1*06:01 (P = 1.4 × 10(-10), odds ratio, OR = 0.39), as reported in previous studies. Additional predisposing effects of DQB1*03:02 were also found (P = 2.5 × 10(-9), OR = 1.97). A comparison between DQB1*06:02 heterozygous cases and controls revealed dominant protective effects of DQB1*06:01 and DQB1*05:01. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based conditional analysis controlling for the effect of HLA-DQB1 was performed to determine whether there were other independent HLA associations outside of HLA-DQB1. This analysis revealed associations at HLA-DPB1 in the HLA class II region (rs3117242, P = 4.1 × 10(-5), OR = 2.45; DPB1*05:01, P = 8.1 × 10(-3), OR = 1.39). These results indicate that complex HLA class II associations contribute to the genetic predisposition to narcolepsy.

  19. Elevated peripheral visfatin levels in narcoleptic patients.

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    Norbert Dahmen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Narcolepsy is a severe sleep disorder that is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexies and a tendency towards obesity. Recent discoveries indicate that the major pathophysiology is a loss of hypocretin (orexin producing neurons due to immunologically mediated degeneration. Visfatin is a recently described proinflammatory adipokine. It is identical to the immune modulating pre-B-cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF. Our study examines the hypothesis that visfatin levels are altered in narcoleptic patients. METHODS: For the analysis, a total of n = 54 patients (n = 18 males and n = 36 females with the diagnosis of narcolepsy according to DSM-IV and the International Classification of Sleep Disorders were examined (BMI mean 30.3+/-5.5, age mean 52.5+/-16.1 years. As a control group 39 unrelated (n = 12 males and n = 27 females healthy volunteers with no sleep disorder according to DSM-IV were included (BMI mean 28.5+/-4.6, age mean 51.1+/-13.6 years. Peripheral visfatin levels were measured using a commercial enzyme immunoassay kit with a measurement range from 0.1-1000 ng/ml. Narcolepsy symptoms, severity and frequency of symptoms as well as the total duration of various aspects of the symptomatology were assessed by unstructured and structured clinical interviews in including the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Sleep Inventory. RESULTS: Circulating visfatin was found to be significantly increased in HLA DR2 positive narcoleptic patients compared to controls. CONCLUSION: Taken together, our results add to the evidence of disturbed immunological regulation in patients with narcolepsy.

  20. Orexin excites rat inferior vestibular nuclear neurons via co-activation of OX1 and OX 2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Zhu, Jing-Ning; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Orexin deficiency results in cataplexy, a motor deficit characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone, strongly indicating an active role of central orexinergic system in motor control. However, effects of orexin on neurons in central motor structures are still largely unknown. Our previous studies have revealed that orexin excites neurons in the cerebellar nuclei and lateral vestibular nucleus, two important subcortical motor centers for control of muscle tone. Here, we report that both orexin-A and orexin-B depolarizes and increases the firing rate of neurons in the inferior vestibular nucleus (IVN), the largest nucleus in the vestibular nuclear complex and holding an important position in integration of information signals in the control of body posture. TTX does not block orexin-induced excitation on IVN neurons, suggesting a direct postsynaptic action of the neuropeptide. Furthermore, bath application of orexin induces an inward current on IVN neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. SB334867 and TCS-OX2-29, specific OX1 and OX2 receptor antagonists, blocked the excitatory effect of orexin, and [Ala(11), D-Leu(15)]-orexin B, a selective OX2 receptor agonist, mimics the orexin-induced inward current on IVN neurons. qPCR and immunofluorescence results show that both OX1 and OX2 receptor mRNAs and proteins are expressed and localized in the rat IVN. These results demonstrate that orexin excites the IVN neurons by co-activation of both OX1 and OX2 receptors, suggesting that via the direct modulation on the IVN, the central orexinergic system may actively participate in the central vestibular-mediated postural and motor control.

  1. GHB pharmacology and toxicology: acute intoxication, concentrations in blood and urine in forensic cases and treatment of the withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, Francesco P; Jones, Alan W

    2015-01-01

    The illicit recreational drug of abuse, γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a potent central nervous system depressant and is often encountered during forensic investigations of living and deceased persons. The sodium salt of GHB is registered as a therapeutic agent (Xyrem®), approved in some countries for the treatment of narcolepsy-associated cataplexy and (Alcover®) is an adjuvant medication for detoxification and withdrawal in alcoholics. Trace amounts of GHB are produced endogenously (0.5-1.0 mg/L) in various tissues, including the brain, where it functions as both a precursor and a metabolite of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Available information indicates that GHB serves as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the GABAergic system, especially via binding to the GABA-B receptor subtype. Although GHB is listed as a controlled substance in many countries abuse still continues, owing to the availability of precursor drugs, γ-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (BD), which are not regulated. After ingestion both GBL and BD are rapidly converted into GHB (t½ ~1 min). The Cmax occurs after 20-40 min and GHB is then eliminated from plasma with a half-life of 30-50 min. Only about 1-5% of the dose of GHB is recoverable in urine and the window of detection is relatively short (3-10 h). This calls for expeditious sampling when evidence of drug use and/or abuse is required in forensic casework. The recreational dose of GHB is not easy to estimate and a concentration in plasma of ~100 mg/L produces euphoria and disinhibition, whereas 500 mg/L might cause death from cardiorespiratory depression. Effective antidotes to reverse the sedative and intoxicating effects of GHB do not exist. The poisoned patients require supportive care, vital signs should be monitored and the airways kept clear in case of emesis. After prolonged regular use of GHB tolerance and dependence develop and abrupt cessation of drug use leads to unpleasant

  2. Narcolepsy and depression Narcolepsia e depressão

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    Carla Adda

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy main symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Its chronic course is accompanied by psychosocial impairment added to the difficulties and side effects of stimulants and tricyclics long term use. Depressive complaints are occasionally reported. The aim of this paper was to evaluate objectively the possibility of depression in a sample of 12 narcoleptics (7F;5 M, with mean age of 53 years (12 years SD, using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D. The results showed absence of depressive disorder in 75.0% of the cases according to BDI (or 58.3% according to HAM-D. The remaining patients had mild depression (only one patient presented major depression. The findings showed no correlation between narcolepsy and major depression.Narcolepsia é um distúrbio do sono caracterizado por sonolência diurna excessiva e ataques de cataplexia. Sendo crônico, traz uma série de dificuldades psicossociais às quais se aliam aquelas geradas pelos efeitos colaterais dos estimulantes e tricíclicos utilizados. Queixas depressivas são encontradas ocasionalmente. Esta pesquisa buscou verificar objetivamente a ocorrência de depressão em narcolépticos. Foi avaliado um grupo de 12 pacientes narcolépticos (7F; 5M com média de idade de 53 anos (DP 12 usando-se como instrumentos o Inventário de Beck para Depressão (BDI e a Escala Hamilton de Depressão (HAM-D. Os resultados demonstraram ausência de distúrbio depressivo em 75.0% dos pacientes avaliados pelo BDI e em 58.3% pela HAM-D. Os demais escores evidenciaram depressão leve ou disforia; depressão maior foi encontrada em apenas um caso. Tais achados não sugerem correlação entre narcolepsia e depressão.

  3. IgG abnormality in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia.

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    Susumu Tanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A close association between narcolepsy and the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-DQB1*0602 allele suggests the involvement of the immune system, or possibly an autoimmune process. We investigated serum IgG levels in narcolepsy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured the serum total IgG levels in 159 Japanese narcolepsy-cataplexy patients positive for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele, 28 idiopathic hypersomnia patients with long sleep time, and 123 healthy controls (the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele present in 45 subjects. The serum levels of each IgG subclass were subsequently measured. The distribution of serum IgG was significantly different among healthy controls negative for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele (11.66+/-3.55 mg/ml, healthy controls positive for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele (11.45+/-3.43, narcolepsy patients (9.67+/-3.38, and idiopathic hypersomnia patients (13.81+/-3.80. None of the following clinical variables, age, disease duration, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, smoking habit and BMI at the time of blood sampling, were associated with IgG levels in narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia. Furthermore we found the decrease in IgG1 and IgG2 levels, stable expression of IgG3, and the increase in the proportion of IgG4 in narcolepsy patients with abnormally low IgG levels. The increase in the proportion of IgG4 levels was also found in narcolepsy patients with normal serum total IgG levels. Idiopathic hypersomnia patients showed a different pattern of IgG subclass distribution with high IgG3 and IgG4 level, low IgG2 level, and IgG1/IgG2 imbalance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study is the first to determine IgG abnormalities in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia by measuring the serum IgG levels in a large number of hypersomnia patients. The observed IgG abnormalities indicate humoral immune alterations in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. Different IgG profiles suggest immunological differences between narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia.

  4. Design and validation of a periodic leg movement detector.

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    Hyatt Moore

    Full Text Available Periodic Limb Movements (PLMs are episodic, involuntary movements caused by fairly specific muscle contractions that occur during sleep and can be scored during nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG. Because leg movements (LM may be accompanied by an arousal or sleep fragmentation, a high PLM index (i.e. average number of PLMs per hour may have an effect on an individual's overall health and wellbeing. This study presents the design and validation of the Stanford PLM automatic detector (S-PLMAD, a robust, automated leg movement detector to score PLM. NPSG studies from adult participants of the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort (WSC, n = 1,073, 2000-2004 and successive Stanford Sleep Cohort (SSC patients (n = 760, 1999-2007 undergoing baseline NPSG were used in the design and validation of this study. The scoring algorithm of the S-PLMAD was initially based on the 2007 American Association of Sleep Medicine clinical scoring rules. It was first tested against other published algorithms using manually scored LM in the WSC. Rules were then modified to accommodate baseline noise and electrocardiography interference and to better exclude LM adjacent to respiratory events. The S-PLMAD incorporates adaptive noise cancelling of cardiac interference and noise-floor adjustable detection thresholds, removes LM secondary to sleep disordered breathing within 5 sec of respiratory events, and is robust to transient artifacts. Furthermore, it provides PLM indices for sleep (PLMS and wake plus periodicity index and other metrics. To validate the final S-PLMAD, experts visually scored 78 studies in normal sleepers and patients with restless legs syndrome, sleep disordered breathing, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, narcolepsy-cataplexy, insomnia, and delayed sleep phase syndrome. PLM indices were highly correlated between expert, visually scored PLMS and automatic scorings (r² = 0.94 in WSC and r² = 0.94 in SSC. In conclusion, The S-PLMAD is a robust

  5. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry determination of GHB, GHB-glucuronide in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of narcoleptic patients under sodium oxybate treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittarelli, Roberta; Pichini, Simona; Pedersen, Daniel S; Pacifici, Roberta; Moresco, Monica; Pizza, Fabio; Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2017-01-25

    Sodium oxybate (Xyrem(®)), the sodium salt of γ- hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), is a first-line treatment of the symptoms induced by type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) and it is highly effective in improving sleep architecture, decreasing excessive daytime sleepiness and the frequency of cataplexy attacks. Using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) validated method, GHB was determined together with its glucuronide (GHB-gluc), in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of NT1 patients under sodium oxybate treatment. To characterize the plasma pharmacokinetics of GHB, three subjects with NT1 were administered at time 0 and 4h with 1.25, 1.5 and 3.55g Xyrem(®), respectively and had their blood samples collected at 7 time points throughout an 8-h session. CSF specimens, collected for orexin A measurement from the same three subjects 6h after their second administration, were also tested. The results obtained suggested that GHB plasma values increased disproportionally with the rising doses, (Cmax0-4: 12.53, 32.95 and 69.62μg/mL; Cmax4-8: 44.93, 75.03 and 111.93μg/mL for total Xyrem(®) dose of 2.5, 3 and 7g respectively) indicating non-linear dose-response. GHB-Gluc was present only in traces in all plasma samples from treated patients, not changing with increasing Xyrem(®) doses. GHB values of 5.62, 6.10 and 17.74μg/mL for 2, 3 and 7g Xyrem(®) were found in CSF with a significant difference from control values. GHB-Gluc was found in negligible concentrations with no differences to those of control individuals. In conclusion this simple and fast UHPLC-MS/MS method proved useful for pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring of GHB in narcoleptic patients treated with sodium oxybate.

  6. 发作性睡病病因的中西医学研究进展%Updates on the etiology of narcolepsy in western and traditional Chinese medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁霜; 顾云帆; 黄弋玲(综述); 江帆(审校)

    2016-01-01

    发作性睡病是一种慢性睡眠障碍,是一种白天过度嗜睡的重要原因,往往伴有猝倒发作、睡眠瘫痪、睡眠幻觉等其他症状,合称为发作性睡病四联症。该文综述近年来中西医在发作性睡病病因方面的研究进展,为本病发病机制的研究提供进一步的方向。目前,西医主要认为发作性睡病的发病机制与食欲素和HLA-DQB1基因∗0602亚型密切相关,此外,近年来西欧某些国家(英国、芬兰、瑞典)研究还发现, H1 N1流感疫苗的使用导致了发作性睡病发病率明显上升。中医主要认为,阴阳偏盛和营卫运行失常易引起睡眠障碍,同时儿童发作性睡病的病因与脏腑的关系也相当密切。%Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder,and a main cause for excessive daytime sleepiness. It is accompanied by cataplexy,sleep paralysis and sleep hallucinations,collectively known as tetralogy of narcolep-sy. Research progresses in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy are briefly summarized in this article,paving directions for further research. Both the realm of western and Chinese traditional medicine are concerned. Western medicine stated that it′s pathogenesis is closely related to orexin and HLA-DQB1∗0602. In addition,recent studies from countries in Western Europe(UK,Finland,and Sweden)have indicated that the use of H1N1 influenza vaccine gives rise to incidence of the narcolepsy as well. From the realm of Chinese medicine,upsetting the balance of Yin-Yang and Yin-Wei are also possible causes attributed to the disease. In the case of child narcolepsy,the con-dition of the patient′s internal organs is also highly concerned.

  7. 1例发作性睡病的6岁孩子最初误诊为不典型癫痫的病例报告%Case report of narcolepsy in a six-year-old child initially misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周锦泉; 张溪; 董再文

    2014-01-01

    概述:本文报告1例6岁女童首次发生发作性睡病被误诊为不典型癫痫。之后10个月在8家不同医院被误诊为其他疾病,最后才得以确诊。发作性睡病的诊断在小儿中比较困难,因为睡眠发作、猝倒、入睡前幻觉和睡眠麻痹四个主要症状都存在的病例在儿童中极少见到。患儿往往发作期更长、症状多样化。为了缩短从首次发病到确诊的时间,我们建议对所有不明原因过度睡眠的患儿监测睡眠并进行睡眠潜伏期试验,以排除发作性睡病的可能,而不论其相关症状如何。该病例凸显出罕见精神障碍的表现可以是多种多样的,特别是儿童。这就需要临床医生在采集病史时要充分考虑这些病例的非典型表现。%Summary:This report describes a case of first-onset narcolepsy in a six-year-old female that was misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy and other diagnoses at eight different hospitals over a period of 10 months before the correct diagnosis was made. The diagnosis of narcolepsy is more difficult in children because very few of them experience all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy - paroxysmal sleep, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis - and they often have a more prolonged onset and diverse symptoms. To decrease the itme lag between iniital presentaiton and accurate diagnosis, we recommend that in all cases in which children report excessive sleep of unknown etiology - regardless of the associated symptoms - that sleep monitoring and sleep latency tests be conducted to rule out the possibility of narcolepsy. The case highlights the wide variety of presentations of uncommon psychiatric condiitons, paritcularly in children, and the need for clinicians to be aware of the atypical presentaitons of these condiitons when collecitng medical histories.

  8. 103例儿童发作性睡病的临床特点及随访%Respective Analysis of 103 Children with Narcolepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹悦; 刘肖予; 苗硕; 杨健

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conclude clinical manifestations and treatment in children with narcolepsy.Methods The clinical data of 103 narcolepsy children,which were diagnosed by the in-patient department of pediatrics of the Capital Institute of Pediatrics from January of 2011 to August of 2014 and were analyzed retrospectively.Based on the documentaries home and a-broad,we telephoned follow up these children and make a retrospective analysis.Results Excessive daytime sleepiness appeared in all cases,cataplexy in 27 cases,sleep paralysis in 1 cases,hypnogogic hallucinations in 2 cases.85 patients available and total remission rate is 88.24%.Conclusion sleep paralysis and hypnogogic hallucinations could not be obviously observed,Applica-tion of methylphenidate and health education could get good effects.%目的:总结儿童发作性睡病的临床特点及治疗愈后。方法回顾分析2011年01月至2014年8月首都儿科研究所神经内科主要诊断为发作性睡病的103例病案资料及电话随访结果。结果103例患儿全部现日间睡眠过多症状,27例患儿有明显猝倒表现,1例现睡眠瘫痪,2例现睡眠幻觉。可随访到的85例患儿中47例病情缓解,28例痊愈,其中66例应用盐酸哌甲酯治疗。结论我院观察的儿童发作性睡病患者四联征表现并不明显,药物治疗及非药物治疗控制疾病进展良好。

  9. Profile of suvorexant in the management of insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutton EL

    2015-11-01

    action, cataplexy and rapid eye movement (REM sleep behavior disorder could potentially occur in some patients taking this medication. Keywords: insomnia, hypnotic, dual orexin receptor antagonist, orexin, hypocretin 

  10. γ-Hydroxybutyric acid induces actions via the GABAB receptor in arousal and motor control-related nuclei: implications for therapeutic actions in behavioral state disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Vardar, B; Christensen, M H

    2013-09-17

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is used as an effective therapeutic for reducing the hypersomnolence and cataplexy (loss of motor control) of the sleeping disorder, narcolepsy, with an immediate pharmacologic behavioral action of inducing a natural sleep-like state. Despite its clinical use, few studies have examined the cellular actions of this drug on behavioral state-related neurons. Therefore, we monitored GHB-induced responses using calcium imaging within the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the dorsal raphe (DR), two pontine nuclei important in state and motor control. In addition, we recorded GHB-induced membrane responses using whole cell, patch clamp electrophysiology of immunohistochemically-identified principal neurons within these nuclei. GHB induced GABAB receptor-mediated rises in calcium in neurons of the LDT and the DR. However, the pattern and amplitude of calcium rises differed greatly between these two nuclei. GHB induced GABAB receptor antagonist-sensitive outward currents/hyperpolarizations in immunohistochemically-identified cholinergic LDT and serotonergic DR neurons. However, GHB had this action in a greater proportion of DR cells than LDT neurons. Further, larger inhibitory currents were induced in DR cells when compared to the amplitude of GHB-induced current in LDT-responding cells. Finally, NCS-382 and HOCPCA, a reported antagonist and agonist specific to activity at the putative GHB receptor, respectively, with no demonstrated binding at the GABAB receptor, failed to block GHB-induced effects or elicit any discernible electrophysiological action when applied alone, indicating a lack of involvement of a GHB receptor in mediating GHB actions. Taken together, our data support the conclusion that GHB may be exerting its actions on state and motor control, in part, via an acutely mediated strong inhibition of serotonergic DR neurons and a more modest inhibitory action on a smaller proportion of LDT cholinergic neurons. Given the roles played by

  11. Orexin-1 receptor blockade dysregulates REM sleep in the presence of orexin-2 receptor antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eDugovic

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the prominent role of orexins in the maintenance of wakefulness via activation of orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R receptors, various dual OX1/2R antagonists have been shown to promote sleep in animals and humans. While selective blockade of OX2R seems to be sufficient to initiate and prolong sleep, the beneficial effect of additional inhibition of OX1R remains controversial. The relative contribution of OX1R and OX2R to the sleep effects induced by a dual OX1/2R antagonist was further investigated in the rat, and specifically on rapid eye movement (REM sleep since a deficiency of the orexin system is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy based on clinical and pre-clinical data. As expected, the dual OX1/2R antagonist SB-649868 was effective in promoting non-REM (NREM and REM sleep following oral dosing (10 and 30 mg/kg at the onset of the dark phase. However, a disruption of REM sleep was evidenced by a more pronounced reduction in the onset of REM as compared to NREM sleep, a marked enhancement of the REM/total sleep ratio, and the occurrence of a few episodes of direct wake to REM sleep transitions (REM intrusion. When administered subcutaneously, the OX2R antagonist JNJ-10397049 (10 mg/kg increased NREM duration whereas the OX1R antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg did not alter sleep. REM sleep was not affected either by OX2R or OX1R blockade alone, but administration of the OX1R antagonist in combination with the OX2R antagonist induced a significant reduction in REM sleep latency and an increase in REM sleep duration at the expense of the time spent in NREM sleep. These results indicate that additional blockade of OX1R to OX2R antagonism elicits a dysregulation of REM sleep by shifting the balance in favor of REM sleep at the expense of NREM sleep that may increase the risk of adverse events. Translation of this hypothesis remains to be tested in the clinic.

  12. History of narcolepsy at Stanford University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Emmanuel J M

    2014-05-01

    Although narcolepsy was first described in the late nineteenth century in Germany and France, much of the research on this disorder has been conducted at Stanford University, starting with Drs. William C. Dement and Christian Guilleminault in the 1970s. The prevalence of narcolepsy was established, and a canine model discovered. Following the finding in Japan that almost all patients with narcolepsy carry a specific HLA subtype, HLA-DR2, Hugh Mac Devitt, F. Carl Grumet, and Larry Steinman initiated immunological studies, but results were generally negative. Using the narcoleptic canines, Dr. Nishino and I established that stimulants increased wakefulness by stimulating dopaminergic transmission while antidepressants suppress cataplexy via adrenergic reuptake inhibition. A linkage study was initiated with Dr. Grumet in 1988, and after 10 years of work, the canine narcolepsy gene was cloned by in 1999 and identified as the hypocretin (orexin) receptor 2. In 1992, studying African Americans, we also found that DQ0602 rather than DR2 was a better marker for narcolepsy across all ethnic groups. In 2000, Dr. Nishino and I, in collaboration with Dr. Lammers in the Netherlands, found that hypocretin 1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were undetectable in most cases, establishing hypocretin deficiency as the cause of narcolepsy. Pursuing this research, our and Dr. Siegel's group, examining postmortem brains, found that the decreased CSF hypocretin 1 was secondary to the loss the 70,000 neurons producing hypocretin in the hypothalamus. This finding revived the autoimmune hypothesis but attempts at demonstrating immune targeting of hypocretin cells failed until 2013. At this date, Dr. Elisabeth Mellins and I discovered that narcolepsy is characterized by the presence of autoreactive CD4(+) T cells to hypocretin fragments when presented by DQ0602. Following reports that narcolepsy cases were triggered by vaccinations and infections against influenza A 2009 pH1N1, a new

  13. [Dr. John Baptiste Edouard Gélineau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janković, S; Susić, V; Sokić, D; Lević, Z

    1996-01-01

    With this brief review we honor the memory of the great French doctor Jean Baptiste Edouard Gélineau. Dr. Gélineau was born on December 23, 1828 at Blaye, Gironde, close to the Bordeaux region. His name is connected with the first clinical description of the disease for which he, both by the right of the primacy as well as ad valorem of his first two names, coined the name "narcolepsy". He was the first to notice the intrinsically evanescent symptoms of narcolepsy, such as excessive daytime somnolence, imperative sleep habits and cataplexy or "astasia" as he called it, and incorporate them into a single clinical syndrome. In 1881 Gélineau discussed Kaffe's case of "maladie du sommeil" as a proof of the existence of the new disease described a year before. As a good clinical observer Gélineau noticed the close relation of emotional engagement and astasia. His attitude was that narcolepsy was a nosologic entity, a disease sui generis, but admitted that it could appear purely as a symptom only. This was in discordance with the views in England where (in 1928) Dr. Samuel Alexander Kinnier Wilson repudiated such convictions; in 1930 Lhermitte still shared the same opinion. Gélineau differentiated narcolepsy from epilepsy with the elegance of clinical reasoning. Overall, Gélineau described three elements of the narcoleptic pentade. Sleep paralyses were first described by Mitchell in 1876, and were first attributed to narcolepsy by Wilson in 1928; in 1930 Lhermitte first described hypnapompic, and Daniels, in 1934, hypnagogic sleep paralysis. Hypnagogic hallucinations were described by Maury in 1848 and subsequently by de Saint Denis in 1867. In twenties they were thoroughly studiesed during the epidemic encephalitis and after the Big War in 1922 by Levy. The life story of Dr. Gélineau covers multivarious activities. As a young student of the Rochefort Navy Medical School he took part in the fight against colera which deluged the city of La Rochelle. In 1849 he

  14. Determination of GHB levels in breast milk and correlation with blood concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busardò, Francesco Paolo; Bertol, Elisabetta; Mannocchi, Giulio; Tittarelli, Roberta; Pantano, Flaminia; Vaiano, Fabio; Baglio, Giovanni; Kyriakou, Chrystalla; Marinelli, Enrico

    2016-08-01

    The sodium salt of GHB or sodium oxybate is approved and registered in some countries as a therapeutic substance (Xyrem(®)) for the treatment of narcolepsy-associated cataplexy. This study was designed to measure the GHB endogenous levels in blood and breast milk of 20 breastfeeding women. In addition, blood and breast milk samples of a 32-year-old narcoleptic nursing mother, who was on sodium oxybate treatment, were simultaneously collected at 0.5, 1, 3, 4 and 5h following a 4.5g GHB dose and analyzed, in order to establish the safety interval of time to breastfeed. A GC-MS method for the detection and quantification of GHB in blood and breast milk was developed and fully validated. The geometric mean of endogenous GHB levels in blood and breast milk detected at time 0 were 0.57mg/L; 95% Reference Interval (RI): 0.21-1.52mg/L and 0.36mg/L; 95% RI: 0.13-1.03mg/L, respectively. The geometric mean of the concentration of GHB in milk was 37% less (95% RI: from 14 to 53%) compared to that found in the blood. The analysis of blood and breast milk samples collected from the 32 years-old female showed the following results: GHB blood concentration 0.5h after medication intake was 80.10mg/L, reaching the peak 1h after the drug administration (108.34mg/L) and it steadily decreased to reach a level of 1.75mg/L, 5h after the medication intake. The GHB concentration found in breast milk followed the same pattern as for the blood, with the highest concentration being 23.19mg/L, 1h after sodium oxybate administration and the lowest 0.99mg/L, 5h after the medication's intake. The comparison between blood and breast milk GHB levels in the 32-year-old woman, showed significant lower GHB levels in milk at 0.5, 1 and 3h, ranging from 71 to 80% less. It is interesting to note that only at 4 and 5h the difference between blood and breast milk GHB levels fell within the 95% RI (14-53%) of endogenous levels. Taking into consideration the absence of reference values for endogenous GHB in

  15. Pineal gland hormone and idiopathic scoliosis: possible effect of melatonin on sleep-related postural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeiano, O; Manzoni, D; Miele, F

    2002-04-01

    regulation of posture during the animal states indicated above. This hypothesis is supported by the facts that: 1) the dorsal pRF may contain specific binding sites for M; 2) this structure is particularly sensitive to M in adolescents, as well as in adult subjects affected by narcoleptic disturbances leading to cataplexy; 3) M increases the release of serotonin (5-HT), a neurotransmitter which enhances the postural tone by acting on the dorsal pRF: on the other hand, deficits in M levels may lower the activity of the serotoninergic raphe system, thus leading to a decrease or suppression of postural activity similar to that occurring either during REM sleep or during the cataplectic episodes typical of narcoleptic patients; 4) IS patients may show episodes of sleep apnea, a phenomenon which has been attibuted to a reduced tonic contraction of primary and accessory respiratory muscles during REM, resulting from a reduced release of 5-HT at dorsal pontine level. It has been postulated that, if the reduced M and 5-HT levels are subliminal to produce a complete suppression of posture under the conditions reported above, the reduced postural tone, which results from this condition may lead to the development of IS, due to hypotonia which affects the axial musculature. M secretion could be regulated not only by the activity of the serotoninergic raphe neurons projecting to the pineal gland, but probably also by the activity of noradrenergic LC neurons. It is likely that the development of IS, which results from a reduced level of M and 5-HT, may occur provided that the noradrenergic LC inhibition of the pontine structures is impaired. Such impairment could depend upon genetic factors, similar to those postulated to play a role in narcolepsy. In conclusion, the possibility exists that an impaired activity of brain monoaminergic systems may lead to disfunction in the production of M, which is apparently an important factor in the etiopathogenesis of IS.

  16. Rare Disease Patient Registry & Natural History Study - Coordination of Rare Diseases at Sanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Rare Disorders; Undiagnosed Disorders; Disorders of Unknown Prevalence; Cornelia De Lange Syndrome; Prenatal Benign Hypophosphatasia; Perinatal Lethal Hypophosphatasia; Odontohypophosphatasia; Adult Hypophosphatasia; Childhood-onset Hypophosphatasia; Infantile Hypophosphatasia; Hypophosphatasia; Kabuki Syndrome; Bohring-Opitz Syndrome; Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy; Narcolepsy-cataplexy; Hypersomnolence Disorder; Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia With Long Sleep Time; Idiopathic Hypersomnia; Kleine-Levin Syndrome; Kawasaki Disease; Leiomyosarcoma; Leiomyosarcoma of the Corpus Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of the Cervix Uteri; Leiomyosarcoma of Small Intestine; Acquired Myasthenia Gravis; Addison Disease; Hyperacusis (Hyperacousis); Juvenile Myasthenia Gravis; Transient Neonatal Myasthenia Gravis; Williams Syndrome; Lyme Disease; Myasthenia Gravis; Marinesco Sjogren Syndrome(Marinesco-Sjogren Syndrome); Isolated Klippel-Feil Syndrome; Frasier Syndrome; Denys-Drash Syndrome; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome; Emanuel Syndrome; Isolated Aniridia; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Paternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Translocation/Inversion; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microdeletion; Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome; Aniridia-intellectual Disability Syndrome; Aniridia - Renal Agenesis - Psychomotor Retardation; Aniridia - Ptosis - Intellectual Disability - Familial Obesity; Aniridia - Cerebellar Ataxia - Intellectual Disability; Aniridia - Absent Patella; Aniridia; Peters Anomaly - Cataract; Peters Anomaly; Potocki-Shaffer Syndrome; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Maternal Uniparental Disomy of Chromosome 11; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to Imprinting Defect of 11p15; Silver-Russell Syndrome Due to 11p15 Microduplication; Syndromic Aniridia; WAGR Syndrome; Wolf

  17. 盐酸托莫西汀治疗儿童发作性睡病66例临床观察%Clinical effect of atomoxetine hydrochloride in 66 children with narcolepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珅; 丁昌红; 吴沪生; 方方; 王晓慧; 任晓暾

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the efficacy and safety of atomoxetine hydrochloride in children with narcolepsy.Method Totally 66 patients with narcolepsy who were conformed international classification of sleep disturbances (ICSD-2) diagnostic criteria treated with atomoxetine hydrochloride seen from November 2010 to December 2014 were enrolled into this study,42 of them were male and 24 female,mean age of onset was 7.5 years (3.75-13.00 years),mean duration before diagnosis was 1.75 years (0.25-5.00 years).Complete blood count,liver and kidney function,multiple sleep latency test (MSLT),polysomnography(PGS),neuroimaging and electroencephalography (EEG) were performed for each patient.For some of the children HLA-DR2 gene and serum markers of infection were tested.The 66 cases were followed up from 2 to 49 months (average 18 months) to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions.Results In 62 cases excessive daytime sleepiness was improved,in 11 cases (16.7%) it was controlled (16.7%),in 29 cases (43.9%)the treatment was obviously effective and in 22 (33.3 %) it was effective;cataplexy occurred in 54 cases,in 18 (33.3%) it was controlled,in 19 (35.2%) the treatment was obviously effective and in 10(18.5%) effective;night sleep disorders existed in 55 cases,in 47 cases it was improved,in 14(25.5%) it was controlled,in 20 (36.4%)the treatment was obviously effective and in 13 (23.6%)effective;hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucination was present in 13 cases,in only 4 these symptoms were controlled.Sleep paralysis existed in 4 cases,it was controlled in only 1 case.In 18 cases attention and learning efficiency improved.Anorexia occurred in 18 cases,mood disorder in 5 cases,depression in 2 cases,nocturia,muscle tremors,involuntary tongue movement each occurred in 1 case.P-R interval prolongation and atrial premature contraction were found in 1 case.Conclusion Atomoxetine hydrochloride showed good effects in patients with narcolepsy on excessive daytime

  18. 发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患的诊断与治疗分析%Diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy and narcolepsy comorbid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨志仙; 韩芳; 秦炯; 刘晓燕

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical diagnosis and treatment process of narcolepsy and epilepsy co-existence,and thereby to improve awareness of such cases.Method The clinical manifestations of 2 cases were observed,and video-electroencephalogram (VEEG),multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT) were performed.Hypocretin 1 level in cerebrospinal fluid was examined in one case.Result The onset of disease of case one was started with epilepsy with myoclonic seizure.After half a year,catalepsy induced by emotion especially laughing and excessive daytime sleepiness appeared.MSLT was positive and hypocretin 1 level decreased.Narcolepsy-cataplexy was definitely diagnosed in this case.Valproate was given and seizure was controlled completely,but the excessive daytime sleepiness was aggravated.Combination of valproate,methylphenidate and clomipramine treatment improved the symptoms of narcolepsy and the patient was still free of epileptic seizures.The onset symptoms of case 2 were catalepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness.MSLT was positive.The treatment was ineffective because of bad compliance.After 2 years,episodes of impairment of consciousness with automatism occurred.VEEG showed slow waves and spikes in right temporal area.Complex partial seizure was determined.Oxcarbazepine was used and then the patients became seizures free,but the symptoms of narcolepsy were still obvious.Conclusion Comorbidity of narcolepsy and epilepsy is a rare phenomenon.Clinical symptoms,predisposing factor,VEEG and MSLT can help diagnosis and differential diagnosis.The antiepileptic drugs might aggravate drowsiness.Based on therapy of epilepsy by using antiepileptic drugs,low dosage of central nervous system stimulants might improve the drowsiness and catalepsy symptoms of narcolepsy.%目的 观察发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患的临床诊断及治疗过程,提高对此类共患病例的认识.方法 分析2例发作性睡病与癫(癎)共患患儿临床资料、视频脑电图监测(VEEG)及多次