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Sample records for catalytic redox-active cysteine

  1. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

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    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  2. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  3. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

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    Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed stable DTT-sensitive adducts with PAO with or without associated regulatory subunits. In addition, a subset of the PAO-binding vicinal thiols of PP2Ac was readily oxidized to disulfide bonds in vitro. Importantly, a small fraction of PP2Ac was still found to contain disulfide bonds after applying stringent conditions designed to prevent protein disulfide bond formation during homogenization and fractionation of the brains. These findings establish the presence of potentially regulatory and redox-active PAO-binding vicinal thiols on the catalytic subunit of PP2A and suggest that a population of PP2Ac may contain disulfide bonds in vivo. PMID:21080067

  4. An iron-oxygen intermediate formed during the catalytic cycle of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, E P; Faponle, A S; Davies, C G; Quesne, M G; Turner, R; Fellner, M; Souness, R J; Wilbanks, S M; de Visser, S P; Jameson, G N L

    2016-07-07

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a key enzyme in the breakdown of cysteine, but its mechanism remains controversial. A combination of spectroscopic and computational studies provides the first evidence of a short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle. The intermediate decays within 20 ms and has absorption maxima at 500 and 640 nm.

  5. Cysteines 208 and 241 in Ero1α are required for maximal catalytic turnover

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    Thomas Ramming

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER oxidoreductin 1α (Ero1α is a disulfide producer in the ER of mammalian cells. Besides four catalytic cysteines (Cys94, Cys99, Cys394, Cys397, Ero1α harbors four regulatory cysteines (Cys104, Cys131, Cys208, Cys241. These cysteines mediate the formation of inhibitory intramolecular disulfide bonds, which adapt the activation state of the enzyme to the redox environment in the ER through feedback signaling. Accordingly, disulfide production by Ero1α is accelerated by reducing conditions, which minimize the formation of inhibitory disulfides, or by mutations of regulatory cysteines. Here we report that reductive stimulation enhances Ero1α activity more potently than the mutation of cysteines. Specifically, mutation of Cys208/Cys241 does not mechanistically mimic reductive stimulation, as it lowers the turnover rate of Ero1α in presence of a reducing agent. The Cys208/Cys241 pair therefore fulfills a function during catalysis that reaches beyond negative regulation. In agreement, we identify a reciprocal crosstalk between the stabilities of the Cys208–Cys241 disulfide and the inhibitory disulfide bonds involving Cys104 and Cys131, which also controls the recruitment of the H2O2 scavenger GPx8 to Ero1α. Two possible mechanisms by which thiol–disulfide exchange at the Cys208/Cys241 pair stimulates the catalytic turnover under reducing conditions are discussed.

  6. Catalytic Intermediate Crystal Structures of Cysteine Desulfurase from the Archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1

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    Thien-Hoang Ho

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 is an anaerobic archaeon usually found in a deep-sea hydrothermal vent area, which can use elemental sulfur (S0 as a terminal electron acceptor for energy. Sulfur, essential to many biomolecules such as sulfur-containing amino acids and cofactors including iron-sulfur cluster, is usually mobilized from cysteine by the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate- (PLP- dependent enzyme of cysteine desulfurase (CDS. We determined the crystal structures of CDS from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 (ToCDS, which include native internal aldimine (NAT, gem-diamine (GD with alanine, internal aldimine structure with existing alanine (IAA, and internal aldimine with persulfide-bound Cys356 (PSF structures. The catalytic intermediate structures showed the dihedral angle rotation of Schiff-base linkage relative to the PLP pyridine ring. The ToCDS structures were compared with bacterial CDS structures, which will help us to understand the role and catalytic mechanism of ToCDS in the archaeon Thermococcus onnurineus NA1.

  7. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    OpenAIRE

    Foley, Timothy D.; Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed s...

  8. The masked cysteine residues in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii are essential for catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, I

    1996-09-30

    Two masked cysteine residues have been reported in methylmalonyl-CoA mutase from Propionibacterium shermanii, Cys-535 in the alpha-subunit and Cys-517 in the beta-subunit, which are revealed only after reduction of the denatured enzyme with dithiothreitol. It has been postulated that these residues are involved in disulphide linkages to unknown thiols of low M(r). These two masked cysteine residues have been changed to an alanine, individually. Both the mutants, C535alphaA and C517betaA, were inactive. This shows that both these residues are essential for catalytic activity.

  9. Exercise induced upregulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene expression in Thoroughbred horses

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    Jeong-Woong Park

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was performed to reveal the molecular structure and expression patterns of horse glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM genes whose products form glutamate cysteine ligase, which were identified as differentially expressed genes in the previous study. Methods We performed bioinformatics analyses, and gene expression assay with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for horse GCLC and GCLM genes in muscle and blood leukocytes of Thoroughbred horses Results Expression of GCLC showed the same pattern in both blood and muscle tissues after exercise. Expression of GCLC increased in the muscle and blood of Thoroughbreds, suggesting a tissue-specific regulatory mechanism for the expression of GCLC. In addition, expression of the GCLM gene increased after exercise in both the blood and muscle of Thoroughbreds. Conclusion We established the expression patterns of GCLC and GCLM in the skeletal muscle and blood of Thoroughbred horses in response to exercise. Further study is now warranted to uncover the functional importance of these genes in exercise and recovery in racehorses.

  10. Modulation of Escherichia coli serine acetyltransferase catalytic activity in the cysteine synthase complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benoni, Roberto; De Bei, O.; Paredi, G.; Hayes, C. S.; Franko, N.; Mozzarelli, A.; Bettati, S.; Campanini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 591, č. 9 (2017), s. 1212-1224 ISSN 0014-5793 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cysteine synthase * protein-protein interaction * serine acetyltransferase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.623, year: 2016

  11. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  12. An Ethnic-Specific Polymorphism in the Catalytic Subunit of Glutamate-Cysteine Ligase Impairs the Production of Glutathione Intermediates In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Truc M.; Willis, Alecia S.; Barr, Frederick E.; Cunningham, Gary R.; Canter, Jeffrey A.; Owens, Sarah E.; Apple, Rachel K.; Ayodo, George; Reich, David; Summar, Marshall L.

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays a crucial role in free radical scavenging, oxidative injury, and cellular homeostasis. Previously, we identified a non-synonymous polymorphism (P462S) in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. This polymorphism is present only in individuals of African descent. Presently, we report that this ethnic-specific polymorphism (462S) encodes an enzyme with significantly decreased in vitro ac...

  13. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    OpenAIRE

    R. D. McWhinney; S. Zhou; J. P. D. Abbatt

    2013-01-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the obse...

  14. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  15. Polymorphism in glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) is associated with sulfamethoxazole-induced hypersensitivity in HIV/AIDS patients.

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    Wang, Danxin; Curtis, Amanda; Papp, Audrey C; Koletar, Susan L; Para, Michael F

    2012-07-23

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a commonly used antibiotic for prevention of infectious diseases associated with HIV/AIDS and immune-compromised states. SMX-induced hypersensitivity is an idiosyncratic cutaneous drug reaction with genetic components. Here, we tested association of candidate genes involved in SMX bioactivation and antioxidant defense with SMX-induced hypersensitivity. Seventy seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 14 candidate genes were genotyped and assessed for association with SMX-induced hypersensitivity, in a cohort of 171 HIV/AIDS patients. SNP rs761142 T > G, in glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), was significantly associated with SMX-induced hypersensitivity, with an adjusted p value of 0.045. This result was replicated in a second cohort of 249 patients (p = 0.025). In the combined cohort, heterozygous and homozygous carriers of the minor G allele were at increased risk of developing hypersensitivity (GT vs TT, odds ratio = 2.2, 95% CL 1.4-3.7, p = 0.0014; GG vs TT, odds ratio = 3.3, 95% CL 1.6 - 6.8, p = 0.0010). Each minor allele copy increased risk of developing hypersensitivity 1.9 fold (95% CL 1.4 - 2.6, p = 0.00012). Moreover, in 91 human livers and 84 B-lymphocytes samples, SNP rs761142 homozygous G allele carriers expressed significantly less GCLC mRNA than homozygous TT carriers (p hypersensitivity in HIV/AIDS patients. Catalyzing a critical step in glutathione biosynthesis, GCLC may play a broad role in idiosyncratic drug reactions.

  16. Solution NMR structure of the NlpC/P60 domain of lipoprotein Spr from Escherichia coli: structural evidence for a novel cysteine peptidase catalytic triad.

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    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Mei; Maglaqui, Melissa; Xiao, Rong; Locke, Jessica; Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-09-16

    Escherichia coli Spr is a membrane-anchored cell wall hydrolase. The solution NMR structure of the C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain of E. coli Spr described here reveals that the protein adopts a papain-like alpha+beta fold and identifies a substrate-binding cleft featuring several highly conserved residues. The active site features a novel Cys-His-His catalytic triad that appears to be a unique structural signature of this cysteine peptidase family. Moreover, the relative orientation of these catalytic residues is similar to that observed in the analogous Ser-His-His triad, a variant of the classic Ser-His-Asp charge relay system, suggesting the convergent evolution of a catalytic mechanism in quite distinct peptidase families.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of redox-active ferric nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, A. G.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Dunphy, D. R.; Artyushkova, K.; Cerrato, J. M.; Kruichak, J. N.; Janish, M. T.; Sun, C. J.; Argo, J. M.; Washington, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous redox reactions on clay mineral surfaces control mobility and bioavailability of redox-sensitive nutrients and contaminants. Iron (Fe) residing in clay mineral structures can either catalyze or directly participate in redox reactions; however, chemical controls over its reactivity are not fully understood. In our previous work we demonstrated that converting a minor portion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) (partial reduction) in the octahedral sheet of natural Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite (NAu-1) activates its surface, making it redox-active. In this study we produced and characterized synthetic ferric nontronite (SIP), highlighting structural and chemical similarities and differences between this synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart NAu-1, and probed whether mineral surface is redox-active by reacting it with arsenic As(III) under oxic and anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that synthetic nontronite SIP undergoes the same activation as natural nontronite NAu-1 following the partial reduction treatment. Similar to NAu-1, SIP oxidized As(III) to As(V) under both oxic (catalytic pathway) and anoxic (direct oxidation) conditions. The similar reactivity trends observed for synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart make SIP an appropriate analog for laboratory studies. The development of chemically pure analogs for ubiquitous soil minerals will allow for systematic research of the fundamental properties of these minerals.

  18. DNA repair enzyme APE1 from evolutionarily ancient Hydra reveals redox activity exclusively found in mammalian APE1.

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    Pekhale, Komal; Haval, Gauri; Perween, Nusrat; Antoniali, Giulia; Tell, Gianluca; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Ghaskadbi, Saroj

    2017-11-01

    Only mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) has been reported to possess both DNA repair and redox activities. C terminal of the protein is required for base excision repair, while the redox activity resides in the N terminal due to cysteine residues at specific positions. APE1s from other organisms studied so far lack the redox activity in spite of having the N terminal domain. We find that APE1 from the Cnidarian Hydra exhibits both endonuclease and redox activities similar to mammalian APE1. We further show the presence of the three indispensable cysteines in Hydra APE1 for redox activity by site directed mutagenesis. Importance of redox domain but not the repair domain of APE1 in regeneration has been demonstrated by using domain-specific inhibitors. Our findings clearly demonstrate that the redox function of APE1 evolved very early in metazoan evolution and is not a recent acquisition in mammalian APE1 as believed so far. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-01-01

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1- 14 C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14 C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  20. Site saturation mutagenesis demonstrates a central role for cysteine 298 as proton donor to the catalytic site in CaHydA [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

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    Simone Morra

    Full Text Available [FeFe]-hydrogenases reversibly catalyse molecular hydrogen evolution by reduction of two protons. Proton supply to the catalytic site (H-cluster is essential for enzymatic activity. Cysteine 298 is a highly conserved residue in all [FeFe]-hydrogenases; moreover C298 is structurally very close to the H-cluster and it is important for hydrogenase activity. Here, the function of C298 in catalysis was investigated in detail by means of site saturation mutagenesis, simultaneously studying the effect of C298 replacement with all other 19 amino acids and selecting for mutants with high retained activity. We demonstrated that efficient enzymatic turnover was maintained only when C298 was replaced by aspartic acid, despite the structural diversity between the two residues. Purified CaHydA C298D does not show any significant structural difference in terms of secondary structure and iron incorporation, demonstrating that the mutation does not affect the overall protein fold. C298D retains the hydrogen evolution activity with a decrease of k(cat only by 2-fold at pH 8.0 and it caused a shift of the optimum pH from 8.0 to 7.0. Moreover, the oxygen inactivation rate was not affected demonstrating that the mutation does not influence O(2 diffusion to the active site or its reactivity with the H-cluster. Our results clearly demonstrate that, in order to maintain the catalytic efficiency and the high turnover number typical of [FeFe] hydrogenases, the highly conserved C298 can be replaced only by another ionisable residue with similar steric hindrance, giving evidence of its involvement in the catalytic function of [FeFe]-hydrogenases in agreement with an essential role in proton transfer to the active site.

  1. An ethnic-specific polymorphism in the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase impairs the production of glutathione intermediates in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Truc M; Willis, Alecia S; Barr, Frederick E; Cunningham, Gary R; Canter, Jeffrey A; Owens, Sarah E; Apple, Rachel K; Ayodo, George; Reich, David; Summar, Marshall L

    2010-09-01

    Glutathione plays a crucial role in free radical scavenging, oxidative injury, and cellular homeostasis. Previously, we identified a non-synonymous polymorphism (P462S) in the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. This polymorphism is present only in individuals of African descent. Presently, we report that this ethnic-specific polymorphism (462S) encodes an enzyme with significantly decreased in vitro activity when expressed by either a bacterial or mammalian cell expression system. In addition, overexpression of the 462P wild-type GCLC enzyme results in higher intracellular glutathione concentrations than overexpression of the 462S isoform. We also demonstrate that apoptotically stimulated mammalian cells overexpressing the 462S enzyme have increased caspase activation and increased DNA laddering compared to cells overexpressing the wild-type 462P enzyme. Finally, we genotyped several African and African-descent populations and demonstrate that the 462S polymorphism is in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium, with no individuals homozygous for the 462S polymorphism identified. These findings describe a glutathione production pathway polymorphism present in individuals of African descent with significantly decreased in vitro activity.

  2. Catalytic

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    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  3. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  4. Iron metallodrugs: stability, redox activity and toxicity against Artemia salina.

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    Hector Aguilar Vitorino

    Full Text Available Iron metallodrugs comprise mineral supplements, anti-hypertensive agents and, more recently, magnetic nanomaterials, with both therapeutic and diagnostic roles. As biologically-active metal compounds, concern has been raised regarding the impact of these compounds when emitted to the environment and associated ecotoxicological effects for the fauna. In this work we assessed the relative stability of several iron compounds (supplements based on glucoheptonate, dextran or glycinate, as well as 3,5,5-trimethylhexanoyl (TMH derivatives of ferrocene against high affinity models of biological binding, calcein and aprotransferrin, via a fluorimetric method. Also, the redox-activity of each compound was determined in a physiologically relevant medium. Toxicity toward Artemia salina at different developmental stages was measured, as well as the amount of lipid peroxidation. Our results show that polymer-coated iron metallodrugs are stable, non-redox-active and non-toxic at the concentrations studied (up to 300 µM. However, TMH derivatives of ferrocene were less stable and more redox-active than the parent compound, and TMH-ferrocene displayed toxicity and lipid peroxidation to A. salina, unlike the other compounds. Our results indicate that iron metallodrugs based on polymer coating do not present direct toxicity at low levels of emission; however other iron species (eg. metallocenes, may be deleterious for aquatic organisms. We suggest that ecotoxicity depends more on metal speciation than on the total amount of metal present in the metallodrugs. Future studies with discarded metallodrugs should consider the chemical speciation of the metal present in the composition of the drug.

  5. Identifying Functional Cysteine Residues in the Mitochondria.

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    Bak, Daniel W; Pizzagalli, Mattia D; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2017-04-21

    The mitochondria are dynamic organelles that regulate oxidative metabolism and mediate cellular redox homeostasis. Proteins within the mitochondria are exposed to large fluxes in the surrounding redox environment. In particular, cysteine residues within mitochondrial proteins sense and respond to these redox changes through oxidative modifications of the cysteine thiol group. These oxidative modifications result in a loss in cysteine reactivity, which can be monitored using cysteine-reactive chemical probes and quantitative mass spectrometry (MS). Analysis of cell lysates treated with cysteine-reactive probes enable the identification of hundreds of cysteine residues, however, the mitochondrial proteome is poorly represented (proteins and suppression of mitochondrial peptide MS signals by highly abundant cytosolic peptides. Here, we apply a mitochondrial isolation and purification protocol to substantially increase coverage of the mitochondrial cysteine proteome. Over 1500 cysteine residues from ∼450 mitochondrial proteins were identified, thereby enabling interrogation of an unprecedented number of mitochondrial cysteines. Specifically, these mitochondrial cysteines were ranked by reactivity to identify hyper-reactive cysteines with potential catalytic and regulatory functional roles. Furthermore, analyses of mitochondria exposed to nitrosative stress revealed previously uncharacterized sites of protein S-nitrosation on mitochondrial proteins. Together, the mitochondrial cysteine enrichment strategy presented herein enables detailed characterization of protein modifications that occur within the mitochondria during (patho)physiological fluxes in the redox environment.

  6. Cysteine residues 244 and 458-459 within the catalytic subunit of Na,K-ATPase control the enzyme's hydrolytic and signaling function under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushanko, Irina Yu; Mitkevich, Vladimir A; Lakunina, Valentina A; Anashkina, Anastasia A; Spirin, Pavel V; Rubtsov, Peter M; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Bogdanov, Nikolay B; Hänggi, Pascal; Fuller, William; Makarov, Alexander A; Bogdanova, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Our previous findings suggested that reversible thiol modifications of cysteine residues within the actuator (AD) and nucleotide binding domain (NBD) of the Na,K-ATPase may represent a powerful regulatory mechanism conveying redox- and oxygen-sensitivity of this multifunctional enzyme. S-glutathionylation of Cys244 in the AD and Cys 454-458-459 in the NBD inhibited the enzyme and protected cysteines' thiol groups from irreversible oxidation under hypoxic conditions. In this study mutagenesis approach was used to assess the role these cysteines play in regulation of the Na,K-ATPase hydrolytic and signaling functions. Several constructs of mouse α1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase were produced in which Cys244, Cys 454-458-459 or Cys 244-454-458-459 were replaced by alanine. These constructs were expressed in human HEK293 cells. Non-transfected cells and those expressing murine α1 subunit were exposed to hypoxia or treated with oxidized glutathione (GSSG). Both conditions induced inhibition of the wild type Na,K-ATPase. Enzymes containing mutated mouse α1 lacking Cys244 or all four cysteines (Cys 244-454-458-459) were insensitive to hypoxia. Inhibitory effect of GSSG was observed for wild type murine Na,K-ATPase, but was less pronounced in Cys454-458-459Ala mutant and completely absent in the Cys244Ala and Cys 244-454-458-459Ala mutants. In cells, expressing wild type enzyme, ouabain induced activation of Src and Erk kinases under normoxic conditions, whereas under hypoxic conditions this effect was inversed. Cys454-458-459Ala substitution abolished Src kinase activation in response to ouabain treatment, uncoupled Src from Erk signaling, and interfered with O 2 -sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase signaling function. Moreover, modeling predicted that S-glutathionylation of Cys 458 and 459 should prevent inhibitory binding of Src to NBD. Our data indicate for the first time that cysteine residues within the AD and NBD influence hydrolytic as well as receptor function of the Na

  7. Cysteine residues 244 and 458–459 within the catalytic subunit of Na,K-ATPase control the enzyme's hydrolytic and signaling function under hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yu. Petrushanko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings suggested that reversible thiol modifications of cysteine residues within the actuator (AD and nucleotide binding domain (NBD of the Na,K-ATPase may represent a powerful regulatory mechanism conveying redox- and oxygen-sensitivity of this multifunctional enzyme. S-glutathionylation of Cys244 in the AD and Cys 454-458-459 in the NBD inhibited the enzyme and protected cysteines’ thiol groups from irreversible oxidation under hypoxic conditions. In this study mutagenesis approach was used to assess the role these cysteines play in regulation of the Na,K-ATPase hydrolytic and signaling functions. Several constructs of mouse α1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase were produced in which Cys244, Cys 454-458-459 or Cys 244-454-458-459 were replaced by alanine. These constructs were expressed in human HEK293 cells. Non-transfected cells and those expressing murine α1 subunit were exposed to hypoxia or treated with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Both conditions induced inhibition of the wild type Na,K-ATPase. Enzymes containing mutated mouse α1 lacking Cys244 or all four cysteines (Cys 244-454-458-459 were insensitive to hypoxia. Inhibitory effect of GSSG was observed for wild type murine Na,K-ATPase, but was less pronounced in Cys454-458-459Ala mutant and completely absent in the Cys244Ala and Cys 244-454-458-459Ala mutants. In cells, expressing wild type enzyme, ouabain induced activation of Src and Erk kinases under normoxic conditions, whereas under hypoxic conditions this effect was inversed. Cys454-458-459Ala substitution abolished Src kinase activation in response to ouabain treatment, uncoupled Src from Erk signaling, and interfered with O2-sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase signaling function. Moreover, modeling predicted that S-glutathionylation of Cys 458 and 459 should prevent inhibitory binding of Src to NBD. Our data indicate for the first time that cysteine residues within the AD and NBD influence hydrolytic as well as receptor

  8. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-10-10

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  10. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  11. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes.

  12. Redox Active Polymers as Soluble Nanomaterials for Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Mark; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-11-15

    It is an exciting time for exploring the synergism between the chemical and dimensional properties of redox nanomaterials for addressing the manifold performance demands faced by energy storage technologies. The call for widespread adoption of alternative energy sources requires the combination of emerging chemical concepts with redesigned battery formats. Our groups are interested in the development and implementation of a new strategy for nonaqueous flow batteries (NRFBs) for grid energy storage. Our motivation is to solve major challenges in NRFBs, such as the lack of membranes that simultaneously allow fast ion transport while minimizing redox active species crossover between anolyte (negative electrolyte) and catholyte (positive electrolyte) compartments. This pervasive crossover leads to deleterious capacity fade and materials underutilization. In this Account, we highlight redox active polymers (RAPs) and related polymer colloids as soluble nanoscopic energy storing units that enable the simple but powerful size-exclusion concept for NRFBs. Crossover of the redox component is suppressed by matching high molecular weight RAPs with simple and inexpensive nanoporous commercial separators. In contrast to the vast literature on the redox chemistry of electrode-confined polymer films, studies on the electrochemistry of solubilized RAPs are incipient. This is due in part to challenges in finding suitable solvents that enable systematic studies on high polymers. Here, viologen-, ferrocene- and nitrostyrene-based polymers in various formats exhibit properties that make amenable their electrochemical exploration as solution-phase redox couples. A main finding is that RAP solutions store energy efficiently and reversibly while offering chemical modularity and size versatility. Beyond the practicality toward their use in NRFBs, the fundamental electrochemistry exhibited by RAPs is fascinating, showing clear distinctions in behavior from that of small molecules. Whereas

  13. Development of a UiO-Type Thin Film Electrocatalysis Platform with Redox-Active Linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ben A; Bhunia, Asamanjoy; Fei, Honghan; Cohen, Seth M; Ott, Sascha

    2018-02-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as electrocatalysis scaffolds are appealing due to the large concentration of catalytic units that can be assembled in three dimensions. To harness the full potential of these materials, charge transport to the redox catalysts within the MOF has to be ensured. Herein, we report the first electroactive MOF with the UiO/PIZOF topology (Zr(dcphOH-NDI)), i.e., one of the most widely used MOFs for catalyst incorporation, by using redox-active naphthalene diimide-based linkers (dcphOH-NDI). Hydroxyl groups were included on the dcphOH-NDI linker to facilitate proton transport through the material. Potentiometric titrations of Zr(dcphOH-NDI) show the proton-responsive behavior via the -OH groups on the linkers and the bridging Zr-μ 3 -OH of the secondary building units with pK a values of 6.10 and 3.45, respectively. When grown directly onto transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO), 1 μm thin films of Zr(dcphOH-NDI)@FTO could be achieved. Zr(dcphOH-NDI)@FTO displays reversible electrochromic behavior as a result of the sequential one-electron reductions of the redox-active NDI linkers. Importantly, 97% of the NDI sites are electrochemically active at applied potentials. Charge propagation through the thin film proceeds through a linker-to-linker hopping mechanism that is charge-balanced by electrolyte transport, giving rise to cyclic voltammograms of the thin films that show characteristics of a diffusion-controlled process. The equivalent diffusion coefficient, D e , that contains contributions from both phenomena was measured directly by UV/vis spectroelectrochemistry. Using KPF 6 as electrolyte, D e was determined to be D e (KPF 6 ) = (5.4 ± 1.1) × 10 -11 cm 2 s -1 , while an increase in countercation size to n-Bu 4 N + led to a significant decrease of D e by about 1 order of magnitude (D e (n-Bu 4 NPF 6 ) = (4.0 ± 2.5) × 10 -12 cm 2 s -1 ).

  14. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  15. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  16. Biogeochemical constraints on uranium cycling in redox active floodplain sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, V.; Boye, K.; Bargar, J.; Maher, K.; Bone, S. E.; Cardarelli, E.; Dam, W. L.; Johnson, R. H.

    2016-12-01

    important, highly dynamic, redox-active systems that can actively uptake and release uranium seasonally. [1] Hazen T et al. (2011) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, p 58[2] V. Noël et al. (2015) Goldschmidt Conference, August 2015, Poster

  17. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhu; Qiliang Li

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent...

  18. Quantitative reactivity profiling predicts functional cysteines in proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerapana, Eranthie; Wang, Chu; Simon, Gabriel M; Richter, Florian; Khare, Sagar; Dillon, Myles B D; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Mowen, Kerri; Baker, David; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-09

    Cysteine is the most intrinsically nucleophilic amino acid in proteins, where its reactivity is tuned to perform diverse biochemical functions. The absence of a consensus sequence that defines functional cysteines in proteins has hindered their discovery and characterization. Here we describe a proteomics method to profile quantitatively the intrinsic reactivity of cysteine residues en masse directly in native biological systems. Hyper-reactivity was a rare feature among cysteines and it was found to specify a wide range of activities, including nucleophilic and reductive catalysis and sites of oxidative modification. Hyper-reactive cysteines were identified in several proteins of uncharacterized function, including a residue conserved across eukaryotic phylogeny that we show is required for yeast viability and is involved in iron-sulphur protein biogenesis. We also demonstrate that quantitative reactivity profiling can form the basis for screening and functional assignment of cysteines in computationally designed proteins, where it discriminated catalytically active from inactive cysteine hydrolase designs.

  19. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  20. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Identifying proteins that can form tyrosine-cysteine crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinie, Ryan J; Godakumbura, Pahan I; Porter, Elizabeth G; Divakaran, Anand; Burkhart, Brandon J; Wertz, John T; Benson, David E

    2012-10-01

    Protein cofactors represent a unique class of redox active posttranslational protein modifications formed in or by metalloproteins. Once formed, protein cofactors provide a one-electron oxidant, which is tethered to the protein backbone. Twenty-five proteins are known to contain protein cofactors, but this number is likely limited by the use of crystallography as the identification technique. In order to address this limitation, a search of all reported protein structures for chemical environments conducive to forming a protein cofactor through tyrosine and cysteine side chain crosslinking yielded three hundred candidate proteins. Using hydrogen bonding and metal center proximity, the three hundred proteins were narrowed to four highly viable candidates. An orphan metalloprotein (BF4112) was examined to validate this methodology, which identifies proteins capable of crosslinking tyrosine and cysteine sidechains. A tyrosine-cysteine crosslink was formed in BF4112 using copper-dioxygen chemistry, as in galactose oxidase. Liquid chromatography-MALDI mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy confirmed tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation in BF4112. This finding demonstrates the efficacy of these predictive methods and the minimal constraints, provided by the BF4112 protein structure, in tyrosine-cysteine crosslink formation. This search method, when coupled with physiological evidence for crosslink formation and function as a cofactor, could identify additional protein-derived cofactors.

  2. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.455, year: 2015

  3. Totally Organic Redox-Active pH-Sensitive Nanoparticles Stabilized by Amphiphilic Aromatic Polyketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Hermosilla, Esteban; Catalán-Toledo, José; Muñoz-Suescun, Fabian; Oyarzun-Ampuero, Felipe; Raffa, Patrizio; Polgar, Lorenzo Massimo; Picchioni, Francesco; Moreno-Villoslada, Ignacio

    2018-01-01

    Amphiphilic aromatic polymers have been synthesized by grafting aliphatic polyketones with 4-(aminomethyl)benzoic acid at different molar ratios via the Paal-Knorr reaction. The resulting polymers, showing diketone conversion degree of 16, 37, 53, and 69 %, have been complexed with the redox-active

  4. Crystal structures of the reduced, sulfenic acid, and mixed disulfide forms of SarZ, a redox active global regulator in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Catherine B; Chen, Peng R; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A; He, Chuan

    2009-08-28

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys(13), to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys(13) sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys(13) sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  5. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  6. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent endurance and multi-bit storage, outperforming the conventional floating-gate flash memory. Such high performance molecular memory will lead to promising on-chip memory and future portable/wearable electronics applications.

  7. Microporous carbon nanosheets with redox-active heteroatoms for pseudocapacitive charge storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Y. S.; Kim, D.-H.; Hong, S. J.; Park, M. H.; Park, Y. W.; Kim, B. H.; Jin, H.-J.; Kang, K.

    2015-09-01

    We report microporous carbon nanosheets containing numerous redox active heteroatoms fabricated from exfoliated waste coffee grounds by simple heating with KOH for pseudocapacitive charge storage. We found that various heteroatom combinations in carbonaceous materials can be a redox host for lithium ion storage. The bio-inspired nanomaterials had unique characteristics, showing superior electrochemical performances as cathode for asymmetric pseudocapacitors.We report microporous carbon nanosheets containing numerous redox active heteroatoms fabricated from exfoliated waste coffee grounds by simple heating with KOH for pseudocapacitive charge storage. We found that various heteroatom combinations in carbonaceous materials can be a redox host for lithium ion storage. The bio-inspired nanomaterials had unique characteristics, showing superior electrochemical performances as cathode for asymmetric pseudocapacitors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04231c

  8. Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Bente L; Carlsen, Monica H; Phillips, Katherine M; Bøhn, Siv K; Holte, Kari; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2006-07-01

    Supplements containing ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, or beta-carotene do not protect against oxidative stress-related diseases in most randomized intervention trials. We suggest that other redox-active phytochemicals may be more effective and that a combination of different redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants or reductants) may be needed for proper protection against oxidative damage. We aimed to generate a ranked food table with values for total content of redox-active compounds to test this alternative antioxidant hypothesis. An assay that measures the total concentration of redox-active compounds above a certain cutoff reduction potential was used to analyze 1113 food samples obtained from the US Department of Agriculture National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. Large variations in the content of antioxidants were observed in different foods and food categories. The food groups spices and herbs, nuts and seeds, berries, and fruit and vegetables all contained foods with very high antioxidant contents. Most food categories also contained products almost devoid of antioxidants. Of the 50 food products highest in antioxidant concentrations, 13 were spices, 8 were in the fruit and vegetables category, 5 were berries, 5 were chocolate-based, 5 were breakfast cereals, and 4 were nuts or seeds. On the basis of typical serving sizes, blackberries, walnuts, strawberries, artichokes, cranberries, brewed coffee, raspberries, pecans, blueberries, ground cloves, grape juice, and unsweetened baking chocolate were at the top of the ranked list. This ranked antioxidant food table provides a useful tool for investigations into the possible health benefit of dietary antioxidants.

  9. Redox Activation as Strategy for the Development of New Drugs Applied to the Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Vinícius P. de Mello; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Mauricio Lanznaster; Universidade Federal Fluminense

    2015-01-01

    Redox activation has been exploited in the development of drugs for treatment of several diseases, including cancer. Some cancers generate solid tumors that have a poor vascularization, which leads to the generation of hypoxic environments, which in turn, limit the effectiveness of both radio and chemotherapies. These regions have a higher reducing capability when compared to normoxic tissues. Thus, substances capable of circulating intact through the body can be reduced and activated selecti...

  10. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion.

  11. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A; Natoli, S N; Ren, T

    2016-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al 2 O 3 /molecule/SiO 2 /Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. (paper)

  12. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Natoli, S N; Ren, T; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A

    2016-03-09

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a 'click' reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The 'click' reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  13. Electro-kinetic Separation of Rare Earth Elements Using a Redox-Active Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Huayi; Cole, Bren E; Qiao, Yusen; Bogart, Justin A; Cheisson, Thibault; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2017-10-16

    Purification of rare earth elements is challenging due to their chemical similarities. All of the deployed separation methods rely on thermodynamic properties, such as distribution equilibria in solvent extraction. Rare-earth-metal separations based on kinetic differences have not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for rare-earth-element separations by exploiting differences in the oxidation rates within a series of rare earth compounds containing the redox-active ligand [{2-(tBuN(O))C 6 H 4 CH 2 } 3 N] 3- . Using this method, a single-step separation factor up to 261 was obtained for the separation of a 50:50 yttrium-lutetium mixture. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  15. Electro-kinetic separation of rare earth elements using a redox-active ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Huayi; Cole, Bren E.; Qiao, Yusen; Bogart, Justin A.; Cheisson, Thibault; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Purification of rare earth elements is challenging due to their chemical similarities. All of the deployed separation methods rely on thermodynamic properties, such as distribution equilibria in solvent extraction. Rare-earth-metal separations based on kinetic differences have not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for rare-earth-element separations by exploiting differences in the oxidation rates within a series of rare earth compounds containing the redox-active ligand [{2-(tBuN(O))C_6H_4CH_2}{sub 3}N]{sup 3-}. Using this method, a single-step separation factor up to 261 was obtained for the separation of a 50:50 yttrium-lutetium mixture. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Progress in conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janošević Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in synthesis, characterization and application of the selected conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines are reviewed. A brief historical background of the selected topics is given. The overview of the preparation, structure and properties of polyaniline, substituted polyanilines, especially those obtained by the oxidative polymerization of p-substituted anilines, poly(1-aminonaphthalene and its derivatives, carbocyclic and heterocyclic polyaryldiamines such as poly(p-phenylenediamine and polydiaminoacridines, is presented. The mechanism of formation of polyaniline nanostructures is discussed. Recent approaches to the preparation of one-dimensional polyaniline nanostructures are concisely reviewed, with special attention paid to the template-free falling-pH method. Current and potential future applications of oligo/polyarylamines are briefly discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 172043

  17. Molecular-like Redox Activity and Size-dependent Electrocatalysis of Inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhu, Nan; Ulstrup, Jens

    of nanoparticles that have intrinsic electroactivity. One of representative examples is the nanoparticles composed of Prussian Blue or/and its analogues. This type of nanoparticles has advantages over classic electrocatalysts in several regards. In this communication, we present some of our recent efforts......The development of low-cost, robust and high-efficient nanoscale electrocatalysts is arguably a dream approach to the use of nanomaterials as key building blocks in design and construction of chemical and biological sensing devices as well as fuel cells. Electroactive nanoparticles are a type...... on synthesis, characterization, and electrocatalytic function of Prussian Blue nanoparticles (PBNPs). Molecule-like redox activity and size-dependent electrocatalysis are clearly revealed, which could offer crucial clues for further optimization of design of nanoscale electrocatalysts and their applications...

  18. Electrochemical, Spectroscopic, and Density Functional Theory Characterization of Redox Activity in Nickel-Substituted Azurin: A Model for Acetyl-CoA Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesis, Anastasia C; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2015-08-17

    Nickel-containing enzymes are key players in global hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane cycles. Many of these enzymes rely on Ni(I) oxidation states in critical catalytic intermediates. However, due to the highly reactive nature of these species, their isolation within metalloenzymes has often proved elusive. In this report, we describe and characterize a model biological Ni(I) species that has been generated within the electron transfer protein, azurin. Replacement of the native copper cofactor with nickel is shown to preserve the redox activity of the protein. The Ni(II/I) couple is observed at -590 mV versus NHE, with an interfacial electron transfer rate of 70 s(-1). Chemical reduction of Ni(II)Az generates a stable species with strong absorption features at 350 nm and a highly anisotropic, axial EPR signal with principal g-values of 2.56 and 2.10. Density functional theory calculations provide insight into the electronic and geometric structure of the Ni(I) species, suggesting a trigonal planar coordination environment. The predicted spectroscopic features of this low-coordinate nickel site are in good agreement with the experimental data. Molecular orbital analysis suggests potential for both metal-centered and ligand-centered reactivity, highlighting the covalency of the metal-thiolate bond. Characterization of a stable Ni(I) species within a model protein has implications for understanding the mechanisms of complex enzymes, including acetyl coenzyme A synthase, and developing scaffolds for unique reactivity.

  19. Synthesis, DNA Cleavage Activity, Cytotoxicity, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition, and Acute Murine Toxicity of Redox-Active Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatrash, Nagham; Narh, Eugenia S; Yadav, Abhishek; Kim, Mahn-Jong; Janaratne, Thamara; Gabriel, James; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2017-07-06

    Four mononuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)] 2+ and two dinuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)Ru(L-L) 2 ] 4+ ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) containing the 9,11,20,22-tetraazatetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-l:2''',3'''-n]pentacene (tatpp) ligand were synthesized, in which L-L is a chelating diamine ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me 4 phen) or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Ph 2 phen). These Ru-tatpp analogues all undergo reduction reactions with modest reducing agents, such as glutathione (GSH), at pH 7. These, plus several structurally related but non-redox-active RPCs, were screened for DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and acute mouse toxicity, and their activities were examined with respect to redox activity and lipophilicity. All of the redox-active RPCs show single-strand DNA cleavage in the presence of GSH, whereas none of the non-redox-active RPCs do. Low-micromolar cytotoxicity (IC 50 ) against malignant H358, CCL228, and MCF7 cultured cell lines was mainly restricted to the redox-active RPCs; however, they were substantially less toxic toward nonmalignant MCF10 cells. The IC 50 values for AChE inhibition in cell-free assays and the acute toxicity of RPCs in mice revealed that whereas most RPCs show potent inhibitory action against AChE (IC 50 values complexes as a class are surprisingly well tolerated in animals relative to other RPCs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  1. Redox modulation of curcumin stability: Redox active antioxidants increase chemical stability of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimiya, Yoshiki; Wang, Weicang; Du, Zheyuan; Sukamtoh, Elvira; Zhu, Julia; Decker, Eric; Zhang, Guodong

    2016-03-01

    Substantial studies have shown that curcumin, a dietary compound from turmeric, has beneficial effects on many diseases. However, curcumin rapidly degrades at physiological pH, making it difficult to interpret whether the observed actions of curcumin are from curcumin itself or its degradation products. Therefore, it is important to better understand the mechanisms involved in curcumin degradation and the roles of degradation in its biological actions. Here, we show that a series of redox active antioxidants with diverse chemical structures, including gallic acid, ascorbate (vitamin C), tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), caffeic acid, rosmarinic acid, and Trolox (a water-soluble analog of vitamin E), dramatically increased curcumin stability in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. When treated in basal cell culture medium in MC38 colon cancer cells, curcumin rapidly degraded with a half-life of several minutes and showed a weak antiproliferative effect; co-addition of antioxidants enhanced stability and antiproliferative effect of curcumin. Finally, co-administration of antioxidant significantly increased plasma level of curcumin in animal models. Together, these studies strongly suggest that a redox-dependent mechanism plays a critical role in mediating curcumin degradation. In addition, curcumin itself, instead of its degradation products, is largely responsible for the observed biological actions of curcumin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  3. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostela, J.; Elmgren, M.; Almgren, M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E 0 -values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase

  4. Making Glasses Conduct: Electrochemical Doping of Redox-Active Polymer Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudouris, Bryan

    Optoelectronically-active macromolecules have been established as promising materials in myriad organic electronic applications (e.g., organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices). To date, however, the majority of the work surrounding these materials has focused on materials with a great deal of conjugation along their macromolecular backbones and with varying degrees of crystalline structure. Here, we describe an emerging class of macromolecular charge conductors, radical polymers, that: (1) do not contain conjugation and (2) are completely amorphous glasses. Radical polymers contain non-conjugated macromolecular backbones and stable radical sites along the side chains of the electronically-active materials. In contrast to conjugated polymer systems, these materials conduct charge in the solid state through oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions along these pendant groups. Specifically, we demonstrate that controlling the chemical functionality of the pendant groups and the molecular mobility of the macromolecular backbones significantly impacts the charge transport ability of the pristine (i.e., not doped) radical polymers species. Through proper control of these crucial parameters, we show that radical polymers can have electrical conductivity and charge mobility values on par with commonly-used conjugated polymers. Importantly, we also highlight the ability to dope radical polymers with redox-active small molecule species. This doping, in turn, increases the electrical conductivity of the glassy radical polymer thin films in a manner akin to what is observed in traditional conjugated polymer systems. In this way, we establish a means by which to fabricate optically-transparent and colorless thin film glasses capable of conducting charge in a rather rapid manner. We anticipate that these fundamental insights will prove crucial in developing new transparent conducting layers for future electronic applications.

  5. Characterization of the nanostructure of complexes formed by a redox-active cationic lipid and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzey, Claire L; Jewell, Christopher M; Hays, Melissa E; Lynn, David M; Abbott, Nicholas L; Kondo, Yukishige; Golan, Sharon; Talmon, Yeshayahu

    2008-05-08

    We report characterization of the nanostructures of complexes formed between the redox-active lipid bis(n-ferrocenylundecyl)dimethylammonium bromide (BFDMA) and DNA using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). A particular focus was directed to the influence of lipid oxidation state (where reduced BFDMA has a net charge of +1 and oxidized BFDMA has a charge of +3) on the nanostructures of the solution aggregates formed. Complexes were characterized over a range of charge ratios of reduced BFDMA to DNA (1.1:1, 2.75:1, and 4:1) in solutions of 1 mM Li2SO4. For these complexes, a single peak in the SANS data at 1.2 nm(-1) indicated that a nanostructure with a periodicity of 5.2 nm was present, similar to that observed with complexes of the classical lipids DODAB/DOPE and DNA (multilamellar spacing of 7.0 nm). The absence of additional Bragg peaks in all the SANS data indicated that the periodicity did not extend over large distances. Both inverse Fourier transform analysis and form factor fitting suggested formation of a multilamellar vesicle. These results were confirmed by cryo-TEM images in which multilamellar complexes with diameters between 50 and 150 nm were observed with no more than seven lamellae per aggregate. In contrast to complexes of reduced BFDMA and DNA, Bragg peaks were absent in SANS spectra of complexes formed by oxidized BFDMA and DNA at all charge ratios investigated. The low-q behavior of the SANS data obtained using oxidized BFDMA and DNA complexes suggested that large, loose aggregates were formed, consistent with complementary cryo-TEM images showing predominantly loose disordered aggregates. Some highly ordered spongelike and cubic phase nanostructures were also detected in cryo-TEM images. We conclude that control of BFDMA oxidation state can be used to manipulate the nanostructures of lipid-DNA complexes formed using BFDMA.

  6. Theory of water treatment by capacitive deionization with redox active porous electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fan; Biesheuvel, P M; Bazant, Martin Z; Hatton, T Alan

    2018-04-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) for water treatment, which relies on the capture of charged species to sustain the electrical double layers (EDLs) established within porous electrodes under an applied electrical potential, can be enhanced by the chemical attachment of fixed charged groups to the porous electrode electrodes (ECDI). It has recently been demonstrated that further improvements in capacity and energy storage can be gained by functionalization of the electrode surfaces with redox polymers in which the charge on the electrodes can be modulated through Faradaic reactions under different cell voltages in a capacitive process that can be called "Faradaic CDI" (FaCDI). Here, we extend recent mathematical models developed for the characterization of CDI and ECDI systems to incorporate the redox mediated contributions by allowing for the variable chemical charges generated by reactions in FaCDI. The lumped model developed here assumes the spacer channel is well-mixed with uniform electrosorption in each electrode. We demonstrate that the salt adsorption performance characterization of the fixed chemical charge ECDI and variable chemical charge FaCDI materials can be unified within a common theoretical framework based on the point of zero charge (PZC) of the electrode material. In the latter case the PZC is determined by the equilibrium potentials of the redox couples immobilized on the porous electrodes. The new model is able to predict the experimentally observed enhanced and inverted performance of CDI cells, and illuminates the benefit of choosing redox active materials for water treatment applications. The deionization performance of FaCDI cells is shown to be superior to that of CDI and ECDI systems with equilibrium adsorption capacities 50-100% higher than attained with CDI systems, and at smaller cell voltages, depending on the redox potentials of the Faradaic moieties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Thioredoxin Txnl1/TRP32 Is a Redox-active Cofactor of the 26 S Proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Klausen, Louise Kjær; Prag, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large proteolytic machine, which degrades most intracellular proteins. We found that thioredoxin, Txnl1/TRP32, binds to Rpn11, a subunit of the regulatory complex of the human 26S proteasome. Txnl1 is abundant, metabolically stable and widely expressed and is present...... in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Txnl1 has thioredoxin activity with a redox potential of about -250 mV. Mutant Txnl1 with one active site cysteine replaced by serine formed disulfide bonds to eEF1A1, a substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. eEF1A1 is therefore a likely physiological substrate...

  8. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  9. The effect of auxins (IAA and 4-Cl-IAA) on the redox activity and medium pH of Zea mays L. root segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekacz, Halina; Karcz, Waldemar

    2006-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 4-chloroindole-3-acetic acid (4-Cl-IAA) were tested at different concentrations and times for their capacity to change the redox activity and medium pH of maize root segments. The dose-response surfaces (dose-response curves as a function of time) plotted for redox activity and changes in medium pH (expressed as DeltapH) had a similar shape for both auxins, but differed significantly at the optimal concentrations. With 4-Cl-IAA, the maximal values of redox activity and medium pH changes were observed at 10(-10) M, which was a 100-fold lower concentration than with IAA. Correlations were observed between redox activity and medium pH changes at the optimal concentrations of both IAA and 4-Cl-IAA. The results are discussed herein, taking into account both the concentration of the auxins and the effects produced by them.

  10. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  11. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  12. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  13. D1-Asn-298 in photosystem II is involved in a hydrogen-bond network near the redox-active tyrosine YZfor proton exit during water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Ryo; Ueoka-Nakanishi, Hanayo; Noguchi, Takumi

    2017-12-08

    In photosynthetic water oxidation, two water molecules are converted into one oxygen molecule and four protons at the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster in photosystem II (PSII) via the S-state cycle. Efficient proton exit from the catalytic site to the lumen is essential for this process. However, the exit pathways of individual protons through the PSII proteins remain to be identified. In this study, we examined the involvement of a hydrogen-bond network near the redox-active tyrosine Y Z in proton transfer during the S-state cycle. We focused on spectroscopic analyses of a site-directed variant of D1-Asn-298, a residue involved in a hydrogen-bond network near Y Z We found that the D1-N298A mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 exhibits an O 2 evolution activity of ∼10% of the wild-type. D1-N298A and the wild-type D1 had very similar features of thermoluminescence glow curves and of an FTIR difference spectrum upon Y Z oxidation, suggesting that the hydrogen-bonded structure of Y Z and electron transfer from the Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster to Y Z were little affected by substitution. In the D1-N298A mutant, however, the flash-number dependence of delayed luminescence showed a monotonic increase without oscillation, and FTIR difference spectra of the S-state cycle indicated partial and significant inhibition of the S 2 → S 3 and S 3 → S 0 transitions, respectively. These results suggest that the D1-N298A substitution inhibits the proton transfer processes in the S 2 → S 3 and S 3 → S 0 transitions. This in turn indicates that the hydrogen-bond network near Y Z can be functional as a proton transfer pathway during photosynthetic water oxidation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function.

  15. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2008-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defenses and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and self-processed mature forms. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen variant, the right subdomain interacts with an unusual prodomain, thus contributing to latency. Unlike the catalytic cysteine residue, already in its competent conformation in the zymogen, the catalytic histidine is swung out from its active conformation and trapped in a cage shaped by a backing helix, a zymogenic hairpin, and a latency flap in the zymogen. Dramatic rearrangement of up to 20A of these elements triggered by a tryptophan switch occurs during activation and accounts for a new activation mechanism for proteolytic enzymes. These findings can be extrapolated to related potentially pathogenic cysteine proteases such as Streprococcus pyogenes SpeB and Porphyromonas gingivalis periodontain.

  16. One-step synthesis of redox-active polymer/AU nanocomposites for electrochemical immunoassay of multiplexed tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang; Han, Hongliang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive multiplexed immunoassay protocol for simultaneous electrochemical determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was designed using redox-active nanocomposites. As the redox-active species, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD)/Au nanocomposite and poly(vinyl ferrocene-2-aminothiophenol) (poly(VFc-ATP))/Au nanocomposite were obtained by one-step method which HAuCl4 was used as the oxidant. With Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), the nanocomposites were successful to immobilize labeled anti-CEA and anti-AFP as the immunosensing probes. The proposed electrochemical immunoassay enabled the simultaneous monitoring of AFP and CEA in a wide range of 0.01-100ngmL(-1). The detection limits was 0.006ngmL(-1) for CEA and 0.003ngmL(-1) for AFP (S/N=3). The assay results of serum samples with the proposed method were well consistent with the reference values from standard ELISA method. And the negligible cross-reactivity between the two analytes makes it possesses potential promise in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinsheng; Wang, Min; Yang, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Huaisheng; Yang, Zhengyu

    2007-07-30

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay.

  18. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinsheng; Wang Min; Yang Zhenyu; Wang Zhong; Wang Huaisheng; Yang Zhengyu

    2007-01-01

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay

  19. Cysteine Protease Zymography: Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine proteases play multiple roles in basically all aspects of physiology and development. In plants, they are involved in growth and development and in accumulation and mobilization of storage proteins. Furthermore, they are engaged in signalling pathways and in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals and also in humans, they are responsible for senescence and apoptosis, prohormone processing, and ECM remodelling. When analyzed by zymography, the enzyme must be renaturated after SDS-PAGE. SDS must be washed out and substituted by Triton X-100. Gels are then further incubated under ideal conditions for activity detection. Cysteine proteases require an acidic pH (5.0-6.0) and a reducing agent, usually DTT. When screening biological samples, there is generally no previous clue on what peptidase class will be present, neither optimal proteolysis conditions are known. Hence, it is necessary to assess several parameters, such as incubation time, pH, temperature, influence of ions or reducing agents, and finally evaluate the inhibition profile. For detection of cysteine peptidase activity, the use of specific inhibitors, such as E-64, can be used to prevent the development of cysteine peptidase activity bands and positively confirm its presence. Here four different protocols to assess cysteine protease activity from different sources are presented.

  20. Chemical Protein Modification through Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnoo, Smita B; Madder, Annemieke

    2016-04-01

    The modification of proteins with non-protein entities is important for a wealth of applications, and methods for chemically modifying proteins attract considerable attention. Generally, modification is desired at a single site to maintain homogeneity and to minimise loss of function. Though protein modification can be achieved by targeting some natural amino acid side chains, this often leads to ill-defined and randomly modified proteins. Amongst the natural amino acids, cysteine combines advantageous properties contributing to its suitability for site-selective modification, including a unique nucleophilicity, and a low natural abundance--both allowing chemo- and regioselectivity. Native cysteine residues can be targeted, or Cys can be introduced at a desired site in a protein by means of reliable genetic engineering techniques. This review on chemical protein modification through cysteine should appeal to those interested in modifying proteins for a range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Reversible Redox Activity in Multicomponent Metal-Organic Frameworks Constructed from Trinuclear Copper Pyrazolate Building Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Binbin; Pang, Qingqing; Xu, Huoshu; Li, Xiaomin; Wang, Yulin; Ma, Zhen; Weng, Linhong; Li, Qiaowei

    2017-06-14

    Inorganic functionalization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), such as incorporation of multiple inorganic building blocks with distinct metals into one structure and further modulation of the metal charges, endows the porous materials with significant properties toward their applications in catalysis. In this work, by an exploration of the role of 4-pyrazolecarboxylic acid (H 2 PyC) in the formation of trinuclear copper pyrazolate as a metalloligand in situ, four new MOFs with multiple components in order were constructed through one-pot synthesis. This metalloligand strategy provides multicomponent MOFs with new topologies (tub for FDM-4 and tap for FDM-5) and is also compatible with a second organic linker for cooperative construction of complex MOFs (1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-6 and 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid for FDM-7). The component multiplicity of these MOFs originates from PyC's ability to separate Cu and Zn on the basis of their differentiated binding affinities toward pyrazolate and carboxylate. These MOFs feature reversible and facile redox transformations between Cu I 3 (PyC) 3 and Cu II 3 (μ-OH)(PyC) 3 (OH) 3 without altering the connecting geometries of the units, thus further contributing to the significant catalytic activities in the oxidation of CO and aromatic alcohols and the decomposition of H 2 O 2 . This study on programming multiple inorganic components into one framework and modulating their electronic structures is an example of functionalizing the inorganic units of MOFs with a high degree of control.

  2. Cobalt(II) salophen-modified carbon-paste electrode for potentiometric and voltammetric determination of cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Mohammad K; Khorasani, Jafar H; Khaloo, Shokooh S; Tangestaninejad, Shahram

    2003-09-01

    A chemically modified electrode constructed by incorporating N,N(')-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediaminocobalt(II) into carbon-paste matrix was used as a sensitive electrochemical sensor for detection of cysteine. The resulting electrode exhibits catalytic properties for the electrooxidation of cysteine and lowers the overpotential for the oxidation of this compound. The faster rate of electron transfer results in a near-Nernstian behavior of the modified electrode and makes it a suitable potentiometric and voltammetric sensor for the fast and easy determination of cysteine. A linear response in concentration range from approximately 2 microM to 0.01 M was obtained with a detection limit of 1 microM for the potentiometric detection of cysteine. The modified electrode was also used for the amperometric and differential pulse voltammetric determination of cysteine and the results were compared with those of the potentiometric method.

  3. A theoretical study on tunneling based biosensor having a redox-active monolayer using physics based simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Yeon; Lee, Won Cheol; Yun, Jun Yeon; Lee, Youngeun; Choi, Seoungwook; Jin, Seonghoon; Park, Young June

    2018-01-01

    We developed a numerical simulator to model the operation of a tunneling based biosensor which has a redox-active monolayer. The simulator takes a realistic device structure as a simulation domain, and it employs the drift-diffusion equation for ion transport, the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for electron tunneling, and the Ramo-Shockley theorem for accurate calculation of non-faradaic current. We also accounted for the buffer reaction and the immobilized peptide layer. For efficient transient simulation, the implicit time integration scheme is employed where the solution at each time step is obtained from the coupled Newton-Raphson method. As an application, we studied the operation of a recently fabricated reference-electrode free biosensor in various bias conditions and confirmed the effect of buffer reaction and the current flowing mechanism. Using the simulator, we also found a strategy to maximize the sensitivity of the tunneling based sensor.

  4. 35S cystein chlorhydrate preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emiliozzi, R.; Pichat, P.; Herbert, M.

    1960-01-01

    35 S cystein chlorhydrate has been prepared with a quantitative yield by electrolytic reduction of 35 S cystin in hydrochloric medium on a vibrating mercury cathode. Reprint of a paper published in Bulletin de la Societe chimique de France, no. 2653, 4. quarter 1959, p. 1544-1545 [fr

  5. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  6. The effect of cysteine on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolati, A.; Imanieh, I.; Salehi, F.; Farahani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cysteine was found as an appropriate additive for electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles. → The deposition mechanism of gold nanoparticle was determined as instantaneous nucleation. → Oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits. - Abstract: The most applications of gold nanoparticles are in the photo-electronical accessories and bio-chemical sensors. Chloride solution with cysteine additive was used as electrolyte in gold nanoparticles electrodeposition. The nucleation and growing mechanism were studied by electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, in order to obtain a suitable nano structure. The deposition mechanism was determined as instantaneous nucleation and the dimension of particles was controlled in nanometric particle size range. Atomic Force Microscope was used to evaluate the effect of cysteine on the morphology and topography of gold nanoparticles. Finally the catalytic property of gold nanoparticle electrodeposited was studied in KOH solution, where oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits.

  7. Selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehzadeh, Hamid; Mokhtari, Banafsheh; Nematollahi, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: 3,5-Di-tert-buthylcatechol was used for the selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione at the glassy carbon and carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine. • Catalytic electron transfer of 3,5-di-tert-buthylcatechol in the presence of homocysteine. • Michael type addition reaction of electrochemically generated 3,5-di-tert-buthyl-o-benzoquinone with glutathione. - Abstract: The electrochemical oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-buthylcatechol in the presence of homocysteine was used for the selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione at a glassy carbon and a glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotube. The results revealed that the electrochemically generated 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione exhibits high catalytic activity toward homocysteine oxidation at reduced over-potential and low catalytic activity for oxidation of cysteine. The catalytic activity 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione toward cysteine was suppressed in the presence of 4-N,N-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde. Contrary to homocysteine and cysteine, the reaction of glutathione with 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione is a substituation reaction. This method exhibits three dynamic linear ranges of 2.5 to 10 μmol L −1 , 10 to 100 μmol L −1 and 100 to 1000 μmol L −1 , and a lower detection limit (3σ) of 0.89 ± 3.53% μmol L −1 for homocysteine

  8. The production and characterisation of novel conducting redox-active oligomeric thin films from electrooxidised indolo[3,2,1-jk]carbazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Stuart I; Henry, John B; McNab, Hamish; Mount, Andrew R

    2009-01-01

    Indolo[3,2,1-jk]carbazole (IC) has been synthesised on a gram scale by flash vacuum pyrolysis. In contrast to a previous suggestion, IC is planar and it is also highly fluorescent, with a solution quantum yield of 0.41. Electro-oxidation of IC at a rotating disc electrode resulted in the passage of steady-state currents and the reproducible formation of conducting, redox-active films with constituent species that are also highly fluorescent. Unusually for coupled electroactive N-heterocyclic systems, electrochemical and spectroscopic characterisation revealed the film to consist exclusively of three redox-active (2,2', 5,5' and 2,5' coupled) IC dimers with no polymeric products. Calculations showed this coupling pattern to be consistent with IC radical-cation coupling through the accessible sites of highest unpaired electron density. The unusual combination of a high dimer second oxidation potential and a negligible dimer-dimer coupling rate explains the lack of further coupling. The identities of the dimeric species were confirmed by independent syntheses involving the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling of IC boronic acids as the key step. Electro-oxidation of the IC system therefore offers a ready route to novel conducting, redox-active molecular films and their redox-active, luminescent dimer constituents.

  9. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...

  10. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a uranium(III) complex containing a redox-active 2,2'-bipyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Steven J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2010-02-01

    Hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate uranium(III) diiodide derivatives have been prepared as an entry into low-valent uranium chemistry with these ligands. The bis(tetrahydrofuran) adduct, Tp*UI(2)(THF)(2) (1) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate), was synthesized by addition of sodium hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (NaTp*) to an equivalent of UI(3)(THF)(4). Addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (2,2'-bpy) to 1 displaced the THF molecules producing Tp*UI(2)(2,2'-bpy) (2). Both derivatives were characterized by (1)H NMR and IR spectroscopies, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography. Reduction of both species was attempted with two equivalents of potassium graphite. The reduction of 1 did not result in a clean product, but rather decomposition and ligand redistribution. However, compound 2 was reduced to form Tp*(2)U(2,2'-bpy), 3, which is composed of a uranium(III) ion with a radical monoanionic bipyridine ligand. This was confirmed by X-ray crystallography, which revealed distortions in the bond lengths of the bipyridine consistent with reduction. Further support was obtained by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, which showed resonances shifted far upfield, consistent with radical character on the 2,2'-bipyridine ligand. Future studies will explore the reactivity of this compound as well as the consequences for redox-activity in the bipyridine ligand.

  12. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  13. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L., E-mail: tait@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  14. Alizarin Red S-Confined Layer-By-Layer Films as Redox-Active Coatings on Electrodes for the Voltammetric Determination of L-Dopa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Takahashi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of redox-active coatings is a key step in fabricating electrochemical biosensors. To this goal, a variety of coating materials have been used in combination with redox-active compounds. In this study, alizarin red S (ARS was confined in layer-by-layer (LbL films composed of poly(ethyleneimine (PEI and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC to study the redox properties. A gold (Au disc electrode coated with PEI/CMC LbL film was immersed in an ARS solution to uptake ARS into the film. ARS was successfully confined in the LbL film through electrostatic interactions. The cyclic voltammogram (CV of ARS-confined PEI/CMC film-coated electrodes thus prepared exhibited redox waves in the potential range from −0.5 to −0.7 V originating from 9,10-anthraquinone moiety in ARS, demonstrating that ARS preserves its redox activity in the LbL film. An additional oxidation peak appeared around −0.4 V in the CV recorded in the solution containing phenylboronic acid (PBA, due to the formation of a boronate ester of ARS (ARS-PBA in the film. The oxidation peak current at −0.4 V decreased upon addition of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa to the solution. Thus, the results suggest a potential use of the ARS-confined PEI/CMC films for constructing voltammetric sensors for L-dopa.

  15. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-05

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols.

  16. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at −0.65 V, −0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes. PMID:26577799

  17. Generation of antibodies against disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains by DNA immunization: An approach to neutralize snake venom-induced haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidgi Syed Anwer Abdo Hasson

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Antibodies generated against the E. ocellatus venom prothrombin activator-like metalloprotease and disintegrin-cysteine-rich domains modulated and inhibited the catalytic activity both in vitro and in vivo of venom metalloproteinase disintegrin cysteine rich molecules. Thus, generating of venom specific-toxin antibodies by DNA immunization offer a more rational treatment of snake envenoming than conventional antivenom.

  18. Monitoring in vivo reversible cysteine oxidation in proteins using ICAT and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santamarina, Sarela; Boronat, Susanna; Domènech, Alba; Ayté, José; Molina, Henrik; Hidalgo, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Reversible thiol oxidation of cysteine residues occurs in many intracellular catalytic and signaling processes. Here we describe an optimized protocol, which can be completed in ∼5 d, to unambiguously identify specific cysteine residues that are transiently and reversibly oxidized by comparing two complex biological samples obtained from yeast cell cultures at the proteome level. After 'freezing' the in vivo thiol stage of cysteine residues by medium acidification, we first block reduced thiols in extracts with iodoacetamide (IAM), and then we sequentially reduce and label reversible oxidized thiols with the biotin-based heavy or light IAM derivatives, which are known as isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) reagents, so that the two samples can be compared at once after combination of the labeled extracts, trypsin digestion, streptavidin-affinity purification of peptides containing oxidized cysteines, and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. For the same protein extracts, before cysteine-containing peptide enrichment, individual relative protein concentrations are obtained by stable-isotope dimethyl labeling.

  19. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  20. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  1. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  2. Understanding the adsorption interface of polyelectrolyte coating on redox active nanoparticles using soft particle electrokinetics and its biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Shashank; Neal, Craig J; Das, Soumen; Barkam, Swetha; McCormack, Rameech; Seal, Sudipta

    2014-04-23

    The application of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) for therapeutic purposes requires a stable dispersion of nanoparticles in a biological environment. The objective of this study is to tailor the properties of polyelectrolyte coated CNPs as a function of molecular weight to achieve a stable and catalytic active dispersion. The coating of CNPs with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has increased the dispersion stability of CNPs and enhanced the catalytic ability. The stability of PAA coating was analyzed using the change in the Gibbs free energy computed by the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption isotherms were determined using soft particle electrokinetics which overcomes the challenges presented by other techniques. The change in Gibbs free energy was highest for CNPs coated with PAA of 250 kg/mol indicating the most stable coating. The change in free energy for PAA of 100 kg/mol coated CNPs was 85% lower than the PAA of 250 kg/mol coated CNPs. This significant difference is caused by the strong adsorption of PAA of 100 kg/mol on CNPs. Catalytic activity of PAA-CNPs is assessed by the catalase enzymatic mimetic activity of nanoparticles. The catalase activity was higher for PAA coated CNPs as compared to bare CNPs which indicated preferential adsorption of hydrogen peroxide induced by coating. This indicates that the catalase activity is also affected by the structure of the coating layer.

  3. Long-term cysteine fortification impacts cysteine/glutathione homeostasis and food intake in ageing rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Karine; Breuille, Denis; Serrant, Patrick; Denis, Philippe; Glomot, Francoise; Bechereau, Fabienne; Papet, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Healthy ageing is associated with higher levels of glutathione. The study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary fortification with cysteine increases cysteine and glutathione pools, thus alleviating age-associated low-grade inflammation and resulting in global physiological benefits. The effect of a 14-week dietary fortification with cysteine was studied in non-inflamed (NI, healthy at baseline) and in spontaneously age-related low-grade inflamed (LGI, prefrail at baseline) 21-month-ol...

  4. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione...... of the species previously identified as the "sulfenome" - the cellular complement of reversibly-oxidized thiol proteins generated via sulfenic acids....

  5. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    Protein folding catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) has been studied both in vivo and in vitro using different assays. PDI contains a CGHC active site in each of its two catalytic domains (a and a'). The relative importance of each active site in PDI from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y...... substrate, procarboxypeptidase Y. In this assay, however, the a' domain active site also appeared to be much more potent than the a-site. These results were unexpected, not only because of the difference with human PDI, but also because analysis of folding of procarboxypeptidase Y in vivo had shown the a...

  6. Modification of cysteine residues by cyclopentenone prostaglandins: interplay with redox regulation of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in the resolution of inflammation and the regulation of cell proliferation and cellular redox status. Upon exogenous administration they have shown beneficial effects in models of inflammation and tissue injury, as well as potential antitumoral actions, which have raised a considerable interest in their study for the development of therapeutic tools. Due to their electrophilic nature, the best-known mechanism of action of these mediators is the covalent modification of proteins at cysteine residues through Michael addition. Identification of cyPG targets through proteomic approaches, including MS/MS analysis to pinpoint the modified residues, is proving critical to characterize their mechanisms of action. Among the targets of cyPG are proinflammatory transcription factors, proteins involved in cell defense, such as the regulator of the antioxidant response Keap1 and detoxifying enzymes like GST, and key signaling proteins like Ras proteins. Moreover, cyPG may interact with redox-active small molecules, such as glutathione and hydrogen sulfide. Much has been learned about cyPG in the past few years and this knowledge has also contributed to clarify both pharmacological actions and signaling mechanisms of these and other electrophilic lipids. Given the fact that many cyPG targets are involved in or are targets for redox regulation, there is a complex interplay with redox-induced modifications. Here we address the modification of protein cysteine residues by cyPG elucidated by proteomic studies, paying special attention to the interplay with redox signaling. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Factors Supporting Cysteine Tolerance and Sulfite Production in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions ...

  8. Synthesis and Application of Aurophilic Poly(Cysteine and Poly(Cysteine-Containing Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ulkoski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The redox capacity, as well as the aurophilicity of the terminal thiol side groups, in poly(Cysteine lend a unique characteristic to this poly(amino acid or polypeptide. There are two major application fields for this polymer: (i biomedical applications in drug delivery and surface modification of biomedical devices and (ii as coating for electrodes to enhance their electrochemical sensitivity. The intended application determines the synthetic route for p(Cysteine. Polymers to be used in biomedical applications are typically polymerized from the cysteine N-carboxyanhydride by a ring-opening polymerization, where the thiol group needs to be protected during the polymerization. Advances in this methodology have led to conditions under which the polymerization progresses as living polymerization, which allows for a strict control of the molecular architecture, molecular weight and polydispersity and the formation of block copolymers, which eventually could display polyphilic properties. Poly(Cysteine used as electrode coating is typically polymerized onto the electrode by cyclic voltammetry, which actually produces a continuous, pinhole-free film on the electrode via the formation of covalent bonds between the amino group of Cysteine and the carbon of the electrode. This resulting coating is chemically very different from the well-defined poly(Cysteine obtained by ring-opening polymerizations. Based on the structure of cysteine a significant degree of cross-linking within the coating deposited by cyclic voltammetry can be assumed. This manuscript provides a detailed discussion of the ring-opening polymerization of cysteine, a brief consideration of the role of glutathione, a key cysteine-containing tripeptide, and examples for the utilization of poly(Cysteine and poly(Cysteine-containing copolymers, in both, the biomedical as well as electrochemical realm.

  9. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) are a family of multidomain proteins that are believed to play key roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We have shown recently that human ADAM 12-S (meltrin alpha) is an active metalloprotease. It is synthesized as a zymogen, with the prod......The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) are a family of multidomain proteins that are believed to play key roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We have shown recently that human ADAM 12-S (meltrin alpha) is an active metalloprotease. It is synthesized as a zymogen......, with the prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition...... of the protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity...

  10. Redox-active quinones induces genome-wide DNA methylation changes by an iron-mediated and Tet-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoli; Chong, Zechen; Yin, Ruichuan; Song, Shu-Hui; Zhao, Chao; Li, Cuiping; Huang, Hua; Sun, Bao-Fa; Wu, Danni; Jin, Kang-Xuan; Song, Maoyong; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Jiang, Guibin; Rendtlew Danielsen, Jannie M; Xu, Guo-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui; Wang, Hailin

    2014-02-01

    DNA methylation has been proven to be a critical epigenetic mark important for various cellular processes. Here, we report that redox-active quinones, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in natural products, cancer therapeutics and environment, stimulate the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC in vivo, and increase 5 hmC in 5751 genes in cells. 5 hmC increase is associated with significantly altered gene expression of 3414 genes. Interestingly, in quinone-treated cells, labile iron-sensitive protein ferritin light chain showed a significant increase at both mRNA and protein levels indicating a role of iron regulation in stimulating Tet-mediated 5 mC oxidation. Consistently, the deprivation of cellular labile iron using specific chelator blocked the 5 hmC increase, and a delivery of labile iron increased the 5 hmC level. Moreover, both Tet1/Tet2 knockout and dimethyloxalylglycine-induced Tet inhibition diminished the 5 hmC increase. These results suggest an iron-regulated Tet-dependent DNA demethylation mechanism mediated by redox-active biomolecules.

  11. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  12. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  13. Cysteine Biosynthesis Controls Serratia marcescens Phospholipase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-08-15

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated opportunistic infections that can be difficult to treat due to a high incidence of antibiotic resistance. One of the many secreted proteins of S. marcescens is the PhlA phospholipase enzyme. Genes involved in the production and secretion of PhlA were identified by screening a transposon insertion library for phospholipase-deficient mutants on phosphatidylcholine-containing medium. Mutations were identified in four genes ( cyaA , crp , fliJ , and fliP ) that are involved in the flagellum-dependent PhlA secretion pathway. An additional phospholipase-deficient isolate harbored a transposon insertion in the cysE gene encoding a predicted serine O -acetyltransferase required for cysteine biosynthesis. The cysE requirement for extracellular phospholipase activity was confirmed using a fluorogenic phospholipase substrate. Phospholipase activity was restored to the cysE mutant by the addition of exogenous l-cysteine or O -acetylserine to the culture medium and by genetic complementation. Additionally, phlA transcript levels were decreased 6-fold in bacteria lacking cysE and were restored with added cysteine, indicating a role for cysteine-dependent transcriptional regulation of S. marcescens phospholipase activity. S. marcescens cysE mutants also exhibited a defect in swarming motility that was correlated with reduced levels of flhD and fliA flagellar regulator gene transcription. Together, these findings suggest a model in which cysteine is required for the regulation of both extracellular phospholipase activity and surface motility in S. marcescens IMPORTANCE Serratia marcescens is known to secrete multiple extracellular enzymes, but PhlA is unusual in that this protein is thought to be exported by the flagellar transport apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that both extracellular phospholipase activity and flagellar function are dependent on the cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, a disruption of cysteine

  14. Fluorescent labeling of specific cysteine residues using CyMPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljung, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The unique reactivity and relative scarcity of cysteine among amino acids makes it a convenient target for the site-specific chemical modification of proteins. Commercially available fluorophores and modifiers react with cysteine through a variety of electrophilic functional groups. However, it can be difficult to obtain specific labeling of a desired cysteine residue in a protein with multiple cysteines, in a mixture of proteins, or in a protein's native environment. CyMPL (Cysteine Metal Protection and Labeling) enables specific labeling by incorporating a cysteine of interest into a minimal binding site for group 12 metal ions (e.g. Cd2+ and Zn2+). These sites can be inserted into any region of known secondary structure in virtually any protein and cause minimal structural perturbation. Bound metal ions protect the cysteine from reaction while background cysteines are blocked with non-fluorescent modifiers. The metal ions are subsequently removed and the deprotected cysteine is labeled specifically. PMID:23151742

  15. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    [Nandi T K, Bairagya H R, Mukhopadhyay B P, Sekar K, Sukul D and Bera A K 2009 Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic. Asn 175 in plant thiol protease; J. Biosci. 34 27–34]. Keywords. Conserved water in molecular recognition; MD simulation; plant cysteine protease. Abbreviations used: CHASA ...

  16. Monitoring the solid-state electrochemistry of Cu(2,7-AQDC) (AQDC = anthraquinone dicarboxylate) in a lithium battery: coexistence of metal and ligand redox activities in a metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyue; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Awaga, Kunio

    2014-11-19

    By adopting a facile synthetic strategy, we obtained a microporous redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF), namely, Cu(2,7-AQDC) (2,7-H2AQDC = 2,7-anthraquinonedicarboxylic acid) (1), and utilized it as a cathode active material in lithium batteries. With a voltage window of 4.0-1.7 V, both metal clusters and anthraquinone groups in the ligands exhibited reversible redox activity. The valence change of copper cations was clearly evidenced by in situ XANES analysis. By controlling the voltage window of operation, extremely high recyclability of batteries was achieved, suggesting the framework was robust. This MOF is the first example of a porous material showing independent redox activity on both metal cluster nodes and ligand sites.

  17. Redox-active quinones induces genome-wide DNA methylation changes by an iron-mediated and Tet-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation has been proven to be a critical epigenetic mark important for various cellular processes. Here, we report that redox-active quinones, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in natural products, cancer therapeutics and environment, stimulate the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC in vivo......, and increase 5 hmC in 5751 genes in cells. 5 hmC increase is associated with significantly altered gene expression of 3414 genes. Interestingly, in quinone-treated cells, labile iron-sensitive protein ferritin light chain showed a significant increase at both mRNA and protein levels indicating a role of iron...... regulation in stimulating Tet-mediated 5 mC oxidation. Consistently, the deprivation of cellular labile iron using specific chelator blocked the 5 hmC increase, and a delivery of labile iron increased the 5 hmC level. Moreover, both Tet1/Tet2 knockout and dimethyloxalylglycine-induced Tet inhibition...

  18. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  19. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  20. A novel role for methyl cysteinate, a cysteine derivative, in cesium accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Eri; Miyazaki, Takae; Hayaishi-Satoh, Aya

    2017-01-01

    Phytoaccumulation is a technique to extract metals from soil utilising ability of plants. Cesium is a valuable metal while radioactive isotopes of cesium can be hazardous. In order to establish a more efficient phytoaccumulation system, small molecules which promote plants to accumulate cesium were...... investigated. Through chemical library screening, 14 chemicals were isolated as 'cesium accumulators' in Arabidopsis thaliana. Of those, methyl cysteinate, a derivative of cysteine, was found to function within the plant to accumulate externally supplemented cesium. Moreover, metabolite profiling demonstrated...

  1. Catalytic Oligopeptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Noda, Hidetoshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Kumagai, Naoya

    2018-02-02

    Waste-free catalytic assembly of α-amino acids is fueled by a multiboron catalyst that features a characteristic B 3 NO 2 heterocycle, providing a versatile catalytic protocol wherein functionalized natural α-amino acid units are accommodated and commonly used protecting groups are tolerated. The facile dehydrative conditions eliminate the use of engineered peptide coupling reagents, exemplifying a greener catalytic alternative for peptide coupling. The catalysis is sufficiently robust to enable pentapeptide synthesis, constructing all four amide bond linkages in a catalytic fashion.

  2. Structural Properties of Macrodontain I, a Cysteine Protease from Pseudananas macrodontes (Morr.) Harms (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errasti, María E; Natalucci, Claudia L; Caffini, Néstor O; Rotelli, Alejandra E; Brullo, Adriana; Maras, Bruno; Trejo, Sebastián A; López, Laura M I

    2018-03-15

    The primary structure of macrodontain I, a peptidase from Pseudananas macrodontes fruits, was determined using Edman's degradation. The enzyme is a non-glycosylated peptidase composed by 213 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 23,486.18 Da, pI value 6.99, and a molar extinction coefficient at 280 nm of 61,685 M -1  cm -1 . The alignment of the sequence of macrodontain I with those cysteine peptidases from species belonging to the family Bromeliaceae showed the highest identity degree (87.74%) against fruit bromelain. A remarkable fact is that all these peptidase sequences show two Met contiguous residues (Met121 and 122) and the nonapeptide VPQSIDWRD located in the mature N-terminal region. Residues Cys26 and His159, which constitute the catalytic dyad in all cysteine peptidases, as well as active site residues Gln20 and Asn176, characteristic of Clan C1A, are conserved in macrodontain I. The 3-D model suggests that the enzyme belongs to the α + β class of proteins, with two disulfide bridges (Cys23-Cys63 and Cys57-Cys96) in the α domain, while the β domain is stabilized by another disulfide bridge (Cys153-Cys201). Further, we were able to establish that the cysteine peptidases from P. macrodontes are involved in the anti-inflammatory activity.

  3. S-nitrosoglutathione covalently modifies cysteine residues of human carbonyl reductase 1 and affects its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmanová, Tereza; Tambor, Vojtěch; Lenčo, Juraj; Staab-Weijnitz, Claudia A; Maser, Edmund; Wsól, Vladimír

    2013-02-25

    Carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1 or SDR21C1) is a ubiquitously-expressed, cytosolic, monomeric, and NADPH-dependent enzyme. CBR1 participates in apoptosis, carcinogenesis and drug resistance, and has a protective role in oxidative stress, cancer and neurodegeneration. S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) represents the newest addition to its diverse substrate spectrum, which includes a wide range of xenobiotics and endogenous substances. GSNO has also been shown to covalently modify and inhibit CBR1. The aim of the present study was to quantify and characterize the resulting modifications. Of five candidate cysteines for modification by 2 mM GSNO (positions 26, 122, 150, 226, 227), the last four were analyzed using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry and then quantified using the Selected Reaction Monitoring Approach on hyphenated HPLC with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The analysis confirmed GSNO concentration-dependent S-glutathionylation of cysteines at positions 122, 150, 226, 227 which was 2-700 times higher compared to wild-type CBR1 (WT-CBR1). Moreover, a disulfide bond between neighboring Cys-226 and Cys-227 was detected. We suggest a role of these two cysteines as a redox-sensitive cysteine pair. The catalytic properties of wild-type and enzyme modified with 2 mM GSNO were also investigated by steady state kinetic experiments with various substrates. GSNO treatment of CBR1 resulted in a 2-5-fold decrease in kcat with menadione, 4-benzoylpyridine, 2,3-hexanedione, daunorubicin and 1,4-naphthoquinone. In contrast, the same treatment increased kcat for substrates containing a 1,2-diketo group in a ring structure (1,2-naphthoquinone, 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, isatin). Except for 9,10-phenanthrenequinone, all changes in kcat were at least in part compensated for by a similar change in Km, overall yielding no drastic changes in catalytic efficiency. The findings indicate that GSNO-induced covalent modification of cysteine residues affects the kinetic mechanism of CBR1

  4. L-Cysteine Metabolism and Fermentation in Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohtsu, Iwao

    L-Cysteine is an important amino acid both biologically and commercially. Although most amino acids are industrially produced by microbial fermentation, L-cysteine has been mainly produced by protein hydrolysis. Due to environmental and safety problems, synthetic or biotechnological products have been preferred in the market. Here, we reviewed L-cysteine metabolism, including biosynthesis, degradation, and transport, and biotechnological production (including both enzymatic and fermentation processes) of L-cysteine. The metabolic regulation of L-cysteine including novel sulfur metabolic pathways found in microorganisms is also discussed. Recent advancement in biochemical studies, genome sequencing, structural biology, and metabolome analysis has enabled us to use various approaches to achieve direct fermentation of L-cysteine from glucose. For example, worldwide companies began to supply L-cysteine and its derivatives produced by bacterial fermentation. These companies successfully optimized the original metabolism of their private strains. Basically, a combination of three factors should be required for improving L-cysteine fermentation: that is, (1) enhancing biosynthesis: overexpression of the altered cysE gene encoding feedback inhibition-insensitive L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT), (2) weakening degradation: knockout of the genes encoding L-cysteine desulfhydrases, and (3) exploiting export system: overexpression of the gene involved in L-cysteine transport. Moreover, we found that "thiosulfate" is much more effective sulfur source than commonly used "sulfate" for L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli, because thiosulfate is advantageous for saving consumption of NADPH and relating energy molecules.

  5. Zinc-Binding Cysteines: Diverse Functions and Structural Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Nicholas J.; Weerapana, Eranthie

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine residues are known to perform essential functions within proteins, including binding to various metal ions. In particular, cysteine residues can display high affinity toward zinc ions (Zn2+), and these resulting Zn2+-cysteine complexes are critical mediators of protein structure, catalysis and regulation. Recent advances in both experimental and theoretical platforms have accelerated the identification and functional characterization of Zn2+-bound cysteines. Zn2+-cysteine complexes have been observed across diverse protein classes and are known to facilitate a variety of cellular processes. Here, we highlight the structural characteristics and diverse functional roles of Zn2+-cysteine complexes in proteins and describe structural, computational and chemical proteomic technologies that have enabled the global discovery of novel Zn2+-binding cysteines. PMID:24970223

  6. Assessment of the toxicity of mixtures of nickel or cadmium with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to Daphnia magna: impact of a reactive oxygen-mediated mechanism with different redox-active metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fangli; Lampi, Mark A; Dixon, D George; Greenberg, Bruce M

    2007-07-01

    Recently, we showed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was involved in the toxicity of the redox-active metal Cu and mixtures of Cu plus a photomodified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), phenanthrenequinone (PHQ), to Daphnia magna. It is unknown, however, if similar results can be observed for metals with lower or no redox activity and their mixtures with PHQ. In the present study using D. magna, the toxicity of Ni, a weakly redox-active metal, and of Cd, a non-redox active metal, was examined with or without PHQ. The abilities of Ni, Cd, PHQ, and binary mixtures of metal plus PHQ to generate ROS were measured using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence assay. The results were compared with the results of Cu and mixtures of Cu plus PHQ from a recent study by our group. The order of metal toxicity to D. magna was found to be Cd > or = Cu > Ni. As with Cu/PHQ mixtures, synergistic toxicity was observed for mixtures of Ni and PHQ, whereas additive toxicity was observed for mixtures of Cd and PHQ. Alone, PHQ had no impact on ROS levels in D. magna. Nickel alone caused elevated ROS, which was further enhanced in the presence of PHQ. Neither Cd nor Cd/PHQ mixtures increased ROS production. Attenuation of toxicity and ROS production was observed in response to treatment with low concentrations of L-ascorbic acid. These results indicate potential toxic interactions between metals and modified PAHs. With redox-active metals, such as Cu and Ni, and modified PAHs, such as PHQ, these interactions can involve ROS formation.

  7. Long-time treatment by low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine enhances proinflammatory cytokine expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohnishi

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to act as a reactive oxygen species scavenger and used in clinical applications. Previous reports have shown that high-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment inhibits the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in activated macrophages. Here, we have found that long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low-concentration increases phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT, which are essential for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment decreases expressions of protein phosphatases, catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-2A and dual specificity phosphatase 1. On the other hand, we have found that short-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low dose increases p53 expression, which inhibits expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations suggest that long-time low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment increases expressions of proinflammatory cytokines through enhancement of kinase phosphorylation.

  8. Diurnal and seasonal trends and source apportionment of redox-active metals in Los Angeles using a novel online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Amirhosein; Sowlat, Mohammad H.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we identified the sources of four redox-active metals, including Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr), Cupper (Cu), and Manganese (Mn) and quantified the contribution of these sources to PM2.5 concentrations in central Los Angeles, California, by employing time-resolved measurements (i.e., a time resolution of 2 h) with a recently developed online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Size distribution of ambient PM (14 nm-10 μm) was measured using the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Optical Particle Sizer (OPS). Auxiliary variables were also collected, including elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC), gaseous pollutants (NO2 and O3), meteorological parameters (including relative humidity (RH) and temperature), and traffic data (for heavy- (HDVs) and light-duty vehicles (LDVs)). A 4-factor solution was found to be optimum for the chemically-speciated dataset, whereas a 5-factor solution appeared to be most plausible for the size distribution data. The factors included fresh traffic, soil/road dust, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and nucleation (only resolved for the size distribution data). Fresh traffic was the major contributor to Fe and Cu concentrations, whereas Cr was mostly found in the urban background aerosol (reflecting a mixture of small local sources as well as aged traffic emissions), and Mn mostly came from both soil/road dust and was to a lesser degree found in urban background aerosol. Secondary aerosol did not contribute to the concentrations of any of these metals, but was associated with very high loading of OC, as expected. Even though the urban background aerosol and secondary aerosol appeared to be characterized by "aged" particles and have a rather homogeneous spatial distribution, the reactions and processes involved in their formation are entirely different. Our results provide insights into the sources of redox-active metals in central Los Angeles. They also underscore the benefits of

  9. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  10. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems.

  11. One-step electrochemically co-assembled redox-active [Ru(bpy)2(tatp)]2+-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid film for non-redox protein biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shi-Bo; Yan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Jun-Wen; Chen, Lin-Lin; Li, Hong

    2013-01-15

    A redox-active [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, tatp=1,4,8,9-tetra-aza-triphenylene, BSA=bovine serum albumin, SWCNTs=single-walled carbon nanotubes) hybrid film is fabricated on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode via one-step electrochemical co-assembly approach. BSA is inherently dispersive and therefore served as the linking mediator of SWCNTs, which facilitate the redox reactions of [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+) employed as a reporter of BSA. The evidences from differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscope, emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscope reveal that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid can be electrochemically co-assembled on the ITO electrode, showing two pairs of well-defined Ru(II)-based redox waves. Furthermore, the electrochemical co-assembly of the [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid is found to be strongly dependent on the simultaneous presence of BSA and SWCNTs, indicating a good linear response to BSA in the range from 6 to 50mgL(-1). The results from this study provide an electrochemical co-assembly method for the development of non-redox protein biosensors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  13. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the

  14. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  15. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  16. Factors supporting cysteine tolerance and sulfite production in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennicke, Florian; Grumbt, Maria; Lermann, Ulrich; Ueberschaar, Nico; Palige, Katja; Böttcher, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Staib, Claudia; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Monod, Michel; Hube, Bernhard; Hertweck, Christian; Staib, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The amino acid cysteine has long been known to be toxic at elevated levels for bacteria, fungi, and humans. However, mechanisms of cysteine tolerance in microbes remain largely obscure. Here we show that the human pathogenic yeast Candida albicans excretes sulfite when confronted with increasing cysteine concentrations. Mutant construction and phenotypic analysis revealed that sulfite formation from cysteine in C. albicans relies on cysteine dioxygenase Cdg1, an enzyme with similar functions in humans. Environmental cysteine induced not only the expression of the CDG1 gene in C. albicans, but also the expression of SSU1, encoding a putative sulfite efflux pump. Accordingly, the deletion of SSU1 resulted in enhanced sensitivity of the fungal cells to both cysteine and sulfite. To study the regulation of sulfite/cysteine tolerance in more detail, we screened a C. albicans library of transcription factor mutants in the presence of sulfite. This approach and subsequent independent mutant analysis identified the zinc cluster transcription factor Zcf2 to govern sulfite/cysteine tolerance, as well as cysteine-inducible SSU1 and CDG1 gene expression. cdg1Δ and ssu1Δ mutants displayed reduced hypha formation in the presence of cysteine, indicating a possible role of the newly proposed mechanisms of cysteine tolerance and sulfite secretion in the pathogenicity of C. albicans. Moreover, cdg1Δ mutants induced delayed mortality in a mouse model of disseminated infection. Since sulfite is toxic and a potent reducing agent, its production by C. albicans suggests diverse roles during host adaptation and pathogenicity.

  17. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  18. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  19. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  20. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  1. Oxidation State Analysis of a Four-Component Redox Series [Os(pap)2(Q)]n Involving Two Different Non-Innocent Ligands on a Redox-Active Transition Metal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Das, D.; Sarkar, B.; Mondal, T. K.; Mobin, S. M.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.; Lahiri, G. K.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 15 (2011), s. 7090-7098 ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA MŠk LD11086 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : oxidation state analysis * [Os(pap)2(Q)]n * redox-active transition metal Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.601, year: 2011

  2. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorhout, P.K.; Strauss, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  3. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  4. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Paul E; Perez, Arnaud J; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g -1 . In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li 2 IrO 3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e - per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (M n+ ) and anionic (O 2 ) n- redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li 2 IrO 3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir 4+ at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li + /Li 0 , as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li 2 IrO 3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  5. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Paul E.; Perez, Arnaud J.; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M.; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g-1. In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li2IrO3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e- per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (Mn+) and anionic (O2)n- redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li2IrO3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir4+ at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li+/Li0, as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li2IrO3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  6. Single turnover of substrate-bound ferric cysteine dioxygenase with superoxide anion: enzymatic reactivation, product formation, and a transient intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Joshua A; Li, Wei; Pierce, Brad S

    2011-11-29

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a non-heme mononuclear iron enzyme that catalyzes the O(2)-dependent oxidation of L-cysteine (Cys) to produce cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA). In this study we demonstrate that the catalytic cycle of CDO can be "primed" by one electron through chemical oxidation to produce CDO with ferric iron in the active site (Fe(III)-CDO, termed 2). While catalytically inactive, the substrate-bound form of Fe(III)-CDO (2a) is more amenable to interrogation by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy than the 'as-isolated' Fe(II)-CDO enzyme (1). Chemical-rescue experiments were performed in which superoxide (O(2)(•-)) anions were introduced to 2a to explore the possibility that a Fe(III)-superoxide species represents the first intermediate within the catalytic pathway of CDO. In principle, O(2)(•-) can serve as a suitable acceptor for the remaining 3-electrons necessary for CSA formation and regeneration of the active Fe(II)-CDO enzyme (1). Indeed, addition of O(2)(•-) to 2a resulted in the rapid formation of a transient species (termed 3a) observable at 565 nm by UV-vis spectroscopy. The subsequent decay of 3a is kinetically matched to CSA formation. Moreover, a signal attributed to 3a was also identified using parallel mode X-band EPR spectroscopy (g ~ 11). Spectroscopic simulations, observed temperature dependence, and the microwave power saturation behavior of 3a are consistent with a ground state S = 3 from a ferromagnetically coupled (J ~ -8 cm(-1)) high-spin ferric iron (S(A) = 5/2) with a bound radical (S(B) = 1/2), presumably O(2)(•-). Following treatment with O(2)(•-), the specific activity of recovered CDO increased to ~60% relative to untreated enzyme.

  7. Spectroscopic and computational studies of reversible O2binding by a cobalt complex of relevance to cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Anne A; Lindeman, Sergey V; Fiedler, Adam T

    2017-10-10

    The substitution of non-native metal ions into metalloenzyme active sites is a common strategy for gaining insights into enzymatic structure and function. For some nonheme iron dioxygenases, replacement of the Fe(ii) center with a redox-active, divalent transition metal (e.g., Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) gives rise to an enzyme with equal or greater activity than the wild-type enzyme. In this manuscript, we apply this metal-substitution approach to synthetic models of the enzyme cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). CDO is a nonheme iron dioxygenase that initiates the catabolism of l-cysteine by converting this amino acid to the corresponding sulfinic acid. Two mononuclear Co(ii) complexes (3 and 4) have been prepared with the general formula [Co 2+ (Tp R2 )(CysOEt)] (R = Ph (3) or Me (4); Tp R2 = hydrotris(pyrazol-1-yl)borate substituted with R-groups at the 3- and 5-positions, and CysOEt is the anion of l-cysteine ethyl ester). These Co(ii) complexes mimic the active-site structure of substrate-bound CDO and are analogous to functional iron-based CDO models previously reported in the literature. Characterization with X-ray crystallography and/or 1 H NMR spectroscopy revealed that 3 and 4 possess five-coordinate structures featuring facially-coordinating Tp R2 and S,N-bidentate CysOEt ligands. The electronic properties of these high-spin (S = 3/2) complexes were interrogated with UV-visible absorption and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The air-stable nature of complex 3 replicates the inactivity of cobalt-substituted CDO. In contrast, complex 4 reversibly binds O 2 at reduced temperatures to yield an orange chromophore (4-O 2 ). Spectroscopic (EPR, resonance Raman) and computational (density functional theory, DFT) analyses indicate that 4-O 2 is a S = 1/2 species featuring a low-spin Co(iii) center bound to an end-on (η 1 ) superoxo ligand. DFT calculations were used to evaluate the energetics of key steps in the reaction mechanism. Collectively, these

  8. Upregulation of capacity for glutathione synthesis in response to amino acid deprivation: regulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikalidis, Angelos K.; Mazor, Kevin M.; Lee, Jeong-In; Roman, Heather B.; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.

    2014-01-01

    Using HepG2/C3A cells and MEFs, we investigated whether induction of GSH synthesis in response to sulfur amino acid deficiency is mediated by the decrease in cysteine levels or whether it requires a decrease in GSH levels per se. Both the glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA levels were upregulated in response to a lack of cysteine or other essential amino acids, independent of GSH levels. This upregulation did not occur in MEFs lacking GCN2 (general control non-derepressible 2, also known as eIF2α kinase 4) or in cells expressing mutant eIF2α lacking the eIF2α kinase Ser51 phosphorylation site, indicating that expression of both GCLC and GCLM was mediated by the GCN2/ATF4 stress response pathway. Only the increase in GCLM mRNA level, however, was accompanied by a parallel increase in protein expression, suggesting that the enhanced capacity for GSH synthesis depended largely on increased association of GCLC with its regulatory subunit. Upregulation of both GCLC and GLCM mRNA levels in response to cysteine deprivation was dependent on new protein synthesis, which is consistent with expression of GCLC and GCLM being mediated by proteins whose synthesis depends on activation of the GCN2/ATF4 pathway. Our data suggest that the regulation of GCLC expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of transcriptional regulators, whereas the regulation of GCLM expression may be mediated by changes in the abundance of mRNA stabilizing or destabilizing proteins. Upregulation of GCLM levels in response to low cysteine levels may serve to protect the cell in the face of a future stress requiring GSH as an antioxidant or conjugating/detoxifying agent. PMID:24557597

  9. Cysteine peroxidase activity in rat blood plasma | Razygraev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rat plasma found to be able to accelerate greatly the H2O2-dependent oxidation of cysteine. The activity was a characteristic of a protein fraction precipitated at 30—44% ammonium sulfate saturation, and the specific activity in protein fraction was significantly higher than in plasma. Cysteine:H2O2 oxidoreductase ...

  10. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...

  11. Reaction mechanism of O-acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    such as, cardiovascular, oncology, osteoporosis, and arthritis. Till now, twenty one families of cysteine proteases have been discovered5, almost half of them are found in viruses and others are found in bacteria, fungi, pro- tozoa and plants. In mammals, two main groups of cysteine proteases are present: cytosolic calpains.

  12. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  13. Novel Cysteine Desulfidase CdsB Involved in Releasing Cysteine Repression of Toxin Synthesis in Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawei Gu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile, a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, still poses serious health-care challenges. The expression of its two main virulence factors, TcdA and TcdB, is reportedly repressed by cysteine, but molecular mechanism remains unclear. The cysteine desulfidase CdsB affects the virulence and infection progresses of some bacteria. The C. difficile strain 630 genome encodes a homolog of CdsB, and in the present study, we analyzed its role in C. difficile 630Δerm by constructing an isogenic ClosTron-based cdsB mutant. When C. difficile was cultured in TY broth supplemented with cysteine, the cdsB gene was rapidly induced during the exponential growth phase. The inactivation of cdsB not only affected the resistance of C. difficile to cysteine, but also altered the expression levels of intracellular cysteine-degrading enzymes and the production of hydrogen sulfide. This suggests that C. difficile CdsB is a major inducible cysteine-degrading enzyme. The inactivation of the cdsB gene in C. difficile also removed the cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production, but failed to remove the Na2S-dependent repression, which supports that the cysteine-dependent repression of toxin production is probably attributable to the accumulation of cysteine by-products. We also mapped a δ54 (SigL-dependent promoter upstream from the cdsB gene, and cdsB expression was not induced in response to cysteine in the cdsR::ermB or sigL::ermB strain. Using a reporter gene fusion analysis, we identified the necessary promoter sequence for cysteine-dependent cdsB expression. Taken together, these results indicate that CdsB is a key inducible cysteine desulfidase in C. difficile which is regulated by δ54 and CdsR in response to cysteine and that cysteine-dependent regulation of toxin production is closely associated with cysteine degradation.

  14. Oxidation Resistance of the Sulfur Amino Acids: Methionine and Cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Bin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur amino acids are a kind of amino acids which contain sulfhydryl, and they play a crucial role in protein structure, metabolism, immunity, and oxidation. Our review demonstrates the oxidation resistance effect of methionine and cysteine, two of the most representative sulfur amino acids, and their metabolites. Methionine and cysteine are extremely sensitive to almost all forms of reactive oxygen species, which makes them antioxidative. Moreover, methionine and cysteine are precursors of S-adenosylmethionine, hydrogen sulfide, taurine, and glutathione. These products are reported to alleviate oxidant stress induced by various oxidants and protect the tissue from the damage. However, the deficiency and excess of methionine and cysteine in diet affect the normal growth of animals; thereby a new study about defining adequate levels of methionine and cysteine intake is important.

  15. Cysteine sulfoxide derivatives in Petiveria alliacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, R; Musah, R A

    2001-11-01

    Two diastereomers of S-benzyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide have been isolated from fresh roots of Petiveria alliacea. Their structures and absolute configurations have been determined by NMR, MALDI-HRMS, IR and CD spectroscopy and confirmed by comparison with authentic compounds. Both the R(S) and S(S) diastereomers of the sulfoxide are present in all parts of the plant (root, stem, and leaves) with the latter diastereomer being predominant. Their total content greatly varied in different parts of the plant between 0.07 and 2.97 mg g(-1) fr. wt, being by far the highest in the root. S-Benzylcysteine has also been detected in trace amounts (<10 microg g(-1) fr. wt) in all parts of the plant. This represents the first report of the presence of S-benzylcysteine derivatives in nature.

  16. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  17. Retaining in-gel zymographic activity of cysteine proteases via a cysteine-supplemented running buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vootukuri Reddy, Sreekanth; Philpott, Mike P; Trigiante, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Zymography is a powerful technique to separate and identify different enzymatic activities on a standard acrylamide gel. For oxidation prone enzymes such as cysteine proteases however, the oxidizing species generated by electrolysis of the gel running buffer may result in partial or complete inactivation, thus compromising the final readout. This can be only partially remedied by subsequent treatment of the gel with reducing agents. We demonstrate the generation of reactive oxidizing species during electrophoresis and discovered that supplementation of the gel running buffer with a minimum of 5 mM cysteine prevents enzyme inactivation and allows retention of proteolytic activity as measured by zymography on model substrate N α-benzoyl-l-arginine p-nitroanilide, without at the same time altering the mobilities of the gel proteins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Electrostatic influence of local cysteine environments on disulfide exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G H; Cennerazzo, M J; Karalis, A J; Field, D

    1981-11-10

    The ionic strength dependence of the bimolecular rate constant for reaction of the negative disulfide 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) with cysteines in fragments of naturally occurring proteins was determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The Debye-Hückel relationship was applied to determine the effective charge at the cysteine and thereby determine the extent to which nearby neighbors in the primary sequence influence the kinetics. Corrections for the secondary salt effect on cysteine pKs were determined by direct spectrometric pH titration of sulfhydryl groups or by observation of the ionic strength dependence of kinetics of cysteine reaction with the neutral disulfide 2,2'-dithiodipyridine. Quantitative expressions was verified by model studies with N-acetyl-cystein. At ionic strengths equal to or greater than 20 mM, the net charge at the polypeptide cysteine site is the sum of the single negative charge of the thiolate anion and the charges of the amino acids immediately preceding and following the cysteine in the primary sequence. At lower ionic strengths, more distant residues influence kinetics. At pH 7.0, 23 degree C, and an ionic strength of 20 mM, rate constants for reaction of the negative disulfide with a cysteine having two positive neighbors, one positive and one neutral neighbor, or two neutral neighbors are 132000, 3350, and 367 s-1 M-1, respectively. This corresponds to a contribution to the activation energy of 0.65- 1.1 kcal/mol per ion pair involved in collision between the cysteine and disulfide regions. The results permit the estimation that cysteine local environments may provide a means of achieving a 10(6)-fold range in rate constants in disulfide exchange reactions in random-coil proteins. This range may prove useful in developing strategies for directing disulfide pairing in synthetic proteins.

  19. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  20. Gel-free proteomic methodologies to study reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, S; García-Santamarina, S; Hidalgo, E

    2015-05-01

    Oxidative modifications in proteins have been traditionally considered as hallmarks of damage by oxidative stress and aging. However, oxidants can generate a huge variety of reversible and irreversible modifications in amino acid side chains as well as in the protein backbones, and these post-translational modifications can contribute to the activation of signal transduction pathways, and also mediate the toxicity of oxidants. Among the reversible modifications, the most relevant ones are those arising from cysteine oxidation. Thus, formation of sulfenic acid or disulfide bonds is known to occur in many enzymes as part of their catalytic cycles, and it also participates in the activation of signaling cascades. Furthermore, these reversible modifications have been usually attributed with a protective role, since they may prevent the formation of irreversible damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species. Among irreversible modifications, protein carbonyl formation has been linked to damage and death, since it cannot be repaired and can lead to protein loss-of-function and to the formation of protein aggregates. This review is aimed at researchers interested on the biological consequences of oxidative stress, both at the level of signaling and toxicity. Here we are providing a concise overview on current mass-spectrometry-based methodologies to detect reversible cysteine oxidation and irreversible protein carbonyl formation in proteomes. We do not pretend to impose any of the different methodologies, but rather to provide an objective catwalk on published gel-free approaches to detect those two types of modifications, from a biologist's point of view.

  1. The role of cysteine residues in the sulphate transporter, SHST1: construction of a functional cysteine-less transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Susan M

    2005-05-20

    We investigated the role of cysteine residues in the sulphate transporter, SHST1, with the aim of generating a functional cysteine-less variant. SHST1 contains five cysteine residues and none was essential for function. However, replacement of C421 resulted in a reduction in transport activity. Sulphate transport by C205 mutants was dependent on the size of the residue at this position. Alanine at position 205 resulted in a complete loss of function whereas leucine resulted in a 3-fold increase in sulphate transport relative to wild type SHST1. C205 is located in a putative intracellular loop and our results suggest that this loop may be important for sulphate transport. By replacing C205 with leucine and the other four cysteine residues with alanine, we constructed a cysteine-less variant of SHST1 that has transport characteristics indistinguishable from wild type. This construct will be useful for further structure and function studies of SHST1.

  2. Fe2O3 nanoparticles suppress Kv1.3 channels via affecting the redox activity of Kvβ2 subunit in Jurkat T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Wei-Xia; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning; Hao, Wei; Gao, Xue; Cao, Ji-Min

    2015-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising nanomaterials in medical practice due to their special magnetic characteristics and nanoscale size. However, their potential impacts on immune cells are not well documented. This study aims to investigate the effects of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) on the electrophysiology of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat T cells. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that incubation of Jurkat cells with Fe2O3-NPs dose- and time-dependently decreased the current density and shifted the steady-state inactivation curve and the recovery curve of Kv1.3 channels to a rightward direction. Fe2O3-NPs increased the NADP level but decreased the NADPH level of Jurkat cells. Direct induction of NADPH into the cytosole of Jurkat cells via the pipette abolished the rightward shift of the inactivation curve. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that Fe2O3-NPs could be endocytosed by Jurkat cells with relatively low speed and capacity. Fe2O3-NPs did not significantly affect the viability of Jurkat cells, but suppressed the expressions of certain cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL-2) and interferon responsive genes (IRF-1 and PIM-1), and the time courses of Fe2O3-NPs endocytosis and effects on the expressions of cytokines and interferon responsive genes were compatible. We conclude that Fe2O3-NPs can be endocytosed by Jurkat cells and act intracellularly. Fe2O3-NPs decrease the current density and delay the inactivation and recovery kinetics of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat cells by oxidizing NADPH and therefore disrupting the redox activity of the Kvβ2 auxiliary subunit, and as a result, lead to changes of the Kv1.3 channel function. These results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles may affect T cell function by disturbing the activity of Kv1.3 channels. Further, the suppressing effects of Fe2O3-NPs on the expressions of certain inflammatory cytokines and interferon responsive genes suggest that iron

  3. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  4. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  5. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  6. Modification of Keap1 Cysteine Residues by Sulforaphane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenqi; Eggler, Aimee L.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) through modification of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) cysteines, leading to up-regulation of the antioxidant response element (ARE), is an important mechanism of cellular defense against reactive oxygen species and xenobiotic electrophiles. Sulforaphane, occurring in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, is a potent natural ARE activator that functions by modifying Keap1 cysteine residues, but there are conflicting in vitro and in vivo data regarding which of these cysteine residues react. Although most biological data indicate that modification of C151 is essential for sulforaphane action, some recent studies using mass spectrometry have failed to identify C151 as a site of Keap1 sulforaphane reaction. We have reconciled these conflicting data using mass spectrometry with a revised sample preparation protocol and confirmed that C151 is indeed among the most readily modified cysteines of Keap1 by sulforaphane. Previous mass spectrometry-based studies used iodoacetamide during sample preparation to derivatize free cysteine sulfhydryl groups causing loss of sulforaphane from highly reactive and reversible cysteine residues on Keap1 including C151. By omitting iodoacetamide from the protocol and reducing sample preparation time, our mass spectrometry-based studies now confirm previous cell-based studies which showed that sulforaphane reacts with at least four cysteine residues of Keap1 including C151. PMID:21391649

  7. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection.

  8. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chunxiang; Behring, Jessica B; Shao, Di; Sverdlov, Aaron L; Whelan, Stephen A; Elezaby, Aly; Yin, Xiaoyan; Siwik, Deborah A; Seta, Francesca; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A; Matsui, Reiko; Colucci, Wilson S; McComb, Mark E; Bachschmid, Markus M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat), an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT) labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg) mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  9. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Tomasić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-10-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria.

  10. Cysteine-rich mini-proteins in human biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Vincent; Taft, Ryan J; Alewood, Paul F

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between structure and function underpins both biochemistry and chemical biology, and has enabled the discovery of numerous agricultural and therapeutic agents. Small cysteine-rich proteins, which form a unique set of protein frameworks and folds, are found in all living organisms and often play crucial roles as hormones, growth factors, ion channel modulators and enzyme inhibitors in various biological pathways. Here we review secreted human cysteine-rich mini-proteins, classify them into broad families and briefly describe their structure and function. To systematically investigate this protein sub-class we designed a step-wise high throughput algorithm that is able to isolate the mature and active forms of human secreted cysteine-rich proteins (up to 200 amino acids in length) and extract their cysteine scaffolds. We limited our search to frameworks that contain an even number of cysteine residues (cysteine-rich frameworks spread over 378 secreted cysteine-rich mini-proteins. Restricting our search to those that contain >5% cysteine residues led to the identification of 22 cysteine-rich frameworks representing 21 protein families. Analysis of their molecular targets showed that these mini-proteins are frequently ligands for G protein- and enzyme-coupled receptors, transporters, extracellular enzyme inhibitors, and antimicrobial peptides. It is clear that these human secreted mini-proteins possess a wide diversity of frameworks and folds, some of which are conserved across the phylogenetic spectrum. Further study of these proteins will undoubtedly lead to insights into unresolved questions of basic biology, and the development of system-specific human therapeutics.

  11. Effect of Redox “Non-Innocent” Linker on the Catalytic Activity of Copper-Catecholate-Decorated Metal–Organic Frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Huang, Zhiyuan [Chemical Sciences & amp, Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Cui, Yuexing [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Liu, Jian [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Krzyaniak, Matthew D. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Li, Zhanyong [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Noh, Hyunho [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Wasielewski, Michael R. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Delferro, Massimiliano [Chemical Sciences & amp, Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Farha, Omar K. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208, United States; Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia

    2017-12-19

    Two new UiO-68 type of Zr-MOFs featuring redox non-innocent catechol-based linkers of different redox activities have been synthesized through a de novo mixed-linker strategy. Metalation of the MOFs with Cu(II) precursors triggers the reduction of Cu(II) by the phenyl-catechol groups to Cu(I) with the concomitant formation of semiquinone radicals as evidenced by EPR and XPS characterization. The MOF-supported catalysts are selective toward the allylic oxidation of cyclohexene and it is found that the presence of in situ-generated Cu(I) species exhibits enhanced catalytic activity as compared to a similar MOF with Cu(II) metalated naphthalenyl-dihydroxy groups. This work unveils the importance of metal-support redox interactions in the catalytic activity of MOF-supported catalysts which are not easily accessible in traditional metal oxide supports.

  12. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  13. A p-nitroaniline redox-active solid-state electrolyte for battery-like electrochemical capacitive energy storage combined with an asymmetric supercapacitor based on metal oxide functionalized β-polytype porous silicon carbide electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yoo, Jeeyoung; Kim, Jooheon

    2017-05-23

    A unique redox active flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with ultra-high capacitance and energy density was fabricated using a composite comprising MgCo 2 O 4 nanoneedles and micro and mesoporous silicon carbide flakes (SiCF) (SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 ) as the positive electrode material. Due to the synergistic effect of the two materials, this hybrid electrode has a high specific capacitance of 516.7 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 in a 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. To obtain a reasonable matching of positive and negative electrode pairs, a composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and SiCF (SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 ) was synthesized for use as a negative electrode material, which shows a high capacitance of 423.2 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 . Therefore, by pairing the SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 positive electrode and the SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 negative electrode with a redox active quasi-solid-state PVA-KOH-p-nitroaniline (PVA-KOH-PNA) gel electrolyte, a novel solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor device was assembled. Because of the synergistic effect between the highly porous SiCF and the vigorous redox-reaction of metal oxides, the hybrid nanostructure electrodes exhibited outstanding charge storage and transport. In addition, the redox active PVA-KOH-PNA electrolyte adds additional pseudocapacitance, which arises from the nitro-reduction and oxidation and reduction process of the reduction product of p-phenylenediamine, resulting in an enhancement of the capacitance (a specific capacitance of 161.77 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 ) and energy density (maximum energy density of 72.79 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 727.96 W kg -1 ).

  14. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  15. Cysteine-functional polymers via thiol-ene conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Matthias; Reimann, Oliver; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Groll, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    A thiofunctional thiazolidine is introduced as a new low-molar-mass building block for the introduction of cysteine residues via a thiol-ene reaction. Allyl-functional polyglycidol (PG) is used as a model polymer to demonstrate polymer-analogue functionalization through reaction with the unsaturated side-chains. A modified trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBSA) assay is used for the redox-insensitive quantification and a precise final cysteine content can be predetermined at the polymerization stage. Native chemical ligation at cysteine-functional PG is performed as a model reaction for a chemoselective peptide modification of this polymer. The three-step synthesis of the thiofunctional thiazolidine reactant, together with the standard thiol-ene coupling and the robust quantification assay, broadens the toolbox for thiol-ene chemistry and offers a generic and straightforward approach to cysteine-functional materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    show that electron-deficient olefins, including acrylamides, can be tuned to react with cysteine thiols in a rapidly reversible manner. Installation of a nitrile group increased the olefins' intrinsic reactivity, but, paradoxically, eliminated the formation of irreversible adducts. Incorporation...

  17. Cysteine String Protein α: A New Role in Vesicle Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Jiansong; Wu, Ling-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Zhang et al. (2012) and Rozas et al. (2012) find that cysteine string protein α, a protein involved in neurodegeneration, regulates vesicle endocytosis via interaction with dynamin 1, which may participate in regulating synaptic transmission and possibly in maintaining synapses.

  18. Improved L-cysteine electrocatalysis through a sequential drop dry technique using multi-walled carbon nanotubes and cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyoni, Stephen; Mugadza, Tawanda; Nyokong, Tebello

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A sequential drop dry modification of a glassy carbon electrode where by multiwalled carbon nanotubes are first placed on to the electrode followed by cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine gave a better catalytic response towards the oxidation of L-cysteine than when the two components were mixed, due to the higher catalytic activity of the former as judged by scanning electrochemical microscopy. - Highlights: • A glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine by a sequential drop dry method. • The modified surface gave a better catalytic response towards the oxidation of L-cysteine than when the individual components were mixed. • Scanning electrochemical microscopy was employed for surface characterization. - Abstract: Voltammetry, chronoamperometry, scanning electrochemical microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods are used for characterization of a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)–cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine (CoTAPc) mixture or sequential drop dry modification technique whereby the MWCNTs are first placed on to the electrode followed by CoTAPc. The sequential drop dry CoTAPc–MWCNTs modified surface gave better catalytic responses with a catalytic rate constant of 2.2 × 10 5 M −1 s −1 , apparent electron transfer rate constant of 0.073 cm s −1 , and a limit of detection of 2.8 × 10 −7 M. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) surface characterization (topography and reactivity) further gave proof the better catalytic perfomance of the sequential drop dry CoTAPc–MWCNTs modified surface

  19. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  20. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    OpenAIRE

    Lepelley Maud; Amor Mohamed; Martineau Nelly; Cheminade Gerald; Caillet Victoria; McCarthy James

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences ...

  1. Biochemical characterization of VQ-VII, a cysteine peptidase with broad specificity, isolated from Vasconcellea quercifolia latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, María José; Trejo, Sebastián Alejandro; Natalucci, Claudia Luisa; López, Laura María Isabel

    2013-06-01

    The latex from Vasconcellea quercifolia ("oak leaved papaya"), a member of the Caricaceae family, contains at least seven cysteine endopeptidases with high proteolytic activity, which helps to protect these plants against injury. In this study, we isolated and characterized the most basic of these cysteine endopeptidases, named VQ-VII. This new purified enzyme was homogeneous by bidimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, and exhibited a molecular mass of 23,984 Da and an isoelectric point >11. The enzymatic activity of VQ-VII was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid, confirming that it belongs to the catalytic group of cysteine endopeptidases. By investigating the cleavage of the oxidized insulin B-chain to establish the hydrolytic specificity of VQ-VII, we found 13 cleavage sites on the substrate, revealing that it is a broad-specificity peptidase. The pH profiles toward p-Glu-Phe-Leu-p-nitroanilide (PFLNA) and casein showed that the optimum pH is about 6.8 for both substrates, and that in casein, it is active over a wide pH range (activity higher than 80 % between pH 6 and 9.5). Kinetic enzymatic assays were performed with the thiol peptidase substrate PFLNA (K m = 0.454 ± 0.046 mM, k cat = 1.57 ± 0.07 s(-1), k cat/K m = 3.46 × 10(3) ± 14 s(-1) M(-1)). The N-terminal sequence (21 amino acids) of VQ-VII showed an identity >70 % with 11 plant cysteine peptidases and the presence of highly conserved residues and motifs shared with the "papain-like" family of peptidases. VQ-VII proved to be a new latex enzyme of broad specificity, which can degrade extensively proteins of different nature in a wide pH range.

  2. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  3. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam [Dept. of Fine Chemistry, Cosmetic R and D Center, Cosmetic Industry Coupled Collaboration Center, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jino [Daebong LS. Ltd, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ{sub 50}) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on {sup 1}O{sub 2} -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC{sub 50} ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics.

  4. Cysteine homeostasis plays an essential role in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Consolación; Bermúdez, M Ángeles; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine is the metabolic precursor of essential biomolecules such as vitamins, cofactors, antioxidants and many defense compounds. The last step of cysteine metabolism is catalysed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), which incorporates reduced sulfur into O-acetylserine to produce cysteine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the main OASTL isoform OAS-A1 and the cytosolic desulfhydrase DES1, which degrades cysteine, contribute to the cytosolic cysteine homeostasis. • Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of knockout plants for OAS-A1 and for DES1 show a high correlation with the biotic stress series in both cases. • The study of the response of knockout mutants to plant pathogens shows that des1 mutants behave as constitutive systemic acquired resistance mutants, with high resistance to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, salicylic acid accumulation and WRKY54 and PR1 induction, while oas-a1 knockout mutants are more sensitive to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. However, oas-a1 knockout mutants lack the hypersensitive response associated with the effector-triggered immunity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 avrRpm1. • Our results highlight the role of cysteine as a crucial metabolite in the plant immune response. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam; Park, Jino

    2017-01-01

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ 50 ) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on 1 O 2 -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC 50 ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics

  6. Cysteine transporter SLC3A1 promotes breast cancer tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yang; Cao, Yuan; Wang, Yongbin; Li, Wei; Liu, Xinyi; Lv, Yixuan; Li, Xiaoling; Mi, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine is an essential amino acid for infants, aged people as well as patients with metabolic disorders. Although the thiol group of cysteine side chain is active in oxidative reactions, the role of cysteine in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the expression level of the solute carrier family 3, member 1 (SLC3A1), the cysteine carrier, tightly correlated with clinical stages and patients' survival. Elevated SLC3A1 expression accelerated the cysteine uptake and the accumulation of reductive glutathione (GSH), leading to reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS increased the stability and activity of PP2Ac, resulting in decreased AKT activity. Hence, SLC3A1 activated the AKT signaling through inhibiting PP2A phosphatase activity. Consistently, overexpression of SLC3A1 enhanced tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells, whereas blocking SLC3A1 either with specific siRNA or SLC3A1 specific inhibitor sulfasalazine suppressed tumor growth and also abolished dietary NAC-promoted tumor growth. Collectively, our data demonstrate that SLC3A1 promotes cysteine uptake and determines cellular response to antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting SLC3A1 is a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  7. Crystal structure of the zymogen form of the group A Streptococcus virulence factor SpeB: an integrin-binding cysteine protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, T F; Cooney, J C; Baker, H M; McSweeney, S; Liu, M; Gubba, S; Musser, J M; Baker, E N

    2000-02-29

    Pathogenic bacteria secrete protein toxins that weaken or disable their host, and thereby act as virulence factors. We have determined the crystal structure of streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), a cysteine protease that is a major virulence factor of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes and participates in invasive disease episodes, including necrotizing fasciitis. The structure, determined for the 40-kDa precursor form of SpeB at 1.6-A resolution, reveals that the protein is a distant homologue of the papain superfamily that includes the mammalian cathepsins B, K, L, and S. Despite negligible sequence identity, the protease portion has the canonical papain fold, albeit with major loop insertions and deletions. The catalytic site differs from most other cysteine proteases in that it lacks the Asn residue of the Cys-His-Asn triad. The prosegment has a unique fold and inactivation mechanism that involves displacement of the catalytically essential His residue by a loop inserted into the active site. The structure also reveals the surface location of an integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif that is a feature unique to SpeB among cysteine proteases and is linked to the pathogenesis of the most invasive strains of S. pyogenes.

  8. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  9. Catalytic Mechanism of Cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi As Determined from Solvent Kinetic Isotope Effects of Steady-State and Pre-Steady-State Kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang; Meek, Thomas D

    2018-02-02

    Cruzain, an important drug target for Chagas disease, is a member of clan CA of the cysteine proteases. Understanding the catalytic mechanism of cruzain is vital to the design of new inhibitors. To this end, we have determined pH-rate profiles for substrates and affinity agents and solvent kinetic isotope effects in pre-steady-state and steady-state modes using three substrates: Cbz-Phe-Arg-AMC, Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC, and Cbz-Arg-Ala-AMC. The pH-rate profile of k cat /K m for Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC indicated pK 1 = 6.6 (unprotonated) and pK 2 ∼ 9.6 (protonated) groups were required for catalysis. The temperature dependence of the pK = 6.2-6.6 group exhibited a ΔH ion value of 8.4 kcal/mol, typical of histidine. The pH-rate profile of inactivation by iodoacetamide confirmed that the catalytic cysteine possesses a pK a of 9.8. Normal solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed for both D 2 O k cat (1.6-2.1) and D 2 O k cat /K m (1.1-1.4) for all three substrates. Pre-steady-state kinetics revealed exponential bursts of AMC production for Cbz-Phe-Arg-AMC and Cbz-Arg-Arg-AMC, but not for Cbz-Arg-Ala-AMC. The overall solvent isotope effect on k cat can be attributed to the solvent isotope effect on the deacylation step. Our results suggest that cruzain is unique among papain-like cysteine proteases in that the catalytic cysteine and histidine have neutral charges in the free enzyme. The generation of the active thiolate of the catalytic cysteine is likely preceded (and possibly triggered) by a ligand-induced conformational change, which could bring the catalytic dyad into the proximity to effect proton transfer.

  10. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  11. Structural and Immunological Characteristics of a 28-Kilodalton Cruzipain-Like Cysteine Protease of Paragonimus westermani Expressed in the Definitive Host Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Doo-Hee; Chung, Joon-Yong; Chung, Young-Bae; Bahk, Young-Yil; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2000-01-01

    A complete cDNA sequence encoding a 28-kDa cruzipain-like cysteine protease of adult Paragonimus westermani, termed Pw28CCP, was isolated from an adult cDNA library. The cDNA contained a single open reading frame of 975 bp encoding 325 amino acids, which exhibited the structural motif and domain organization characteristic of cysteine proteases of non-cathepsin Bs including a hydrophobic signal sequence, an ERFNIN motif, and essential cysteine residues as well as active sites in the mature catalytic region. Analysis of its phylogenetic position revealed that this novel enzyme belonged to the cruzipain-like cysteine proteases. The sequence of the first 13 amino acids predicted from the mature domain of Pw28CCP was in accord with that determined from the native 28-kDa enzyme purified from the adult worm. Expression of Pw28CCP was observed specifically in juvenile and adult worms, with a location in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting that this enzyme could be secreted and involved in nutrient uptake and immune modulation. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli was used to assess antigenicity by immunoblotting with sera from patients with active paragonimiasis and from those with other parasitic infections. The resulting sensitivity of 86.2% (56 of 65 samples) and specificity of 98% (147 of 150 samples) suggest its potential as an antigen for use in immunodiagnosis. PMID:11063501

  12. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  14. Measuring site occupancy: a new perspective on cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Site occupancy is an extremely important aspect of quantification of protein modifications. Knowing the degree of modification of each oxidised cysteine residue is critical to understanding the biological role of these modifications. Yet modification site occupancy is very often overlooked, in part because there are very few analytical tools that allow such measurements. Here we present a new strategy, which provides quantitative analysis of cysteine S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH) simultaneously at the resolution of single cysteine and allows for determination of relative oxidation occupancy of the modification site. We show that, on one hand, heavily modified cysteines are not necessarily involved in the response to oxidative stress. On the other hand residues with low modification level can be dramatically affected by mild oxidative imbalance. We make use of high resolution mass spectrometry. The method relies on differential reduction of "total" cysteines, SNO cysteines and SOH cysteines with TCEP, sodium ascorbate and sodium arsenite respectively followed by iodoTMT(TM) alkylation. Enrichment of iodoTMT(TM)-containing peptides is performed using anti-TMT antibody. In vivo model of mild oxidative stress in Escherichia coli is used. To induce endogenous SNO bacteria were grown anaerobically in minimal media supplemented with fumarate or nitrate. Short-term treatment with submilimolar levels of hydrogen peroxide were used to induce SOH. We have quantified 114 SNO/SOH modified peptides corresponding to 90 proteins. Only 6 modified peptides changed significantly under mild oxidative stress. Quantitative information allowed us to determine relative modification site occupancy of each identified modified residue and pin point heavily modified ones. The method proved to be precise and sensitive enough to detect and quantify endogenous levels of oxidative stress on proteome-wide scale and brings a new perspective on the role of the modification site

  15. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  16. Biotin Switch Assays for Quantitation of Reversible Cysteine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Kast, J

    2017-01-01

    Thiol groups in protein cysteine residues can be subjected to different oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Reversible cysteine oxidation, including S-nitrosylation, S-sulfenylation, S-glutathionylation, and disulfide formation, modulate multiple biological functions, such as enzyme catalysis, antioxidant, and other signaling pathways. However, the biological relevance of reversible cysteine oxidation is typically underestimated, in part due to the low abundance and high reactivity of some of these modifications, and the lack of methods to enrich and quantify them. To facilitate future research efforts, this chapter describes detailed procedures to target the different modifications using mass spectrometry-based biotin switch assays. By switching the modification of interest to a biotin moiety, these assays leverage the high affinity between biotin and avidin to enrich the modification. The use of stable isotope labeling and a range of selective reducing agents facilitate the quantitation of individual as well as total reversible cysteine oxidation. The biotin switch assay has been widely applied to the quantitative analysis of S-nitrosylation in different disease models and is now also emerging as a valuable research tool for other oxidative cysteine modifications, highlighting its relevance as a versatile, robust strategy for carrying out in-depth studies in redox proteomics. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cysteine Sulfoxidation Increases the Photostability of Red Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haiyan; Yang, Bing; Ma, Cheng; Hu, Ying S; Wang, Peng George; Wang, Lei

    2016-10-21

    Photobleaching of fluorescent proteins (FPs) is a major limitation to their use in advanced microscopy, and improving photostability remains highly challenging due to limited understanding of its molecular mechanism. Here we discovered a new mechanism to increase FP photostability. Cysteine oxidation, implicated in only photobleaching before, was found to drastically enhance FP photostability to the contrary. We generated a far-red FP mStable by introducing a cysteine proximal to the chromophore. Upon illumination, this cysteine was oxidized to sulfinic and sulfonic acids, enabling mStable more photostable than its ancestor mKate2 by 12-fold and surpassing other far-red FPs. mStable outperformed in laser scanning confocal imaging and super-resolution structured illumination microscopy. Moreover, photosensitization to oxidize a cysteine similarly introduced in another FP mPlum also increased its photostability by 23-fold. This postfolding cysteine sulfoxidation cannot be simply substituted by the isosteric aspartic acid, representing a unique mechanism valuable for engineering better photostability into FPs.

  18. Modulation of the reactivity of the essential cysteine residue of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Velasco-García, Roberto; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2002-02-01

    Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) catalyses the irreversible NAD(P)(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. In the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa this reaction is an obligatory step in the assimilation of carbon and nitrogen when bacteria are growing in choline or choline precursors. As with every aldehyde dehydrogenase studied so far, BADH possesses an essential cysteine residue involved in the formation of the intermediate thiohemiacetal with the aldehyde substrate. We report here that the chemical modification of this residue is conveniently measured by the loss in enzyme activity, which allowed us to explore its reactivity in a pH range around neutrality. The pH dependence of the observed second-order rate constant of BADH inactivation by methyl methanethiosulphonate (MMTS) suggests that at low pH values the essential cysteine residue exists as thiolate by the formation of an ion pair with a positively charged residue. The estimated macroscopic pK values are 8.6 and 4.0 for the free and ion-pair-forming thiolate respectively. The reactivity towards MMTS of both thiolate forms is notably lower than that of model compounds of similar pK, suggesting a considerable steric inhibition by the structure of the protein. Binding of the dinucleotides rapidly induced a significant and transitory increment of thiolate reactivity, followed by a relatively slow change to an almost unreactive form. Thus it seems that to gain protection against oxidation without compromising catalytic efficiency, BADH from P. aeruginosa has evolved a complex and previously undescribed mechanism, involving several conformational rearrangements of the active site, to suit the reactivity of the essential thiol to the availability of coenzyme and substrate.

  19. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  20. Chemical Protein Ubiquitylation with Preservation of the Native Cysteine Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Li, Guorui; Gong, Ping; Gui, Weijun; Yuan, Libo; Zhuang, Zhihao

    2016-06-02

    We report a cysteine-based ligation strategy for generating a monoubiquitylated protein while preserving the native cysteine residues on the acceptor protein. In monoubiquitylation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) this method circumvents the need to mutate the native cysteine residues on PCNA. The chemically ubiquitylated PCNA contains a noncleavable linkage of the same length as the native isopeptide linkage. It also retains the normal function of the native Ub-PCNA in stimulating the ATPase activity of replication factor C (RFC) and lesion bypass synthesis by Polη. This method may be adapted for chemical ubiquitylation of other proteins and for site-specific modification of a target protein at a specific site through sulfhydryl chemistry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  2. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  3. Characterization of L-cysteine desulfhydrase from Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T; Fukamachi, H; Yamamoto, M; Igarashi, T

    2009-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is responsible for lysis of red blood cells and is a major compound for oral malodor. To clarify the production mechanism of hydrogen sulfide in Prevotella intermedia, we found an L-cysteine desulfhydrase gene (lcs) homologue on the genome database of P. intermedia ATCC25611 and characterized its gene product. The lcs gene homologue cloned into pGEX6p-1 vector was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Lcs activity was assayed by detection of the reaction products (hydrogen sulfide and pyruvate) or its derivatives from L-cysteine. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to convert an amino acid of the Lcs molecule. The purified lcs gene product catalysed the degradation of L-cysteine to pyruvate, ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide, indicating that the protein is L-cysteine desulfhydrase. The enzyme required pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor, and it was highly active at pH 7.0 and completely inhibited by ZnCl(2). The K(m) and V(max) of the enzyme were 0.7 mm and 4.2 micromol/min/mg, respectively. Replacement of Tyr-59, Tyr-118, Asp-198, and Lys-233 with any of the amino acids resulted in the complete disappearance of Lcs activity, implying that these amino acids are essential for enzyme activity. In addition, hydrogen sulfide produced by this enzyme lysed sheep red blood cells and modified hemoglobin. These results show the enzymatic properties of L-cysteine desulfhydrase from P. intermedia ATCC25611 and also suggest that the Lcs enzyme, which produces hydrogen sulfide from L-cysteine, is closely associated with the pathogenesis of P. intermedia.

  4. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  5. Electrochemistry of redox-active Mn porphyrin-based SOD mimic MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ - Study of Redox Species Involved in ROS/RNS Scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Weitner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese ortho tetrakis(N-n-butoxyethylpyridinium-2-ylporphyrin, MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+, is a third-generation redox-active compound currently undergoing preclinical exploration. This work is intended to complement the already extensive research of its chemical and biological properties by a simple electrochemical study. The thermodynamic parameters related to the Mn(IV porphyrin species of MnTnBuOE-2-PyP5+ determined in this work support its observed reactivity as an efficient scavenger of peroxynitrite. The corresponding driving forces for the possible single-electron or two-electron reductions of ONOO- have been estimated as well.

  6. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  7. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  8. IDENTIFYING CRITICAL CYSTEINE RESIDUES IN ARSENIC (+3 OXIDATION STATE) METHYLTRANSFERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) catalyzes methylation of inorganic arsenic to mono, di, and trimethylated arsenicals. Orthologous AS3MT genes in genomes ranging from simple echinoderm to human predict a protein with five conserved cysteine (C) residues. In ...

  9. Chemoselective PEGylation of cysteine analogs of human basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the stability and bioactivity of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) by site-specific pegylation. Methods: Four new mutants of hbFGF were designed with substituted Asp68, Lys77, Glu78 and Arg81 with cysteine with the aid of bioinformatics technique, and then cloned into pET21a plasmid, ...

  10. A Serendipitous Formation of a Cysteine-bridged Disaccharide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    O-acetyl-b-D-glucopyranosylisothiouronium salt and the iodide or tosyl derivatives of L-serine,3 the desulfurization of disulfide- linked glycosyl cysteine derivatives,4 Lewis acid-catalyzed glycosylation,5,6 and solid phase glycosylation.7. Glycosylation of amino acids has previously relied on the use of amino acids protected ...

  11. Isolation of recombinant cysteine dioxygenase protein from Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašperová, A.; Kunert, J.; Horynová, M.; Weigl, E.; Sebela, M.; Lenobel, René; Raška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2011), E456-E462 ISSN 0933-7407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cysteine dioxygenase * dermatophytes * recombinant protein * keratinolytic fungi * cDNA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2011

  12. Chemoselective PEGylation of Cysteine Analogs of Human Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    crystal structure of FGF2 (PDB code: 1BFG, chain A, 1.6 oA) with high score and lower e- value and maximum sequence identity served as a template. For each cysteine analog, 10,000 molecules were generated and structure quality was validated by PSVS (http:// psvs-1_4- dev.nesg.org/ ). The best structural model was.

  13. Structure and Reactivity of the Cysteine Methyl Ester Radical Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.; O' Hair, R. A. J.; Van Stipdonk, M.; Ryzhov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and reactivity of the cysteine methyl ester radical cation, CysOMe(center dot+), have been examined in the gas phase using a combination of experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CysOMe(center dot+) undergoes rapid ion molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide,

  14. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-07-20

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers.

  15. Chemical detection of cysteine-rich circular petides in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysteine-rich circular peptides (CRCs) comprise a large family of gene encoded and low molecular weight polypeptides that has recently engaged the attention of scientists. This class of peptides exhibit a continuous circular configuration and a cystine knot backbone, which defines their resilient nature-directed structural ...

  16. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Latex has been reported to contain a number of proteins such as protease-like enzymes (Arima et al 2000;. Arribere et al 1998), chitinase (Haque and Bradbury 1999;. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene (HbCP1) from Hevea brasiliensis. SHI-QING PENG. 1,#,*, JIA-HONG ZHU. 1,#, HUI-LIANG LI.

  17. Effect of cysteine supplementation on in vitro maturation of bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parham

    2011-11-09

    Nov 9, 2011 ... This study was aimed at determining the effect of cysteine supplement during in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes. Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from abattoir ovaries were matured in vitro in. Hepes-TCM 199 supplemented with 0.2 mM sodium pyruvate, 1 µg/ml 17-β-estradiol, 10% fetal calf.

  18. Chemoselective PEGylation of Cysteine Analogs of Human Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the stability and bioactivity of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) by site-specific pegylation. Methods: Four new mutants of hbFGF were designed with substituted Asp68, Lys77, Glu78 and Arg81 with cysteine with the aid of bioinformatics technique, and then cloned into pET21a plasmid, ...

  19. Study of Ag-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode for detection of L-cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugavelu, M.; Karthikeyan, B.

    2014-11-01

    Ag-Pd bimetallic nanoparticles (Ag-Pd BNPs) as an enhanced sensing material with improved electronic transmission rates in the electrochemical sensing of L-cysteine (L-cys) has been reported. The morphology of Ag-Pd BNPs was characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Oxidation of L-cys on Ag-Pd BNPs is investigated in detail by discussing the effect of the structure and from the electrocatalytic oxidation of L-cys. We found that the Ag-Pd BNPs exhibited high electrocatalytic activity towards L-cys oxidation in neutral condition and could be used for the development of nonenzymatic L-cys sensor. Based on the efficient catalytic ability of Ag-Pd BNPs, the fabricated biosensor exhibited a wide linear range of responses to the L-cys with the concentration detection limit of nearly down to 2 mM with fast response time.

  20. Structure of human Fe-S assembly subcomplex reveals unexpected cysteine desulfurase architecture and acyl-ACP-ISD11 interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, Seth A; Van Vranken, Jonathan G; Brignole, Edward J; Patra, Shachin; Winge, Dennis R; Drennan, Catherine L; Rutter, Jared; Barondeau, David P

    2017-07-03

    In eukaryotes, sulfur is mobilized for incorporation into multiple biosynthetic pathways by a cysteine desulfurase complex that consists of a catalytic subunit (NFS1), LYR protein (ISD11), and acyl carrier protein (ACP). This NFS1-ISD11-ACP (SDA) complex forms the core of the iron-sulfur (Fe-S) assembly complex and associates with assembly proteins ISCU2, frataxin (FXN), and ferredoxin to synthesize Fe-S clusters. Here we present crystallographic and electron microscopic structures of the SDA complex coupled to enzyme kinetic and cell-based studies to provide structure-function properties of a mitochondrial cysteine desulfurase. Unlike prokaryotic cysteine desulfurases, the SDA structure adopts an unexpected architecture in which a pair of ISD11 subunits form the dimeric core of the SDA complex, which clarifies the critical role of ISD11 in eukaryotic assemblies. The different quaternary structure results in an incompletely formed substrate channel and solvent-exposed pyridoxal 5'-phosphate cofactor and provides a rationale for the allosteric activator function of FXN in eukaryotic systems. The structure also reveals the 4'-phosphopantetheine-conjugated acyl-group of ACP occupies the hydrophobic core of ISD11, explaining the basis of ACP stabilization. The unexpected architecture for the SDA complex provides a framework for understanding interactions with acceptor proteins for sulfur-containing biosynthetic pathways, elucidating mechanistic details of eukaryotic Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, and clarifying how defects in Fe-S cluster assembly lead to diseases such as Friedreich's ataxia. Moreover, our results support a lock-and-key model in which LYR proteins associate with acyl-ACP as a mechanism for fatty acid biosynthesis to coordinate the expression, Fe-S cofactor maturation, and activity of the respiratory complexes.

  1. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure

  2. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  3. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  4. Is perturbation in the quaternary structure of bacterial CysE, another regulatory mechanism for cysteine synthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepali; Gupta, Sunita; Kaur, Kanwal J; Gupta, Vibha

    2018-01-26

    Drug resistance to almost all antibiotics of Shigella flexneri, a major cause of shigellosis in developing countries, necessitates continuous discovery of novel therapeutics. This study reports a structure-function analysis of a potential drug target serine acetyltransferase (CysE), an enzyme of de novo cysteine biosynthesis pathway that is absent in humans. Analysis of CysE sequences of S. flexneri species and serotypes displayed only two variants that differed by a single amino acid substitution at position 241. Structural inspection of the available crystal structure disclosed this site to be distinct from the substrate/cofactor binding pockets or dimer/trimer interfaces. This study discovers that V241 variant of S. flexneri CysE has nearly null enzymatic activity. The observation is explained by molecular dynamic studies which reveal that the disorder generated by A241V substitution is the basis of dissociation of the quaternary assembly of S. flexneri CysE leading to loss of enzymatic activity and stability. The study provides the first evidence that position 241 of CysE, affects the catalytic efficiency of enzyme and suggests this locus as a 'hot spot' for the propagation of conformational changes. It may be postulated that transient quaternary structure of CysE maybe another mechanism for regulating the intracellular level of cysteine. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Vibrio type III effector VPA1380 is related to the cysteine protease domain of large bacterial toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Calder

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis. Its genome harbors two Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2, but only T3SS2 is required for enterotoxicity seen in animal models. Effector proteins secreted from T3SS2 have been previously shown to promote colonization of the intestinal epithelium, invasion of host cells, and destruction of the epithelial monolayer. In this study, we identify VPA1380, a T3SS2 effector protein that is toxic when expressed in yeast. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that VPA1380 is highly similar to the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6-inducible cysteine protease domains of several large bacterial toxins. Mutations in conserved catalytic residues and residues in the putative IP6-binding pocket abolished toxicity in yeast. Furthermore, VPA1380 was not toxic in IP6 deficient yeast cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that VPA1380 is a cysteine protease that requires IP6 as an activator.

  6. Vibrio Type III Effector VPA1380 Is Related to the Cysteine Protease Domain of Large Bacterial Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Thomas; Kinch, Lisa N.; Fernandez, Jessie; Salomon, Dor; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis. Its genome harbors two Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2), but only T3SS2 is required for enterotoxicity seen in animal models. Effector proteins secreted from T3SS2 have been previously shown to promote colonization of the intestinal epithelium, invasion of host cells, and destruction of the epithelial monolayer. In this study, we identify VPA1380, a T3SS2 effector protein that is toxic when expressed in yeast. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that VPA1380 is highly similar to the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6)-inducible cysteine protease domains of several large bacterial toxins. Mutations in conserved catalytic residues and residues in the putative IP6-binding pocket abolished toxicity in yeast. Furthermore, VPA1380 was not toxic in IP6 deficient yeast cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that VPA1380 is a cysteine protease that requires IP6 as an activator. PMID:25099122

  7. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H M

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  9. Ultrasensitive chemiluminescence biosensors using nucleic acid-functionalized silver-cysteine nanowires as signal amplifying labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjuan; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Meilan; Chi, Yuwu

    2018-03-26

    Ultrasensitive chemiluminescence (CL) sensors for biomolecules (DNA and proteins) have been developed by adopting DNA-functionalized silver-cysteine hybrid nanowires (p-SCNWs) as signal amplifying labels. The sensing is established from a sandwich-type DNA hybridization, where the target DNA strands are initially hybridized with the capture DNA located at paramagnetic microspheres (PMs) and subsequently hybridized with p-SCNWs functionalized with the signal DNA probe. After magnetic separation, p-SCNWs on the hybrids were completely decomposed with HNO3 to release numerous silver ions. The powerful catalysis of silver ions toward the redox reaction of K2S2O8-Mn2+-H3PO4 causes the generation of KMnO4 that is capable of oxidizing luminol at high pH, triggering an amplified chemiluminescent signal emission. The sensing combines the extraordinary sensitivity of the catalytic chemiluminescence technology and the amplifying strategy via releasing large quantities of silver ions as the catalyst from each hybrid, enabling the assay of target DNA strands at a concentration as low as 0.34 fM. The CL signals associated with single-base pair mismatched DNA strands and non-complementary DNA strands are able to be discriminated well from the CL signal related to the complementary DNA hybridization. Likewise, the combination of p-SCNWs functionalized with an aptamer and PMs/aptamer/thrombin complex allowed the chemiluminescence sensing of thrombin with a low limit of detection corresponding to 0.17 pM.

  10. Clinical and molecular characterization of 6 children with glutamate-cysteine ligase deficiency causing hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almusafri, Fatima; Elamin, Hiba E; Khalaf, Tamam E; Ali, Alaa; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; El-Hattab, Ayman W

    2017-06-01

    Glutathione (gamma-glutamylcysteinylglycine) has diverse functions including free radicals scavenging and modulating many critical cellular processes. Glutathione is synthesized by the consecutive action of the enzymes glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) and glutathione synthetase. GCL is composed of a catalytic subunit encoded by the GCLC gene and a regulatory subunit encoded by the GCLM gene. GCL deficiency due to homozygous mutations in GCLC has been reported in 6 individuals from 4 independent families. All presented with hemolytic anemia and 4 had additional neurological manifestations including cognitive impairment, neuropathy, ataxia, and myopathy. In this report, we present additional 6 children from 2 independent consanguineous families with GCL deficiency. All the children presented with neonatal hemolytic anemia. Beyond the neonatal period, they did not have jaundice or hemolysis, but continued to have mild anemia. They all had normal development and neurological examination. The affected children from the first family had the homozygous mutation c.1772G>A (p.S591N) and the second family had the homozygous mutation c.514T>A (p.S172T) in GCLC. GCL deficiency can have a mild non-neurological phenotype or a more severe phenotype with neurological manifestations. GCL deficiency can be an underdiagnosed cause of hemolytic anemia, thus awareness may aid in early diagnosis, appropriate genetic counseling, and management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic and voltammetric studies of a novel Schiff-base of cysteine and saccharin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, Semiha; Odabaşoğlu, Mustafa; Biçer, Ender; Yazar, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a novel Schiff-base of cysteine and saccharin [( 2R)-2-(1, 1-dioxo-1, 2-dihydro-1λ6-benzo[ d]isothiazol-3-ylideneamino)-3-mercapto-propionic acid] was synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. The voltammetric behaviour of Schiff-base was investigated on the static mercury drop electrode (SMDE) by using Square-Wave voltammetry (SWV) and Cyclic voltammetry (CV). The voltammograms of the Schiff-base gave three reduction waves in Britton-Robinson buffer (pH 5.0-9.0) for the potential range from 0.0 to -1.4 V. The first reversible cathodic peak is due to reduction of the mercury thiolate, produced by the thiol group of Schiff-base which adsorbs at Hg electrode surface, to metallic mercury and free thiol. The second reduction peak may be assigned to the reduction of azomethine center (>C dbnd N sbnd ) in the Schiff-base and the last peak may be related to the catalytic hydrogen reduction.

  12. A single amino acid substitution affects substrate specificity in cysteine proteinases from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smooker, P. M.; Whisstock, J. C.; Irving, J. A.; Siyaguna, S.; Spithill, T. W.; Pike, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica secretes a number of cathepsin L-like proteases that are proposed to be involved in feeding, migration, and immune evasion by the parasite. To date, six full cDNA sequences encoding cathepsin L preproproteins have been identified. Previous studies have demonstrated that one of these cathepsins (L2) is unusual in that it is able to cleave substrates with a proline in the P2 position, translating into an unusual ability (for a cysteine proteinase) to clot fibrinogen. In this study, we report the sequence of a novel cathepsin (L5) and compare the substrate specificity of a recombinant enzyme with that of recombinant cathepsin L2. Despite sharing 80% sequence identity with cathepsin L2, cathepsin L5 does not exhibit substantial catalytic activity against substrates containing proline in the P2 position. Molecular modeling studies suggested that a single amino acid change (L69Y) in the mature proteinases may account for the difference in specificity at the S2 subsite. Recombinant cathepsin L5/L69Y was expressed in yeast and a substantial increase in the ability of this variant to accommodate substrates with a proline residue in the P2 position was observed. Thus, we have identified a single amino acid substitution that can substantially influence the architecture of the S2 subsite of F. hepatica cathepsin L proteases. PMID:11206078

  13. Producing armyworm (spodoptera sp.) Bioinsecticide based on cysteine protease of red ginger (zingiber officinale var. Rubrum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, N. T.; Nur, D. F.; Utami, T. S.; Sahlan, M.; Wijanarko, A.; Hermansyah, H.

    2018-03-01

    Armyworm (Spodoptera sp.) is highly polyphagous defoliator on various horticulture and grain plants. Various chemical insecticides have been created to control it. There is a need to create an eco-friendly and specific insecticide which only affect armyworm’s nervous system. This research investigates cysteine-protease’s enzyme activity of red ginger (Zingiber officinale var. Rubrum) which is called zingibain. Its catalytic site matches with residue site in armyworm’s body so it can be used as bioinsecticide raw material which meets the criterias above. Fresh red ginger rhizomes were washed and extracted. The juice was then deposited in low temperature and centrifuged to get rid of its starch content. It was filtrated to remove large contaminants and poured into Potassium Phospate buffer. The liquid was then centrifuged again for 30 minutes before collecting the supernatant. Fresh leaves were then dipped into crude ginger protease extract and fed to fourth instar-armyworms. Leaves dipped into non-diluted extract were barely eaten by armyworm while the 50% and 25% dilution was half eaten and most eaten. The crude red ginger extract was not strong enough to kill them although the research showed its enzymatic activity reaches up to 169 PU. It still needs improvement to be produced as commercial bioinsecticide.

  14. Targeted Quantitation of Site-Specific Cysteine Oxidation in Endogenous Proteins Using a Differential Alkylation and Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jason M.; Danielson, Steven R.; Behring, Jessica B.; Atsriku, Christian; Britton, David J.; Puckett, Rachel L.; Schilling, Birgit; Campisi, Judith; Benz, Christopher C.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are both physiological intermediates in cellular signaling and mediators of oxidative stress. The cysteine-specific redox-sensitivity of proteins can shed light on how ROS are regulated and function, but low sensitivity has limited quantification of the redox state of many fundamental cellular regulators in a cellular context. Here we describe a highly sensitive and reproducible oxidation analysis approach (OxMRM) that combines protein purification, differential alkylation with stable isotopes, and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry that can be applied in a targeted manner to virtually any cysteine or protein. Using this approach, we quantified the site-specific cysteine oxidation status of endogenous p53 for the first time and found that Cys182 at the dimerization interface of the DNA binding domain is particularly susceptible to diamide oxidation intracellularly. OxMRM enables analysis of sulfinic and sulfonic acid oxidation levels, which we validate by assessing the oxidation of the catalytic Cys215 of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B under numerous oxidant conditions. OxMRM also complements unbiased redox proteomics discovery studies as a verification tool through its high sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and throughput. PMID:20233844

  15. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influenc...... its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated...... is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis...... of a redox directed activity "light switch", reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein...

  16. Expanding the Catalytic Promiscuity of Heparinase III from Pedobacter heparinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yayun; Lu, Meiling; Wang, Zongqiang; Wu, Xuri; Chen, Yijun

    2017-02-21

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) lyases are useful biocatalysts for the preparation of oligosaccharides, but their substrate spectra are limited to the same family. Thus, the degradation activity across families of GAG lyases is advantageous and desirable for various applications. In this study, residue Lys130 at the substrate entrance of monomeric heparinase III from Pedobacter heparinus ATCC 13125 was replaced by cysteine, and the resulting mutant K130C showed novel catalytic activity in degrading hyaluronic acid without affecting its native activity toward heparin and heparan sulfate. The broadened catalytic promiscuity by mutant K130C was the result of dimerization through a disulfide bond to expand the substrate binding pocket. This bifunctional enzyme is potentially valuable in the degradation of different types of GAGs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Aerobic sulfide production and cadmium precipitation by Escherichia coli expressing the Treponema denticola cysteine desulfhydrase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C L; Lum, A M; Ozuna, S C; Clark, D S; Keasling, J D

    2001-08-01

    The cysteine desulfhydrase gene of Treponema denticola was over-expressed in Escherichia coli to produce sulfide under aerobic conditions and to precipitate metal sulfide complexes on the cell wall. When grown in a defined salts medium supplemented with cadmium and cysteine, E. coli producing cysteine desulfhydrase secreted sulfide and removed nearly all of the cadmium from solution after 48 h. A control strain produced significantly less sulfide and removed significantly less cadmium. Measurement of acid-labile sulfide and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that cadmium was precipitated as cadmium sulfide. Without supplemental cysteine, both the E. coli producing cysteine desulfhydrase and the control E. coli demonstrated minimal cadmium removal.

  18. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: Parameterization and validation of a simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R.; Poole, Leslie B.; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pKas from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pKas. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pKas; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pKas. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pKa values (where the calculation should reproduce the pKa within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pKa in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pKa should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. PMID:22777874

  19. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsiaryna Skryhan

    Full Text Available Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1 responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1 that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2 that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1, thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4 and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC. AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%. Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98-99%. In addition of being part of a redox directed activity "light switch", reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these

  20. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A; Nielsen, Morten M; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B; Glaring, Mikkel A; Jensen, Poul E; Palcic, Monica M; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98-99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity "light switch", reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings is

  1. Fluoresence quenching of riboflavin in aqueous solution by methionin and cystein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droessler, P.; Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Hegemann, P.

    2003-01-01

    The fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes of riboflavin in methanol, DMSO, water, and aqueous solutions of the sulphur atom containing amino acids methionin and cystein have been determined. In methanol, DMSO, and water (pH=4-8) only dynamic fluorescence reduction due to intersystem crossing and internal conversion is observed. In aqueous methionin solutions of pH=5.25-9 a pH independent static and dynamic fluorescence quenching occurs probably due to riboflavin anion-methionin cation pair formation. In aqueous cystein solutions (pH range from 4.15 to 9) the fluorescence quenching increases with rising pH due to cystein thiolate formation. The cystein thiol form present at low pH does not react with neutral riboflavin. Cystein thiolate present at high pH seems to react with neutral riboflavin causing riboflavin deprotonation (anion formation) by cystein thiolate reduction to the cystein thiol form

  2. Chemical characterization of complexation behavior of pertechnetate with cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang A.-Y.; Lin J.-L.; Lo J.-G.

    1992-01-01

    The labeling behavior of cysteine with 99 TcO 4 - ion and/or 99m TcO 4 - ion at different cysteine concentrations reductant and pH values has been studied by chromatography, and the labeling yield was calculated. Three major Tc-complexes, yellow, reddish brown and green can be separated by gel filtration chromatography (GFC). Thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion-exchange chromatography (IC) were used to separate the complexes collected from GFC. The TLC, HPLC data show the pertechnetate accompanied with a yellow complex; the green and purple complex contain more than two complexes. Electrophoresis and IC data show that the complexes carry a negative charge. The conductivity, UV-VIS, flow beta-detector with HPLC and autoradiography are also applied to analyze complex formation. (author) 20 refs.; 13 figs.; 5 tabs

  3. Carbon Nanotubes Facilitate Oxidation of Cysteine Residues of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Atsushi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Wada, Momoyo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-10-19

    The adsorption of proteins onto nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) governs the early stages of nanoparticle uptake into biological systems. Previous studies regarding these adsorption processes have primarily focused on the physical interactions between proteins and nanoparticles. In this study, using reduced lysozyme and intact human serum albumin in aqueous solutions, we demonstrated that CNTs interact chemically with proteins. The CNTs induce the oxidation of cysteine residues of the proteins, which is accounted for by charge transfer from the sulfhydryl groups of the cysteine residues to the CNTs. The redox reaction simultaneously suppresses the intermolecular association of proteins via disulfide bonds. These results suggest that CNTs can affect the folding and oxidation degree of proteins in biological systems such as blood and cytosol.

  4. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  5. Thiazolidine prodrugs of cysteamine and cysteine as radioprotective agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J.C.; Koch, K.E.; Detrick, S.R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    The need for protection against the toxic effects of ionizing radiation comes from many different directions: occupational exposure, nuclear accidents, environmental sources and protection of normal tissue during the therapeutic irradiation of cancer. Sulfhydryl-containing compounds, including cysteamine and L-cysteine, have long been known to possess radioprotective properties, but their therapeutic utility is limited by their side effects at radioprotective doses. To avoid this drawback, thiazolidine prodrugs of cysteamine and L-cysteine were prepared by the condensation of each thiolamine with the aldose monosaccharides, D-ribose and D-glucose, producing RibCyst, GlcCyst, Rib-Cys and GlcCys. The prodrugs were designed to liberate the parent thiolamine nonenzymatically, after ring opening and hydrolysis, which is then available e to function as a radioprotective agent. Cysteamine`s inherent toxicity, measured using Chinese hamster V79 cells growing in culture, was completely eliminated, even at concentrations as high as 25 mM, by providing the thiolamine in the form of a prodrug. Good protection against radiation-induced lethality was demonstrated by the cysteamine prodrugs using a clonogenic assay. Protection against radiation-induced DNA single-strand breaks, as measured by alkaline elution, was also shown by both RibCyst and GlcCyst; this activity was higher than that exhibited by either cysteamine or WR-1065. The L-cysteine prodrugs, RibCys and GlcCys, also possessed radioprotective abilities under most of the conditions studied. Protection against DNA damage was comparable between L-cystein, WR-1065 and RibCys. 42 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zechmann, Bernd; Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine,...

  7. Effect of cysteine supplementation on in vitro maturation of bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B Rahim, S Jalal, N Yosef ... Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from abattoir ovaries were matured in vitro in Hepes-TCM 199 supplemented with 0.2 mM sodium pyruvate, 1 μg/ml 17-β-estradiol, 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), 0.5 μg/ml bFSH and 0 (control) and 100 or 500 μM/ml of cysteine for 24 h. When COCs matured in ...

  8. Cysteine endoprotease activity of human ribosomal protein S4 is entirely due to the C-terminal domain, and is consistent with Michaelis-Menten mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhamalla, Babu; Kumar, Mahesh; Roy, Karnati R; Kumar, R Sunil; Bhuyan, Abani K

    2013-11-01

    It is known that tandem domains of enzymes can carry out catalysis independently or by collaboration. In the case of cysteine proteases, domain sequestration abolishes catalysis because the active site residues are distributed in both domains. The validity of this argument is tested here by using isolated human ribosomal protein S4, which has been recently identified as an unorthodox cysteine protease. Cleavage of the peptide substrate Z-FR↓-AMC catalyzed by recombinant C-terminal domain of human S4 (CHS4) is studied by fluorescence-monitored steady-state and stopped-flow kinetic methods. Proteolysis and autoproteolysis were analyzed by electrophoresis. The CHS4 domain comprised of sequence residues 116-263 has been cloned and ovreexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified domain is enzymatically active. Barring minor differences, steady-state kinetic parameters for catalysis by CHS4 are very similar to those for full-length human S4. Further, stopped-flow transient kinetics of pre-steady-state substrate binding shows that the catalytic mechanism for both full-length S4 and CHS4 obeys the Michaelis-Menten model adequately. Consideration of the evolutionary domain organization of the S4e family of ribosomal proteins indicates that the central domain (residues 94-170) within CHS4 is indispensable. The C-terminal domain can carry out catalysis independently and as efficiently as the full-length human S4 does. Localization of the enzyme function in the C-terminal domain of human S4 provides the only example of a cysteine endoprotease where substrate-mediated intramolecular domain interaction is irrelevant for catalytic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  10. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.A.; Friedman, B.; Gruskin, E.A.; Schrock, R.D. III; Lloyd, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  11. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... of an uncorrelated ancilla system. This removes a restriction on the standard notion of decoupling, which becomes important for structureless resources, and yields a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. Catalytic decoupling naturally unifies various tasks like the erasure of correlations...

  13. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...

  14. Substitution of cysteine for selenocysteine in the catalytic center of type III iodothyronine deiodinase reduces catalytic efficiency and alters substrate preference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractHuman type III iodothyronine deiodinase (D3) catalyzes the conversion of T(4) to rT(3) and of T(3) to 3, 3'-diiodothyronine (T2) by inner-ring deiodination. Like types I and II iodothyronine deiodinases, D3 protein contains selenocysteine (SeC) in the highly conserved

  15. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies ...

  16. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  17. Catalytic carboxyester hydrolysis by diaminodiphenols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Two diaminodiphenols, 1 and 2, have been examined as catalysts for the hydrolysis of 4- nitrophenyl acetate (NA) and 4-nitrophenylphosphate (NP) in aqueous-acetonitrile (25% acetonitrile v/v) media at 35ºC, I = 1·0 mol dm–3. The compound 1 enhances the hydrolysis rate of NA more than 105 times. Its catalytic efficiency ...

  18. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so ...

  19. Anaerobic Cysteine Degradation and Potential Metabolic Coordination in Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loddeke, Melissa; Schneider, Barbara; Oguri, Tamiko; Mehta, Iti; Xuan, Zhenyu; Reitzer, Larry

    2017-08-15

    Salmonella enterica has two CyuR-activated enzymes that degrade cysteine, i.e., the aerobic CdsH and an unidentified anaerobic enzyme; Escherichia coli has only the latter. To identify the anaerobic enzyme, transcript profiling was performed for E. coli without cyuR and with overexpressed cyuR Thirty-seven genes showed at least 5-fold changes in expression, and the cyuPA (formerly yhaOM ) operon showed the greatest difference. Homology suggested that CyuP and CyuA represent a cysteine transporter and an iron-sulfur-containing cysteine desulfidase, respectively. E. coli and S. enterica Δ cyuA mutants grown with cysteine generated substantially less sulfide and had lower growth yields. Oxygen affected the CyuR-dependent genes reciprocally; cyuP-lacZ expression was greater anaerobically, whereas cdsH-lacZ expression was greater aerobically. In E. coli and S. enterica , anaerobic cyuP expression required cyuR and cysteine and was induced by l-cysteine, d-cysteine, and a few sulfur-containing compounds. Loss of either CyuA or RidA, both of which contribute to cysteine degradation to pyruvate, increased cyuP-lacZ expression, which suggests that CyuA modulates intracellular cysteine concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CyuA homologs are present in obligate and facultative anaerobes, confirming an anaerobic function, and in archaeal methanogens and bacterial acetogens, suggesting an ancient origin. Our results show that CyuA is the major anaerobic cysteine-catabolizing enzyme in both E. coli and S. enterica , and it is proposed that anaerobic cysteine catabolism can contribute to coordination of sulfur assimilation and amino acid synthesis. IMPORTANCE Sulfur-containing compounds such as cysteine and sulfide are essential and reactive metabolites. Exogenous sulfur-containing compounds can alter the thiol landscape and intracellular redox reactions and are known to affect several cellular processes, including swarming motility, antibiotic sensitivity, and

  20. Aromatic boronic acids as probes of the catalytic site of human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhiainen, M; Ridgway, N D; Dolphin, P J

    1987-04-03

    We have recently proposed a catalytic mechanism for human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.43) (J. Biol. Chem. (1986) 261, 7032-7043), implicating single serine and histidine residues in phosphatidylcholine cleavage and two cysteine residues in cholesterol esterification. We now confirm the involvement of serine and histidine in catalysing the phospholipase A2 action of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase by demonstrating the inhibition of this activity by phenylboronic acid (Ki = 1.23 mM) and m-aminophenylboronic acid (Ki = 2.32 mM), inhibitors of known serine/histidine hydrolases. The specificity of the interaction of aromatic boronic acids with catalytic serine and histidine residues and the putative formation of a tetrahedral adduct between boron and the lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase serine hydroxyl group which is similar to the transition-state intermediate formed between phosphatidylcholine and the catalytic serine residue was suggested by: substrate protection against inhibition by phenylboronic acids; a much reduced incorporation of phenylmethane[35S]sulphonyl fluoride into the enzyme in the presence of phenylboronic acid; the lack of interaction of histidine- or serine-modified enzyme with immobilized phenylboronic acid in the presence of glycerol (Ve/Vo = 2.7 and 2.3 respectively) when compared to the native enzyme (Ve/Vo = 5.25). Fatty acyl-lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, produced by incubation of the enzyme with a lecithin-apolipoprotein A-I proteoliposome substrate, was not retarded upon the sorbent column (Ve/Vo = 1.5). Modification of the enzyme's two free cysteine residues with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) or potassium ferricyanide reduced (Ve/Vo = 3.5) but did not abolish retardation on the sorbent column, indicating that these modifications resulted in steric hinderance of the interaction of the boron atom with the lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase serine hydroxyl group. These data suggest that the

  1. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ferguson, A.G.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  2. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR METAL BINDING CAPACITY OF CYSTEINE BY USING UV-VIS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    OpenAIRE

    Shivendu Ranjan; Nandita Dasgupta; Gyanendra Gour; Rashmi Dubey; Kumari Amrita

    2012-01-01

    The metal binding capacity of cysteine with three different metals Nickel, Copper and Lead was studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer for which absorbance values were taken after interaction of cysteine with metal salt solutions (10ppm and 100ppm). Before taking above absorbance dilution factor was set using cysteine stock. The increase in peak intensity was observed when metal salt solution and metal saltcysteine solution were compared. Based on peak shift and peak intensity finally it can b...

  3. Cysteine toxicity for oral streptococci and effect of branched-chain amino acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Cowman, R A; Baron, S S; Fitzgerald, R J

    1983-01-01

    Cysteine was bactericidal to strains of Streptococcus mutans and S. salivarius in concentrations that were nontoxic to S. sanguis, S. milleri, or S. mitior when these microorganisms were incubated in a saliva protein-based synthetic medium. Cysteine toxicity for S. mutans also occurred after incubation in synthetic base medium supplemented with amino acids as the nitrogen source for growth. The bactericidal effect of cysteine for S. mutans or S. salivarius in the saliva protein medium was inf...

  4. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Young-Bae; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine protea...

  5. Chicken scFvs with an Artificial Cysteine for Site-Directed Conjugation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aerin Yoon

    Full Text Available For the site-directed conjugation of chemicals and radioisotopes to the chicken-derived single-chain variable fragment (scFv, we investigated amino acid residues replaceable with cysteine. By replacing each amino acid of the 157 chicken variable region framework residues (FR, 82 residues on VH and 75 on VL with cysteine, 157 artificial cysteine mutants were generated and characterized. At least 27 residues on VL and 37 on VH could be replaced with cysteine while retaining the binding activity of the original scFv. We prepared three VL (L5, L6 and L7 and two VH (H13 and H16 mutants as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and showed that PEG-conjugation to the sulfhydryl group of the artificial cysteine was achievable in all five mutants. Because the charge around the cysteine residue affects the in vivo stability of thiol-maleimide conjugation, we prepared 16 charge-variant artificial cysteine mutants by replacing the flanking residues of H13 with charged amino acids and determined that the binding activity was not affected in any of the mutants except one. We prepared four charge-variant H13 artificial cysteine mutants (RCK, DCE, ECD and ECE as scFv-Ckappa fusion proteins and confirmed that the reactivity of the sulfhydryl group on cysteine is active and their binding activity is retained after the conjugation process.

  6. Electrocatalytic Oxidation and Determination of Cysteine at Oxovanadium(IV Salen Coated Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Kumar Sonkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A transition metal complex, oxovanadium(IV salen (where salen represents N,N′-bis(salicylideneethylenediamine is immobilized on glassy carbon (GC electrodes and utilized for electrocatalytic oxidation of cysteine. In presence of oxovanadium(IV salen, increased oxidation current is observed due to the effective oxidation of cysteine by the electrogenerated oxovanadium(V salen species. The oxidation current linearly varies with the concentration of cysteine from 0.1 to 1.0 mM. The modified electrode has good sensitivity and low limit of detection. These properties make the oxovanadium(IV salen as an effective electrocatalyst for the determination of cysteine.

  7. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M; Ramesh, R

    2015-03-05

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E=P or As; X=Cl or Br; L=NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d(5)) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx≠gy≠gz) at 77K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(IV)-Ru(IV); Ru(III)-Ru(III)/Ru(II)-Ru(II)) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent Ru(V)O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Changes of Highly Active Pd/MeOx (Me = Fe, Co, Ni during Catalytic Methane Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Seeburg

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fe2O3, Co3O4 and NiO nanoparticles were prepared via a citrate method and further functionalized with Pd by impregnation. The pure oxides as well as Pd/Fe2O3, Pd/Co3O4, and Pd/NiO (1, 5 and 10 wt % Pd were employed for catalytic methane combustion under methane lean (1 vol %/oxygen rich (18 vol %, balanced with nitrogen conditions. Already, the pure metal oxides showed a high catalytic activity leading to complete conversion temperature of T100 ≤ 500 °C. H2-TPR (Temperature-programmed reduction experiments revealed that Pd-functionalized metal oxides exhibited enhanced redox activity compared to the pure oxides leading to improved catalytic combustion activity at lower temperatures. At a loading of 1 wt % Pd, 1Pd/Co3O4 (T100 = 360 °C outperforms 1Pd/Fe2O3 (T100 = 410 °C as well as 1Pd/NiO (T100 = 380 °C. At a loading of 10 wt % Pd, T100 could only be slightly reduced in all cases. 1Pd/Co3O4 and 1Pd/NiO show reasonable stability over 70 h on stream at T100. XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and STEM (Scanning transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed strong interactions between Pd and NiO as well as Co3O4, respectively, leading to dynamic transformations and reoxidation of Pd due to solid state reactions, which leads to the high long-term stability.

  9. The titanium tris-anilide cation [Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3](+) stabilized as its perfluoro-tetra-phenylborate salt: structural characterization and synthesis in connection with redox activity of 4,4'-bipyridine dititanium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Heather A; Clough, Christopher R; Cummins, Christopher C

    2015-04-21

    This work explores the reduction of 4,4'-bipyridine using two equivalents of the titanium(iii) complex Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 resulting in formation of a black, crystalline complex, (4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2, for which an X-ray structure determination is reported. The neutral, black, 4,4'-bipyridine-bridged bimetallic was found to be redox active, with mono- and di-anions being accessible electrochemically, and with the mono- and di-cations also being accessible chemically, and isolable, at least when using the weakly coordinating anion [B(C6F5)4](-) as the counter-ion. It proved possible to crystallize the salt [(4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2][B(C6F5)4]2 for a single-crystal X-ray structure investigation; in this instance it was revealed that the aromaticity of the 4,4'-bipyridine ligand, that had been disrupted upon reduction, had been regained. A rare cationic d(0) metal tris-amide complex, shown by X-ray crystallography to contain an intriguing pyramidal TiN3 core geometry, namely {Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}(+), could also be isolated when using [B(C6F5)4] as the essentially non-interacting counter-ion. This highly reactive cation should be considered as a potential intermediate in the plethora of reactions wherein Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 has been shown to effect the reduction of substrates including halogenated organic molecules, carbonyl compounds, organic nitriles, and metal complexes.

  10. Redox Signaling Regulated by Cysteine Persulfide and Protein Polysulfidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasamatsu, Shingo; Nishimura, Akira; Morita, Masanobu; Matsunaga, Tetsuro; Abdul Hamid, Hisyam; Akaike, Takaaki

    2016-12-15

    For decades, reactive persulfide species including cysteine persulfide (CysSSH) have been known to exist endogenously in organisms. However, the physiological significance of endogenous persulfides remains poorly understood. That cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase produced CysSSH from cystine was recently demonstrated. An endogenous sulfur transfer system involving CysSSH evidently generates glutathione persulfide (GSSH) that exists at concentrations greater than 100 μM in vivo. Because reactive persulfide species such as CysSSH and GSSH have higher nucleophilicity than parental cysteine (Cys) and glutathione do, these reactive species exhibit strong scavenging activities against oxidants, e.g., hydrogen peroxide, and electrophiles, which contributes to redox signaling regulation. Also, several papers indicated that various proteins and enzymes have Cys polysulfides including CysSSH at their specific Cys residues, which is called protein polysulfidation. Apart from the redox signaling regulatory mechanism, another plausible function of protein polysulfidation is providing protection for protein thiol residues against irreversible chemical modification caused by oxidants and electrophiles. Elucidation of the redox signaling regulatory mechanism of reactive persulfide species including small thiol molecules and thiol-containing proteins should lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies and drug discoveries for oxidative and electrophilic stress-related diseases.

  11. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Sumana, Gajjala; Tiwari, Ida

    2014-09-01

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10-4 cm s-1. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  12. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  13. Redox-active nanomaterials for nanomedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Christopher M; Hanna, Shannon K; Heller, Daniel A; Horoszko, Christopher P; Johnson, Monique E; Montoro Bustos, Antonio R; Reipa, Vytas; Riley, Kathryn R; Nelson, Bryant C

    2017-10-19

    Nanomedicine utilizes the remarkable properties of nanomaterials for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. Many of these nanomaterials have been shown to have robust antioxidative properties, potentially functioning as strong scavengers of reactive oxygen species. Conversely, several nanomaterials have also been shown to promote the generation of reactive oxygen species, which may precipitate the onset of oxidative stress, a state that is thought to contribute to the development of a variety of adverse conditions. As such, the impacts of nanomaterials on biological entities are often associated with and influenced by their specific redox properties. In this review, we overview several classes of nanomaterials that have been or projected to be used across a wide range of biomedical applications, with discussion focusing on their unique redox properties. Nanomaterials examined include iron, cerium, and titanium metal oxide nanoparticles, gold, silver, and selenium nanoparticles, and various nanoscale carbon allotropes such as graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and their derivatives/variations. Principal topics of discussion include the chemical mechanisms by which the nanomaterials directly interact with biological entities and the biological cascades that are thus indirectly impacted. Selected case studies highlighting the redox properties of nanomaterials and how they affect biological responses are used to exemplify the biologically-relevant redox mechanisms for each of the described nanomaterials.

  14. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  16. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Determination of free and total cyst(e)ine in plasma of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tôrres, Cristina L; Miller, Joshua W; Rogers, Quinton R

    2004-01-01

    In human blood, the amino acid cysteine forms disulfide bonds with itself and with other sulfhydryl compounds in their free form and with sulfhydryls in protein. Protein-bound cysteine is lost when plasma proteins are removed before amino acid analysis. The purpose of this study was to assess the time course and extent of cyst(e)ine (cysteine + half-cystine) loss in dog and cat plasma. An equal volume of 6% sulfosalicylic acid was added to plasma aliquots at 0, 2, 4, 10, 16, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours after separation of blood cells. Tris-2-carboxyethyl-phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP - HCl), a reducing agent, was used to regenerate total plasma cyst(e)ine after 3 months of sample storage (-20 degrees C). Initial free cyst(e)ine concentrations (mean +/- SEM) were higher in canine plasma (77 +/- 4 micromol/L) than in feline plasma (37 +/- 3 micromol/L). Free plasma cyst(e)ine concentrations in dogs and cats decreased after first-order kinetics, with a half-life of 23 and 69 hours, respectively. Total plasma cysteine after TCEP - HCl treatment was similar for dogs (290 micromol/L) and cats (296 micromol/L), but the percentage of free cysteine was higher (P = .02) in dogs (27%) than in cats (13%). Over half of the cyst(e)ine, homocysteine, cysteinylglycine, and glutathione were bound in vivo to plasma proteins. These results emphasize the importance of removing plasma proteins within 1 hour after blood collection for reliable assay of free plasma cyst(e)ine.

  18. Elimination of hydrogen sulphide and β substitution in cystein, catalyzed by the cysteine-lyase of hens yolk-sac and yolk (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapeville, F.; Fromageot, P.

    1961-01-01

    The yolk of incubated hen's eggs contains a pyridoxal phosphate activated enzyme, free of iron, copper, magnesium and calcium. This enzyme activates the β-carbon atom of cysteine. Its reactivity is demonstrated by the ease with which this β-carbon fixes various sulfur containing substances in which the sulfur has reducing properties: inorganic sulfide, sulfide or cysteine itself. In the absence of substances able to react with the β-carbon atom, the active complex, consisting of the enzyme and the aminated tri-carbon chain, is hydrolysed to pyruvic acid and ammonia. The liberation of hydrogen sulfide thus appears to be the consequence either of the substitution of the β-carbon atom of cysteine or of the decomposition of the complex which this aminoacid forms with the enzyme studied. The latter seems therefore to possess an activity which differs from the activity of the desulfhydrases as yet known. We suggest to call this enzyme cystein-lyase. (authors) [fr

  19. [Genetic variation and clustal analysis of Trichomonas vaginalis cysteine proteases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Wan-Zhong; Li, Zhi; Zhao, Liang; Lun, Zhao-Rong

    2008-06-30

    To clone the genes coding for cysteine proteases (CPs, TvCPs) from Trichomonas vaginalis and to analyze their genetic variations with the related sequences from NCBI database (GenBank) and T. vaginalis Genome Project database from The Institute for Genomic Research (TIGR). TvCP genes were amplified using PCR, and inserted into vector pET28b or pBS-T. The recombinant plasmids were then transformed to Escherichia coli BL21 or Topl0 strain. The recombinant plasmids were used for sequencing. Homologous TvCP genes were blasted based on NCBI GenBank and TIGR T. vaginalis Genome Project database. The sequences of cloned TvCP genes were aligned and clustered by Clustal X (1.83 version) with retrieved sequences. Comparisons of amino acids among cathepsin L-like TvCPs, human L-like cathepsins and papaya papain were performed using DNAstar software, and their phylogenic tree was constructed based on neighbor-joining method using Clustal X. Two TvCP3 clones and one TvCP2 had a high identity of more than 99% with their responding TvCPs. Three clones of TvCP4 genes, GZ-CP4-clone 1-3, belonged to two members of a family showing a high percentage identity of more than 97.5% with the sequences of TvCP4 genes from databases (GenBank and TIGR) both at amino acid and nucleotide levels. Nine homologous TvCP4 pro-enzymes with 304 amino acids and other two members with deletions of N-terminal sequence existed in T. vaginalis sharing a similarity of 62.3-96.7% amino acids, which may evolve by means of gene replication and deletion. TvCP1-4, TvCP12, TvCP25 and CP65 had an identity of 61-88.2% at amino acid levels. So far, all reported sequences of C1 family from T. vaginalis belonged to capanthesin L-like subfamily with the same enzymatic active sites, conserved cysteine residues and similar structural features such as ERFNIN-like motif in pro-enzyme region, suggesting that they might result from gene duplication and mutations. TvCPs belong to cathepsin L-like family with genetic diversity

  20. An endogenous inhibitor of cysteine cathepsin B from brain tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.L. Lyanna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are the key degradative compartments of the cell in which the processes of protein degradation take place. Lysosomal cathepsins, which are enclosed in the lysosomes, help to maintain the homeostasis of the cell’s metabolism by participating in the degradation of heterophagic and autophagic material. When breaking down the integrity of lysosomal membranes the cathepsins are released into the cytosol and initiate the development of numerous pathological states. Breakdown in the control of protease activity leads to undesired and unregulated proteolysis. This is a cause of many diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, viral infections, cataracts etc. For this reason inhibitors of proteases have the potential to provide successful treatment for a wide range of diseases. Cathepsin B is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed cysteine peptidases of the papain family. It is implicated in a number of pathological states including: inflammatory diseases of the airways, bone and joint disorders, acute pancreatitis, tumour metastasis, Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic neuronal death. The study of specific inhibitors for cathepsin B is considered important for chemotherapy and treatments of other diseases. This article represents part of a complex study of the lysosomal proteolytic-antiproteolytic system and its breakdown in the process of illness. In this article we present a scheme for extraction, purification and characterization of endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin B. The cathepsin inhibitor was purified to homogeneity from the human neocortex. The purification was carried out in several successive stages: ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel-filtration on Sephadex G-150, and ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sephadex A-75, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Throughout the purification procedure, cathepsin inhibitory activity was controlled against the substrate p

  1. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysteine peptidases are important in many biological processes. In this study, we describe the design, synthesis and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family. The structure of the proposed substrates can be expressed by the general formula Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y, wh...

  2. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing...

  3. Tuning the carbon nanotube photoluminescence enhancement at addition of cysteine through the change of external conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnosov, N.V.; Karachevtsev, M.V.; Leontiev, V.S.; Karachevtsev, V.A., E-mail: karachevtsev@ilt.kharkov.ua

    2017-01-15

    The enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in water observed after amino acids doping is the largest at cysteine addition. The PL intensity increased through the passivation of p-defects on the carbon nanotube sidewall by the cysteine molecules due to thiol group. The effect of several external factors on the cysteine-induced enhancement of PL from carbon nanotubes covered with ssDNA was studied: UV irradiation, tip or bath sonication treatment of the suspension, the ionic strength and pH of aqueous suspension. It turned out that all these factors have an essential influence on the dependence of the PL enhancement on the cysteine concentration through inducing of additional defects on nanotube as well as a change of the nanotube surface coverage with polymer. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that PL from carbon nanotubes can be exploited successfully for the monitoring of cysteine concentration in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Cysteine doping enhances carbon nanotube emission more than other amino acids do. • SWNT emission dependence on cysteine concentration is tuned by UV irradiation and pH. • Type of sonication treatment influences SWNT PL dependence on cysteine concentration. • Polymer coverage and defectiveness of nanotubes effect on nanotube emission. • Graphic abstract.

  4. Cysteine: a conditionally essential amino acid in low-birth-weight preterm infants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedijk, Maaike A.; van Beek, Ron H. T.; Voortman, Gardi; de Bie, Henrica M. A.; Dassel, Anne C. M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Cyst(e)ine can be synthesized de novo from methionine and serine and is, therefore, a nonessential amino acid in human adults. Several studies have suggested that cyst(e)ine might be a conditionally essential amino acid in preterm infants because of biochemical immaturity. No data are available on

  5. Extending the scope of site-specific cysteine bioconjugation by appending a prelabeled cysteine tag to proteins using protein trans-splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Tulika; Kurpiers, Thomas; Mootz, Henning D

    2011-01-01

    Incorporating synthetic probes site-specifically into proteins is of central interest in several areas of biotechnology and protein chemistry. Bioconjugation techniques provide a simple and effective means of chemically modifying a protein. In particular, covalent chemical modifications of cysteine residues belong to one of the most important reactions due to the unique reactivity of its thiol moiety and the relatively low abundance of this amino acid in proteins. However, such types of modifications cannot be performed in a regioselective fashion when one or more additional cysteines are present. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach where a short cysteine-containing tag (Cys-Tag) fused to one part of a split intein and modified at its sulfhydryl group can be used to label proteins by trans-splicing with a protein of interest (POI) fused to the other half of the split intein. In this way, it is possible to selectively label a protein containing multiple cysteines. The artificially split Mycobacterium xenopi GyrA intein and the Synechocystis sp. DnaB intein were highly suitable for this purpose and were successfully used for the labeling of several proteins. This approach enables a simple route for labeling proteins by site-specific cysteine bioconjugation with any one of several commercially available cysteine-modifying probes.

  6. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power.

  8. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Daquan, E-mail: zhdq@sh163.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong [Stress Analysis and Failure Design Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-31

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E{sub LUMO}) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  9. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  10. Detection of Cysteine Redox States in Mitochondrial Proteins in Intact Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habich, Markus; Riemer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Import, folding, and activity regulation of mitochondrial proteins are important for mitochondrial function. Cysteine residues play crucial roles in these processes as their thiol groups can undergo (reversible) oxidation reactions. For example, during import of many intermembrane space (IMS) proteins, cysteine oxidation drives protein folding and translocation over the outer membrane. Mature mitochondrial proteins can undergo changes in the redox state of specific cysteine residues, for example, as part of their enzymatic reaction cycle or as adaptations to changes of the local redox environment which might influence their activity. Here we describe methods to study changes in cysteine residue redox states in intact cells. These approaches allow to monitor oxidation-driven protein import as well as changes of cysteine redox states in mature proteins during oxidative stress or during the reaction cycle of thiol-dependent enzymes like oxidoreductases.

  11. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  12. Influence of ancillary ligands on preferential geometry and biomimetic catalytic activity in manganese(III)-catecholate systems: A combined experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Narayan Ch; Brandão, Paula; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio; Panja, Anangamohan

    2017-11-01

    The present report describes the synthesis and structural characterizations of six new manganese(III) complexes with redox-active tetrachlorocatecholate ligand in the presence of different ancillary ligands (pyridines and imidazole). X-ray crystal structure analysis reveals that the geometry of manganese(III) centres in 1 and 2 is essentially square pyramidal, while it is discrete octahedron in compounds 3-6. These preferential structural diversities in these systems have been critically analysed by theoretical calculations. Remarkably, the characterization of both π⋯π stacking interactions and MnMn bonds in the supramolecular dimeric aggregates in the solid state in 1 and 2 by means of the Bader's theory of "atoms in molecules" (AIM) is quite interesting as that nicely corroborates the experimental fact. All the complexes are active toward the phenoxazinone synthase like activity and the detailed kinetic analysis was performed to get better insight into their catalytic efficiency. Electrochemical property of these complexes as well as different donor property of the ancillary ligands clearly establish that the ease of reduction of the metal centre i.e., the catalytic ability is favoured when the metal centre is bonded to the electron deficient pyridyl systems. EPR spectroscopy and theoretical study are further helpful to get insight into origin of the catalytic activity in these compounds. The present report overall highlights that tuning of the geometry and catalytic activity of manganese(III) complexes with tetrachlorocatecholate ligand can be attained by the introduction of different substitutions in ancillary pyridine ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  14. The cysteine radical cation: structures and fragmentation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junfang; Siu, K W Michael; Hopkinson, Alan C

    2008-01-14

    A theoretical study on the structures, relative energies, isomerization reactions and fragmentation pathways of the cysteine radical cation, [NH(2)CH(CH(2)SH)COOH].+, is reported. Hybrid density functional theory (B3LYP) has been used in conjunction with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The isomer at the global minimum, Captodative-1, has the structure NH(2)C.(CH(2)SH)C(OH)(2)+; the stability of this ion is attributed to the captodative effect in which the NH(2) functions as a powerful pi-electron donor and C(OH)(2)+ as a powerful pi-electron acceptor. Ion Distonic-S-1, H(3)N(+)CH(CH(2)S.)COOH, in which the radical is formally situated on the S atom, is higher in enthalpy (DeltaH degrees (0)) than Captodative-1 by 6.1 kcal mol(-1), but is lower in enthalpy than another isomer Distonic-C-1, H(3)N(+)C.(CH(2)SH)COOH, by 8.2 kcal mol(-1). Isomerization of the canonical radical cation of cysteine, [H(2)NCH(CH(2)SH)COOH].+, (Canonical-1), to Captodative-1 has an enthalpy of activation of 25.8 kcal mol(-1), while the barrier against isomerization of Canonical-1 to Distonic-S-1 is only 9.6 kcal mol(-1). Two additional transient tautomers, one with the radical located at C(alpha) and the charge on SH(2), and the other a carboxy radical with the charge on NH(3), are reported. Plausible fragmentation pathways (losses of small molecules, CO(2), CH(2)S, H(2)S and NH(3), and neutral radicals COOH. , HSCH(2). and NH(2).) from Canonical-1 are examined.

  15. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M.; Cabeza, M. Carmen; Quintero, Bartolomé

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis

  16. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  17. The structure of classical swine fever virus N(pro: a novel cysteine Autoprotease and zinc-binding protein involved in subversion of type I interferon induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Gottipati

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express their genome as a single polypeptide that is subsequently cleaved into individual proteins by host- and virus-encoded proteases. The pestivirus N-terminal protease (N(pro is a cysteine autoprotease that cleaves between its own C-terminus and the N-terminus of the core protein. Due to its unique sequence and catalytic site, it forms its own cysteine protease family C53. After self-cleavage, N(pro is no longer active as a protease. The released N(pro suppresses the induction of the host's type-I interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β response. N(pro binds interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3, the key transcriptional activator of IFN-α/β genes, and promotes degradation of IRF3 by the proteasome, thus preventing induction of the IFN-α/β response to pestivirus infection. Here we report the crystal structures of pestivirus N(pro. N(pro is structurally distinct from other known cysteine proteases and has a novel "clam shell" fold consisting of a protease domain and a zinc-binding domain. The unique fold of N(pro allows auto-catalysis at its C-terminus and subsequently conceals the cleavage site in the active site of the protease. Although many viruses interfere with type I IFN induction by targeting the IRF3 pathway, little information is available regarding structure or mechanism of action of viral proteins that interact with IRF3. The distribution of amino acids on the surface of N(pro involved in targeting IRF3 for proteasomal degradation provides insight into the nature of N(pro's interaction with IRF3. The structures thus establish the mechanism of auto-catalysis and subsequent auto-inhibition of trans-activity of N(pro, and its role in subversion of host immune response.

  18. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  19. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  20. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X...... as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  1. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  2. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  3. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  5. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  7. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  8. Catalytic Hydrogenation Activity and Electronic Structure Determination of Bis(arylimidazol-2-ylidene)pyridine Cobalt Alkyl and Hydride Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Renyuan Pony; Darmon, Jonathan M.; Milsmann, Carsten; Margulieux, Grant W.; E. Stieber, S. Chantal; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-01-01

    The bis(arylimidazol-2-ylidene)pyridine cobalt methyl complex, (iPrCNC)CoCH3, was evaluated for the catalytic hydrogenation of alkenes. At 22 °C and 4 atm of H2 pressure, (iPrCNC)CoCH3 is an effective pre-catalyst for the hydrogenation of sterically hindered, unactivated alkenes such as trans-methylstilbene, 1-methyl-1-cyclohexene and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene, representing one of the most active cobalt hydrogenation catalysts reported to date. Preparation of the cobalt hydride complex, (iPrCNC)CoH was accomplished by hydrogenation of (iPrCNC)CoCH3. Over the course of 3 hours at 22 °C, migration of the metal-hydride to the 4-position of the pyridine ring yielded (4-H2-iPrCNC)CoN2. Similar alkyl migration was observed upon treatment of (iPrCNC)CoH with 1,1-diphenylethylene. This reactivity raised the question as to whether this class of chelate is redoxactive, engaging in radical chemistry with the cobalt center. A combination of structural, spectroscopic and computational studies was conducted and provided definitive evidence for bis(arylimidazol-2-ylidene)pyridine radicals in reduced cobalt chemistry. Spin density calculations established that the radicals were localized on the pyridine ring, accounting for the observed reactivity and suggest a wide family of pyridine-based pincers may also be redox active. PMID:23968297

  9. The mechanism for catalytic hydrosilylation by bis(imino)pyridine iron olefin complexes supported by broken symmetry density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yan Choi; Nielsen, Robert J; Goddard, William A; Dash, Aswini K

    2017-09-26

    Density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP-D3 with implicit solvation in toluene) was used to investigate the mechanisms of olefin hydrosilylation catalyzed by PDI(Fe) (bis(imino)pyridine iron) complexes, where PDI = 2,6-(ArN[double bond, length as m-dash]CMe) 2 (C 5 H 3 N) with Ar = 2,6-R 2 -C 6 H 3 . We find that the rate-determining step for hydrosilylation is hydride migration from Et 3 SiH onto the Fe-bound olefin to form (PDI)Fe(alkyl)(SiEt 3 ). This differs from the mechanism for the Pt Karstedt catalyst in that there is no prior Si-H oxidative addition onto the Fe center. (PDI)Fe(alkyl)(SiEt 3 ) then undergoes C-Si reductive elimination to form (PDI)Fe, which coordinates an olefin ligand to regenerate the resting state (PDI)Fe(olefin). In agreement with experimental observations, we found that anti-Markovnikov hydride migration has a 5.1 kcal mol -1 lower activation enthalpy than Markovnikov migration. This system has an unusual anti-ferromagnetic coupling between high spin electrons on the Fe center and the unpaired spin in the pi system of the non-innocent redox-active PDI ligand. To describe this with DFT, we used the "broken-symmetry" approach to establish the ground electronic and spin state of intermediates and transition states over the proposed catalytic cycles.

  10. Cysteine protects rabbit spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species-induced damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhendong; Ren, Zhanjun; Fan, Xiaoteng; Pan, Yang; Lv, Shan; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Anmin; Zeng, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in over-production of reactive oxygen species, which is extremely detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of cysteine to freezing extender would facilitate the cryosurvival of rabbit spermatozoa, and if so, how cysteine protects spermatozoa from cryodamages. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of cysteine. The motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials, 8-hydroxyguanosine level and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity were examined. Furthermore, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione content (GSH), and level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide of spermatozoa were analyzed. The values of motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of cysteine were significantly higher than those of the control. Addition of cysteine to extenders improved the GPx activity and GSH content of spermatozoa, while lowered the ROS, DNA oxidative alterations and lipid peroxidation level, which makes spermatozoa avoid ROS to attack DNA, the plasma membrane and mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine protects spermatozoa against ROS-induced damages during cryopreservation and post-thaw incubation. Addition of cysteine is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry.

  11. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nikhil, E-mail: nkumar.phd2011.bt@nitrr.ac.in; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan, E-mail: contactlataupadhyay@gmail.com

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles is reported. • Synthesis of Highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (∼40 nm) was done in an aqueous medium. • FTIR analysis shows that L-cysteine bound to the nanoparticle surface via thiol group. - Abstract: A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month.

  12. A Sensitive Ratiometric Long-Wavelength Fluorescent Probe for Selective Determination of Cysteine/Homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manibalan, Kesavan; Chen, Sin-Ming; Mani, Veerappan; Huang, Tsung-Tao; Huang, Sheng-Tung

    2016-07-01

    The development of sensitive fluorescence probes to detect biothiols such as cysteine and homocysteine has attracted great attention in recent times. Herein, we described the design and synthesis of coumarin based long-wavelength fluorescence probe, Bromo-2-benzothiazolyl-3-cyano-7-hydroxy coumarin (BBCH, 2) for selective detections of cysteine and homocysteine. The probe is rationally designed in such a way that both sulfhydryl and adjacent amino groups of thiols are involved in sensing process. Only cysteine/homocysteine able to react with BBCH to release fluorescence reporter (BCH, 1); while, glutathione and other amino acids unable to react with BBCH due to the absence of adjacent amino groups. In presence of cysteine, the color of BBCH is turns from colorless to red and thus BBCH is a naked eye fluorescence indicator for cysteine. Besides, BBCH can discriminate cysteine and homocysteine based on color changes and different reaction rates. The described sensing platform showed good sensing performances to detect cysteine and homocysteine with detection limits of 0.87 and 0.19 μM, respectively. Practical applicability was verified in biological and pharmaceutical samples.

  13. Proteomic Approaches to Quantify Cysteine Reversible Modifications in Aging and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liqing; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine is a highly reactive amino acid and is subject to a variety of reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs), including nitrosylation, glutathionylation, palmitoylation, as well as formation of sulfenic acid and disulfides. These modifications are not only involved in normal biological activities, such as enzymatic catalysis, redox signaling and cellular homeostasis, but can also be the result of oxidative damage. Especially in aging and neurodegenerative diseases, oxidative stress leads to aberrant cysteine oxidations that affect protein structure and function leading to neurodegeneration as well as other detrimental effects. Methods that can identify cysteine modifications by type, including the site of modification, as well as the relative stoichiometry of the modification can be very helpful for understanding the role of the thiol proteome and redox homeostasis in the context of disease. Cysteine reversible modifications however, are challenging to investigate as they are low abundant, diverse, and labile especially under endogenous conditions. Thanks to the development of redox proteomic approaches, large-scale quantification of cysteine reversible modifications is possible. These approaches cover a range of strategies to enrich, identify, and quantify cysteine reversible modifications from biological samples. This review will focus on nongel-based redox proteomics workflows that give quantitative information about cysteine PTMs and highlight how these strategies have been useful for investigating the redox thiol proteome in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27666938

  14. Quantification of free cysteines in membrane and soluble proteins using a fluorescent dye and thermal unfolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelueken, Gregor; Naismith, James H

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine is an extremely useful site for selective attachment of labels to proteins for many applications, including the study of protein structure in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence spectroscopy and medical imaging. The demand for quantitative data for these applications means that it is important to determine the extent of the cysteine labeling. The efficiency of labeling is sensitive to the 3D context of cysteine within the protein. Where the label or modification is not directly measurable by optical or magnetic spectroscopy, for example, in cysteine modification to dehydroalanine, assessing labeling efficiency is difficult. We describe a simple assay for determining the efficiency of modification of cysteine residues, which is based on an approach previously used to determine membrane protein stability. The assay involves a reaction between the thermally unfolded protein and a thiol-specific coumarin fluorophore that is only fluorescent upon conjugation with thiols. Monitoring fluorescence during thermal denaturation of the protein in the presence of the dye identifies the temperature at which the maximum fluorescence occurs; this temperature differs among proteins. Comparison of the fluorescence intensity at the identified temperature between modified, unmodified (positive control) and cysteine-less protein (negative control) allows for the quantification of free cysteine. We have quantified both site-directed spin labeling and dehydroalanine formation. The method relies on a commonly available fluorescence 96-well plate reader, which rapidly screens numerous samples within 1.5 h and uses proteins. PMID:24091556

  15. Degenerate cysteine patterns mediate two redox sensing mechanisms in the papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporeale, Gabriela; Lorenzo, Juan R; Thomas, Maria G; Salvatierra, Edgardo; Borkosky, Silvia S; Risso, Marikena G; Sánchez, Ignacio E; de Prat Gay, Gonzalo; Alonso, Leonardo G

    2017-04-01

    Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus induces deregulation of cellular redox homeostasis. Virus replication and papillomavirus-induced cell transformation require persistent expression of viral oncoproteins E7 and E6 that must retain their functionality in a persistent oxidative environment. Here, we dissected the molecular mechanisms by which E7 oncoprotein can sense and manage the potentially harmful oxidative environment of the papillomavirus-infected cell. The carboxy terminal domain of E7 protein from most of the 79 papillomavirus viral types of alpha genus, which encloses all the tumorigenic viral types, is a cysteine rich domain that contains two classes of cysteines: strictly conserved low reactive Zn +2 binding and degenerate reactive cysteine residues that can sense reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on experimental data obtained from E7 proteins from the prototypical viral types 16, 18 and 11, we identified a couple of low pKa nucleophilic cysteines that can form a disulfide bridge upon the exposure to ROS and regulate the cytoplasm to nucleus transport. From sequence analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of redox sensing states we propose that reactive cysteine acquisition through evolution leads to three separate E7s protein families that differ in the ROS sensing mechanism: non ROS-sensitive E7s; ROS-sensitive E7s using only a single or multiple reactive cysteine sensing mechanisms and ROS-sensitive E7s using a reactive-resolutive cysteine couple sensing mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles is reported. • Synthesis of Highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (∼40 nm) was done in an aqueous medium. • FTIR analysis shows that L-cysteine bound to the nanoparticle surface via thiol group. - Abstract: A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month

  17. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  18. Transcriptome Analysis of Maize Immature Embryos Reveals the Roles of Cysteine in Improving Agrobacterium Infection Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fu, Junjie; Wang, Guoying; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Yunjun

    2017-01-01

    Maize Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency has been greatly improved in recent years. Antioxidants, such as, cysteine, can significantly improve maize transformation frequency through improving the Agrobacterium infection efficiency. However, the mechanism underlying the transformation improvement after cysteine exposure has not been elucidated. In this study, we showed that the addition of cysteine to the co-cultivation medium significantly increased the Agrobacterium infection efficiency of hybrid HiII and inbred line Z31 maize embryos. Reactive oxygen species contents were higher in embryos treated with cysteine than that without cysteine. We further investigated the mechanism behind cysteine-related infection efficiency increase using transcriptome analysis. The results showed that the cysteine treatment up-regulated 939 genes and down-regulated 549 genes in both Z31 and HiII. Additionally, more differentially expressed genes were found in HiII embryos than those in Z31 embryos, suggesting that HiII was more sensitive to the cysteine treatment than Z31. GO analysis showed that the up-regulated genes were mainly involved in the oxidation reduction process. The up-regulation of these genes could help maize embryos to cope with the oxidative stress stimulated by Agrobacterium infection. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in the cell wall and membrane metabolism, such as, aquaporin and expansin genes. Decreased expression of these cell wall integrity genes could loosen the cell wall, thereby improving the entry of Agrobacterium into plant cells. This study offers insight into the role of cysteine in improving Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize immature embryos. PMID:29089955

  19. Homocysteine, cysteine, and risk of incident colorectal cancer in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, Shirley AA; Neuhouser, Marian L; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Song, Xiaoling; Brown, Elissa C; Zheng, Yingye; Rodriguez, Beatriz; Green, Ralph; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Inflammation underlies the etiology of colorectal cancer (CRC). Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with inflammation and may be a risk marker for CRC. Cysteine is a metabolic product of homocysteine and a precursor of the antioxidant glutathione. It is unknown whether cysteine is associated with CRC. Objective: The objective was to assess the associations between homocysteine and cysteine and CRC incidence in postmenopausal women. Design: Associations between homocysteine and cysteine and incident CRC in the Women's Health Initiative observational cohort were assessed by using a nested case-control design. Cases and controls (n = 988/group) were matched for age (mean ± SD age: 67 ± 7 y), ethnicity (85.2% white, 8.9% black, 2.2% Hispanic/Latina, and 3.6% other), hysterectomy status, and date of blood draw. Homocysteine and cysteine were measured by HPLC with postcolumn fluorimetric detection. Results: Multivariate-adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for CRC were 1.46 (1.05, 2.04) for the highest quartile of homocysteine (>9.85 μmol/L) compared with the lowest quartile (≤6.74 μmol/L) (P = 0.02) and 0.57 (0.40, 0.82) for the highest quartile of cysteine (>309 μmol/L) compared with the lowest quartile (≤260 μmol/L) (P = 0.01). The association with homocysteine was significant for proximal colon tumors (P = 0.008) but not for distal or rectal tumors, whereas the association with cysteine was significant for rectal tumors (P = 0.02), borderline for proximal tumors (P = 0.06), and not significant for distal tumors. The associations with both homocysteine and cysteine were significant for localized tumors (P ≤ 0.01) but not for metastases. Conclusion: High plasma homocysteine is associated with increased risk of CRC, whereas high cysteine is associated with decreased risk. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT 00000611. PMID:23426034

  20. l-cysteine suppresses ghrelin and reduces appetite in rodents and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGavigan, A K; O'Hara, H C; Amin, A; Kinsey-Jones, J; Spreckley, E; Alamshah, A; Agahi, A; Banks, K; France, R; Hyberg, G; Wong, C; Bewick, G A; Gardiner, J V; Lehmann, A; Martin, N M; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Murphy, K G

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-protein diets promote weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance, but are difficult to adhere to. The mechanisms by which protein exerts these effects remain unclear. However, the amino acids produced by protein digestion may have a role in driving protein-induced satiety. Methods: We tested the effects of a range of amino acids on food intake in rodents and identified l-cysteine as the most anorexigenic. Using rodents we further studied the effect of l-cysteine on food intake, behaviour and energy expenditure. We proceeded to investigate its effect on neuronal activation in the hypothalamus and brainstem before investigating its effect on gastric emptying and gut hormone release. The effect of l-cysteine on appetite scores and gut hormone release was then investigated in humans. Results: l-Cysteine dose-dependently decreased food intake in both rats and mice following oral gavage and intraperitoneal administration. This effect did not appear to be secondary to behavioural or aversive side effects. l-Cysteine increased neuronal activation in the area postrema and delayed gastric emptying. It suppressed plasma acyl ghrelin levels and did not reduce food intake in transgenic ghrelin-overexpressing mice. Repeated l-cysteine administration decreased food intake in rats and obese mice. l-Cysteine reduced hunger and plasma acyl ghrelin levels in humans. Conclusions: Further work is required to determine the chronic effect of l-cysteine in rodents and humans on appetite and body weight, and whether l-cysteine contributes towards protein-induced satiety. PMID:25219528

  1. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  2. Site-Specific Dual Functionalization of Cysteine Residue in Peptides and Proteins with 2-Azidoacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Shinya; Hayashi, Hirohito; Xing, Bengang; Chiba, Shunsuke

    2017-04-19

    Herein, we report use of 2-azidoacrylates to perform site-specific dual functionalization of the cysteine residue of peptides and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a native protein containing one free cysteine residue. The sulfhydryl group of the cysteine residue could be conjugated with 2-azidoacrylates bearing various functionalities, such as fluorescent dyes under physiological aqueous buffer conditions, to afford peptide and protein conjugates anchoring an azide moiety. Successive azide-alkyne cycloaddition enables installation of the second functionality, thus affording dual-functionalized peptide- and protein-based materials.

  3. Redox-inactive metal ions promoted the catalytic reactivity of non-heme manganese complexes towards oxygen atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Cholho; Yang, Ling; Lv, Zhanao; Mo, Wanling; Chen, Zhuqi; Li, Guangxin; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-21

    Redox-inactive metal ions can modulate the reactivity of redox-active metal ions in a variety of biological and chemical oxidations. Many synthetic models have been developed to help address the elusive roles of these redox-inactive metal ions. Using a non-heme manganese(II) complex as the model, the influence of redox-inactive metal ions as a Lewis acid on its catalytic efficiency in oxygen atom transfer was investigated. In the absence of redox-inactive metal ions, the manganese(II) catalyst is very sluggish, for example, in cyclooctene epoxidation, providing only 9.9% conversion with 4.1% yield of epoxide. However, addition of 2 equiv. of Al(3+) to the manganese(II) catalyst sharply improves the epoxidation, providing up to 97.8% conversion with 91.4% yield of epoxide. EPR studies of the manganese(II) catalyst in the presence of an oxidant reveal a 16-line hyperfine structure centered at g = 2.0, clearly indicating the formation of a mixed valent di-μ-oxo-bridged diamond core, Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV). The presence of a Lewis acid like Al(3+) causes the dissociation of this diamond Mn(III)-(μ-O)2-Mn(IV) core to form monomeric manganese(iv) species which is responsible for improved epoxidation efficiency. This promotional effect has also been observed in other manganese complexes bearing various non-heme ligands. The findings presented here have provided a promising strategy to explore the catalytic reactivity of some di-μ-oxo-bridged complexes by adding non-redox metal ions to in situ dissociate those dimeric cores and may also provide clues to understand the mechanism of methane monooxygenase which has a similar diiron diamond core as the intermediate.

  4. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  5. Catalytic gasification of dry and wet biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Potic, B.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic gasification of dry biomass and of wet biomass streams in hot compressed water are reviewed and discussed as potential technologies for the production of synthesis gas, hydrogen- and methane-rich gas. Next to literature data also new experimental results from our laboratory on catalytic

  6. Structure of the HHARI catalytic domain shows glimpses of a HECT E3 ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E Spratt

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING, or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT. The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI. These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn²⁺-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases.

  7. Mechanistic Studies of the Spore Photoproduct Lyase (SPL) via a Single Cysteine Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Lin, Gengjie; Nelson, Renae S.; Jian, Yajun; Telser, Joshua; Li, Lei

    2012-01-01

    5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine (also called spore photoproduct or SP) is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores. It is repaired by a radical SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) enzyme, the spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), at the bacterial early germination phase. Our previous studies proved that SPL utilizes the 5′-dA• generated by SAM cleavage reaction to abstract the H6proR atom to initiate the SP repair process. The resulting thymine allylic radical was suggested to take an H atom from an unknown protein source, most likely the cysteine 141. Here we show that C141 can be readily alkylated in the native SPL by iodoacetamide treatment, suggesting that it is accessible to the TpT radical. SP repair by the SPL C141A mutant yields TpTSO2− and TpT simultaneously from the very beginning of the reaction; no lag phase is observed for the TpTSO2− formation. Should any other protein residue serve as the H donor, its presence would result in TpT as the major product at least for the first enzyme turnover. These observations provide strong evidence to support C141 as the direct H atom donor. Moreover, due to the lack of this intrinsic H donor, the C141A mutant produces TpT via an unprecedented thymine cation radical reduction (proton coupled electron transfer) process, contrasting to the H atom transfer mechanism in the WT SPL reaction. The C141A mutant repairs SP at a rate which is ~3-fold slower than the WT enzyme. Formation of TpTSO2− and TpT exhibit a Vmax deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.7 ± 0.2 respectively, which is smaller than the DVmax KIE of 2.8 ± 0.3 determined in the WT SPL reaction. These findings suggest that removing the intrinsic H atom donor disturbs the rate-limiting process in the enzyme catalysis. As expected, the pre-reduced C141A mutant only supports ~ 0.4 turnover, which is in sharp contrast to the > 5 turnovers exhibited by the WT SPL reaction, suggesting that the enzyme catalytic cycle (SAM regeneration) is

  8. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  9. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  10. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  11. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  12. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  13. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  14. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2 isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2 and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  15. Identification and preliminary characterization of protein-cysteine farnesyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, V.; Roberts, D.; Tobin, A.; O'Rourke, E.; Barbacid, M.; De Virgilio, M.; Meyers, C.; Ahmed, N.; Kurz, B.; Resh, M.; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    1990-01-01

    Ras proteins must be isoprenylated at a conserved cysteine residue near the carboxyl terminus in order to exert their biological activity. Previous studies indicate that an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway, most likely farnesyl pyrophosphate, is the donor of this isoprenyl group. Inhibition of mevalonate synthesis reverts the abnormal phenotypes induced by the mutant RAS2 Valendash19 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and blocks the maturation of Xenopus oocytes induced by an onocogenic Ras p21 protein of human origin. These results have raised the possibility of using inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway to block the transforming properties of ras oncogenes. Unfortunately, mevalonate is a precursor of various end products essential to mammalian cells, such as dolichols, ubiquinones, heme A, and cholesterol. In this study, the authors describe an enzymatic activity(ies) capable of catalyzing the farnesylation of unprocessed Ras p21 proteins in vitro at the correct (Cys-186) residue. Gel filtration analysis of a partially purified preparation of protein farnesyltransferase revealed two peaks of activity at 250-350 kDa and 80-130 kDa. Availability of an in vitro protein farnesyltransferase assay should be useful in screening for potential inhibitors of ras oncogene function that will not interfere with other aspects of the mevalonate pathway

  16. Effectiveness of cysteine proteases on protein/pigment film removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jiang-Wu; Xiao, Yin; Zuo, Qi-liang; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Tao; Lin, Chang-Jian

    2013-11-01

    Theaflavin (TF) from the black tea can react to human salivary proline-rich proteins (PRPs) to form stains on exposed dental surfaces. Here, we employed a model of protein/pigment film using TF and dephosphorylated bovine β-casein (Dβ-CN), which has an extended conformation, similar to that of salivary PRPs, on a sensor surface to assess the efficacy of cysteine proteases (CPs) including papain, stem bromelain, and ficin, on removing TF bound to Dβ-CN and the control TF readsorption on the residual substrate surfaces was also measured. The protein/pigment complex film was built by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). The efficacies of CPs were assessed by Boltzman equation model. The surface details were detected by grazing angle infrared spectroscopy spectra, atomic force microscopy images, and contact angles. The efficacy order of CPs on hydrolyzing protein/pigment complex film is ficin>papain>bromelain. The results from grazing angle infrared spectroscopy spectra, atomic force microscopy images, and contact angles demonstrated that TF bound on the Dβ-CN was effectively removed by the CPs, and the amount of TF readsorption on both the residual film of the Dβ-CN/TF and the Dβ-CN was markedly decreased after hydrolysis. This study indicates the potential application of the CPs for tooth stain removal and suggests that these enzymes are worthy of further investigation for use in oral healthcare. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrogen bonding, solvent exchange, and coupled proton and electron transfer in the oxidation and reduction of redox-active tyrosine Y(Z) in Mn-depleted core complexes of photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, B A; Force, D A; Randall, D W; Britt, R D

    1998-12-22

    The redox-active tyrosines, Y(Z) and Y(D), of Photosystem II are oxidized by P680+ to the neutral tyrosyl radical. This oxidation thus involves the transfer of the phenolic proton as well as an electron. It has recently been proposed that tyrosine Y(Z) might replace the lost proton by abstraction of a hydrogen atom or a proton from a water molecule bound to the manganese cluster, thereby increasing the driving force for water oxidation. To compare and contrast with the intact system, we examine here, in a simplified Mn-depleted PSII core complex, isolated from a site-directed mutant of Synechocystis PCC 6803 lacking Y(D), the role of proton transfer in the oxidation and reduction of Y(Z). We show how the oxidation and reduction rates for Y(Z), the deuterium isotope effect on these rates, and the Y(Z)* - Y(Z) difference spectra all depend on pH (from 5.5 to 9.5). This simplified system allows examination of electron-transfer processes over a broader range of pH than is possible with the intact system and with more tractable rates. The kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation of P680+ by Y(Z) is maximal at pH 7.0 (3.64). It decreases to lower pH as charge recombination, which shows no deuterium isotope, starts to become competitive with Y(Z) oxidation. To higher pH, Y(Z) becomes increasingly deprotonated to form the tyrosinate, the oxidation of which at pH 9.5 becomes extremely rapid (1260 ms(-1)) and no longer limited by proton transfer. These observations point to a mechanism for the oxidation of Y(Z) in which the tyrosinate is the species from which the electron occurs even at lower pH. The kinetics of oxidation of Y(Z) show elements of rate limitation by both proton and electron transfer, with the former dominating at low pH and the latter at high pH. The proton-transfer limitation of Y(Z) oxidation at low pH is best explained by a gated mechanism in which Y(Z) and the acceptor of the phenolic proton need to form an electron/proton-transfer competent complex in

  18. High-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence assay of pyruvic acid to determine cysteine conjugate beta-lyase activity : application to S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine and S-2-benzothiazolyl-L-cysteine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijntjes, G.J.; te Koppele, J.M.; Vermeulen, N P

    1992-01-01

    An HPLC-fluorescence assay has been developed for the determination of the activity of rat renal cytosolic cysteine conjugate beta-lyase. The method is based on isocratic HPLC separation and fluorescence detection of pyruvic acid, derivatized with o-phenylenediamine (OPD), and is shown to be rapid,

  19. The Cysteine S-Alkylation Reaction as a Synthetic Method to Covalently Modify Peptide Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calce, Enrica; De Luca, Stefania

    2017-01-05

    Synthetic methodologies to chemically modify peptide molecules have long been investigated for their impact in the field of chemical biology. They allow the introduction of biochemical probes useful for studying protein functions, for manipulating peptides with therapeutic potential, and for structure-activity relationship investigations. The commonly used approach was the derivatization of an amino acid side chain. In this regard, the cysteine, for its unique reactivity, has been widely employed as the substrate for such modifications. Herein, we report on methodologies developed to modify the cysteine thiol group through the S-alkylation reaction. Some procedures perform the alkylation of cysteine derivatives, in order to prepare building blocks to be used during the peptide synthesis, whilst some others selectively modify peptide sequences containing a cysteine residue with a free thiol group, both in solution and in the solid phase. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2016-11-01

    A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month

  1. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells.

  2. Allenamides as orthogonal handles for selective modification of cysteine in peptides and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ata; Xing, Bengang; Loh, Teck-Peng

    2014-07-14

    In this study, a remarkably simple and direct strategy has been successfully developed to selectively label target cysteine residues in fully unprotected peptides and proteins. The strategy is based on the reaction between allenamides and the cysteine thiol, and proceeds swiftly in aqueous medium with excellent selectivity and quantitative conversion, thus forming a stable and irreversible conjugate. The combined simplicity and mildness of the process project allenamide as robust and versatile handles to target cysteines and has potential use in biological systems. Additionally, fluorescent-labeling studies demonstrated that the installation of a C-terminal allenamide moiety onto various molecules of interest may supply a new methodology towards the site-specific labeling of cysteine-containing proteins. Such a new labeling strategy may thus open a window for its application in the field of life sciences. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine proteases were distributed at the linings of excretory bladder and excretory concretions of the metacercariae. It was suggested that the excretory epithelium of P. westermani undertake the secretory function of metacercarial cysteine proteases, in addition to its role as a route for eliminating waste products. PMID:12073734

  4. 7-cysteine-pyrrole conjugate: A new potential DNA reactive metabolite of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Ma, Liang; Fu, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) require metabolic activation to exert cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. We previously reported that (±)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts are responsible for PA-induced liver tumor formation in rats. In this study, we determined that metabolism of riddelliine and monocrotaline by human or rat liver microsomes produced 7-cysteine-DHP and DHP. The metabolism of 7-glutathionyl-DHP by human and rat liver microsomes also generated 7-cysteine-DHP. Further, reaction of 7-cysteine-DHP with calf thymus DNA in aqueous solution yielded the described DHP-derived DNA adducts. This study represents the first report that 7-cysteine-DHP is a new PA metabolite that can lead to DNA adduct formation.

  5. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yugui

    2013-11-21

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  6. Study of the histochemical detection of cysteine desulfhydrase in the vitellin sac of birds (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapeville, F.; Khau Van Kien, L.

    1961-01-01

    We have developed a method for the histochemical detection of cysteine desulfhydrase in the vitellin sac of the chicken embryo. The enzyme is localized in the presence of a lead salt by lead sulphide formed in situ from hydrogen sulphide liberated from the cysteine. The micrographs obtained are histological and show the presence of the enzyme in the different types of endoderm cell. (authors) [fr

  7. Dealing with methionine/homocysteine sulfur: cysteine metabolism to taurine and inorganic sulfur

    OpenAIRE

    Stipanuk, Martha H.; Ueki, Iori

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of cysteine as a product of the transsulfuration pathway can be viewed as part of methionine or homocysteine degradation, with cysteine being the vehicle for sulfur conversion to end products (sulfate, taurine) that can be excreted in the urine. Transsulfuration is regulated by stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase and inhibition of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase in response to changes in the level of S-adenosylmethionine, and this promotes homocysteine degradation when meth...

  8. Functional role and analysis of cysteine residues of the salt tolerance protein Sod2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asad; El-Magd, Rabab Abou; Fliegel, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Sod2 is the major salt tolerance plasma membrane protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. It functions to remove excess intracellular sodium (or lithium) in exchange for protons. We investigated the role of cysteine residues and created a cysteine-free Sod2 protein. Each cysteine residue of the ten present was individually mutated to serine and the different proteins expressed and characterized in S. pombe. Western blotting revealed that all the individual mutant proteins were expressed. We examined the ability of the mutant proteins to confer salt tolerance to S. pombe with the endogenous Sod2 protein deleted. Only proteins with C26S and C374S mutations were partially reduced in their ability to confer salt tolerance. Additionally, they showed a change in conformation in comparison to the wild-type protein, indicated by differential sensitivity to trypsin. Deletion of all the cysteine residues of Sod2 resulted in a functional protein that was expressed in S. pombe at levels similar to the wild type and also conferred salt tolerance. The conformation of the cysteine-free Sod2 protein was not altered relative to the wild-type protein. We examined the accessibility of amino acids of the cysteineless protein present on putative extracellular loop 2. A cysteine placed at position Ala119 was accessible to externally applied [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methane thiosulfonate bromide. The results demonstrate that cysteines in the Sod2 protein can be changed to serine residues resulting in an expressed, functional protein. The utility of the cysteine-free Sod2 protein for determination of topology and amino acid accessibility is demonstrated.

  9. Structural influence in the interaction of cysteine with five coordinated copper complexes: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Aguilar, Carlos Alberto; Thangarasu, Pandiyan; Mora, Jesús Gracia

    2018-04-01

    Copper complexes of N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane (L1) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (L2) prepared were characterized completely by different analytical methods. The X-structure of the complexes shows that Cu(II) presents in trigonal bi-pyramidal (TBP) geometry, consisting with the electronic spectra where two visible bands corresponding to five coordinated structure were observed. Thus TD-DFT was used to analyze the orbital contribution to the electronic transitions for the visible bands. Furthermore, the interaction of cysteine with the complexes was spectrally studied, and the results were explained through DFT analysis, observing that the geometrical parameters and oxidation state of metal ions play a vital role in the binding of cysteine with copper ion. It appears that the TBP structure is being changed into octahedral geometry during the addition of cysteine to the complexes as two bands (from complex) is turned to a broad band in visible region, signifying the occupation of cysteine molecule at sixth position of octahedral geometry. In the molecular orbital analysis, the existence of a strong overlapping of HOMOs (from cysteine) with LUMOs of Cu ion was observed. The total energy of the systems calculated by DFT shows that cysteine binds favorably with copper (I) than that with Cu(II).

  10. Cysteinome: The first comprehensive database for proteins with targetable cysteine and their covalent inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sijin; Luo Howard, Huizhe; Wang, Haina; Zhao, Weijie; Hu, Qiwan; Yang, Yongliang

    2016-09-23

    The covalent modification of intrinsically nucleophilic cysteine in proteins is crucial for diverse biochemical events. Bioinformatics approaches may prove useful in the design and discovery of covalent molecules targeting the cysteine in proteins to tune their functions and activities. Herein, we describe the Cysteinome, the first online database that provides a rich resource for the display, search and analysis of structure, function and related annotation for proteins with targetable cysteine as well as their covalent modulators. To this end, Cysteinome compiles 462 proteins with targetable cysteine from 122 different species along with 1217 covalent modulators curated from existing literatures. Proteins are annotated with a detailed description of protein families, biological process and related diseases. In addition, covalent modulators are carefully annotated with chemical name, chemical structure, binding affinity, physicochemical properties, molecule type and related diseases etc. The Cysteinome database may serve as a useful platform for the identification of crucial proteins with targetable cysteine in certain cellular context. Furthermore, it may help biologists and chemists for the design and discovery of covalent chemical probes or inhibitors homing at functional cysteine of critical protein targets implicated in various physiological or disease process. The Cysteinome database is freely available to public at http://www.cysteinome.org/. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Contribution of cysteine residue to the properties of Listeria monocytogenes listeriolysin O.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Radosław; Wiśniewski, Jarosław; Osińska, Olga; Bielecki, Jacek

    2009-10-01

    Listeriolysin (LLO) is the key virulence factor critical for Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis. Listerial cytolysin belongs to the family of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), a group of pore-forming toxins produced by related gram-positive bacteria. Most CDCs contain a cysteine residue in the conserved undecapeptide - a sequence that is highly preserved among this group of proteins. Substitutions of cysteine do not always lead to loss of hemolytic activity, questioning the purpose of such strong conservation of this amino acid in the sequence of CDC. The properties of 3 L. monocytogenes strains, a wild type and 2 mutants expressing modified LLO within the cysteine residue, were analyzed in this work. The first of these mutants producing a toxin with cysteine to alanine substitution showed similar features to the wild type except that a thiol-reducing agent was not necessary for hemolytic activity. Another strain secreting LLO containing serine instead of cysteine exhibited strikingly different properties than the wild type. Modified toxin is independent of the reducing reagents, less stable, and shows accelerated kinetics of cytolysis in comparison with the unchanged protein. However, both mutant strains are less invasive in the cell culture model showing the important role of cysteine in L. monocytogenes virulence.

  12. Depletion of circulating cyst(e)ine by oral and intravenous mesna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofer-Vogel, B.; Cerny, T.; Küpfer, A.; Junker, E.; Lauterburg, B. H.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfhydryl status of normal and tumour cells is critically important in determining their susceptibility to various cytostatic agents. As a sulfhydryl compound, mesna (sodium 2-mercaptoethane-sulfonate) which is used in large doses to prevent haemorrhagic cystitis associated with certain chemotherapeutic regimens might derange cellular thiol homeostasis. In order to investigate the effects of mesna on the concentrations of thiols in plasma, cysteine, glutathione and their disulfides were measured by HPLC following the oral and intravenous administration of mesna to healthy volunteers. After 7.3 mmol mesna i.v. free cysteine rose from 8.2 (95% CI 7.0-9.4) nmol ml-1 to 53.6 (47.4-59.8) nmol ml-1 at 5 min, most likely due to reduction of circulating cystine by the sulfhydryl drug. This initial rise was followed by a marked decrease of total cyst(e)ine in plasma from 276 (215-337) nmol ml-1 to a nadir of 102 (89-115) nmol ml-1 between 30-120 min after infusion, most likely due to an increased uptake of cysteine into cells and an increased urinary excretion of cyst(e)ine. Qualitatively similar changes were seen after oral mesna. The present data indicate that mesna depletes circulating cyst(e)ine and may thereby markedly alter the sulfhydryl status of cells in vivo although the drug itself is not taken up by most cells. PMID:8353049

  13. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  14. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Zhiqi; Toy, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  15. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat kidney tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Rosa, J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    In studies with rat hepatocytes, hypotaurine plus taurine production accounted for less than 5% of the total amount of cysteine (CYS) catabolized, whereas more than 90% of the metabolized cysteinesulfinate (CSA) was converted to taurine plus hypotaurine. Similar studies have been carried out with kidney tubules isolated from fed rats and incubated with 2 mM [1- 14 C]CYS or 25 mM [1- 14 C]CSA at 37 0 C for up to 40 min. The production of 14 CO 2 from CSA (3.1 +/- 1.3 nmol/sup ./ min -1 /sup ./ mg dry wt -1 ) was equivalent to the accumulation of N in NH 4 + plus glutamate. Substantial oxidation of CYS was observed (16 +/- 11 nmol CO 2 x min -1 x mg dry wt -1 ), but only 12% of the expected amount of N was recovered as NH 4 + plus glutamate. Accumulation of hypotaurine plus taurine was equivalent to 20% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CSA but accounted for only 2% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CYS. Addition of unlabeled CSA to incubations with varying levels of CYS had no effect on production of 14 CO 2 . Addition of 2 mM α-ketoglutarate to the incubation mixtures resulted in an increased in 14 CO 2 production from CSA to 290% of the control level but had no effect on CYS oxidation. In agreement with the authors findings for rat hepatocytes, these data suggest that most metabolism of CYS by the rat kidney tubule occurs by a CSA-independent pathway. However, in contrast to the metabolism of CSA almost entirely to taurine in the hepatocyte, kidney tubules appeared to metabolize CSA primarily by the transamination pathway

  16. Kininogens: More than cysteine protease inhibitors and kinin precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalmanach, Gilles; Naudin, Clément; Lecaille, Fabien; Fritz, Hans

    2010-11-01

    Two kininogens are found in mammalian sera: HK (high molecular weight kininogen) and LK (low molecular weight kininogen) with the exception of the rat which encompasses a third kininogen, T-Kininogen (TK). Kininogens are multifunctional glycosylated molecules related to cystatins (clan IH, family I25). They harbor three cystatin domains but only two of them are tight-binding inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins. HK and LK, but not TK, are precursors of potent peptide hormones, the kinins, which are released proteolytically by tissue and plasma kallikreins. Besides these classical features novel functions of kininogens have been recently discovered; they are described in the second part of this review. HKa, which corresponds to the kinin-free two-chain HK and its isolated domain D5 (kininostatin), possesses angiostatic and pro-apoptotic properties, inhibits the proliferation of endothelial cells and participates in the regulation of angiogenesis. Moreover, some HK-derived peptides display potent and broad-spectrum microbicidal properties against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and thus may offer a promising alternative to conventional antibiotic therapy. Of seminal interest, a kininogen-derived peptide inhibits activation of the contact phase system of coagulation and protects mice with invasive Streptococcus pyogenes infection from pulmonary lesions. On the other hand, TK is a biomarker of aging at the end of lifespan of elderly rats. However, although TK has been initially identified as an acute phase reactant, and earlier known as alpha-l-acute phase globulin, the increase of TK in liver and plasma is not known to relate to any inflammatory event during the senescence process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxidation of hypotaurine and cysteine sulphinic acid by peroxynitrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Peroxynitrite mediates the oxidation of the sulphinic group of both HTAU (hypotaurine) and CSA (cysteine sulphinic acid), producing the respective sulphonates, TAU (taurine) and CA (cysteic acid). The reaction is associated with extensive oxygen uptake, suggesting that HTAU and CSA are oxidized by the one-electron transfer mechanism to sulphonyl radicals, which may initiate an oxygen-dependent radical chain reaction with the sulphonates as final products. Besides the one-electron mechanism, HTAU and CSA can be oxidized by the two-electron pathway, leading directly to sulphonate formation without oxygen consumption. The apparent second-order rate constants for the direct reaction of peroxynitrite with HTAU and CSA at pH 7.4 and 25 °C are 77.4±5 and 76.4±9 M−1·s−1 respectively. For both sulphinates, the apparent second-order rate constants increase sharply with decrease in pH, and the sigmoidal curves obtained are consistent with peroxynitrous acid as the species responsible for sulphinate oxidation. The kinetic data, together with changes in oxygen uptake, sulphinate depletion, sulphonate production, and product distribution of nitrite and nitrate, suggest that oxidation of sulphinates by peroxynitrite may take place by the two reaction pathways whose relative importance depends on reagent concentrations and pH value. In the presence of bicarbonate, the direct reaction of sulphinates with peroxynitrite is inhibited and the oxidative reaction probably involves only the radicals •NO2 and CO3•−, generated by decomposition of the peroxynitrite-CO2 adduct. PMID:15740460

  18. ROSics: chemistry and proteomics of cysteine modifications in redox biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Ha, Sura; Lee, Hee Yoon; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occurring in proteins determine their functions and regulations. Proteomic tools are available to identify PTMs and have proved invaluable to expanding the inventory of these tools of nature that hold the keys to biological processes. Cysteine (Cys), the least abundant (1-2%) of amino acid residues, are unique in that they play key roles in maintaining stability of protein structure, participating in active sites of enzymes, regulating protein function and binding to metals, among others. Cys residues are major targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are important mediators and modulators of various biological processes. It is therefore necessary to identify the Cys-containing ROS target proteins, as well as the sites and species of their PTMs. Cutting edge proteomic tools which have helped identify the PTMs at reactive Cys residues, have also revealed that Cys residues are modified in numerous ways. These modifications include formation of disulfide, thiosulfinate and thiosulfonate, oxidation to sulfenic, sulfinic, sulfonic acids and thiosulfonic acid, transformation to dehydroalanine (DHA) and serine, palmitoylation and farnesylation, formation of chemical adducts with glutathione, 4-hydroxynonenal and 15-deoxy PGJ2, and various other chemicals. We present here, a review of relevant ROS biology, possible chemical reactions of Cys residues and details of the proteomic strategies employed for rapid, efficient and sensitive identification of diverse and novel PTMs involving reactive Cys residues of redox-sensitive proteins. We propose a new name, "ROSics," for the science which describes the principles of mode of action of ROS at molecular levels. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  20. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  1. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judge Bryan S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from non-acetaminophen hepatotoxins have not been well characterized. The objective of this study is to describe APAP-CYS concentrations in these clinical settings as well as to further characterize the concentrations observed following acetaminophen overdose. Methods Samples were collected during three clinical trials in which subjects received 4 g/day of acetaminophen and during an observational study of acetaminophen overdose patients. Trial 1 consisted of non-drinkers who received APAP for 10 days, Trial 2 consisted of moderate drinkers dosed for 10 days and Trial 3 included subjects who chronically abuse alcohol dosed for 5 days. Patients in the observational study were categorized by type of acetaminophen exposure (single or repeated. Serum APAP-CYS was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Trial 1 included 144 samples from 24 subjects; Trial 2 included 182 samples from 91 subjects and Trial 3 included 200 samples from 40 subjects. In addition, we collected samples from 19 subjects with acute acetaminophen ingestion, 7 subjects with repeated acetaminophen exposure and 4 subjects who ingested another hepatotoxin. The mean (SD peak APAP-CYS concentrations for the Trials were: Trial 1- 0.4 (0.20 nmol/ml, Trial 2- 0.1 (0.09 nmol/ml and Trial 3- 0.3 (0.12 nmol/ml. APAP-CYS concentrations varied substantially among the patients with acetaminophen toxicity (0.10 to 27.3 nmol/ml. No subject had detectable APAP

  2. The effect of L-cysteine on the portion-selective uptake of cadmium in the renal proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masataka; Sano, Kenichi; Webb, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), co-administered with an excess of L-cysteine, accumulates rapidly in the kidneys of the rat. After subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of 3 μmol CdCl 2 /kg body wt the concentrations of Cd in the blood and kidneys increase with the dose of cysteine over the range 0.06-5.0 mmol/kg body wt. At cysteine doses of less than 1.5 mmol/kg body wt the ratio of the concentrations of Cd in the outer medulla and cortex of the kidney remains the same as that after the injection of Cd alone. This ratio, however, is more than doubled at dose levels of 5-10 mmol cysteine/kg body wt. Hepatic uptake of Cd is unaffected by doses of cysteine below 1.5 mmol/kg body wt but decreases markedly at higher doses. In animals that are dosed simultaneously with 5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt, renal uptake of 109 Cd is known to occur in the straight segments of the proximal tubules. At a dose level of less than 1.5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt the present autoradiographical studies show that 109 Cd is taken up predominantly by the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney cortex. At the critical dose level (1.5 mmol/kg body wt), cysteine decreases the retention of Cd at the s.c. injection site, but probably has little effect on the distribution of Cd between protein and other carrier molecules in the blood. This distribution, however, is altered at higher cysteine dose levels. It is suggested that, under the latter conditions, stable Cd-cysteine complexes are formed in the blood and are filtered readily through the glomeruli. These complexes are taken up in the kidney at the sites of cysteine reabsorption which, by studies with L-[ 35 S]-cysteine, are identified as the straight segments of the proximal tubules. (orig.)

  3. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  4. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelley, Maud; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Martineau, Nelly; Cheminade, Gerald; Caillet, Victoria; McCarthy, James

    2012-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role in the programmed cell death

  5. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepelley Maud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is

  6. Effect of cysteine on methionine production by a regulatory mutant of Corynebacterium lilium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Subramanian, Kartik; Bisaria, Virendra S.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.; Gomes, James [Indian Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi (India)

    2005-02-01

    The production of methionine by submerged fermentation using a mutant strain of Corynebacterium lilium was studied to determine suitable conditions for obtaining high productivity. The mutant strain resistant to the methionine analogues ethionine, norleucine, methionine sulfoxide and methionine methylsulfonium chloride produced 2.34 g l{sup -1} of methionine in minimal medium containing glucose as carbon source. The effect of cysteine on methionine production in a 15 l bioreactor was studied by supplementing cysteine intermittently during the course of fermentation. The addition of cysteine (0.75 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}) every 2 h to the production medium increased the production of methionine to 3.39 g l{sup -1}. A metabolic flux analysis showed that during cysteine supplementation the ATP consumption reduced by 20%. It also showed that the increase in flux from phosphoenol pyruvate to oxaloacetate leads to higher methionine production. Results indicate that controlling the respiratory quotient close to 0.75 will produce the highest amount of methionine and that regulatory mutants also resistant to analogues of cysteine would be better methionine over producers. (Author)

  7. Observation of Cysteine Thiolate and -S...H-O Intermolecular Hydrogen Bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hin-koon; Lau, Kai Chung; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2006-11-23

    The cysteine anion was produced in the gas phase by electrospray ionization and investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy at low-temperature (70K). The cysteine anion was found to exhibit the thiolate form [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2H], rather than the expected carboxylate form [HSCH2CH(NH2)CO2 -]. This observation was confirmed by two control experiments i.e. methyl cysteine [CH3SCH2CH(NH2)CO2-] and cysteine methyl ester [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2CH3]. The electron binding energy of [-CH2CH(NH2)CO2H] was measured to be about 0.7 eV blue-shifted relative to [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2CH3] due to the formation of an intramolecular –S-…HO2C– hydrogen bond in the cysteine hiolate. Theoretical calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(2df,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,p) levels were carried out to estimate the strength of this intramolecular –S-…HO2C– hydrogen bond. Combining experimental measurements and theoretical calculations yielded an estimated value of 16.4 ± 2.0 kcal/mol for the –S-…HO2C– intramolecular hydrogen bond strength.

  8. CMD: A Database to Store the Bonding States of Cysteine Motifs with Secondary Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bostan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches to the disulphide bonding state and its connectivity pattern prediction are based on various descriptors. One descriptor is the amino acid sequence motifs flanking the cysteine residue motifs. Despite the existence of disulphide bonding information in many databases and applications, there is no complete reference and motif query available at the moment. Cysteine motif database (CMD is the first online resource that stores all cysteine residues, their flanking motifs with their secondary structure, and propensity values assignment derived from the laboratory data. We extracted more than 3 million cysteine motifs from PDB and UniProt data, annotated with secondary structure assignment, propensity value assignment, and frequency of occurrence and coefficiency of their bonding status. Removal of redundancies generated 15875 unique flanking motifs that are always bonded and 41577 unique patterns that are always nonbonded. Queries are based on the protein ID, FASTA sequence, sequence motif, and secondary structure individually or in batch format using the provided APIs that allow remote users to query our database via third party software and/or high throughput screening/querying. The CMD offers extensive information about the bonded, free cysteine residues, and their motifs that allows in-depth characterization of the sequence motif composition.

  9. A triticale water-deficit-inducible phytocystatin inhibits endogenous cysteine proteinases in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacka, Magdalena; Szewińska, Joanna; Mielecki, Marcin; Nykiel, Małgorzata; Imai, Ryozo; Bielawski, Wiesław; Orzechowski, Sławomir

    2015-02-01

    Water-deficit is accompanied by an increase in proteolysis. Phytocystatins are plant inhibitors of cysteine proteinases that belong to the papain and legumain family. A cDNA encoding the protein inhibitor TrcC-8 was identified in the vegetative organs of triticale. In response to water-deficit, increases in the mRNA levels of TrcC-8 were observed in leaf and root tissues. Immunoblot analysis indicated that accumulation of the TrcC-8 protein occurred after 72h of water-deficit in the seedlings. Using recombinant protein, inhibitory activity of TrcC-8 against cysteine proteases from triticale and wheat tissues was analyzed. Under water-deficit conditions, there are increases in cysteine proteinase activities in both plant tissues. The cysteine proteinase activities were inhibited by addition of the recombinant TrcC-8 protein. These results suggest a potential role for the triticale phytocystatin in modulating cysteine proteinase activities during water-deficit conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K., E-mail: e7141@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Tsujibayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Azuma, J. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Kakimoto, K. [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kamada, M. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. {yields} The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. {yields} The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. {yields} The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. {yields} The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  11. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  12. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy by L-cysteine in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhangdaquan@shiep.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Yang, Dong [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Wang, Hongxia; Lin, Tong [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition of L-cysteine on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 mol/L NaOH solution was investigated by hydrogen gas evolution experiment, polarisation curve, galvanostatic discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of L-cysteine on aluminium alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The polarisation curves indicated that L-cysteine acted as a cathodic inhibitor to inhibit cathodic reaction. The inhibition mechanism was dominated by the geometric covering effect. The galvanostatic discharge shows that the additives restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that L-cysteine molecules mainly interacted with on the carboxyl groups on the aluminium alloy surface. A strong hybridization occurred between the s-orbital and p-orbital of reactive sites in the L-cysteine molecule and the sp-orbital of Aluminium. - Highlights: • L-cysteine was used as corrosion inhibitor for Al alloy in alkaline solution. • Adsorption of L-cysteine on Al alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's isotherm. • L-cysteine molecules interacted with the carboxyl groups on the Al alloy surface. • A strong orbital hybridization occurred between the reactive sites in L-cysteine and Al.

  14. The antitumor mechanism of di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone and its copper complex in ROS generation and topoisomerase inhibition, and hydrazone involvement in oxygen-catalytic iron mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tengfei; Li, Cuiping; Sun, Xingzhi; Zhu, Zhenfu; Fu, Yun; Liu, Youxun; Yuan, Yanbin; Li, Shaoshan; Li, Changzheng

    2015-11-01

    Iron depletion and stimulation of iron-dependent free radical damage is a rapidly developing field for chelation therapy, but the iron mobilization from ferritin by chelators has received less attention. In this study, the di-2-pyridylketone 2-pyridine carboxylic acid hydrazone (DPPCAH) and its copper complex was prepared and characterized by NMR and MS spectra. The proliferation inhibition assay showed that both DPPCAH and its copper complex exhibited selectively proliferation inhibition for HepG2 (IC50, 4.6 ± 0.2 µM for DPPACH and 1.3 ± 0.2 µM for its copper complex), but less inhibition for HCT-116 cell line (IC50, >100 µM for DPPACH and 7.8 ± 0.4 µM for its copper complex). The mechanistic studies revealed that DPPACH could remove iron from ferritin in a oxygen-catalytic manner, and contributed to redox activity of labile iron pool (LIP), that is less reported for the chelators that possess significant biological activity. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and DNA cleavage assay in vitro and in vivo showed that both DPPACH-Fe(II) and DPPACH-Cu were redox-active species, indicating that ROS may mediate their antitumor activity. Further study revealed that both DPPACH and its copper complex displayed certain degree of inhibition of type II topoisomerase (Top) which contributed to their antitumor activity. Thus, the mechanism that iron mobilization by DPPACH from ferritin contributed to LIP was proposed, and both DPPACH and its copper complex were involved in ROS generation and Top II inhibition for their antitumor activities.

  15. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  16. YbdK is a carboxylate-amine ligase with a gamma-glutamyl:Cysteine ligase activity: crystal structure and enzymatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Christopher; Doseeva, Victoria; Pullalarevu, Sadhana; Krajewski, Wojciech; Howard, Andrew; Herzberg, Osnat

    2004-08-01

    The Escherichia coli open reading frame YbdK encodes a member of a large bacterial protein family of unknown biological function. The sequences within this family are remotely related to the sequence of gamma-glutamate-cysteine ligase (gamma-GCS), an enzyme in the glutathione biosynthetic pathway. A gene encoding gamma-GCS in E. coli is already known. The 2.15 A resolution crystal structure of YbdK reveals an overall fold similar to that of glutamine synthetase (GS), a nitrogen metabolism enzyme that ligates glutamate and ammonia to yield glutamine. GS and gamma-GCS perform related chemical reactions and require ATP and Mg2+ for their activity. The Mg2+-dependent binding of ATP to YbdK was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy employing 2'(or 3')-O-(trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate, and yielding a dissociation constant of 3 +/- 0.5 microM. The structure of YbdK contains a crevice that corresponds to the binding sites of ATP, Mg2+ and glutamate in GS. Many of the GS residues that coordinate the metal ions and interact with glutamic acid and the phosphoryl and ribosyl groups of ATP are also present in YbdK. GS amino acids that have been associated with ammonia binding have no obvious counterparts in YbdK, consistent with a substrate specificity that is different from that of GS. Ligase activity between glutamic acid and each of the twenty amino acid residues was tested on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) by following the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP. Catalysis was observed only with cysteine. A pyruvate kinase/lactic acid dehydrogenase coupled assay was used to rule out GS activity and to determine that YbdK exhibits gamma-GCS activity. The catalytic rate was found to be approximately 500-fold slower than that reported for authentic gamma-GCS. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  18. S-Substituted cysteine derivatives and thiosulfinate formation in Petiveria alliacea-part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, Roman; Kim, Seokwon; Musah, Rabi A

    2002-11-01

    Three cysteine derivatives, (R)-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine, together with (R(S)R(C))- and (S(S)R(C))-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine sulfoxides, have been isolated from the roots of Petiveria alliacea. Furthermore, three additional amino acids, S-methyl-, S-ethyl-, and S-propylcysteine derivatives, were detected. They were present only in trace amounts (<3 microg g(-1) fr. wt), precluding determination of their absolute configurations and oxidation states. In addition, four thiosulfinates, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) (2-hydroxyethane)-, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenylmethane-, S-benzyl (2-hydroxyethane)- and S-benzyl phenylmethanethiosulfinates, have been found in a homogenate of the roots. The formation pathways of various benzyl/phenyl-containing compounds previously found in the plant were also discussed.

  19. Regulation of Protein Function and Signaling by Reversible Cysteine S-Nitrosylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Neal; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Raju, Karthik; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    NO is a versatile free radical that mediates numerous biological functions within every major organ system. A molecular pathway by which NO accomplishes functional diversity is the selective modification of protein cysteine residues to form S-nitrosocysteine. This post-translational modification, S-nitrosylation, impacts protein function, stability, and location. Despite considerable advances with individual proteins, the in vivo biological chemistry, the structural elements that govern the selective S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, and the potential overlap with other redox modifications are unknown. In this minireview, we explore the functional features of S-nitrosylation at the proteome level and the structural diversity of endogenously modified residues, and we discuss the potential overlap and complementation that may exist with other cysteine modifications. PMID:23861393

  20. A Critical Role for Cysteine 57 in the Biological Functions of Selenium Binding Protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Qi; Ansong, Emmanuel; Diamond, Alan M; Yang, Wancai

    2015-11-18

    The concentration of selenium-binding protein1 (SBP1) is often lower in tumors than in the corresponding tissue and lower levels have been associated with poor clinical outcomes. SBP1 binds tightly selenium although what role selenium plays in its biological functions remains unknown. Previous studies indicated that cysteine 57 is the most likely candidate amino acid for selenium binding. In order to investigate the role of cysteine 57 in SBP1, this amino acid was altered to a glycine and the mutated protein was expressed in human cancer cells. The SBP1 half-life, as well as the cellular response to selenite cytotoxicity, was altered by this change. The ectopic expression of SBP1(GLY) also caused mitochondrial damage in HCT116 cells. Taken together, these results indicated that cysteine 57 is a critical determinant of SBP1 function and may play a significant role in mitochondrial function.

  1. Stoichiometric and irreversible cysteine-selective protein modification using carbonylacrylic reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardim, Barbara; Cal, Pedro M. S. D.; Matos, Maria J.; Oliveira, Bruno L.; Martínez-Sáez, Nuria; Albuquerque, Inês S.; Perkins, Elizabeth; Corzana, Francisco; Burtoloso, Antonio C. B.; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.

    2016-10-01

    Maleimides remain the reagents of choice for the preparation of therapeutic and imaging protein conjugates despite the known instability of the resulting products that undergo thiol-exchange reactions in vivo. Here we present the rational design of carbonylacrylic reagents for chemoselective cysteine bioconjugation. These reagents undergo rapid thiol Michael-addition under biocompatible conditions in stoichiometric amounts. When using carbonylacrylic reagents equipped with PEG or fluorophore moieties, this method enables access to protein and antibody conjugates precisely modified at pre-determined sites. Importantly, the conjugates formed are resistant to degradation in plasma and are biologically functional, as demonstrated by the selective imaging and detection of apoptotic and HER2+ cells, respectively. The straightforward preparation, stoichiometric use and exquisite cysteine selectivity of the carbonylacrylic reagents combined with the stability of the products and the availability of biologically relevant cysteine-tagged proteins make this method suitable for the routine preparation of chemically defined conjugates for in vivo applications.

  2. Regulation of protein function and signaling by reversible cysteine S-nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Neal; Doulias, Paschalis-Thomas; Tenopoulou, Margarita; Raju, Karthik; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-09-13

    NO is a versatile free radical that mediates numerous biological functions within every major organ system. A molecular pathway by which NO accomplishes functional diversity is the selective modification of protein cysteine residues to form S-nitrosocysteine. This post-translational modification, S-nitrosylation, impacts protein function, stability, and location. Despite considerable advances with individual proteins, the in vivo biological chemistry, the structural elements that govern the selective S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues, and the potential overlap with other redox modifications are unknown. In this minireview, we explore the functional features of S-nitrosylation at the proteome level and the structural diversity of endogenously modified residues, and we discuss the potential overlap and complementation that may exist with other cysteine modifications.

  3. L-Cysteine Capped CdSe Quantum Dots Synthesized by Photochemical Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avinash; Kunwar, Amit; Rath, M C

    2018-05-01

    L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots were synthesized via photochemical route in aqueous solution under UV photo-irradiation. The as grown CdSe quantum dots exhibit broad fluorescence at room temperature. The CdSe quantum dots were found to be formed only through the reactions of the precursors, i.e., Cd(NH3)2+4 and SeSO2-3 with the photochemically generated 1-hydroxy-2-propyl radicals, (CH3)2COH radicals, which are formed through the process of H atom abstraction by the photoexcited acetone from 2-propanol. L-Cysteine was found to act as a suitable capping agent for the CdSe quantum dots and increases their biocompatability. Cytotoxicty effects of these quantum dots were evaluated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) epithelial cells, indicated a significant lower level for the L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots as compare to the bare ones.

  4. Hieronymain I, a new cysteine peptidase isolated from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mariela A; Pardo, Marcelo F; Caffini, Néstor O; López, Laura M I

    2003-02-01

    A new peptidase, named hieronymain I, was purified to homogeneity from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae) by acetone fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC) on CM-Sepharose FF. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF), isoelectric focusing, and SDS-PAGE. Hieronymain is a basic peptidase (pI > 9.3) and its molecular mass was 24,066 Da. Maximum proteolytic activity on casein (>90% of maximum activity) was achieved at pH 8.5-9.5. The enzyme was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid and activated by the addition of cysteine; these results strongly suggest that the isolated protease should be included within the cysteine group. The N-terminal sequence of hieronymain (ALPESIDWRAKGAVTEVKRQDG) was compared with 25 plant cysteine proteases that showed more than 50% of identity.

  5. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  6. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  7. The proteins of Fusobacterium spp. involved in hydrogen sulfide production from L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Madeleine; Dahlén, Gunnar; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2017-03-14

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a toxic foul-smelling gas produced by subgingival biofilms in patients with periodontal disease and is suggested to be part of the pathogenesis of the disease. We studied the H 2 S-producing protein expression of bacterial strains associated with periodontal disease. Further, we examined the effect of a cysteine-rich growth environment on the synthesis of intracellular enzymes in F. nucleatum polymorphum ATCC 10953. The proteins were subjected to one-dimensional (1DE) and two-dimensional (2DE) gel electrophoresis An in-gel activity assay was used to detect the H 2 S-producing enzymes; Sulfide from H 2 S, produced by the enzymes in the gel, reacted with bismuth forming bismuth sulfide, illustrated as brown bands (1D) or spots (2D) in the gel. The discovered proteins were identified with liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cysteine synthase and proteins involved in the production of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'phosphate (that catalyzes the production of H 2 S) were frequently found among the discovered enzymes. Interestingly, a higher expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes was detected from bacteria incubated without cysteine prior to the experiment. Numerous enzymes, identified as cysteine synthase, were involved in the production of H 2 S from cysteine and the expression varied among Fusobacterium spp. and strains. No enzymes were detected with the in-gel activity assay among the other periodontitis-associated bacteria tested. The expression of the H 2 S-producing enzymes was dependent on environmental conditions such as cysteine concentration and pH but less dependent on the presence of serum and hemin.

  8. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector.

  9. Evaluation of Methods for the Calculation of the pKa of Cysteine Residues in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoonor-Williams, Ernest; Rowley, Christopher N

    2016-09-13

    Methods for the calculation of the pKa ionizable amino acids are valuable tools for understanding pH-dependent properties of proteins. Cysteine is unique among the amino acids because of the chemical reactivity of its thiol group (S-H), which plays an instrumental role in several biochemical and regulatory functions. The acidity of noncatalytic cysteine residues is a factor in their susceptibility to chemical modification. Despite the plethora of existing pKa computing methods, no definitive protocol exists for accurately calculating the pKa's of cysteine residues in proteins. A cysteine pKa test set was developed, which is comprised of 18 cysteine residues in 12 proteins where the pKa's have been determined experimentally and an experimental structure is available. The pKa's of these residues were calculated using three methods that use an implicit solvent model (H++, MCCE, and PROPKA) and an all-atom replica-exchange thermodynamic integration approach with the CHARMM36 and AMBER ff99SB-ILDNP force fields. The models that use implicit solvation methods were generally unreliable in predicting cysteine residue pKa's, with RMSDs between 3.41 and 4.72 pKa units. On average, the explicit solvent methods performed better than the implicit solvent methods. RMSD values of 2.40 and 3.20 were obtained for simulations with the CHARMM36 and AMBER ff99SB-ILDNP force fields, respectively. Further development of these methods is necessary because the performance of the best method is similar to that of the null-model (RMSD = 2.74) and these differences in RMSD are of limited statistical significance given the small size of our test set.

  10. Sample Multiplexing with Cysteine-Selective Approaches: cysDML and cPILOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liqing; Evans, Adam R.; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2015-04-01

    Cysteine-selective proteomics approaches simplify complex protein mixtures and improve the chance of detecting low abundant proteins. It is possible that cysteinyl-peptide/protein enrichment methods could be coupled to isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging methods for quantitative proteomics analyses in as few as two or up to 10 samples, respectively. Here we present two novel cysteine-selective proteomics approaches: cysteine-selective dimethyl labeling (cysDML) and cysteine-selective combined precursor isotopic labeling and isobaric tagging (cPILOT). CysDML is a duplex precursor quantification technique that couples cysteinyl-peptide enrichment with on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling. Cysteine-selective cPILOT is a novel 12-plex workflow based on cysteinyl-peptide enrichment, on-resin stable-isotope dimethyl labeling, and iodoTMT tagging on cysteine residues. To demonstrate the broad applicability of the approaches, we applied cysDML and cPILOT methods to liver tissues from an Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model and wild-type (WT) controls. From the cysDML experiments, an average of 850 proteins were identified and 594 were quantified, whereas from the cPILOT experiment, 330 and 151 proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. Overall, 2259 unique total proteins were detected from both cysDML and cPILOT experiments. There is tremendous overlap in the proteins identified and quantified between both experiments, and many proteins have AD/WT fold-change values that are within ~20% error. A total of 65 statistically significant proteins are differentially expressed in the liver proteome of AD mice relative to WT. The performance of cysDML and cPILOT are demonstrated and advantages and limitations of using multiple duplex experiments versus a single 12-plex experiment are highlighted.

  11. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. PMID:22254046

  12. An Assay Study of Molecular Recognition of Amino Acids in Water: Covalent Imprinting of Cysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Yu, Donghong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic N-(9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH) receptor was pre- pared by co-polymerizing (9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-S-(1-propene-2-thiol)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SCH2CHCH2)-OH) and a non-imprinted polymer prepared from 1-propene-1-thiol photo-chemically 15 h at ...... be reproducible and contain constant binding strengths and recognition properties. Furthermore, we proved that short incubation periods resulted in fast and efficient thiol-disulfide interchange reactions....

  13. Two Japanese CADASIL families exhibiting Notch3 mutation R75P not involving cysteine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Toshiki; Muranishi, Manabu; Torugun, Torusunjian; Tango, Hiromi; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kudeken, Tukasa; Kawase, Yuji; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Oshima, Fumiko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Most previously reported mutations in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) result in an odd number of cysteine residues within the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in Notch3. We report here R75P mutation in two Japanese CADASIL families not directly involving cysteine residues located within the first EGF-like repeats. Probands in both families had repeated episodes of stroke, depression, dementia as well as T2 high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter, but fewer white matter lesions in the temporal pole on MRI. These families provide new insights into the diagnosis and pathomechanisms of CADASIL.

  14. A simple synthesis of L-[35S]cysteine sulfinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.M.; Martin, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of L-[ 35 S]cysteine sulfinic acid (L-2-amino-3-[ 35 S]sulfino-propanoic acid) in 65% yield from S-[ 35 S]cystine is described. The procedure was designed for use with milligram quantities of starting material and requires no purification of intermediates. L-[ 35 S]Cystine was converted first to its thiosulfonate. Subsequent reaction of the thiosulfonate with ammonium hydroxide generated L-[ 35 S]cysteine sulfinic acid and L-[ 35 S]cystine as the major products. The L-[ 35 S]cystine was recovered and reprocessed thereby increasing the yield. (author)

  15. Development of a cysteine-deprived and C-terminally truncated GLP-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Garibay, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to family B of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and has become a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the development and characterization of a fully functional cysteine-deprived and C-terminally trun......The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to family B of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and has become a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the development and characterization of a fully functional cysteine-deprived and C...

  16. Formation of Hg(II) Tetrathiolate Complexes with Cysteine at Neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H 2 Cys) solutions containing H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg( S -HCys) 2 . In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg( S,N -Cys) 2 ] 2- complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which C Hg(II) varied between 8 - 9 mM and 80 - 100 mM, respectively, with H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 - 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg( S -HCys) 2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199 Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions ( C Hg(II) = 8 - 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess ( C H2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions ( C Hg(II) = 80 - 100 mM) with high cysteine excess ( C H2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg( S -cysteinate) 4 ] m -6 ( m = 0 - 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 - 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complex due to protonation of some ( m ) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. The results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems.

  17. Synthesis of cysteine from methionine in normal adult subjects: effect of route of alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegink, L D; Den Besten, L

    1972-11-03

    Parenteral alimentation solutions free of cysteine, probably an essential amino acid for premature infants, were administered continuously to eight healthy men through catheters in the superior vena cava and through nasogastric tubes. When the preparation was administered parenterally, the plasma cystine concentration dropped markedly. When feeding was switched to the oral route, the concentration rose immediately, but returned to baseline only when a cystine-containing diet was fed. These studies indicate that the synthesis of cysteine from methionine is limited, even in the adult subject, when cystine-free diets are administered parenterally.

  18. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  19. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L–Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles–graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hamid R., E-mail: hrzare@yazd.ac.ir; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Quercetin AgNPs graphene nanosheets modified GCE (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) was prepared as a new sensor. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. • In DPV, the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. • The proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of AA, UA and L–Cys. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE was satisfactorily used for the determination of AA, UA and L–Cys in real samples. - Abstract: By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L–Cys peak potential at Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs–GCE or AgNPs–GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k′, for the oxidation of L–Cys at the Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L–Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L–Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L–Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  20. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  1. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  2. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  3. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented.......A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  4. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  5. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  6. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  7. Cysteine is not the sulfur source for iron-sulfur cluster and methionine biosynthesis in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena; Whitman, William B; White, Robert H

    2010-10-15

    Three multiprotein systems are known for iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes as follows: the NIF (nitrogen fixation), the ISC (iron-sulfur cluster), and the SUF (mobilization of sulfur) systems. In all three, cysteine is the physiological sulfur source, and the sulfur is transferred from cysteine desulfurase through a persulfidic intermediate to a scaffold protein. However, the biochemical nature of the sulfur source for Fe-S cluster assembly in archaea is unknown, and many archaea lack homologs of cysteine desulfurases. Methanococcus maripaludis is a methanogenic archaeon that contains a high amount of protein-bound Fe-S clusters (45 nmol/mg protein). Cysteine in this archaeon is synthesized primarily via the tRNA-dependent SepRS/SepCysS pathway. When a ΔsepS mutant (a cysteine auxotroph) was grown with (34)S-labeled sulfide and unlabeled cysteine, 92% of the methionine, and >87% of the sulfur in the Fe-S clusters in proteins were labeled, suggesting that the sulfur in methionine and Fe-S clusters was derived predominantly from exogenous sulfide instead of cysteine. Therefore, this investigation challenges the concept that cysteine is always the sulfur source for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in vivo and suggests that Fe-S clusters are derived from sulfide in those organisms, which live in sulfide-rich habitats.

  8. Th1 Cell Development Induced by Cysteine Proteinases A and B in Localized Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Due to Leishmania guyanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascalis, Hervé; Lavergne, Anne; Bourreau, Eliane; Prévot-Linguet, Ghislaine; Kariminia, Amina; Pradinaud, Roger; Rafati, Sima; Launois, Pascal

    2003-01-01

    The cysteine proteinases CPA and CPB from Leishmania major induced Th1 responses in patients with leishmaniasis due to Leishmania guyanensis. Furthermore, cysteine proteinases induced neither interleukin 4 (IL-4) nor IL-13 and low levels of IL-10 in controls and patients. The results suggest that CPs would be quite good candidates for a vaccine against different Leishmania species. PMID:12704171

  9. Accessibility of Myofilament Cysteines and Effects on ATPase Depend on the Activation State during Exposure to Oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sean M.; Lehman, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Signaling by reactive oxygen species has emerged as a major physiological process. Due to its high metabolic rate, striated muscle is especially subject to oxidative stress, and there are multiple examples in cardiac and skeletal muscle where oxidative stress modulates contractile function. Here we assessed the potential of cysteine oxidation as a mechanism for modulating contractile function in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Analyzing the cysteine content of the myofilament proteins in striated muscle, we found that cysteine residues are relatively rare, but are very similar between different muscle types and different vertebrate species. To refine this list of cysteines to those that may modulate function, we estimated the accessibility of oxidants to cysteine residues using protein crystal structures, and then sharpened these estimates using fluorescent labeling of cysteines in cardiac and skeletal myofibrils. We demonstrate that cysteine accessibility to oxidants and ATPase rates depend on the contractile state in which preparations are exposed. Oxidant exposure of skeletal and cardiac myofibrils in relaxing solution exposes myosin cysteines not accessible in rigor solution, and these modifications correspond to a decrease in maximum ATPase. Oxidant exposure under rigor conditions produces modifications that increase basal ATPase and calcium sensitivity in ventricular myofibrils, but these effects were muted in fast twitch muscle. These experiments reveal how structural and sequence variations can lead to divergent effects from oxidants in different muscle types. PMID:23894416

  10. Cysteine Addition Promotes Sulfide Production and 4-Fold Hg(II)-S Coordination in Actively Metabolizing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sara A; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2017-04-18

    The bacterial uptake of mercury(II), Hg(II), is believed to be energy-dependent and is enhanced by cysteine in diverse species of bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To gain insight into this Hg(II) biouptake pathway, we have employed X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to investigate the relationship between exogenous cysteine, cellular metabolism, cellular localization, and Hg(II) coordination in aerobically respiring Escherichia coli (E. coli). We show that cells harvested in exponential growth phase consistently display mixtures of 2-fold and 4-fold Hg(II) coordination to sulfur (Hg-S 2 and Hg-S 4 ), with added cysteine enhancing Hg-S 4 formation. In contrast, cells in stationary growth phase or cells treated with a protonophore causing a decrease in cellular ATP predominantly contain Hg-S 2 , regardless of cysteine addition. Our XAS results favor metacinnabar (β-HgS) as the Hg-S 4 species, which we show is associated with both the cell envelope and cytoplasm. Additionally, we observe that added cysteine abiotically oxidizes to cystine and exponentially growing E. coli degrade high cysteine concentrations (100-1000 μM) into sulfide. Thermodynamic calculations confirm that cysteine-induced sulfide biosynthesis can promote the formation of dissolved and particulate Hg(II)-sulfide species. This report reveals new complexities arising in Hg(II) bioassays with cysteine and emphasizes the need for considering changes in chemical speciation as well as growth stage.

  11. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oligomerization of Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Oliver Dennis

    increased with temperature, with 17 wt.% observed at 190ºC. Higher reaction temperatures led to the formation of odd-numbered oligomers primarily due to acid-catalyzed cracking reactions. In the range of space velocities tested, a moderate WHSV of 2.0 hr-1 resulted in a local maximum of 10.6 wt.% of liquid hydrocarbon yield. A moderate nickel loading of 3.4 wt.% also resulted in the highest liquid yield out of the three loadings tested (10.6 wt.%). The variation in nickel loading revealed the importance of having a synergistic balance of nickel and acid sites on the catalyst to maximize ethylene conversion and maintain high liquid hydrocarbon yield. Lastly, we used supercritical ethylene as both a solvent and as a reactant for ethylene oligomerization over two silica-alumina type catalysts: Ni-Hbeta and Ni-Al-SBA-15. Specifically, the effect of pressure and temperature on the overall conversion and product selectivity were evaluated in the range from 0 to 65 bar and 30 to 120ºC. At subcritical conditions, the ethylene conversion reached a plateau of around 50%. By increasing the pressure past the critical point of ethylene, the conversion drastically increased to 71%. The increased conversion can be attributed to the solubility of certain oligomers, namely butene, in supercritical ethylene that promotes desorption from catalytic active site before further oligomerization. We also tested a mesoporous catalyst, Ni-Al-SBA-15 and observed conversion trends analogous to that of Ni-Hbeta. At supercritical conditions, ethylene oligomerization over Ni-Al-SBA-15 was more selective towards the butene product, with nearly 74 wt.% butenes observed. The catalyst activity increased with temperature from 30ºC to 120ºC. The experiment conducted at 30ºC showed very little activity and ethylene conversion, however it effectively heavy molecular weight species from the catalyst. This condition, albeit being not effective for ethylene oligomerization, could be implemented as an in

  12. Key Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis and Subcellular Localization of Sulfur Oxygenase-Reductase of Acidianus tengchongensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; She, Qunxin

    2005-01-01

    ). The thio-modifying reagent N-ethylmaleimide and Zn2+ strongly inhibited the activities of the SORs of A. tengchongensis, suggesting that cysteine residues are important. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct four mutant SORs with cysteines replaced by serine or alanine. The purified mutant......Analysis of known sulfur oxygenase-reductases (SORs) and the SOR-like sequences identified from public databases indicated that they all possess three cysteine residues within two conserved motifs (V-G-P-K-V-C31 and C101-X-X-C104; numbering according to the Acidianus tengchongensis numbering system...... proteins were investigated in parallel with the wild-type SOR. Replacement of any cysteine reduced SOR activity by 98.4 to 100%, indicating that all the cysteine residues are crucial to SOR activities. Circular-dichroism and fluorescence spectrum analyses revealed that the wild-type and mutant SORs have...

  13. Drug susceptibility testing in microaerophilic parasites: Cysteine strongly affects the effectivities of metronidazole and auranofin, a novel and promising antimicrobial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Giardia lamblia annually cause hundreds of millions of human infections which are treated with antiparasitic drugs. Metronidazole is the most often prescribed drug but also other drugs are in use, and novel drugs with improved characteristics are constantly being developed. One of these novel drugs is auranofin, originally an antirheumatic which has been relabelled for the treatment of parasitic infections. Drug effectivity is arguably the most important criterion for its applicability and is commonly assessed in susceptibility assays using in vitro cultures of a given pathogen. However, drug susceptibility assays can be strongly affected by certain compounds in the growth media. In the case of microaerophilic parasites, cysteine which is added in large amounts as an antioxidant is an obvious candidate because it is highly reactive and known to modulate the toxicity of metronidazole in several microaerophilic parasites.In this study, it was attempted to reduce cysteine concentrations as far as possible without affecting parasite viability by performing drug susceptibility assays under strictly anaerobic conditions in an anaerobic cabinet. Indeed, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica could be grown without any cysteine added and the cysteine concentration necessary to maintain G. lamblia could be reduced to 20%. Susceptibilities to metronidazole were found to be clearly reduced in the presence of cysteine. With auranofin the protective effect of cysteine was extreme, providing protection to concentrations up to 100-fold higher as observed in the absence of cysteine. With three other drugs tested, albendazole, furazolidone and nitazoxanide, all in use against G. lamblia, the effect of cysteine was less pronounced. Oxygen was found to have a less marked impact on metronidazole and auranofin than cysteine but bovine bile which is standardly used in growth media for G

  14. Lifespan extension and increased resistance to environmental stressors by N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Il Oh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a modified sulfur-containing amino acid that acts as a strong cellular antioxidant, on the response to environmental stressors and on aging in C. elegans. METHOD: The survival of worms under oxidative stress conditions induced by paraquat was evaluated with and without in vivo N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the response to other environmental stressors, including heat stress and ultraviolet irradiation (UV, was also monitored. To investigate the effect on aging, we examined changes in lifespan, fertility, and expression of age-related biomarkers in C. elegans after N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. RESULTS: Dietary N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly increased resistance to oxidative stress, heat stress, and UV irradiation in C. elegans. In addition, N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly extended both the mean and maximum lifespan of C. elegans. The mean lifespan was extended by up to 30.5% with 5 mM N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment, and the maximum lifespan was increased by 8 days. N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation also increased the total number of progeny produced and extended the gravid period of C. elegans. The green fluorescent protein reporter assay revealed that expression of the stress-responsive genes, sod-3 and hsp-16.2, increased significantly following N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. CONCLUSION: N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation confers a longevity phenotype in C. elegans, possibly through increased resistance to environmental stressors.

  15. Expression and localisation of a senescence-associated KDEL-cysteine protease from Lilium longiflorum tepals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, Riccardo; Lombardi, Lara; Picciarelli, Piero; Lorenzi, Roberto; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Rogers, Hilary J

    2014-01-01

    Senescence is a tightly regulated process and both compartmentalisation and regulated activation of degradative enzymes is critical to avoid premature cellular destruction. Proteolysis is a key process in senescent tissues, linked to disassembly of cellular contents and nutrient remobilisation. Cysteine proteases are responsible for most proteolytic activity in senescent petals, encoded by a gene family comprising both senescence-specific and senescence up-regulated genes. KDEL cysteine proteases are present in senescent petals of several species. Isoforms from endosperm tissue localise to ricinosomes: cytosol acidification following vacuole rupture results in ricinosome rupture and activation of the KDEL proteases from an inactive proform. Here data show that a Lilium longiflorum KDEL protease gene (LlCYP) is transcriptionally up-regulated, and a KDEL cysteine protease antibody reveals post-translational processing in senescent petals. Plants over-expressing LlCYP lacking the KDEL sequence show reduced growth and early senescence. Immunogold staining and confocal analyses indicate that in young tissues the protein is retained in the ER, while during floral senescence it is localised to the vacuole. Our data therefore suggest that the vacuole may be the site of action for at least this KDEL cysteine protease during tepal senescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary excretion of N-acetyl-S-allyl-L-cystein upon garlic consumption by human volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, B.M.; Boogaard, P.J.; Rijksen, D.A.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1996-01-01

    N-Acetyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine (allylmercapturic acid, ALMA) was previously detected in urine from humans consuming garlic. Exposure of rats to allyl halides is also known to lead to excretion of ALMA in urine. ALMA is a potential biomarker for exposure assessment of workers exposed to allyl halides.

  17. Cysteine Protease Secreted by Paragonimus westermani Attenuates Effector Functions of Human Eosinophils Stimulated with Immunoglobulin G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Myeong Heon; Kita, Hirohito; Park, Hae Young; Seoh, Ju Young

    2001-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated surface, such as that found on helminth parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for eosinophil activation. The cysteine proteases secreted by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play an important role in evasion of the immune response by degrading the host immunoglobulins. In this study, we investigated whether cysteine proteases in the excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM), which cause pulmonary or extrapulmonary paragonimiasis in human beings, could modify effector functions of human eosinophils stimulated with IgG. We coated 96-well plates with human IgG in the absence or presence of the ESP produced by PwNEM. When eosinophils were incubated in the wells coated with IgG in the presence of the ESP, eosinophil degranulation and superoxide production were significantly reduced compared with results for cells incubated in wells coated with IgG alone. This inhibitory effect of the ESP on IgG-induced superoxide production was dose dependent and was significantly abolished by pretreatment of the ESP with heat. These findings suggest that the cysteine proteases secreted by PwNEM attenuate both activation and degranulation of eosinophils stimulated with IgG. Thus, the cysteine proteases produced by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play crucial roles in evasion of IgG-dependent eosinophil helminthotoxicity and in reduction of eosinophil-associated tissue inflammation during the migratory period. PMID:11179333

  18. Inhibitory selectivity of canecystatin: a recombinant cysteine peptidase inhibitor from sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Carmona, Adriana K.; Andrade, Sheila S.; Cotrin, Simone S.; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2004-01-01

    The cDNA of a cystein peptidase inhibitor was isolated from sugarcane and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, named canecystatin, has previously been shown to exert antifungal activity on the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Herein, the inhibitory specificity of canecystatin was further characterized. It inhibits the cysteine peptidases from plant source papain (K i =3.3 nM) and baupain (K i =2.1x10 -8 M), but no inhibitory effect was observed on ficin or bromelain. Canecystatin also inhibits lysosomal cysteine peptidases such as human cathepsin B (K i =125 nM), cathepsin K (K i =0.76 nM), cathepsin L (K i =0.6 nM), and cathepsin V (K i =1.0 nM), but not the aspartyl peptidase cathepsin D. The activity of serine peptidases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic, and neutrophil elastases, and human plasma kallikrein is not affected by the inhibitor, nor is the activity of the metallopeptidases angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of a sugarcane cystatin on cysteine peptidases

  19. Use of equimolar cysteine/ascorbic acids to recover MCP synthesized Ti(Mg) alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mushove, T

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of waste by-products of mechanochemical processing (MCP) synthesis of Ti(Mg) alloy, from TiO2 and 15 wt.% excess Mg, was conducted in equimolar cysteine/ascorbic acids. The synthesized alloy is inherently mixed with MgO and other oxides...

  20. A Kunitz-type cysteine protease inhibitor from cauliflower and Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halls, C.E.; Rogers, S. W.; Ouffattole, M.

    2006-01-01

    A Kunitz-type protease inhibitor co-purified from cauliflower florets with a granulin domain cysteine protease that cleaved barley proaleurain to yield a molecular form the same size as that for mature aleurain. The purified cauliflower protease required treatment with SDS detergent to become...

  1. Irreversible Cysteine-Selective Protein Labeling Employing Modular Electrophilic Tetrafluoroethylation Reagents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, Jiří; Zschoche, R.; Klimánková, Iveta; Matoušek, V.; Beier, Petr; Hilvert, D.; Togni, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 27 (2017), s. 6490-6494 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-00598S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : bioconjugation * cysteine * enzymes * fluorine * fluoroalkylation * hypervalent iodine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  2. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G.K. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical

  3. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  4. Adsorption Dynamics and Self-Assembled L-cysteine on Au(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Yan, Jiawei

    can be structurally mapped at the single - molecule level . In this work, we have followed the adsorption of L - cysteine on single - crystal Au(100) by measuring the electrode potential dynamics during the adsorption process. In situ STM revealed the structure of the self - assembled ordered layers...

  5. Schizophrenia and oxidative stress: glutamate cysteine ligase modifier as a susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosic, Mirjana; Ott, Jurg; Barral, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder. Glutathione (GSH), a redox regulator, is decreased in patients' cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex. The gene of the key GSH-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM...

  6. Micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics and prebiotics, a review of effectiveness in reducing HIV progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical

  7. Formation of elemental sulfur by Chlorella fusca during growth on L-cysteine ethylester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, F.; Schafer, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1984-01-01

    During growth on L-cysteine ethylester, Chlorella fusca (211-8b) accumulated a substance which contained bound sulfide, which could be liberated by reduction with dithioerythritol (DTE) as inorganic sulfide. This substance was extracted with hot methanol and purified by thin layer chromatography. This substance liberated free sulfide when incubated with mono- and dithiols, and thiocyanate was formed after heating with KCN. The isolated substance cochromatographed with authentic sulfur flower using different solvent systems for thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, and the identical spectrum with a relative βmax at 263 nm was found. The chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectrometry showing a molecular weight of 256 m/e for the S 8 configuration. No labeled elemental sulfur was detected when the cells were grown on [ 35 S]sulfate and L-cysteine ethylester. C. fusca seems to have enzymes for the metabolism of elemental sulfur, since it disappeared after prolonged growth into the stationary phase. Cysteine was formed from O-acetyl-L-serine and elemental sulfur in the presence of thiol groups and purified cysteine synthase from spinach or Chlorella

  8. Covalent binding of nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue in human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jansen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Covalent binding of various clinically important nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin, in vitro and in vivo, is demonstrated. A rapid method for detection of these adducts is presented, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the adducted

  9. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  10. Cysteine proteases and wheat (Triticum aestivum L) under drought: A still greatly unexplored association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Anna-Maria; Kunert, Karl J; Cullis, Christopher A

    2017-09-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) provides about 19% of global dietary energy. Environmental stress, such as drought, affects wheat growth causing premature plant senescence and ultimately plant death. A plant response to drought is an increase in protease-mediated proteolysis with rapid degradation of proteins required for metabolic processes. Among the plant proteases that are increased in their activity following stress, cysteine proteases are the best characterized. Very little is known about particular wheat cysteine protease sequences, their expression and also localization. The current knowledge on wheat cysteine proteases belonging to the five clans (CA, CD, CE, CF and CP) is outlined, in particular their expression and possible function under drought. The first successes in establishing an annotated wheat genome database are further highlighted which has allowed more detailed mining of cysteine proteases. We also share our thoughts on future research directions considering the growing availability of genomic resources of this very important food crop. Finally, we also outline future application of developed knowledge in transgenic wheat plants for environmental stress protection and also as senescence markers to monitor wheat growth under environmental stress conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of taurine, L-cysteine and silymarin on biochemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of taurine, L-cysteine and silymarin on biochemical and pathological changes in albino rats receiving tetrachloroethylene. Hanan Mohamed Fathy Abdel Wahab. Abstract. No Abstract. The Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Vol. 22(2) 2004: 139-156. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL ...

  12. Effect of free cysteine on the denaturation and aggregation of holo α-lactalbumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line R.; Lund, Marianne N.; Davies, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) is a key commercial whey protein for nutritional purposes. The holo protein (calcium saturated) is considered the most heat stable whey protein, capable of refolding from unfolded states under many conditions. This is due to the absence of free thiols (cysteine residues...

  13. Improved stability of halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 by replacement of cysteine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Lixia; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Lutje Spelberg, Jeffrey H.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 is a homo-tetrameric protein containing three cysteines per 28 kDa subunit. Under oxidizing conditions the enzyme was found to be susceptible to inactivation which could be prevented by the addition of beta-mercaptoethanol or glycerol. Gel

  14. TRIADs: a new class of proteins with a novel cysteine-rich signature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. van der Reijden (Bert); C.A.J. Erpelinck (Claudia); J.H. Jansen (Joop); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractTriad1 was recently identified as a nuclear RING finger protein, which is up-regulated during retinoic acid induced granulocytic differentiation of acute leukemia cells. Here we show that a cysteine-rich domain (C6HC), present in Triad1, is conserved in at

  15. Artificial metalloenzymes through cysteine-selective conjugation of phosphines to photoactive yellow protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W.; Muñoz, B.K.; den Heeten, R.; Kamer, P.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Pinning phosphines on proteins: A method for the cysteine-selective bioconjugation of phosphines has been developed. The photoactive yellow protein has been site-selectively functionalized with phosphine ligands and phosphine transition metal complexes to afford artificial metalloenzymes that are

  16. Accurate disulfide-bonding network predictions improve ab initio structure prediction of cysteine-rich proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; He, Bao-Ji; Jang, Richard; Zhang, Yang; Shen, Hong-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Cysteine-rich proteins cover many important families in nature but there are currently no methods specifically designed for modeling the structure of these proteins. The accuracy of disulfide connectivity pattern prediction, particularly for the proteins of higher-order connections, e.g., >3 bonds, is too low to effectively assist structure assembly simulations. We propose a new hierarchical order reduction protocol called Cyscon for disulfide-bonding prediction. The most confident disulfide bonds are first identified and bonding prediction is then focused on the remaining cysteine residues based on SVR training. Compared with purely machine learning-based approaches, Cyscon improved the average accuracy of connectivity pattern prediction by 21.9%. For proteins with more than 5 disulfide bonds, Cyscon improved the accuracy by 585% on the benchmark set of PDBCYS. When applied to 158 non-redundant cysteine-rich proteins, Cyscon predictions helped increase (or decrease) the TM-score (or RMSD) of the ab initio QUARK modeling by 12.1% (or 14.4%). This result demonstrates a new avenue to improve the ab initio structure modeling for cysteine-rich proteins. http://www.csbio.sjtu.edu.cn/bioinf/Cyscon/ zhng@umich.edu or hbshen@sjtu.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The "Presodium" Hydrogen Evolution at the Dropping Mercury Electrode Catalysed by Simple Cysteine Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mader, P.; Veselá, V.; Dorčák, V.; Heyrovský, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 3 (2001), s. 397-410 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : cysteine peptides * polarography * hydrogen catalysis Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 0.778, year: 2001

  18. Formation of elemental sulfur by Chlorella fusca during growth on L-cysteine ethylester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, F.; Schafer, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1984-01-01

    During growth on L-cysteine ethylester, Chlorella fusca (211-8b) accumulated a substance which contained bound sulfide, which could be liberated by reduction with dithioerythritol (DTE) as inorganic sulfide. This substance was extracted with hot methanol and purified by thin layer chromatography. This substance liberated free sulfide when incubated with mono- and dithiols, and thiocyanate was formed after heating with KCN. The isolated substance cochromatographed with authentic sulfur flower using different solvent systems for thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, and the identical spectrum with a relative ..beta..max at 263 nm was found. The chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectrometry showing a molecular weight of 256 m/e for the S/sub 8/ configuration. No labeled elemental sulfur was detected when the cells were grown on (/sup 35/S)sulfate and L-cysteine ethylester. C. fusca seems to have enzymes for the metabolism of elemental sulfur, since it disappeared after prolonged growth into the stationary phase. Cysteine was formed from O-acetyl-L-serine and elemental sulfur in the presence of thiol groups and purified cysteine synthase from spinach or Chlorella.

  19. Competition of charge- versus radical-directed fragmentation of gas-phase protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Chasity B; Tan, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-24

    The fragmentation behavior of various cysteine sulfinyl ions (intact, N-acetylated, and O-methylated), new members of the gas-phase amino acid radical ion family, was investigated by low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID). The dominant fragmentation channel for the protonated cysteine sulfinyl radicals ((SO•)Cys) was the radical-directed Cα-Cβ homolytic cleavage, resulting in the formation of glycyl radical ions and loss of CH2SO. This channel, however, was not observed for protonated N-acetylated cysteine sulfinyl radicals (Ac-(SO•)Cys); instead, charge-directed H2O loss followed immediately by SH loss prevailed. Counterintuitively, the H2O loss did not derive from the carboxyl group but involved the sulfinyl oxygen, a proton, and a Cβ hydrogen atom. Theoretical calculations suggested that N-acetylation significantly increases the barrier (~14 kcal mol(-1)) for the radical-directed fragmentation channel because of its reduced capability to stabilize the thus-formed glycyl radical ions via the captodative effect. N-Acetylation also assists in moving the proton to the sulfinyl site, which reduces the barrier for H2O loss. Our studies demonstrate that for cysteine sulfinyl radical ions, the stability of the product ions (glycyl radical ions) and the location of the charge (proton) can significantly modulate the competition between radical- and charge-directed fragmentation.

  20. Cyst(e)ine requirements in enterally fed very low birth weight preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedijk, Maaike A; Voortman, Gardi; van Beek, Ron H T; Baartmans, Martin G A; Wafelman, Leontien S; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2008-03-01

    Optimal nutrition is of utmost importance for the preterm infant's later health and developmental outcome. Amino acid requirements for preterm infants differ from those for term and older infants, because growth rates differ. Some nonessential amino acids, however, cannot be sufficiently synthesized endogenously. Cyst(e)ine is supposed to be such a conditionally essential amino acid in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to determine, at 32 and 35 weeks' postmenstrual age, cyst(e)ine requirements in fully enterally fed very low birth weight preterm infants with gestational ages of ine requirement was determined with the indicator amino acid oxidation technique ([1-(13)C]phenylalanine) after 24-hour adaptation. Fractional [1-(13)C]phenylalanine oxidation was established in 47 very low birth weight preterm infants (mean gestational age: 28 weeks +/- 1 week SD; birth weight: 1.07 kg +/- 0.21 kg SD). Increase in dietary cyst(e)ine intake did not result in a decrease in fractional [1-(13)C]phenylalanine oxidation. These data do not support the hypothesis that endogenous cyst(e)ine synthesis is limited in very low birth weight preterm infants with gestational ages of ine requirement is ine is probably not a conditionally essential amino acid in these infants.

  1. Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cysteine Using Silver and Copper Solid Amalgam Electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Novotný, Ladislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2002), s. 971-976 ISSN 0039-9140 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silver or copper solid amalgam electrode * cysteine * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.054, year: 2002

  2. Effects of N-acetyl cysteine on lipid levels and on leukocyte and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Many of studies have shown that increased lipid levels play a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis after splenectomy. We investigated the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on lipid parameters and leukocyte and platelet (PLT) levels following splenectomy. Materials and Methods: 32 Sprague.

  3. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malek, Mahrooz [Medical Image Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oghabian, Mohammad Ali [Research Centre for Sciences and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoudi, Afshin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gu Ning; Zhang Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biomaterials and Devices, Nanjing (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  4. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Reza; Malek, Mahrooz; Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Masoudi, Afshin; Gu Ning; Zhang Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. ► pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. ► Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. ► MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  5. Gold compounds as cysteine protease inhibitors: perspectives for pharmaceutical application as antiparasitic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massai, Lara; Messori, Luigi; Micale, Nicola; Schirmeister, Tanja; Maes, Louis; Fregona, Dolores; Cinellu, Maria Agostina; Gabbiani, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    Gold compounds form a new class of promising metal-based drugs with a number of potential therapeutic applications, particularly in the fields of anticancer and antimicrobial treatments. Previous research revealed that a group of structurally diverse gold compounds cause conspicuous inhibition of the protease activities of the human proteasome. Given the pharmacological importance of protease inhibition, the present study further explored whether these gold compounds might inhibit a few other proteases that are accepted druggable targets for disease treatment. In particular, four distinct cysteine proteases were considered here: cathepsin B and L that play a primary role in tumor-cell invasion and metastasis; rhodesain, the major cathepsin L-like cysteine protease of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and CPB2.8ΔCTE, a Leishmania mexicana mature cysteine protease. Based on the encouraging results obtained for some of the tested gold compounds on the two parasitic cysteine proteases, especially against CPB2.8ΔCTE, with IC 50s in the micromolar range, we next evaluated whether those gold compounds might contrast effectively the growth of the respective protozoa and indeed important antiprotozoal properties were disclosed; on the other hand a certain lack of selectivity was highlighted. Also, no direct or clear correlation could be established between the in vitro antiprotozoal properties and the level of protease inhibition. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to possible pharmaceutical applications.

  6. A sensitive chemiluminescence method for the determination of cysteine based on silver nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.; Wang, Q.; Liu, X.; Luo, X.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) assay for cysteine. It is based on the use of water-soluble and fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) which are found to be able to strongly enhance the weak CL signal resulting from the redox reaction between Ce(IV) ion and sulfite ion. This enhancement is inhibited by cysteine under appropriate conditions. Taking advantage of this specific CL inhibition, a novel CL method for the sensitive and selective detection of cysteine was developed. This effect is interpreted in terms of an electronic energy transfer from excited state intermediate sulfur dioxide (originating from the CL reaction between Ce(IV) and sulfite ions) to the Ag-NCs. The latter become electronically excited and thus can act as a new source of emission. The method was applied to the determination of cysteine in the range from 5.0 nM to 1.0 μM, with a detection limit at 2.5 nM (S/N=3). (author)

  7. Computational study of the covalent bonding of microcystins to cysteine residues--a reaction involved in the inhibition of the PPP family of protein phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Susana R; Vasconcelos, Vítor M; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are cyclic peptides, produced by cyanobacteria, that are hepatotoxic to mammals. The toxicity mechanism involves the potent inhibition of protein phosphatases, as the toxins bind the catalytic subunits of five enzymes of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family of serine/threonine-specific phosphatases: Ppp1 (aka PP1), Ppp2 (aka PP2A), Ppp4, Ppp5 and Ppp6. The interaction with the proteins includes the formation of a covalent bond with a cysteine residue. Although this reaction seems to be accessory for the inhibition of PPP enzymes, it has been suggested to play an important part in the biological role of MCs and furthermore is involved in their nonenzymatic conjugation to glutathione. In this study, the molecular interaction of microcystins with their targeted PPP catalytic subunits is reviewed, including the relevance of the covalent bond for overall inhibition. The chemical reaction that leads to the formation of the covalent bond was evaluated in silico, both thermodynamically and kinetically, using quantum mechanical-based methods. As a result, it was confirmed to be a Michael-type addition, with simultaneous abstraction of the thiol hydrogen by a water molecule, transfer of hydrogen from the water to the α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group of the microcystin and addition of the sulfur to the β-carbon of the microcystin moiety. The calculated kinetics are in agreement with previous experimental results that had indicated the reaction to occur in a second step after a fast noncovalent interaction that inhibited the enzymes per se. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  8. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new precise and accurate catalytic spectrophotometric ... manganese sulfate monohydrate (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) in water and diluted to 250 mL. The working .... and potassium hydrogen phthalate-HCl buffer solutions, the slope of calibration graph was unsatisfactory.

  9. Catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition with Grignard reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Fernando; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    In this Account, recent advances in catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition of Grignard reagents are discussed. Synthetic methodology to perform highly enantioselective Cu-catalyzed conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to cyclic enones with ee's up to 96% was reported in 2004 from our

  10. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...

  11. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  12. Catalytic dehydrogenations of ethylbenzene to styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, C.

    2012-01-01

    This research work on the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (ST) had a primary goal of developing improved catalysts for dehydrogenation processes both in CO2 as well as with O2 that can compete with the conventional dehydrogenation process in steam. In order to achieve this

  13. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ruthenium(III) complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3. Priyarega M Muthu Tamizh R Karvembu R Prabhakaran K Natarajan. Volume 123 Issue 3 May ...

  14. DEALUMINATION OF MORDENITE ZEOLITE AND ITS CATALYTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The xylene mixtures result from the catalytic reforming of petroleum NAFTA and the isomers of xylenes are usually obtained from this mixture by separation. After separation of o-isomers and p-isomers, the remainder richer in m-xylene, needs to be subjected to isomerization [2]. Xylene isomerization has received growing ...

  15. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  16. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  17. THEORETICAL STUDY OF CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Catalytic hydrotreating process is a technique of purification of the crude oil with the aim of the improvement of the quality and the stability of fuels and lubricants. This is performed by the destruction of heterocyclic compounds and by the saturation of unsaturated hydrocarbons under the effect of the hydrogen pressure in ...

  18. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  19. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...

  20. Cyst(e)ine imbalance and its effect on methionine precursor utilization in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, R N; Baker, D H

    2008-08-01

    Five 9- or 12-d chick growth bioassays were done in batteries using 2 Met-deficient diets: a purified AA-based diet containing (by analysis, as-fed) 20.3% CP, 0.12% Met, and 0.05% cyst(e)ine; and an AA-fortified corn-peanut meal diet containing (by analysis, as-fed) 19.0% CP, 0.22% Met, and 0.23% cyst(e) ine. Feed-grade DL-Met (dl-M; 99%) was compared with feed-grade DL-OH-Met, Ca (OH-M; 84%). When the purified diet was modified to contain 0.12% Met and 0.20% or greater cyst(e)ine, slope-ratio assays involving graded dosing of DL-M (0, 404, 808, and 1,212 mg of DL-M/kg) or isosulfurous levels of OH-M resulted in linear (P ine [i.e., 0.12% Met, 0.12% cyst(e)ine]. When this diet was supplemented with either 404 mg of DL-M/kg or 476 mg of OH-M/kg, BW gain and G:F responded (P 0.10). Assays 4 and 5 used the corn-peanut meal basal diet containing 0.22% total Met and 0.23% total cyst(e)ine. In both assays, addition of either 465 mg of DL-M/kg or 554 mg of OH-M/kg resulted in increased (P ine concentration. In the absence of excess cyst(e)ine, BW gain responses to DL-M and OH-M were similar, but when 0.10% excess cyst(e)ine was provided as L-cystine or feather meal, DL-M responses tended to exceed those of OH-M. Moreover, this small excess of dietary cyst(e)ine, regardless of source, depressed (P ine, when included in Met-deficient diets, has the potential to be both anorexigenic and pernicious to OH-M utilization.

  1. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  2. Cysteine deprivation prevents induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 and adipose differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yasein, Nadia Nabil; Berg, Ole; Jernerén, Fredrik; Refsum, Helga; Nebb, Hilde I; Dalen, Knut Tomas

    2017-06-01

    Plasma cysteine is strongly associated with body fat mass in human cohorts and diets low in cysteine prevents fat accumulation in mice. It is unclear if plasma cysteine affects fat development or if fat accumulation raises plasma cysteine. To determine if cysteine affects adipogenesis, we differentiated 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in medium with reduced cysteine. Cells incubated in media with 10-20μM cysteine exhibited reduced capacity to differentiate into triacylglycerol-storing mature adipocytes compared with cells incubated with 50μM cysteine. Low cysteine severely reduced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (Pparγ2) and its target genes perlipin1 (Plin1) and fatty acid binding protein-4 (Fabp4). Expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (Scd1), known to be repressed with cysteine depletion, was also reduced with low cysteine. Medium depletion of the essential amino acids leucine, valine, and isoleucine had only a modest effect on adipocyte specific gene expression and differentiation. Stimulation with the PPARγ agonist BRL-49653 or addition of a hydrogen sulfide donor enhanced differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells cultured in low cysteine. This demonstrates that the ability to induce PPARγ expression is preserved when cells are cultured in low cysteine. It therefore appears that cysteine depletion inhibits adipogenesis by specifically affecting molecular pathways required for induction of PPARγ expression, rather than through a general reduction of global protein synthesis. In conclusion, we show that low extracellular cysteine reduces adipocyte differentiation by interfering with PPARγ2 and PPARγ target gene expression. Our results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that plasma cysteine is a casual determinant for body fat mass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  4. Photoelectrochemical properties of bare fluorine doped tin oxide and its electrocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis toward cysteine oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Shaolin; Shi, Qiaofang

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: CVs of 0.30 M Na 2 SO 4 solution containing 2.0 mM cysteine, curves: (1) glassy carbon electrode, (2) FTO electrode in the dark, (3) FTO electrode in the light illumination, and (4) Pt electrode; pH 10.0, at a scan rate of 60 mV s −1 . - Highlights: • First revelation of photoelectrochemical properties of bare fluorine doped tin oxide. • Determination of band gap of energy of FTO in the solution without a redox couple. • Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical catalysis of bare FTO toward cysteine oxidation. • Determination and recognition of cysteine with electrocatalytic and photocatalytic methods. • Rate-determining step of cysteine oxidation at the FTO electrode. - Abstract: We first revealed that the bare fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) under the cathodic polarization over −0.7 V (vs.SCE) shows very sensitive to the irradiating light in a wide wavelength region 850–400 nm in the aqueous solution free of a redox couple, and its band gap of energy E g is determined to be 1.38 eV via the photoelectrochemical method. The bare FTO can effectively catalyze electrochemically L-cysteine (CySH) oxidation and especially shows the photocatalytic ability toward CySH oxidation. Thus the bare FTO electrode can be directly used for determination of CySH concentration using cyclic voltammetry in both the dark and light illumination and it can be used to recognize CySH among 20 α-amino acids found in proteins, based on the low oxidation peak potential and unique photoelectric response. The rate-determining step for the photocatalytic oxidation of CySH on the bare FTO electrode is controlled by supply of charge inside the FTO film to the electrode surface, which exhibits the typical characteristics of semiconductors.

  5. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter’s L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R2) for their absorbance, Hunter’s L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter’s b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter’s b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine. PMID:28401086

  6. Individual quality via sensitivity to cysteine availability in a melanin-based honest signaling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Ismael; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos

    2017-08-01

    The evolution of honest animal communication is mostly understood through the handicap principle, which is intrinsically dependent on the concept of individual quality: low-quality individuals are prevented from producing high-quality signals because, if they did so, they would pay greater production costs than high-quality individuals. We tested an alternative explanation for the black bib size of male house sparrows, Passer domesticus , an honest signal of quality the expression of which is negatively related to levels of the pigment pheomelanin in the constituent feathers. We previously showed that experimental depletion of cysteine, which participates in pheomelanogenesis, improves the phenotype (bibs larger than in controls) of high-quality males (birds with largest bibs initially) only. Here, we conducted an experiment under opposite conditions, increasing the availability of dietary cysteine, and obtained opposite results: deteriorated phenotypes (bibs smaller than in controls) were only expressed by high-quality birds. Some birds were also treated with the pro-oxidant diquat dibromide, and we found that the cellular resistance to free radicals of high-quality birds benefited more from the antioxidant activity of cysteine against diquat than that of low-quality birds. These findings support the existence of a mechanism uncoupling cysteine and pheomelanin in low-quality birds that confers on them a low sensitivity to variations in cysteine availability. This constitutes an explanation for the evolution of signal honesty that overcomes the limitations of the handicap principle, because it provides a specific definition of individual quality and because costs are no longer required to prevent low-quality individuals from producing large signals. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Cysteine-functionalized silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles as potential nanoadsorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enache, Daniela F.; Vasile, Eugenia; Simonescu, Claudia M.; Răzvan, Anca; Nicolescu, Alina; Nechifor, Aurelia-Cristina; Oprea, Ovidiu; Pătescu, Rodica-Elena; Onose, Cristian; Dumitru, Florina

    2017-09-01

    Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2, and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine MNPs have been prepared by the deposition of silica onto magnetite nanoparticles via controlled hydrolysis of TEOS. The new formed silica surface has been functionalized by grafting 3-(triethoxysilyl) propyl isocyanate (ICPTES) and, subsequently, by condensation of isocyanate moiety with cysteine. The morphology of magnetic silica nanoparticles has been investigated by FTIR, PXRD, TEM-HRTEM/SEM/EDX as well as TG experiments. HRTEM microscopy revealed that the Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2 and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine nanoparticles are all of spherical shape with particle of ca. 10-30 nm diameters and the silica-coated magnetites have a core-shell structure. Fe3O4, Fe3O4@SiO2, and Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine MNPs have been tested for their sorption capacity of Pb(II) from synthetic aqueous solutions and the influence of pH solution, contact time, initial heavy metal ion concentrations, and adsorption isotherms on the sorption behavior were also studied. The kinetic studies revealed that the Pb(II) sorption process is mainly controlled by chemical mechanisms. Fe3O4@SiO2@ICPTES-cysteine, with a sorption capacity of 81.8 mg Pb(II)/g, has the potential to be an efficient Pb(II) adsorbent.

  8. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R 2 ) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  9. Active Component Migration and Catalytic Properties of Nitrogen Modified Composite Catalytic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the catalytic combustion reaction of methane, the migration of the active species on surface facilitates the catalytic reaction, and the element doping can improve the redox performance of the catalyst. Nitrogen-modified perovskite type composite catalysts were prepared by hydrothermal method and then characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, temperature-programmed reductions (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS. The results revealed that nitrogen sources (urea, biuret, melamine, carbohydrazide, and semicarbazide hydrochloride and nitrogen source addition changed the catalytic performance in physical and chemical properties, the migration of reactive species and the catalytic performance. When the addition amount of semicarbazide hydrochloride was three times that of LaCoO3, the composite catalysts had high Co3+/Co2+ (1.39 and Oads/Olat (15.18 and showed the best catalytic performance: the temperatures that are required for achieving methane conversion of 50% and 90% were 277 and 360 °C, which are more effective than noble metal oxides. Moreover, the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS were applied to elucidate the efficient for CH4 removal and also can further explain the surface reaction mechanism of the composite catalyst during the methane catalytic combustion.

  10. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  11. Prospective study of serum cysteine and cysteinylglycine and cancer of the head and neck, esophagus, and stomach in a cohort of male smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The nonessential amino acid cysteine is known to be involved in many antioxidant and anticarcinogenic pathways. Cysteinylglycine is a pro-oxidant metabolite of glutathione and a precursor of cysteine. Objective: To examine the relation between serum cysteine and cysteinylglycine and ris...

  12. Nitrilase in biosynthesis of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid from indole-3-acetonitrile: cloning of the Alcaligenes gene and site-directed mutagenesis of cysteine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M; Izui, H; Nagasawa, T; Yamada, H

    1993-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is the major auxin in most plants. In Cruciferae, including Brassicaceae, indole-3-acetic acid is synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile by nitrilase, after indole-3-acetonitrile is formed from tryptophan via indole-3-acetaldoxime or indole glycosinolates as the intermediate. We cloned and sequenced the gene for nitrilase (EC 3.5.5.1), which catalyzes the hydrolysis of indole-3-acetonitrile to indole-3-acetic acid, from Alcaligenes faecalis JM3. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the nitrilase gene shows 34.7% identity with that of Klebsiella ozaenae nitrilase. A DNA clone containing the nitrilase gene expressed the active enzyme in Escherichia coli with excellent yield. Among five cysteine residues (Cys-40, Cys-115, Cys-162, Cys-163, and Cys-218) in the Alcaligenes nitrilase, only Cys-163 was conserved at the corresponding position in the Klebsiella nitrilase. Two mutant enzymes, in which Cys-162 and Cys-163 were replaced with Asn and Ala, respectively, were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. A 35% increase of the specific activity and a large reduction of the Km for thiophene-2-acetonitrile (which was used as a standard substrate for the nitrilase) were observed in the Cys-162-->Asn mutant enzyme. The Cys-163-->Ala mutation resulted in complete loss of nitrilase activity, clearly indicating that Cys-163 is crucial for the activity and Cys-162 could not provide the catalytic function of Cys-163. Images PMID:8419930

  13. A very low potential electrochemical detection of L-cysteine based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes/gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francisco de Assis dos Santos; da Silva, Monique Gabriella Angelo; Lima, Phabyanno Rodrigues; Meneghetti, Mario Roberto; Kubota, Lauro Tatsuo; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca

    2013-12-15

    A nanohybrid platform built with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and gold nanorods, prepared via a cationic surfactant-containing seed-mediated sequential growth process, in aqueous solution, on a glassy carbon substrate has been successfully developed to be used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of L-cysteine (Cys). The nanohybrid was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical measurements. Cyclic voltammetry results had shown that the modified electrode allows the oxidation of Cys at a very low anodic potential (0.00 V vs. Ag/AgCl). The kinetic constant kcat for the catalytic oxidation of Cys was evaluated by chronoamperometry and provided a value of 5.6×10(4) L mol(-1) s(-1). The sensor presents a linear response range from 5.0 up to 200.0 µmol L(-1), detection limit of 8.25 nmol L(-1) and a sensitivity of 120 nA L µmol(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L-Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles-graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L-Cysteine (L-Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L-Cys peak potential at Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs-GCE or AgNPs-GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k‧, for the oxidation of L-Cys at the Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L-Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9-12.4 μM and 12.4-538.5 μM of L-Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L-Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L-Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  15. The tumour metabolism inhibitors GSAO and PENAO react with cysteines 57 and 257 of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Danielle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GSAO (4-(N-(S-glutathionylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid and PENAO (4-(N-(S-penicillaminylacetylamino phenylarsonous acid are tumour metabolism inhibitors that target adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT of the inner-mitochondrial membrane. Both compounds are currently being trialled in patients with solid tumours. The trivalent arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO reacts with two matrix facing cysteine residues of ANT, inactivating the transporter. This leads to proliferation arrest and death of tumour and tumour-supporting cells. Results The two reactive ANT cysteine residues have been identified in this study by expressing cysteine mutants of human ANT1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and measuring interaction with the arsenical moiety of GSAO and PENAO. The arsenic atom of both compounds cross-links cysteine residues 57 and 257 of human ANT1. Conclusions The sulphur atoms of these two cysteines are 20 Å apart in the crystal structures of ANT and the optimal spacing of cysteine thiolates for reaction with As (III is 3-4 Å. This implies that a significant conformational change in ANT is required for the organoarsenicals to react with cysteines 57 and 257. This conformational change may relate to the selectivity of the compounds for proliferating cells.

  16. Detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour by Raman microspectroscopy combined chemometrics of HCA and PCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebi, Nur; Dogan, Canan Ekinci; Develioglu, Ayşen; Yayla, Mediha Esra Altuntop; Sagdic, Osman

    2017-08-01

    l-Cysteine is deliberately added to various flour types since l-Cysteine has enabled favorable baking conditions such as low viscosity, increased elasticity and rise during baking. In Turkey, usage of l-Cysteine as a food additive isn't allowed in wheat flour according to the Turkish Food Codex Regulation on food additives. There is an urgent need for effective methods to detect l-Cysteine in wheat flour. In this study, for the first time, a new, rapid, effective, non-destructive and cost-effective method was developed for detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour using Raman microscopy. Detection of l-Cysteine in wheat flour was accomplished successfully using Raman microscopy combined chemometrics of PCA (Principal Component Analysis) and HCA (Hierarchical Cluster Analysis). In this work, 500-2000cm -1 spectral range (fingerprint region) was determined to perform PCA and HCA analysis. l-Cysteine and l-Cystine were determined with detection limit of 0.125% (w/w) in different wheat flour samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cysteine residues of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus ORF5a protein are not essential for virus viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lichang; Zhou, Yan; Liu, Runxia; Li, Yanhua; Gao, Fei; Wang, Xiaomin; Fan, Hongjie; Yuan, Shishan; Wei, Zuzhang; Tong, Guangzhi

    2015-02-02

    ORF5a protein was recently identified as a novel structural protein in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). The ORF5a protein possesses two cysteines at positions 29 and 30 that are highly conserved among type 2 PRRSV. In this study, the significance of the ORF5a protein cysteine residues on virus replication was determined based on a type 2 PRRSV cDNA clone (pAJXM). Each cysteine was substituted by serine or glycine and the mutations were introduced into pAJXM. We found that the replacement of cysteine to glycine at position 30 was lethal for virus viability, but all serine mutant clones produced infectious progeny viruses. This data indicated that cysteine residues in the ORF5a protein were not essential for replication of type 2 PRRSV. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay were used to study ORF5a protein interacted with other enveloped proteins. These results showed that ORF5a protein interacted non-covalently with itself and interacted with GP4 and 2b protein. The replacement of cysteine to glycine at position 30 affected the ORF5a protein interacted non-covalently with itself, which may account for the lethal phenotype of mutants carrying substitution of cysteine to glycine at position 30. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Global analysis of gene expression in response to L-Cysteine deprivation in the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric protozoan parasite, causes amebic colitis and extra intestinal abscesses in millions of inhabitants of endemic areas. E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione metabolism but possesses L-cysteine as the principle low molecular weight thiol. L-Cysteine is essential for the structure, stability, and various protein functions, including catalysis, electron transfer, redox regulation, nitrogen fixation, and sensing for regulatory processes. Recently, we demonstrated that in E. histolytica, L-cysteine regulates various metabolic pathways including energy, amino acid, and phospholipid metabolism. Results In this study, employing custom-made Affymetrix microarrays, we performed time course (3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h) gene expression analysis upon L-cysteine deprivation. We identified that out of 9,327 genes represented on the array, 290 genes encoding proteins with functions in metabolism, signalling, DNA/RNA regulation, electron transport, stress response, membrane transport, vesicular trafficking/secretion, and cytoskeleton were differentially expressed (≥3 fold) at one or more time points upon L-cysteine deprivation. Approximately 60% of these modulated genes encoded proteins of no known function and annotated as hypothetical proteins. We also attempted further functional analysis of some of the most highly modulated genes by L-cysteine depletion. Conclusions To our surprise, L-cysteine depletion caused only limited changes in the expression of genes involved in sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress defense. In contrast, we observed significant changes in the expression of several genes encoding iron sulfur flavoproteins, a major facilitator super-family transporter, regulator of nonsense transcripts, NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase, short chain dehydrogenase, acetyltransferases, and various other genes involved in diverse cellular functions. This study represents the first genome-wide analysis of

  19. Photo-fermentative bacteria aggregation triggered by L-cysteine during hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guo-Jun; Liu, Bing-Feng; Xing, De-Feng; Nan, Jun; Ding, Jie; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2013-05-03

    Hydrogen recovered from organic wastes and solar energy by photo-fermentative bacteria (PFB) has been suggested as a promising bioenergy strategy. However, the use of PFB for hydrogen production generally suffers from a serious biomass washout from photobioreactor, due to poor flocculation of PFB. In the continuous operation, PFB cells cannot be efficiently separated from supernatant and rush out with effluent from reactor continuously, which increased the effluent turbidity, meanwhile led to increases in pollutants. Moreover, to replenish the biomass washout, substrate was continuously utilized for cell growth rather than hydrogen production. Consequently, the poor flocculability not only deteriorated the effluent quality, but also decreased the potential yield of hydrogen from substrate. Therefore, enhancing the flocculability of PFB is urgent necessary to further develop photo-fermentative process. Here, we demonstrated that L-cysteine could improve hydrogen production of Rhodopseudomonas faecalis RLD-53, and more importantly, simultaneously trigger remarkable aggregation of PFB. Experiments showed that L-cysteine greatly promoted the production of extracellular polymeric substances, especially secretion of protein containing more disulfide bonds, and help for enhancement stability of floc of PFB. Through formation of disulfide bonds, L-cysteine not only promoted production of EPS, in particular the secretion of protein, but also stabilized the final confirmation of protein in EPS. In addition, the cell surface elements and functional groups, especially surface charged groups, have also been changed by L-cysteine. Consequently, absolute zeta potential reached a minimum value at 1.0 g/l of L-cysteine, which obviously decreased electrostatic repulsion interaction energy based on DLVO theory. Total interaction energy barrier decreased from 389.77 KT at 0.0 g/l of L-cysteine to 127.21 kT at 1.0 g/l. Thus, the strain RLD-53 overcame the total energy barrier and

  20. Determination of stability constants of iron(III and chromium(III-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine mixed complexes by electrophoretic technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brij Bhushan Tewari

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stability constants of Fe(III and Cr(III with methyl cysteine and nitrilotriacetate (NTA were determined by paper electrophoretic technique. Beside binary ternary complexes have also been studied, in which nitrilotriacetate and methyl cysteine acts as primary and secondary ligand, respectively. The stability constants of mixed ligand complexes metal (M-nitrilotriacetate-methyl cysteine have been found to be 5.72 plus or minus 0.09 and 5.54 plus or minus 0.11 (log K values for Fe(III and Cr(III complexes, respectively, at 35 oC and ionic strength 0.1 M.

  1. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  2. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  3. Synthesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines

    OpenAIRE

    Škoch, Karel

    2014-01-01

    6 Title: Sythesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines Author: Karel Škoch Institution: Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Department of Inorganic Chemistry Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Petr Štěpnička, Ph.D. Keywords: ferrocene, ferrocenophane, phosphine ligands, palladium, asymetric catalysis, aza- Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction, asymetric allylic alkylation Abstract: This Thesis describes the preparation of five sterically and electronically different ferrocene ph...

  4. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  5. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  6. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  7. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  8. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  9. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  10. The importance of pH in regulating the function of the Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 cysteine protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lowther

    Full Text Available The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cathepsin L cysteine proteases to invade its host, migrate through tissues and digest haemoglobin, its main source of amino acids. Here we investigated the importance of pH in regulating the activity and functions of the major cathepsin L protease FheCL1. The slightly acidic pH of the parasite gut facilitates the auto-catalytic activation of FheCL1 from its inactive proFheCL1 zymogen; this process was approximately 40-fold faster at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.0. Active mature FheCL1 is very stable at acidic and neutral conditions (the enzyme retained approximately 45% activity when incubated at 37 degrees C and pH 4.5 for 10 days and displayed a broad pH range for activity peptide substrates and the protein ovalbumin, peaking between pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. This pH profile likely reflects the need for FheCL1 to function both in the parasite gut and in the host tissues. FheCL1, however, could not cleave its natural substrate Hb in the pH range pH 5.5 and pH 7.0; digestion occurred only at pH

  11. N-Acetyl-cysteine causes analgesia by reinforcing the endogenous activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernabucci Matteo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological activation of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu2 receptors causes analgesia in experimental models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Presynaptic mGlu2 receptors are activated by the glutamate released from astrocytes by means of the cystine/glutamate antiporter (System xc- or Sxc-. We examined the analgesic activity of the Sxc- activator, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, in mice developing inflammatory or neuropathic pain. Results A single injection of NAC (100 mg/kg, i.p. reduced nocifensive behavior in the second phase of the formalin test. NAC-induced analgesia was abrogated by the Sxc- inhibitor, sulphasalazine (8 mg/kg, i.p. or by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.. NAC still caused analgesia in mGlu3−/− mice, but was inactive in mGlu2−/− mice. In wild-type mice, NAC retained the analgesic activity in the formalin test when injected daily for 7 days, indicating the lack of tolerance. Both single and repeated injections of NAC also caused analgesia in the complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA model of chronic inflammatory pain, and, again, analgesia was abolished by LY341495. Data obtained in mice developing neuropathic pain in response to chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve were divergent. In this model, a single injection of NAC caused analgesia that was reversed by LY341495, whereas repeated injections of NAC were ineffective. Thus, tolerance to NAC-induced analgesia developed in the CCI model, but not in models of inflammatory pain. The CFA and CCI models differed with respect to the expression levels of xCT (the catalytic subunit of Sxc- and activator of G-protein signaling type-3 (AGS3 in the dorsal portion of the lumbar spinal cord. CFA-treated mice showed no change in either protein, whereas CCI mice showed an ipislateral reduction in xCT levels and a bilateral increase in AGS3 levels in the spinal cord. Conclusions These data demonstrate that

  12. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  14. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  15. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  16. Identification of cysteine proteases and screening of cysteine protease inhibitors in biological samples by a two-dimensional gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Eiichi; Yamamoto, Shinya; Okamoto, Eishiro; Hayakawa, Yoshimi; Hoshino, Takashi; Sato, Ritsuko; Isemura, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Sadami; Taniguchi, Masayuki

    2007-11-18

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D-) gel system of zymography and reverse zymography for the detection and characterization of proteases and protease inhibitors. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) agarose gels with pH gradients were employed for separation in the first-dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel copolymerized with gelatin used for the second dimension. Proteases and protease inhibitors separated by IEF gel were applied on the second gel without trichloroacetic acid (TCA) fixation. Protease activity in the 2D-gel was visualized as transparent spots where gelatin substrate was digested after commassie brilliant blue (CBB) staining. Some of the transparent spots from the skin mucus extract of rainbow trout were determined to be a cysteine protease through use of E-64 or CA-074. In the reverse zymography technique, the gel was incubated with papain solution at 37 degrees C for 18 h. Cysteine protease inhibitors from broad bean seeds were detected as clear blue spots after CBB staining. The amino (N-) terminal sequences of four papain inhibitor spots thus detected were demonstrated to be identical to that of favin beta chain, a broad bean lectin. Taken together, our system can be considered to be an efficient technique for discovering and characterizing new proteases and protease inhibitors in biological samples. This is the first report describing a 2D-gel system of zymography and reverse zymography.

  17. Discovery of novel antimicrobial peptides with unusual cysteine motifs in dandelion Taraxacum officinale Wigg. flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astafieva, A A; Rogozhin, E A; Odintsova, T I; Khadeeva, N V; Grishin, E V; Egorov, Ts A

    2012-08-01

    Three novel antimicrobial peptides designated ToAMP1, ToAMP2 and ToAMP3 were purified from Taraxacum officinale flowers. Their amino acid sequences were determined. The peptides are cationic and cysteine-rich and consist of 38, 44 and 42 amino acid residues for ToAMP1, ToAMP2 and ToAMP3, respectively. Importantly, according to cysteine motifs, the peptides are representatives of two novel previously unknown families of plant antimicrobial peptides. ToAMP1 and ToAMP2 share high sequence identity and belong to 6-Cys-containing antimicrobial peptides, while ToAMP3 is a member of a distinct 8-Cys family. The peptides were shown to display high antimicrobial activity both against fungal and bacterial pathogens, and therefore represent new promising molecules for biotechnological and medicinal applications. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...

  19. Mutation screening of the glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) gene in patients with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butticaz, Christophe; Werge, Thomas; Beckmann, Jacques S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental evidences show that glutathione and its rate-limiting synthesizing enzyme, the glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), are involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, genetic association has been previously reported between two single nucleotide polymorphisms lying...... in noncoding regions of glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) gene, which specifies for the modifier subunit of GCL and schizophrenia. OBJECTIVE: We wanted to investigate the presence of GCLM true functional mutations, likely in linkage disequilibrium with the previously identified single nucleotide...... relationship of any of these DNA variants with schizophrenia. CONCLUSION: It is unlikely that functional mutations in the GCLM gene could play a major role in genetic predisposition to schizophrenia and further studies will be required to assess its etiological function in the disease....

  20. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik eLöser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging.After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.