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Sample records for catalytic rna populations

  1. Quasispecies-like behavior observed in catalytic RNA populations evolving in a test tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Arenas, Carolina; Lehman, Niles

    2010-03-23

    During the RNA World, molecular populations were probably very small and highly susceptible to the force of strong random drift. In conjunction with Muller's Ratchet, this would have imposed difficulties for the preservation of the genetic information and the survival of the populations. Mechanisms that allowed these nascent populations to overcome this problem must have been advantageous. Using continuous in vitro evolution experimentation with an increased mutation rate imposed by MnCl2, it was found that clonal 100-molecule populations of ribozymes clearly exhibit certain characteristics of a quasispecies. This is the first time this has been seen with a catalytic RNA. Extensive genotypic sampling from two replicate lineages was gathered and phylogenetic networks were constructed to elucidate the structure of the evolving RNA populations. A common distribution was found in which a mutant sequence was present at high frequency, surrounded by a cloud of mutant with lower frequencies. This is a typical distribution of quasispecies. Most of the mutants in these clouds were connected by short Hamming distance values, indicating their close relatedness. The quasispecies nature of mutant RNA clouds facilitates the recovery of genotypes under pressure of being removed from the population by random drift. The empirical populations therefore evolved a genotypic resiliency despite a high mutation rate by adopting the characteristics of quasispecies, implying that primordial RNA pools could have used this strategy to avoid extinction.

  2. Quasispecies-like behavior observed in catalytic RNA populations evolving in a test tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Niles

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the RNA World, molecular populations were probably very small and highly susceptible to the force of strong random drift. In conjunction with Muller's Ratchet, this would have imposed difficulties for the preservation of the genetic information and the survival of the populations. Mechanisms that allowed these nascent populations to overcome this problem must have been advantageous. Results Using continuous in vitro evolution experimentation with an increased mutation rate imposed by MnCl2, it was found that clonal 100-molecule populations of ribozymes clearly exhibit certain characteristics of a quasispecies. This is the first time this has been seen with a catalytic RNA. Extensive genotypic sampling from two replicate lineages was gathered and phylogenetic networks were constructed to elucidate the structure of the evolving RNA populations. A common distribution was found in which a mutant sequence was present at high frequency, surrounded by a cloud of mutant with lower frequencies. This is a typical distribution of quasispecies. Most of the mutants in these clouds were connected by short Hamming distance values, indicating their close relatedness. Conclusions The quasispecies nature of mutant RNA clouds facilitates the recovery of genotypes under pressure of being removed from the population by random drift. The empirical populations therefore evolved a genotypic resiliency despite a high mutation rate by adopting the characteristics of quasispecies, implying that primordial RNA pools could have used this strategy to avoid extinction.

  3. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, Joseph Albert [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 121±s are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  4. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  5. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

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    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  6. DNA/RNA hybrid substrates modulate the catalytic activity of purified AID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdouni, Hala S; King, Justin J; Ghorbani, Atefeh; Fifield, Heather; Berghuis, Lesley; Larijani, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts cytidine to uridine at Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, initiating somatic hypermutation and class switching of antibodies. In vitro, AID acts on single stranded DNA (ssDNA), but neither double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligonucleotides nor RNA, and it is believed that transcription is the in vivo generator of ssDNA targeted by AID. It is also known that the Ig loci, particularly the switch (S) regions targeted by AID are rich in transcription-generated DNA/RNA hybrids. Here, we examined the binding and catalytic behavior of purified AID on DNA/RNA hybrid substrates bearing either random sequences or GC-rich sequences simulating Ig S regions. If substrates were made up of a random sequence, AID preferred substrates composed entirely of DNA over DNA/RNA hybrids. In contrast, if substrates were composed of S region sequences, AID preferred to mutate DNA/RNA hybrids over substrates composed entirely of DNA. Accordingly, AID exhibited a significantly higher affinity for binding DNA/RNA hybrid substrates composed specifically of S region sequences, than any other substrates composed of DNA. Thus, in the absence of any other cellular processes or factors, AID itself favors binding and mutating DNA/RNA hybrids composed of S region sequences. AID:DNA/RNA complex formation and supporting mutational analyses suggest that recognition of DNA/RNA hybrids is an inherent structural property of AID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like protein-3G in cervical cancer.

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    Xu, Yanhua; Leng, Junhong; Xue, Fang; Dong, Ruiqian

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecologic cancers. The role of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like protein-3G (APCBEC-3G) in cervical cancer has yet to be elucidated. This study intends to explore the effect of APCBEC-3G on cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. In vitro, the cervical cancer cell line Hela was transfected by APCBEC-3G plasmid. The mRNA and protein expression levels of APCBEC-3G were detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Cervical cancer cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Transwell assay was applied to measure the effect of APCBEC-3G on cell invasion. APCBEC-3G mRNA and protein increased significantly after transfection (P3G serves as a suppressor of cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Our research provides theoretical basis for further investigation APOBEC-3G effect in cervical cancer occurrence and development.

  8. The evolution of RNA viruses: A population genetics view

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    Moya, Andrés; Elena, Santiago F.; Bracho, Alma; Miralles, Rosario; Barrio, Eladio

    2000-01-01

    RNA viruses are excellent experimental models for studying evolution under the theoretical framework of population genetics. For a proper justification of this thesis we have introduced some properties of RNA viruses that are relevant for studying evolution. On the other hand, population genetics is a reductionistic theory of evolution. It does not consider or make simplistic assumptions on the transformation laws within and between genotypic and phenotypic spaces. However, such laws are minimized in the case of RNA viruses because the phenotypic space maps onto the genotypic space in a much more linear way than on higher DNA-based organisms. Under experimental conditions, we have tested the role of deleterious and beneficial mutations in the degree of adaptation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a nonsegmented virus of negative strand. We also have studied how effective population size, initial genetic variability in populations, and environmental heterogeneity shapes the impact of mutations in the evolution of vesicular stomatitis virus. Finally, in an integrative attempt, we discuss pros and cons of the quasispecies theory compared with classic population genetics models for haploid organisms to explain the evolution of RNA viruses. PMID:10860958

  9. Catalytic mechanism of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase: sulfur transfer is mediated by disulfide and persulfide.

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    Liu, Yuchen; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Zhu, Xiang; Orlando, Ron; Dean, Dennis R; Söll, Dieter; Yuan, Jing

    2012-02-17

    Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) catalyzes the sulfhydrylation of tRNA-bound O-phosphoserine (Sep) to form cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys) (Cys-tRNA(Cys)) in methanogens that lack the canonical cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). A crystal structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus SepCysS apoenzyme provides information on the binding of the pyridoxal phosphate cofactor as well as on amino acid residues that may be involved in substrate binding. However, the mechanism of sulfur transfer to form cysteine was not known. Using an in vivo Escherichia coli complementation assay, we showed that all three highly conserved Cys residues in SepCysS (Cys(64), Cys(67), and Cys(272) in the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii enzyme) are essential for the sulfhydrylation reaction in vivo. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that Cys(64) and Cys(67) form a disulfide linkage and carry a sulfane sulfur in a portion of the enzyme. These results suggest that a persulfide group (containing a sulfane sulfur) is the proximal sulfur donor for cysteine biosynthesis. The presence of Cys(272) increased the amount of sulfane sulfur in SepCysS by 3-fold, suggesting that this Cys residue facilitates the generation of the persulfide group. Based upon these findings, we propose for SepCysS a sulfur relay mechanism that recruits both disulfide and persulfide intermediates.

  10. Catalytic mechanism and inhibition of tRNA (Uracil-5-)methyltransferase: evidence for covalent catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santi, D.V.; Hardy, L.W.

    1987-01-01

    tRNA (Ura-5-) methyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) to the 5-carbon of a specific Urd residue in tRNA. This results in stoichiometric release of tritium from [5- 3 H] Urd-labeled substrate tRNA isolated from methyltransferase-deficient Escherichia coli. The enzyme also catalyzes an AdoMet-independent exchange reaction between [5- 3 H]-Urd-labeled substrate tRNA and protons of water at a rate that is about 1% that of the normal methylation reaction, but with identical stoichiometry. S-Adenosylhomocysteine inhibits the rate of the exchange reaction by 2-3-fold, whereas an analog having the sulfur of AdoMet replaced by nitrogen accelerates the exchange reaction 9-fold. In the presence (but not absence) of AdoMet, 5-fluorouracil-substituted tRNA (FUra-tRNA) leads to the first-order inactivation of the enzyme. This is accompanied by the formation of a stable covalent complex containing the enzyme, FUra-tRNA, and the methyl group AdoMet. A mechanism for catalysis is proposed that explains both the 5-H exchange reaction and the inhibition by FUra-tRNA: the enzyme forms a covalent Michael adduct with substrate or inhibitor tRNA by attack of a nucleophilic group of the enzyme at carbon 6 of the pyrimidine residue to be modified. As a result, an anion equivalent is generated at carbon 5 that is sufficiently reactive to be methylated by AdoMet. Preliminary experiments and precedents suggest that the nucleophilic catalyst of the enzyme is a thiol group of cysteine. The potent irreversible inhibition by FUra-tRNA suggest that a mechanism for the RNA effects of FUra may also involve irreversible inhibition of RNA-modifying enzymes

  11. Catalytic properties of RNA polymerases IV and V: accuracy, nucleotide incorporation and rNTP/dNTP discrimination.

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    Marasco, Michelle; Li, Weiyi; Lynch, Michael; Pikaard, Craig S

    2017-11-02

    All eukaryotes have three essential nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases, abbreviated as Pol I, Pol II and Pol III. Plants are remarkable in having two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V, which synthesize noncoding RNAs that coordinate RNA-directed DNA methylation for silencing of transposons and a subset of genes. Based on their subunit compositions, Pols IV and V clearly evolved as specialized forms of Pol II, but their catalytic properties remain undefined. Here, we show that Pols IV and V differ from one another, and Pol II, in nucleotide incorporation rate, transcriptional accuracy and the ability to discriminate between ribonucleotides and deoxyribonucleotides. Pol IV transcription is considerably more error-prone than Pols II or V, which may be tolerable in its synthesis of short RNAs that serve as precursors for siRNAs targeting non-identical members of transposon families. By contrast, Pol V exhibits high fidelity transcription, similar to Pol II, suggesting a need for Pol V transcripts to faithfully reflect the DNA sequence of target loci to which siRNA-Argonaute silencing complexes are recruited. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in t...... inactivation by hemin plus hydrogen peroxide. The sensitivity to oxidation of A. ferrooxidans GluRS1 might provide a means to regulate tetrapyrrole and protein biosynthesis in response to extreme changes in both the redox and heme status of the cell via a single enzyme....

  13. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvissel, Anne-Katrine; Orstavik, Sigurd; Eikvar, Sissel; Brede, Gaute; Jahnsen, Tore; Collas, Philippe; Akusjaervi, Goeran; Skalhegg, Bjorn Steen

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both Cα and Cβ are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism

  14. Alterations in Lipoxygenase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Catalytic Activity and mRNA Expression in Prostate Carcinoma

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    Scott B. Shappell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in prostate tissues and especially cell lines have suggested roles for arachidonic acid (AA metabolizing enzymes in prostate adenocarcinoma (Pca development or progression. The goal of this study was to more fully characterize lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 gene expression and AA metabolism in benign and malignant prostate using snap-frozen tissues obtained intraoperatively and mRNA analyses and enzyme assays. Formation of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE was detected in 23/29 benign samples and 15-LOX-2 mRNA was detected in 21/25 benign samples. In pairs of pure benign and Pca from the same patients, 15-HETE production and 15-LOX-2 mRNA were reduced in Pca versus benign in 9/14 (P=.04 and 14/17 (P=.002, respectively. Under the same conditions, neither 5HETE nor 12-HETE formation was detectable in 29 benign and 24 tumor samples; with a more sensitive assay, traces were detected in some samples, but there was no clear association with tumor tissue. COX-2 mRNA was detected by nuclease protection assay in 7/16 benign samples and 5/16 tumors. In benign and tumor pairs from 10 patients, COX-2 was higher in tumor versus benign in only 2, with similar results by in situ hybridization. Paraffin immunoperoxidase for COX2 was performed in whole mount sections from 87 additional radical prostatectomy specimens, with strong expression in ejaculatory duct as a positive control and corroboration with in situ hybridization. No immunostaining was detected in benign prostate or tumor in 45% of cases. Greater immunostaining in tumor versus benign was present in only 17% of cases, and correlated with high tumor grade (Gleason score 8 and 9 vs. 5 to 7. In conclusion, reduced 15-LOX-2 expression and 15-HETE formation is the most characteristic alteration of AA metabolism in Pca. Increased 12-HETE and 5-HETE formation in Pca were not discernible. Increased COX-2 expression is not a typical abnormality in Pca in general, but

  15. MicroRNA-triggered, cascaded and catalytic self-assembly of functional ``DNAzyme ferris wheel'' nanostructures for highly sensitive colorimetric detection of cancer cells

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    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbin; Li, Xin; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2015-05-01

    The construction of DNA nanostructures with various sizes and shapes has significantly advanced during the past three decades, yet the application of these DNA nanostructures for solving real problems is still in the early stage. On the basis of microRNA-triggered, catalytic self-assembly formation of the functional ``DNAzyme ferris wheel'' nanostructures, we show here a new signal amplification platform for highly sensitive, label-free and non-enzyme colorimetric detection of a small number of human prostate cancer cells. The microRNA (miR-141), which is catalytically recycled and reused, triggers isothermal self-assembly of a pre-designed, G-quadruplex sequence containing hairpin DNAs into ``DNAzyme ferris wheel''-like nanostructures (in association with hemin) with horseradish peroxidase mimicking activity. These DNAzyme nanostructures catalyze an intensified color transition of the probe solution for highly sensitive detection of miR-141 down to 0.5 pM with the naked eye, and the monitoring of as low as 283 human prostate cancer cells can also, theoretically, be achieved in a colorimetric approach. The work demonstrated here thus offers new opportunities for the construction of functional DNA nanostructures and for the application of these DNA nanostructures as an effective signal amplification means in the sensitive detection of nucleic acid biomarkers.

  16. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations.

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    Jeffrey R Kugelman

    Full Text Available Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic "no amplification" method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a "targeted" amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA as a "random" amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq as an advanced "no amplification" method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a "targeted" enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4-5 of all compared methods.

  17. RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  18. Insight into the recognition, binding, and reactivity of catalytic metallodrugs targeting stem loop IIb of hepatitis C IRES RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Seth S; Ross, Martin James; Fidai, Insiya; Cowan, James A

    2014-06-01

    The complex Cu-GGHYrFK-amide (1-Cu) was previously reported as a novel metallotherapeutic that catalytically inactivates stem loop IIb (SLIIb) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) RNA and demonstrates significant antiviral activity in a cellular HCV replicon assay. Herein we describe additional studies focused on understanding the cleavage mechanism as well as the relationship of catalyst configuration to structural recognition and site-selective cleavage of the structured RNA motif. These are advanced by use of a combination of MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, melting temperature determinations, and computational analysis to develop a structural model for binding and reactivity toward SLIIb of the IRES RNA. In addition, the binding, reactivity, and structural chemistry of the all-D-amino acid form of this metallopeptide, complex 2-Cu, are reported and compared with those of complex 1-Cu. In vitro RNA binding and cleavage assays for complex 2-Cu show a KD value of 76 ± 3 nM, and Michaelis-Menten parameters of kcat =0.14 ± 0.01 min(-1) and KM =7.9 ± 1.2 μM, with a turnover number exceeding 40. In a luciferase-based cellular replicon assay Cu-GGhyrfk-amide shows activity similar to that of the 1-Cu parent peptide, with an IC50 value of 1.9 ± 0.4 μM and cytotoxicity exceeding 100 μM. RT-PCR experiments confirm a significant decrease in HCV RNA levels in replicon assays for up to nine days when treated with complex 1-Cu in three-day dosing increments. This study shows the influence that the α-carbon stereocenter has for this new class of compounds, while detailed mass spectrometry and computational analyses provide new insight into the mechanisms of recognition, binding, and reactivity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Error baseline rates of five sample preparation methods used to characterize RNA virus populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugelman, Jeffrey R.; Wiley, Michael R.; Nagle, Elyse R.; Reyes, Daniel; Pfeffer, Brad P.; Kuhn, Jens H.; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Palacios, Gustavo F.

    2017-01-01

    Individual RNA viruses typically occur as populations of genomes that differ slightly from each other due to mutations introduced by the error-prone viral polymerase. Understanding the variability of RNA virus genome populations is critical for understanding virus evolution because individual mutant genomes may gain evolutionary selective advantages and give rise to dominant subpopulations, possibly even leading to the emergence of viruses resistant to medical countermeasures. Reverse transcription of virus genome populations followed by next-generation sequencing is the only available method to characterize variation for RNA viruses. However, both steps may lead to the introduction of artificial mutations, thereby skewing the data. To better understand how such errors are introduced during sample preparation, we determined and compared error baseline rates of five different sample preparation methods by analyzing in vitro transcribed Ebola virus RNA from an artificial plasmid-based system. These methods included: shotgun sequencing from plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a basic “no amplification” method, amplicon sequencing from the plasmid DNA or in vitro transcribed RNA as a “targeted” amplification method, sequence-independent single-primer amplification (SISPA) as a “random” amplification method, rolling circle reverse transcription sequencing (CirSeq) as an advanced “no amplification” method, and Illumina TruSeq RNA Access as a “targeted” enrichment method. The measured error frequencies indicate that RNA Access offers the best tradeoff between sensitivity and sample preparation error (1.4−5) of all compared methods. PMID:28182717

  20. Association between SNPs in microRNA-machinery genes and tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Tibetan population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xingbo; Li, Siyue; QuCuo, MeiLang; Zhou, MeiLang; Zhou, Yi; Hu, Xin; Zhou, Juan; Lu, Xiaojun; Wang, Jun; Hua, Wei; Ye, Yuanxin; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Lanlan

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality caused by infectious agents worldwide. Although our current understanding of the pathogenesis of TB is far from clear, there is a growing body of evidence suggesting a genetic contribution to the etiology of TB. By analyzing 294 TB cases and 287 healthy controls in a Chinese Tibetan population, we used a candidate gene approach to evaluate the association between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10719, rs3757, rs3742330, rs636832, rs7813, and rs3744741) in microRNA machinery genes and TB susceptibility. The genotypic distributions of rs3757 and rs3744741 in controls were not in accordance with the Hardy–Weinberg Equilibrium (P microRNA-632 (miR-632) and that the G allele alters the affinity of microRNA-mRNA binding by disrupting the local structure of dicer 1, ribonuclease type III (DICER) mRNA, presumably allowing for upregulated DICER expression. Taken together, our data suggest that common genetic variations DICER may influence TB risk, possibly through miR-632-mediated regulation. Replication of our studies in other populations will strengthen our understanding of this association.

  1. Host apolipoprotein B messenger RNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G is an innate defensive factor and drug target against hepatitis C virus.

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    Peng, Zong-Gen; Zhao, Zhi-Yun; Li, Yan-Ping; Wang, Yu-Ping; Hao, Lan-Hu; Fan, Bo; Li, Yu-Huan; Wang, Yue-Ming; Shan, Yong-Qiang; Han, Yan-Xing; Zhu, Yan-Ping; Li, Jian-Rui; You, Xue-Fu; Li, Zhuo-Rong; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2011-04-01

    Host cellular factor apolipoprotein B messenger RNA (mRNA)-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (hA3G) is a cytidine deaminase that inhibits a group of viruses including human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). In the continuation of our research on hA3G, we found that hA3G stabilizing compounds significantly inhibited hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication. Therefore, this study investigated the role of hA3G in HCV replication. Introduction of external hA3G into HCV-infected Huh7.5 human hepatocytes inhibited HCV replication; knockdown of endogenous hA3G enhanced HCV replication. Exogenous HIV-1 virion infectivity factor (Vif) decreased intracellular hA3G and therefore enhanced HCV proliferation, suggesting that the presence of Vif might be an explanation for the HIV-1/HCV coinfection often observed in HIV-1(+) individuals. Treatment of the HCV-infected Huh7.5 cells with RN-5 or IMB-26, two known hA3G stabilizing compounds, increased intracellular hA3G and accordingly inhibited HCV replication. The compounds inhibit HCV through increasing the level of hA3G incorporated into HCV particles, but not through inhibiting HCV enzymes. However, G/A hypermutation in the HCV genome were not detected, suggesting a new antiviral mechanism of hA3G in HCV, different from that in HIV-1. Stabilization of hA3G by RN-5 was safe in vivo. hA3G appears to be a cellular restrict factor against HCV and could be a potential target for drug discovery. 2011 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. Reexamining microRNA site accessibility in Drosophila: a population genomics study.

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    Kevin Chen

    Full Text Available Kertesz et al. (Nature Genetics 2008 described PITA, a miRNA target prediction algorithm based on hybridization energy and site accessibility. In this note, we used a population genomics approach to reexamine their data and found that the PITA algorithm had lower specificity than methods based on evolutionary conservation at comparable levels of sensitivity.We also showed that deeply conserved miRNAs tend to have stronger hybridization energies to their targets than do other miRNAs. Although PITA had higher specificity in predicting targets than a naïve seed-match method, this signal was primarily due to the use of a single cutoff score for all miRNAs and to the observed correlation between conservation and hybridization energy. Overall, our results clarify the accuracy of different miRNA target prediction algorithms in Drosophila and the role of site accessibility in miRNA target prediction.

  3. An anti-HIV-1 compound that increases steady-state expression of apoplipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G.

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    Ejima, Tomohiko; Hirota, Mayuko; Mizukami, Tamio; Otsuka, Masami; Fujita, Mikako

    2011-10-01

    Human apoplipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like (APOBEC) 3G (A3G) is an antiviral protein that blocks HIV-1 replication. However, the antiviral activity of A3G is overcome by the HIV-1 protein Vif. This inhibitory function of Vif is related to its ability to degrade A3G in the proteasome. This finding prompted us to examine the activities of 4-(dimethylamino)-2,6-bis[(N-(2-[(2-nitrophenyl)dithio]ethyl)amino)methyl]pyridine (SN-2) and SN-3. We found that 5 µM SN-2 increases the expression of A3G to a level much higher than that observed in the absence of Vif, without affecting the level of Vif expression. The proteasome inhibitor MG-132 increased the level of both A3G and Vif expression. These results demonstrate that A3G is ubiquitinated and degraded in the proteasome by a factor other than Vif, and that SN-2 selectively inhibits these processes. Furthermore, 5 µM SN-2 significantly inhibited the MAGI cell infectivity of wild-type HIV-1. These findings may contribute to the development of a novel anti-HIV-1 drug.

  4. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  5. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  6. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  7. The inhibitory effect of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G) and its family members on the activity of cellular microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    The apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G or APOBEC3G) and its fellow cytidine deaminase family members are potent restrictive factors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and many other retroviruses. However, the cellular function of APOBEC3G remains to be further clarified. It has been reported that APOBEC3s can restrict the mobility of endogenous retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons, suggesting that they can maintain stability in host genomes. However, APOBEC3G is normally cytoplasmic. Further studies have demonstrated that it is associated with an RNase-sensitive high molecular mass (HMM) and located in processing bodies (P-bodies) of replicating T-cells, indicating that the major cellular function of APOBEC3G seems to be related to P-body-related RNA processing and metabolism. As the function of P-body is closely related to miRNA activity, APOBEC3G could affect the miRNA function. Recent studies have demonstrated that APOBEC3G and its family members counteract miRNA-mediated repression of protein translation. Further, APOBEC3G enhances the association of miRNA-targeted mRNA with polysomes, and facilitates the dissociation of miRNA-targeted mRNA from P-bodies. As such, APOBEC3G regulate the activity of cellular miRNAs. Whether this function is related to its potent antiviral activity remains to be further determined.

  8. A Diverse Range of Novel RNA Viruses in Geographically Distinct Honey Bee Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnant, Emily J; Shi, Mang; Buchmann, Gabriele; Blacquière, Tjeerd; Holmes, Edward C; Beekman, Madeleine; Ashe, Alyson

    2017-08-15

    Understanding the diversity and consequences of viruses present in honey bees is critical for maintaining pollinator health and managing the spread of disease. The viral landscape of honey bees ( Apis mellifera ) has changed dramatically since the emergence of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor , which increased the spread of virulent variants of viruses such as deformed wing virus. Previous genomic studies have focused on colonies suffering from infections by Varroa and virulent viruses, which could mask other viral species present in honey bees, resulting in a distorted view of viral diversity. To capture the viral diversity within colonies that are exposed to mites but do not suffer the ultimate consequences of the infestation, we examined populations of honey bees that have evolved naturally or have been selected for resistance to Varroa This analysis revealed seven novel viruses isolated from honey bees sampled globally, including the first identification of negative-sense RNA viruses in honey bees. Notably, two rhabdoviruses were present in three geographically diverse locations and were also present in Varroa mites parasitizing the bees. To characterize the antiviral response, we performed deep sequencing of small RNA populations in honey bees and mites. This provided evidence of a Dicer-mediated immune response in honey bees, while the viral small RNA profile in Varroa mites was novel and distinct from the response observed in bees. Overall, we show that viral diversity in honey bee colonies is greater than previously thought, which encourages additional studies of the bee virome on a global scale and which may ultimately improve disease management. IMPORTANCE Honey bee populations have become increasingly susceptible to colony losses due to pathogenic viruses spread by parasitic Varroa mites. To date, 24 viruses have been described in honey bees, with most belonging to the order Picornavirales Collapsing Varroa -infected colonies are often overwhelmed

  9. A Diverse Range of Novel RNA Viruses in Geographically Distinct Honey Bee Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Mang; Buchmann, Gabriele; Blacquière, Tjeerd; Beekman, Madeleine; Ashe, Alyson

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the diversity and consequences of viruses present in honey bees is critical for maintaining pollinator health and managing the spread of disease. The viral landscape of honey bees (Apis mellifera) has changed dramatically since the emergence of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, which increased the spread of virulent variants of viruses such as deformed wing virus. Previous genomic studies have focused on colonies suffering from infections by Varroa and virulent viruses, which could mask other viral species present in honey bees, resulting in a distorted view of viral diversity. To capture the viral diversity within colonies that are exposed to mites but do not suffer the ultimate consequences of the infestation, we examined populations of honey bees that have evolved naturally or have been selected for resistance to Varroa. This analysis revealed seven novel viruses isolated from honey bees sampled globally, including the first identification of negative-sense RNA viruses in honey bees. Notably, two rhabdoviruses were present in three geographically diverse locations and were also present in Varroa mites parasitizing the bees. To characterize the antiviral response, we performed deep sequencing of small RNA populations in honey bees and mites. This provided evidence of a Dicer-mediated immune response in honey bees, while the viral small RNA profile in Varroa mites was novel and distinct from the response observed in bees. Overall, we show that viral diversity in honey bee colonies is greater than previously thought, which encourages additional studies of the bee virome on a global scale and which may ultimately improve disease management. IMPORTANCE Honey bee populations have become increasingly susceptible to colony losses due to pathogenic viruses spread by parasitic Varroa mites. To date, 24 viruses have been described in honey bees, with most belonging to the order Picornavirales. Collapsing Varroa-infected colonies are often

  10. Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Smidler, Andrea L; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Church, George M

    2014-07-17

    Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology.

  11. A Multisampling Reporter System for Monitoring MicroRNA Activity in the Same Population of Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs downregulate gene expression by binding to the partially complementary sites in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR of target mRNAs. Several methods, such as Northern blot analysis, quantitative real-time RT-PCR, microarray, and the luciferase reporter system, are commonly used to quantify the relative level or activity of miRNAs. The disadvantage of these methods is the requirement for cell lysis, which means that several sets of wells/dishes of cells must be prepared to monitor changes in miRNA activity in time-course studies. In this study, we developed a multisampling reporter system in which two secretable bioluminescence-generating enzymes are employed, one as a reporter and the other as an internal control. The reporters consist of a pair of vectors containing the Metridia luciferase gene, one with and one without a duplicated miRNA targeting sequence at their 3′UTR, while the other vector coding for the secreted alkaline phosphatase gene is used as an internal control. This method allows miRNA activity to be monitored within the same population of cells over time by withdrawing aliquots of the culture medium. The practicability and benefits of this system are addressed in this report.

  12. Association of MiRNA-146a, MiRNA-499, IRAK1 and PADI4 Polymorphisms with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Egyptian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfat Gamil Shaker

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune disease affecting up to 1% of the population worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether miRNA-146a rs2910164, miRNA-499 rs3746444, IRAK1 rs3027898 and PADI4 rs1748033 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to RA in Egyptians and whether they influence disease severity and activity. Methods: The study was performed on 104 unrelated RA patients and 112 healthy subjects. RA patients were further subdivided into active and inactive RA groups. Polymorphisms were genotyped by using real-time polymerase chain reaction with TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Results: Significant differences in the frequency of miRNA-146a rs2910164, miRNA-499 rs3746444, IRAK1 rs3027898 and PADI4 rs1748033 alleles and genotypes were observed between RA patients and controls. Only CA and AA genotypes of IRAK1 rs3027898 shows a significant difference between active and inactive subgroups. MiRNA-146a rs2910164 and IRAK1 rs3027898 polymorphisms were a risk factor for predisposition to RA in codominant and dominant tested inheritance models, while, the miRNA-499 rs3746444 and PADI4 rs1748033 polymorphisms were a risk factor in codominant and recessive one. CG and GG genotypes of miRNA-146a rs2910164 were associated with positive erosions. CA genotype of IRAK1 rs3027898 was associated with low disease activity and negative erosions, while, the AA genotype was associated with high disease activity. CC genotype of PADI4 rs1748033 was associated with negative rheumatoid factor. Conclusion: The 4 studied SNPs were likely to play an important role in the susceptibility to RA and can influence disease severity and activity in Egyptian population.

  13. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  14. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang; Axtell, Michael J.; Fedoroff, Nina V.

    2012-01-01

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display

  15. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  16. Screening of Active Lyssavirus Infection in Wild Bat Populations by Viral RNA Detection on Oropharyngeal Swabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Juan E.; Avellón, Ana; Juste, Javier; Vera, Manuel; Ibáñez, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Brain analysis cannot be used for the investigation of active lyssavirus infection in healthy bats because most bat species are protected by conservation directives. Consequently, serology remains the only tool for performing virological studies on natural bat populations; however, the presence of antibodies merely reflects past exposure to the virus and is not a valid marker of active infection. This work describes a new nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR technique specifically designed for the detection of the European bat virus 1 on oropharyngeal swabs obtained from bats but also able to amplify RNA from the remaining rabies-related lyssaviruses in brain samples. The technique was successfully used for surveillance of a serotine bat (Eptesicus serotinus) colony involved in a case of human exposure, in which 15 out of 71 oropharyngeal swabs were positive. Lyssavirus infection was detected on 13 oropharyngeal swabs but in only 5 brains out of the 34 animals from which simultaneous brain and oropharyngeal samples had been taken. The lyssavirus involved could be rapidly identified by automatic sequencing of the RT-PCR products obtained from 14 brains and three bat oropharyngeal swabs. In conclusion, RT-PCR using oropharyngeal swabs will permit screening of wild bat populations for active lyssavirus infection, for research or epidemiological purposes, in line not only with conservation policies but also in a more efficient manner than classical detection techniques used on the brain. PMID:11574590

  17. Punctual mutations in 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori in Colombian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Andrés Jenuer; Zambrano, Diana Carolina; Pazos, Alvaro Jairo

    2018-04-14

    To characterize punctual mutations in 23S rRNA gene of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) and determine their association with therapeutic failure. PCR products of 23S rRNA gene V domain of 74 H. pylori isolates; 34 resistant to clarithromycin (29 from a low-risk gastric cancer (GC) population: Tumaco-Colombia, and 5 from a high-risk population: Tuquerres-Colombia) and 40 from a susceptible population (28 from Tumaco and 12 from Túquerres) were sequenced using capillary electrophoresis. The concordance between mutations of V domain 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori and therapeutic failure was determined using the Kappa coefficient and McNemar's test was performed to determine the relationship between H. pylori mutations and clarithromycin resistance. 23S rRNA gene from H. pylori was amplified in 56/74 isolates, of which 25 were resistant to clarithromycin (20 from Tumaco and 5 from Túquerres, respectively). In 17 resistant isolates (13 from Tumaco and 4 from Túquerres) the following mutations were found: A1593T1, A1653G2, C1770T, C1954T1, and G1827C in isolates from Tumaco, and A2144G from Túquerres. The mutations T2183C, A2144G and C2196T in H. pylori isolates resistant to clarithromycin from Colombia are reported for the first time. No association between the H. pylori mutations and in vitro clarithromycin resistance was found. However, therapeutic failure of eradication treatment was associated with mutations of 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori ( κ = 0.71). The therapeutic failure of eradication treatment in the two populations from Colombia was associated with mutations of the 23S rRNA gene in clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori .

  18. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  19. Association of mitochondrial lysyl-tRNA synthetase with HIV-1 GagPol involves catalytic domain of the synthetase and transframe and integrase domains of Pol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalak V. F.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Analyze the interaction between Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (LysRS and HIV-1 GagPol to know whether a particular N-terminal sequence of mitochondrial LysRS triggers a specific recognition with GagPol. Methods. Yeast two-hybrid analysis, immunoprecipitation. Results. We have shown that LysRS associates with the Pol domain of GagPol. Conclusions. A model of the assembly of the LysRS:tRNA3Lys:GagPol packaging complex is proposed.

  20. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  1. miRNA Expression Profiles of HPV-Infected Patients with Cervical Cancer in the Uyghur Population in China.

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    Dongmei Gao

    Full Text Available The study aimed to investigate the state of human papillomavirus (HPV infection in patients with cervical cancer in the Uyghur population in China and to identify miRNA as biomarker for cervical cancer and HPV infection. We also performed genotyping to determine the variation in the types of HPV. Using microRNA (miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression between HPV-infected cervical cancer and uninfected normal cervical tissues was determined; the microarray results were verified by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR using 20 samples of both the tissues. The infection rate of HPV in patients with cervical cancer was 96.7% (29 of 30, and the main subtype identified was HPV16 (29 of 29. HPV16 integration assay demonstrated that the majority of infectious cases were of the integrated form (26 of 29. Analysis of 140 miRNAs demonstrated greater than two-fold change in miRNA expression in HPV-infected cervical cancer tissue as compared to that in uninfected cervical tissue. The qRT-PCR analysis verified that the expression of miR-15a-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-20a-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-96, miR-106b-5p, and miR-3653 was higher, while the expression of miR-497-5p was lower in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. The results demonstrate significant changes in miRNA expression in cervical cancer tissues associated with HPV infection as compared to that in normal tissues. These molecular markers may be useful for an early diagnosis and prognosis of cervical cancer in specific human populations.

  2. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Turroni, Silvia; Vannini, Lucia; Bancalari, Elena; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Neviani, Erasmo; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE). The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples.

  3. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrocino, Ilario; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria; Turroni, Silvia; Vannini, Lucia; Bancalari, Elena; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Neviani, Erasmo; Cocolin, Luca

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE). The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples. PMID:26035837

  4. Fecal Microbiota in Healthy Subjects Following Omnivore, Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Culturable Populations and rRNA DGGE Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilario Ferrocino

    Full Text Available In this study, the fecal microbiota of 153 healthy volunteers, recruited from four different locations in Italy, has been studied by coupling viable counts, on different microbiological media, with ribosomal RNA Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (rRNA-DGGE. The volunteers followed three different diets, namely omnivore, ovo-lacto-vegetarian and vegan. The results obtained from culture-dependent and -independent methods have underlined a high level of similarity of the viable fecal microbiota for the three investigated diets. The rRNA DGGE profiles were very complex and comprised a total number of bands that varied from 67 to 64 for the V3 and V9 regions of the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Only a few bands were specific in/of all three diets, and the presence of common taxa associated with the dietary habits was found. As far as the viable counts are concerned, the high similarity of the fecal microbiota was once again confirmed, with only a few of the investigated groups showing significant differences. Interestingly, the samples grouped differently, according to the recruitment site, thus highlighting a higher impact of the food consumed by the volunteers in the specific geographical locations than that of the type of diet. Lastly, it should be mentioned that the fecal microbiota DGGE profiles obtained from the DNA were clearly separated from those produced using RNA, thus underlining a difference between the total and viable populations in the fecal samples.

  5. Enhancing chemosensitivity to gemcitabine via RNA interference targeting the catalytic subunits of protein kinase CK2 in human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreutzer, Jan N; Ruzzene, Maria; Guerra, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a complex genetic disorder that is characterized by rapid progression, invasiveness, resistance to treatment and high molecular heterogeneity. Various agents have been used in clinical trials showing only modest improvements with respect to gemcitabine-based chemotherapy, which continues to be the standard first-line treatment for this disease. However, owing to the overwhelming molecular alterations that have been reported in pancreatic cancer, there is increasing focus on targeting molecular pathways and networks, rather than individual genes or gene-products with a combination of novel chemotherapeutic agents. Cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the individual CK2 subunits. The CK2 protein expression levels were determined and the effect of its down-regulation on chemosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells was investigated. The present study examined the impact on cell death following depletion of the individual protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunits alone or in combination with gemcitabine and the molecular mechanisms by which this effect is achieved. Depletion of the CK2α or -α' subunits in combination with gemcitabine resulted in marked apoptotic and necrotic cell death in PANC-1 cells. We show that the mechanism of cell death is associated with deregulation of distinct survival signaling pathways. Cellular depletion of CK2α leads to phosphorylation and activation of MKK4/JNK while down-regulation of CK2α' exerts major effects on the PI3K/AKT pathway. Results reported here show that the two catalytic subunits of CK2 contribute differently to enhance gemcitabine-induced cell death, the reduced level of CK2α' being the most effective and that simultaneous reduction in the expression of CK2 and other survival factors might be an effective therapeutic strategy for enhancing the sensitivity of human pancreatic cancer towards chemotherapeutic agents

  6. Comparative analysis among the small RNA populations of source, sink and conductive tissues in two different plant-virus pathosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Navarro, Jose Antonio; Sommen, Evelien; Pallas, Vicente

    2015-02-22

    In plants, RNA silencing plays a fundamental role as defence mechanism against viruses. During last years deep-sequencing technology has allowed to analyze the sRNA profile of a large variety of virus-infected tissues. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies have been restricted to a unique tissue and no comparative analysis between phloem and source/sink tissues has been conducted. In the present work, we compared the sRNA populations of source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues in two different plant virus pathosystems. We chose two cucurbit species infected with two viruses very different in genome organization and replication strategy; Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV). Our findings showed, in both systems, an increase of the 21-nt total sRNAs together with a decrease of those with a size of 24-nt in all the infected tissues, except for the phloem where the ratio of 21/24-nt sRNA species remained constant. Comparing the vsRNAs, both PNRSV- and MNSV-infected plants share the same vsRNA size distribution in all the analyzed tissues. Similar accumulation levels of sense and antisense vsRNAs were observed in both systems except for roots that showed a prevalence of (+) vsRNAs in both pathosystems. Additionally, the presence of overrepresented discrete sites along the viral genome, hot spots, were identified and validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. Despite that in PNRSV-infected plants the presence of vsRNAs was scarce both viruses modulated the host sRNA profile. We compare for the first time the sRNA profile of four different tissues, including source, sink and conductive (phloem) tissues, in two plant-virus pathosystems. Our results indicate that antiviral silencing machinery in melon and cucumber acts mainly through DCL4. Upon infection, the total sRNA pattern in phloem remains unchanged in contrast to the rest of the analyzed tissues indicating a certain tissue-tropism to this polulation. Independently of the

  7. RNA interference of three up-regulated transcripts associated with insecticide resistance in an imidacloprid resistant population of Leptinotarsa decemlineata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Justin; Schoville, Sean; Peterson, Nathan; Huseth, Anders S; Lan, Que; Groves, Russell L

    2017-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), is a major agricultural pest of potatoes in the Central Sands production region of Wisconsin. Previous studies have shown that populations of L. decemlineata have become resistant to many classes of insecticides, including the neonicotinoid insecticide, imidacloprid. Furthermore, L. decemlineata has multiple mechanisms of resistance to deal with a pesticide insult, including enhanced metabolic detoxification by cytochrome p450s and glutathione S-transferases. With recent advances in the transcriptomic analysis of imidacloprid susceptible and resistant L. decemlineata populations, it is possible to investigate the role of candidate genes involved in imidacloprid resistance. A recently annotated transcriptome analysis of L. decemlineata was obtained from select populations of L. decemlineata collected in the Central Sands potato production region, which revealed a subset of mRNA transcripts constitutively up-regulated in resistant populations. We hypothesize that a portion of the up-regulated transcripts encoding for genes within the resistant populations also encode for pesticide resistance and can be suppressed to re-establish a susceptible phenotype. In this study, a discrete set of three up-regulated targets were selected for RNA interference experiments using a resistant L. decemlineata population. Following the successful suppression of transcripts encoding for a cytochrome p450, a cuticular protein, and a glutathione synthetase protein in a select L. decemlineata population, we observed reductions in measured resistance to imidacloprid that strongly suggest these genes control essential steps in imidacloprid metabolism in these field populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of active dehalorespiring microbial populations in anoxic river sediment by RNA-based stable isotope probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelmann, S.; Friedrich, M. W.

    2005-12-01

    Tetrachloroethene (perchloroethylene, PCE), a persistent contaminant in aquifers, soils and sediments, can be reductively dechlorinated by anaerobic microorganisms in a process referred to as dehalorespiration. However, the biodiversity of dehalorespiring microorganisms and their distribution especially in pristine environments is largely unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect potentially novel PCE-dehalorespiring microorganisms by using stable isotope probing (SIP), a technique that allows to directly identify the function of uncultivated microbial populations. We simulated a PCE contamination by incubating pristine river sediment in the presence of PCE at a steady, low aqueous concentration (20 μM). Dehalogenation activity in microcosms (20 nmol cis-dichloroethene per ml slurry per day formed) was detected already after 4 weeks at 20°C with sediment indigenous electron donors. The microbial community in sediment incubations was probed with 13C-labelled acetate (0.5 mM) as electron donor and carbon source at 15°C for 3 days. After RNA extraction, "heavy" 13C-rRNA and light 12C-rRNA were separated by isopycnic centrifugation, and Bacteria-related populations in gradient fractions were characterised by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and cloning. In heavy gradient fractions from the microcosm with PCE, we detected a prominent 506-bp terminal restriction fragment (T-RF) and a few minor T-RFs only. In contrast, in the control without PCE, Bacteria-specific rRNA was restricted to light gradient fractions, and the prominent T-RFs found in the PCE-dechlorinating microcosm were of minor importance. Apparently, 13C-acetate was incorporated into bacterial rRNA more effectively in PCE-respiring microcosms. Thus, rRNA-SIP provides strong evidence for the presence of PCE-dehalorespiring, 13C-acetate-utilising populations in river sediment microcosms. Cloning/sequencing analysis identified the prominent members of the heavy

  9. A survey of small RNA population during FR-induced apical hook opening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Photomorphogenesis is a mechanism employed by plants to regulate their architecture and developmental program in response to light conditions. As they emerge into light for the first time, dark-grown seedlings employ a rapid and finely-controlled photomorphogenic signaling network. Small RNAs have increasingly been revealed to play an important role in regulating multiple aspects of plant development, by modulating the stability of mRNAs. The rapid alteration of the mRNA transcriptome is a known hallmark of the de-etiolation response, thus we investigated the small RNA transcriptome during this process in specific seedling tissues. Here we describe a survey of the small RNA expression profile in four tissues of etiolated soybean seedlings, the cotyledons, hypocotyl and the convex and concave sides of the apical hook. We also investigate how this profile responds to a one-hour far-red light treatment. Our data suggests that miRNAs show a different global profile between these tissues and treatments, suggesting a possible role for tissue- and treatment-specific expression in the differential morphology of the seedling on de-etiolation. Further evidence for the role of miRNA in light-regulated development is given by the de-etiolation responses of a hypomorphic ago1 mutant, which displays reduced and delayed photomorphogenic responses in apical hook and cotyledon angle to far-red light.

  10. Iron induced RNA-oxidation in the general population and in mouse tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvanovic, Vanja; Kjær, Laura Kofoed; Bergholdt, Helle Kirstine Mørup

    2018-01-01

    Iron promotes formation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction, subsequently leading to potential oxidatively generated damage of nucleic acids. Oxidatively generated damage to RNA, measured as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) in urine, is increased in patients with genetic iron overloa...

  11. The Role of piRNA-Mediated Epigenetic Silencing in the Population Dynamics of Transposable Elements in Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Yuh Chwen G Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNA are small RNAs that target selfish transposable elements (TEs in many animal genomes. Until now, piRNAs' role in TE population dynamics has only been discussed in the context of their suppression of TE transposition, which alone is not sufficient to account for the skewed frequency spectrum and stable containment of TEs. On the other hand, euchromatic TEs can be epigenetically silenced via piRNA-dependent heterochromatin formation and, similar to the widely known "Position-effect variegation", heterochromatin induced by TEs can "spread" into nearby genes. We hypothesized that the piRNA-mediated spread of heterochromatin from TEs into adjacent genes has deleterious functional effects and leads to selection against individual TEs. Unlike previously identified deleterious effects of TEs due to the physical disruption of DNA, the functional effect we investigated here is mediated through the epigenetic influences of TEs. We found that the repressive chromatin mark, H3K9me, is elevated in sequences adjacent to euchromatic TEs at multiple developmental stages in Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, the heterochromatic states of genes depend not only on the number of and distance from adjacent TEs, but also on the likelihood that their nearest TEs are targeted by piRNAs. These variations in chromatin status probably have functional consequences, causing genes near TEs to have lower expression. Importantly, we found stronger selection against TEs that lead to higher H3K9me enrichment of adjacent genes, demonstrating the pervasive evolutionary consequences of TE-induced epigenetic silencing. Because of the intrinsic biological mechanism of piRNA amplification, spread of TE heterochromatin could result in the theoretically required synergistic deleterious effects of TE insertions for stable containment of TE copy number. The indirect deleterious impact of piRNA-mediated epigenetic silencing of TEs is a previously

  12. Population density approach for discrete mRNA distributions in generalized switching models for stochastic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Adam R; Peskin, Charles S; Tranchina, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    We present a generalization of a population density approach for modeling and analysis of stochastic gene expression. In the model, the gene of interest fluctuates stochastically between an inactive state, in which transcription cannot occur, and an active state, in which discrete transcription events occur; and the individual mRNA molecules are degraded stochastically in an independent manner. This sort of model in simplest form with exponential dwell times has been used to explain experimental estimates of the discrete distribution of random mRNA copy number. In our generalization, the random dwell times in the inactive and active states, T_{0} and T_{1}, respectively, are independent random variables drawn from any specified distributions. Consequently, the probability per unit time of switching out of a state depends on the time since entering that state. Our method exploits a connection between the fully discrete random process and a related continuous process. We present numerical methods for computing steady-state mRNA distributions and an analytical derivation of the mRNA autocovariance function. We find that empirical estimates of the steady-state mRNA probability mass function from Monte Carlo simulations of laboratory data do not allow one to distinguish between underlying models with exponential and nonexponential dwell times in some relevant parameter regimes. However, in these parameter regimes and where the autocovariance function has negative lobes, the autocovariance function disambiguates the two types of models. Our results strongly suggest that temporal data beyond the autocovariance function is required in general to characterize gene switching.

  13. Combined analyses of the ITS loci and the corresponding 16S rRNA genes reveal high micro- and macrodiversity of SAR11 populations in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David; Stingl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While

  14. Larval application of sodium channel homologous dsRNA restores pyrethroid insecticide susceptibility in a resistant adult mosquito population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bona, Ana Caroline Dalla; Chitolina, Rodrigo Faitta; Fermino, Marise Lopes; de Castro Poncio, Lisiane; Weiss, Avital; Lima, José Bento Pereira; Paldi, Nitzan; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Henen, Jonathan; Maori, Eyal

    2016-07-14

    Mosquitoes host and pass on to humans a variety of disease-causing pathogens such as infectious viruses and other parasitic microorganisms. The emergence and spread of insecticide resistance is threatening the effectiveness of current control measures for common mosquito vector borne diseases, such as malaria, dengue and Zika. Therefore, the emerging resistance to the widely used pyrethroid insecticides is an alarming problem for public health. Herein we demonstrated the use of RNA interference (RNAi) to increase susceptibility of adult mosquitoes to a widely used pyrethroid insecticide. Experiments were performed on a field-collected pyrethroid resistant strain of Ae. aegypti (Rio de Janeiro; RJ). Larvae from the resistant Ae. aegypti population were soaked with double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that correspond either to voltage-gate sodium channel (VGSC), P-glycoprotein, or P450 detoxification genes and reared to adulthood. Adult mortality rates in the presence of various Deltamethrin pyrethroid concentrations were used to assess mosquito insecticide susceptibility. We characterized the RJ Ae. aegypti strain with regard to its level of resistance to a pyrethroid insecticide and found that it was approximately 6 times more resistant to Deltamethrin compared to the laboratory Rockefeller strain. The RJ strain displayed a higher frequency of Val1016Ile and Phe1534Cys substitutions of the VGSC gene. The resistant strain also displayed a higher basal expression level of VGSC compared to the Rockefeller strain. When dsRNA-treated mosquitoes were subjected to a standard pyrethroid contact bioassay, only dsRNA targeting VGSC increased the adult mortality of the pyrethroid resistant strain. The dsRNA treatment proved effective in increasing adult mosquito susceptibility over a range of pyrethroid concentrations and these results were associated with dsRNA-specific small interfering RNAs in treated adults, and the corresponding specific down regulation of VGSC gene expression

  15. Population-genomic variation within RNA viruses of the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, inferred from deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman, Robert Scott; Boncristiani, Humberto; Dainat, Benjamin; Chen, Yanping; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Weaver, Daniel; Evans, Jay D

    2013-03-07

    Deep sequencing of viruses isolated from infected hosts is an efficient way to measure population-genetic variation and can reveal patterns of dispersal and natural selection. In this study, we mined existing Illumina sequence reads to investigate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within two RNA viruses of the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera), deformed wing virus (DWV) and Israel acute paralysis virus (IAPV). All viral RNA was extracted from North American samples of honey bees or, in one case, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor. Coverage depth was generally lower for IAPV than DWV, and marked gaps in coverage occurred in several narrow regions (selection. The Kakugo strain of DWV fell outside of all other DWV sequences at 100% bootstrap support. IAPV consensus sequences supported the existence of multiple clades as had been previously reported, and Fu and Li's D was closer to neutral expectation overall, although a sliding-window analysis identified a significantly positive D within the protease region, suggesting selection maintains diversity in that region. Within-sample mean diversity was comparable between the two viruses on average, although for both viruses there was substantial variation among samples in mean diversity at third codon positions and in the number of high-diversity sites. FST values were bimodal for DWV, likely reflecting neutral divergence in two low-diversity populations, whereas IAPV had several sites that were strong outliers with very low FST. This initial survey of genetic variation within honey bee RNA viruses suggests future directions for studies examining the underlying causes of population-genetic structure in these economically important pathogens.

  16. The simple fool's guide to population genomics via RNA-Seq: An introduction to high-throughput sequencing data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Wit, P.; Pespeni, M.H.; Ladner, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    to Population Genomics via RNA-seq' (SFG), a document intended to serve as an easy-to-follow protocol, walking a user through one example of high-throughput sequencing data analysis of nonmodel organisms. It is by no means an exhaustive protocol, but rather serves as an introduction to the bioinformatic methods...... used in population genomics, enabling a user to gain familiarity with basic analysis steps. The SFG consists of two parts. This document summarizes the steps needed and lays out the basic themes for each and a simple approach to follow. The second document is the full SFG, publicly available at http://sfg.......stanford.edu, that includes detailed protocols for data processing and analysis, along with a repository of custom-made scripts and sample files. Steps included in the SFG range from tissue collection to de novo assembly, blast annotation, alignment, gene expression, functional enrichment, SNP detection, principal components...

  17. The effects of stabilizing and directional selection on phenotypic and genotypic variation in a population of RNA enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Eric J; Bratulic, Sinisa; Koenig, Iwo; Ferrada, Evandro; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The distribution of variation in a quantitative trait and its underlying distribution of genotypic diversity can both be shaped by stabilizing and directional selection. Understanding either distribution is important, because it determines a population's response to natural selection. Unfortunately, existing theory makes conflicting predictions about how selection shapes these distributions, and very little pertinent experimental evidence exists. Here we study a simple genetic system, an evolving RNA enzyme (ribozyme) in which a combination of high throughput genotyping and measurement of a biochemical phenotype allow us to address this question. We show that directional selection, compared to stabilizing selection, increases the genotypic diversity of an evolving ribozyme population. In contrast, it leaves the variance in the phenotypic trait unchanged.

  18. The Associations between RNA Splicing Complex Gene SF3A1 Polymorphisms and Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Chen

    Full Text Available Aberrant alternative splicing included alterations in components of the mRNA splicing machinery often occurred in colon cancer. However, the role of SF3A1, one key component of the mRNA splicing machinery, on colorectal cancer (CRC risk was still not elucidated.We performed a hospital-based case-control study containing 801 CRC patients and 817 cancer-free controls to examine the association between SF3A1 polymorphisms and CRC risk in a Chinese population. Four candidate SNPs (rs10376, rs5753073, rs2839998 and rs2074733 were selected based on bioinformatics analysis and previous findings. The results showed no significant associations between these SNPs and CRC risk (P > 0.05. Besides, the stratified analysis based on the smoking and alcohol use status obtained no statistically significant results.Our study was the first one to investigate the association between SF3A1 polymorphisms and CRC risk. The results suggested these four SNPs in SF3A1 were not associated with CRC risk in a Chinese population, however, further more studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  19. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to a Heterogeneous RNA Population in the Malachite Green Aptamer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Joshua E.; Dombrowski, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.

    2011-01-01

    The malachite green aptamer binds two closely related ligands, malachite green (MG) and tetramethylrosamine (TMR), with near equal affinity. The MG ligand consists of three phenyl rings emanating from a central carbon, while TMR has two of the three rings connected by an ether linkage. The binding pockets for MG and TMR in the aptamer, known from high-resolution structure, differ only in the conformation of a few nucleotides. Herein, we applied isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to compare the thermodynamics for binding of MG and TMR to the aptamer. Binding heat capacities were obtained from ITC titrations over the temperature range of 15 to 60 °C. Two temperature regimes were found for MG binding: one from 15 to 45 °C where MG bound with a large negative heat capacity and an apparent stoichiometry (n) of ~0.4, and another from 50 to 60 °C where MG bound with positive heat capacity and n~1.1. The binding of TMR, on the other hand, revealed only one temperature regime for binding, with a more modest negative heat capacity and n~1.2. The large difference in heat capacity between the two ligands suggests that significantly more conformational rearrangement occurs upon the binding of MG than TMR, which is consistent with differences in solvent accessible surface area calculated for available ligand-bound structures. Lastly, we note that binding stoichiometry of MG was improved not only by raising the temperature, but also by lowering the concentration of Mg2+ or increasing the time between ITC injections. These studies suggest that binding of a dynamical ligand to a functional RNA requires the RNA itself to have significant dynamics. PMID:22192051

  20. miRNA as potential biomarkers of breast cancer in the Lebanese population and in young women: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah J Nassar

    Full Text Available Relative to western populations, the percentage of women diagnosed with breast cancer at a young age in Lebanon is high. While the younger age of the Lebanese population compared to the West certainly contributes to this difference, potential genetic, reproductive and/or biological factors likely play an important role. The objective of this study is to investigate the contribution of miRNAs in this setting through the analysis of the expression of five reported dysregulated miRNAs, miR-148b, miR-10b, miR-21, miR-221, and miR-155 in 20 normal and 57 cancerous breast tissues from Lebanese breast cancer patients. After finding their relative expression by quantitative reverse transcription real time PCR, the results were analyzed with respect to the patients' clinical and histopathology presentations. Compared to normal breast tissues, significant upregulation of miR-155, miR-21 and miR-148b, notable downregulation of miR-10b and non-significant expression of miR-221 were observed in tumor tissues. Moreover, miR-10b was significantly underexpressed in estrogen/progesterone receptor (ER/PR negative tumors relative to ER/PR positive tumor tissues. miR-155 was also significantly overexpressed in postmenopausal patients and in those of age at diagnosis greater than 40 years old as well as in PR negative or in human epidermal growth factor 2 (Her2 positive tissues. This study is the first one to report miRNA expression patterns in Lebanese breast cancer patients. We found that differential miRNA expression in breast cancer could be variable between Lebanese and Western populations. miR-10b was positively correlated with the ER and PR status and miR-155 could be a noteworthy biomarker for the menopausal state, age at diagnosis, PR and Her2 status. Hence, miRNA can be used as biomarkers for early breast cancer detection.

  1. Association of a miRNA-137 Polymorphism with Schizophrenia in a Southern Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoda Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both genome wide association study (GWAS and biochemical studies of Caucasian populations indicate a robust association between the miR-137 genetic variant rs1625579 and schizophrenia, but inconsistent results have been reported. To assay the association between this variant and schizophrenia, we genotyped 611 schizophrenic patients from Southern Chinese Han population for the risk single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs1625579 using the SNaPshot technique and compared the clinical profiles of different genotypes. Additionally, a meta-analysis was performed using the combined sample groups from five case-control publications and the present study. Both the genotype and allele distributions of the rs1625579 SNP were significantly different between patients and controls (P=0.036 and 0.026, SNP. TT genotype carriers showed slightly lower Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia- (BACS- derived working memory performance than G carriers (15.58 ± 9.56 versus 19.71 ± 8.18, P=0.045. In the meta-analysis, we observed a significant association between rs1625579 and schizophrenia under different genetic models (all P<0.05. The results of our study and meta-analysis provide convincing evidence that rs1625579 is significantly associated with schizophrenia. Furthermore, the miR-137 polymorphism influences the working memory performance of schizophrenic patients in a Chinese Han population.

  2. Zinc-mediated binding of a low-molecular-weight stabilizer of the host anti-viral factor apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Mohamed O; Sonoda, Sachiko; Ejima, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Ayumi; Koga, Ryoko; Okamoto, Yoshinari; Fujita, Mikako; Otsuka, Masami

    2016-09-15

    Apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G (APOBEC3G, A3G), is a human anti-virus restriction protein which works deaminase-dependently and -independently. A3G is known to be ubiquitinated by HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) protein, leading to proteasomal degradation. A3G contains two zinc ions at the N-terminal domain and the C-terminal domain. Four lysine residues, K(297), K(301), K(303), and K(334), are known to be required for Vif-mediated A3G ubiquitination and degradation. Previously, we reported compound SN-1, a zinc chelator that increases steady-state expression level of A3G in the presence of Vif. In this study, we prepared Biotin-SN-1, a biotinylated derivative of SN-1, to study the SN-1-A3G interaction. A pull-down assay revealed that Biotin-SN-1 bound A3G. A zinc-abstraction experiment indicated that SN-1 binds to the zinc site of A3G. We carried out a SN-1-A3G docking study using molecular operating environment. The calculations revealed that SN-1 binds to the C-terminal domain through Zn(2+), H(216), P(247), C(288), and Y(315). Notably, SN-1-binding covers the H(257), E(259), C(288), and C(291) residues that participate in zinc-mediated deamination, and the ubiquitination regions of A3G. The binding of SN-1 presumably perturbs the secondary structure between C(288) and Y(315), leading to less efficient ubiquitination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Potential roles of placental human beta-defensin-3 and apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3G in prevention of intrauterine transmission of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaoxia; Tian, Ting; Wang, Peng; Yang, Xiaofu; Wang, Zhengping; Dong, Minyue

    2015-03-01

    Approximately 5% of newborns were infected by hepatitis B virus (HBV) via intrauterine transmission and this is the main reason for high prevalence of HBV in endemic regions. However, the mechanisms by which intrauterine transmission is avoided in most cases remain elusive and placental natural anti-microbial factors may play a role in the prevention of HBV intrauterine transmission. The expression levels of human β-defensin-3 (HBD-3), apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 3G (A3G) and mannose binding lectin (MBL) were determined in the placenta of 30 HBV-seronegative pregnant women (controls), 7 HBV-seropositive pregnant women with infants infected via intrauterine transmission (infected group) and 30 HBV-seropositive pregnant women with non-infected infants (non-infected group). The expression of HBD-3, A3G, and MBL of placental trophoblast cell line Swan71 was determined after exposed to HBV. There were significant differences in placental HBD-3 and A3G levels among three groups, but the expression of MBL did not significantly differ. The expressions of HBD-3 and A3G were higher in non-infected group than controls and infected group, but not significantly different between infected group and controls. The exposure to HBV increased significantly the expression of HBD-3, A3G, and MBL by Swan 71. It may be concluded HBV up-regulates HBD-3 and A3G expression in vivo and in vitro in placental trophoblast and lack of this up-regulation is possibly associated with intrauterine transmission of HBV. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Associations of ACE Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism, ACE Activity, and ACE mRNA Expression with Hypertension in a Chinese Population

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qingfang; Fan, Chunhong; Yu, Min; Wallar, Gina; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wang, Lixin; Zhang, Xinwei; Hu, Ruying

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to explore the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D, rs4646994) polymorphism, plasma ACE activity, and circulating ACE mRNA expression with essential hypertension (EH) in a Chinese population. In addition, a new detection method for circulating ACE mRNA expression was explored. Methods The research was approved by the ethics committee of Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Prevention and Control. Written i...

  5. Experimental evolution of an RNA virus in wild birds: evidence for host-dependent impacts on population structure and competitive fitness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within hosts, RNA viruses form populations that are genetically and phenotypically complex. Heterogeneity in RNA virus genomes arises due to error-prone replication and is reduced by stochastic and selective mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Defining how natural selection shapes RNA virus populations is critical because it can inform treatment paradigms and enhance control efforts. We allowed West Nile virus (WNV to replicate in wild-caught American crows, house sparrows and American robins to assess how natural selection shapes RNA virus populations in ecologically relevant hosts that differ in susceptibility to virus-induced mortality. After five sequential passages in each bird species, we examined the phenotype and population diversity of WNV through fitness competition assays and next generation sequencing. We demonstrate that fitness gains occur in a species-specific manner, with the greatest replicative fitness gains in robin-passaged WNV and the least in WNV passaged in crows. Sequencing data revealed that intrahost WNV populations were strongly influenced by purifying selection and the overall complexity of the viral populations was similar among passaged hosts. However, the selective pressures that control WNV populations seem to be bird species-dependent. Specifically, crow-passaged WNV populations contained the most unique mutations (~1.7× more than sparrows, ~3.4× more than robins and defective genomes (~1.4× greater than sparrows, ~2.7× greater than robins, but the lowest average mutation frequency (about equal to sparrows, ~2.6× lower than robins. Therefore, our data suggest that WNV replication in the most disease-susceptible bird species is positively associated with virus mutational tolerance, likely via complementation, and negatively associated with the strength of selection. These differences in genetic composition most likely have distinct phenotypic consequences for the virus populations. Taken together

  6. Genetic variants in long non-coding RNA MIAT contribute to risk of paranoid schizophrenia in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shu-Quan; Hu, Hui-Ling; Ye, Ning; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2015-08-01

    The heritability of schizophrenia has been reported to be as high as ~80%, but the contribution of genetic variants identified to this heritability remains to be estimated. Long non-coding RNAs (LncRNAs) are involved in multiple processes critical to normal cellular function and dysfunction of lncRNA MIAT may contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the genetic evidence of lncRNAs involved in schizophrenia has not been documented. Here, we conducted a two-stage association analysis on 8 tag SNPs that cover the whole MIAT locus in two independent Han Chinese schizophrenia case-control cohorts (discovery sample from Shanxi Province: 1093 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 1180 control subjects; replication cohort from Jilin Province: 1255 cases and 1209 healthy controls). In discovery stage, significant genetic association with paranoid schizophrenia was observed for rs1894720 (χ(2)=74.20, P=7.1E-18), of which minor allele (T) had an OR of 1.70 (95% CI=1.50-1.91). This association was confirmed in the replication cohort (χ(2)=22.66, P=1.9E-06, OR=1.32, 95%CI 1.18-1.49). Besides, a weak genotypic association was detected for rs4274 (χ(2)=4.96, df=2, P=0.03); the AA carriers showed increased disease risk (OR=1.30, 95%CI=1.03-1.64). No significant association was found between any haplotype and paranoid schizophrenia. The present studies showed that lncRNA MIAT was a novel susceptibility gene for paranoid schizophrenia in the Chinese Han population. Considering that most lncRNAs locate in non-coding regions, our result may explain why most susceptibility loci for schizophrenia identified by genome wide association studies were out of coding regions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association between polymorphisms in pre-miRNA genes and risk of oral squamous cell cancer in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enjiao Zhang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs play important roles in the development of human cancers. This case-control study is to evaluate the roles of the polymorphisms in pre-miRNAs on risk of oral cancer in a Chinese population.The genotypes of three polymorphisms were determined in 340 patients with oral squamous cell cancer and 340 healthy controls who were frequency matched for age and sex. Odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs were calculated to assess the association. All analyses were performed using the SPSS software. 3.154( 0.001.For miR-499 rs3746444, individuals carrying homozygous CC genotype had increased risks of oral cancer compared with the homozygous wild TT genotype (adjusted OR was 3.154, 95%CI was 1.555-6.397, P value was 0.001. The C allele of miR-499 rs3746444 was associated with a higher risk of oral cancer with significant odds ratio of 1.453. In the stratified analyses by sex, the associations between miR-499 rs3746444 and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms with the susceptibility of oral squamous cell cancer were significant in males. However, with 1/4 as many subjects there were no significant associations between the three polymorphisms and oral cancer risks in females. The joint effects of miRNA polymorphisms and smoking on the risk of OSCC were analyzed and the results suggested that the association between microRNA genetic variants and OSCC risk was modified by smoking.These findings suggest that miR-499 rs3746444 and miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphisms may contribute to genetic susceptibility to oral squamous cell cancer.

  8. Redefining high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer by risk index and microRNA-21: results from a population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Kjær-Frifeldt, S; Christensen, R D

    2014-01-01

    Background:The aim of the present study was to analyse the prognostic value of microRNA-21 (miRNA-21) in patients with stage II colon cancer aiming at a risk index for this group of patients.Methods:A population-based cohort of 554 patients was included. MicroRNA-21 was analysed by qPCR based.......001). The overall survival (OS) index identified three different subgroups (Pcolon cancer. Furthermore...... on tumour tissue. An index was created using the coefficients obtained from a collective multiple Cox regression. The entire procedure was cross-validated (10-fold). The performance of the index was quantified by time-dependent receiver operating characteristics curves.Results:High miRNA-21 expression...

  9. CORSEN, a new software dedicated to microscope-based 3D distance measurements: mRNA-mitochondria distance, from single-cell to population analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdren, Laurent; Delaveau, Thierry; Marquenet, Emelie; Jacq, Claude; Garcia, Mathilde

    2010-07-01

    Recent improvements in microscopy technology allow detection of single molecules of RNA, but tools for large-scale automatic analyses of particle distributions are lacking. An increasing number of imaging studies emphasize the importance of mRNA localization in the definition of cell territory or the biogenesis of cell compartments. CORSEN is a new tool dedicated to three-dimensional (3D) distance measurements from imaging experiments especially developed to access the minimal distance between RNA molecules and cellular compartment markers. CORSEN includes a 3D segmentation algorithm allowing the extraction and the characterization of the cellular objects to be processed--surface determination, aggregate decomposition--for minimal distance calculations. CORSEN's main contribution lies in exploratory statistical analysis, cell population characterization, and high-throughput assays that are made possible by the implementation of a batch process analysis. We highlighted CORSEN's utility for the study of relative positions of mRNA molecules and mitochondria: CORSEN clearly discriminates mRNA localized to the vicinity of mitochondria from those that are translated on free cytoplasmic polysomes. Moreover, it quantifies the cell-to-cell variations of mRNA localization and emphasizes the necessity for statistical approaches. This method can be extended to assess the evolution of the distance between specific mRNAs and other cellular structures in different cellular contexts. CORSEN was designed for the biologist community with the concern to provide an easy-to-use and highly flexible tool that can be applied for diverse distance quantification issues.

  10. Associations of ACE Gene Insertion/Deletion Polymorphism, ACE Activity, and ACE mRNA Expression with Hypertension in a Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingfang; Fan, Chunhong; Yu, Min; Wallar, Gina; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Wang, Lixin; Zhang, Xinwei; Hu, Ruying

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to explore the association of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D, rs4646994) polymorphism, plasma ACE activity, and circulating ACE mRNA expression with essential hypertension (EH) in a Chinese population. In addition, a new detection method for circulating ACE mRNA expression was explored. Methods The research was approved by the ethics committee of Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Prevention and Control. Written informed consent was obtained prior to the investigation. 221 hypertensives (cases) and 221 normotensives (controls) were interviewed, subjected to a physical examination, and provided blood for biochemical and genetic tests. The ACE mRNA expression was analyzed by real time fluorescent quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (FQ-RT-PCR). We performed logistic regression to assess associations of ACE I/D genotypes, ACE activity, and ACE mRNA expression levels with hypertension. Results The results of the multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the additive model (ID, DD versus II) of the ACE genotype revealed an association with hypertension with adjusted OR of 1.43(95% CI: 1.04-1.97), and ACE ID genotype with adjusted OR of 1.72(95% CI: 1.01-2.92), DD genotype with adjusted OR of 1.94(95% CI: 1.01-3.73), respectively. In addition, our data also indicate that plasma ACE activity (adjusted OR was 1.13(95% CI: 1.08-1.18)) was significantly related to hypertension. However, the plasma ACE mRNA expressions were not different between the cases and controls. Conclusion ACE I/D polymorphism and ACE activity revealed significant influence on hypertension, while circulating ACE mRNA expression was not important factors associated with hypertension in this Chinese population. The detection of circulating ACE mRNA expression by FQ-RT-PCR might be a useful method for early screening and monitoring of EH. PMID:24098401

  11. The use of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase for the taxonomic assignment of Picorna-like viruses (order Picornavirales infecting Apis mellifera L. populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Declan C

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded RNA viruses, infectious to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. are known to reside at low levels in colonies, with typically no apparent signs of infection observed in the honeybees. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR of regions of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is often used to diagnose their presence in apiaries and also to classify the type of virus detected. Results Analysis of RdRp conserved domains was undertaken on members of the newly defined order, the Picornavirales; focusing in particular on the amino acid residues and motifs known to be conserved. Consensus sequences were compiled using partial and complete honeybee virus sequences published to date. Certain members within the iflaviruses, deformed wing virus (DWV, Kakugo virus (KV and Varroa destructor virus (VDV; and the dicistroviruses, acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV, Israeli paralysis virus (IAPV and Kashmir bee virus (KBV, shared greater than 98% and 92% homology across the RdRp conserved domains, respectively. Conclusion RdRp was validated as a suitable taxonomic marker for the assignment of members of the order Picornavirales, with the potential for use independent of other genetic or phenotypic markers. Despite the current use of the RdRp as a genetic marker for the detection of specific honeybee viruses, we provide overwhelming evidence that care should be taken with the primer set design. We demonstrated that DWV, VDV and KV, or ABPV, IAPV and KBV, respectively are all recent descendents or variants of each other, meaning caution should be applied when assigning presence or absence to any of these viruses when using current RdRp primer sets. Moreover, it is more likely that some primer sets (regardless of what gene is used are too specific and thus are underestimating the diversity of honeybee viruses.

  12. Screening Yield of HIV Antigen/Antibody Combination and Pooled HIV RNA Testing for Acute HIV Infection in a High-Prevalence Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Philip J; Westheimer, Emily; Cohen, Stephanie; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Moss, Nicholas; Tsoi, Benjamin; Hall, Laura; Fann, Charles; Daskalakis, Demetre C; Beagle, Steve; Patel, Pragna; Radix, Asa; Foust, Evelyn; Kohn, Robert P; Marmorino, Jenni; Pandori, Mark; Fu, Jie; Samandari, Taraz; Gay, Cynthia L

    2016-02-16

    established and acute HIV infections) by 10.4% (95% CI, 8.8%-12.2%) and pooled HIV RNA testing increased the relative HIV diagnostic yield by 12.4% (95% CI, 10.7%-14.3%). In a high-prevalence population, HIV screening using an HIV Ag/Ab combination assay following a negative rapid test detected 82% of acute HIV infections detectable by pooled HIV RNA testing, with a positive predictive value of 59%. Further research is needed to evaluate this strategy in lower-prevalence populations and in persons using preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention.

  13. Improved detection of CXCR4-using HIV by V3 genotyping: application of population-based and "deep" sequencing to plasma RNA and proviral DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Luke C; Moores, Andrew; Low, Andrew J; Thielen, Alexander; Dong, Winnie; Woods, Conan; Jensen, Mark A; Wynhoven, Brian; Chan, Dennison; Glascock, Christopher; Harrigan, P Richard

    2010-08-01

    Tropism testing should rule out CXCR4-using HIV before treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Currently, the recombinant phenotypic Trofile assay (Monogram) is most widely utilized; however, genotypic tests may represent alternative methods. Independent triplicate amplifications of the HIV gp120 V3 region were made from either plasma HIV RNA or proviral DNA. These underwent standard, population-based sequencing with an ABI3730 (RNA n = 63; DNA n = 40), or "deep" sequencing with a Roche/454 Genome Sequencer-FLX (RNA n = 12; DNA n = 12). Position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMX4/R5) (-6.96 cutoff) and geno2pheno[coreceptor] (5% false-positive rate) inferred tropism from V3 sequence. These methods were then independently validated with a separate, blinded dataset (n = 278) of screening samples from the maraviroc MOTIVATE trials. Standard sequencing of HIV RNA with PSSM yielded 69% sensitivity and 91% specificity, relative to Trofile. The validation dataset gave 75% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Proviral DNA plus PSSM gave 77% sensitivity and 71% specificity. "Deep" sequencing of HIV RNA detected >2% inferred-CXCR4-using virus in 8/8 samples called non-R5 by Trofile, and <2% in 4/4 samples called R5. Triplicate analyses of V3 standard sequence data detect greater proportions of CXCR4-using samples than previously achieved. Sequencing proviral DNA and "deep" V3 sequencing may also be useful tools for assessing tropism.

  14. Combined Analyses of the ITS Loci and the Corresponding 16S rRNA Genes Reveal High Micro- and Macrodiversity of SAR11 Populations in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngugi, David Kamanda; Stingl, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24°C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (∼22°C) and salinity (∼41 psu) from the mixed layer (∼200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea’s water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium. PMID:23185592

  15. Combined analyses of the ITS loci and the corresponding 16S rRNA genes reveal high micro- and macrodiversity of SAR11 populations in the Red Sea.

    KAUST Repository

    Ngugi, David

    2012-11-20

    Bacteria belonging to the SAR11 clade are among the most abundant prokaryotes in the pelagic zone of the ocean. 16S rRNA gene-based analyses indicate that they constitute up to 60% of the bacterioplankton community in the surface waters of the Red Sea. This extremely oligotrophic water body is further characterized by an epipelagic zone, which has a temperature above 24 °C throughout the year, and a remarkable uniform temperature (~22 °C) and salinity (~41 psu) from the mixed layer (~200 m) to the bottom at over 2000 m depth. Despite these conditions that set it apart from other marine environments, the microbiology of this ecosystem is still vastly understudied. Prompted by the limited phylogenetic resolution of the 16S rRNA gene, we extended our previous study by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of SAR11 in different depths of the Red Sea\\'s water column together with the respective 16S fragment. The overall diversity captured by the ITS loci was ten times higher than that of the corresponding 16S rRNA genes. Moreover, species estimates based on the ITS showed a highly diverse population of SAR11 in the mixed layer that became diminished in deep isothermal waters, which was in contrast to results of the related 16S rRNA genes. While the 16S rRNA gene-based sequences clustered into three phylogenetic subgroups, the related ITS fragments fell into several phylotypes that showed clear depth-dependent shifts in relative abundances. Blast-based analyses not only documented the observed vertical partitioning and universal co-occurrence of specific phylotypes in five other distinct oceanic provinces, but also highlighted the influence of ecosystem-specific traits (e.g., temperature, nutrient availability, and concentration of dissolved oxygen) on the population dynamics of this ubiquitous marine bacterium.

  16. Redefining high-risk patients with stage II colon cancer by risk index and microRNA-21: results from a population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T F; Kjær-Frifeldt, S; Christensen, R D

    2014-01-01

    Background:The aim of the present study was to analyse the prognostic value of microRNA-21 (miRNA-21) in patients with stage II colon cancer aiming at a risk index for this group of patients.Methods:A population-based cohort of 554 patients was included. MicroRNA-21 was analysed by qPCR based...... on tumour tissue. An index was created using the coefficients obtained from a collective multiple Cox regression. The entire procedure was cross-validated (10-fold). The performance of the index was quantified by time-dependent receiver operating characteristics curves.Results:High miRNA-21 expression...... was associated with an unfavourable recurrence-free cancer-specific survival (RF-CSS), hazard ratio 1.35 (95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.76) (P=0.028). The generated RF-CSS index divided the traditional high-risk patients into subgroups with 5-year RF-CSS rates of 87% and 73%, respectively (P...

  17. Comparison of variable region 3 sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from infected children with the RNA and DNA sequences of the virus populations of their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlatti, G; Leitner, T; Halapi, E; Wahlberg, J; Marchisio, P; Clerici-Schoeller, M A; Wigzell, H; Fenyö, E M; Albert, J; Uhlén, M

    1993-01-01

    We have compared the variable region 3 sequences from 10 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected infants to virus sequences from the corresponding mothers. The sequences were derived from DNA of uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), DNA of cultured PBMC, and RNA from serum collected at or shortly after delivery. The infected infants, in contrast to the mothers, harbored homogeneous virus populations. Comparison of sequences from the children and clones derived from DNA of the corresponding mothers showed that the transmitted virus represented either a minor or a major virus population of the mother. In contrast to an earlier study, we found no evidence of selection of minor virus variants during transmission. Furthermore, the transmitted virus variant did not show any characteristic molecular features. In some cases the transmitted virus was more related to the virus RNA population of the mother and in other cases it was more related to the virus DNA population. This suggests that either cell-free or cell-associated virus may be transmitted. These data will help AIDS researchers to understand the mechanism of transmission and to plan strategies for prevention of transmission. PMID:8446584

  18. Analysis of hepatic deiodinase 2 mRNA levels in natural fish lake populations exposed to different levels of putative thyroid disrupters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarque, Sergio; Bosch, Carme; Casado, Marta; Grimalt, Joan O.; Raldúa, Demetrio; Piña, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic mRNA levels of the dio2 gene (deiodinase 2), implicated in thyroid hormone homeostasis, were analyzed in trout from six remote lakes in the Pyrenees (Spain) and the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia). Highest levels corresponded to fish from the two coldest lakes in Pyrenees, whereas relatively low levels were found in the Tatra lakes. These values correlated with the presence of highly-brominated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDE) congeners in the muscle of the same animals, reflecting the distribution of these compounds across European mountain ranges. In contrast, cyp1a expression levels, diagnostic for the presence of dioxin-like pollutants, mirrored the distribution of semi-volatile organochlorine compounds, indicating the specificity of the two types of biological responses. Exposure to PDBEs is known to increase transcription of dio2 and other thyroid-related genes in laboratory experiments; we propose that our data reflects the same phenomenon in natural populations, driven by anthropogenic pollutants at the environmental concentrations. - Highlights: • Hepatic deiodinase 2 (dio2) mRNA levels vary among mountain lake trout populations. • High dio2 expression correlated with elevated levels of PBDE 153 and 154 in muscle. • Expression patterns of dio2 and cyp1a diverge among the same fish populations. • Elevated biological responses associated to high loads of specific pollutants. • These data indicate that thyroid disruption may occur in remote ecosystems. - Deionidase dio2 expression as a marker for exposure to putative thyroid disruptors in mountain lake trout

  19. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  20. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  1. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  2. Electronic coupling between photo-excited stacked bases in DNA and RNA strands with emphasis on the bright states initially populated

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen (Baggesen), Lisbeth Munksgård; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2013-01-01

    . In this review paper, we focus on the bright states initially populated and discuss their nature based on information obtained from systematic absorption and circular dichroism experiments on single strands of different lengths. Our results from the last five years are compared with those from other groups......, and are discussed in the context of successive deexcitation schemes. Pieces to the puzzle have come from different experiments and theory but a complete description has yet to emerge. As such the story about DNA/RNA photophysical decay mechanisms resembles the tale about the blind men and the elephant where all see...

  3. 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a tool to study microbial populations in foods and process environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschhardt, Tasja; Hansen, Tina Beck; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    communities in meat and the meat process environment with special focus on the Enterobacteriaceae family as a subpopulation comprising enteropathogens including Salmonella. Samples were analyzed by a nested PCR approach combined with MiSeq® Illumina®16S DNA sequencing and standardized culture methods as cross...... reference. Results: Taxonomic assignments and abundances of sequences in the total community and in the Enterobacteriaceae subpopulation were affected by the 16S rRNA gene variable region, DNA extraction methods, and polymerases chosen. However, community compositions were very reproducible when the same...

  4. Association between tuberculosis and circulating microRNA hsa-let-7b and hsa-miR-30b: A pilot study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Henan; Yang, Yu; Liu, Jianmin; Li, Xiangwei; Li, Mufei; Feng, Boxuan; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Haoran; Li, Hengjing; Shen, Fei; Guan, Ling; Gao, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest communicable diseases. Limitations in the current diagnosis tools have heavily slowed down the step to eliminate TB. The objective of this study was to identify potential circulating miRNA associated with tuberculosis (TB) infection and disease development. Agilent human miRNA microarray was used to estimate the circulating levels of 1887 miRNAs among 34 study participants (10 patients with pulmonary TB, 13 controls with latent TB infection and 11 non-infected healthy controls). The identified miRNAs were subsequently verified by real-time qPCR. Target gene prediction and miRNA-gene network construction were further explored. A total of 119 miRNAs were identified to be in different levels between any two groups of the study population by microarray (Fold Change>2, p < 0.01). 11 most promising miRNAs were then selected for verification by real-time qPCR. The levels of hsa-let-7b-5p and hsa-miR-30b-5p were confirmed to be significantly up-regulated in pulmonary TB patients as compared to both control groups (p < 0.01). Caspase 3 was predicted to be one common target gene for these two miRNAs. None of the selected miRNA was confirmed to be related with the infection status. This pilot study suggested circulating hsa-let-7b and hsa-miR-30b might be associated with TB development by regulating the target genes involved in TLR-NF-kB mediated signal pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of Biomphalaria havanensis and Biomphalaria obstructa populations from Cuba using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism of the ribosomal RNA intergenic spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofânia HDA Vidigal

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available In Cuba, several Biomphalaria species have been reported such as B. orbignyi, B. schrammi, B. helophila, B. havanensis and B. peregrina; only the latter three are considered as potential hosts of Schistosoma mansoni. The specific identification of Biomphalaria species is based on anatomical and morphological characters of genital organs and shells. The correct identification of these snails is complicated by the high variation in these characters, similarity among species and in some cases by the small size of the snails. In this paper, we reported the classical morphological identification, the use of PCR and RFLP analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA genes for molecular identification of seven snail populations from different localities in Cuba. Using morphological and molecular analysis, we showed that among the studied Cuban Biomphalaria populations only B. havanensis and B. obstructa species were found.

  6. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  7. RNA-Seq using two populations reveals genes and alleles controlling wood traits and growth in Eucalyptus nitens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Thavamanikumar

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus nitens is a perennial forest tree species grown mainly for kraft pulp production in many parts of the world. Kraft pulp yield (KPY is a key determinant of plantation profitability and increasing the KPY of trees grown in plantations is a major breeding objective. To speed up the breeding process, molecular markers that can predict KPY are desirable. To achieve this goal, we carried out RNA-Seq studies on trees at extremes of KPY in two different trials to identify genes and alleles whose expression correlated with KPY. KPY is positively correlated with growth measured as diameter at breast height (DBH in both trials. In total, six RNA bulks from two treatments were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq platform. At 5% false discovery rate level, 3953 transcripts showed differential expression in the same direction in both trials; 2551 (65% were down-regulated and 1402 (35% were up-regulated in low KPY samples. The genes up-regulated in low KPY trees were largely involved in biotic and abiotic stress response reflecting the low growth among low KPY trees. Genes down-regulated in low KPY trees mainly belonged to gene categories involved in wood formation and growth. Differential allelic expression was observed in 2103 SNPs (in 1068 genes and of these 640 SNPs (30% occurred in 313 unique genes that were also differentially expressed. These SNPs may represent the cis-acting regulatory variants that influence total gene expression. In addition we also identified 196 genes which had Ka/Ks ratios greater than 1.5, suggesting that these genes are under positive selection. Candidate genes and alleles identified in this study will provide a valuable resource for future association studies aimed at identifying molecular markers for KPY and growth.

  8. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  9. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe......The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...

  10. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  11. Integration of Immune Cell Populations, mRNA-Seq, and CpG Methylation to Better Predict Humoral Immunity to Influenza Vaccination: Dependence of mRNA-Seq/CpG Methylation on Immune Cell Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A. Poland

    2017-04-01

    lower performance (AUC = 0.67, but highlighted well-known mechanisms. Our analysis demonstrated that each of the three data sets (cell composition, mRNA-Seq, and DNA methylation may provide distinct information for the prediction of humoral immune response outcomes. We believe that these findings are important for the interpretation of current omics-based studies and set the stage for a more thorough understanding of interindividual immune responses to influenza vaccination.

  12. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  13. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  14. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  15. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  16. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Using RNA-Based Sendai Virus System and Pluripotency Validation of the Resulting Cell Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichagova, Valeria; Sanchez-Vera, Irene; Armstrong, Lyle; Steel, David; Lako, Majlinda

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) provide a platform for studying human disease in vitro, increase our understanding of human embryonic development, and provide clinically relevant cell types for transplantation, drug testing, and toxicology studies. Since their discovery, numerous advances have been made in order to eliminate issues such as vector integration into the host genome, low reprogramming efficiency, incomplete reprogramming and acquisition of genomic instabilities. One of the ways to achieve integration-free reprogramming is by using RNA-based Sendai virus. Here we describe a method to generate hiPSCs with Sendai virus in both feeder-free and feeder-dependent culture systems. Additionally, we illustrate methods by which to validate pluripotency of the resulting stem cell population.

  17. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  18. Identification of KIF3A as a Novel Candidate Gene for Childhood Asthma Using RNA Expression and Population Allelic Frequencies Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Wang, Ning; Martin, Lisa J.; Lindsey, Mark; Ericksen, Mark B.; He, Hua; Patterson, Tia L.; Baye, Tesfaye M.; Torgerson, Dara; Roth, Lindsey A.; Gupta, Jayanta; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Gibson, Aaron M.; Tsoras, Anna M.; Hu, Donglei; Eng, Celeste; Chapela, Rocío; Rodríguez-Santana, José R.; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William; Avila, Pedro C.; Beckman, Kenneth; Seibold, Max A.; Gignoux, Chris; Musaad, Salma M.; Chen, Weiguo; Burchard, Esteban González; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease with a strong genetic predisposition. A major challenge for candidate gene association studies in asthma is the selection of biologically relevant genes. Methodology/Principal Findings Using epithelial RNA expression arrays, HapMap allele frequency variation, and the literature, we identified six possible candidate susceptibility genes for childhood asthma including ADCY2, DNAH5, KIF3A, PDE4B, PLAU, SPRR2B. To evaluate these genes, we compared the genotypes of 194 predominantly tagging SNPs in 790 asthmatic, allergic and non-allergic children. We found that SNPs in all six genes were nominally associated with asthma (pasthma (OR = 2.3, pasthma population attributable risk of 18.5%. The association between KIF3A rs7737031 and asthma was validated in 3 independent populations, further substantiating the validity of our gene selection approach. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrates that KIF3A, a member of the kinesin superfamily of microtubule associated motors that are important in the transport of protein complexes within cilia, is a novel candidate gene for childhood asthma. Polymorphisms in KIF3A may in part be responsible for poor mucus and/or allergen clearance from the airways. Furthermore, our study provides a promising framework for the identification and evaluation of novel candidate susceptibility genes. PMID:21912604

  19. Population transcriptomes reveal synergistic responses of DNA polymorphism and RNA expression to extreme environments on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in a predatory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shengkai; Zhang, Tongzuo; Rong, Zhengqin; Hu, Li; Gu, Zhongru; Wu, Qi; Dong, Shanshan; Liu, Qiong; Lin, Zhenzhen; Deutschova, Lucia; Li, Xinhai; Dixon, Andrew; Bruford, Michael W; Zhan, Xiangjiang

    2017-06-01

    Low oxygen and temperature pose key physiological challenges for endotherms living on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP). Molecular adaptations to high-altitude living have been detected in the genomes of Tibetans, their domesticated animals and a few wild species, but the contribution of transcriptional variation to altitudinal adaptation remains to be determined. Here we studied a top QTP predator, the saker falcon, and analysed how the transcriptome has become modified to cope with the stresses of hypoxia and hypothermia. Using a hierarchical design to study saker populations inhabiting grassland, steppe/desert and highland across Eurasia, we found that the QTP population is already distinct despite having colonized the Plateau adaptation to hypothermia. Our results exemplify synergistic responses between DNA polymorphism and RNA expression diversity in coping with common stresses, underpinning the successful rapid colonization of a top predator onto the QTP. Importantly, molecular mechanisms underpinning highland adaptation involve relatively few genes, but are nonetheless more complex than previously thought and involve fine-tuned transcriptional responses and genomic adaptation. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Sequence analysis of RNase MRP RNA reveals its origination from eukaryotic RNase P RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanglong; Stribinskis, Vilius; Ramos, Kenneth S.; Li, Yong

    2006-01-01

    RNase MRP is a eukaryote-specific endoribonuclease that generates RNA primers for mitochondrial DNA replication and processes precursor rRNA. RNase P is a ubiquitous endoribonuclease that cleaves precursor tRNA transcripts to produce their mature 5′ termini. We found extensive sequence homology of catalytic domains and specificity domains between their RNA subunits in many organisms. In Candida glabrata, the internal loop of helix P3 is 100% conserved between MRP and P RNAs. The helix P8 of MRP RNA from microsporidia Encephalitozoon cuniculi is identical to that of P RNA. Sequence homology can be widely spread over the whole molecule of MRP RNA and P RNA, such as those from Dictyostelium discoideum. These conserved nucleotides between the MRP and P RNAs strongly support the hypothesis that the MRP RNA is derived from the P RNA molecule in early eukaryote evolution. PMID:16540690

  1. Catalytic exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  2. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  3. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  4. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  5. Carbon transformations in deep granitic groundwater by attached bacterial populations characterized with 16S-rRNA gene sequencing technique and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekendahl, S.; Arlinger, J.; Staahl, F.; Pedersen, K.

    1993-10-01

    This report presents molecular characterization of attached bacterial populations growing in slowly flowing (1-3 mm s -1 ) artesian groundwater from deep crystalline bed-rock of the Stripa research mine, south central Sweden. The assimilation rate of CO 2 and lactate, and the lactate respiration rates were also determined. The bacteria studied grew in anoxic, high pH, 9-10, and low redox artesian groundwater flowing up through tubings from two levels of a borehole designated V2, 812-820 m and 970-1240 m below ground. The major groups of bacteria were found. Signature bases placed them in the appropriate systematic groups. All belonged to the Proteobacterial groups beta and gamma. One group was found only at the 812-820 m level, where it constituted 63% of the sequenced clones, whereas the second group existed almost exclusively and constituted 85% of the sequenced clones at the 970-1240 m level. The third group was equally distributed between the levels. A few other bacteria were also found. None of the 16S-rRNA genes from the dominating bacteria resembled any of the other by more than 90% similarity, and none of them resembled anything in the database by more than 96%. Temperature did not seem to have any effect on species composition at the deeper level. SEM images showed rods appearing in microcolonies. The difference in population diversity between the two levels studied presumably reflect the different environments. The earlier proposed presence of sulphate reducing bacteria could no be confirmed

  6. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    introducerede vores gruppe den enkeltstrengede RNA-origami metode, der giver mulighed for cotranscriptional foldning af veldefinerede nanostrukturer, og er en central del af arbejdet præsenteret heri. Denne ph.d.-afhandling udforsker potentielle anvendelser af RNA-origami nanostrukturer, som nanomedicin eller...... biosensorer. Afhandlingen består af en introduktion til RNA-nanoteknologi feltet, en introduktion af enkeltstrenget RNA-origami design, og fire studier, der beskriver design, produktion og karakterisering af både strukturelle og funktionelle RNA-origamier. Flere RNA-origami designs er blevet undersøgt, og...... projekterne, der indgår i denne afhandling, inkluderer de nyeste fremskridt indenfor strukturel RNA-nanoteknologi og udvikling af funktionelle RNA-baserede enheder. Det første studie beskriver konstruktion og karakterisering af en enkeltstrenget 6-helix RNA-origami stuktur, som er den første demonstration af...

  7. Existence of a Strong Correlation of Biomarkers and miRNA in Females with Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity in a Population of West Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguet-Rubio, Perrine; Klug, Rebecca L; Sharma, Dana L; Srikanthan, Krithika; Puri, Nitin; Lakhani, Vishal H; Nichols, Alexandra; O'Hanlon, Kathleen M; Abraham, Nader G; Shapiro, Joseph I; Sodhi, Komal

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Metabolic syndrome causes complications like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). As metabolic syndrome develops, altered levels of cytokines and microRNAs (miRNA) are measurable in the circulation. We aimed to construct a panel detecting abnormal levels of cytokines and miRNAs in patients at risk for metabolic syndrome. Methods: Participants included 54 patients from a Family Medicine Clinic at Marshall University School of Medicine, in groups of: Control, Obese, and Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Results: Serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, leptin: adiponectin ratio, IL-6, six miRNAs (320a, 197-3p, 23-3p, 221-3p, 27a-3p, and 130a-3p), were measured. Among the three groups, leptin, and leptin: adiponectin ratio, and IL-6 levels were highest in MetS, and levels in Obese were greater than Control (p>0.05). Adiponectin levels were lower in Obese compared to Control, but lowest in MetS (p0.05). Conclusion: Our results support the clinical application of biomarkers in diagnosing early stage MetS, which will enable attenuation of disease progression before onset of irreversible complications. Since West Virginians are high-risk for developing MetS, our biomarker panel could reduce the disease burden on our population.

  8. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-04

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science.

  9. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  10. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  11. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  12. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  13. Production of high quality brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) RNA from isolated populations of rat spinal cord motor neurons obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Prachi; Premkumar, Brian; Morris, Renée

    2016-08-03

    The mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is composed of multiple cellular elements, making it challenging to segregate one particular cell type to study their gene expression profile. For instance, as motor neurons represent only 5-10% of the total cell population of the spinal cord, meaningful transcriptional analysis on these neurons is almost impossible to achieve from homogenized spinal cord tissue. A major challenge faced by scientists is to obtain good quality RNA from small amounts of starting material. In this paper, we used Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) techniques to identify and isolate spinal cord motor neurons. The present analysis revealed that perfusion with paraformaldehyde (PFA) does not alter RNA quality. RNA integrity numbers (RINs) of tissue samples from rubrospinal tract (RST)-transected, intact spinal cord or from whole spinal cord homogenate were all above 8, which indicates intact, high-quality RNA. Levels of mRNA for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or for its tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) were not affected by rubrospinal tract (RST) transection, a surgical procedure that deprive motor neurons from one of their main supraspinal input. The isolation of pure populations of neurons with LCM techniques allows for robust transcriptional characterization that cannot be achieved with spinal cord homogenates. Such preparations of pure population of motor neurons will provide valuable tools to advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying spinal cord injury and neuromuscular diseases. In the near future, LCM techniques might be instrumental to the success of gene therapy for these debilitating conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  15. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  16. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  17. RNA-Seq Revealed Differences in Transcriptomes between 3ADON and 15ADON Populations of Fusarium graminearum In Vitro and In Planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Krishna D; Yan, Changhui; Leng, Yueqiang; Zhong, Shaobin

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the major causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB) in barley and wheat in North America. The fungus not only causes yield loss of the crops but also produces harmful trichothecene mycotoxins [Deoxynivalenol (DON) and its derivatives-3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON) and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15ADON), and nivalenol (NIV)] that contaminate grains. Previous studies showed a dramatic increase of 3ADON-producing isolates with higher aggressiveness and DON production than the 15ADON-producing isolates in North America. However, the genetic and molecular basis of differences between the two types of isolates is unclear. In this study, we compared transcriptomes of the 3ADON and 15ADON isolates in vitro (in culture media) and in planta (during infection on the susceptible wheat cultivar 'Briggs') using RNA-sequencing. The in vitro gene expression comparison identified 479 up-regulated and 801 down-regulated genes in the 3ADON isolates; the up-regulated genes were mainly involved in C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism (18.6%), polysaccharide metabolism (7.7%) or were of unknown functions (57.6%). The in planta gene expression analysis revealed that 185, 89, and 62 genes were up-regulated in the 3ADON population at 48, 96, and 144 hours after inoculation (HAI), respectively. The up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in functions for cellular import, C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, allantoin and allantoate transport at 48 HAI, for detoxification and virulence at 96 HAI, and for metabolism of acetic acid derivatives, detoxification, and cellular import at 144 HAI. Comparative analyses of in planta versus in vitro gene expression further revealed 2,159, 1,981 and 2,095 genes up-regulated in the 3ADON isolates, and 2,415, 2,059 and 1,777 genes up-regulated in the 15ADON isolates at the three time points after inoculation. Collectively, our data provides a foundation for further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in

  18. RNA-Seq Revealed Differences in Transcriptomes between 3ADON and 15ADON Populations of Fusarium graminearum In Vitro and In Planta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna D Puri

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum is the major causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB in barley and wheat in North America. The fungus not only causes yield loss of the crops but also produces harmful trichothecene mycotoxins [Deoxynivalenol (DON and its derivatives-3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3ADON and 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15ADON, and nivalenol (NIV] that contaminate grains. Previous studies showed a dramatic increase of 3ADON-producing isolates with higher aggressiveness and DON production than the 15ADON-producing isolates in North America. However, the genetic and molecular basis of differences between the two types of isolates is unclear. In this study, we compared transcriptomes of the 3ADON and 15ADON isolates in vitro (in culture media and in planta (during infection on the susceptible wheat cultivar 'Briggs' using RNA-sequencing. The in vitro gene expression comparison identified 479 up-regulated and 801 down-regulated genes in the 3ADON isolates; the up-regulated genes were mainly involved in C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism (18.6%, polysaccharide metabolism (7.7% or were of unknown functions (57.6%. The in planta gene expression analysis revealed that 185, 89, and 62 genes were up-regulated in the 3ADON population at 48, 96, and 144 hours after inoculation (HAI, respectively. The up-regulated genes were significantly enriched in functions for cellular import, C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, allantoin and allantoate transport at 48 HAI, for detoxification and virulence at 96 HAI, and for metabolism of acetic acid derivatives, detoxification, and cellular import at 144 HAI. Comparative analyses of in planta versus in vitro gene expression further revealed 2,159, 1,981 and 2,095 genes up-regulated in the 3ADON isolates, and 2,415, 2,059 and 1,777 genes up-regulated in the 15ADON isolates at the three time points after inoculation. Collectively, our data provides a foundation for further understanding of molecular mechanisms involved

  19. Prokaryotic Argonautes - variations on the RNA interference theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Oost, John; Swarts, Daan C.; Jore, Matthijs M.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) has been a major scientific breakthrough. This RNA-guided RNA interference system plays a crucial role in a wide range of regulatory and defense mechanisms in eukaryotes. The key enzyme of the RNAi system is Argonaute (Ago), an endo-ribonuclease that uses a small RNA guide molecule to specifically target a complementary RNA transcript. Two functional classes of eukaryotic Ago have been described: catalytically active Ago that cleaves RNA targets complementary to its guide, and inactive Ago that uses its guide to bind target RNA to down-regulate translation efficiency. A recent comparative genomics study has revealed that Argonaute-like proteins are also encoded by prokaryotic genomes. Interestingly, there is a lot of variation among these prokaryotic Argonaute (pAgo) proteins with respect to domain architecture: some resemble the eukaryotic Ago (long pAgo) containing a complete or disrupted catalytic site, while others are truncated versions (short pAgo) that generally contain an incomplete catalytic site. Prokaryotic Agos with an incomplete catalytic site often co-occur with (predicted) nucleases. Based on this diversity, and on the fact that homologs of other RNAi-related protein components (such as Dicer nucleases) have never been identified in prokaryotes, it has been predicted that variations on the eukaryotic RNAi theme may occur in prokaryotes. PMID:28357239

  20. MicroRNAs in Amoebozoa: deep sequencing of the small RNA population in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum reveals developmentally regulated microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesson, Lotta; Reimegård, Johan; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Söderbom, Fredrik

    2012-10-01

    The RNA interference machinery has served as a guardian of eukaryotic genomes since the divergence from prokaryotes. Although the basic components have a shared origin, silencing pathways directed by small RNAs have evolved in diverse directions in different eukaryotic lineages. Micro (mi)RNAs regulate protein-coding genes and play vital roles in plants and animals, but less is known about their functions in other organisms. Here, we report, for the first time, deep sequencing of small RNAs from the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. RNA from growing single-cell amoebae as well as from two multicellular developmental stages was sequenced. Computational analyses combined with experimental data reveal the expression of miRNAs, several of them exhibiting distinct expression patterns during development. To our knowledge, this is the first report of miRNAs in the Amoebozoa supergroup. We also show that overexpressed miRNA precursors generate miRNAs and, in most cases, miRNA* sequences, whose biogenesis is dependent on the Dicer-like protein DrnB, further supporting the presence of miRNAs in D. discoideum. In addition, we find miRNAs processed from hairpin structures originating from an intron as well as from a class of repetitive elements. We believe that these repetitive elements are sources for newly evolved miRNAs.

  1. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  2. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  3. Genetic variation in a microRNA-502 minding site in SET8 gene confers clinical outcome of non-small cell lung cancer in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic variants may influence microRNA-target interaction through modulate their binding affinity, creating or destroying miRNA-binding sites. SET8, a member of the SET domain-containing methyltransferase, has been implicated in a variety array of biological processes. METHODS: Using Taqman assay, we genotyped a polymorphism rs16917496 T>C within the miR-502 binding site in the 3'-untranslated region of the SET8 gene in 576 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Functions of rs16917496 were investigated using luciferase activity assay and validated by immunostaining. RESULTS: Log-rank test and cox regression indicated that the CC genotype was associated with a longer survival and a reduced risk of death for NSCLC [58.0 vs. 41.0 months, P = 0.031; hazard ratio = 0.44, 95% confidential interval: 0.26-0.74]. Further stepwise regression analysis suggested rs16917496 was an independently favorable factor for prognosis and the protective effect more prominent in never smokers, patients without diabetes and patients who received chemotherapy. A significant interaction was observed between rs16917496 and smoking status in relation to NSCLC survival (PC located at miR-502 binding site contributes to NSCLC survival by altering SET8 expression through modulating miRNA-target interaction.

  4. RNA signal amplifier circuit with integrated fluorescence output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Farhima; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2015-05-15

    We designed an in vitro signal amplification circuit that takes a short RNA input that catalytically activates the Spinach RNA aptamer to produce a fluorescent output. The circuit consists of three RNA strands: an internally blocked Spinach aptamer, a fuel strand, and an input strand (catalyst), as well as the Spinach aptamer ligand 3,5-difluoro-4-hydroxylbenzylidene imidazolinone (DFHBI). The input strand initially displaces the internal inhibitory strand to activate the fluorescent aptamer while exposing a toehold to which the fuel strand can bind to further displace and recycle the input strand. Under a favorable condition, one input strand was able to activate up to five molecules of the internally blocked Spinach aptamer in 185 min at 30 °C. The simple RNA circuit reported here serves as a model for catalytic activation of arbitrary RNA effectors by chemical triggers.

  5. Flock House virus subgenomic RNA3 is replicated and its replication correlates with transactivation of RNA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Ball, L. Andrew.

    2003-01-01

    The nodavirus Flock House virus has a bipartite genome composed of RNAs 1 and 2, which encode the catalytic component of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein precursor, respectively. In addition to catalyzing replication of the viral genome, the RdRp also transcribes from RNA1 a subgenomic RNA3, which is both required for and suppressed by RNA2 replication. Here, we show that in the absence of RNA1 replication, FHV RdRp replicated positive-sense RNA3 transcripts fully and copied negative-sense RNA3 transcripts into positive strands. The two nonstructural proteins encoded by RNA3 were dispensable for replication, but sequences in the 3'-terminal 58 nucleotides were required. RNA3 variants that failed to replicate also failed to transactivate RNA2. These results imply that RNA3 is naturally produced both by transcription from RNA1 and by subsequent RNA1-independent replication and that RNA3 replication may be necessary for transactivation of RNA2

  6. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  7. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling....

  8. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance ... The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also ... cies at room temperature. ..... aldehyde part of Schiff base ligands, catalytic activ- ity of new ...

  10. Detecting deletions, insertions, and single nucleotide substitutions in cloned β-globin genes and new polymorphic nucleotide substitutions in β-globin genes in a Japanese population using ribonuclease cleavage at mismatches in RNA: DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiyama, Keiko; Kodaira, Mieko; Satoh, Chiyoko.

    1990-08-01

    The applicability of ribonuclease (RNase) cleavage at mismatches in RNA:DNA duplexes (the RNase cleavage method) for determining nucleotide variant rates was examined in a Japanese population. DNA segments of various lengths obtained from four different regions of one normal and three thalassemic cloned human β-globin genes were inserted into transcription vectors. Sense and antisense RNA probes uniformly labeled with 32 P were prepared. When RNA probes of 771 nucleotides (nt) or less were hybridized with cloned DNAs and the resulting duplexes were treated with a mixture of RNases A and T1, the length of products agreed with theoretical values. Twelve possible mismatches were examined. Since both sense and antisense probes were used, uncleavable mismatches such as G:T and G:G which were made from one combination of RNA and DNA strands could be converted to the cleavable C:A and C:C mismatches, respectively, by using the opposite combination. Deletions and insertions of one (G), four(TTCT), five (ATTTT), and 10 (ATTTTATTTT) nt were easily detected. A polymorphic substitution of T to C at position 666 of the second intervening sequence (IVS2-666) of the β-globin gene was detected using genomic DNAs from cell lines established from the peripheral B lymphocytes of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima or those amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The frequency of the gene with C at the IVS2-666 (allele C) was 0.48 and that of the gene with T (allene T) was 0.52. Two new polymorphic substitutions of C to A and A to T were detected at nucleotide positions 1789 and 1945 from the capping site, respectively, using genomic DNAs amplified by PCR. We conclude that it would be feasible to use the RNase cleavage method combined with PCR for large-scale screening of variation in chromosomal DNA. (J.P.N.)

  11. Random catalytic reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F.; Fontana, Walter; Miller, John H.

    1993-03-01

    We study networks that are a generalization of replicator (or Lotka-Volterra) equations. They model the dynamics of a population of object types whose binary interactions determine the specific type of interaction product. Such a system always reduces its dimension to a subset that contains production pathways for all of its members. The network equation can be rewritten at a level of collectives in terms of two basic interaction patterns: replicator sets and cyclic transformation pathways among sets. Although the system contains well-known cases that exhibit very complicated dynamics, the generic behavior of randomly generated systems is found (numerically) to be extremely robust: convergence to a globally stable rest point. It is easy to tailor networks that display replicator interactions where the replicators are entire self-sustaining subsystems, rather than structureless units. A numerical scan of random systems highlights the special properties of elementary replicators: they reduce the effective interconnectedness of the system, resulting in enhanced competition, and strong correlations between the concentrations.

  12. Studies on the catalytic rate constant of ribosomal peptidyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synetos, D; Coutsogeorgopoulos, C

    1987-02-20

    A detailed kinetic analysis of a model reaction for the ribosomal peptidyltransferase is described, using fMet-tRNA or Ac-Phe-tRNA as the peptidyl donor and puromycin as the acceptor. The initiation complex (fMet-tRNA X AUG X 70 S ribosome) or (Ac-Phe-tRNA X poly(U) X 70 S ribosome) (complex C) is isolated and then reacted with excess puromycin (S) to give fMet-puromycin or Ac-Phe-puromycin. This reaction (puromycin reaction) is first order at all concentrations of S tested. An important asset of this kinetic analysis is the fact that the relationship between the first order rate constant kobs and [S] shows hyperbolic saturation and that the value of kobs at saturating [S] is a measure of the catalytic rate constant (k cat) of peptidyltransferase in the puromycin reaction. With fMet-tRNA as the donor, this kcat of peptidyltransferase is 8.3 min-1 when the 0.5 M NH4Cl ribosomal wash is present, compared to 3.8 min-1 in its absence. The kcat of peptidyltransferase is 2.0 min-1 when Ac-Phe-tRNA replaces fMet-tRNA in the presence of the ribosomal wash and decreases to 0.8 min-1 in its absence. This kinetic procedure is the best method available for evaluating changes in the activity of peptidyltransferase in vitro. The results suggest that peptidyltransferase is subjected to activation by the binding of fMet-tRNA to the 70 S initiation complex.

  13. Population Abundance of Potentially Pathogenic Organisms in Intestinal Microbiome of Jungle Crow (Corvus macrorhynchos Shown with 16S rRNA Gene-Based Microbial Community Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jungle Crows (Corvus macrorhynchos prefer human habitats because of their versatility in feeding accompanied with human food consumption. Therefore, it is important from a public health viewpoint to characterize their intestinal microbiota. However, no studies have been involved in molecular characterization of the microbiota based on huge and reliable number of data acquisition. In this study, 16S rRNA gene-based microbial community analysis coupled with the next-generation DNA sequencing techniques was applied to the taxonomic classification of intestinal microbiome for three jungle crows. Clustering of the reads into 130 operational taxonomic units showed that at least 70% of analyzed sequences for each crow were highly homologous to Eimeria sp., which belongs to the protozoan phylum Apicomplexa. The microbiotas of three crows also contained potentially pathogenic bacteria with significant percentages, such as the genera Campylobacter and Brachyspira. Thus, the profiling of a large number of 16S rRNA gene sequences in crow intestinal microbiomes revealed the high-frequency existence or vestige of potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

  14. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-03

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Triage of HR-HPV positive women with minor cytological abnormalities: a comparison of mRNA testing, HPV DNA testing, and repeat cytology using a 4-year follow-up of a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Maria; Elfström, K Miriam; Brismar Wendel, Sophia; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Andersson, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) is necessary for malignant conversion and maintenance in cervical tissue. In order to determine whether HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing more effectively predicts precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer than HR-HPV DNA testing, we aimed to compare triage using HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing by APTIMA HPV Assay (APTIMA) to HPV16 DNA testing, HPV16/18 DNA testing, and repeat cytology. Liquid-based (PreservCyt) cell samples were obtained from HR-HPV-positive women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) within the framework of the population-based cervical cancer screening program in Stockholm, Sweden. Samples were tested for HR-HPV E6/E7 mRNA by APTIMA (Gene-Probe Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). Women were followed up for 4 years after the index cytology via medical and laboratory records, and the Stockholm Oncology Center. Nine of 25 (36%) women in the ASCUS group, and 64 of 180 (36%) women in the LSIL group developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or worse during 4 years of follow-up. 162 (74%) women were APTIMA-positive, and APTIMA had the highest sensitivity to predict CIN2 or worse and CIN3 or worse in the ASCUS (77.8% and 100%) and LSIL (78.1 and 75.8%) groups, although specificity was insufficient (cytology were more specific than APTIMA. The results of this population-based study with comprehensive follow-up support the use of APTIMA as a triage test for women with ASCUS. More focused investigation is required for women with LSIL.

  16. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  17. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  18. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  19. Catalytic processes for cleaner fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catani, R.; Marchionna, M.; Rossini, S.

    1999-01-01

    More stringent limitations on vehicle emissions require different measurement: fuel reformulation is one of the most important and is calling for a noticeable impact on refinery assets. Composition rangers of the future fuels have been defined on a time scale. In this scenario the evolution of catalytic technologies becomes a fundamental tool for allowing refinery to reach the fixed-by-law targets. In this paper, the refinery process options to meet each specific requirements of reformulated fuels are surveyed [it

  20. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  1. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  2. Association Between Four Polymorphisms in lncRNA and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Chinese Never-Smoking Female Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Li, Hang; Lv, Xiaoting; Zhou, Baosen; Yin, Zhihua

    2018-06-07

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in the development of human cancers. This is the first case-control study of the association between specific polymorphisms in lncRNA genes and the risk of lung cancer, as well as the gene-environment interaction between the polymorphisms and cooking oil fume exposure in Chinese never-smoking females. A hospital-based case-control study was carried out in Shenyang, Liaoning province. The study included 395 cases and 556 controls. The polymorphisms of rs4785367, rs3803662, rs10750417, and rs1814343 in lncRNA genes were analyzed. The gene-environment interactions were explored on both additive and multiplicative scale. In addition, the results were listed as follows: for rs3803662, compared with the individuals carrying homozygous TT genotype, those with homozygous CC genotype had the decreased risk of lung cancer (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.40-0.92, p = 0.018). As for rs4785367, compared with homozygous TT, homozygous CC could lessen the risk of lung cancer (adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.33-0.89, p = 0.016). The recessive models of rs3803662 and rs4785367 showed significant association (adjusted OR = 0.65, 95% CIs = 0.44-0.97, p = 0.033; adjusted OR = 0.54, 95% CIs = 0.33-0.88, p = 0.014). The C allele of rs3803662 was suggested to be protective allele of lung cancer (adjusted OR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.66-0.97, p = 0.023). However, rs10750417 and rs1814343 polymorphisms were not significantly associated with lung cancer risks. The measures of additive interaction and logistic models suggested that the gene-environment interactions were not statistically significant on both additive and multiplicative scales.

  3. Structural basis of RNA folding and recognition in an AMP-RNA aptamer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F; Kumar, R A; Jones, R A; Patel, D J

    1996-07-11

    The catalytic properties of RNA and its well known role in gene expression and regulation are the consequence of its unique solution structures. Identification of the structural determinants of ligand recognition by RNA molecules is of fundamental importance for understanding the biological functions of RNA, as well as for the rational design of RNA Sequences with specific catalytic activities. Towards this latter end, Szostak et al. used in vitro selection techniques to isolate RNA sequences ('aptamers') containing a high-affinity binding site for ATP, the universal currency of cellular energy, and then used this motif to engineer ribozymes with polynucleotide kinase activity. Here we present the solution structure, as determined by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics calculations, of both uniformly and specifically 13C-, 15N-labelled 40-mer RNA containing the ATP-binding motif complexed with AMP. The aptamer adopts an L-shaped structure with two nearly orthogonal stems, each capped proximally by a G x G mismatch pair, binding the AMP ligand at their junction in a GNRA-like motif.

  4. Association of microRNA-125a and microRNA-499a polymorphisms in chronic periodontitis in a sample south Indian population: A hospital-based genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Priyanka; Lavu, Vamsi; Rao, Suresh Ranga; Venkatesan, Vettriselvi

    2017-10-05

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease, caused by interaction between periodontopathic bacteria and the host immune response. MicroRNAs are small, single-stranded molecules, which play a key role in the regulation of diverse biological processes. Dysregulation of microRNAs function can lead to several diseases such as autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases. The objective of the study was to determine the association between selected single nucleotide polymorphisms in miR-125a, miR-499 and LIN28 homology A with chronic periodontitis susceptibility in a sample population from south India. Genotyping of the single nucleotide polymorphisms in miR-125a (rs41275794, rs12976445, rs10404453 and rs12975333), miR-499 (rs3746444) and LIN28 homolog A (rs3811463) was performed in DNA from288 controls (individuals with healthy gingiva) and 262 cases (chronic periodontitis patients) by direct dye-terminator sequencing. Disease association analysis revealed a significant association of the variant alleles of the miR-499a polymorphism (rs3746444) in chronic periodontitis [OR=2.07; 95%CI (1.35-3.17)]. The risk associated C-allele frequency was found to be higher in chronic periodontitis subjects as compared to that of healthy individuals. Similar results were also observed in the dominant model [OR=2.42; 95% CI (1.67-3.51)]. The recessive model for miR-125a polymorphism (rs12976445) was also found to be statistically significant with OR=1.54 and 95% CI (1.03-2.30). The haplotype "GCGGCA" was found to be higher in chronic periodontitis subjects than in healthy individuals. Pairwise linkage disequilibrium analysis exhibited that the polymorphisms, rs41275794 and rs12976445 in miR-125a, were in strong linkage equilibrium (D'=0.97). Epistatic interaction by multifactorial dimensionality reduction analysis revealed that the genotypes of the polymorphisms of miR-125a (rs41275794, rs12976445, rs10404453), miR-499a (rs3746444) and LIN28 (rs3811463) were interacting

  5. SNP Variation in MicroRNA Biogenesis Pathway Genes as a New Innovation Strategy for Alzheimer Disease Diagnostics: A Study of 10 Candidate Genes in an Understudied Population From the Eastern Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görücü Yilmaz, Şenay; Erdal, Mehmet E; Avci Özge, Aynur; Sungur, Mehmet A

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a common complex neurodegenerative disorder accounting for nearly 50% to 70% of dementias worldwide. Yet the current diagnostic options for AD are limited. New diagnostic innovation strategies focusing on novel molecules and pathways are sorely needed. In this connection, microRNAs (miRNAs) are conserved small noncoding RNAs that regulate posttranscriptional gene expression and are vital for neuronal development and its functional sustainability. Conceivably, biological pathways responsible for the biogenesis of miRNAs represent a veritable set of upstream candidate genes that can be potentially associated with the AD pathophysiology. Notably, whereas functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes have been studied in other complex diseases, surprisingly, virtually no such study has been conducted on their relevance in AD. Moreover, novel diagnostics identified in easily accessible peripheral tissues such as the whole blood samples represent the initial entry or gateway points on the biomarker discovery critical path for AD. To the best of our knowledge, we report here the first association study of functional SNPs, as measured by real-time PCR in 10 "upstream" candidate genes critically situated on the miRNA biogenesis pathway, in a large sample of AD patients (N=172) and healthy controls (N=109) in a hitherto understudied world population from the Mersin region of the Eastern Mediterranean. We observed a significant association between 2 candidate genes and AD, TARBP2 rs784567 genotype and AD (χ=6.292, P=0.043), and a trend for RNASEN rs10719 genotype (χ=4.528, P=0.104) and allele (P=0.035). Functional SNP variations in the other 8 candidate genes (DGCR8, XPO5, RAN, DICER1, AGO1, AGO2, GEMIN3, and GEMIN4) did not associate with AD in our sample. Given the putative biological importance of miRNA biogenesis pathways, these emerging data can provide a new foundation to stimulate future debate and

  6. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  7. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  8. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  9. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  10. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  11. Protein and mRNA levels support the notion that a genetic regulatory circuit controls growth phases in E. coli populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustino Martinez-Antonio

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial populations transition between growing and non-growing phases, based on nutrient availability and stresses conditions. The hallmark of a growing state is anabolism, including DNA replication and cell division. In contrast, bacteria in a growth-arrested state acquire a resistant physiology and diminished metabolism. However, there is little knowledge on how this transition occurs at the molecular level. Here, we provide new evidence that a multi-element genetic regulatory circuit might work to maintain genetic control among growth-phase transitions in Escherichia coli. This work contributes to the discovering of design principles behind the performance of biological functions, which could be of relevance on the new disciplines of biological engineering and synthetic biology.

  12. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  13. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  14. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  15. Sequence polymorphism in an insect RNA virus field population: A snapshot from a single point in space and time reveals stochastic differences among and within individual hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenger, Drake C., E-mail: drake.stenger@ars.usda.gov [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States); Krugner, Rodrigo [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States); Nouri, Shahideh; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Falk, Bryce W. [Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Sisterson, Mark S. [USDA, Agricultural Research Service, San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center, 9611 South Riverbend Ave., Parlier, CA 93648-9757 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Population structure of Homalodisca coagulata Virus-1 (HoCV-1) among and within field-collected insects sampled from a single point in space and time was examined. Polymorphism in complete consensus sequences among single-insect isolates was dominated by synonymous substitutions. The mutant spectrum of the C2 helicase region within each single-insect isolate was unique and dominated by nonsynonymous singletons. Bootstrapping was used to correct the within-isolate nonsynonymous:synonymous arithmetic ratio (N:S) for RT-PCR error, yielding an N:S value ~one log-unit greater than that of consensus sequences. Probability of all possible single-base substitutions for the C2 region predicted N:S values within 95% confidence limits of the corrected within-isolate N:S when the only constraint imposed was viral polymerase error bias for transitions over transversions. These results indicate that bottlenecks coupled with strong negative/purifying selection drive consensus sequences toward neutral sequence space, and that most polymorphism within single-insect isolates is composed of newly-minted mutations sampled prior to selection. -- Highlights: •Sampling protocol minimized differential selection/history among isolates. •Polymorphism among consensus sequences dominated by negative/purifying selection. •Within-isolate N:S ratio corrected for RT-PCR error by bootstrapping. •Within-isolate mutant spectrum dominated by new mutations yet to undergo selection.

  16. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  17. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  19. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  20. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  1. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  2. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  3. Kin Selection in the RNA World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Samuel R; West, Stuart A

    2017-12-05

    Various steps in the RNA world required cooperation. Why did life's first inhabitants, from polymerases to synthetases, cooperate? We develop kin selection models of the RNA world to answer these questions. We develop a very simple model of RNA cooperation and then elaborate it to model three relevant issues in RNA biology: (1) whether cooperative RNAs receive the benefits of cooperation; (2) the scale of competition in RNA populations; and (3) explicit replicator diffusion and survival. We show: (1) that RNAs are likely to express partial cooperation; (2) that RNAs will need mechanisms for overcoming local competition; and (3) in a specific example of RNA cooperation, persistence after replication and offspring diffusion allow for cooperation to overcome competition. More generally, we show how kin selection can unify previously disparate answers to the question of RNA world cooperation.

  4. iDoRNA: An Interacting Domain-based Tool for Designing RNA-RNA Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jittrawan Thaiprasit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA-RNA interactions play a crucial role in gene regulation in living organisms. They have gained increasing interest in the field of synthetic biology because of their potential applications in medicine and biotechnology. However, few novel regulators based on RNA-RNA interactions with desired structures and functions have been developed due to the challenges of developing design tools. Recently, we proposed a novel tool, called iDoDe, for designing RNA-RNA interacting sequences by first decomposing RNA structures into interacting domains and then designing each domain using a stochastic algorithm. However, iDoDe did not provide an optimal solution because it still lacks a mechanism to optimize the design. In this work, we have further developed the tool by incorporating a genetic algorithm (GA to find an RNA solution with maximized structural similarity and minimized hybridized RNA energy, and renamed the tool iDoRNA. A set of suitable parameters for the genetic algorithm were determined and found to be a weighting factor of 0.7, a crossover rate of 0.9, a mutation rate of 0.1, and the number of individuals per population set to 8. We demonstrated the performance of iDoRNA in comparison with iDoDe by using six RNA-RNA interaction models. It was found that iDoRNA could efficiently generate all models of interacting RNAs with far more accuracy and required far less computational time than iDoDe. Moreover, we compared the design performance of our tool against existing design tools using forty-four RNA-RNA interaction models. The results showed that the performance of iDoRNA is better than RiboMaker when considering the ensemble defect, the fitness score and computation time usage. However, it appears that iDoRNA is outperformed by NUPACK and RNAiFold 2.0 when considering the ensemble defect. Nevertheless, iDoRNA can still be an useful alternative tool for designing novel RNA-RNA interactions in synthetic biology research. The source code of iDoRNA

  5. Multiple isoforms for the catalytic subunit of PKA in the basal fungal lineage Mucor circinelloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Núñez, Lucas; Ocampo, Josefina; Gottlieb, Alexandra M; Rossi, Silvia; Moreno, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) activity is involved in dimorphism of the basal fungal lineage Mucor. From the recently sequenced genome of Mucor circinelloides we could predict ten catalytic subunits of PKA. From sequence alignment and structural prediction we conclude that the catalytic core of the isoforms is conserved, and the difference between them resides in their amino termini. This high number of isoforms is maintained in the subdivision Mucoromycotina. Each paralogue, when compared to the ones form other fungi is more homologous to one of its orthologs than to its paralogs. All of these fungal isoforms cannot be included in the class I or II in which fungal protein kinases have been classified. mRNA levels for each isoform were measured during aerobic and anaerobic growth. The expression of each isoform is differential and associated to a particular growth stage. We reanalyzed the sequence of PKAC (GI 20218944), the only cloned sequence available until now for a catalytic subunit of M. circinelloides. PKAC cannot be classified as a PKA because of its difference in the conserved C-tail; it shares with PKB a conserved C2 domain in the N-terminus. No catalytic activity could be measured for this protein nor predicted bioinformatically. It can thus be classified as a pseudokinase. Its importance can not be underestimated since it is expressed at the mRNA level in different stages of growth, and its deletion is lethal. Copyright © 2016 British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of mRNA expression of TP53 and the TP53 codon 72 Arg/Pro gene polymorphism with colorectal cancer risk in Asian population: a bioinformatics analysis and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhiyong; Zheng, Longzhi; Liu, Weimin; Wang, Cunchuan

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between TP53 codon 72 Pro/Arg gene polymorphism and colorectal cancer risk in Asians is still controversial, and this bioinformatics analysis and meta-analysis was performed to assess the associations. The association studies were identified from PubMed, and eligible reports were included. RevMan 5.3.1 software, Oncolnc, cBioPortal, and Oncomine online tools were used for statistical analysis. A random/fixed effects model was used in meta-analysis. The data were reported as risk ratios or mean differences with corresponding 95% CI. We confirmed that TP53 was associated with colorectal cancer, the alteration frequency of TP53 was 53% mutation and 7% deep deletion, and TP53 mRNA expression was different in different types of colorectal cancer based on The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Then, 18 studies were included that examine the association of TP53 codon 72 gene polymorphism with colorectal cancer risk in Asians. The meta-analysis indicated that TP53 Pro allele and Pro/Pro genotype were associated with colorectal cancer risk in Asian population, but Arg/Arg genotype was not (Pro allele: odds ratios [OR]=1.20, 95% CI: 1.06 to 1.35, P =0.003; Pro/Pro genotype: OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.69, P =0.0007; Arg/Arg genotype: OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.74 to 1.00, P =0.05). Interestingly, in the meta-analysis of the controls from the population-based studies, we found that TP53 codon 72 Pro/Arg gene polymorphism was associated with colorectal cancer risk (Pro allele: OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.55, P =0.0002; Pro/Pro genotype: OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.02, P colorectal cancer, but the different value levels of mRNA expression were not associated with survival rate of colon and rectal cancer. TP53 Pro allele and Pro/Pro genotype were associated with colorectal cancer risk in Asians.

  7. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  8. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  9. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  10. Intrinsic noise of microRNA-regulated genes and the ceRNA hypothesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Noorbakhsh

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate genes post-transciptionally by binding and degrading target eukaryotic mRNAs. We use a quantitative model to study gene regulation by inhibitory microRNAs and compare it to gene regulation by prokaryotic small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs. Our model uses a combination of analytic techniques as well as computational simulations to calculate the mean-expression and noise profiles of genes regulated by both microRNAs and sRNAs. We find that despite very different molecular machinery and modes of action (catalytic vs stoichiometric, the mean expression levels and noise profiles of microRNA-regulated genes are almost identical to genes regulated by prokaryotic sRNAs. This behavior is extremely robust and persists across a wide range of biologically relevant parameters. We extend our model to study crosstalk between multiple mRNAs that are regulated by a single microRNA and show that noise is a sensitive measure of microRNA-mediated interaction between mRNAs. We conclude by discussing possible experimental strategies for uncovering the microRNA-mRNA interactions and testing the competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA hypothesis.

  11. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  12. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  13. Efficient catalytic combustion in integrated micropellistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bársony, I; Ádám, M; Fürjes, P; Dücső, Cs; Lucklum, R; Hirschfelder, M; Kulinyi, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses two of the key issues of the development of catalytic combustion-type sensors: the selection and production of active catalytic particles on the micropellistor surface as well as the realization of a reliable thermal conduction between heater element and catalytic surface, for the sensing of temperature increase produced by the combustion. The report also demonstrates that chemical sensor product development by a MEMS process is a continuous struggle for elimination of all uncertainties influencing reliability and sensitivity of the final product

  14. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  15. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of the project is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulphur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with goods yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white and black oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues.

  16. Chemistry and engineering of catalytic hydrodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1973-01-01

    A review with 74 refs. on catalytic hydrodesulfurization of pure compds. and petroleum feedstocks, with emphasis on reaction intermediates and structures of Al2O3-supported Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts. [on SciFinder (R)

  17. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemler, Sherry R; Bovino, Michael T

    2013-06-07

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review.

  18. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  19. RNase MRP cleaves pre-tRNASer-Met in the tRNA maturation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yuichiro; Takeda, Jun; Adachi, Kousuke; Nobe, Yuko; Kobayashi, Junya; Hirota, Kouji; Oliveira, Douglas V; Taoka, Masato; Isobe, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) is a multifunctional ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex that is involved in the maturation of various types of RNA including ribosomal RNA. RNase MRP consists of a potential catalytic RNA and several protein components, all of which are required for cell viability. We show here that the temperature-sensitive mutant of rmp1, the gene for a unique protein component of RNase MRP, accumulates the dimeric tRNA precursor, pre-tRNA(Ser-Met). To examine whether RNase MRP mediates tRNA maturation, we purified the RNase MRP holoenzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and found that the enzyme directly and selectively cleaves pre-tRNA(Ser-Met), suggesting that RNase MRP participates in the maturation of specific tRNA in vivo. In addition, mass spectrometry-based ribonucleoproteomic analysis demonstrated that this RNase MRP consists of one RNA molecule and 11 protein components, including a previously unknown component Rpl701. Notably, limited nucleolysis of RNase MRP generated an active catalytic core consisting of partial mrp1 RNA fragments, which constitute "Domain 1" in the secondary structure of RNase MRP, and 8 proteins. Thus, the present study provides new insight into the structure and function of RNase MRP.

  20. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  1. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marie Luisa; Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP) proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized. Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication. We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target regulating an essential

  2. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Luisa Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized.Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication.We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target

  3. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  4. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...... means that in a diagram representation the intramolecular bonds of each partner are pseudoknot-free, that the intermolecular binding pairs are noncrossing, and that there is no so-called "zigzag" configuration. This paper presents the combinatorics of RNA interaction structures including...

  5. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Small suitability of the DLEC1, MLH1 and TUSC4 mRNA expression analysis as potential prognostic or differentiating markers for NSCLC patients in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordiak, Jacek; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Antczak, Adam; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Nawrot, Ewa; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2017-06-01

    According to the latest data, lung cancer is one of the most common cancer worldwide, men contributing nearly 21.2% and women 8.6% of all diagnosed cancers. Late detection of tumour drastically reduces the chance for a cure. Thus, it is important to search for candidate biomarkers for screening of early stage nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Tumour suppressor genes, DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1, localized on 3p21 are recognized to play a role in NSCLC carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 mRNA expression, and clinical features of NSCLC patients, tobacco addiction, and tumour histopathological characteristics. The DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression was analysed in lung tumour tissue samples obtained from 69 patients diagnosed with NSCLC: squamous cell carcinoma (n = 34), adenocarcinoma (n = 24), large cell carcinoma (n = 5), carcinoma adenosquamosum (n = 5). A decreased gene expression (RQ MLH1 in 50.7% and for TUSC4 in 26% of NSCLC samples. DLEC1 was decreased in more aggressive subtypes: large cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma-squamous cell carcinoma. The simultaneous downregulation of two of the studied genes, DLEC1 andMLH1,was observed in 30.4% of NSCLCsamples, highlighting the importance of these two genes in lung carcinogenesis. We found no correlation between the DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 gene expression and NSCLC patient characteristics (gender, age and smoking) or cancer histopathology. No significant differences in the gene expression among NSCLC subtypes indicate the weakness of DLEC1, TUSC4 and MLH1 expression analysis as potential differentiating markers of NSCLC subtypes in the Polish population.

  7. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  8. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  9. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh M; Bragin, O V

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  10. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  11. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  12. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis and mathematical modeling are essential components of the continuing search for better utilization of raw materials and energy, with reduced impact on the environment. Numerical modeling of chemical systems has progressed rapidly due to increases in computer power, and is used extensively for analysis, design and development of catalytic reactors and processes. This book presents reviews of the state-of-the-art in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic reactors and processes. Reviews by leading authorities in the respective areas Up-to-date reviews of latest techniques in modeling of catalytic processes Mix of US and European authors, as well as academic/industrial/research institute perspectives Connections between computation and experimental methods in some of the chapters.

  13. Circular RNA (circRNA) was an important bridge in the switch from the RNA world to the DNA world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, Gerald

    2018-06-14

    The concept that life on Earth began as an RNA world has been built upon extensive experimentation demonstrating that many of the building blocks required for living cells could be synthesized in the laboratory under conditions approximating our primordial world. Many of the building blocks for life have also been found in meteorites indicating that meteors may have been a source for these molecules, or more likely, that they represent the chemical library present in most/all bodies in the universe after the big bang. Perhaps the most important support for the concept comes from the fact that some RNA species possess catalytic activity, ribozymes, and that RNA could be reverse transcribe to DNA. The thrust of numerous papers on this topic has been to explore how the available molecules on Earth, at its birth, gave rise to life as we know it today. This paper focuses more on a reverse view of the topic. The "how" molecular building blocks were synthesized is not addressed nor how the "first" RNA molecules were synthesized. We can clearly speculate on the variable environmental conditions and chemistry available on Earth billions of years ago. However, we can never truly replicate the changing conditions or know the chemical composition of Earth at the beginning of time. We can, however, confirm that over millions, perhaps billions of years the basic building blocks for life accumulated sufficiently to initiate evolution to an RNA world followed by our RNA/DNA world. Here we are attempting to take the information from our current knowledge of biology and by inference and extrapolation work backward to hypothesize biological events in the march forward from RNA to DNA. It is proposed that the primordial replicating RNA cell, the ribocyte, evolved from liposomes encompassing required reactants and products for "life" and that ribonucleopeptide complexes formed membrane pores to support bidirectional ion and molecular transport to maintain biological functions and

  14. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  15. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  16. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  18. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  19. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  20. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  1. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)

  2. Theoretical studies on sRNA-mediated regulation in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao-Xue; Xu, Liu-Fang; Shi, Hua-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Small RNA(sRNA)-mediated post-transcriptional regulation differs from protein-mediated regulation. Through base-pairing, sRNA can regulate the target mRNA in a catalytic or stoichiometric manner. Some theoretical models were built for comparison of the protein-mediated and sRNA-mediated modes in the steady-state behaviors and noise properties. Many experiments demonstrated that a single sRNA can regulate several mRNAs, which causes crosstalk between the targets. Here, we focus on some models in which two target mRNAs are silenced by the same sRNA to discuss their crosstalk features. Additionally, the sequence-function relationship of sRNA and its role in the kinetic process of base-pairing have been highlighted in model building. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB834100), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11121403 and 11274320), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Grant No. Y4KF171CJ1), the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scholar of China (Grant No. 11304115), and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M541282).

  3. Identifying and characterizing Hfq-RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faner, M A; Feig, A L

    2013-09-15

    To regulate stress responses and virulence, bacteria use small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs). These RNAs can up or down regulate target mRNAs through base pairing by influencing ribosomal access and RNA decay. A large class of these sRNAs, called trans-encoded sRNAs, requires the RNA binding protein Hfq to facilitate base pairing between the regulatory RNA and its target mRNA. The resulting network of regulation is best characterized in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, but the importance of Hfq dependent sRNA regulation is recognized in a diverse population of bacteria. In this review we present the approaches and methods used to discover Hfq binding RNAs, characterize their interactions and elucidate their functions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Working with RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Working with RNA is not a special discipline in molecular biology. However, RNA is chemically and structurally different from DNA and a few simple work rules have to be implemented to maintain the integrity of the RNA. Alkaline pH, high temperatures, and heavy metal ions should be avoided when po...

  5. Generation and Development of RNA Ligase Ribozymes with Modular Architecture Through “Design and Selection”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Fujita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro selection with long random RNA libraries has been used as a powerful method to generate novel functional RNAs, although it often requires laborious structural analysis of isolated RNA molecules. Rational RNA design is an attractive alternative to avoid this laborious step, but rational design of catalytic modules is still a challenging task. A hybrid strategy of in vitro selection and rational design has been proposed. With this strategy termed “design and selection,” new ribozymes can be generated through installation of catalytic modules onto RNA scaffolds with defined 3D structures. This approach, the concept of which was inspired by the modular architecture of naturally occurring ribozymes, allows prediction of the overall architectures of the resulting ribozymes, and the structural modularity of the resulting ribozymes allows modification of their structures and functions. In this review, we summarize the design, generation, properties, and engineering of four classes of ligase ribozyme generated by design and selection.

  6. Let-7 miRNA-binding site polymorphism in the KRAS 3′UTR; colorectal cancer screening population prevalence and influence on clinical outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersem Janne B

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have reported associations between a variant allele in a let-7 microRNA complementary site (LCS6 within the 3′untranslated region (3′UTR of KRAS (rs61764370 and clinical outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients receiving cetuximab. The variant allele has also been associated with increased cancer risk. We aimed to reveal the incidence of the variant allele in a colorectal cancer screening population and to investigate the clinical relevance of the variant allele in mCRC patients treated with 1st line Nordic FLOX (bolus 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid and oxaliplatin +/− cetuximab. Methods The feasibility of the variant allele as a risk factor for CRC was investigated by comparing the LCS6 gene frequencies in 197 CRC patients, 1060 individuals with colorectal polyps, and 358 healthy controls. The relationship between clinical outcome and LCS6 genotype was analyzed in 180 mCRC patients receiving Nordic FLOX and 355 patients receiving Nordic FLOX + cetuximab in the NORDIC-VII trial (NCT00145314. Results LCS6 frequencies did not vary between CRC patients (23%, individuals with polyps (20%, and healthy controls (20% (P = 0.50. No statistically significant differences were demonstrated in the NORDIC-VII cohort even if numerically increased progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were found in patients with the LCS6 variant allele (8.5 (95% CI: 7.3-9.7 months versus 7.8 months (95% CI: 7.4-8.3 months, P = 0.16 and 23.5 (95% CI: 21.6-25.4 months versus 19.5 months (95% CI: 17.8-21.2 months, P = 0.31, respectively. Addition of cetuximab seemed to improve response rate more in variant carriers than in wild-type carriers (from 35% to 57% versus 44% to 47%, however the difference was not statistically significant (interaction P = 0.16. Conclusions The LCS6 variant allele does not seem to be a risk factor for development of colorectal polyps or CRC. No statistically significant effect of the

  7. Methods for RNA Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivarius, Signe

    of the transcriptome, 5’ end capture of RNA is combined with next-generation sequencing for high-throughput quantitative assessment of transcription start sites by two different methods. The methods presented here allow for functional investigation of coding as well as noncoding RNA and contribute to future...... RNAs rely on interactions with proteins, the establishment of protein-binding profiles is essential for the characterization of RNAs. Aiming to facilitate RNA analysis, this thesis introduces proteomics- as well as transcriptomics-based methods for the functional characterization of RNA. First, RNA...

  8. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  9. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  10. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased

  11. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  12. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...... understanding of the nature of the electrochemical promotion is also presented....

  13. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  14. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  15. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) with the oxidation of Celestine blue .... water samples were filtered through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter to remove suspended .... slope of the calibration graph as the optimization criterion. ..... In presence of Phen as stability enhancement agent in indicator system. ( ) +.

  16. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the alkaloid (+)-myrtine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizzuti, Maria Gabriefla; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    A new protocol for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-2,6-disubstituted-4-piperidones has been developed using a catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reaction in combination with a diastereoselective lithiation-substitution sequence; an efficient synthesis of (+)-myrtine has been achieved

  17. Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a precursor and characterized by chemical analysis using the ICP–AES method, XRD, TEM, FTIR and BET surface area determination. The oxidation reaction was carried out at 70°C under atmospheric pressure. The results showed the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 as being very high in terms of turnover frequency.

  18. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  19. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  20. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation

  1. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  2. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  3. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  4. Mammalian α-polymerase: cloning of partial complementary DNA and immunobinding of catalytic subunit in crude homogenate protein blots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SenGupta, D.N.; Kumar, P.; Zmudzka, B.Z.; Coughlin, S.; Vishwanatha, J.K.; Robey, F.A.; Parrott, C.; Wilson, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    A new polyclonal antibody against the α-polymerase catalytic polypeptide was prepared by using homogeneous HeLa cellα-polymerase. The antibody neutralized α-polymerase activity and was strong and specific for the α-polymerase catalytic polypeptide (M/sub r/ 183,000) in Western blot analysis of crude extracts of HeLa cells. The antibody was used to screen a cDNA library of newborn rat brain poly(A+) RNA in λgt11. A positive phage was identified and plaque purified. This phage, designated λpolα1.2, also was found to be positive with an antibody against Drosophila α-polymerase. The insert in λpolα1.2 (1183 base pairs) contained a poly(A) sequence at the 3' terminus and a short in-phase open reading frame at the 5' terminus. A synthetic oligopeptide (eight amino acids) corresponding to the open reading frame was used to raise antiserum in rabbits. Antibody affinity purified from this serum was found to be immunoreactive against purified α-polymerase by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and was capable of immunoprecipitating α-polymerase. This indicated the λpolα1.2 insert encoded an α-polymerase epitope and suggested that the cDNA corresponded to an α-polymerase mRNA. This was confirmed in hybrid selection experiments using pUC9 containing the cDNA insert and poly(A+) RNA from newborn rat brain; the insert hybridized to mRNA capable of encoding α-polymerase catalytic polypeptides. Northern blot analysis of rat brain poly(A+) RNA revealed that this mRNA is ∼5.4 kilobases

  5. Catalytic site identification—a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Daniel A.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov. PMID:23680785

  6. Electrocatalytic miRNA Detection Using Cobalt Porphyrin-Modified Reduced Graphene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille De Souza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Metalated porphyrins have been described to bind nucleic acids. Additionally, cobalt porphyrins present catalytic properties towards oxygen reduction. In this work, a carboxylic acid-functionalized cobalt porphyrin was physisorbed on reduced graphene oxide, then immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes. The carboxylic groups were used to covalently graft amino-terminated oligonucleotide probes which are complementary to a short microRNA target. It was shown that the catalytic oxygen electroreduction on cobalt porphyrin increases upon hybridization of miRNA strand (“signal-on” response. Current changes are amplified compared to non-catalytic amperometric system. Apart from oxygen, no added reagent is necessary. A limit of detection in the sub-nanomolar range was reached. This approach has never been described in the literature.

  7. Differential distribution of calcineurin Aα isoenzyme mRNA's in rat brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M.; Limonta, S.; Luyten, M.; Boddeke, H.

    1993-01-01

    Specific antisense oligonucleotide probes for the α isoforms of the catalytic subunit (A-subunit) of calcineurin were prepared and the distribution of Aα1 and Aα2 mRNA's has been studied in rat brain using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Clear regional differences have been observed for the

  8. Nature of the Nucleosomal Barrier to RNA Polymerase II | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the cell, RNA polymerase II (pol II) efficiently transcribes DNA packaged into nucleosomes, but in vitro encounters with the nucleosomes induce catalytic inactivation (arrest) of the pol II core enzyme. To determine potential mechanisms making nucleosomes transparent to transcription in vivo, we analyzed the nature of the nucleosome-induced arrest. We found that the arrests

  9. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonlinear physics approach to RNA cross-replication: Marginal stability, generalized logistic growth, and impacts of degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, T.D., E-mail: till.frank@ucd.ie [UCD School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Systems Biology Ireland, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Center for the Ecological Study of Perception and Action, Department of Psychology, University of Connecticut, 406 Babbidge Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2011-10-24

    Highlights: → RNA cross-replication is a marginally stable but not asymptotically stable process. → RNA enzymes exhibits a generalized logistic growth pattern with exponent equal to 2. → Degradation results in non-symmetric saturation levels of cross-replicating RNAs. -- Abstract: It is nowadays believed that the evolution of life involved as an intermediate step an RNA world. In such an RNA world RNA molecules replicate themselves in catalytic reactions. Recent experiments on cross-replicating RNA support the RNA world hypothesis. We derive a nonlinear mass-action kinetics model to explain logistic growth patterns and non-symmetric saturation levels observed in those experiments. We also demonstrate that fixed points of the RNA growth process are only marginally stable rather than asymptotically stable.

  11. Mechanism for Coordinated RNA Packaging and Genome Replication by Rotavirus Polymerase VP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xiaohui; McDonald, Sarah M.; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Tao, Yizhi Jane; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Nibert, Max L.; Patton, John T.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (NIH); (CH-Boston)

    2009-04-08

    Rotavirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1 catalyzes RNA synthesis within a subviral particle. This activity depends on core shell protein VP2. A conserved sequence at the 3' end of plus-strand RNA templates is important for polymerase association and genome replication. We have determined the structure of VP1 at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, as apoenzyme and in complex with RNA. The cage-like enzyme is similar to reovirus {lambda}3, with four tunnels leading to or from a central, catalytic cavity. A distinguishing characteristic of VP1 is specific recognition, by conserved features of the template-entry channel, of four bases, UGUG, in the conserved 3' sequence. Well-defined interactions with these bases position the RNA so that its 3' end overshoots the initiating register, producing a stable but catalytically inactive complex. We propose that specific 3' end recognition selects rotavirus RNA for packaging and that VP2 activates the autoinhibited VP1/RNA complex to coordinate packaging and genome replication.

  12. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mR...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs.......Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...

  13. A Structural Overview of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerases from the Flaviviridae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiqin Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs from the Flaviviridae family are representatives of viral polymerases that carry out RNA synthesis through a de novo initiation mechanism. They share a ≈ 600-residue polymerase core that displays a canonical viral RdRP architecture resembling an encircled right hand with palm, fingers, and thumb domains surrounding the active site. Polymerase catalytic motifs A–E in the palm and motifs F/G in the fingers are shared by all viral RdRPs with sequence and/or structural conservations regardless of the mechanism of initiation. Different from RdRPs carrying out primer-dependent initiation, Flaviviridae and other de novo RdRPs utilize a priming element often integrated in the thumb domain to facilitate primer-independent initiation. Upon the transition to the elongation phase, this priming element needs to undergo currently unresolved conformational rearrangements to accommodate the growth of the template-product RNA duplex. In the genera of Flavivirus and Pestivirus, the polymerase module in the C-terminal part of the RdRP protein may be regulated in cis by the N-terminal region of the same polypeptide. Either being a methyltransferase in Flavivirus or a functionally unclarified module in Pestivirus, this region could play auxiliary roles for the canonical folding and/or the catalysis of the polymerase, through defined intra-molecular interactions.

  14. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  15. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  16. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  17. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  18. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  19. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  20. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  1. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  2. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  3. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  4. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  5. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  6. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  7. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  8. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  9. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Hongzhu, E-mail: hzmachem@snnu.edu.cn [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Xinhai [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Ma Qingliang [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024 Taiyuan (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  10. The Structure of the RNA m5C Methyltransferase YebU from Escherichia coli Reveals a C-terminal RNA-recruiting PUA Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallberg, B. Martin; Ericsson, Ulrika B.; Johnson, Kenneth A

    2006-01-01

    potential that differ from other RNA-MTase structures, suggesting that YebU interacts with its RNA target in a different manner. Docking of YebU onto the 30 S subunit indicates that the PUA and MTase domains make several contacts with 16 S rRNA as well as with the ribosomal protein S12. The ribosomal...... protein interactions would explain why the assembled 30 S subunit, and not naked 16 S rRNA, is the preferred substrate for YebU....... by X-ray crystallography, and we present a molecular model for how YebU specifically recognizes, binds and methylates its ribosomal substrate. The YebU protein has an N-terminal SAM-binding catalytic domain with structural similarity to the equivalent domains in several other m(5)C RNA MTases including...

  11. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  12. RNA Localization in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    , regulation of the blood brain barrier and glial scar tissue formation. Despite the involvement in various CNS functions only a limited number of studies have addressed mRNA localization in astrocytes. This PhD project was initially focused on developing and implementing methods that could be used to asses mRNA......Messenger RNA (mRNA) localization is a mechanism by which polarized cells can regulate protein synthesis to specific subcellular compartments in a spatial and temporal manner, and plays a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes from embryonic development to cell differentiation...... localization in astrocyte protrusions, and following look into the subcellular localization pattern of specific mRNA species of both primary astrocytes isolated from cortical hemispheres of newborn mice, and the mouse astrocyte cell line, C8S. The Boyden chamber cell fractionation assay was optimized, in a way...

  13. Particle size effects in the catalytic electroreduction of CO₂ on Cu nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reske, Rulle; Mistry, Hemma; Behafarid, Farzad; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Strasser, Peter

    2014-05-14

    A study of particle size effects during the catalytic CO2 electroreduction on size-controlled Cu nanoparticles (NPs) is presented. Cu NP catalysts in the 2-15 nm mean size range were prepared, and their catalytic activity and selectivity during CO2 electroreduction were analyzed and compared to a bulk Cu electrode. A dramatic increase in the catalytic activity and selectivity for H2 and CO was observed with decreasing Cu particle size, in particular, for NPs below 5 nm. Hydrocarbon (methane and ethylene) selectivity was increasingly suppressed for nanoscale Cu surfaces. The size dependence of the surface atomic coordination of model spherical Cu particles was used to rationalize the experimental results. Changes in the population of low-coordinated surface sites and their stronger chemisorption were linked to surging H2 and CO selectivities, higher catalytic activity, and smaller hydrocarbon selectivity. The presented activity-selectivity-size relations provide novel insights in the CO2 electroreduction reaction on nanoscale surfaces. Our smallest nanoparticles (~2 nm) enter the ab initio computationally accessible size regime, and therefore, the results obtained lend themselves well to density functional theory (DFT) evaluation and reaction mechanism verification.

  14. Phylogenetic footprinting of non-coding RNA: hammerhead ribozyme sequences in a satellite DNA family of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venanzetti Federica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The great variety in sequence, length, complexity, and abundance of satellite DNA has made it difficult to ascribe any function to this genome component. Recent studies have shown that satellite DNA can be transcribed and be involved in regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Some satellite DNAs, such as the pDo500 sequence family in Dolichopoda cave crickets, have a catalytic hammerhead (HH ribozyme structure and activity embedded within each repeat. Results We assessed the phylogenetic footprints of the HH ribozyme within the pDo500 sequences from 38 different populations representing 12 species of Dolichopoda. The HH region was significantly more conserved than the non-hammerhead (NHH region of the pDo500 repeat. In addition, stems were more conserved than loops. In stems, several compensatory mutations were detected that maintain base pairing. The core region of the HH ribozyme was affected by very few nucleotide substitutions and the cleavage position was altered only once among 198 sequences. RNA folding of the HH sequences revealed that a potentially active HH ribozyme can be found in most of the Dolichopoda populations and species. Conclusions The phylogenetic footprints suggest that the HH region of the pDo500 sequence family is selected for function in Dolichopoda cave crickets. However, the functional role of HH ribozymes in eukaryotic organisms is unclear. The possible functions have been related to trans cleavage of an RNA target by a ribonucleoprotein and regulation of gene expression. Whether the HH ribozyme in Dolichopoda is involved in similar functions remains to be investigated. Future studies need to demonstrate how the observed nucleotide changes and evolutionary constraint have affected the catalytic efficiency of the hammerhead.

  15. Structure of Drosophila Oskar reveals a novel RNA binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Yu, Zhenyu; Hu, Menglong; Wang, Mingzhu; Lehmann, Ruth; Xu, Rui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Oskar (Osk) protein plays critical roles during Drosophila germ cell development, yet its functions in germ-line formation and body patterning remain poorly understood. This situation contrasts sharply with the vast knowledge about the function and mechanism of osk mRNA localization. Osk is predicted to have an N-terminal LOTUS domain (Osk-N), which has been suggested to bind RNA, and a C-terminal hydrolase-like domain (Osk-C) of unknown function. Here, we report the crystal structures of Osk-N and Osk-C. Osk-N shows a homodimer of winged-helix–fold modules, but without detectable RNA-binding activity. Osk-C has a lipase-fold structure but lacks critical catalytic residues at the putative active site. Surprisingly, we found that Osk-C binds the 3′UTRs of osk and nanos mRNA in vitro. Mutational studies identified a region of Osk-C important for mRNA binding. These results suggest possible functions of Osk in the regulation of stability, regulation of translation, and localization of relevant mRNAs through direct interaction with their 3′UTRs, and provide structural insights into a novel protein–RNA interaction motif involving a hydrolase-related domain. PMID:26324911

  16. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  17. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  18. Clay catalyzed RNA synthesis under Martian conditions: Application for Mars return samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Prakash C; Dubey, Krishna; Aldersley, Michael F; Sausville, Meaghen

    2015-06-26

    Catalysis by montmorillonites clay minerals is regarded as a feasible mechanism for the abiotic production and polymerization of key biomolecules on early Earth. We have investigated a montmorillonite-catalyzed reaction of the 5'-phosphorimidazolide of nucleosides as a model to probe prebiotic synthesis of RNA-type oligomers. Here we show that this model is specific for the generation of RNA oligomers despite deoxy-mononucleotides adsorbing equally well onto the montmorillonite catalytic surfaces. Optimum catalytic activity was observed over a range of pH (6-9) and salinity (1 ± 0.2 M NaCl). When the weathering steps of early Earth that generated catalytic montmorillonite were modified to meet Martian soil conditions, the catalytic activity remained intact without altering the surface layer charge. Additionally, the formation of oligomers up to tetramer was detected using as little as 0.1 mg of Na⁺-montmorillonite, suggesting that the catalytic activity of a Martian clay return sample can be investigated with sub-milligram scale samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mg2+ Effect on Argonaute and RNA Duplex by Molecular Dynamics and Bioinformatics Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Seungyoon; Ryu, Hyojung; Son, Won-joon; Kim, Yon Hui; Kim, Kyung Tae; Balch, Curt; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Lee, Jinhyuk

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by small non-coding RNAs (e.g., miRNAs, siRNAs), influences diverse cellular functions. Highly complementary miRNA-target RNA (or siRNA-target RNA) duplexes are recognized by an Argonaute family protein (Ago2), and recent observations indicate that the concentration of Mg2+ ions influences miRNA targeting of specific mRNAs, thereby modulating miRNA-mRNA networks. In the present report, we studied the thermodynamic effects of differential [Mg2+] on slicing (RNA silencing cycle) through molecular dynamics simulation analysis, and its subsequent statistical analysis. Those analyses revealed different structural conformations of the RNA duplex in Ago2, depending on Mg2+ concentration. We also demonstrate that cation effects on Ago2 structural flexibility are critical to its catalytic/functional activity, with low [Mg2+] favoring greater Ago2 flexibility (e.g., greater entropy) and less miRNA/mRNA duplex stability, thus favoring slicing. The latter finding was supported by a negative correlation between expression of an Mg2+ influx channel, TRPM7, and one miRNA’s (miR-378) ability to downregulate its mRNA target, TMEM245. These results imply that thermodynamics could be applied to siRNA-based therapeutic strategies, using highly complementary binding targets, because Ago2 is also involved in RNAi slicing by exogenous siRNAs. However, the efficacy of a siRNA-based approach will differ, to some extent, based on the Mg2+ concentration even within the same disease type; therefore, different siRNA-based approaches might be considered for patient-to-patient needs. PMID:25330448

  20. Methods for Determination of 2′-O-Me in RNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Ulf; Krogh, Nicolai; Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg

    2016-01-01

    mechanism of ribose methylation is found in rRNA of Archaea and Eukarya where a methyltransferase (fibrillarin) use sRNA (Archaea) or box C/D snoRNA (Eukarya) as guide RNAs to specify the site of modification. The general function of these modifications is to promote ribosome biogenesis, in particular...... for mapping modifications and quantitating the fraction of RNA molecules modified in a population until recently remained poorly developed. Here, we review the methods that have been used to study 2′-O-Me in RNA starting with the original approach employing in vivo isotope labeling followed by paper......Ribose methylation is one of the most abundant RNA modifications and is found in all kingdoms of life and all major classes of RNA (rRNA, tRNA, and mRNA). Ribose methylations are introduced by stand-alone enzymes or by generic enzymes guided to the target by small RNA guides. The most abundant...

  1. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  2. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  3. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  4. Expedited quantification of mutant ribosomal RNA by binary deoxyribozyme (BiDz) sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Yakovchuk, Petro; Dedkova, Larisa M; Hecht, Sidney M; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) have traditionally been detected by the primer extension assay, which is a tedious and multistage procedure. Here, we describe a simple and straightforward fluorescence assay based on binary deoxyribozyme (BiDz) sensors. The assay uses two short DNA oligonucleotides that hybridize specifically to adjacent fragments of rRNA, one of which contains a mutation site. This hybridization results in the formation of a deoxyribozyme catalytic core that produces the fluorescent signal and amplifies it due to multiple rounds of catalytic action. This assay enables us to expedite semi-quantification of mutant rRNA content in cell cultures starting from whole cells, which provides information useful for optimization of culture preparation prior to ribosome isolation. The method requires less than a microliter of a standard Escherichia coli cell culture and decreases analysis time from several days (for primer extension assay) to 1.5 h with hands-on time of ∼10 min. It is sensitive to single-nucleotide mutations. The new assay simplifies the preliminary analysis of RNA samples and cells in molecular biology and cloning experiments and is promising in other applications where fast detection/quantification of specific RNA is required. © 2015 Gerasimova et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Structural explanation for the role of Mn2+ in the activity of phi6 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poranen, Minna M; Salgado, Paula S; Koivunen, Minni R L; Wright, Sam; Bamford, Dennis H; Stuart, David I; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2008-11-01

    The biological role of manganese (Mn(2+)) has been a long-standing puzzle, since at low concentrations it activates several polymerases whilst at higher concentrations it inhibits. Viral RNA polymerases possess a common architecture, reminiscent of a closed right hand. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of bacteriophage 6 is one of the best understood examples of this important class of polymerases. We have probed the role of Mn(2+) by biochemical, biophysical and structural analyses of the wild-type enzyme and of a mutant form with an altered Mn(2+)-binding site (E491 to Q). The E491Q mutant has much reduced affinity for Mn(2+), reduced RNA binding and a compromised elongation rate. Loss of Mn(2+) binding structurally stabilizes the enzyme. These data and a re-examination of the structures of other viral RNA polymerases clarify the role of manganese in the activation of polymerization: Mn(2+) coordination of a catalytic aspartate is necessary to allow the active site to properly engage with the triphosphates of the incoming NTPs. The structural flexibility caused by Mn(2+) is also important for the enzyme dynamics, explaining the requirement for manganese throughout RNA polymerization.

  6. Assembling RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanoparticles are designed and self-assembled according to noncanonical interactions of naturally conserved RNA motifs and/or canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, which have potential applications in gene therapy and nanomedicine. These artificially engineered nanoparticles are mainly synthesized from in vitro transcribed RNAs, purified by denaturing and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and characterized with native PAGE, AFM, and TEM technologies. The protocols of in vitro transcription, denaturing and native PAGE, and RNA nanoparticle self-assembly are described in detail.

  7. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Catalytic cracking models developed for predictive control purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Ljungqvist

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with state-space modeling issues in the context of model-predictive control, with application to catalytic cracking. Emphasis is placed on model establishment, verification and online adjustment. Both the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC and the Residual Catalytic Cracking (RCC units are discussed. Catalytic cracking units involve complex interactive processes which are difficult to operate and control in an economically optimal way. The strong nonlinearities of the FCC process mean that the control calculation should be based on a nonlinear model with the relevant constraints included. However, the model can be simple compared to the complexity of the catalytic cracking plant. Model validity is ensured by a robust online model adjustment strategy. Model-predictive control schemes based on linear convolution models have been successfully applied to the supervisory dynamic control of catalytic cracking units, and the control can be further improved by the SSPC scheme.

  9. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  11. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  12. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  13. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it

  14. Direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina to biofuels with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qin; Liao, Hansheng; Zhou, Shiqin; Li, Qiuping; Wang, Lu; Yu, Zhihao; Jing, Li

    2018-01-01

    We report herein on acquiring biofuels from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina. The component of bio-oil from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction was similar to that from two independent processes (including liquefaction and upgrading of biocrude). However, one step process has higher carbon recovery, due to the less loss of carbons. It was demonstrated that the yield and HHV of bio-oil from direct catalytic algae with hydrothermal condition is higher than that from two independent processes.

  15. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  16. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  17. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation uni...

  18. Plant RNA binding proteins for control of RNA virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Un eHuh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant RNA viruses have effective strategies to infect host plants through either direct or indirect interactions with various host proteins, thus suppressing the host immune system. When plant RNA viruses enter host cells exposed RNAs of viruses are recognized by the host immune system through processes such as siRNA-dependent silencing. Interestingly, some host RNA binding proteins have been involved in the inhibition of RNA virus replication, movement, and translation through RNA-specific binding. Host plants intensively use RNA binding proteins for defense against viral infections in nature. In this mini review, we will summarize the function of some host RNA binding proteins which act in a sequence-specific binding manner to the infecting virus RNA. It is important to understand how plants effectively suppresses RNA virus infections via RNA binding proteins, and this defense system can be potentially developed as a synthetic virus defense strategy for use in crop engineering.

  19. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-06-30

    The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000ppm) over MnO(2) modified with different supports. α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al(2)O(3) (commercial), SiO(2), TiO(2) and ZrO(2) were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO(2) was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO(2)/α-Al(2)O(3)(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289°C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalytic membrane in reduction of aqueous nitrates: operational principles and catalytic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Nosova, L.V.; Gribov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic membrane with palladium-copper active component supported over the macroporous ceramic membrane, and a series of γ-Al 2O 3 supported Pd-Cu catalysts were prepared and investigated. In reduction of nitrate ions by hydrogen in water at ambient temperature, pronounced internal diffusion

  1. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  2. Shapes of interacting RNA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Benjamin Mingming; Reidys, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Shapes of interacting RNA complexes are studied using a filtration via their topological genus. A shape of an RNA complex is obtained by (iteratively) collapsing stacks and eliminating hairpin loops.This shape-projection preserves the topological core of the RNA complex and for fixed topological...... genus there are only finitely many such shapes. Our main result is a new bijection that relates the shapes of RNA complexes with shapes of RNA structures. This allows to compute the shape polynomial of RNA complexes via the shape polynomial of RNA structures. We furthermore present a linear time uniform...... sampling algorithm for shapes of RNA complexes of fixed topological genus....

  3. Remote Network Access (RNA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... Remote Network Access (RNA) includes or is associated with all communication devices/software, firewalls, intrusion detection systems and virus protection applications to ensure security of the OIG, DoD, Network from remote...

  4. RNA/PNA Approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this approach we want to develop structural analogue of the leader that might have higher affinity towards the Phosphoprotein, but would impair the dimerization process and viral leader RNA binding.

  5. Cations and hydration in catalytic RNA: Molecular dynamics of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krasovská, Maryna V.; Šefčíková, J.; Réblová, Kamila; Schneider, Bohdan; Walter, N.G.; Šponer, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 91, č. 2 (2006), s. 626-638 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0388; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0009; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : molecular dynamics * cations * hydration Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.757, year: 2006

  6. Microwave Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Chang

    2003-01-01

    .... A sufficient amount of experimental work has been completed evaluating the performance of the microwave catalytic oxidation process and determining the effect of different operating parameters...

  7. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  8. Dynamics of 103K/N and 184M/V HIV-1 drug resistant populations: relative comparison in plasma virus RNA versus CD45RO+T cell proviral DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Martin Roelsgaard; Tolstrup, M; Bertelsen, L

    2007-01-01

    on real-time PCR and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). RESULTS: The 103N and 184V mutations were not detected in patients with stable low viremia. Patients previously exposed to mono or dual therapy often carried minor viral populations of either one or both mutations in plasma. The viral......BACKGROUND: Viral populations defined by 103K/N and 184M/V as linked or single mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase gene were investigated in plasma samples and compared with previous findings in the CD45RO(+)T cell compartment. OBJECTIVE: To develop an ARMS assay for plasma virions...... an unequal distribution of linked-mutation populations in plasma and CD45RO(+)T cells. Furthermore, the linked 103N-184V mutation may be more fit than the single 184V mutation and this linked population emerges rapidly under inadequate drug pressure. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul...

  9. Reconstruction and analysis of the lncRNA-miRNA-mRNA network based on competitive endogenous RNA reveal functional lncRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hui; Ma, Rong; Zou, Shubiao; Wang, Yongzhong; Li, Zhuqing; Li, Weiping

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with an unknown etiology, occurring in approximately 1.0% of general population. More and more studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) could play important roles in various biological processes and be associated with the pathogenesis of different kinds of diseases including RA. Although a large number of lncRNAs have been found, our knowledge of their function and physiological/pathological significance is still in its infancy. In order to reveal functional lncRNAs and identify the key lncRNAs in RA, we reconstructed a global triple network based on the competitive endogenous RNA (ceRNA) theory using the data from National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus and our previous paper. Meanwhile, Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway analysis were performed using Cytoscape plug-in BinGO and Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integration Discovery (DAVID), respectively. We found that the lncRNA-miRNA-mRNA network was composed of 7 lncRNA nodes, 90 mRNA nodes, 24 miRNA nodes, and 301 edges. The functional assay showed that 147 GO terms and 23 pathways were enriched. In addition, three lncRNAs (S5645.1, XR_006437.1, J01878) were highly related to RA, and therefore, were selected as key lncRNAs. This study suggests that specific lncRNAs are associated with the development of RA, and three lncRNAs (S5645.1, XR_006437.1, J01878) could be used as potential diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  10. Structural insights into RNA processing by the human RISC-loading complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Noland, Cameron; Siridechadilok, Bunpote; Taylor, David W; Ma, Enbo; Felderer, Karin; Doudna, Jennifer A; Nogales, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Targeted gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) requires loading of a short guide RNA (small interfering RNA (siRNA) or microRNA (miRNA)) onto an Argonaute protein to form the functional center of an RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). In humans, Argonaute2 (AGO2) assembles with the guide RNA-generating enzyme Dicer and the RNA-binding protein TRBP to form a RISC-loading complex (RLC), which is necessary for efficient transfer of nascent siRNAs and miRNAs from Dicer to AGO2. Here, using single-particle EM analysis, we show that human Dicer has an L-shaped structure. The RLC Dicer's N-terminal DExH/D domain, located in a short 'base branch', interacts with TRBP, whereas its C-terminal catalytic domains in the main body are proximal to AGO2. A model generated by docking the available atomic structures of Dicer and Argonaute homologs into the RLC reconstruction suggests a mechanism for siRNA transfer from Dicer to AGO2.

  11. Computational and Physical Analysis of Catalytic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard; Sohn, Jung Jae; Kyung, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical and chemical properties depending on their geometrical properties. For this reason, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled shape and size is important to use their unique properties. Catalyst supports are usually made of high-surface-area porous oxides or carbon nanomaterials. These support materials stabilize metal catalysts against sintering at high reaction temperatures. Many studies have demonstrated large enhancements of catalytic behavior due to the role of the oxide-metal interface. In this paper, the catalyzing ability of supported nano metal oxides, such as silicon oxide and titanium oxide compounds as catalysts have been analyzed using computational chemistry method. Computational programs such as Gamess and Chemcraft has been used in an effort to compute the efficiencies of catalytic compounds, and bonding energy changes during the optimization convergence. The result illustrates how the metal oxides stabilize and the steps that it takes. The graph of the energy computation step(N) versus energy(kcal/mol) curve shows that the energy of the titania converges faster at the 7th iteration calculation, whereas the silica converges at the 9th iteration calculation.

  12. New separation technique. Catalytically functionated separation membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgami, Tadashi [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    1989-02-01

    This report introduces research examples, showing the fundamental principle of the membrane by separating the catalytically functionated separation membrane into enzyme fixing separation membrane, polymerized metal complex separation membrane and polymer catalyst separation membrane. This membrane can achieve both functions of separation and catalytic reaction simultaneously and has sufficient possibility to combine powerful functions. Enzyme fixing separation membrane is prepared by carrier combination method, bridging method or covering method and the enzyme fixing method with polymerized complex in which enzyme is controlled to prevent the activity lowering as much as possible and enzyme is fixed from an aqueous solution into polymer membrane. This membrane is applied to the continuous manufacturing of invert sugar from cane sugar and adsorption and removing of harmful substances from blood by utilizing both micro-capsuled urease and active carbon. Alginic acid-copper (II) complex membrane is used for the polymerized metal complex membrane and polystyrene sulfonate membrane is used for the polymer catalyst separation membrane. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  13. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  14. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunev, A G; Parkhomchuk, E V; Lysikov, A I; Parunin, P D; Semeikina, V S; Parmon, V N

    2015-01-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references

  15. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  16. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  17. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  18. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Several independent studies show that gas stoves to some degree contribute to the indoor emissions of NO{sub x} especially in situations were the ventilation flow is poor. The peak-NO{sub x} concentrations can reach several hundred ppb but the integral concentration seldom exceeds about 20 - 50 ppb, which corresponds to an indoor-outdoor ratio of about 1 - 2.5. Epidemiological studies indicate increasing problems with respiratory symptoms in sensitive people at concentrations as low as 15 ppb of NO{sub 2}. Consequently, the NO{sub x}-concentration in homes where gas stoves are used is high enough to cause health effects. However, in situations where the ventilation flow is high (utilisation of ventilation hoods) the NO{sub x}-emissions are not likely to cause any health problems. This study has been aimed at investigating the possibilities to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions from gas stoves by replacing the conventional flame combustion with catalytic combustion. The investigation is requested by Swedish Gas Center, and is a following-up work of an earlier conducted feasibility study presented in April-2002. The present investigation reports on the possibility to use cheap and simple retro-fit catalytic design suggestions for traditional gas stoves. Experiments have been conducted with both natural and town gas, and parameters such as emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned fuel gas and thermal efficiency, etc, have been examined and are discussed. The results show that it is possible to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions up to 80% by a simple retro-fit installation, without decreasing the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate. The measured source strengths correspond to indoor NO{sub x} concentrations that are below or equal to the average outdoor concentration, implying that no additional detrimental health effects are probable. The drawback of the suggested installations is that the concentration of CO and in some cases also CH{sub 4} are increased in the flue gases

  19. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of its...

  20. A functional polymorphism at microRNA-629-binding site in the 3'-untranslated region of NBS1 gene confers an increased risk of lung cancer in Southern and Eastern Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Li, Yinyan; Cheng, Mei; Huang, Dongsheng; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Bin; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Li, Qingchu; Zhang, Xin; Ji, Weidong; Zhou, Yifeng; Lu, Jiachun

    2012-02-01

    The genetic variations in NBS1 gene have been reported to be associated with cancer risk. The polymorphisms in 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of NBS1 might affect gene's function and thus contribute to cancer susceptibility. We hypothesized that these polymorphisms of NBS1 are associated with the lung cancer risk. In two independent case-control studies conducted in Southern and Eastern Chinese, we genotyped three tagSNPs (rs14448, rs13312986 and rs2735383) in Southern Chinese and then validated the discovered association in Eastern Chinese. No significant association was observed for rs13312986 and rs14448; we only found that the rs2735383CC genotype had a significantly increased risk of lung cancer under a recessive genetic model in the total 1559 cases versus 1679 controls (odds ratio = 1.40, 95% confidence interval = 1.18-1.66, P = 0.0001) when compared with GG or GC genotypes; the rs2735383CC genotype carriers had lower messenger RNA and protein expression levels in tumor tissues than those of other genotypes as quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot shown. Luciferase assay revealed that the rs2735383C allele had a lower transcription activity than G allele, and the hsa-miR-629 but not hsa-miR-499-5P had effect on modulation of NBS1 gene in vitro. We further observed that the X-ray radiation induced more chromatid breaks in lymphocyte cells from the carriers of rs2735383CC homozygote than those from the subjects with other genotypes (P = 0.0008). Our data suggested that the rs2735383G>C variation contributes to an increased risk of lung cancer by diminishing gene's expression through binding of microRNA-629 to the polymorphic site in the 3'-UTR of NBS1 gene.

  1. Secreted histidyl-tRNA synthetase splice variants elaborate major epitopes for autoantibodies in inflammatory myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie J; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhiwen; Lo, Wing-Sze; Lau, Ching-Fun; Chiang, Kyle P; Nangle, Leslie A; Ashlock, Melissa A; Mendlein, John D; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Zhang, Mingjie; Schimmel, Paul

    2014-07-11

    Inflammatory and debilitating myositis and interstitial lung disease are commonly associated with autoantibodies (anti-Jo-1 antibodies) to cytoplasmic histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). Anti-Jo-1 antibodies from different disease-afflicted patients react mostly with spatially separated epitopes in the three-dimensional structure of human HisRS. We noted that two HisRS splice variants (SVs) include these spatially separated regions, but each SV lacks the HisRS catalytic domain. Despite the large deletions, the two SVs cross-react with a substantial population of anti-Jo-l antibodies from myositis patients. Moreover, expression of at least one of the SVs is up-regulated in dermatomyositis patients, and cell-based experiments show that both SVs and HisRS can be secreted. We suggest that, in patients with inflammatory myositis, anti-Jo-1 antibodies may have extracellular activity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Programmed self-assembly of DNA/RNA for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei

    Three self-assembly strategies were utilized for assembly of novel functional DNA/RNA nanostructures. RNA-DNA hybrid origami method was developed to fabricate nano-objects (ribbon, rectangle, and triangle) with precisely controlled geometry. Unlike conventional DNA origami which use long DNA single strand as scaffold, a long RNA single strand was used instead, which was folded by short DNA single strands (staples) into prescribed objects through sequence specific hybridization between RNA and DNA. Single stranded tiles (SST) and RNA-DNA hybrid origami were utilized to fabricate a variety of barcode-like nanostructures with unique patterns by expanding a plain rectangle via introducing spacers (10-bp dsDNA segment) between parallel duplexes. Finally, complex 2D array and 3D polyhedrons with multiple patterns within one structure were assembled from simple DNA motifs. Two demonstrations of biomedical applications of DNA nanotechnology were presented. Firstly, lambda-DNA was used as template to direct the fabrication of multi-component magnetic nanoparticle chains. Nuclear magnetic relaxation (NMR) characterization showed superb magnetic relaxativity of the nanoparticle chains which have large potential to be utilized as MRI contrast agents. Secondly, DNA nanotechnology was introduced into the conformational study of a routinely used catalytic DNAzyme, the RNA-cleaving 10-23 DNAzyme. The relative angle between two flanking duplexes of the catalytic core was determined (94.8°), which shall be able to provide a clue to further understanding of the cleaving mechanism of this DNAzyme from a conformational perspective.

  3. Snapshots of Dynamics in Synthesizing N6-isopentenyladenosine at tRNA Anticodon†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimnaronk, Sarin; Forouhar, Farhad; Sakai, Junichi; Yao, Min; Tron, Cecile M.; Atta, Mohamed; Fontecave, Marc; Hunt, John F.; Tanaka, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial and eukaryotic transfer RNAs that decode codons starting with uridine have a hydrophobically-hypermodified adenosine at the position 37 (A37) adjacent to the 3′-end of the anticodon, which is essential for efficient and highly accurate protein translation by the ribosome. However, it remains unclear how the corresponding tRNAs are selected to be modified by alkylation at the correct position of the adenosine base. We have determined a series of the crystal structures of bacterial tRNA isopentenyltransferase (MiaA) in apo- and tRNA-bound forms, which completely render snapshots of substrate selections during modification of RNA. A compact evolutionary inserted domain (herein ‘swinging domain’) in MiaA that exhibits as a highly mobile entity moves around the catalytic domain as likely to reach and trap the tRNA substrate. Thereby, MiaA clamps the anticodon stem loop of tRNA substrate between the catalytic and swinging domains, where the two conserved elongated residues from the swinging domain pinch the two flanking A36 and A38 together to squeeze out A37 into the reaction tunnel. The site-specific isopentenylation of RNA is thus ensured by a characteristic pinch-and-flip mechanism and by a reaction tunnel to confine the substrate selection. Furthermore, combining information from soaking experiments with structural comparisons, we propose a mechanism for the ordered substrate-binding of MiaA. PMID:19435325

  4. Footprinting analysis of interactions between the largest eukaryotic RNase P/MRP protein Pop1 and RNase P/MRP RNA components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Robert D; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2015-09-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related catalytic ribonucleoproteins involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules, including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. The catalytic RNA component of eukaryotic RNase P retains the core elements of the bacterial RNase P ribozyme; however, the peripheral RNA elements responsible for the stabilization of the global architecture are largely absent in the eukaryotic enzyme. At the same time, the protein makeup of eukaryotic RNase P is considerably more complex than that of the bacterial RNase P. RNase MRP, an essential and ubiquitous eukaryotic enzyme, has a structural organization resembling that of eukaryotic RNase P, and the two enzymes share most of their protein components. Here, we present the results of the analysis of interactions between the largest protein component of yeast RNases P/MRP, Pop1, and the RNA moieties of the enzymes, discuss structural implications of the results, and suggest that Pop1 plays the role of a scaffold for the stabilization of the global architecture of eukaryotic RNase P RNA, substituting for the network of RNA-RNA tertiary interactions that maintain the global RNA structure in bacterial RNase P. © 2015 Fagerlund et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Hydrogen Production From catalytic reforming of greenhouse gases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The 20wt%. ... catalytic activity for hydrogen production with the highest yield and selectivity of 32.5% and 17.6% respectively. © JASEM ... CO2 reforming of methane is however not fully developed ..... Design and preparation of .... catalytic nickel membrane for gas to liquid (GTL) process.

  6. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  7. synthesis, characterization, electrical and catalytic studies of some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    catalytic activity of the VO(IV) and Mn(III) complexes have been tested in the epoxidation reaction of styrene ... Vanadyl sulfate pentahydrate, chromium chloride hexahydrate, anhydrous ferric ..... The catalytic oxidation of styrene gives the products styrene oxide, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, ... bond via a radical mechanism.

  8. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  9. Radiant non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.

    2017-10-31

    A radiant, non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot exhaust gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned adjacent to the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot exhaust gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned outside of flue gas flow path for a relatively large residence time.

  10. Chemical and catalytic effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic particles are used for inducing chemical reactions as well as for modifying the properties of materials with regard to their bulk and surface chemical behavior. The effects are partly caused by radiation damage or phase intermixing, partly by the chemical properties of the individual bombarding particles. In this contribution a survey of relevant applications of these techniques is presented: (1) Chemical reactions of implanted and recoil atoms and their use for syntheses, doping and labeling of compounds. (2) The formation of thin films by decomposing chemical compounds with ion beams. 3) Catalytic effects on substrates treated by sputtering or ion implantation. Recent results with nonmetallic substrates are reviewed. Mainly hydrogenation reactions at a solid/gas interface or redox reactions at an electrified solid/liquid interface are mentioned. The present status and future prospects of these kinds of investigations will be discussed. (author)

  11. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1984-03-27

    A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  12. Direct catalytic asymmetric aldol-Tishchenko reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Horiuchi, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2004-06-30

    A direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction of propionate equivalent was achieved via the aldol-Tishchenko reaction. Coupling an irreversible Tishchenko reaction to a reversible aldol reaction overcame the retro-aldol reaction problem and thereby afforded the products in high enantio and diastereoselectivity using 10 mol % of the asymmetric catalyst. A variety of ketones and aldehydes, including propyl and butyl ketones, were coupled efficiently, yielding the corresponding aldol-Tishchenko products in up to 96% yield and 95% ee. Diastereoselectivity was generally below the detection limit of 1H NMR (>98:2). Preliminary studies performed to clarify the mechanism revealed that the aldol products were racemic with no diastereoselectivity. On the other hand, the Tishchenko products were obtained in a highly enantiocontrolled manner.

  13. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  14. Smoke emissions from a catalytic wood stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowburn, D.A.; Stephens, N.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported here was concerned with testing a catalytic wood burning stove (roomheater) following the most applicable UK procedures. The identical stove has also been tested in several other nations to their individual procedures. The results will be submitted to the International Energy Agency (IEA) such that appropriate comparisons can be made. The results comprised: burning rate; an indicative appliance efficiency; heat output; carbon dioxide emissions; carbon monoxide emissions; and smoke emissions. These results were determined with the appliance at three nominal burning rates (high, medium and low). Comparing the results with those obtained in other countries indicates good agreement except when the appliance was operated at low burning rates, under which conditions the UK results indicate significantly worse smoke emissions than those measured by other researchers. (author)

  15. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  16. Propulsion Mechanism of Catalytic Microjet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Vladimir M; Hippler, Markus; Magdanz, Veronika; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-02-01

    We describe the propulsion mechanism of the catalytic microjet engines that are fabricated using rolled-up nanotech. Microjets have recently shown numerous potential applications in nanorobotics but currently there is a lack of an accurate theoretical model that describes the origin of the motion as well as the mechanism of self-propulsion. The geometric asymmetry of a tubular microjet leads to the development of a capillary force, which tends to propel a bubble toward the larger opening of the tube. Because of this motion in an asymmetric tube, there emerges a momentum transfer to the fluid. In order to compensate this momentum transfer, a jet force acting on the tube occurs. This force, which is counterbalanced by the linear drag force, enables tube velocities of the order of 100 μ m/s. This mechanism provides a fundamental explanation for the development of driving forces that are acting on bubbles in tubular microjets.

  17. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  18. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  19. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  20. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two

  1. A ribosome without RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold S Bernhardt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It was Francis Crick who first asked why the ribosome contains so much RNA, and discussed the implications of this for the direct flow of genetic information from DNA to protein. Remarkable advances in our understanding of the ribosome and protein synthesis, including the recent publication of two mammalian mitochondrial ribosome structures, have shed new light on this intriguing aspect of evolution in molecular biology. We examine here whether RNA is indispensable for coded protein synthesis, or whether an all-protein ‘ribosome’ (or ‘synthosome’ might be possible, with a protein enzyme catalyzing peptide synthesis, and release factor-like protein adaptors able to read a message composed of deoxyribonucleotides. We also compare the RNA world hypothesis with the alternative ‘proteins first’ hypothesis in terms of their different understandings of the evolution of the ribosome, and whether this might have been preceded by an ancestral form of nonribosomal peptide synthesis catalyzed by protein enzymes.

  2. Bacteriophage populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klieve, A.V.; Gilbert, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous to the rumen ecosystem; they have a role in nitrogen metabolism through bacterial lysis in the rumen, they may help to regulate bacterial population densities, be an agent for genetic exchange and be of use in biocontrol of bacterial populations through phage therapy. In Chapter 2.1, classical methodologies to enable the isolation, enumeration, storage and morphological characterization of phages were presented. In addition to these classic procedures, molecular biological techniques have resulted in a range of methodologies to investigate the type, topology and size of phage nucleic acids, to fingerprint individual phage strains and to create a profile of ruminal phage populations. Different phage families possess all the currently identified combinations of double-stranded or single-stranded RNA or DNA and may also possess unusual bases such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (found in T-even phage) or 5- hydroxymethyluracil and uracil in place of thymidine. In all morphological groups of phage except the filamentous phages, the nucleic acid is contained within a head or polyhedral structure, predominantly composed of protein. Filamentous phages have their nucleic acid contained inside the helical filament, occupying much of its length. Many of the procedures used with phage nucleic acids and double-stranded (ds) DNA, in particular, are not specific to ruminal phages but are the same as in other areas where nucleic acids are investigated and are covered elsewhere in the literature and this chapter. Most applications with rumen phages are similar to those reported for phages of non-ruminal bacteria and are covered in general texts such as Maniatis et al. In this chapter, we will concentrate on aspects of methodology as they relate to ruminal phages

  3. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  4. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  5. Pyrite footprinting of RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatterer, Jörg C.; Wieder, Matthew S.; Jones, Christopher D.; Pollack, Lois; Brenowitz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► RNA structure is mapped by pyrite mediated · OH footprinting. ► Repetitive experiments can be done in a powdered pyrite filled cartridge. ► High · OH reactivity of nucleotides imply dynamic role in Diels–Alderase catalysis. -- Abstract: In RNA, function follows form. Mapping the surface of RNA molecules with chemical and enzymatic probes has revealed invaluable information about structure and folding. Hydroxyl radicals ( · OH) map the surface of nucleic acids by cutting the backbone where it is accessible to solvent. Recent studies showed that a microfluidic chip containing pyrite (FeS 2 ) can produce sufficient · OH to footprint DNA. The 49-nt Diels–Alder RNA enzyme catalyzes the C–C bond formation between a diene and a dienophile. A crystal structure, molecular dynamics simulation and atomic mutagenesis studies suggest that nucleotides of an asymmetric bulge participate in the dynamic architecture of the ribozyme’s active center. Of note is that residue U42 directly interacts with the product in the crystallized RNA/product complex. Here, we use powdered pyrite held in a commercially available cartridge to footprint the Diels–Alderase ribozyme with single nucleotide resolution. Residues C39 to U42 are more reactive to · OH than predicted by the solvent accessibility calculated from the crystal structure suggesting that this loop is dynamic in solution. The loop’s flexibility may contribute to substrate recruitment and product release. Our implementation of pyrite-mediated · OH footprinting is a readily accessible approach to gleaning information about the architecture of small RNA molecules.

  6. RNA Regulation of Estrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Berglund, Rodger Voelker, Paul Barber and Julien Diegel 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...estrogen  receptors  [reviewed  in  (3,  4)],  also   functions   by  interacting  directly  with  RNA  to  alter  RNA...Mog myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 6.06 207115_x_at mbtd1 mbt domain containing 1 6.06 208004_at Prol1 proline rich, lacrimal 1 6.06 205247_at

  7. RNA Regulation by Estrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Julien Diegel, Amy Mahady, and Micah Bodner 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: aberglund@molbio.uoregon.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING...4)],  also   functions   by  interacting  directly  with  RNA  to  alter  RNA  processing  events  such  as  splicing...1 6.06 208004_at Prol1 proline rich, lacrimal 1 6.06 205247_at NOTCH4 Notch homolog 4 (Drosophila) 6.06 211203_s_at Cntn1 contactin 1 6.06 220689_at

  8. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways.......Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...

  9. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  10. Characterization of the molecular basis of group II intron RNA recognition by CRS1-CRM domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Ido; Klipcan, Liron; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Kolton, Max; Shaya, Felix; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2008-08-22

    CRM (chloroplast RNA splicing and ribosome maturation) is a recently recognized RNA-binding domain of ancient origin that has been retained in eukaryotic genomes only within the plant lineage. Whereas in bacteria CRM domains exist as single domain proteins involved in ribosome maturation, in plants they are found in a family of proteins that contain between one and four repeats. Several members of this family with multiple CRM domains have been shown to be required for the splicing of specific plastidic group II introns. Detailed biochemical analysis of one of these factors in maize, CRS1, demonstrated its high affinity and specific binding to the single group II intron whose splicing it facilitates, the plastid-encoded atpF intron RNA. Through its association with two intronic regions, CRS1 guides the folding of atpF intron RNA into its predicted "catalytically active" form. To understand how multiple CRM domains cooperate to achieve high affinity sequence-specific binding to RNA, we analyzed the RNA binding affinity and specificity associated with each individual CRM domain in CRS1; whereas CRM3 bound tightly to the RNA, CRM1 associated specifically with a unique region found within atpF intron domain I. CRM2, which demonstrated only low binding affinity, also seems to form specific interactions with regions localized to domains I, III, and IV. We further show that CRM domains share structural similarities and RNA binding characteristics with the well known RNA recognition motif domain.

  11. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andronescu Mirela

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand.

  12. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  13. Branched RNA: A New Architecture for RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Aviñó

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Branched RNAs with two and four strands were synthesized. These structures were used to obtain branched siRNA. The branched siRNA duplexes had similar inhibitory capacity as those of unmodified siRNA duplexes, as deduced from gene silencing experiments of the TNF-α protein. Branched RNAs are considered novel structures for siRNA technology, and they provide an innovative tool for specific gene inhibition. As the method described here is compatible with most RNA modifications described to date, these compounds may be further functionalized to obtain more potent siRNA derivatives and can be attached to suitable delivery systems.

  14. The RNA gene information: retroelement-microRNA entangling as the RNA quantum code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yoichi Robertus

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) and retroelements may be a master of regulator in our life, which are evolutionally involved in the origin of species. To support the Darwinism from the aspect of molecular evolution process, it has tremendously been interested in the molecular information of naive RNA. The RNA wave model 2000 consists of four concepts that have altered from original idea of the miRNA genes for crosstalk among embryonic stem cells, their niche cells, and retroelements as a carrier vesicle of the RNA genes. (1) the miRNA gene as a mobile genetic element induces transcriptional and posttranscriptional silencing via networking-processes (no hierarchical architecture); (2) the RNA information supplied by the miRNA genes expands to intracellular, intercellular, intraorgan, interorgan, intraspecies, and interspecies under the cycle of life into the global environment; (3) the mobile miRNAs can self-proliferate; and (4) cells contain two types information as resident and genomic miRNAs. Based on RNA wave, we have developed an interest in investigation of the transformation from RNA information to quantum bits as physicochemical characters of RNA with the measurement of RNA electron spin. When it would have been given that the fundamental bases for the acquired characters in genetics can be controlled by RNA gene information, it may be available to apply for challenging against RNA gene diseases, such as stress-induced diseases.

  15. A complex small RNA repertoire is generated by a plant/fungal-like machinery and effected by a metazoan-like Argonaute in the single-cell human parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Braun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In RNA silencing, small RNAs produced by the RNase-III Dicer guide Argonaute-like proteins as part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC to regulate gene expression transcriptionally or post-transcriptionally. Here, we have characterized the RNA silencing machinery and exhaustive small RNAome of Toxoplasma gondii, member of the Apicomplexa, a phylum of animal- and human-infecting parasites that cause extensive health and economic damages to human populations worldwide. Remarkably, the small RNA-generating machinery of Toxoplasma is phylogenetically and functionally related to that of plants and fungi, and accounts for an exceptionally diverse array of small RNAs. This array includes conspicuous populations of repeat-associated small interfering RNA (siRNA, which, as in plants, likely generate and maintain heterochromatin at DNA repeats and satellites. Toxoplasma small RNAs also include many microRNAs with clear metazoan-like features whose accumulation is sometimes extremely high and dynamic, an unexpected finding given that Toxoplasma is a unicellular protist. Both plant-like heterochromatic small RNAs and metazoan-like microRNAs bind to a single Argonaute protein, Tg-AGO. Toxoplasma miRNAs co-sediment with polyribosomes, and thus, are likely to act as translational regulators, consistent with the lack of catalytic residues in Tg-AGO. Mass spectrometric analyses of the Tg-AGO protein complex revealed a common set of virtually all known RISC components so far characterized in human and Drosophila, as well as novel proteins involved in RNA metabolism. In agreement with its loading with heterochromatic small RNAs, Tg-AGO also associates substoichiometrically with components of known chromatin-repressing complexes. Thus, a puzzling patchwork of silencing processor and effector proteins from plant, fungal and metazoan origin accounts for the production and action of an unsuspected variety of small RNAs in the single-cell parasite Toxoplasma and

  16. The microRNA effector RNA-induced silencing complex in hidradenitis suppurativa: a significant dysregulation within active inflammatory lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessam, S; Sand, M; Skrygan, M; Bechara, Falk G

    2017-09-01

    Recently, we could show that the expression levels of the key regulators of the microRNA (miRNA) maturation and transport were dysregulated in inflamed hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) tissue (Heyam et al. in Wiley Interdiscip Rev RNA 6:271-289, 2015). The RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is the central element of the miRNA pathway and regulates miRNA formation and function. We investigated the expression of the RISC components, namely transactivation-responsive RNA-binding protein-1 (TRBP1), TRBP2, protein activator (PACT) of the interferon-induced protein kinase R, Argonaute RISC Catalytic Component-1 (AGO1) and Component-2 (AGO2), metadherin, and staphylococcal nuclease and Tudor domain-containing-1 (SND1) in inflamed HS tissue compared to healthy and psoriatic controls by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Expression levels of all investigated components were significantly lower in lesional HS skin (n = 18) compared to healthy controls (n = 10). TRBP1, PACT, AGO1, AGO2, and SND1 expression levels were significantly down-regulated in lesional HS skin compared to healthy-appearing perilesional skin (n = 7). TRBP2 and SND1 expression levels were significantly lower in healthy-appearing perilesional skin compared to healthy controls. In lesional HS skin, expression levels of PACT, AGO1, and AGO2 were significantly lower compared to psoriatic skin (n = 10). In summary, our data showed that all investigated components of RISC are dysregulated in the skin of HS patients, providing support for the hypothesis that miRNAs may have a pathological role in the inflammatory pathogenesis of HS.

  17. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Mäkinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and

  18. Plant RNA Regulatory Network and RNA Granules in Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Kristiina; Lõhmus, Andres; Pollari, Maija

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of post-transcriptional gene expression on mRNA level in eukaryotic cells includes translocation, translation, translational repression, storage, mRNA decay, RNA silencing, and nonsense-mediated decay. These processes are associated with various RNA-binding proteins and cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes many of which are conserved across eukaryotes. Microscopically visible aggregations formed by ribonucleoprotein complexes are termed RNA granules. Stress granules where the translationally inactive mRNAs are stored and processing bodies where mRNA decay may occur present the most studied RNA granule types. Diverse RNP-granules are increasingly being assigned important roles in viral infections. Although the majority of the molecular level studies on the role of RNA granules in viral translation and replication have been conducted in mammalian systems, some studies link also plant virus infection to RNA granules. An increasing body of evidence indicates that plant viruses require components of stress granules and processing bodies for their replication and translation, but how extensively the cellular mRNA regulatory network is utilized by plant viruses has remained largely enigmatic. Antiviral RNA silencing, which is an important regulator of viral RNA stability and expression in plants, is commonly counteracted by viral suppressors of RNA silencing. Some of the RNA silencing suppressors localize to cellular RNA granules and have been proposed to carry out their suppression functions there. Moreover, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein-mediated virus resistance has been linked to enhanced processing body formation and translational repression of viral RNA. Many interesting questions relate to how the pathways of antiviral RNA silencing leading to viral RNA degradation and/or repression of translation, suppression of RNA silencing and viral RNA translation converge in plants and how different RNA granules and their individual

  19. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  20. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  1. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Abdallah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the chemical industry regarding reducing the production cost and obtaining a high-quality product with low environmental impact became the essential requirements of the world in these days. The catalytic membrane is considered as one of the new alternative solutions of catalysts problems in the industries, where the reaction and separation can be amalgamated in one unit. The catalytic membrane has numerous advantages such as breaking the thermodynamic equilibrium limitation, increasing conversion rate, reducing the recycle and separation costs. But the limitation or most disadvantages of catalytic membranes related to the high capital costs for fabrication or the fact that manufacturing process is still under development. This review article summarizes the most recent advances and research activities related to preparation, characterization, and applications of catalytic membranes. In this article, various types of catalytic membranes are displayed with different applications and explained the positive impacts of using catalytic membranes in various reactions. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved. Received: 1st April 2016; Revised: 14th February 2017; Accepted: 22nd February 2017 How to Cite: Abdallah, H. (2017. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 136-156 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156

  2. RNA-Catalyzed Polymerization and Replication of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, D. P.; Samantha, B.; Tjhung, K. F.; Joyce, G. F.

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to reconstruct RNA-based life, in vitro evolution was used to obtain an RNA polymerase ribozyme that can synthesize a variety of complex functional RNAs and can catalyze the exponential amplification of short RNAs.

  3. Hydrocarbon conversion with an attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antos, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are converted by contacting them at hydrocarbon conversion conditions with a novel attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite comprising a combination of a catalytically effective amount of a pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of catalytically effective amounts of a platinum group component, which is maintained in the elemental metallic state during the incorporation and pyrolysis of the rhenium carbonyl component, and of an iron component. In a highly preferred embodiment, this novel catalytic composite also contains a catalytically effective amount of a halogen component. The platinum group component, pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component, iron component and optional halogen component are preferably present in the multimetallic catalytic composite in amounts, calculated on an elemental basis, corresponding to about 0.01 to about 2 wt. % platinum group metal, about 0.01 to about 5 wt. % rhenium, about 0.005 to about 4 wt. % iron and about 0.1 to about 5 wt. % halogen. A key feature associated with the preparation of the subject catalytic composite is reaction of a rhenium carbonyl complex with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of an iron component and of a platinum group component maintained in the elemental state, whereby the interaction of the rhenium moiety with the platinum group moiety is maximized due to the platinophilic (i.e., platinum-seeking) propensities of the carbon monoxide ligands associated with the rhenium reagent. A specific example of the type of hydrocarbon conversion process disclosed herein is a process for the catalytic reforming of a low octane gasoline fraction wherein the gasoline fraction and a hydrogen stream are contacted with the attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite at reforming conditions

  4. Monitoring of an RNA Multistep Folding Pathway by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Reymond, Cédric; Bisaillon, Martin; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to monitor the energetic landscape of a catalytic RNA, specifically that of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme. Using mutants that isolated various tertiary interactions, the thermodynamic parameters of several ribozyme-substrate intermediates were determined. The results shed light on the impact of several tertiary interactions on the global structure of the ribozyme. In addition, the data indicate that the formation of the P1.1 pseudoknot is the lim...

  5. Surveillance of siRNA integrity by FRET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järve, Anne; Müller, Julius; Kim, Il-Han; Rohr, Karl; MacLean, Caroline; Fricker, Gert; Massing, Ulrich; Eberle, Florian; Dalpke, Alexander; Fischer, Roger; Trendelenburg, Michael F.; Helm, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Techniques for investigation of exogenous small interfering RNA (siRNA) after penetration of the cell are of substantial interest to the development of efficient transfection methods as well as to potential medical formulations of siRNA. A FRET-based visualization method including the commonplace dye labels fluorescein and tetramethylrhodamin (TMR) on opposing strands of siRNA was found compatible with RNA interference (RNAi). Investigation of spectral properties of three labelled siRNAs with differential FRET efficiencies in the cuvette, including pH dependence and FRET efficiency in lipophilic environments, identified the ratio of red and green fluorescence (R/G-ratio) as a sensitive parameter, which reliably identifies samples containing >90% un-degraded siRNA. Spectral imaging of siRNAs microinjected into cells showed emission spectra indistinguishable from those measured in the cuvette. These were used to establish a calibration curve for assessing the degradation state of siRNA in volume elements inside cells. An algorithm, applied to fluorescence images recorded in standard green and red fluorescence channels, produces R/G-ratio images of high spatial resolution, identifying volume elements in the cell with high populations of intact siRNA with high fidelity. To demonstrate the usefulness of this technique, the movement of intact siRNA molecules are observed after introduction into the cytosol by microinjection, standard transfection and lipofection with liposomes. PMID:17890733

  6. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  7. Enhanced propylene production in FCC by novel catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, C.P.; Harris, D.; Xu, M.; Fu, J. [BASF Catalyst LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking is expected to increasingly supply the additional incremental requirements for propylene. The most efficient route to increase propylene yield from an FCC unit is through the use of medium pore zeolites such as ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite cracks near linear olefins in the gasoline range to LPG olefins such as propylene and butylenes. This paper will describe catalytic approaches to increase gasoline range olefins and the chemistry of ZSM-5 to crack those olefins. The paper will also describe novel catalytic materials designed to increase propylene. (orig.)

  8. Complete determination of the Pin1 catalytic domain thermodynamic cycle by NMR lineshape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Rogals, Monique J.; De, Soumya; Lu, Kun Ping; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Nicholson, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    The phosphorylation-specific peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 catalyzes the isomerization of the peptide bond preceding a proline residue between cis and trans isomers. To best understand the mechanisms of Pin1 regulation, rigorous enzymatic assays of isomerization are required. However, most measures of isomerase activity require significant constraints on substrate sequence and only yield rate constants for the cis isomer, k cat cis and apparent Michaelis constants, K M App . By contrast, NMR lineshape analysis is a powerful tool for determining microscopic rates and populations of each state in a complex binding scheme. The isolated catalytic domain of Pin1 was employed as a first step towards elucidating the reaction scheme of the full-length enzyme. A 24-residue phosphopeptide derived from the amyloid precurser protein intracellular domain (AICD) phosphorylated at Thr668 served as a biologically-relevant Pin1 substrate. Specific 13 C labeling at the Pin1-targeted proline residue provided multiple reporters sensitive to individual isomer binding and on-enzyme catalysis. We have performed titration experiments and employed lineshape analysis of phosphopeptide 13 C– 1 H constant time HSQC spectra to determine k cat cis , k cat trans , K D cis , and K D trans for the catalytic domain of Pin1 acting on this AICD substrate. The on-enzyme equilibrium value of [E·trans]/[E·cis] = 3.9 suggests that the catalytic domain of Pin1 is optimized to operate on this substrate near equilibrium in the cellular context. This highlights the power of lineshape analysis for determining the microscopic parameters of enzyme catalysis, and demonstrates the feasibility of future studies of Pin1-PPIase mutants to gain insights on the catalytic mechanism of this important enzyme.

  9. Natural RNA circles function as efficient microRNA sponges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Birkballe; Jensen, Trine I; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so-called comp......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that act by direct base pairing to target sites within untranslated regions of messenger RNAs. Recently, miRNA activity has been shown to be affected by the presence of miRNA sponge transcripts, the so......-called competing endogenous RNA in humans and target mimicry in plants. We previously identified a highly expressed circular RNA (circRNA) in human and mouse brain. Here we show that this circRNA acts as a miR-7 sponge; we term this circular transcript ciRS-7 (circular RNA sponge for miR-7). ciRS-7 contains more...... sponge, suggesting that miRNA sponge effects achieved by circRNA formation are a general phenomenon. This study serves as the first, to our knowledge, functional analysis of a naturally expressed circRNA....

  10. Strategies underlying RNA silencing suppression by negative strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research described in this thesis focused on the strategies of negative strand RNA viruses to counteract antiviral RNA silencing. In plants and insects, RNA silencing has been shown to act as a sequence specific antiviral defence mechanism that is characterised by the processing of double

  11. RNA Interference - Towards RNA becoming a Medicine -42 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research. A brief history of the development ofRNAi is shown in. Box 2. Mechanism of ... new RNA strand using target RNA as the template and thereby converting it ... thought to excise precursor stRNA from their -70 nt stem loop precursor to ...

  12. Semiautomated improvement of RNA alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Knudsen, Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    connects to external tools to provide a flexible semiautomatic editing environment. A new method, Pcluster, is introduced for dividing the sequences of an RNA alignment into subgroups with secondary structure differences. Pcluster was used to evaluate 574 seed alignments obtained from the Rfam database...... and we identified 71 alignments with significant prediction of inconsistent base pairs and 102 alignments with significant prediction of novel base pairs. Four RNA families were used to illustrate how SARSE can be used to manually or automatically correct the inconsistent base pairs detected by Pcluster......: the mir-399 RNA, vertebrate telomase RNA (vert-TR), bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), and the signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA. The general use of the method is illustrated by the ability to accommodate pseudoknots and handle even large and divergent RNA families. The open architecture...

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  14. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1998-07-28

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  15. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste: Demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of this project and report is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In Phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulfur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In Phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with good yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In Phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white'' and black'' oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm

    2000-01-01

    investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... between 0.1 and 0.3 V. There were no Faradaic reactions in the negative polarization region, and there was an anodic current which was less than 16% of the theoretical value for an exclusively Faradaic SO2 oxidation. Therefore the promotion effects at negative polarization are completely non-Faradaic. All...... the promotion effects have been explained as mainly due to charging of the electric double layer at the gold electrode. The effect at -0.2 V also depends on the V2O5 concentration and is more pronounced at higher V2O5 concentrations. This has been ascribed to a destruction of the vanadium polymeric chains...

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Catalytically Active Living Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Johnston, Trevor G; Shafranek, Ryan T; Goodman, Cassandra J; Zalatan, Jesse G; Storti, Duane W; Ganter, Mark A; Nelson, Alshakim

    2018-04-25

    Living materials, which are composites of living cells residing in a polymeric matrix, are designed to utilize the innate functionalities of the cells to address a broad range of applications such as fermentation and biosensing. Herein, we demonstrate the additive manufacturing of catalytically active living materials (AMCALM) for continuous fermentation. A multi-stimuli-responsive yeast-laden hydrogel ink, based on F127-dimethacrylate, was developed and printed using a direct-write 3D printer. The reversible stimuli-responsive behaviors of the polymer hydrogel inks to temperature and pressure are critical, as they enabled the facile incorporation of yeast cells and subsequent fabrication of 3D lattice constructs. Subsequent photo-cross-linking of the printed polymer hydrogel afforded a robust elastic material. These yeast-laden living materials were metabolically active in the fermentation of glucose into ethanol for 2 weeks in a continuous batch process without significant reduction in efficiency (∼90% yield of ethanol). This cell immobilization platform may potentially be applicable toward other genetically modified yeast strains to produce other high-value chemicals in a continuous biofermentation process.

  18. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  20. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H 2 . In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N 2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H 2 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 . The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H 2 O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  1. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  2. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldhuis, A.; Goudriaan, F.; Groeneveld, M.; Samson, R.

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  3. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  4. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT's proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE's inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of DOE sites

  5. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  6. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  7. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  8. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41 Ar, 79 Kr or 85 Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products, 140 La and 24 Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  9. Mechanism of microRNA-target interaction: molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenously produced approximately 21-nt riboregulators that associate with Argonaute (Ago proteins to direct mRNA cleavage or repress the translation of complementary RNAs. Capturing the molecular mechanisms of miRNA interacting with its target will not only reinforce the understanding of underlying RNA interference but also fuel the design of more effective small-interfering RNA strands. To address this, in the present work the RNA-bound (Ago-miRNA, Ago-miRNA-target and RNA-free Ago forms were analyzed by performing both molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamic analysis. Based on the principal component analysis results of the simulation trajectories as well as the correlation analysis in fluctuations of residues, we discover that: 1 three important (PAZ, Mid and PIWI domains exist in Argonaute which define the global dynamics of the protein; 2 the interdomain correlated movements are so crucial for the interaction of Ago-RNAs that they not only facilitate the relaxation of the interactions between residues surrounding the RNA binding channel but also induce certain conformational changes; and 3 it is just these conformational changes that expand the cavity of the active site and open putative pathways for both the substrate uptake and product release. In addition, by thermodynamic analysis we also discover that for both the guide RNA 5'-end recognition and the facilitated site-specific cleavage of the target, the presence of two metal ions (of Mg(2+ plays a predominant role, and this conclusion is consistent with the observed enzyme catalytic cleavage activity in the ternary complex (Ago-miRNA-mRNA. Our results find that it is the set of arginine amino acids concentrated in the nucleotide-binding channel in Ago, instead of the conventionally-deemed seed base-paring, that makes greater contributions in stabilizing the binding of the nucleic acids to Ago.

  10. Mechanism of microRNA-target interaction: molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yonghua; Li, Yan; Ma, Zhi; Yang, Wei; Ai, Chunzhi

    2010-07-29

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenously produced approximately 21-nt riboregulators that associate with Argonaute (Ago) proteins to direct mRNA cleavage or repress the translation of complementary RNAs. Capturing the molecular mechanisms of miRNA interacting with its target will not only reinforce the understanding of underlying RNA interference but also fuel the design of more effective small-interfering RNA strands. To address this, in the present work the RNA-bound (Ago-miRNA, Ago-miRNA-target) and RNA-free Ago forms were analyzed by performing both molecular dynamics simulations and thermodynamic analysis. Based on the principal component analysis results of the simulation trajectories as well as the correlation analysis in fluctuations of residues, we discover that: 1) three important (PAZ, Mid and PIWI) domains exist in Argonaute which define the global dynamics of the protein; 2) the interdomain correlated movements are so crucial for the interaction of Ago-RNAs that they not only facilitate the relaxation of the interactions between residues surrounding the RNA binding channel but also induce certain conformational changes; and 3) it is just these conformational changes that expand the cavity of the active site and open putative pathways for both the substrate uptake and product release. In addition, by thermodynamic analysis we also discover that for both the guide RNA 5'-end recognition and the facilitated site-specific cleavage of the target, the presence of two metal ions (of Mg(2+)) plays a predominant role, and this conclusion is consistent with the observed enzyme catalytic cleavage activity in the ternary complex (Ago-miRNA-mRNA). Our results find that it is the set of arginine amino acids concentrated in the nucleotide-binding channel in Ago, instead of the conventionally-deemed seed base-paring, that makes greater contributions in stabilizing the binding of the nucleic acids to Ago.

  11. Comparative RNA genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last two decades it has become clear that RNA is much more than just a boring intermediate in protein expression. Ancient RNAs still appear in the core information metabolism and comprise a surprisingly large component in bacterial gene regulation. A common theme with these types of mostly...... small RNAs is their reliance of conserved secondary structures. Large scale sequencing projects, on the other hand, have profoundly changed our understanding of eukaryotic genomes. Pervasively transcribed, they give rise to a plethora of large and evolutionarily extremely flexible noncoding RNAs...... that exert a vastly diverse array of molecule functions. In this chapter we provide a—necessarily incomplete—overview of the current state of comparative analysis of noncoding RNAs, emphasizing computational approaches as a means to gain a global picture of the modern RNA world....

  12. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  13. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-03-06

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  14. Catalytic cleavage activities of 10–23 DNAzyme analogs functionalized with an amino group in its catalytic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionalization of the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme with an amino group was performed by incorporation of 7-(3-aminopropyl-8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine in different single positions. Among the nine modified positions in the catalytic loop, A9 is the unique position with positive contribution by such modification. These results indicated that more efficient deoxyribozymes remain to be explored by introduction of exogenous functional groups in an appropriate position in the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme, such as the combination of 7-functional group substituted 8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine analogs and A9 position.

  15. Mapping the active site of vaccinia virus RNA triphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Chunling; Shuman, Stewart

    2003-01-01

    The RNA triphosphatase component of vaccinia virus mRNA capping enzyme (the product of the viral D1 gene) belongs to a family of metal-dependent phosphohydrolases that includes the RNA triphosphatases of fungi, protozoa, Chlorella virus, and baculoviruses. The family is defined by two glutamate-containing motifs (A and C) that form the metal-binding site. Most of the family members resemble the fungal and Chlorella virus enzymes, which have a complex active site located within the hydrophilic interior of a topologically closed eight-stranded β barrel (the so-called ''triphosphate tunnel''). Here we queried whether vaccinia virus capping enzyme is a member of the tunnel subfamily, via mutational mapping of amino acids required for vaccinia triphosphatase activity. We identified four new essential side chains in vaccinia D1 via alanine scanning and illuminated structure-activity relationships by conservative substitutions. Our results, together with previous mutational data, highlight a constellation of six acidic and three basic amino acids that likely compose the vaccinia triphosphatase active site (Glu37, Glu39, Arg77, Lys107, Glu126, Asp159, Lys161, Glu192, and Glu194). These nine essential residues are conserved in all vertebrate and invertebrate poxvirus RNA capping enzymes. We discerned no pattern of clustering of the catalytic residues of the poxvirus triphosphatase that would suggest structural similarity to the tunnel proteins (exclusive of motifs A and C). We infer that the poxvirus triphosphatases are a distinct lineage within the metal-dependent RNA triphosphatase family. Their unique active site, which is completely different from that of the host cell's capping enzyme, recommends the poxvirus RNA triphosphatase as a molecular target for antipoxviral drug discovery

  16. Structural organizations of yeast RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes as revealed by UV-crosslinking studies of RNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanova, Elena; Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2012-04-01

    Eukaryotic ribonuclease (RNase) P and RNase MRP are closely related ribonucleoprotein complexes involved in the metabolism of various RNA molecules including tRNA, rRNA, and some mRNAs. While evolutionarily related to bacterial RNase P, eukaryotic enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family are much more complex. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P consists of a catalytic RNA component and nine essential proteins; yeast RNase MRP has an RNA component resembling that in RNase P and 10 essential proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNases P/MRP are not clear. Here we present the results of RNA-protein UV crosslinking studies performed on RNase P and RNase MRP holoenzymes isolated from yeast. The results indicate locations of specific protein-binding sites in the RNA components of RNase P and RNase MRP and shed light on the structural organizations of these large ribonucleoprotein complexes.

  17. MicroRNA from tuberculosis RNA: A bioinformatics study

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    The role of microRNA in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis is the interesting topic in chest medicine at present. Recently, it was proposed that the microRNA can be a useful biomarker for monitoring of pulmonary tuberculosis and might be the important part in pathogenesis of disease. Here, the authors perform a bioinformatics study to assess the microRNA within known tuberculosis RNA. The microRNA part can be detected and this can be important key information in further study of the p...

  18. Bimetallic Nanoparticles in Alternative Solvents for Catalytic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dang-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles represent attractive catalytic systems thanks to the synergy between both partners at the atomic level, mainly induced by electronic effects which in turn are associated with the corresponding structures (alloy, core-shell, hetero-dimer. This type of engineered material can trigger changes in the kinetics of catalyzed processes by variations on the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of the metal centers involved and also promote cooperative effects to foster organic transformations, including multi-component and multi-step processes. Solvents become a crucial factor in the conception of catalytic processes, not only due to their environmental impact, but also because they can preserve the bimetallic structure during the catalytic reaction and therefore increase the catalyst life-time. In this frame, the present review focuses on the recent works described in the literature concerning the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in non-conventional solvents, i.e., other than common volatile compounds, for catalytic applications.

  19. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported

  20. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  1. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  2. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs); catalytic vapor decomposition; soap bubble mass flowmeter. ... [4,13,14], makes them an excellent candidate for use as a dielectric in supercapac- itors [15]. ... the change in liquid level in the scrubber. After the ...

  3. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would

  4. The Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)‐Liphagal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Joshua J.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Virgil, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Ring a ding: The first catalytic enantioselective total synthesis of the meroterpenoid natural product (+)-liphagal is disclosed. The approach showcases a variety of technology including enantioselective enolate alkylation, a photochemical alkyne-alkene [2+2] reaction, microwaveassisted metal...

  5. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using Chromium VI Oxide in. Acetic Acid ... respect to the oxidant using pseudo-order approximation method. .... making the concentration of the cyclohexene in ..... on Titanium Silicate.

  6. Processing and structural characterization of porous reforming catalytic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Xianghui; Williams, Jey; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-based catalysts are often used to reform methanol into hydrogen. The preparation and installation of these catalysts are costly and laborious. As an alternative, directly applying catalytic films onto the separator components can improve the manufacturing efficiency. This paper reports the successful deposition of adherent porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films with well-controlled stoichiometry, using a single-step Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) method. The microstructure, composition and crystalline phase of the as-deposited catalytic films are characterized using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer. The results have demonstrated the capability of AACVD to produce porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films

  7. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes ... to the oxidation of 3,5-di--butylcatechol to the corresponding quinone. ... EPR spectral studies in methanol solvent show welldefined four hyperfine ...

  8. Quantum catalysis : the modelling of catalytic transition states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, M.B.; Margl, P.; Naray-Szabo, G.; Schramm, Vern; Truhlar, D.G.; Santen, van R.A.; Warshel, A.; Whitten, J.L.; Truhlar, D.G.; Morokuma, K.

    1999-01-01

    A review with 101 refs.; we present an introduction to the computational modeling of transition states for catalytic reactions. We consider both homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, including organometallic catalysts, enzymes, zeolites and metal oxides, and metal surfaces. We summarize

  9. Evolution of complexity in RNA-like replicator systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogeweg Paulien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of complexity is among the most important questions in biology. The evolution of complexity is often observed as the increase of genetic information or that of the organizational complexity of a system. It is well recognized that the formation of biological organization – be it of molecules or ecosystems – is ultimately instructed by the genetic information, whereas it is also true that the genetic information is functional only in the context of the organization. Therefore, to obtain a more complete picture of the evolution of complexity, we must study the evolution of both information and organization. Results Here we investigate the evolution of complexity in a simulated RNA-like replicator system. The simplicity of the system allows us to explicitly model the genotype-phenotype-interaction mapping of individual replicators, whereby we avoid preconceiving the functionality of genotypes (information or the ecological organization of replicators in the model. In particular, the model assumes that interactions among replicators – to replicate or to be replicated – depend on their secondary structures and base-pair matching. The results showed that a population of replicators, originally consisting of one genotype, evolves to form a complex ecosystem of up to four species. During this diversification, the species evolve through acquiring unique genotypes with distinct ecological functionality. The analysis of this diversification reveals that parasitic replicators, which have been thought to destabilize the replicator's diversity, actually promote the evolution of diversity through generating a novel "niche" for catalytic replicators. This also makes the current replicator system extremely stable upon the evolution of parasites. The results also show that the stability of the system crucially depends on the spatial pattern formation of replicators. Finally, the evolutionary dynamics is shown to

  10. Structural and functional basis for RNA cleavage by Ire1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroud Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR controls the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Central to this signaling pathway is the ER-resident bifunctional transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1. The endoribonuclease (RNase domain of Ire1 initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, leading to the production of a transcription factor that controls UPR target genes. The mRNA splicing reaction is an obligatory step of Ire1 signaling, yet its mechanism has remained poorly understood due to the absence of substrate-bound crystal structures of Ire1, the lack of structural similarity between Ire1 and other RNases, and a scarcity of quantitative enzymological data. Here, we experimentally define the active site of Ire1 RNase and quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the key active site residues to catalysis. Results This analysis and two new crystal structures suggest that Ire1 RNase uses histidine H1061 and tyrosine Y1043 as the general acid-general base pair contributing ≥ 7.6 kcal/mol and 1.4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization, respectively, and asparagine N1057 and arginine R1056 for coordination of the scissile phosphate. Investigation of the stem-loop recognition revealed that additionally to the stem-loops derived from the classic Ire1 substrates HAC1 and Xbp1 mRNA, Ire1 can site-specifically and rapidly cleave anticodon stem-loop (ASL of unmodified tRNAPhe, extending known substrate specificity of Ire1 RNase. Conclusions Our data define the catalytic center of Ire1 RNase and suggest a mechanism of RNA cleavage: each RNase monomer apparently contains a separate catalytic apparatus for RNA cleavage, whereas two RNase subunits contribute to RNA stem-loop docking. Conservation of the key residues among Ire1 homologues suggests that the mechanism elucidated here for yeast Ire1 applies to Ire1 in metazoan cells, and to the only known Ire1 homologue RNase L.

  11. RNA binding and replication by the poliovirus RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberste, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    RNA binding and RNA synthesis by the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase were studied in vitro using purified polymerase. Templates for binding and RNA synthesis studies were natural RNAs, homopolymeric RNAs, or subgenomic poliovirus-specific RNAs synthesized in vitro from cDNA clones using SP6 or T7 RNA polymerases. The binding of the purified polymerase to poliovirion and other RNAs was studied using a protein-RNA nitrocellulose filter binding assay. A cellular poly(A)-binding protein was found in the viral polymerase preparations, but was easily separated from the polymerase by chromatography on poly(A) Sepharose. The binding of purified polymerase to 32 P-labeled ribohomopolymeric RNAs was examined, and the order of binding observed was poly(G) >>> poly(U) > poly(C) > poly(A). The K a for polymerase binding to poliovirion RNA and to a full-length negative strand transcript was about 1 x 10 9 M -1 . The polymerase binds to a subgenomic RNAs which contain the 3' end of the genome with a K a similar to that for virion RNA, but binds less well to 18S rRNA, globin mRNA, and subgenomic RNAs which lack portions of the 3' noncoding region

  12. Genetic relatedness of orbiviruses by RNA-RNA blot hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodkin, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    RNA-RNA blot hybridization was developed in order to identify type-specific genes among double-stranded (ds) RNA viruses, to assess the genetic relatedness of dsRNA viruses and to classify new strains. Viral dsRNA segments were electrophoresed through 10% polyacrylamide gels, transferred to membranes, and hybridized to [5' 32 P]-pCp labeled genomic RNA from a related strain. Hybridization was performed at 52 0 C, 50% formamide, 5X SSC. Under these conditions heterologous RNA species must share ≥ 74% sequence homology in order to form stable dsRNA hybrids. Cognate genes of nine members of the Palyam serogroup of orbiviruses were identified and their sequence relatedness to the prototype. Palyam virus, was determined. Reciprocal blot hybridizations were performed using radiolabeled genomic RNA of all members of the Palyam serogroup. Unique and variant genes were identified by lack of cross-homology or by weak homology between segments. Since genes 2 and 6 exhibited the highest degree of sequence variability, response to the vertebrate immune system may be a major cause of sequence divergence among members of a single serogroup. Changuinola serogroup isolates were compared by dot-blot hybridization, while Colorado tick fever (CTF) serogroup isolates were compared by the RNA-RNA blot hybridization procedure described for reovirus and Palyam serogroup isolates. Preliminary blot hybridization data were also obtained on the relatedness of members of different Orbivirus serogroups

  13. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes.

  14. Effect of radioactive radiation on catalytic properties of solid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokol' skii, D V; Kuzembaev, K K; Kel' man, I V [AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Inst. Organicheskogo Kataliza i Ehlektrokhimii

    1977-05-01

    General survey is made of the problem of radiation modification of the action of solid catalysts with respect to the various types of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Consideration is given to the key mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in the interaction of high-energy radiation with a solid body. The effect of ionizing radiation on the adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of solid bodies is discussed.

  15. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  16. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Leman A.M.; Jajuli Afiqah; Feriyanto Dafit; Rahman Fakhrurrazi; Zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to i...

  17. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    OpenAIRE

    Abril Flores-Maltos; Luis V. Rodríguez-Durán; Jacqueline Renovato; Juan C. Contreras; Raúl Rodríguez; Cristóbal N. Aguilar

    2011-01-01

    A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methy...

  18. Application of Zeolitic Additives in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nemati Kharat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current article describes application of zeolites in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC. The use of several zeolitic additives for the production light olefins and reduction of pollutants is described. Application of zeolites as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalysts and additives due to the presence of active acid sites in the zeolite framework  increase the formation of desired cracking products (i.e., olefin and branched products  in the FCC unit.

  19. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  20. Aerobic, catalytic oxidation of alcohols in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Roberto F. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and simple catalytic system based on RuCl3 dissolved in ionic liquids has been developed for the oxidation of alcohols into aldehydes and ketones under mild conditions. A new fluorinated ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium pentadecafluorooctanoate, was synthesized and demonstrated better performance that the other ionic liquids employed. Moreover this catalytic system utilizes molecular oxygen as an oxidizing agent, producing water as the only by-product.

  1. The Comparison of Hydrochloric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Treatments in the Preparation of Montmorillonite Catalysts for RNA Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldersley, Michael Frank; Joshi, Prakash C.; Huang, Yixing

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of clay minerals with a preliminary acid wash and titration to pH 7 has proven to generate catalysts for the most interesting of oligomerization reactions in which activated RNA-nucleotides generate oligomers up to 40-mers. Significantly, not all clay minerals become catalytic following this treatment and none are catalytic in the absence of such treatment. The washing procedure has been modified and explored further using phosphoric acid and the outcomes are compared to those obtained when clay samples are prepared following a hydrochloric acid wash.

  2. The Comparison of Hydrochloric Acid and Phosphoric Acid Treatments in the Preparation of Montmorillonite Catalysts for RNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldersley, Michael Frank; Joshi, Prakash C; Huang, Yixing

    2017-09-01

    The treatment of clay minerals with a preliminary acid wash and titration to pH 7 has proven to generate catalysts for the most interesting of oligomerization reactions in which activated RNA-nucleotides generate oligomers up to 40-mers. Significantly, not all clay minerals become catalytic following this treatment and none are catalytic in the absence of such treatment. The washing procedure has been modified and explored further using phosphoric acid and the outcomes are compared to those obtained when clay samples are prepared following a hydrochloric acid wash.

  3. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post

  4. siRNA for Influenza Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sailen Barik

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus is one of the most prevalent and ancient infections in humans. About a fifth of world's population is infected by influenza virus annually, leading to high morbidity and mortality, particularly in infants, the elderly and the immunocompromised. In the US alone, influenza outbreaks lead to roughly 30,000 deaths each year. Current vaccines and anti-influenza drugs are of limited use due to high mutation rate of the virus and side effects. In recent years, RNA interference, triggered by synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA, has rapidly evolved as a potent antiviral regimen. Properly designed siRNAs have been shown to function as potent inhibitors of influenza virus replication. The siRNAs outperform traditional small molecule antivirals in a number of areas, such as ease of design, modest cost, and fast turnaround. Although specificity and tissue delivery remain major bottlenecks in the clinical applications of RNAi in general, intranasal application of siRNA against respiratory viruses including, but not limited to influenza virus, has experienced significant success and optimism, which is reviewed here.

  5. siRNA for Influenza Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2010-07-01

    Influenza virus is one of the most prevalent and ancient infections in humans. About a fifth of world's population is infected by influenza virus annually, leading to high morbidity and mortality, particularly in infants, the elderly and the immunocompromised. In the US alone, influenza outbreaks lead to roughly 30,000 deaths each year. Current vaccines and anti-influenza drugs are of limited use due to high mutation rate of the virus and side effects. In recent years, RNA interference, triggered by synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA), has rapidly evolved as a potent antiviral regimen. Properly designed siRNAs have been shown to function as potent inhibitors of influenza virus replication. The siRNAs outperform traditional small molecule antivirals in a number of areas, such as ease of design, modest cost, and fast turnaround. Although specificity and tissue delivery remain major bottlenecks in the clinical applications of RNAi in general, intranasal application of siRNA against respiratory viruses including, but not limited to influenza virus, has experienced significant success and optimism, which is reviewed here.

  6. Catalytic gasification in fluidized bed, of orange waste. Comparison with non catalytic gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Trujillo, Leonardo; Marquez Montesinos, Francisco; Ramos Robaina, Boris A.; Guerra Reyes, Yanet; Arauzo Perez, Jesus; Gonzalo Callejo, Alberto; Sanchez Cebrian, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    The industry processing of the orange, generates high volumes of solid waste. This waste has been used as complement in the animal feeding, in biochemical processes; but their energy use has not been valued by means of the gasification process. They were carried out gasification studies with air in catalytic fluidized bed (using dolomite and olivine as catalysts in a secondary reactor, also varying the temperature of the secondary reactor and the catalyst mass), of the solid waste of orange and the results are compared with those obtained in the gasification with non catalytic air. In the processes we use a design of complete factorial experiment of 2k, valuing the influence of the independent variables and their interactions in the answers, using the software Design-Expert version 7 and a grade of significance of 95 %. The results demonstrate the qualities of the solid waste of orange in the energy use by means of the gasification process for the treatment of these residuals, obtaining a gas of low caloric value. The use of catalysts also diminishes the yield of tars obtained in the gasification process, being more active the dolomite that the olivine in this process. (author)

  7. RNA meets disease in paradise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Julia; Roth, Anna; Diederichs, Sven

    2011-01-01

    Getting off the train in Jena-Paradies, 60 participants joined for the 12 (th) Young Scientist Meeting of the German Society for Cell Biology (DGZ) entitled "RNA & Disease". Excellent speakers from around the world, graduate students, postdocs and young group leaders enjoyed a meeting in a familiar atmosphere to exchange inspiring new data and vibrant scientific discussions about the fascinating history and exciting future of non-coding RNA research including microRNA, piRNA and long non-coding RNA as well as their function in cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  9. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  10. From "Cellular" RNA to "Smart" RNA: Multiple Roles of RNA in Genome Stability and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Flavia; Jalihal, Ameya P; Francia, Sofia; Meers, Chance; Neeb, Zachary T; Rossiello, Francesca; Gioia, Ubaldo; Aguado, Julio; Jones-Weinert, Corey; Luke, Brian; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Nowacki, Mariusz; Storici, Francesca; Carninci, Piero; Walter, Nils G; Fagagna, Fabrizio d'Adda di

    2018-03-30

    Coding for proteins has been considered the main function of RNA since the "central dogma" of biology was proposed. The discovery of noncoding transcripts shed light on additional roles of RNA, ranging from the support of polypeptide synthesis, to the assembly of subnuclear structures, to gene expression modulation. Cellular RNA has therefore been recognized as a central player in often unanticipated biological processes, including genomic stability. This ever-expanding list of functions inspired us to think of RNA as a "smart" phone, which has replaced the older obsolete "cellular" phone. In this review, we summarize the last two decades of advances in research on the interface between RNA biology and genome stability. We start with an account of the emergence of noncoding RNA, and then we discuss the involvement of RNA in DNA damage signaling and repair, telomere maintenance, and genomic rearrangements. We continue with the depiction of single-molecule RNA detection techniques, and we conclude by illustrating the possibilities of RNA modulation in hopes of creating or improving new therapies. The widespread biological functions of RNA have made this molecule a reoccurring theme in basic and translational research, warranting it the transcendence from classically studied "cellular" RNA to "smart" RNA.

  11. Nonviral pulmonary delivery of siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Olivia M; Kissel, Thomas

    2012-07-17

    target site. In addition, the ideal carrier would be biodegradable (to address difficulties with repeated administration for the treatment of chronic diseases) and would contain targeting moieties to enhance uptake by specific cell types. None of the currently available polymer- and lipid-based formulations meet every one of these requirements, but we introduce here several promising new approaches, including a biodegradable, nonimmunogenic polyester. We also discuss imaging techniques for following the biodistribution according to the administration route. This tracking is crucial for better understanding the translocation and clearance of nanoformulated siRNA subsequent to pulmonary delivery. In the literature, the success of pulmonary siRNA delivery is evaluated solely by relief from or prophylaxis against a disease; side effects are not studied in detail. It also remains unclear which cell types in the lung eventually take up siRNA. These are critical issues for the translational use of pulmonary siRNA formulations; accordingly, we present a flow cytometry technique that can be utilized to differentiate transfected cell populations in a mouse model that expresses transgenic enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP). This technique, in which different cell types are identified on the basis of their surface antigen expression, may eventually help in the development of safer carriers with minimized side effects in nontargeted tissues.

  12. Transfer RNA and human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Abbott

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA genes are hotspots for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase, mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers, and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes. Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing. Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  13. Transfer RNA and human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Jamie A; Francklyn, Christopher S; Robey-Bond, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological mutations in tRNA genes and tRNA processing enzymes are numerous and result in very complicated clinical phenotypes. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) genes are "hotspots" for pathological mutations and over 200 mt-tRNA mutations have been linked to various disease states. Often these mutations prevent tRNA aminoacylation. Disrupting this primary function affects protein synthesis and the expression, folding, and function of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes. Mitochondrial tRNA mutations manifest in a wide panoply of diseases related to cellular energetics, including COX deficiency (cytochrome C oxidase), mitochondrial myopathy, MERRF (Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers), and MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes). Diseases caused by mt-tRNA mutations can also affect very specific tissue types, as in the case of neurosensory non-syndromic hearing loss and pigmentary retinopathy, diabetes mellitus, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Importantly, mitochondrial heteroplasmy plays a role in disease severity and age of onset as well. Not surprisingly, mutations in enzymes that modify cytoplasmic and mitochondrial tRNAs are also linked to a diverse range of clinical phenotypes. In addition to compromised aminoacylation of the tRNAs, mutated modifying enzymes can also impact tRNA expression and abundance, tRNA modifications, tRNA folding, and even tRNA maturation (e.g., splicing). Some of these pathological mutations in tRNAs and processing enzymes are likely to affect non-canonical tRNA functions, and contribute to the diseases without significantly impacting on translation. This chapter will review recent literature on the relation of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic tRNA, and enzymes that process tRNAs, to human disease. We explore the mechanisms involved in the clinical presentation of these various diseases with an emphasis on neurological disease.

  14. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs). However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE) element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  15. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  16. Identifying microRNA/mRNA dysregulations in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Gregory D; Seiler, Michael; Rodriguez, Lorna; Rajagopal, Gunaretnam; Bhanot, Gyan

    2012-03-27

    MicroRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA molecules that co-regulate the expression of multiple genes via mRNA transcript degradation or translation inhibition. Since they often target entire pathways, they may be better drug targets than genes or proteins. MicroRNAs are known to be dysregulated in many tumours and associated with aggressive or poor prognosis phenotypes. Since they regulate mRNA in a tissue specific manner, their functional mRNA targets are poorly understood. In previous work, we developed a method to identify direct mRNA targets of microRNA using patient matched microRNA/mRNA expression data using an anti-correlation signature. This method, applied to clear cell Renal Cell Carcinoma (ccRCC), revealed many new regulatory pathways compromised in ccRCC. In the present paper, we apply this method to identify dysregulated microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). TCGA Microarray data was normalized and samples whose class labels (tumour or normal) were ambiguous with respect to consensus ensemble K-Means clustering were removed. Significantly anti-correlated and correlated genes/microRNA differentially expressed between tumour and normal samples were identified. TargetScan was used to identify gene targets of microRNA. We identified novel microRNA/mRNA mechanisms in ovarian cancer. For example, the expression level of RAD51AP1 was found to be strongly anti-correlated with the expression of hsa-miR-140-3p, which was significantly down-regulated in the tumour samples. The anti-correlation signature was present separately in the tumour and normal samples, suggesting a direct causal dysregulation of RAD51AP1 by hsa-miR-140-3p in the ovary. Other pairs of potentially biological relevance include: hsa-miR-145/E2F3, hsa-miR-139-5p/TOP2A, and hsa-miR-133a/GCLC. We also identified sets of positively correlated microRNA/mRNA pairs that are most likely result from indirect regulatory mechanisms. Our findings identify

  17. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.

    2012-01-01

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ( 1 H– 15 N 2D HMQC) and proton–proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ( 1 H– 1 H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino resonances for a

  18. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  19. Organization and alternative splicing of the Caenorhabditis elegans cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic-subunit gene (kin-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabish, M; Clegg, R A; Rees, H H; Fisher, M J

    1999-04-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A, PK-A) is multifunctional in nature, with key roles in the control of diverse aspects of eukaryotic cellular activity. In the case of the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, a gene encoding the PK-A catalytic subunit has been identified and two isoforms of this subunit, arising from a C-terminal alternative-splicing event, have been characterized [Gross, Bagchi, Lu and Rubin (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 6896-6907]. Here we report the occurrence of N-terminal alternative-splicing events that, in addition to generating a multiplicity of non-myristoylatable isoforms, also generate the myristoylated variant(s) of the catalytic subunit that we have recently characterized [Aspbury, Fisher, Rees and Clegg (1997) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 238, 523-527]. The gene spans more than 36 kb and is divided into a total of 13 exons. Each of the mature transcripts contains only 7 exons. In addition to the already characterized exon 1, the 5'-untranslated region and first intron actually contain 5 other exons, any one of which may be alternatively spliced on to exon 2 at the 5' end of the pre-mRNA. This N-terminal alternative splicing occurs in combination with either of the already characterized C-terminal alternative exons. Thus, C. elegans expresses at least 12 different isoforms of the catalytic subunit of PK-A. The significance of this unprecedented structural diversity in the family of PK-A catalytic subunits is discussed.

  20. RNA SURVEILLANCE– AN EMERGING ROLE FOR RNA REGULATORY NETWORKS IN AGING

    OpenAIRE

    Montano, Monty; Long, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe recent advances in the field of RNA regulatory biology and relate these advances to aging science. We introduce a new term, RNA surveillance, an RNA regulatory process that is conserved in metazoans, and describe how RNA surveillance represents molecular cross-talk between two emerging RNA regulatory systems – RNA interference and RNA editing. We discuss how RNA surveillance mechanisms influence mRNA and microRNA expression and activity during lifespan. Additionall...

  1. On RNA-RNA interaction structures of fixed topological genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Benjamin M M; Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2015-04-01

    Interacting RNA complexes are studied via bicellular maps using a filtration via their topological genus. Our main result is a new bijection for RNA-RNA interaction structures and a linear time uniform sampling algorithm for RNA complexes of fixed topological genus. The bijection allows to either reduce the topological genus of a bicellular map directly, or to lose connectivity by decomposing the complex into a pair of single stranded RNA structures. Our main result is proved bijectively. It provides an explicit algorithm of how to rewire the corresponding complexes and an unambiguous decomposition grammar. Using the concept of genus induction, we construct bicellular maps of fixed topological genus g uniformly in linear time. We present various statistics on these topological RNA complexes and compare our findings with biological complexes. Furthermore we show how to construct loop-energy based complexes using our decomposition grammar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular phylogenetics and comparative modeling of HEN1, a methyltransferase involved in plant microRNA biogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obarska Agnieszka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, HEN1 protein from Arabidopsis thaliana was discovered as an essential enzyme in plant microRNA (miRNA biogenesis. HEN1 transfers a methyl group from S-adenosylmethionine to the 2'-OH or 3'-OH group of the last nucleotide of miRNA/miRNA* duplexes produced by the nuclease Dicer. Previously it was found that HEN1 possesses a Rossmann-fold methyltransferase (RFM domain and a long N-terminal extension including a putative double-stranded RNA-binding motif (DSRM. However, little is known about the details of the structure and the mechanism of action of this enzyme, and about its phylogenetic origin. Results Extensive database searches were carried out to identify orthologs and close paralogs of HEN1. Based on the multiple sequence alignment a phylogenetic tree of the HEN1 family was constructed. The fold-recognition approach was used to identify related methyltransferases with experimentally solved structures and to guide the homology modeling of the HEN1 catalytic domain. Additionally, we identified a La-like predicted RNA binding domain located C-terminally to the DSRM domain and a domain with a peptide prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase fold, but without the conserved PPIase active site, located N-terminally to the catalytic domain. Conclusion The bioinformatics analysis revealed that the catalytic domain of HEN1 is not closely related to any known RNA:2'-OH methyltransferases (e.g. to the RrmJ/fibrillarin superfamily, but rather to small-molecule methyltransferases. The structural model was used as a platform to identify the putative active site and substrate-binding residues of HEN and to propose its mechanism of action.

  3. The Transcription Bubble of the RNA Polymerase-Promoter Open Complex Exhibits Conformational Heterogeneity and Millisecond-Scale Dynamics : Implications for Transcription Start-Site Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, Nicole C.; Cordes, Thorben; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Duchi, Diego; Craggs, Timothy D.; Santoso, Yusdi; Weiss, Shimon; Ebright, Richard H.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription is initiated after RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds to promoter DNA, melts similar to 14 bp around the transcription start site and forms a single-stranded "transcription bubble" within a catalytically active RNAP-DNA open complex (RPo). There is significant flexibility in the

  4. Phosphorolytic activity of Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase towards its cognate aminoacyl adenylate detected by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Led, Jens Jørgen; Switon, Werner K.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic activity of highly purified Escherichia coli glycyl-tRNA synthetase has been studied by 31P-NMR spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography on poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose. It was found that this synthetase, besides the activation of its cognate amino acid and the syntheses...

  5. PRMT1 methylates the single Argonaute of Toxoplasma gondii and is important for the recruitment of Tudor nuclease for target RNA cleavage by antisense guide RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiyenko, Alla; Majumdar, Tanmay; Andrews, Joel; Adams, Brian; Barik, Sailen

    2013-01-01

    Summary Argonaute (Ago) plays a central role in RNA interference in metazoans, but its status in lower organisms remains ill-defined. We report on the Ago complex of the unicellular protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii (Tg), an obligatory pathogen of mammalian hosts. The PIWI-like domain of TgAgo lacked the canonical DDE/H catalytic triad, explaining its weak target RNA cleavage activity. However, TgAgo associated with a stronger RNA slicer, a Tudor staphylococcal nuclease (TSN), and with a protein Arg methyl transferase, PRMT1. Mutational analysis suggested that the N-terminal RGG-repeat domain of TgAgo was methylated by PRMT1, correlating with the recruitment of TSN. The slicer activity of TgAgo was Mg2+-dependent and required perfect complementarity between the guide RNA and the target. In contrast, the TSN activity was Ca2+-dependent and required an imperfectly paired guide RNA. Ago knockout parasites showed essentially normal growth, but in contrast, the PRMT1 knockouts grew abnormally. Chemical inhibition of Arg-methylation also had an anti-parasitic effect. These results suggest that the parasitic PRMT1 plays multiple roles, and its loss affects the recruitment of a more potent second slicer to the parasitic RNA silencing complex, the exact mechanism of which remains to be determined. PMID:22309152

  6. Role of RNA structure and RNA binding activity of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protein in VPg uridylylation and virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, A.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Woolaway, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The uridylylation of the VPg peptide primer is the first stage in the replication of picornavirus RNA. This process can be achieved in vitro using purified components, including 3B (VPg) with the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (3D(pol)), the precursor 3CD, and an RNA template containing the cre....../bus. We show that certain RNA sequences within the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 5' untranslated region but outside of the cre/bus can enhance VPg uridylylation activity. Furthermore, we have shown that the FMDV X protein alone can substitute for 3CD, albeit less efficiently. In addition, the VPg...... precursors, 3B(3)3C and 3B(123)3C, can function as substrates for uridylylation in the absence of added 3C or 3CD. Residues within the FMDV 3C protein involved in interaction with the cre/bus RNA have been identified and are located on the face of the protein opposite from the catalytic site. These residues...

  7. Cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase disrupts the intracellular splicing machinery by entering the nucleus and interfering with Prp8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chin Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary role of cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is viral genome replication in the cellular cytoplasm. However, picornaviral RdRp denoted 3D polymerase (3D(pol also enters the host nucleus, where its function remains unclear. In this study, we describe a novel mechanism of viral attack in which 3D(pol enters the nucleus through the nuclear localization signal (NLS and targets the pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8 to block pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA synthesis. The fingers domain of 3D(pol associates with the C-terminal region of Prp8, which contains the Jab1/MPN domain, and interferes in the second catalytic step, resulting in the accumulation of the lariat form of the splicing intermediate. Endogenous pre-mRNAs trapped by the Prp8-3D(pol complex in enterovirus-infected cells were identified and classed into groups associated with cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Our results suggest that picornaviral RdRp disrupts pre-mRNA splicing processes, that differs from viral protease shutting off cellular transcription and translation which contributes to the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  8. The RNA world hypothesis: the worst theory of the early evolution of life (except for all the othersa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhardt Harold S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problems associated with the RNA world hypothesis are well known. In the following I discuss some of these difficulties, some of the alternative hypotheses that have been proposed, and some of the problems with these alternative models. From a biosynthetic – as well as, arguably, evolutionary – perspective, DNA is a modified RNA, and so the chicken-and-egg dilemma of “which came first?” boils down to a choice between RNA and protein. This is not just a question of cause and effect, but also one of statistical likelihood, as the chance of two such different types of macromolecule arising simultaneously would appear unlikely. The RNA world hypothesis is an example of a ‘top down’ (or should it be ‘present back’? approach to early evolution: how can we simplify modern biological systems to give a plausible evolutionary pathway that preserves continuity of function? The discovery that RNA possesses catalytic ability provides a potential solution: a single macromolecule could have originally carried out both replication and catalysis. RNA – which constitutes the genome of RNA viruses, and catalyzes peptide synthesis on the ribosome – could have been both the chicken and the egg! However, the following objections have been raised to the RNA world hypothesis: (i RNA is too complex a molecule to have arisen prebiotically; (ii RNA is inherently unstable; (iii catalysis is a relatively rare property of long RNA sequences only; and (iv the catalytic repertoire of RNA is too limited. I will offer some possible responses to these objections in the light of work by our and other labs. Finally, I will critically discuss an alternative theory to the RNA world hypothesis known as ‘proteins first’, which holds that proteins either preceded RNA in evolution, or – at the very least – that proteins and RNA coevolved. I will argue that, while theoretically possible, such a hypothesis is probably unprovable, and that the RNA

  9. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  10. The RNA Exosome Channeling and Direct Access Conformations Have Distinct In Vivo Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeil Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The RNA exosome is a 3′–5′ ribonuclease complex that is composed of nine core subunits and an essential catalytic subunit, Rrp44. Two distinct conformations of Rrp44 were revealed in previous structural studies, suggesting that Rrp44 may change its conformation to exert its function. In the channeling conformation, (Rrp44ch, RNA accesses the active site after traversing the central channel of the RNA exosome, whereas in the other conformation, (Rrp44da, RNA gains direct access to the active site. Here, we show that the Rrp44da exosome is important for nuclear function of the RNA exosome. Defects caused by disrupting the direct access conformation are distinct from those caused by channel-occluding mutations, indicating specific functions for each conformation. Our genetic analyses provide in vivo evidence that the RNA exosome employs a direct-access route to recruit specific substrates, indicating that the RNA exosome uses alternative conformations to act on different RNA substrates.

  11. Distributed biotin-streptavidin transcription roadblocks for mapping cotranscriptional RNA folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Eric J; Watters, Kyle E; Nedialkov, Yuri; Artsimovitch, Irina; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-07-07

    RNA folding during transcription directs an order of folding that can determine RNA structure and function. However, the experimental study of cotranscriptional RNA folding has been limited by the lack of easily approachable methods that can interrogate nascent RNA structure at nucleotide resolution. To address this, we previously developed cotranscriptional selective 2΄-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension sequencing (SHAPE-Seq) to simultaneously probe all intermediate RNA transcripts during transcription by stalling elongation complexes at catalytically dead EcoRIE111Q roadblocks. While effective, the distribution of elongation complexes using EcoRIE111Q requires laborious PCR using many different oligonucleotides for each sequence analyzed. Here, we improve the broad applicability of cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq by developing a sequence-independent biotin-streptavidin (SAv) roadblocking strategy that simplifies the preparation of roadblocking DNA templates. We first determine the properties of biotin-SAv roadblocks. We then show that randomly distributed biotin-SAv roadblocks can be used in cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq experiments to identify the same RNA structural transitions related to a riboswitch decision-making process that we previously identified using EcoRIE111Q. Lastly, we find that EcoRIE111Q maps nascent RNA structure to specific transcript lengths more precisely than biotin-SAv and propose guidelines to leverage the complementary strengths of each transcription roadblock in cotranscriptional SHAPE-Seq. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. antaRNA: ant colony-based RNA sequence design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinkauf, Robert; Mann, Martin; Backofen, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    RNA sequence design is studied at least as long as the classical folding problem. Although for the latter the functional fold of an RNA molecule is to be found ,: inverse folding tries to identify RNA sequences that fold into a function-specific target structure. In combination with RNA-based biotechnology and synthetic biology ,: reliable RNA sequence design becomes a crucial step to generate novel biochemical components. In this article ,: the computational tool antaRNA is presented. It is capable of compiling RNA sequences for a given structure that comply in addition with an adjustable full range objective GC-content distribution ,: specific sequence constraints and additional fuzzy structure constraints. antaRNA applies ant colony optimization meta-heuristics and its superior performance is shown on a biological datasets. http://www.bioinf.uni-freiburg.de/Software/antaRNA CONTACT: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Intergenic mRNA molecules resulting from trans-splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finta, Csaba; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2002-02-22

    Accumulated recent evidence is indicating that alternative splicing represents a generalized process that increases the complexity of human gene expression. Here we show that mRNA production may not necessarily be limited to single genes, as human liver also has the potential to produce a variety of hybrid cytochrome P450 3A mRNA molecules. The four known cytochrome P450 3A genes in humans, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP3A7, and CYP3A43, share a high degree of similarity, consist of 13 exons with conserved exon-intron boundaries, and form a cluster on chromosome 7. The chimeric CYP3A mRNA molecules described herein are characterized by CYP3A43 exon 1 joined at canonical splice sites to distinct sets of CYP3A4 or CYP3A5 exons. Because the CYP3A43 gene is in a head-to-head orientation with the CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 genes, bypassing transcriptional termination can not account for the formation of hybrid CYP3A mRNAs. Thus, the mechanism generating these molecules has to be an RNA processing event that joins exons of independent pre-mRNA molecules, i.e. trans-splicing. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the ratio of one CYP3A43/3A4 intergenic combination was estimated to be approximately 0.15% that of the CYP3A43 mRNAs. Moreover, trans-splicing has been found not to interfere with polyadenylation. Heterologous expression of the chimeric species composed of CYP3A43 exon 1 joined to exons 2-13 of CYP3A4 revealed catalytic activity toward testosterone.

  14. Integrated mRNA and microRNA transcriptome sequencing characterizes sequence variants and mRNA–microRNA regulatory network in nasopharyngeal carcinoma model systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Ying-Ying Szeto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a prevalent malignancy in Southeast Asia among the Chinese population. Aberrant regulation of transcripts has been implicated in many types of cancers including NPC. Herein, we characterized mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes by RNA sequencing (RNASeq of NPC model systems. Matched total mRNA and small RNA of undifferentiated Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-positive NPC xenograft X666 and its derived cell line C666, well-differentiated NPC cell line HK1, and the immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line NP460 were sequenced by Solexa technology. We found 2812 genes and 149 miRNAs (human and EBV to be differentially expressed in NP460, HK1, C666 and X666 with RNASeq; 533 miRNA–mRNA target pairs were inversely regulated in the three NPC cell lines compared to NP460. Integrated mRNA/miRNA expression profiling and pathway analysis show extracellular matrix organization, Beta-1 integrin cell surface interactions, and the PI3K/AKT, EGFR, ErbB, and Wnt pathways were potentially deregulated in NPC. Real-time quantitative PCR was performed on selected mRNA/miRNAs in order to validate their expression. Transcript sequence variants such as short insertions and deletions (INDEL, single nucleotide variant (SNV, and isomiRs were characterized in the NPC model systems. A novel TP53 transcript variant was identified in NP460, HK1, and C666. Detection of three previously reported novel EBV-encoded BART miRNAs and their isomiRs were also observed. Meta-analysis of a model system to a clinical system aids the choice of different cell lines in NPC studies. This comprehensive characterization of mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes in NPC cell lines and the xenograft provides insights on miRNA regulation of mRNA and valuable resources on transcript variation and regulation in NPC, which are potentially useful for mechanistic and preclinical studies.

  15. sRNAnalyzer-a flexible and customizable small RNA sequencing data analysis pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaogang; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Baxter, David; Scherler, Kelsey; Gordon, Aaron; Fong, Olivia; Etheridge, Alton; Galas, David J; Wang, Kai

    2017-12-01

    Although many tools have been developed to analyze small RNA sequencing (sRNA-Seq) data, it remains challenging to accurately analyze the small RNA population, mainly due to multiple sequence ID assignment caused by short read length. Additional issues in small RNA analysis include low consistency of microRNA (miRNA) measurement results across different platforms, miRNA mapping associated with miRNA sequence variation (isomiR) and RNA editing, and the origin of those unmapped reads after screening against all endogenous reference sequence databases. To address these issues, we built a comprehensive and customizable sRNA-Seq data analysis pipeline-sRNAnalyzer, which enables: (i) comprehensive miRNA profiling strategies to better handle isomiRs and summarization based on each nucleotide position to detect potential SNPs in miRNAs, (ii) different sequence mapping result assignment approaches to simulate results from microarray/qRT-PCR platforms and a local probabilistic model to assign mapping results to the most-likely IDs, (iii) comprehensive ribosomal RNA filtering for accurate mapping of exogenous RNAs and summarization based on taxonomy annotation. We evaluated our pipeline on both artificial samples (including synthetic miRNA and Escherichia coli cultures) and biological samples (human tissue and plasma). sRNAnalyzer is implemented in Perl and available at: http://srnanalyzer.systemsbiology.net/. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. sRNAnalyzer—a flexible and customizable small RNA sequencing data analysis pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taek-Kyun; Baxter, David; Scherler, Kelsey; Gordon, Aaron; Fong, Olivia; Etheridge, Alton; Galas, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although many tools have been developed to analyze small RNA sequencing (sRNA-Seq) data, it remains challenging to accurately analyze the small RNA population, mainly due to multiple sequence ID assignment caused by short read length. Additional issues in small RNA analysis include low consistency of microRNA (miRNA) measurement results across different platforms, miRNA mapping associated with miRNA sequence variation (isomiR) and RNA editing, and the origin of those unmapped reads after screening against all endogenous reference sequence databases. To address these issues, we built a comprehensive and customizable sRNA-Seq data analysis pipeline—sRNAnalyzer, which enables: (i) comprehensive miRNA profiling strategies to better handle isomiRs and summarization based on each nucleotide position to detect potential SNPs in miRNAs, (ii) different sequence mapping result assignment approaches to simulate results from microarray/qRT-PCR platforms and a local probabilistic model to assign mapping results to the most-likely IDs, (iii) comprehensive ribosomal RNA filtering for accurate mapping of exogenous RNAs and summarization based on taxonomy annotation. We evaluated our pipeline on both artificial samples (including synthetic miRNA and Escherichia coli cultures) and biological samples (human tissue and plasma). sRNAnalyzer is implemented in Perl and available at: http://srnanalyzer.systemsbiology.net/. PMID:29069500

  17. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  18. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-05-11

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  19. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  20. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Kim, Jungkwon [Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrera, Julian [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Metcalfe, Ian S. [Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Font, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.font@urv.cat

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P{sub O{sub 2}} were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P{sub O{sub 2}}, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD{sub RB}) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  1. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julian; Metcalfe, Ian S.; Font, Josep

    2007-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P O 2 ) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P O 2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P O 2 , which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD RB ) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  2. RNA interference of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase results in reduced insecticide resistance in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fang; Sams, Sarah; Moural, Tim; Haynes, Kenneth F; Potter, Michael F; Palli, Subba R

    2012-01-01

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) plays a central role in cytochrome P450 action. The genes coding for P450s are not yet fully identified in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius. Hence, we decided to clone cDNA and knockdown the expression of the gene coding for CPR which is suggested to be required for the function of all P450s to determine whether or not P450s are involved in resistance of bed bugs to insecticides. The full length Cimex lectularius CPR (ClCPR) cDNA was isolated from a deltamethrin resistant bed bug population (CIN-1) using a combined PCR strategy. Bioinformatics and in silico modeling were employed to identify three conserved binding domains (FMN, FAD, NADP), a FAD binding motif, and the catalytic residues. The critical amino acids involved in FMN, FAD, NADP binding and their putative functions were also analyzed. No signal peptide but a membrane anchor domain with 21 amino acids which facilitates the localization of ClCPR on the endoplasmic reticulum was identified in ClCPR protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ClCPR is closer to the CPR from the body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis than to the CPRs from the other insect species studied. The ClCPR gene was ubiquitously expressed in all tissues tested but showed an increase in expression as immature stages develop into adults. We exploited the traumatic insemination mechanism of bed bugs to inject dsRNA and successfully knockdown the expression of the gene coding for ClCPR. Suppression of the ClCPR expression increased susceptibility to deltamethrin in resistant populations but not in the susceptible population of bed bugs. These data suggest that P450-mediated metabolic detoxification may serve as one of the resistance mechanisms in bed bugs.

  3. RNA FRABASE 2.0: an advanced web-accessible database with the capacity to search the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasik Szymon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries concerning novel functions of RNA, such as RNA interference, have contributed towards the growing importance of the field. In this respect, a deeper knowledge of complex three-dimensional RNA structures is essential to understand their new biological functions. A number of bioinformatic tools have been proposed to explore two major structural databases (PDB, NDB in order to analyze various aspects of RNA tertiary structures. One of these tools is RNA FRABASE 1.0, the first web-accessible database with an engine for automatic search of 3D fragments within PDB-derived RNA structures. This search is based upon the user-defined RNA secondary structure pattern. In this paper, we present and discuss RNA FRABASE 2.0. This second version of the system represents a major extension of this tool in terms of providing new data and a wide spectrum of novel functionalities. An intuitionally operated web server platform enables very fast user-tailored search of three-dimensional RNA fragments, their multi-parameter conformational analysis and visualization. Description RNA FRABASE 2.0 has stored information on 1565 PDB-deposited RNA structures, including all NMR models. The RNA FRABASE 2.0 search engine algorithms operate on the database of the RNA sequences and the new library of RNA secondary structures, coded in the dot-bracket format extended to hold multi-stranded structures and to cover residues whose coordinates are missing in the PDB files. The library of RNA secondary structures (and their graphics is made available. A high level of efficiency of the 3D search has been achieved by introducing novel tools to formulate advanced searching patterns and to screen highly populated tertiary structure elements. RNA FRABASE 2.0 also stores data and conformational parameters in order to provide "on the spot" structural filters to explore the three-dimensional RNA structures. An instant visualization of the 3D RNA

  4. Progress in catalytic naphtha reforming process: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Mitra; Iranshahi, Davood

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming process is a vital process for refineries due to the production of high-octane components, which is intensely demanded in our modern life. The significance of this industrial process induced researchers to investigate different aspects of catalytic naphtha reforming process intensively. Some of the investigators try to improve this process by representing more effective catalysts, while others try to elucidate its kinetic and deactivation mechanisms and design more efficient reactor setups. The amount of these established papers is so much that may confuse some of the researchers who want to find collective information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. In the present paper, the published studies from 1949 until now are categorized into three main groups including finding suitable catalyst, revealing appropriate kinetic and deactivation model, and suggesting efficient reactor configuration and mode of operation. These studies are reviewed separately, and a suitable reference is provided for those who want to have access to generalized information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. Finally, various suggestions for revamping the catalytic naphtha reforming process have been proposed as a guideline for further investigations

  5. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-07

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  6. Catalytic conversion of ethanol on H-Y zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čegar Nedeljko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of the H-form of synthetic zeolite NaY was examined in this study. The catalytic activity was determined according to the rate of ethanol conversion in a gas phase in the static system. In the conversion of ethanol on synthetic NaY zeolite at 585, 595, and 610 K, on which the reaction develops at an optimal rate, ethene and diethyl ether are evolved in approximately the same quantity. After transforming the NaY zeolite into the H-form, its catalytic activity was extremely increases so, the reaction develops at a significantly lower temperature with a very large increase in the reaction rate. The distribution of the products also changes, so that at lower temperatures diethyl ether is elvolved in most cases, and the development of ethene is favored at higher ones, and after a certain period of time there is almost complete conversion of ethanol into ethene. The increase in catalytic activity, as well as the change of selectivity of conversion of ethanol on the H-form of zeolite, is the result of removing Na+ cations in the NaY zeolite, so that more acidic catalyst is obtained which contains a number of acidic catalytically active centers, as well as a more powerful one compared to the original NaY zeolite.

  7. RNA İNTERFERANS (RNAİ)

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDOĞDU, Ramazan; ÇELİK, Venhar

    2009-01-01

    RNA interferans, uygun çift zincirli RNA’nın hücreye girdiği zaman, endojenik komplementer mRNA dizisinin parçalanmasına yol açan, transkripsiyon sonrası gen susturma mekanizmasıdır. RNA interferans, Dicer adı verilen bir RNase III enzimi tarafından çift zincirli RNA’nın küçük engelleyici RNA’lara (siRNA) kesilmesi ile başlamaktadır. Bu siRNA’lar daha sonra, bir multiprotein-RNA nükleaz kompleksi olan, RNA- indükleyici baskılama kompleksine (RISC) bağlanır. RISC, siRNA’ları komplementer mRNA’...

  8. Radiation sensitivity of messenger RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponta, H.; Pfennig-Yeh, M.L.; Herrlich, P.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Wagner, E.F.; Schweiger, M.

    1979-01-01

    Messenger RNA function is inactivated by irradiation with ultraviolet light. A unit length mRNA (in bases) is 2-3 times more sensitive than a unit length of DNA (in base pairs) with respect to the inactivation of template function. These data stem from four experimental systems all of which do not repair DNA: the translation of E. coli mRNA in rifampicin-treated cells, of T7 mRNA in infected E.coli, of f2 phage RNA in vivo, and of stable mRNA in chromosomeless minicells. The comparison of relative sensitivities to UV is relevant to the technique of UV mapping of transcription units which enjoys increasing popularity in pro- and eukaryotic genetic research. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiation sensitivity of messenger RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponta, H; Pfennig-Yeh, M L; Herrlich, P [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik und Toxikologie von Spaltstoffen; Karlsruhe Univ. (TH) (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Genetik); Wagner, E F; Schweiger, M [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Biochemie

    1979-08-01

    Messenger RNA function is inactivated by irradiation with ultraviolet light. A unit length mRNA (in bases) is 2-3 times more sensitive than a unit length of DNA (in base pairs) with respect to the inactivation of template function. These data stem from four experimental systems all of which do not repair DNA: the translation of E. coli mRNA in rifampicin-treated cells, of T7 mRNA in infected E.coli, of f2 phage RNA in vivo, and of stable mRNA in chromosomeless minicells. The comparison of relative sensitivities to UV is relevant to the technique of UV mapping of transcription units which enjoys increasing popularity in pro- and eukaryotic genetic research.

  10. Accurate SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure modeling, including pseudoknots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdin, Christine E; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Huggins, Wayne; Leonard, Christopher W; Mathews, David H; Weeks, Kevin M

    2013-04-02

    A pseudoknot forms in an RNA when nucleotides in a loop pair with a region outside the helices that close the loop. Pseudoknots occur relatively rarely in RNA but are highly overrepresented in functionally critical motifs in large catalytic RNAs, in riboswitches, and in regulatory elements of viruses. Pseudoknots are usually excluded from RNA structure prediction algorithms. When included, these pairings are difficult to model accurately, especially in large RNAs, because allowing this structure dramatically increases the number of possible incorrect folds and because it is difficult to search the fold space for an optimal structure. We have developed a concise secondary structure modeling approach that combines SHAPE (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) experimental chemical probing information and a simple, but robust, energy model for the entropic cost of single pseudoknot formation. Structures are predicted with iterative refinement, using a dynamic programming algorithm. This melded experimental and thermodynamic energy function predicted the secondary structures and the pseudoknots for a set of 21 challenging RNAs of known structure ranging in size from 34 to 530 nt. On average, 93% of known base pairs were predicted, and all pseudoknots in well-folded RNAs were identified.

  11. RNA Catalysis, Thermodynamics and the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Scott

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World Hypothesis posits that the first self-replicating molecules were RNAs. RNA self-replicases are, in general, assumed to have employed nucleotide 5ʹ-polyphosphates (or their analogues as substrates for RNA polymerization. The mechanism by which these substrates might be synthesized with sufficient abundance to supply a growing and evolving population of RNAs is problematic for evolutionary hypotheses because non-enzymatic synthesis and assembly of nucleotide 5ʹ-triphosphates (or other analogously activated phosphodiester species is inherently difficult. However, nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates are also phosphodiesters, and are the natural and abundant products of RNA degradation. These have previously been dismissed as viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. We propose that the arguments for their dismissal are based on a flawed assumption, and that nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates in fact possess several significant, advantageous properties that indeed make them particularly viable substrates for prebiotic RNA synthesis. An RNA World hypothesis based upon the polymerization of nucleotide 2ʹ,3ʹ-cyclic phosphates possesses additional explanatory power in that it accounts for the observed ribozyme “fossil record”, suggests a viable mechanism for substrate transport across lipid vesicle boundaries of primordial proto-cells, circumvents the problems of substrate scarcity and implausible synthetic pathways, provides for a primitive but effective RNA replicase editing mechanism, and definitively explains why RNA, rather than DNA, must have been the original catalyst. Finally, our analysis compels us to propose that a fundamental and universal property that drives the evolution of living systems, as well as pre-biotic replicating molecules (be they composed of RNA or protein, is that they exploit chemical reactions that already possess competing kinetically-preferred and thermodynamically-preferred pathways in a

  12. Enzymatic synthesis of tRNA-peptide conjugates and spectroscopic studies of fluorine-modified RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, D.

    2010-01-01

    possess the naturally occurring nucleoside modifications. Hence, an alternative process for access to 5'-fragments containing these modifications was needed. Starting from wild-type tRNA, a DNA-enzyme mediated position-specific cleavage at the desired cleavage site was elaborated. For quantitative cleavage, the introduction of repeated temperature cycles was inevitable. Dephosphorylation of the so obtained 2',3'-cyclophosphate cleavage products had to be performed prior to ligating the wild-type 5'-fragment by T4 RNA ligase to the chimeric 3'-fragment yielding the fully modified tRNA-peptide conjugate. The broad applicability of that approach was demonstrated by successful ligation of various tRNA, and tRNA from different species. In the second part of this thesis fluorinated nucleic acids were applied to 19F NMR spectroscopic investigations. One subproject concerned fluorinated nucleic acids for probing secondary structures. For that reason, a 2,4-difluorotoluyl-ribofuranose phosphoramidite was synthesized and site-specifically incorporated into oligonucleotides. As a proof of principle, the differentiation between monomolecular and bimolecular melting transitions was demonstrated by monitoring the temperature dependent alterations in the chemical shift signatures. It was also shown that oligonucleotides of self-complementary sequences - which simultaneously adopt different secondary structures - can be analyzed in terms of quantification of the coexisting populations. Moreover, melting temperatures determined by 19F NMR spectroscopy were in excellent accordance with those found using traditional UV-techniques. In another subproject, the interaction of tRNA pseudouridine synthase (TruB) with its TΨC loop tRNA substrate was studied using 19F NMR spectroscopy. So far, published contributions have focused on 5-fluorouridine substrate/enzyme reactions which were expected to result in a stable covalently linked RNA-enzyme complex. However, the enzyme was capable of

  13. RNase-assisted RNA chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlewski, Gracjan; Cáceres, Javier F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA chromatography combined with mass spectrometry represents a widely used experimental approach to identify RNA-binding proteins that recognize specific RNA targets. An important drawback of most of these protocols is the high background due to direct or indirect nonspecific binding of cellular proteins to the beads. In many cases this can hamper the detection of individual proteins due to their low levels and/or comigration with contaminating proteins. Increasing the salt concentration during washing steps can reduce background, but at the cost of using less physiological salt concentrations and the likely loss of important RNA-binding proteins that are less stringently bound to a given RNA, as well as the disassembly of protein or ribonucleoprotein complexes. Here, we describe an improved RNA chromatography method that relies on the use of a cocktail of RNases in the elution step. This results in the release of proteins specifically associated with the RNA ligand and almost complete elimination of background noise, allowing a more sensitive and thorough detection of RNA-binding proteins recognizing a specific RNA transcript. PMID:20571124

  14. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  15. RNA interference in Lepidoptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terenius, Ole; Papanicolaou, Alexie; Garbutt, Jennie S.

    2011-01-01

    in RNAi experiments in Lepidoptera are discussed. The review also points to a need to further investigate the mechanism of RNAi in lepidopteran insects and its possible connection to the innate immune response. Our general understanding of RNAi in Lepidoptera will be further aided in the future as our...... experiments have not been collected in such a way that they are possible to analyze. In this review, we have collected detailed data from more than 150 experiments including all to date published and many unpublished experiments. Despite a large variation in the data, trends that are found are that RNAi...... is particularly successful in the family Saturniidae and in genes involved in immunity. On the contrary, gene expression in epidermal tissues seems to be most difficult to silence. In addition, gene silencing by feeding dsRNA requires high concentrations for success. Possible causes for the variability of success...

  16. Heterogeneous-catalytic redox reactions in nitrate - formate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; Tananaev, I.G.; Brossard, Ph.; Broudic, J.Ch.

    2000-01-01

    It was found that an intensive destruction of various organic and mineral substances - usual components of aqueous waste solutions (oxalic acid, complexones, urea, hydrazine, ammonium nitrate, etc.) takes place under the conditions of catalytic denitration. Kinetics and mechanisms of urea and ammonium nitrate decomposition in the system HNO 3 - HCOOH - Pt/SiO 2 are comprehensively investigated. The behaviour of uranium, neptunium and plutonium under the conditions of catalytic denitration is studied. It is shown, that under the certain conditions the formic acid is an effective reducer of the uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) ions. Kinetics of heterogeneous-catalytic red-ox reactions of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) with formic acid are investigated. The mechanisms of the appropriate reactions are evaluated. (authors)

  17. Catalytic dehydration of ethanol using transition metal oxide catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, T

    2005-04-15

    The aim of this work is to study catalytic ethanol dehydration using different prepared catalysts, which include Fe(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and calcined physical mixtures of both ferric and manganese oxides with alumina and/or silica gel. The physicochemical properties of these catalysts were investigated via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), acidity measurement, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption at -196 degrees C. The catalytic activities of such catalysts were tested through conversion of ethanol at 200-500 degrees C using a catalytic flow system operated under atmospheric pressure. The results obtained indicated that the dehydration reaction on the catalyst relies on surface acidity, whereas the ethylene production selectivity depends on the catalyst chemical constituents.

  18. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hirotaka; Kitaoka, Takuya; Isogai, Akira

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  19. Hydrogen production via catalytic processing of renewable feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazim Muradov; Franklyn Smith; Ali T-Raissi

    2006-01-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) and biogas can potentially become important feedstocks for renewable hydrogen production. The objectives of this work were: (1) to develop a catalytic process for direct reforming of CH 4 -CO 2 gaseous mixture mimicking LFG, (2) perform thermodynamic analysis of the reforming process using AspenPlus chemical process simulator, (3) determine operational conditions for auto-thermal (or thermo-neutral) reforming of a model CH 4 -CO 2 feedstock, and (4) fabricate and test a bench-scale hydrogen production unit. Experimental data obtained from catalytic reformation of the CH 4 -CO 2 and CH 4 -CO 2 -O 2 gaseous mixtures using Ni-catalyst were in a good agreement with the simulation results. It was demonstrated that catalytic reforming of LFG-mimicking gas produced hydrogen with the purity of 99.9 vol.%. (authors)

  20. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  1. Electro-catalytic degradation of sulfisoxazole by using graphene anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Shuan; Li, Ruiping; Huang, Yingping; Chen, Chuncheng

    2016-05-01

    Graphite and graphene electrodes were prepared by using pure graphite as precursor. The electrode materials were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. The electro-catalytic activity for degradation of sulfisoxazole (SIZ) was investigated by using prepared graphene or graphite anode. The results showed that the degradation of SIZ was much more rapid on the graphene than that on the graphite electrode. Moreover, the graphene electrode exhibited good stability and recyclability. The analysis on the intermediate products and the measurement of active species during the SIZ degradation demonstrated that indirect oxidation is the dominant mechanism, involving the electro-catalytic generation of OH and O2(-) as the main active oxygen species. This study implies that graphene is a promising potential electrode material for long-term application to electro-catalytic degradation of organic pollutants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. A catalytic distillation process for light gas oil hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Villamil, F.D.; Marroquin, J.O.; Paz, C. de la; Rodriguez, E. [Prog. de Matematicas Aplicadas y Computacion, Prog. de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A light gas oil hydrodesulfurization process via catalytic distillation is developed and compared to a conventional process. By integrating the separation and reaction into a single unit, the catalytic distillation may produce a diesel with low concentration of sulfur compounds at a lower cost than the traditional reaction/separation process. The process proposed in this work is compared to an optimised conventional hydrodesulfurization unit which represents fairly well a plant that belongs to the National System of Refineries. During the optimisation of the conventional process, a compromise is established among the production of diesel and naphtha and the operating costs. The results show that the light gas oil hydrodesulfurization via catalytic distillation is as or more efficient than the conventional process. However, the removal of the sulfur compounds is carried out under less rigorous conditions. This design reduces the fix and operational costs. (author)

  3. Photolytic AND Catalytic Destruction of Organic Waste Water Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Kryuchkova, S. O.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The system: water supply source - potable and industrial water - wastewater - sewage treatment - water supply source is necessary for water supply and efficient utilization of water resources. Up-to-date technologies of waste water biological treatment require for special microorganisms, which are technologically complex and expensive but unable to solve all the problems. Application of photolytic and catalytically-oxidizing destruction is quite promising. However, the most reagents are strong oxidizers in catalytic oxidation of organic substances and can initiate toxic substance generation. Methodic and scientific approaches to assess bread making industry influence on the environment have been developed in this paper in order to support forecasting and taking technological decisions concerning reduction of this influence. Destructive methods have been tested: ultra violet irradiation and catalytic oxidation for extraction of organic compounds from waste water by natural reagents.

  4. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  5. The RNA World as a Model System to Study the Origin of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Abe; Blanco, Celia; Chen, Irene A

    2015-10-05

    Understanding how life arose is a fundamental problem of biology. Much progress has been made by adopting a synthetic and mechanistic perspective on originating life. We present a current view of the biochemistry of the origin of life, focusing on issues surrounding the emergence of an RNA World in which RNA dominated informational and functional roles. There is cause for optimism on this difficult problem: the prebiotic chemical inventory may not have been as nightmarishly complex as previously thought; the catalytic repertoire of ribozymes continues to expand, approaching the goal of self-replicating RNA; encapsulation in protocells provides evolutionary and biophysical advantages. Nevertheless, major issues remain unsolved, such as the origin of a genetic code. Attention to this field is particularly timely given the accelerating discovery and characterization of exoplanets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS OF CATALYTIC CLEANING OF GAS FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lisý

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the theoretical description of the cleaning of syngas from biomass and waste gasification using catalytic methods, and on the verification of the theory through experiments. The main obstruction to using syngas from fluid gasification of organic matter is the presence of various high-boiling point hydrocarbons (i.e., tar in the gas. The elimination of tar from the gas is a key factor in subsequent use of the gas in other technologies for cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. The application of a natural or artificial catalyst for catalytic destruction of tar is one of the methods of secondary elimination of tar from syngas. In our experiments, we used a natural catalyst (dolomite or calcium magnesium carbonate from Horní Lánov with great mechanical and catalytic properties, suitable for our purposes. The advantages of natural catalysts in contrast to artificial catalysts include their availability, low purchase prices and higher resilience to the so-called catalyst poison. Natural calcium catalysts may also capture undesired compounds of sulphure and chlorine. Our paper presents a theoretical description and analysis of catalytic destruction of tar into combustible gas components, and of the impact of dolomite calcination on its efficiency. The efficiency of the technology is verified in laboratories. The facility used for verification was a 150 kW pilot gasification unit with a laboratory catalytic filter. The efficiency of tar elimination reached 99.5%, the tar concentration complied with limits for use of the gas in combustion engines, and the tar content reached approximately 35 mg/mn3. The results of the measurements conducted in laboratories helped us design a pilot technology for catalytic gas cleaning.

  7. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  8. Minotaur is critical for primary piRNA biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, Vasily V; Yu, Yang; Jankowska, Anna; Luo, Yicheng; Wasik, Kaja A; Malone, Colin D; Harrison, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam; Wakimoto, Barbara T; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J

    2013-08-01

    Piwi proteins and their associated small RNAs are essential for fertility in animals. In part, this is due to their roles in guarding germ cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence transposon targets and, as such, form a molecular code that discriminates transposons from endogenous genes. Information ultimately carried by piRNAs is encoded within genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters. These give rise to long, single-stranded, primary transcripts that are processed into piRNAs. Despite the biological importance of this pathway, neither the characteristics that define a locus as a source of piRNAs nor the mechanisms that catalyze primary piRNA biogenesis are well understood. We searched an EMS-mutant collection annotated for fertility phenotypes for genes involved in the piRNA pathway. Twenty-seven homozygous sterile strains showed transposon-silencing defects. One of these, which strongly impacted primary piRNA biogenesis, harbored a causal mutation in CG5508, a member of the Drosophila glycerol-3-phosphate O-acetyltransferase (GPAT) family. These enzymes catalyze the first acylation step on the path to the production of phosphatidic acid (PA). Though this pointed strongly to a function for phospholipid signaling in the piRNA pathway, a mutant form of CG5508, which lacks the GPAT active site, still functions in piRNA biogenesis. We have named this new biogenesis factor Minotaur.

  9. Minotaur is critical for primary piRNA biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, Vasily V.; Yu, Yang; Jankowska, Anna; Luo, Yicheng; Wasik, Kaja A.; Malone, Colin D.; Harrison, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam; Wakimoto, Barbara T.; Fagegaltier, Delphine; Muerdter, Felix; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    Piwi proteins and their associated small RNAs are essential for fertility in animals. In part, this is due to their roles in guarding germ cell genomes against the activity of mobile genetic elements. piRNA populations direct Piwi proteins to silence transposon targets and, as such, form a molecular code that discriminates transposons from endogenous genes. Information ultimately carried by piRNAs is encoded within genomic loci, termed piRNA clusters. These give rise to long, single-stranded, primary transcripts that are processed into piRNAs. Despite the biological importance of this pathway, neither the characteristics that define a locus as a source of piRNAs nor the mechanisms that catalyze primary piRNA biogenesis are well understood. We searched an EMS-mutant collection annotated for fertility phenotypes for genes involved in the piRNA pathway. Twenty-seven homozygous sterile strains showed transposon-silencing defects. One of these, which strongly impacted primary piRNA biogenesis, harbored a causal mutation in CG5508, a member of the Drosophila glycerol-3-phosphate O-acetyltransferase (GPAT) family. These enzymes catalyze the first acylation step on the path to the production of phosphatidic acid (PA). Though this pointed strongly to a function for phospholipid signaling in the piRNA pathway, a mutant form of CG5508, which lacks the GPAT active site, still functions in piRNA biogenesis. We have named this new biogenesis factor Minotaur. PMID:23788724

  10. Concepts and introduction to RNA bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Ruzzo, Walter L.

    2014-01-01

    RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology have emerged from implementing methods for predicting the secondary structure of single sequences. The field has evolved to exploit multiple sequences to take evolutionary information into account, such as compensating (and structure preserving) base...... for interactions between RNA and proteins.Here, we introduce the basic concepts of predicting RNA secondary structure relevant to the further analyses of RNA sequences. We also provide pointers to methods addressing various aspects of RNA bioinformatics and computational RNA biology....

  11. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Liu, Wei; Xu, Yanjun; Li, Chunquan; Wang, Yingying; Yang, Haixiu; Zhang, Chunlong; Su, Fei; Li, Yixue; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it i...

  12. Upgrading of Intermediate Bio-Oil Produced by Catalytic Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Zia [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Chadwell, Brad [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Taha, Rachid [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Hindin, Barry [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Ralston, Kevin [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objectives of this project were to (1) develop a process to upgrade catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, (2) investigate new upgrading catalysts suited for upgrading catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, (3) demonstrate upgrading system operation for more than 1,000 hours using a single catalyst charge, and (4) produce a final upgraded product that can be blended to 30 percent by weight with petroleum fuels or that is compatible with existing petroleum refining operations. This project has, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time enabled a commercially viable bio-oil hydrotreatment process to produce renewable blend stock for transportation fuels.

  13. Bubble Driven Quasioscillatory Translational Motion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjare, Manoj; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Y.-P.

    2012-09-01

    A new quasioscillatory translational motion has been observed for big Janus catalytic micromotors with a fast CCD camera. Such motional behavior is found to coincide with both the bubble growth and burst processes resulting from the catalytic reaction, and the competition of the two processes generates a net forward motion. Detailed physical models have been proposed to describe the above processes. It is suggested that the bubble growth process imposes a growth force moving the micromotor forward, while the burst process induces an instantaneous local pressure depression pulling the micromotor backward. The theoretic predictions are consistent with the experimental data.

  14. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  15. New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. (Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1994-07-25

    A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

  16. Catalytic Oxidation of Allylic Alcohols to Methyl Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata; Kotni, Rama Krishna; Nielsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic oxidation of allylic alcohols to methyl esters using gold nanoparticles supported on different metal oxide carriers has been performed successfully under mild conditions (room temperature, 0.1 MPa O2) without significant loss of catalytic activity. The effects of different reaction...... parameters are studied to find the suitable reaction conditions. All catalysts are characterised by XRD, XRF and TEM. Among these catalysts, Au/TiO2 showed the most efficient catalytic activity towards the selective oxidation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding esters. Moreover, the same Au/TiO2...... to synthesize methyl esters from allylic alcohols....

  17. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    measurements of gas-phase catalytic products. To overcome this deficiency, operando TEM techniques are being developed that combine atomic characterization with the simultaneous measurement of catalytic products. This article provides a short review of the current status and major developments......) is a powerful technique for revealing the atomic structures of materials at elevated temperatures in the presence of reactive gases. This approach can allow the structure-reactivity relations underlying catalyst functionality to be investigated. Thus far, ETEM has been limited by the absence of in situ...... in the application of ETEM to gas-phase catalysis over the past 10 years....

  18. Hydrophilic Pt nanoflowers: synthesis, crystallographic analysis and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Altantzis, Thomas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Bals, Sara; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge

    2016-05-21

    Water-soluble Pt nanoflowers (NFs) were prepared by diethylene glycol-mediated reduction of Pt acetylacetonate (Pt(acac) 2 ) in the presence of polyethylenimine. Advanced electron microscopy analysis showed that the NFs consist of multiple branches with a truncated cubic morphology and different crystallographic orientations. We demonstrate that the nature of the solvent strongly influences the resulting morphology. The catalytic performance of the Pt NFs in 4-nitrophenol reduction was found to be superior to that of other nanoparticle-based catalysts. Additionally, the Pt NFs display good catalytic reusability with no loss of activity after five consecutive cycles.

  19. Bifurcations in the interplay of messenger RNA, protein and nonprotein coding RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P

    2008-01-01

    The interplay of messenger RNA (mRNA), protein, produced via translation of this RNA, and nonprotein coding RNA (ncRNA) may include regulation of the ncRNA production by protein and (i) ncRNA-protein association resulting in suppression of the protein regulatory activity or (ii) ncRNA-mRNA association resulting in degradation of the miRNA-mRNA complex. The kinetic models describing these two scenarios are found to predict bistability provided that protein suppresses the ncRNA formation

  20. 34A, miRNA-944, miRNA-101 and miRNA-218 in cervical cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RNAs (21 - 24 nucleotides in length) that are critical for many important processes such as development, ... RNA extraction and reverse transcription. Total RNA was extracted from each of the experimental groups using ... used as an endogenous control to normalize the expression of miRNA-143, miRNA-34A, miRNA-.

  1. The modeled structure of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase of GBV-C Virus suggests a role for motif E in Flaviviridae RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutartre Hélène

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Flaviviridae virus family includes major human and animal pathogens. The RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp plays a central role in the replication process, and thus is a validated target for antiviral drugs. Despite the increasing structural and enzymatic characterization of viral RdRps, detailed molecular replication mechanisms remain unclear. The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major human pathogen difficult to study in cultured cells. The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is often used as a surrogate model to screen antiviral drugs against HCV. The structure of BVDV RdRp has been recently published. It presents several differences relative to HCV RdRp. These differences raise questions about the relevance of BVDV as a surrogate model, and cast novel interest on the "GB" virus C (GBV-C. Indeed, GBV-C is genetically closer to HCV than BVDV, and can lead to productive infection of cultured cells. There is no structural data for the GBV-C RdRp yet. Results We show in this study that the GBV-C RdRp is closest to the HCV RdRp. We report a 3D model of the GBV-C RdRp, developed using sequence-to-structure threading and comparative modeling based on the atomic coordinates of the HCV RdRp structure. Analysis of the predicted structural features in the phylogenetic context of the RNA polymerase family allows rationalizing most of the experimental data available. Both available structures and our model are explored to examine the catalytic cleft, allosteric and substrate binding sites. Conclusion Computational methods were used to infer evolutionary relationships and to predict the structure of a viral RNA polymerase. Docking a GTP molecule into the structure allows defining a GTP binding pocket in the GBV-C RdRp, such as that of BVDV. The resulting model suggests a new proposition for the mechanism of RNA synthesis, and may prove useful to design new experiments to implement our knowledge on the initiation mechanism of RNA

  2. Triose phosphate isomerase deficiency is caused by altered dimerization--not catalytic inactivity--of the mutant enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ralser

    Full Text Available Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by various mutations in the gene encoding the key glycolytic enzyme TPI. A drastic decrease in TPI activity and an increased level of its substrate, dihydroxyacetone phosphate, have been measured in unpurified cell extracts of affected individuals. These observations allowed concluding that the different mutations in the TPI alleles result in catalytically inactive enzymes. However, despite a high occurrence of TPI null alleles within several human populations, the frequency of this disorder is exceptionally rare. In order to address this apparent discrepancy, we generated a yeast model allowing us to perform comparative in vivo analyses of the enzymatic and functional properties of the different enzyme variants. We discovered that the majority of these variants exhibit no reduced catalytic activity per se. Instead, we observed, the dimerization behavior of TPI is influenced by the particular mutations investigated, and by the use of a potential alternative translation initiation site in the TPI gene. Additionally, we demonstrated that the overexpression of the most frequent TPI variant, Glu104Asp, which displays altered dimerization features, results in diminished endogenous TPI levels in mammalian cells. Thus, our results reveal that enzyme deregulation attributable to aberrant dimerization of TPI, rather than direct catalytic inactivation of the enzyme, underlies the pathogenesis of TPI deficiency. Finally, we discovered that yeast cells expressing a TPI variant exhibiting reduced catalytic activity are more resistant against oxidative stress caused by the thiol-oxidizing reagent diamide. This observed advantage might serve to explain the high allelic frequency of TPI null alleles detected among human populations.

  3. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Katahira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex.

  4. RNA viruses in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andrew S; Rise, Matthew L; Culley, Alexander I; Steward, Grieg F

    2009-03-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous in the sea and appear to outnumber all other forms of marine life by at least an order of magnitude. Through selective infection, viruses influence nutrient cycling, community structure, and evolution in the ocean. Over the past 20 years we have learned a great deal about the diversity and ecology of the viruses that constitute the marine virioplankton, but until recently the emphasis has been on DNA viruses. Along with expanding knowledge about RNA viruses that infect important marine animals, recent isolations of RNA viruses that infect single-celled eukaryotes and molecular analyses of the RNA virioplankton have revealed that marine RNA viruses are novel, widespread, and genetically diverse. Discoveries in marine RNA virology are broadening our understanding of the biology, ecology, and evolution of viruses, and the epidemiology of viral diseases, but there is still much that we need to learn about the ecology and diversity of RNA viruses before we can fully appreciate their contributions to the dynamics of marine ecosystems. As a step toward making sense of how RNA viruses contribute to the extraordinary viral diversity in the sea, we summarize in this review what is currently known about RNA viruses that infect marine organisms.

  5. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  6. High-throughput sequencing of human plasma RNA by using thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yidan; Yao, Jun; Wu, Douglas C.; Nottingham, Ryan M.; Mohr, Sabine; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionized transcriptome profiling, gene expression analysis, and RNA-based diagnostics. Here, we developed a new RNA-seq method that exploits thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptases (TGIRTs) and used it to profile human plasma RNAs. TGIRTs have higher thermostability, processivity, and fidelity than conventional reverse transcriptases, plus a novel template-switching activity that can efficiently attach RNA-seq adapters to target RNA sequences without RNA ligation. The new TGIRT-seq method enabled construction of RNA-seq libraries from RNA in RNA in 1-mL plasma samples from a healthy individual revealed RNA fragments mapping to a diverse population of protein-coding gene and long ncRNAs, which are enriched in intron and antisense sequences, as well as nearly all known classes of small ncRNAs, some of which have never before been seen in plasma. Surprisingly, many of the small ncRNA species were present as full-length transcripts, suggesting that they are protected from plasma RNases in ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or exosomes. This TGIRT-seq method is readily adaptable for profiling of whole-cell, exosomal, and miRNAs, and for related procedures, such as HITS-CLIP and ribosome profiling. PMID:26554030

  7. Transfecting Human Monocytes with RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannull, Jens; Nair, Smita K

    2016-01-01

    Targeting monocytes as a delivery system for drugs or nucleic acids, and thereby harnessing their natural tissue-infiltrating capacity, has become an area of intense investigation in both basic and clinical research. Herein we describe an efficient method to deliver mRNA (messenger RNA) or siRNA (small interfering RNA) into human monocytes by electroporation. This method can be applied in the laboratory to monocytes isolated via magnetic bead-based techniques, or in a clinical setting using monocytes that were collected via counterflow centrifugation elutriation using the Elutra(®) Cell Separation System. We further demonstrate that electroporation of monocytes with RNA represents a robust and highly relevant approach to modify monocytes for cell-based therapies. Last, the procedure described can readily be adapted to monocytes from different species, hence facilitating research in animal models.

  8. Fast prediction of RNA-RNA interaction using heuristic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaseri, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Interaction between two RNA molecules plays a crucial role in many medical and biological processes such as gene expression regulation. In this process, an RNA molecule prohibits the translation of another RNA molecule by establishing stable interactions with it. Some algorithms have been formed to predict the structure of the RNA-RNA interaction. High computational time is a common challenge in most of the presented algorithms. In this context, a heuristic method is introduced to accurately predict the interaction between two RNAs based on minimum free energy (MFE). This algorithm uses a few dot matrices for finding the secondary structure of each RNA and binding sites between two RNAs. Furthermore, a parallel version of this method is presented. We describe the algorithm's concurrency and parallelism for a multicore chip. The proposed algorithm has been performed on some datasets including CopA-CopT, R1inv-R2inv, Tar-Tar*, DIS-DIS, and IncRNA54-RepZ in Escherichia coli bacteria. The method has high validity and efficiency, and it is run in low computational time in comparison to other approaches.

  9. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  10. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  11. Viral replication. Structural basis for RNA replication by the hepatitis C virus polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Todd C; Perry, Jason K; Murakami, Eisuke; Barauskas, Ona; Feng, Joy; Cho, Aesop; Fox, David; Wetmore, Diana R; McGrath, Mary E; Ray, Adrian S; Sofia, Michael J; Swaminathan, S; Edwards, Thomas E

    2015-02-13

    Nucleotide analog inhibitors have shown clinical success in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, despite an incomplete mechanistic understanding of NS5B, the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Here we study the details of HCV RNA replication by determining crystal structures of stalled polymerase ternary complexes with enzymes, RNA templates, RNA primers, incoming nucleotides, and catalytic metal ions during both primed initiation and elongation of RNA synthesis. Our analysis revealed that highly conserved active-site residues in NS5B position the primer for in-line attack on the incoming nucleotide. A β loop and a C-terminal membrane-anchoring linker occlude the active-site cavity in the apo state, retract in the primed initiation assembly to enforce replication of the HCV genome from the 3' terminus, and vacate the active-site cavity during elongation. We investigated the incorporation of nucleotide analog inhibitors, including the clinically active metabolite formed by sofosbuvir, to elucidate key molecular interactions in the active site. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. tRNA acceptor-stem and anticodon bases embed separate features of amino acid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2016-01-01

    abstract The universal genetic code is a translation table by which nucleic acid sequences can be interpreted as polypeptides with a wide range of biological functions. That information is used by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to translate the code. Moreover, amino acid properties dictate protein folding. We recently reported that digital correlation techniques could identify patterns in tRNA identity elements that govern recognition by synthetases. Our analysis, and the functionality of truncated synthetases that cannot recognize the tRNA anticodon, support the conclusion that the tRNA acceptor stem houses an independent code for the same 20 amino acids that likely functioned earlier in the emergence of genetics. The acceptor-stem code, related to amino acid size, is distinct from a code in the anticodon that is related to amino acid polarity. Details of the acceptor-stem code suggest that it was useful in preserving key properties of stereochemically-encoded peptides that had developed the capacity to interact catalytically with RNA. The quantitative embedding of the chemical properties of amino acids into tRNA bases has implications for the origins of molecular biology. PMID:26595350

  13. CYP3A5 mRNA degradation by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busi, Florent; Cresteil, Thierry

    2005-09-01

    The total CYP3A5 mRNA level is significantly greater in carriers of the CYP3A5*1 allele than in CYP3A5*3 homozygotes. Most of the CYP3A5*3 mRNA includes an intronic sequence (exon 3B) containing premature termination codons (PTCs) between exons 3 and 4. Two models were used to investigate the degradation of CYP3A5 mRNA: a CYP3A5 minigene consisting of CYP3A5 exons and introns 3 to 6 transfected into MCF7 cells, and the endogenous CYP3A5 gene expressed in HepG2 cells. The 3'-untranslated region g.31611C>T mutation has no effect on CYP3A5 mRNA decay. Splice variants containing exon 3B were more unstable than wild-type (wt) CYP3A5 mRNA. Cycloheximide prevents the recognition of PTCs by ribosomes: in transfected MCF7 and HepG2 cells, cycloheximide slowed down the degradation of exon 3B-containing splice variants, suggesting the participation of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). When PTCs were removed from pseudoexon 3B or when UPF1 small interfering RNA was used to impair the NMD mechanism, the decay of the splice variant was reduced, confirming the involvement of NMD in the degradation of CYP3A5 splice variants. Induction could represent a source of variability for CYP3A5 expression and could modify the proportion of splice variants. The extent of CYP3A5 induction was investigated after exposure to barbiturates or steroids: CYP3A4 was markedly induced in a pediatric population compared with untreated neonates. However, no effect could be detected in either the total CYP3A5 RNA, the proportion of splice variant RNA, or the protein level. Therefore, in these carriers, induction is unlikely to switch on the phenotypic CYP3A5 expression in carriers of CYP3A5*3/*3.

  14. The UEA Small RNA Workbench: A Suite of Computational Tools for Small RNA Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohorianu, Irina; Stocks, Matthew Benedict; Applegate, Christopher Steven; Folkes, Leighton; Moulton, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    RNA silencing (RNA interference, RNAi) is a complex, highly conserved mechanism mediated by short, typically 20-24 nt in length, noncoding RNAs known as small RNAs (sRNAs). They act as guides for the sequence-specific transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of target mRNAs and play a key role in the fine-tuning of biological processes such as growth, response to stresses, or defense mechanism.High-throughput sequencing (HTS) technologies are employed to capture the expression levels of sRNA populations. The processing of the resulting big data sets facilitated the computational analysis of the sRNA patterns of variation within biological samples such as time point experiments, tissue series or various treatments. Rapid technological advances enable larger experiments, often with biological replicates leading to a vast amount of raw data. As a result, in this fast-evolving field, the existing methods for sequence characterization and prediction of interaction (regulatory) networks periodically require adapting or in extreme cases, a complete redesign to cope with the data deluge. In addition, the presence of numerous tools focused only on particular steps of HTS analysis hinders the systematic parsing of the results and their interpretation.The UEA small RNA Workbench (v1-4), described in this chapter, provides a user-friendly, modular, interactive analysis in the form of a suite of computational tools designed to process and mine sRNA datasets for interesting characteristics that can be linked back to the observed phenotypes. First, we show how to preprocess the raw sequencing output and prepare it for downstream analysis. Then we review some quality checks that can be used as a first indication of sources of variability between samples. Next we show how the Workbench can provide a comparison of the effects of different normalization approaches on the distributions of expression, enhanced methods for the identification of differentially expressed

  15. Generation of miRNA sponge constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluiver, Joost; Slezak-Prochazka, Izabella; Smigielska-Czepiel, Katarzyna; Halsema, Nancy; Kroesen, Bart-Jan; van den Berg, Anke

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) sponges are RNA molecules with repeated miRNA antisense sequences that can sequester miRNAs from their endogenous targets and thus serve as a decoy. Stably expressed miRNA sponges are especially valuable for long-term loss-of-function studies and can be used in vitro and in vivo. We

  16. TET2 Regulates Mast Cell Differentiation and Proliferation through Catalytic and Non-catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Montagner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Dioxygenases of the TET family impact genome functions by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. Here, we identified TET2 as a crucial regulator of mast cell differentiation and proliferation. In the absence of TET2, mast cells showed disrupted gene expression and altered genome-wide 5hmC deposition, especially at enhancers and in the proximity of downregulated genes. Impaired differentiation of Tet2-ablated cells could be relieved or further exacerbated by modulating the activity of other TET family members, and mechanistically it could be linked to the dysregulated expression of C/EBP family transcription factors. Conversely, the marked increase in proliferation induced by the loss of TET2 could be rescued exclusively by re-expression of wild-type or catalytically inactive TET2. Our data indicate that, in the absence of TET2, mast cell differentiation is under the control of compensatory mechanisms mediated by other TET family members, while proliferation is strictly dependent on TET2 expression. : The impact of TET enzymes on gene expression and cell function is incompletely understood. Montagner et al. investigate the TET-mediated regulation of mast cell differentiation and function, uncover transcriptional pathways regulated by TET2, and identify both enzymatic activity-dependent and -independent functions of TET2. Keywords: differentiation, DNA hydroxymethylation, epigenetics, mast cells, proliferation, TET

  17. RNase MRP RNA and RNase P activity in plants are associated with a Pop1p containing complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehan, Mario; Heubeck, Christian; Menzel, Nicolas; Seibel, Peter; Schön, Astrid

    2012-09-01

    RNase P processes the 5'-end of tRNAs. An essential catalytic RNA has been demonstrated in Bacteria, Archaea and the nuclei of most eukaryotes; an organism-specific number of proteins complement the holoenzyme. Nuclear RNase P from yeast and humans is well understood and contains an RNA, similar to the sister enzyme RNase MRP. In contrast, no protein subunits have yet been identified in the plant enzymes, and the presence of a nucleic acid in RNase P is still enigmatic. We have thus set out to identify and characterize the subunits of these enzymes in two plant model systems. Expression of the two known Arabidopsis MRP RNA genes in vivo was verified. The first wheat MRP RNA sequences are presented, leading to improved structure models for plant MRP RNAs. A novel mRNA encoding the central RNase P/MRP protein Pop1p was identified in Arabidopsis, suggesting the expression of distinct protein variants from this gene in vivo. Pop1p-specific antibodies precipitate RNase P activity and MRP RNAs from wheat extracts. Our results provide evidence that in plants, Pop1p is associated with MRP RNAs and with the catalytic subunit of RNase P, either separately or in a single large complex.

  18. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Huch

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization.

  19. RNA Structural Dynamics As Captured by Molecular Simulations: A Comprehensive Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    With both catalytic and genetic functions, ribonucleic acid (RNA) is perhaps the most pluripotent chemical species in molecular biology, and its functions are intimately linked to its structure and dynamics. Computer simulations, and in particular atomistic molecular dynamics (MD), allow structural dynamics of biomolecular systems to be investigated with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. We here provide a comprehensive overview of the fast-developing field of MD simulations of RNA molecules. We begin with an in-depth, evaluatory coverage of the most fundamental methodological challenges that set the basis for the future development of the field, in particular, the current developments and inherent physical limitations of the atomistic force fields and the recent advances in a broad spectrum of enhanced sampling methods. We also survey the closely related field of coarse-grained modeling of RNA systems. After dealing with the methodological aspects, we provide an exhaustive overview of the available RNA simulation literature, ranging from studies of the smallest RNA oligonucleotides to investigations of the entire ribosome. Our review encompasses tetranucleotides, tetraloops, a number of small RNA motifs, A-helix RNA, kissing-loop complexes, the TAR RNA element, the decoding center and other important regions of the ribosome, as well as assorted others systems. Extended sections are devoted to RNA–ion interactions, ribozymes, riboswitches, and protein/RNA complexes. Our overview is written for as broad of an audience as possible, aiming to provide a much-needed interdisciplinary bridge between computation and experiment, together with a perspective on the future of the field. PMID:29297679

  20. Triangular Diagrams Teach Steady and Dynamic Behaviour of Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusacek, K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how triangular diagrams can aid in presenting some of the rather complex transient interactions that occur among gas and surface species during heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The basic equations and numerical examples are described. Classroom use of the triangular diagram is discussed. Several diagrams and graphs are provided. (YP)