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Sample records for catalytic redox-active cysteine

  1. Factors Controlling the Redox Activity of Oxygen in Perovskites: From Theory to Application for Catalytic Reactions

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    Chunzhen Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Triggering the redox reaction of oxygens has become essential for the development of (electro catalytic properties of transition metal oxides, especially for perovskite materials that have been envisaged for a variety of applications such as the oxygen evolution or reduction reactions (OER and ORR, respectively, CO or hydrocarbons oxidation, NO reduction and others. While the formation of ligand hole for perovskites is well-known for solid state physicists and/or chemists and has been widely studied for the understanding of important electronic properties such as superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions, magnetoresistance, ferroelectrics, redox properties etc., oxygen electrocatalysis in aqueous media at low temperature barely scratches the surface of the concept of oxygen ions oxidation. In this review, we briefly explain the electronic structure of perovskite materials and go through a few important parameters such as the ionization potential, Madelung potential, and charge transfer energy that govern the oxidation of oxygen ions. We then describe the surface reactivity that can be induced by the redox activity of the oxygen network and the formation of highly reactive surface oxygen species before describing their participation in catalytic reactions and providing mechanistic insights and strategies for designing new (electro catalysts. Finally, we give a brief overview of the different techniques that can be employed to detect the formation of such transient oxygen species.

  2. Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Bio-inspired Nickel Complex with Redox Active Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Bruner, Charlie O.

    2017-01-01

    The oxidation of water to dioxygen is important in natural photosynthesis. One of nature’s strategies for managing such multi-electron transfer reactions is to employ redox active metal-organic cofactor arrays. One prototype example is the copper-tyrosinate active site found in galactose oxidase. In this work, we have implemented such a strategy to develop a bio-inspired nickel-phenolate complex capable of catalyzing the oxidation of water to O2 electrochemically at neutral pH with a modest overpotential. The employment of the redox-active ligand turned out to be a useful strategy to avoid the formation of high-valent nickel intermediates while a reasonable turnover rate (0.15 s−1) is retained. PMID:29099176

  3. Catalytic Water Oxidation by a Bio-inspired Nickel Complex with a Redox-Active Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Bruner, Charlie O

    2017-11-20

    The oxidation of water (H 2 O) to dioxygen (O 2 ) is important in natural photosynthesis. One of nature's strategies for managing such multi-electron transfer reactions is to employ redox-active metal-organic cofactor arrays. One prototype example is the copper tyrosinate active site found in galactose oxidase. In this work, we have implemented such a strategy to develop a bio-inspired nickel phenolate complex capable of catalyzing the oxidation of H 2 O to O 2 electrochemically at neutral pH with a modest overpotential. Employment of the redox-active ligand turned out to be a useful strategy to avoid the formation of high-valent nickel intermediates while a reasonable turnover rate (0.15 s -1 ) is retained.

  4. Probes of the catalytic site of cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Sergio C; Bruyere, John R; Maroney, Michael J

    2006-06-09

    The first major step of cysteine catabolism, the oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO). In the present work, we utilize recombinant rat liver CDO and cysteine derivatives to elucidate structural parameters involved in substrate recognition and x-ray absorption spectroscopy to probe the interaction of the active site iron center with cysteine. Kinetic studies using cysteine structural analogs show that most are inhibitors and that a terminal functional group bearing a negative charge (e.g. a carboxylate) is required for binding. The substrate-binding site has no stringent restrictions with respect to the size of the amino acid. Lack of the amino or carboxyl groups at the alpha-carbon does not prevent the molecules from interacting with the active site. In fact, cysteamine is shown to be a potent activator of the enzyme without being a substrate. CDO was also rendered inactive upon complexation with the metal-binding inhibitors azide and cyanide. Unlike many non-heme iron dioxygenases that employ alpha-keto acids as cofactors, CDO was shown to be the only dioxygenase known to be inhibited by alpha-ketoglutarate.

  5. Atypical Thioredoxins in Poplar: The Glutathione-Dependent Thioredoxin-Like 2.1 Supports the Activity of Target Enzymes Possessing a Single Redox Active Cysteine1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Kamel; Tarrago, Lionel; Gualberto, José Manuel; Wingsle, Gunnar; Rey, Pascal; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Rouhier, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Plant thioredoxins (Trxs) constitute a complex family of thiol oxidoreductases generally sharing a WCGPC active site sequence. Some recently identified plant Trxs (Clot, Trx-like1 and -2, Trx-lilium1, -2, and -3) display atypical active site sequences with altered residues between the two conserved cysteines. The transcript expression patterns, subcellular localizations, and biochemical properties of some representative poplar (Populus spp.) isoforms were investigated. Measurements of transcript levels for the 10 members in poplar organs indicate that most genes are constitutively expressed. Using transient expression of green fluorescent protein fusions, Clot and Trx-like1 were found to be mainly cytosolic, whereas Trx-like2.1 was located in plastids. All soluble recombinant proteins, except Clot, exhibited insulin reductase activity, although with variable efficiencies. Whereas Trx-like2.1 and Trx-lilium2.2 were efficiently regenerated both by NADPH-Trx reductase and glutathione, none of the proteins were reduced by the ferredoxin-Trx reductase. Only Trx-like2.1 supports the activity of plastidial thiol peroxidases and methionine sulfoxide reductases employing a single cysteine residue for catalysis and using a glutathione recycling system. The second active site cysteine of Trx-like2.1 is dispensable for this reaction, indicating that the protein possesses a glutaredoxin-like activity. Interestingly, the Trx-like2.1 active site replacement, from WCRKC to WCGPC, suppresses its capacity to use glutathione as a reductant but is sufficient to allow the regeneration of target proteins employing two cysteines for catalysis, indicating that the nature of the residues composing the active site sequence is crucial for substrate selectivity/recognition. This study provides another example of the cross talk existing between the glutathione/glutaredoxin and Trx-dependent pathways. PMID:22523226

  6. Flexible strategy for immobilizing redox-active compounds using in situ generation of diazonium salts. Investigations of the blocking and catalytic properties of the layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Jean-Marc; Sjöberg, Béatrice; Marsac, Rémi; Zigah, Dodzi; Bergamini, Jean-François; Wang, Aifang; Rigaut, Stéphane; Hapiot, Philippe; Lagrost, Corinne

    2009-11-03

    A versatile two-step method is developed to covalently immobilize redox-active molecules onto carbon surfaces. First, a robust anchoring platform is grafted onto surfaces by electrochemical reduction of aryl diazonium salts in situ generated. Depending on the nature of the layer termini, -COOH or -NH(2), a further chemical coupling involving ferrocenemethylamine or ferrocene carboxylic acid derivatives leads to the covalent binding of ferrocene centers. The chemical strategy using acyl chloride activation is efficient and flexible, since it can be applied either to surface-reactive end groups or to reactive species in solution. Cyclic voltammetry analyses point to the covalent binding of ferrocene units restricted to the upper layers of the underlying aryl films, while AFM measurements show a lost of compactness of the layers after the chemical attachment of ferrocene centers. The preparation conditions of the anchoring layers were found to determine the interfacial properties of the resulted ferrocenyl-modified electrodes. The ferrocene units promoted effective redox mediation providing that the free redox probes are adequately chosen (i.e., vs size/formal potential) and the underlying layers exhibit strong blocking properties. For anchoring films with weaker blocking effect, the coexistence of two distinct phenomena, redox mediation and ET at pinholes could be evidenced.

  7. Roles of the redox-active disulfide and histidine residues forming a catalytic dyad in reactions catalyzed by 2-ketopropyl coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Melissa A; Wampler, David A; Pandey, Arti S; Peters, John W; Ensign, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    NADPH:2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase (2-KPCC), an atypical member of the disulfide oxidoreductase (DSOR) family of enzymes, catalyzes the reductive cleavage and carboxylation of 2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M [2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate; 2-KPC] to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M (CoM) in the bacterial pathway of propylene metabolism. Structural studies of 2-KPCC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 have revealed a distinctive active-site architecture that includes a putative catalytic triad consisting of two histidine residues that are hydrogen bonded to an ordered water molecule proposed to stabilize enolacetone formed from dithiol-mediated 2-KPC thioether bond cleavage. Site-directed mutants of 2-KPCC were constructed to test the tenets of the mechanism proposed from studies of the native enzyme. Mutagenesis of the interchange thiol of 2-KPCC (C82A) abolished all redox-dependent reactions of 2-KPCC (2-KPC carboxylation or protonation). The air-oxidized C82A mutant, as well as wild-type 2-KPCC, exhibited the characteristic charge transfer absorbance seen in site-directed variants of other DSOR enzymes but with a pK(a) value for C87 (8.8) four units higher (i.e., four orders of magnitude less acidic) than that for the flavin thiol of canonical DSOR enzymes. The same higher pK(a) value was observed in native 2-KPCC when the interchange thiol was alkylated by the CoM analog 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Mutagenesis of the flavin thiol (C87A) also resulted in an inactive enzyme for steady-state redox-dependent reactions, but this variant catalyzed a single-turnover reaction producing a 0.8:1 ratio of product to enzyme. Mutagenesis of the histidine proximal to the ordered water (H137A) led to nearly complete loss of redox-dependent 2-KPCC reactions, while mutagenesis of the distal histidine (H84A) reduced these activities by 58 to 76%. A redox-independent reaction of 2-KPCC (acetoacetate decarboxylation) was not decreased for any of the

  8. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of Cu2+ ion based on catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Li, Bowei; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-02-15

    As an essential element, copper ion (Cu(2+)) plays important roles in human beings for its participation in diverse metabolic processes as a cofactor and/or a structural component of enzymes. However, excessive uptake of Cu(2+) ion gives rise to the risk of certain diseases. So, it is important to develop simple ways to monitor and detect Cu(2+) ion. In this study, a simple, facile colorimetric sensor for the ultrasensitive determination of Cu(2+) ion was developed based on the following principle: L-cysteine and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) could be conjugated to form the yellow product 2,4-dinitrophenylcysteine (DNPC), which was measurable at 355nm; however, upon addition of Cu(2+) ion, the absorbance of DNPC would be decreased owing to the Cu(2+) ion catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cystine in the presence of O2. Thus, the colorimetric detection of Cu(2+) ion could be achieved. The optimal pH, buffer, temperature and incubation time for the colorimetric sensor were obtained of pH 6.8 in 0.1M HEPES solution, 90 °C and 50 min, respectively. A good linearity within the range of 0.8-10 nM (r = 0.996) was attained, with a high detectability up to 0.5nM. Analyses of Cu(2+) ion in drinking water, lake water, seawater and biological samples were carried out and the method performances were found to agree well with that obtained by ICP-MS. The developed simple colorimetric sensor proved applicable for Cu(2+) ion determination in real samples with high sensitivity and selectivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise induced upregulation of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit gene expression in Thoroughbred horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Woong Park

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was performed to reveal the molecular structure and expression patterns of horse glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM genes whose products form glutamate cysteine ligase, which were identified as differentially expressed genes in the previous study. Methods We performed bioinformatics analyses, and gene expression assay with quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for horse GCLC and GCLM genes in muscle and blood leukocytes of Thoroughbred horses Results Expression of GCLC showed the same pattern in both blood and muscle tissues after exercise. Expression of GCLC increased in the muscle and blood of Thoroughbreds, suggesting a tissue-specific regulatory mechanism for the expression of GCLC. In addition, expression of the GCLM gene increased after exercise in both the blood and muscle of Thoroughbreds. Conclusion We established the expression patterns of GCLC and GCLM in the skeletal muscle and blood of Thoroughbred horses in response to exercise. Further study is now warranted to uncover the functional importance of these genes in exercise and recovery in racehorses.

  10. Modulation of Escherichia coli serine acetyltransferase catalytic activity in the cysteine synthase complex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benoni, Roberto; De Bei, O.; Paredi, G.; Hayes, C. S.; Franko, N.; Mozzarelli, A.; Bettati, S.; Campanini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 591, č. 9 (2017), s. 1212-1224 ISSN 0014-5793 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : cysteine synthase * protein - protein interaction * serine acetyltransferase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 3.623, year: 2016

  11. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivavec, T.M.; Mackenzie, P.D.; Horney, D.P.; Baghel, S.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  12. A Facile synthesis of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers with superior peroxidase-like catalytic activity for sensitive colorimetric detection of L-cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sihui; Chi, Maoqiang; Zhu, Yun; Gao, Mu; Wang, Ce; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2018-05-01

    Superaramagnetic Fe3O4 nanomaterials are good candidates as enzyme mimics due to their excellent catalytic activity, high stability and facile synthesis. However, the morphology of Fe3O4 nanomaterials has much influence on their enzyme-like catalytic activity. In this work, we have developed a simple polymer-assisted thermochemical reduction approach to prepare Fe3O4 nanofibers for peroxidase-like catalytic applications. The as-prepared Fe3O4 nanofibers show a higher catalytic activity than commercial Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The steady-state kinetic assay result shows that the Michaelis-Menten constant value of the as-obtained Fe3O4 nanofibers is similar to that of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), indicating their superior affinity to the 3,3‧,5,5‧-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and H2O2 substrate. Based on the outstanding catalytic activity, a sensing platform for the detection of L-cysteine has been performed and the limit of detection is as low as 0.028 μM. In addition, an excellent selectivity toward L-cysteine over other types of amino acids, glucose and metal ions has been achieved as well. This work offers an original means for the fabrication of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanofibers and demonstrates their delightful potential applications in the fields of biosensing, environmental monitoring, and medical diagnostics.

  13. A novel electrochemical sensor based on metal-organic framework for electro-catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi; Ahmar, Hamid; Dehghani, Ali; Bagheri, Akbar; Tadjarodi, Azadeh; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-04-15

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on Au-SH-SiO₂ nanoparticles supported on metal-organic framework (Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF) has been developed for electrocatalytic oxidation and determination of L-cysteine. The Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical behavior of L-cysteine at the Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF showed a very efficient electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of L-cysteine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (pH 5.0). The oxidation overpotentials of L-cysteine decreased significantly and their oxidation peak currents increased dramatically at Au-SH-SiO₂@Cu-MOF. The potential utility of the sensor was demonstrated by applying it to the analytical determination of L-cysteine concentration. The results showed that the electrocatalytic current increased linearly with the L-cysteine concentration in the range of 0.02-300 μM and the detection limit was 0.008 μM. Finally, the sensor was applied to determine L-cysteine in water and biological samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of redox-active ferric nontronite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgen, A. G.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Dunphy, D. R.; Artyushkova, K.; Cerrato, J. M.; Kruichak, J. N.; Janish, M. T.; Sun, C. J.; Argo, J. M.; Washington, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous redox reactions on clay mineral surfaces control mobility and bioavailability of redox-sensitive nutrients and contaminants. Iron (Fe) residing in clay mineral structures can either catalyze or directly participate in redox reactions; however, chemical controls over its reactivity are not fully understood. In our previous work we demonstrated that converting a minor portion of Fe(III) to Fe(II) (partial reduction) in the octahedral sheet of natural Fe-rich clay mineral nontronite (NAu-1) activates its surface, making it redox-active. In this study we produced and characterized synthetic ferric nontronite (SIP), highlighting structural and chemical similarities and differences between this synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart NAu-1, and probed whether mineral surface is redox-active by reacting it with arsenic As(III) under oxic and anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that synthetic nontronite SIP undergoes the same activation as natural nontronite NAu-1 following the partial reduction treatment. Similar to NAu-1, SIP oxidized As(III) to As(V) under both oxic (catalytic pathway) and anoxic (direct oxidation) conditions. The similar reactivity trends observed for synthetic nontronite and its natural counterpart make SIP an appropriate analog for laboratory studies. The development of chemically pure analogs for ubiquitous soil minerals will allow for systematic research of the fundamental properties of these minerals.

  15. DNA repair enzyme APE1 from evolutionarily ancient Hydra reveals redox activity exclusively found in mammalian APE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekhale, Komal; Haval, Gauri; Perween, Nusrat; Antoniali, Giulia; Tell, Gianluca; Ghaskadbi, Surendra; Ghaskadbi, Saroj

    2017-11-01

    Only mammalian apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1) has been reported to possess both DNA repair and redox activities. C terminal of the protein is required for base excision repair, while the redox activity resides in the N terminal due to cysteine residues at specific positions. APE1s from other organisms studied so far lack the redox activity in spite of having the N terminal domain. We find that APE1 from the Cnidarian Hydra exhibits both endonuclease and redox activities similar to mammalian APE1. We further show the presence of the three indispensable cysteines in Hydra APE1 for redox activity by site directed mutagenesis. Importance of redox domain but not the repair domain of APE1 in regeneration has been demonstrated by using domain-specific inhibitors. Our findings clearly demonstrate that the redox function of APE1 evolved very early in metazoan evolution and is not a recent acquisition in mammalian APE1 as believed so far. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.N.I.; Ashley, G.W.; Stubbe, J.

    1987-01-01

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1- 14 C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14 C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14 C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14 C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  17. Cupryphans, metal-binding, redox-active, redesigned conopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Marco; Sobolev, Anatoli P; Romeo, Cristina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Mannina, Luisa; Musci, Giovanni; Polticelli, Fabio

    2009-03-01

    Contryphans are bioactive peptides, isolated from the venom of marine snails of the genus Conus, which are characterized by the short length of the polypeptide chain and the high degree of unusual post-translational modifications. The cyclization of the polypeptide chain through a single disulphide bond, the presence of two conserved Pro residues, and the epimerization of a Trp/Leu residue confer to Contryphans a stable and well-defined structure in solution, conserved in all members of the family, and tolerant to multiple substitutions. The potential of Contryphans as scaffolds for the design of redox-active (macro)molecules was tested by engineering a copper-binding site on two different variants of the natural peptide Contryphan-Vn. The binding site was designed by computational modeling, and the redesigned peptides were synthesized and characterized by optical, fluorescence, electron spin resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The novel peptides, named Cupryphan and Arg-Cupryphan, bind Cu(2+) ions with a 1:1 stoichiometry and a K(d) in the 100 nM range. Other divalent metals (e.g., Zn(2+) and Mg(2+)) are bound with much lower affinity. In addition, Cupryphans catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anions with an activity comparable to other nonpeptidic superoxide dismutase mimics. We conclude that the Contryphan motif represents a natural robust scaffold which can be engineered to perform different functions, providing additional means for the design of catalytically active mini metalloproteins.

  18. Traceless splicing enabled by substrate-induced activation of the Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after mutation of a catalytic cysteine to serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Chan, Siu-Hong; Perler, Francine

    2014-12-12

    Inteins self-catalytically cleave out of precursor proteins while ligating the surrounding extein fragments with a native peptide bond. Much attention has been lavished on these molecular marvels with the hope of understanding and harnessing their chemistry for novel biochemical transformations including coupling peptides from synthetic or biological origins and controlling protein function. Despite an abundance of powerful applications, the use of inteins is still hampered by limitations in our understanding of their specificity (defined as flanking sequences that permit splicing) and the challenge of inserting inteins into target proteins. We examined the frequently used Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after the C-extein cysteine nucleophile (Cys+1) was mutated to serine or threonine. Previous studies demonstrated reduced rates and/or splicing yields with the Npu DnaE intein after mutation of Cys+1 to Ser+1. In this study, genetic selection identified extein sequences with Ser+1 that enabled the Npu DnaE intein to splice with only a 5-fold reduction in rate compared to the wild-type Cys+1 intein and without mutation of the intein itself to activate Ser+1 as a nucleophile. Three different proteins spliced efficiently after insertion of the intein flanked by the selected sequences. We then used this selected specificity to achieve traceless splicing in a targeted enzyme at a location predicted by primary sequence similarity to only the selected C-extein sequence. This study highlights the latent catalytic potential of the Npu DnaE intein to splice with an alternative nucleophile and enables broader intein utility by increasing insertion site choices. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Redox active polymers and colloidal particles for flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavvalapalli, Nagarjuna; Moore, Jeffrey S.; Rodriguez-Lopez, Joaquin; Cheng, Kevin; Shen, Mei; Lichtenstein, Timothy

    2018-05-29

    The invention provides a redox flow battery comprising a microporous or nanoporous size-exclusion membrane, wherein one cell of the battery contains a redox-active polymer dissolved in the non-aqueous solvent or a redox-active colloidal particle dispersed in the non-aqueous solvent. The redox flow battery provides enhanced ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator and reduced redox-active species crossover, thereby improving the performance and enabling widespread utilization. Redox active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) and redox active colloidal particles (RACs) were prepared and were found to be highly effective redox species. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The high concentration attainable (>2.0 M) for RAPs in common non-aqueous battery solvents, their electrochemical and chemical reversibility, and their hindered transport across porous separators make them attractive materials for non-aqueous redox flow batteries based on size-selectivity.

  20. Electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence from a redox-active metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Yin, Xue-Bo; He, Xi-Wen; Zhang, Yu-Kui

    2015-06-15

    The marriage of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) can combine their merits together. Designing ECL-active MOF with a high electron transfer capacity and high stability is critical for ECL emission. Here we reported the ECL from a redox-active MOF prepared from {Ru[4,4'-(HO2C)2-bpy]2bpy}(2+) and Zn(2+); a property of MOFs has not been reported previously. The MOF structure is independent of its charge and is therefore stable electrochemically. The redox-activity and well-ordered porous structure of the MOF were confirmed by its electrochemical properties and ECL emission. The high ECL emission indicated the ease of electron transfer between the MOF and co-reactants. Furthermore, the MOF exhibited permselectivity, charge selectivity, and catalytic selectivity along with a stable and concentration-dependent ECL emission toward co-reactants. ECL mechanism was proposed based on the results. The detection and recovery of cocaine in the serum sample was used to validate the feasibility of MOF- based ECL system. The information obtained in this study provides a better understanding of the redox properties of MOFs and their potential electrochemical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  2. Redox-active Hybrid Materials for Pseudocapacitive Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boota, Muhammad

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials show a great promise for the purpose of manufacturing high performance electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage systems and beyond. Molecular level combination of two best suited components in a hybrid material leads to new or sometimes exceptional sets of physical, chemical, mechanical and electrochemical properties that makes them attractive for broad ranges of applications. Recently, there has been growing interest in producing redox-active hybrid nanomaterials for energy storage applications where generally the organic component provides high redox capacitance and the inorganic component offers high conductivity and robust support. While organic-inorganic hybrid materials offer tremendous opportunities for electrochemical energy storage applications, the task of matching the right organic material out of hundreds of natural and nearly unlimited synthetic organic molecules to appropriate nanostructured inorganic support hampers their electrochemical energy storage applications. We aim to present the recent development of redox-active hybrid materials for pseudocapacitive energy storage. We will show the impact of combination of suitable organic materials with distinct carbon nanostructures and/or highly conductive metal carbides (MXenes) on conductivity, charge storage performance, and cyclability. Combined experimental and molecular simulation results will be discussed to shed light on the interfacial organic-inorganic interactions, pseudocapacitive charge storage mechanisms, and likely orientations of organic molecules on conductive supports. Later, the concept of all-pseudocapacitive organic-inorganic asymmetric supercapacitors will be highlighted which open up new avenues for developing inexpensive, sustainable, and high energy density aqueous supercapacitors. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities to further tailor the redox-active hybrids will be highlighted.

  3. Cysteine residues 244 and 458–459 within the catalytic subunit of Na,K-ATPase control the enzyme's hydrolytic and signaling function under hypoxic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yu. Petrushanko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings suggested that reversible thiol modifications of cysteine residues within the actuator (AD and nucleotide binding domain (NBD of the Na,K-ATPase may represent a powerful regulatory mechanism conveying redox- and oxygen-sensitivity of this multifunctional enzyme. S-glutathionylation of Cys244 in the AD and Cys 454-458-459 in the NBD inhibited the enzyme and protected cysteines’ thiol groups from irreversible oxidation under hypoxic conditions. In this study mutagenesis approach was used to assess the role these cysteines play in regulation of the Na,K-ATPase hydrolytic and signaling functions. Several constructs of mouse α1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase were produced in which Cys244, Cys 454-458-459 or Cys 244-454-458-459 were replaced by alanine. These constructs were expressed in human HEK293 cells. Non-transfected cells and those expressing murine α1 subunit were exposed to hypoxia or treated with oxidized glutathione (GSSG. Both conditions induced inhibition of the wild type Na,K-ATPase. Enzymes containing mutated mouse α1 lacking Cys244 or all four cysteines (Cys 244-454-458-459 were insensitive to hypoxia. Inhibitory effect of GSSG was observed for wild type murine Na,K-ATPase, but was less pronounced in Cys454-458-459Ala mutant and completely absent in the Cys244Ala and Cys 244-454-458-459Ala mutants. In cells, expressing wild type enzyme, ouabain induced activation of Src and Erk kinases under normoxic conditions, whereas under hypoxic conditions this effect was inversed. Cys454-458-459Ala substitution abolished Src kinase activation in response to ouabain treatment, uncoupled Src from Erk signaling, and interfered with O2-sensitivity of Na,K-ATPase signaling function. Moreover, modeling predicted that S-glutathionylation of Cys 458 and 459 should prevent inhibitory binding of Src to NBD. Our data indicate for the first time that cysteine residues within the AD and NBD influence hydrolytic as well as receptor

  4. The self-assembly of redox active peptides: Synthesis and electrochemical capacitive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Julia P; Santos, Adriano; Santos-Filho, Norival A; Lorenzón, Esteban N; Cilli, Eduardo M; Bueno, Paulo R

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports on the synthesis of a redox-tagged peptide with self-assembling capability aiming applications in electrochemically active capacitive surfaces (associated with the presence of the redox centers) generally useful in electroanalytical applications. Peptide containing ferrocene (fc) molecular (redox) group (Ac-Cys-Ile-Ile-Lys(fc)-Ile-Ile-COOH) was thus synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). To obtain the electrochemically active capacitive interface, the side chain of the cysteine was covalently bound to the gold electrode (sulfur group) and the side chain of Lys was used to attach the ferrocene in the peptide chain. After obtaining the purified redox-tagged peptide, the self-assembly and redox capability was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance-based capacitance spectroscopy techniques. The obtained results confirmed that the redox-tagged peptide was successfully attached by forming an electroactive self-assembled monolayer onto gold electrode. The design of redox active self-assembly ferrocene-tagged peptide is predictably useful in the development of biosensor devices precisely to detect, in a label-free platform, those biomarkers of clinical relevance. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 357-367, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Theo); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  6. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  8. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonta, Lital [San Diego, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Zhang, Zhiwen [San Diego, CA

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-10-10

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  10. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei; Baby, Rakhi Raghavan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active

  11. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  12. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl; Wiberg, Joanna; El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Ljungdahl, Thomas; Må rtensson, Jerker; Brown, Tom; Nordén, Bengt; Albinsson, Bo

    2010-01-01

    , such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore

  13. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei; Xia, Chuan; Baby, Rakhi Raghavan; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2014-01-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline

  14. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Rakhi, R. B.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2013-05-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles).We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section, supporting figures including SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, CV and CD curves and a summary table of capacitance. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00773a

  15. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  16. Redox active polymer devices and methods of using and manufacturing the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul; Bautista-Martinez, Jose Antonio; Friesen, Cody; Switzer, Elise

    2018-06-05

    The disclosed technology relates generally to apparatus comprising conductive polymers and more particularly to tag and tag devices comprising a redox-active polymer film, and method of using and manufacturing the same. In one aspect, an apparatus includes a substrate and a conductive structure formed on the substrate which includes a layer of redox-active polymer film having mobile ions and electrons. The conductive structure further includes a first terminal and a second terminal configured to receive an electrical signal therebetween, where the layer of redox-active polymer is configured to conduct an electrical current generated by the mobile ions and the electrons in response to the electrical signal. The apparatus additionally includes a detection circuit operatively coupled to the conductive structure and configured to detect the electrical current flowing through the conductive structure.

  17. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Redox-active antibiotics control gene expression and community behavior in divergent bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Lars E P; Teal, Tracy K; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K

    2008-08-29

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for stress responses, despite the fact that many of these organisms still produce redox-active small molecules, which indicates that redox-active pigments play a role independent of oxidative stress. These compounds had profound effects on the structural organization of colony biofilms in both P. aeruginosa and S. coelicolor, which shows that "secondary metabolites" play important conserved roles in gene expression and development.

  19. Redox activity of airborne particulate matter at different sites in the Los Angeles Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Arthur K.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Miguel, Antonio H.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Schmitz, Debra A.; Singh, Manisha; Eiguren-Fernandez, Arantza; Froines, John R.

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown associations between ambient particulate matter (PM) and adverse health outcomes including increased mortality, emergency room visits, and time lost from school and work. The mechanisms of PM-related health effects are still incompletely understood, but a hypothesis under investigation is that many of the adverse health effects may derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. While the adverse effects from PM have historically been associated with the airborne concentration of PM and more recently fine-particle PM, we considered it relevant to develop an assay to quantitatively measure the ability of PM to catalyze ROS generation as the initial step in the induction of oxidative stress. This ability of PM could then be related to different sources, chemical composition, and physical and spatial/temporal characteristics in the ambient environment. The measurement of ROS-forming ability in relation to sources and other factors will have potential relevance to control of redox-active PM. If oxidative stress represents a relevant mechanism of toxicity from PM, the measurement of redox activity represents a first step in the elucidation of the subsequent downstream processes. We have developed an assay for PM redox activity, utilizing the reduction of oxygen by dithiothreitol which serves as an electron source. We have found that PM will catalyze the reduction of oxygen and have examined the distribution and chemical characteristics of the redox activity of PM fractions collected in different sites in the Los Angeles Basin. Samples of concentrated coarse, fine, and ultrafine PM, obtained with aerosol concentrators, were studied with regard to their chemical properties and redox activity. Redox activity was highest in the ultrafine fraction, in agreement with results indicating ultrafines were the most potent toward inducing that heme oxygenase expression and depleting

  20. Electron transfer across the polarized interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Trojánek, Antonín; Samec, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2010), s. 1333-1335 ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08098; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.282, year: 2010

  1. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.455, year: 2015

  2. Investigating Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Lung Cells Exposed to Redox-Active PM Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) causes cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality through mechanisms that involve oxidative stress. 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ) is a ubiquitous component of PM and a potent redox-active electrophile. We previously reported that 1,2-NQ incr...

  3. Effect of L-cysteine on the oxidation of cyclohexane catalyzed by manganeseporphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-You; Tian, Peng; Chen, Yong; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun; Chen, Zai Xin

    2015-06-01

    Effect of L-cysteine as the cocatalyst on the oxidation of cyclohexane by tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) catalyzed by manganese tetraphenylporphyrin (MnTPP) has been investigated. The results showed that L-cysteine could moderately improve the catalytic activity of MnTPP and significantly increase the selectivity of cyclohexanol. Different from imidazole and pyridine, the L-cysteine may perform dual roles in the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane. Besides as the axial ligand for MnTPP, the L-cysteine could also react with cyclohexyl peroxide formed as the intermediate to produce alcohol as the main product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-term aerobic exercise increases redox-active iron through nitric oxide in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Xiao, De-Sheng

    2014-01-30

    Adult hippocampus is highly vulnerable to iron-induced oxidative stress. Aerobic exercise has been proposed to reduce oxidative stress but the findings in the hippocampus are conflicting. This study aimed to observe the changes of redox-active iron and concomitant regulation of cellular iron homeostasis in the hippocampus by aerobic exercise, and possible regulatory effect of nitric oxide (NO). A randomized controlled study was designed in the rats with swimming exercise treatment (for 3 months) and/or an unselective inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) (L-NAME) treatment. The results from the bleomycin-detectable iron assay showed additional redox-active iron in the hippocampus by exercise treatment. The results from nonheme iron content assay, combined with the redox-active iron content, showed increased storage iron content by exercise treatment. NOx (nitrate plus nitrite) assay showed increased NOx content by exercise treatment. The results from the Western blot assay showed decreased ferroportin expression, no changes of TfR1 and DMT1 expressions, increased IRP1 and IRP2 expression, increased expressions of eNOS and nNOS rather than iNOS. In these effects of exercise treatment, the increased redox-active iron content, storage iron content, IRP1 and IRP2 expressions were completely reversed by L-NAME treatment, and decreased ferroportin expression was in part reversed by L-NAME. L-NAME treatment completely inhibited increased NOx and both eNOS and nNOS expression in the hippocampus. Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise could increase the redox-active iron in the hippocampus, indicating an increase in the capacity to generate hydroxyl radicals through the Fenton reactions, and aerobic exercise-induced iron accumulation in the hippocampus might mainly result from the role of the endogenous NO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Redox-active porous coordination polymers prepared by trinuclear heterometallic pivalate linking with the redox-active nickel(II) complex: synthesis, structure, magnetic and redox properties, and electrocatalytic activity in organic compound dehalogenation in heterogeneous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvynenko, A S; Kolotilov, S V; Kiskin, M A; Cador, O; Golhen, S; Aleksandrov, G G; Mishura, A M; Titov, V E; Ouahab, L; Eremenko, I L; Novotortsev, V M

    2014-05-19

    Linking of the trinuclear pivalate fragment Fe2CoO(Piv)6 by the redox-active bridge Ni(L)2 (compound 1; LH is Schiff base from hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid and 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde, Piv(-) = pivalate) led to formation of a new porous coordination polymer (PCP) {Fe2CoO(Piv)6}{Ni(L)2}1.5 (2). X-ray structures of 1 and 2 were determined. A crystal lattice of compound 2 is built from stacked 2D layers; the Ni(L)2 units can be considered as bridges, which bind two Fe2CoO(Piv)6 units. In desolvated form, 2 possesses a porous crystal lattice (SBET = 50 m(2) g(-1), VDR = 0.017 cm(3) g(-1) estimated from N2 sorption at 78 K). At 298 K, 2 absorbed a significant quantity of methanol (up to 0.3 cm(3) g(-1)) and chloroform. Temperature dependence of molar magnetic susceptibility of 2 could be fitted as superposition of χMT of Fe2CoO(Piv)6 and Ni(L)2 units, possible interactions between them were taken into account using molecular field model. In turn, magnetic properties of the Fe2CoO(Piv)6 unit were fitted using two models, one of which directly took into account a spin-orbit coupling of Co(II), and in the second model the spin-orbit coupling of Co(II) was approximated as zero-field splitting. Electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of 2 were studied by cyclic voltammetry in suspension and compared with electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of a soluble analogue 1. A catalytic effect was determined by analysis of the catalytic current dependency on concentrations of the substrate. Compound 1 possessed electrocatalytic activity in organic halide dehalogenation, and such activity was preserved for the Ni(L)2 units, incorporated into the framework of 2. In addition, a new property occurred in the case of 2: the catalytic activity of PCP depended on its sorption capacity with respect to the substrate. In contrast to homogeneous catalysts, usage of solid PCPs may allow selectivity due to porous structure and simplify separation of product.

  6. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  7. Content of redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants) in foods consumed in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Bente L; Carlsen, Monica H; Phillips, Katherine M; Bøhn, Siv K; Holte, Kari; Jacobs, David R; Blomhoff, Rune

    2006-07-01

    Supplements containing ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, or beta-carotene do not protect against oxidative stress-related diseases in most randomized intervention trials. We suggest that other redox-active phytochemicals may be more effective and that a combination of different redox-active compounds (ie, antioxidants or reductants) may be needed for proper protection against oxidative damage. We aimed to generate a ranked food table with values for total content of redox-active compounds to test this alternative antioxidant hypothesis. An assay that measures the total concentration of redox-active compounds above a certain cutoff reduction potential was used to analyze 1113 food samples obtained from the US Department of Agriculture National Food and Nutrient Analysis Program. Large variations in the content of antioxidants were observed in different foods and food categories. The food groups spices and herbs, nuts and seeds, berries, and fruit and vegetables all contained foods with very high antioxidant contents. Most food categories also contained products almost devoid of antioxidants. Of the 50 food products highest in antioxidant concentrations, 13 were spices, 8 were in the fruit and vegetables category, 5 were berries, 5 were chocolate-based, 5 were breakfast cereals, and 4 were nuts or seeds. On the basis of typical serving sizes, blackberries, walnuts, strawberries, artichokes, cranberries, brewed coffee, raspberries, pecans, blueberries, ground cloves, grape juice, and unsweetened baking chocolate were at the top of the ranked list. This ranked antioxidant food table provides a useful tool for investigations into the possible health benefit of dietary antioxidants.

  8. Redox-Active Antibiotics Control Gene Expression and Community Behavior in Divergent Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Teal, Tracy K.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Newman, Dianne K.

    2008-01-01

    It is thought that bacteria excrete redox-active pigments as antibiotics to inhibit competitors. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the endogenous antibiotic pyocyanin activates SoxR, a transcription factor conserved in Proteo- and Actinobacteria. In Escherichia coli, SoxR regulates the superoxide stress response. Bioinformatic analysis coupled with gene expression studies in P. aeruginosa and Streptomyces coelicolor revealed that the majority of SoxR regulons in bacteria lack the genes required for ...

  9. Flowable Conducting Particle Networks in Redox-Active Electrolytes for Grid Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatzell, K. B.; Boota, M.; Kumbur, E. C.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a new hybrid approach toward achieving high volumetric energy and power densities in an electrochemical flow capacitor for grid energy storage. The electrochemical flow capacitor suffers from high self-discharge and low energy density because charge storage is limited to the available surface area (electric double layer charge storage). Here, we examine two carbon materials as conducting particles in a flow battery electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple. Highly porous activated carbon spheres (CSs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are investigated as conducting particle networks that facilitate both faradaic and electric double layer charge storage. Charge storage contributions (electric double layer and faradaic) are distinguished for flow-electrodes composed of MWCNTs and activated CSs. A MWCNT flow-electrode based in a redox-active electrolyte containing the VO2+/VO2+ redox couple demonstrates 18% less self-discharge, 10 X more energy density, and 20 X greater power densities (at 20 mV s-1) than one based on a non-redox active electrolyte. Furthermore, a MWCNT redox-active flow electrode demonstrates 80% capacitance retention, and >95% coulombic efficiency over 100 cycles, indicating the feasibility of utilizing conducting networks with redox chemistries for grid energy storage.

  10. Simultaneous Activation of Iron- and Thiol-Based Sensor-Regulator Systems by Redox-Active Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Lok; Yoo, Ji-Sun; Oh, Gyeong-Seok; Singh, Atul K; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria in natural habitats are exposed to myriad redox-active compounds (RACs), which include producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive electrophile species (RES) that alkylate or oxidize thiols. RACs can induce oxidative stress in cells and activate response pathways by modulating the activity of sensitive regulators. However, the effect of a certain compound on the cell has been investigated primarily with respect to a specific regulatory pathway. Since a single compound can exert multiple chemical effects in the cell, its effect can be better understood by time-course monitoring of multiple sensitive regulatory pathways that the compound induces. We investigated the effect of representative RACs by monitoring the activity of three sensor-regulators in the model actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor ; SoxR that senses reactive compounds directly through oxidation of its [2Fe-2S] cluster, CatR/PerR that senses peroxides through bound iron, and an anti-sigma factor RsrA that senses RES via disulfide formation. The time course and magnitude of induction of their target transcripts were monitored to predict the chemical activities of each compound in S. coelicolor . Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) was found to be an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR and an effective ROS-producer that induced CatR/PerR with little thiol-perturbing activity. p -Benzoquinone was an effective RAC that directly activated SoxR, with slower ROS-producing activity, and an effective RES that induced the RsrA-SigR system. Plumbagin was an effective RAC that activated SoxR, an effective ROS-producer, and a less agile but effective RES. Diamide was an RES that effectively formed disulfides and a weak RAC that activated SoxR. Monobromobimane was a moderately effective RES and a slow producer of ROS. Interestingly, benzoquinone induced the SigR system by forming adducts on cysteine thiols in RsrA, revealing a new pathway to modulate RsrA activity. Overall, this study showed

  11. Lateral transport of solutes in microfluidic channels using electrochemically generated gradients in redox-active surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2011-04-15

    We report principles for a continuous flow process that can separate solutes based on a driving force for selective transport that is generated by a lateral concentration gradient of a redox-active surfactant across a microfluidic channel. Microfluidic channels fabricated with gold electrodes lining each vertical wall were used to electrochemically generate concentration gradients of the redox-active surfactant 11-ferrocenylundecyl-trimethylammonium bromide (FTMA) in a direction perpendicular to the flow. The interactions of three solutes (a hydrophobic dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (yellow AB), an amphiphilic molecule, 2-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-pentanoyl)-1-hexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (BODIPY C(5)-HPC), and an organic salt, 1-methylpyridinium-3-sulfonate (MPS)) with the lateral gradients in surfactant/micelle concentration were shown to drive the formation of solute-specific concentration gradients. Two distinct physical mechanisms were identified to lead to the solute concentration gradients: solubilization of solutes by micelles and differential adsorption of the solutes onto the walls of the microchannels in the presence of the surfactant concentration gradient. These two mechanisms were used to demonstrate delipidation of a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC (lipid) and MPS and purification of BODIPY C(5)-HPC from a mixture of BODIPY C(5)-HPC and yellow AB. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that lateral concentration gradients of redox-active surfactants formed within microfluidic channels can be used to transport solutes across the microfluidic channels in a solute-dependent manner. The approach employs electrical potentials (solutions having high ionic strength (>0.1M), and offers the basis of continuous processes for the purification or separation of solutes in microscale systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pookpanratana, S; Zhu, H; Bittle, E G; Richter, C A; Li, Q; Hacker, C A; Natoli, S N; Ren, T

    2016-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al 2 O 3 /molecule/SiO 2 /Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. (paper)

  13. Redox non-innocent ligands: versatile new tools to control catalytic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyaskovskyy, V.; de Bruin, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this (tutorial overview) perspective we highlight the use of "redox non-innocent" ligands in catalysis. Two main types of reactivity in which the redox non-innocent ligand is involved can be specified: (A) The redox active ligand participates in the catalytic cycle only by accepting/donating

  14. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  15. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  16. Electro-kinetic separation of rare earth elements using a redox-active ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Huayi; Cole, Bren E.; Qiao, Yusen; Bogart, Justin A.; Cheisson, Thibault; Manor, Brian C.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Purification of rare earth elements is challenging due to their chemical similarities. All of the deployed separation methods rely on thermodynamic properties, such as distribution equilibria in solvent extraction. Rare-earth-metal separations based on kinetic differences have not been examined. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach for rare-earth-element separations by exploiting differences in the oxidation rates within a series of rare earth compounds containing the redox-active ligand [{2-(tBuN(O))C_6H_4CH_2}{sub 3}N]{sup 3-}. Using this method, a single-step separation factor up to 261 was obtained for the separation of a 50:50 yttrium-lutetium mixture. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Fundamental understanding and practical challenges of anionic redox activity in Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assat, Gaurav; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2018-05-01

    Our increasing dependence on lithium-ion batteries for energy storage calls for continual improvements in the performance of their positive electrodes, which have so far relied solely on cationic redox of transition-metal ions for driving the electrochemical reactions. Great hopes have recently been placed on the emergence of anionic redox—a transformational approach for designing positive electrodes as it leads to a near-doubling of capacity. But questions have been raised about the fundamental origins of anionic redox and whether its full potential can be realized in applications. In this Review, we discuss the underlying science that triggers a reversible and stable anionic redox activity. Furthermore, we highlight its practical limitations and outline possible approaches for improving such materials and designing new ones. We also summarize their chances for market implementation in the face of the competing nickel-based layered cathodes that are prevalent today.

  18. Thermodynamic aspects of the electron transfer across the interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2011), s. 606-613 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0707; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  19. Synthesis, structural characterisation and bonding in an anionic hexavanadate bearing redox-active ferrocenyl groups at the periphery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schulz, J.; Gyepes, Robert; Císařová, I.; Štěpnička, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 12 (2010), s. 2749-2756 ISSN 1144-0546 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : synthesis * redox-active ferrocenyl groups * ferrocene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  20. Strategies for "wiring" redox-active proteins to electrodes and applications in biosensors, biofuel cells, and nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöll, Tanja; Nöll, Gilbert

    2011-07-01

    In this tutorial review the basic approaches to establish electrochemical communication between redox-active proteins and electrodes are elucidated and examples for applications in electrochemical biosensors, biofuel cells and nanotechnology are presented. The early stage of protein electrochemistry is described giving a short overview over electron transfer (ET) between electrodes and proteins, followed by a brief introduction into experimental procedures for studying proteins at electrodes and possible applications arising thereof. The article starts with discussing the electrochemistry of cytochrome c, the first redox-active protein, for which direct reversible ET was obtained, under diffusion controlled conditions and after adsorption to electrodes. Next, examples for the electrochemical study of redox enzymes adsorbed on electrodes and modes of immobilization are discussed. Shortly the experimental approach for investigating redox-active proteins adsorbed on electrodes is outlined. Possible applications of redox enzymes in electrochemical biosensors and biofuel cells working by direct ET (DET) and mediated ET (MET) are presented. Furthermore, the reconstitution of redox active proteins at electrodes using molecular wire-like units in order to "wire" the proteins to the electrode surface and possible applications in nanotechnology are discussed.

  1. A High-Throughput Mass Spectrometry Assay Coupled with Redox Activity Testing Reduces Artifacts and False Positives in Lysine Demethylase Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigle, Tim J; Swinger, Kerren K; Campbell, John E; Scholle, Michael D; Sherrill, John; Admirand, Elizabeth A; Boriack-Sjodin, P Ann; Kuntz, Kevin W; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P; Scott, Margaret Porter; Copeland, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Demethylation of histones by lysine demethylases (KDMs) plays a critical role in controlling gene transcription. Aberrant demethylation may play a causal role in diseases such as cancer. Despite the biological significance of these enzymes, there are limited assay technologies for study of KDMs and few quality chemical probes available to interrogate their biology. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of self-assembled monolayer desorption/ionization (SAMDI) mass spectrometry for the investigation of quantitative KDM enzyme kinetics and for high-throughput screening for KDM inhibitors. SAMDI can be performed in 384-well format and rapidly allows reaction components to be purified prior to injection into a mass spectrometer, without a throughput-limiting liquid chromatography step. We developed sensitive and robust assays for KDM1A (LSD1, AOF2) and KDM4C (JMJD2C, GASC1) and screened 13,824 compounds against each enzyme. Hits were rapidly triaged using a redox assay to identify compounds that interfered with the catalytic oxidation chemistry used by the KDMs for the demethylation reaction. We find that overall this high-throughput mass spectrometry platform coupled with the elimination of redox active compounds leads to a hit rate that is manageable for follow-up work. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. Synthesis, DNA Cleavage Activity, Cytotoxicity, Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition, and Acute Murine Toxicity of Redox-Active Ruthenium(II) Polypyridyl Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alatrash, Nagham; Narh, Eugenia S; Yadav, Abhishek; Kim, Mahn-Jong; Janaratne, Thamara; Gabriel, James; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2017-07-06

    Four mononuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)] 2+ and two dinuclear [(L-L) 2 Ru(tatpp)Ru(L-L) 2 ] 4+ ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes (RPCs) containing the 9,11,20,22-tetraazatetrapyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c:3'',2''-l:2''',3'''-n]pentacene (tatpp) ligand were synthesized, in which L-L is a chelating diamine ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me 4 phen) or 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Ph 2 phen). These Ru-tatpp analogues all undergo reduction reactions with modest reducing agents, such as glutathione (GSH), at pH 7. These, plus several structurally related but non-redox-active RPCs, were screened for DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition, and acute mouse toxicity, and their activities were examined with respect to redox activity and lipophilicity. All of the redox-active RPCs show single-strand DNA cleavage in the presence of GSH, whereas none of the non-redox-active RPCs do. Low-micromolar cytotoxicity (IC 50 ) against malignant H358, CCL228, and MCF7 cultured cell lines was mainly restricted to the redox-active RPCs; however, they were substantially less toxic toward nonmalignant MCF10 cells. The IC 50 values for AChE inhibition in cell-free assays and the acute toxicity of RPCs in mice revealed that whereas most RPCs show potent inhibitory action against AChE (IC 50 values <15 μm), Ru-tatpp complexes as a class are surprisingly well tolerated in animals relative to other RPCs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Digallane with redox-active diimine ligand: dualism of electron-transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Chudakova, Valentina A; Bazyakina, Natalia L; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy V; Fukin, Georgy K

    2014-05-19

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1), which consists of redox-active ligand 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene (dpp-Bian), has been studied. The reaction of 1 with I2 proceeds via one-electron oxidation of each of two dpp-Bian ligands to a radical-anionic state and affords complex (dpp-Bian)IGa-GaI(dpp-Bian) (2). Dissolution of complex 2 in pyridine (Py) gives monomeric compound (dpp-Bian)GaI(Py) (3) as a result of a solvent-induced intramolecular electron transfer from the metal-metal bond to the dpp-Bian ligands. Treatment of compound 3 with B(C6F5)3 leads to removal of pyridine and restores compound 2. The reaction of compound 1 with 3,6-di-tert-butyl-ortho-benzoquinone (3,6-Q) proceeds with oxidation of all the redox-active centers in 1 (the Ga-Ga bond and two dpp-Bian dianions) and results in mononuclear catecholate (dpp-Bian)Ga(Cat) (4) (Cat = [3,6-Q](2-)). Treatment of 4 with AgBF4 gives a mixture of [(dpp-Bian)2Ag][BF4] (5) and (dpp-Bian)GaF(Cat) (6), which both consist of neutral dpp-Bian ligands. The reduction of benzylideneacetone (BA) with 1 generates the BA radical-anions, which dimerize, affording (dpp-Bian)Ga-(BA-BA)-Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). In this case the Ga-Ga bond remains unchanged. Within 10 min at 95 °C in solution compound 7 undergoes transformation to paramagnetic complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(BA-BA) (8) and metal-free compound C36H40N2 (9). The latter is a product of intramolecular addition of the C-H bond of one of the iPr groups to the C═N bond in dpp-Bian. Diamagnetic compounds 3, 5, 6, and 9 have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy, and paramagnetic complexes 2, 4, 7, and 8 by ESR spectroscopy. Molecular structures of 2-7 and 9 have been established by single-crystal X-ray analysis.

  4. Characterization of mammalian selenoprotein o: a redox-active mitochondrial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seong-Jeong; Lee, Byung Cheon; Yim, Sun Hee; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Lee, Seung-Rock

    2014-01-01

    Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO), the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.

  5. Characterization of mammalian selenoprotein o: a redox-active mitochondrial protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Jeong Han

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins exhibit diverse biological functions, most of which are associated with redox control. However, the functions of approximately half of mammalian selenoproteins are not known. One such protein is Selenoprotein O (SelO, the largest mammalian selenoprotein with orthologs found in a wide range of organisms, including bacteria and yeast. Here, we report characterization of mammalian SelO. Expression of this protein could be verified in HEK 293T cells by metabolic labeling of cells with 75Se, and it was abolished when selenocysteine was replaced with serine. A CxxU motif was identified in the C-terminal region of SelO. This protein was reversibly oxidized in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in HEK 293T cells when cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide. This treatment led to the formation of a transient 88 kDa SelO-containing complex. The formation of this complex was enhanced by replacing the CxxU motif with SxxC, but abolished when it was replaced with SxxS, suggesting a redox interaction of SelO with another protein through its Sec residue. SelO was localized to mitochondria and expressed across mouse tissues. Its expression was little affected by selenium deficiency, suggesting it has a high priority for selenium supply. Taken together, these results show that SelO is a redox-active mitochondrial selenoprotein.

  6. Sodium-ion supercapacitors based on nanoporous pyroproteins containing redox-active heteroatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Na Rae; Yun, Young Soo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials fabricated via simple methods from renewable bio-resources have great potential in rechargeable energy storage systems. In this study, nanoporous pyroproteins containing a large amount of redox-active heteroatoms (H-NPs) were fabricated from silk fibroin by an in situ carbonization/activation method. The H-NPs have a large surface area of ∼3050 m2 g-1, which is mainly comprised of nanometer-scale pores. Also, these H-NPs have oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms of 17.4 wt% and 2.9 wt%, respectively. Synergistic sodium ion storage behaviors originate from electrochemical double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, leading to very high electrochemical performances of H-NPs in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolyte systems. Sodium-ion supercapacitors (NISs) based on commercial graphite//H-NPs show a high specific power of ∼1900 W kg-1 at ∼77 Wh kg-1. Also, NISs based on commercial hard carbon//H-NPs exhibit a high specific energy of ∼217 Wh kg-1 at ∼42 W kg-1. In addition, outstanding cycling performances over 30,000 cycles are achieved for symmetric NISs.

  7. Harnessing redox activity for the formation of uranium tris(imido) compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nickolas H.; Odoh, Samuel O.; Yao, Yiyi; Williams, Ursula J.; Schaefer, Brian A.; Kiernicki, John J.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Goshert, Mitchell D.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Schelter, Eric J.; Walensky, Justin R.; Gagliardi, Laura; Bart, Suzanne C.

    2014-10-01

    Classically, late transition-metal organometallic compounds promote multielectron processes solely through the change in oxidation state of the metal centre. In contrast, uranium typically undergoes single-electron chemistry. However, using redox-active ligands can engage multielectron reactivity at this metal in analogy to transition metals. Here we show that a redox-flexible pyridine(diimine) ligand can stabilize a series of highly reduced uranium coordination complexes by storing one, two or three electrons in the ligand. These species reduce organoazides easily to form uranium-nitrogen multiple bonds with the release of dinitrogen. The extent of ligand reduction dictates the formation of uranium mono-, bis- and tris(imido) products. Spectroscopic and structural characterization of these compounds supports the idea that electrons are stored in the ligand framework and used in subsequent reactivity. Computational analyses of the uranium imido products probed their molecular and electronic structures, which facilitated a comparison between the bonding in the tris(imido) structure and its tris(oxo) analogue.

  8. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostela, J.; Elmgren, M.; Almgren, M.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E 0 -values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase

  9. Redox-Flow Batteries: From Metals to Organic Redox-Active Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsberg, Jan; Hagemann, Tino; Janoschka, Tobias; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2017-01-16

    Research on redox-flow batteries (RFBs) is currently experiencing a significant upturn, stimulated by the growing need to store increasing quantities of sustainably generated electrical energy. RFBs are promising candidates for the creation of smart grids, particularly when combined with photovoltaics and wind farms. To achieve the goal of "green", safe, and cost-efficient energy storage, research has shifted from metal-based materials to organic active materials in recent years. This Review presents an overview of various flow-battery systems. Relevant studies concerning their history are discussed as well as their development over the last few years from the classical inorganic, to organic/inorganic, to RFBs with organic redox-active cathode and anode materials. Available technologies are analyzed in terms of their technical, economic, and environmental aspects; the advantages and limitations of these systems are also discussed. Further technological challenges and prospective research possibilities are highlighted. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4 nanowires with a high conductance for flexible solid state supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Dai, Shuge; Wang, Mingjun; Xi, Yi; Lang, Qiang; Guo, Donglin; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-08-01

    The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in a high pseudocapacitive performance with a relatively high specific energy and specific power. Such a new type of pseudocapacitive material of Cu7S4-NWs with its low cost is very promising for actual application in supercapacitors.The exploration of high Faradic redox active materials with the advantages of low cost and low toxicity has been attracting great attention for producing high energy storage supercapacitors. Here, the high Faradic redox active material of Cu7S4-NWs coated on a carbon fiber fabric (CFF) is directly used as a binder-free electrode for a high performance flexible solid state supercapacitor. The Cu7S4-NW-CFF supercapacitor exhibits excellent electrochemical performance such as a high specific capacitance of 400 F g-1 at the scan rate of 10 mV s-1 and a high energy density of 35 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 200 W kg-1, with the advantages of a light weight, high flexibility and long term cycling stability by retaining 95% after 5000 charge-discharge cycles at a constant current of 10 mA. The high Faradic redox activity and high conductance behavior of the Cu7S4-NWs result in

  11. Unravelling ``off-target'' effects of redox-active polymers and polymer multilayered capsules in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Giovanni L.; Folini, Marco; Cavalieri, Francesca; Yan, Yan; Fresch, Enrico; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Hasenöhrl, Christoph; Richardson, Joseph J.; Tinelli, Stella; Fery, Andreas; Caruso, Frank; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2015-03-01

    Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell lines. This suggests that the simultaneous action of carboxyl and disulfide groups in PMASH polymer or capsules may play a role in mediating the intracellular off-target effects. Our work provides evidence that the rational design of redox-active carriers for therapeutic-related application should be guided by a careful investigation on potential disturbance of the cellular machineries related to the carrier association.Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell

  12. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  13. Redox Activation of the Universally Conserved ATPase YchF by Thioredoxin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannemann, Liya; Suppanz, Ida; Ba, Qiaorui; MacInnes, Katherine; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2016-01-20

    YchF/Ola1 are unconventional members of the universally conserved GTPase family because they preferentially hydrolyze ATP rather than GTP. These ATPases have been associated with various cellular processes and pathologies, including DNA repair, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. In particular, a possible role in regulating the oxidative stress response has been suggested for both bacterial and human YchF/Ola1. In this study, we analyzed how YchF responds to oxidative stress and how it potentially regulates the antioxidant response. Our data identify a redox-regulated monomer-dimer equilibrium of YchF as a key event in the functional cycle of YchF. Upon oxidative stress, the oxidation of a conserved and surface-exposed cysteine residue promotes YchF dimerization, which is accompanied by inhibition of the ATPase activity. No dimers were observed in a YchF mutant lacking this cysteine. In vitro, the YchF dimer is dissociated by thioredoxin 1 (TrxA) and this stimulates the ATPase activity. The physiological significance of the YchF-thioredoxin 1 interaction was demonstrated by in vivo cross-linking, which validated this interaction in living cells. This approach also revealed that both the ATPase domain and the helical domain of YchF are in contact with TrxA. YchF/Ola1 are the first redox-regulated members of the universally conserved GTPase family and are inactivated by oxidation of a conserved cysteine residue within the nucleotide-binding motif. Our data provide novel insights into the regulation of the so far ill-defined YchF/Ola1 family of proteins and stipulate their role as negative regulators of the oxidative stress response.

  14. Mutagenesis of the redox-active disulfide in mercuric ion reductase: Catalysis by mutant enzymes restricted to flavin redox chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distefano, M.D.; Au, K.G.; Walsh, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, a flavoenzyme that possesses a redox-active cystine, Cys 135 Cys 140 , catalyzes the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by NADPH. As a probe of mechanism, the authors have constructed mutants lacking a redox-active disulfide by eliminating Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 140 ), Cys 14 (Cys 135 Ala 140 ), or both (Ala 135 Ala 140 ). Additionally, they have made double mutants that lack Cys 135 (Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 140 ) or Cys 140 (Cys 135 Cys 139 Ala 140 ) but introduce a new Cys in place of Gly 139 with the aim of constructing dithiol pairs in the active site that do not form a redox-active disulfide. The resulting mutant enzymes all lack redox-active disulfides and are hence restricted to FAD/FADH 2 redox chemistry. Each mutant enzyme possesses unique physical and spectroscopic properties that reflect subtle differences in the FAD microenvironment. Preliminary evidence for the Ala 135 Cys 139 Cys 14 mutant enzyme suggests that this protein forms a disulfide between the two adjacent Cys residues. Hg(II) titration experiments that correlate the extent of charge-transfer quenching with Hg(II) binding indicate that the Ala 135 Cys 140 protein binds Hg(II) with substantially less avidity than does the wild-type enzyme. All mutant mercuric reductases catalyze transhydrogenation and oxygen reduction reactions through obligatory reduced flavin intermediates at rates comparable to or greater than that of the wild-type enzyme. In multiple-turnover assays which monitored the production of Hg(0), two of the mutant enzymes were observed to proceed through at least 30 turnovers at rates ca. 1000-fold slower than that of wild-type mercuric reductase. They conclude that the Cys 135 and Cys 140 thiols serve as Hg(II) ligands that orient the Hg(II) for subsequent reduction by a reduced flavin intermediate

  15. Thioredoxin Txnl1/TRP32 Is a Redox-active Cofactor of the 26 S Proteasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Klausen, Louise Kjær; Prag, Søren

    2009-01-01

    in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Txnl1 has thioredoxin activity with a redox potential of about -250 mV. Mutant Txnl1 with one active site cysteine replaced by serine formed disulfide bonds to eEF1A1, a substrate-recruiting factor of the 26S proteasome. eEF1A1 is therefore a likely physiological substrate....... In response to knock-down of Txnl1, ubiquitin-protein conjugates were moderately stabilised. Hence, Txnl1 is the first example of a direct connection between protein reduction and proteolysis, two major intracellular protein quality control mechanisms....

  16. Tissue redox activity as a hallmark of carcinogenesis: from early to terminal stages of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalova, Rumiana; Zhelev, Zhivko; Aoki, Ichio; Saga, Tsuneo

    2013-05-01

    The study aimed to clarify the dynamics of tissue redox activity (TRA) in cancer progression and assess the importance of this parameter for therapeutic strategies. The experiments were carried out on brain tissues of neuroblastoma-bearing, glioma-bearing, and healthy mice. TRA was visualized in vivo by nitroxide-enhanced MRI on anesthetized animals or in vitro by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy on isolated tissue specimens. Two biochemical parameters were analyzed in parallel: tissue total antioxidant capacity (TTAC) and plasma levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). In the early stage of cancer, the brain tissues were characterized by a shorter-lived MRI signal than that from healthy brains (indicating a higher reducing activity for the nitroxide radical), which was accompanied by an enhancement of TTAC and MMP9 plasma levels. In the terminal stage of cancer, tissues in both hemispheres were characterized by a longer-lived MRI signal than in healthy brains (indicating a high-oxidative activity) that was accompanied by a decrease in TTAC and an increase in the MMP2/MMP9 plasma levels. Cancer progression also affected the redox potential of tissues distant from the primary tumor locus (liver and lung). Their oxidative status increased in both stages of cancer. The study shows that tissue redox balance is very sensitive to the progression of cancer and can be used as a diagnostic marker of carcinogenesis. The study also suggests that the noncancerous tissues of a cancer-bearing organism are susceptible to oxidative damage and should be considered a therapeutic target. ©2013 AACR.

  17. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostela, J. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: johan.kostela@fki.uu.se; Elmgren, M. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden); Almgren, M. [Uppsala University, Department of Physical Chemistry, Box 579, S-75123 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-05-30

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E {sup 0}-values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase.

  18. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  19. Assay of cysteine dioxygenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, P.J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    It has been proposed that rat liver contains two cysteine dioxygenase enzymes which convert cysteine to cysteinesulfinic acid, one which is stimulated by NAD + and has a pH optimum of 6.8 and one which is not stimulated by NAD + and has a pH optimum of 9.0. This led the authors to reinvestigate assay conditions for measuring cysteine dioxygenase activity in rat liver homogenate. An HPLC method, using an anion exchange column (Dionex Amino-Pac trademark PA1 (4x250 mm)) was used to separate the [ 35 S]cysteinesulfinic acid produced from [ 35 S]cysteine in the incubation mixture. They demonstrated that inclusion of hydroxylamine prevented further metabolism of cysteinesulfinic acid. which occurred rapidly in the absence of hydroxylamine

  20. Adsorption behavior of redox-active suppressor additives: Combined electrochemical and STM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hai, N.T.M.; Huynh, T.M.T.; Fluegel, A.; Mayer, D.; Broekmann, P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Janus Green B and safranine are prototypical redox-active leveler additives for copper electroplating. → Their redox-transitions lie within the copper potential window. → Reduced additives are identified as active species for the leveling effect. → Electro-reduction affects in particular the central aromatic cores of the additives. - Abstract: The redox chemistry and the related surface phase behavior of Safranine (SAF) and Janus Green B (JGB) have been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry in combination with in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy using HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) and single crystalline Cu(1 0 0) as model substrates, both revealing different widths of the accessible potential windows. JGB and SAF serve as prototypical heterocyclic suppressor/leveler additives that are used for the metallization of 3D-TSVs (3D Through Silicon Vias) following a classical 'leveling' concept. SAF can be considered as the reductive decomposition product of JGB that is formed at the copper/electrolyte interface upon electroplating. Both additives reveal a pronounced pH-dependent redox-chemistry with redox-transitions lying close to or even beyond the anodic limit of the copper potential window. Affected by these redox-processes are in particular the aromatic cores of those heterocycles that can be (quasi)reversibly reduced by a two electron transfer process within the potential window of copper. Therefore we identify the reduced form of those dyes as the active components for the suppressing/leveling effect in copper plating. STM data clearly shows a dye surface phase behavior that is crucially determined by its potential-dependent redox-chemistry. This will be exemplarily discussed for the SAF dye. On chloride-modified Cu(1 0 0) mono-reduced SAF forms a structurally well-defined monolayer of cationic stacking polymers. However, this coupled anion/cation layer reveals only minor suppressing capabilities with respect to the copper

  1. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  2. Ground-state kinetics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Li, Hao; Trabolsi, Ali; Coskun, Ali; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2014-02-18

    The ability to design and confer control over the kinetics of theprocesses involved in the mechanisms of artificial molecular machines is at the heart of the challenge to create ones that can carry out useful work on their environment, just as Nature is wont to do. As one of the more promising forerunners of prototypical artificial molecular machines, chemists have developed bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) over the past couple of decades. These bistable MIMs generally come in the form of [2]rotaxanes, molecular compounds that constitute a ring mechanically interlocked around a dumbbell-shaped component, or [2]catenanes, which are composed of two mechanically interlocked rings. As a result of their interlocked nature, bistable MIMs possess the inherent propensity to express controllable intramolecular, large-amplitude, and reversible motions in response to redox stimuli. In this Account, we rationalize the kinetic behavior in the ground state for a large assortment of these types of bistable MIMs, including both rotaxanes and catenanes. These structures have proven useful in a variety of applications ranging from drug delivery to molecular electronic devices. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs can switch between two different isomeric states. The favored isomer, known as the ground-state co-conformation (GSCC) is in equilibrium with the less favored metastable state co-conformation (MSCC). The forward (kf) and backward (kb) rate constants associated with this ground-state equilibrium are intimately connected to each other through the ground-state distribution constant, KGS. Knowing the rate constants that govern the kinetics and bring about the equilibration between the MSCC and GSCC, allows researchers to understand the operation of these bistable MIMs in a device setting and apply them toward the construction of artificial molecular machines. The three biggest influences on the ground-state rate constants arise from

  3. Ground-state thermodynamics of bistable redox-active donor-acceptor mechanically interlocked molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbach, Albert C; Bruns, Carson J; Cao, Dennis; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-09-18

    Fashioned through billions of years of evolution, biological molecular machines, such as ATP synthase, myosin, and kinesin, use the intricate relative motions of their components to drive some of life's most essential processes. Having control over the motions in molecules is imperative for life to function, and many chemists have designed, synthesized, and investigated artificial molecular systems that also express controllable motions within molecules. Using bistable mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs), based on donor-acceptor recognition motifs, we have sought to imitate the sophisticated nanoscale machines present in living systems. In this Account, we analyze the thermodynamic characteristics of a series of redox-switchable [2]rotaxanes and [2]catenanes. Control and understanding of the relative intramolecular movements of components in MIMs have been vital in the development of a variety of applications of these compounds ranging from molecular electronic devices to drug delivery systems. These bistable donor-acceptor MIMs undergo redox-activated switching between two isomeric states. Under ambient conditions, the dominant translational isomer, the ground-state coconformation (GSCC), is in equilibrium with the less favored translational isomer, the metastable-state coconformation (MSCC). By manipulating the redox state of the recognition site associated with the GSCC, we can stimulate the relative movements of the components in these bistable MIMs. The thermodynamic parameters of model host-guest complexes provide a good starting point to rationalize the ratio of GSCC to MSCC at equilibrium. The bistable [2]rotaxanes show a strong correlation between the relative free energies of model complexes and the ground-state distribution constants (K(GS)). This relationship does not always hold for bistable [2]catenanes, most likely because of the additional steric and electronic constraints present when the two rings are mechanically interlocked with each other

  4. On the activation of Pt/Al2O3 catalysts in HC-SCR by sintering. Determination of redox-active sites using Multitrack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaccaro, A.R.; Mul, G.; Moulijn, J.A.; Perez-Ramirez, J.

    2003-01-01

    A highly dispersed Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalyst was used for the selective catalytic reduction of NO x using propene (HC-SCR). Contact with the reaction gas mixture led to a significant activation of the catalyst at temperatures above 523K. According to CO chemisorption data and HRTEM analysis, Pt particles on the activated catalyst had sintered. The redox behavior of the fresh and sintered catalysts was investigated using Multitrack, a TAP-like pulse reactor. If Pt particles on the catalyst are highly dispersed (average size below =2nm), only a small part (=10%) of the total number of Pt surface sites as determined by CO chemisorption (Pt surf ) participates in H 2 /O 2 redox cycles (Pt surf,redox ) in Multitrack conditions. For a sintered catalyst, with an average particle size of 2.7nm, the number of Pt surf and Pt surf,redox sites are in good agreement. Similar results were obtained for both catalysts using NO as the oxidant. The low number of Pt surf,redox sites on highly dispersed Pt/Al 2 O 3 is explained by the presence of a kinetically more stable-probably ionic-form of Pt-O bonds on all surface sites of the smaller Pt particles, including corner, edge and terrace sites. When the average particle size shifts to =2.7nm, the kinetic stability of all Pt-O bonds is collectively decreased, enabling the participation of all Pt surface sites in the redox cycles. A linear correlation between the NO x conversion in HC-SCR, and the amount of Pt surf,redox was found. This suggests that redox-active Pt sites are necessary for catalytic activity. In addition, the correlation could be significantly improved by assuming that Pt surf,terrace sites of the particles larger than 2.7nm are mainly responsible for HC-SCR activity in steady state conditions. Implications of these results for the pathway of HC-SCR over Pt catalysts are discussed

  5. Cysteine Protease Zymography: Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine proteases play multiple roles in basically all aspects of physiology and development. In plants, they are involved in growth and development and in accumulation and mobilization of storage proteins. Furthermore, they are engaged in signalling pathways and in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals and also in humans, they are responsible for senescence and apoptosis, prohormone processing, and ECM remodelling. When analyzed by zymography, the enzyme must be renaturated after SDS-PAGE. SDS must be washed out and substituted by Triton X-100. Gels are then further incubated under ideal conditions for activity detection. Cysteine proteases require an acidic pH (5.0-6.0) and a reducing agent, usually DTT. When screening biological samples, there is generally no previous clue on what peptidase class will be present, neither optimal proteolysis conditions are known. Hence, it is necessary to assess several parameters, such as incubation time, pH, temperature, influence of ions or reducing agents, and finally evaluate the inhibition profile. For detection of cysteine peptidase activity, the use of specific inhibitors, such as E-64, can be used to prevent the development of cysteine peptidase activity bands and positively confirm its presence. Here four different protocols to assess cysteine protease activity from different sources are presented.

  6. Highly sensitive electrochemical immunoassay for human IgG using double-encoded magnetic redox-active nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, D.; Tang, J.; Su, B.; Chen, H.; Chen, G.; Huang, J.

    2010-01-01

    A new sandwich-type electrochemical immunoassay was developed for the detection of human IgG using doubly-encoded and magnetic redox-active nanoparticles as recognition elements on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with anti-IgG on nanogold particles. The recognition elements were synthesized by coating magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with Prussian blue nanoparticles and then covered with peroxidase-labeled anti-IgG antibodies (POx-anti-IgG) on Prussian blue nanoparticles. The immunoelectrode displays very good electrochemical properties towards detection of IgG via using double-encoded magnetic redox-active nanoparticles as trace and hydrogen peroxide as enzyme substrate. Its limit of detection (10 pmol.L -1 ) is 10-fold better than that of using plain POx-anti-IgG secondary antibodies. The method was applied to the detection of IgG in serum samples, and an excellent correspondence with the reference values was found. (author)

  7. One-step synthesis of redox-active polymer/AU nanocomposites for electrochemical immunoassay of multiplexed tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Rong, Qinfeng; Ma, Zhanfang; Han, Hongliang

    2015-03-15

    In this work, a simple and sensitive multiplexed immunoassay protocol for simultaneous electrochemical determination of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was designed using redox-active nanocomposites. As the redox-active species, the poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD)/Au nanocomposite and poly(vinyl ferrocene-2-aminothiophenol) (poly(VFc-ATP))/Au nanocomposite were obtained by one-step method which HAuCl4 was used as the oxidant. With Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), the nanocomposites were successful to immobilize labeled anti-CEA and anti-AFP as the immunosensing probes. The proposed electrochemical immunoassay enabled the simultaneous monitoring of AFP and CEA in a wide range of 0.01-100ngmL(-1). The detection limits was 0.006ngmL(-1) for CEA and 0.003ngmL(-1) for AFP (S/N=3). The assay results of serum samples with the proposed method were well consistent with the reference values from standard ELISA method. And the negligible cross-reactivity between the two analytes makes it possesses potential promise in clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jinsheng; Wang Min; Yang Zhenyu; Wang Zhong; Wang Huaisheng; Yang Zhengyu

    2007-01-01

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay

  9. The different behaviors of three oxidative mediators in probing the redox activities of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jinsheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Wang Min [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Yang Zhenyu [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330047 (China); Wang Zhong [School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon 791-0295 (Japan); Wang Huaisheng [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059 (China); Yang Zhengyu [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2007-07-30

    The different behaviors of three lipophilic mediators including 2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenedione(menadione), 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol (DCPIP) and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) in probing the redox activity of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by several comparative factor-influencing experiments. Hydrophilic ferricyanide was employed as an extracellular electron acceptor, and constituted dual mediator system with each of three lipophilic mediators. Limiting-current microelectrode voltammetry was used to measure the quantity of ferrocyanide accumulations, giving a direct measure of the redox activity. It was found that under anaerobic condition, menadione interacts with anaerobic respiration pathway, whereas DCPIP and TMPD interact with fermentation pathway in the yeast. Based on the understanding of the interaction between the yeast and each of three mediators, three mediators were respectively employed in evaluating the toxicity of acetic acid on S. cerevisiae and, the results for the first showed that the mediators are complementary to each other when used as electron carriers in biotoxicity assay.

  10. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  11. 35S cystein chlorhydrate preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emiliozzi, R.; Pichat, P.; Herbert, M.

    1960-01-01

    35 S cystein chlorhydrate has been prepared with a quantitative yield by electrolytic reduction of 35 S cystin in hydrochloric medium on a vibrating mercury cathode. Reprint of a paper published in Bulletin de la Societe chimique de France, no. 2653, 4. quarter 1959, p. 1544-1545 [fr

  12. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  13. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  14. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  15. Selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehzadeh, Hamid; Mokhtari, Banafsheh; Nematollahi, Davood

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: 3,5-Di-tert-buthylcatechol was used for the selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione at the glassy carbon and carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode. - Highlights: • Selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine. • Catalytic electron transfer of 3,5-di-tert-buthylcatechol in the presence of homocysteine. • Michael type addition reaction of electrochemically generated 3,5-di-tert-buthyl-o-benzoquinone with glutathione. - Abstract: The electrochemical oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-buthylcatechol in the presence of homocysteine was used for the selective electrochemical determination of homocysteine in the presence of cysteine and glutathione at a glassy carbon and a glassy carbon electrode modified with carbon nanotube. The results revealed that the electrochemically generated 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione exhibits high catalytic activity toward homocysteine oxidation at reduced over-potential and low catalytic activity for oxidation of cysteine. The catalytic activity 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione toward cysteine was suppressed in the presence of 4-N,N-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde. Contrary to homocysteine and cysteine, the reaction of glutathione with 3,5-di-tert-butylcyclohexa-3,5-diene-1,2-dione is a substituation reaction. This method exhibits three dynamic linear ranges of 2.5 to 10 μmol L −1 , 10 to 100 μmol L −1 and 100 to 1000 μmol L −1 , and a lower detection limit (3σ) of 0.89 ± 3.53% μmol L −1 for homocysteine

  16. The effect of cysteine on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolati, A.; Imanieh, I.; Salehi, F.; Farahani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cysteine was found as an appropriate additive for electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles. → The deposition mechanism of gold nanoparticle was determined as instantaneous nucleation. → Oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits. - Abstract: The most applications of gold nanoparticles are in the photo-electronical accessories and bio-chemical sensors. Chloride solution with cysteine additive was used as electrolyte in gold nanoparticles electrodeposition. The nucleation and growing mechanism were studied by electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, in order to obtain a suitable nano structure. The deposition mechanism was determined as instantaneous nucleation and the dimension of particles was controlled in nanometric particle size range. Atomic Force Microscope was used to evaluate the effect of cysteine on the morphology and topography of gold nanoparticles. Finally the catalytic property of gold nanoparticle electrodeposited was studied in KOH solution, where oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits.

  17. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  18. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  19. Maleimide-activated aryl diazonium salts for electrode surface functionalization with biological and redox-active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Jason C; Polsky, Ronen; Wheeler, David R; Brozik, Susan M

    2008-03-04

    A versatile and simple method is introduced for formation of maleimide-functionalized surfaces using maleimide-activated aryl diazonium salts. We show for the first time electrodeposition of N-(4-diazophenyl)maleimide tetrafluoroborate on gold and carbon electrodes which was characterized via voltammetry, grazing angle FTIR, and ellipsometry. Electrodeposition conditions were used to control film thickness and yielded submonolayer-to-multilayer grafting. The resulting phenylmaleimide surfaces served as effective coupling agents for electrode functionalization with ferrocene and the redox-active protein cytochrome c. The utility of phenylmaleimide diazonium toward formation of a diazonium-activated conjugate, followed by direct electrodeposition of the diazonium-modified DNA onto the electrode surface, was also demonstrated. Effective electron transfer was obtained between immobilized molecules and the electrodes. This novel application of N-phenylmaleimide diazonium may facilitate the development of bioelectronic devices including biofuel cells, biosensors, and DNA and protein microarrays.

  20. Impedance aspect of charge storage at graphite and glassy carbon electrodes in potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Magdić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of charge storage mechanisms at unmodified graphite vs. glassy carbon electrodes in acid sulphate supporting solution containing potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte, have been revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and supported by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Reversible charge transfer of Fe(CN63-/4- redox reaction detected by assessment of CVs of glassy carbon electrode, is in impedance spectra indicated by presence of bulk diffusion impedance and constant double-layer/pseudocapacitive electrode impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. Some surface retention of redox species detected by assessment of CVs of graphite electrode is in impedance spectra indicated by diffusion impedance coupled in this case by diminishing of double-layer/pseudo­capacitive impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. This phenomenon is ascribed to contribution of additional pseudocapacitive impedance generated by redox reaction of species confined at the electrode surface.

  1. Epigallocatechin Gallate-Modified Graphite Paste Electrode for Simultaneous Detection of Redox-Active Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashwin V. S. Ganesh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, simultaneous electrochemical detection of ascorbic acid (AA, dopamine (DA, and uric acid (UA was performed using a modified graphite paste electrode (MGPE with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and green tea (GT powder. It was shown that the anodic peak current increased in comparison with that of the graphite paste electrode (GPE in the cyclic voltammograms. The optimal pH for simultaneous determination of a quaternary mixture of AA–DA–UA was determined to be pH 2. The anodic peak potentials for a mixture containing AA–DA–UA were well separated from each other. The catalytic peak currents obtained at the surface of the MGPE/EGCG were linearly dependent on the AA, DA, and UA concentrations up to 23, 14, and 14 µM, respectively. The detection limits for AA, DA, and UA were 190, 90, and 70 nM, respectively. The analytical performance of this sensor has been evaluated for simultaneous detection of AA, DA, and UA in real samples. Finally, a modified electrode was prepared using GT and used for simultaneous determination of AA, DA, and UA. Based on the results, MPGE/GT showed two oxidation peaks at 0.43 and 0.6 V for DA and UA, respectively, without any oxidation peak for AA. The calibration curves at the surface of MGPE/GT were linear up to 14 µM with a detection limit of 0.18 and 0.33 µM for DA and UA, respectively. MGPEs provide a promising platform for the future development of sensors for multiplexed electrochemical detection of clinically important analytes.

  2. Cysteine 893 is a target of regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 AMPA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Ossowski

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that glutamatergic signaling involves, and is regulated by, thiol modifying and redox-active compounds. In this study, we examined the role of a reactive cysteine residue, Cys-893, in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of GluA1 AMPA receptor as a potential regulatory target. Elimination of the thiol function by substitution of serine for Cys-893 led to increased steady-state expression level and strongly reduced interaction with SAP97, a major cytosolic interaction partner of GluA1 C-terminus. Moreover, we found that of the three cysteine residues in GluA1 C-terminal tail, Cys-893 is the predominant target for S-nitrosylation induced by exogenous nitric oxide donors in cultured cells and lysates. Co-precipitation experiments provided evidence for native association of SAP97 with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and for the potential coupling of Ca2+-permeable GluA1 receptors with nNOS via SAP97. Our results show that Cys-893 can serve as a molecular target for regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 receptors, including the effects of nitric oxide.

  3. Redox-active quinones induces genome-wide DNA methylation changes by an iron-mediated and Tet-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation has been proven to be a critical epigenetic mark important for various cellular processes. Here, we report that redox-active quinones, a ubiquitous class of chemicals found in natural products, cancer therapeutics and environment, stimulate the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC in vivo,...

  4. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  5. Generation of antibodies against disintegrin and cysteine-rich domains by DNA immunization: An approach to neutralize snake venom-induced haemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidgi Syed Anwer Abdo Hasson

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Antibodies generated against the E. ocellatus venom prothrombin activator-like metalloprotease and disintegrin-cysteine-rich domains modulated and inhibited the catalytic activity both in vitro and in vivo of venom metalloproteinase disintegrin cysteine rich molecules. Thus, generating of venom specific-toxin antibodies by DNA immunization offer a more rational treatment of snake envenoming than conventional antivenom.

  6. Inhibitors of nuclease and redox activity of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laev, Sergey S; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Lavrik, Olga I

    2017-05-01

    Human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein which is essential in the base excision repair (BER) pathway of DNA lesions caused by oxidation and alkylation. This protein hydrolyzes DNA adjacent to the 5'-end of an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site to produce a nick with a 3'-hydroxyl group and a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate moiety or activates the DNA-binding activity of certain transcription factors through its redox function. Studies have indicated a role for APE1/Ref-1 in the pathogenesis of cancer and in resistance to DNA-interactive drugs. Thus, this protein has potential as a target in cancer treatment. As a result, major efforts have been directed to identify small molecule inhibitors against APE1/Ref-1 activities. These agents have the potential to become anticancer drugs. The aim of this review is to present recent progress in studies of all published small molecule APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors. The structures and activities of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors, that target both DNA repair and redox activities, are presented and discussed. To date, there is an urgent need for further development of the design and synthesis of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors due to high importance of this protein target. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. On the Redox Activity of Urban Aerosol Particles: Implications for Size Distribution and Relationships with Organic Aerosol Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantini Samara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the distribution of the dithiothreitol-based (DTT redox activity of water-soluble airborne particulate matter (PM from two urban sites in the city of Thessaloniki, northern Greece in four size ranges (<0.49, 0.49–0.97, 0.97–3.0 and >3 μm. Seasonal and spatial variations are examined. The correlations of the mass-normalized DTT activity with the content of PM in water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC and non-water-soluble carbonaceous species, such as organic and elemental carbon, as well as with solvent-extractable trace organic compounds (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitro-derivatives, polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorines, polybrominated biphenyl ethers and polar organic markers (dicarboxylic acids and levoglucosan, are investigated. Our study provides new and additional insights into the ambient size distribution of the DTT activity of the water-soluble fraction of airborne PM at urban sites and its associations with organic PM components.

  8. Functionalized carbon nanotube based hybrid electrochemical capacitors using neutral bromide redox-active electrolyte for enhancing energy density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaohui; Lui, Yu Hui; Chen, Bolin; Hu, Shan

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid electrochemical capacitor (EC) with enhanced energy density is realized by integrating functionalized carbon nanotube (FCNT) electrodes with redox-active electrolyte that has a neutral pH value (1 M Na2SO4 and 0.5 M KBr mixed aqueous solution). The negative electrode shows an electric double layer capacitor-type behavior. On the positive electrode, highly reversible Br-/Br3- redox reactions take place, presenting a battery-type behavior, which contributes to increase the capacitance of the hybrid cell. The voltage window of the whole cell is extended up to 1.5 V because of the high over-potentials of oxygen and hydrogen evolution reactions in the neutral electrolyte. Compared with raw CNT, the FCNT has better wettability in the aqueous electrolyte and contributes to increase the electric double layer capacitance of the cell. As a result, the maximum energy density of 28.3 Wh kg-1 is obtained from the hybrid EC at 0.5 A g-1 without sacrificing its power density, which is around 4 times larger than that of the electrical double layer capacitor constructed by FCNT electrodes and 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. Moreover, the discharge capacity retained 86.3% of its initial performance after 10000 cycles of galvanostatic charge and discharge test (10 A/g), suggesting its long life cycle even at high current loading.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of a uranium(III) complex containing a redox-active 2,2'-bipyridine ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Steven J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2010-02-01

    Hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate uranium(III) diiodide derivatives have been prepared as an entry into low-valent uranium chemistry with these ligands. The bis(tetrahydrofuran) adduct, Tp*UI(2)(THF)(2) (1) (Tp* = hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate), was synthesized by addition of sodium hydrotris(3,5-dimethylpyrazolyl)borate (NaTp*) to an equivalent of UI(3)(THF)(4). Addition of 2,2'-bipyridine (2,2'-bpy) to 1 displaced the THF molecules producing Tp*UI(2)(2,2'-bpy) (2). Both derivatives were characterized by (1)H NMR and IR spectroscopies, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography. Reduction of both species was attempted with two equivalents of potassium graphite. The reduction of 1 did not result in a clean product, but rather decomposition and ligand redistribution. However, compound 2 was reduced to form Tp*(2)U(2,2'-bpy), 3, which is composed of a uranium(III) ion with a radical monoanionic bipyridine ligand. This was confirmed by X-ray crystallography, which revealed distortions in the bond lengths of the bipyridine consistent with reduction. Further support was obtained by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, which showed resonances shifted far upfield, consistent with radical character on the 2,2'-bipyridine ligand. Future studies will explore the reactivity of this compound as well as the consequences for redox-activity in the bipyridine ligand.

  10. The N-terminal domain of human DNA helicase Rtel1 contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Aaron P; Ding, Huangen

    2014-01-01

    Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN) expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of -248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0). The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss) and double-stranded (ds) DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  11. The N-Terminal Domain of Human DNA Helicase Rtel1 Contains a Redox Active Iron-Sulfur Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron P. Landry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human telomere length regulator Rtel1 is a superfamily II DNA helicase and is essential for maintaining proper length of telomeres in chromosomes. Here we report that the N-terminal domain of human Rtel1 (RtelN expressed in Escherichia coli cells produces a protein that contains a redox active iron-sulfur cluster with the redox midpoint potential of −248 ± 10 mV (pH 8.0. The iron-sulfur cluster in RtelN is sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, indicating that reactive oxygen/nitrogen species may modulate the DNA helicase activity of Rtel1 via modification of its iron-sulfur cluster. Purified RtelN retains a weak binding affinity for the single-stranded (ss and double-stranded (ds DNA in vitro. However, modification of the iron-sulfur cluster by hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide does not significantly affect the DNA binding activity of RtelN, suggesting that the iron-sulfur cluster is not directly involved in the DNA interaction in the N-terminal domain of Rtel1.

  12. Ga2O3 photocatalyzed on-line tagging of cysteine to facilitate peptide mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Su, Fangzheng; Bi, Hongyan; Girault, Hubert H; Liu, Baohong

    2011-09-01

    β-Ga(2)O(3) is a wide-band-gap semiconductor having strong oxidation ability under light irradiation. Herein, the steel target plates modified with β-Ga(2)O(3) nanoparticles have been developed to carry out in-source photo-catalytic oxidative reactions for online peptide tagging during laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) analysis. Under UV laser irradiation, β-Ga(2)O(3) can catalyze the photo-oxidation of 2-methoxyhydroquinone added to a sample mixture to 2-methoxy benzoquinone that can further react with the thiol groups of cysteine residues by Michael addition reaction. The tagging process leads to appearance of pairs of peaks with an m/z shift of 138.1Th. This online labelling strategy is demonstrated to be sensitive and efficient with a detection-limit at femtomole level. Using the strategy, the information on cysteine content in peptides can be obtained together with peptide mass, therefore constraining the database searching for an advanced identification of cysteine-containing proteins from protein mixtures. The current peptide online tagging method can be important for specific analysis of cysteine-containing proteins especially the low-abundant ones that cannot be completely isolated from other high-abundant non-cysteine-proteins. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Protein cysteine oxidation in redox signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forman, Henry Jay; Davies, Michael J; Krämer, Anna C

    2017-01-01

    Oxidation of critical signaling protein cysteines regulated by H2O2 has been considered to involve sulfenic acid (RSOH) formation. RSOH may subsequently form either a sulfenyl amide (RSNHR') with a neighboring amide, or a mixed disulfide (RSSR') with another protein cysteine or glutathione. Previ...

  14. Yeast genes involved in regulating cysteine uptake affect production of hydrogen sulfide from cysteine during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Wei; Walker, Michelle E; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Gardner, Richard C; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2017-08-01

    An early burst of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation could increase varietal thiols and therefore enhance desirable tropical aromas in varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc. Here we attempted to identify genes affecting H2S formation from cysteine by screening yeast deletion libraries via a colony colour assay on media resembling grape juice. Both Δlst4 and Δlst7 formed lighter coloured colonies and produced significantly less H2S than the wild type on high concentrations of cysteine, likely because they are unable to take up cysteine efficiently. We then examined the nine known cysteine permeases and found that deletion of AGP1, GNP1 and MUP1 led to reduced production of H2S from cysteine. We further showed that deleting genes involved in the SPS-sensing pathway such as STP1 and DAL81 also reduced H2S from cysteine. Together, this study indirectly confirms that Agp1p, Gnp1p and Mup1p are the major cysteine permeases and that they are regulated by the SPS-sensing and target of rapamycin pathways under the grape juice-like, cysteine-supplemented, fermentation conditions. The findings highlight that cysteine transportation could be a limiting factor for yeast to generate H2S from cysteine, and therefore selecting wine yeasts without defects in cysteine uptake could maximise thiol production potential. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L., E-mail: tait@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  16. Redox-Active Carbohydrate-Coated Nanoparticles: Self-Assembly of a Cyclodextrin-Polystyrene Glycopolymer with Tetrazine-Naphthalimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andrew J; Haddad, Raoudha; Travelet, Christophe; Reynaud, Eric; Audebert, Pierre; Borsali, Redouane; Cosnier, Serge

    2016-11-15

    The controlled self-assembly of precise and well-defined photochemically and electrochemically active carbohydrate-coated nanoparticles offers the exciting prospect of biocompatible catalysts for energy storage/conversion and biolabeling applications. Here an aqueous nanoparticle system has been developed with a versatile outer layer for host-guest molecule encapsulation via β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes. A β-cyclodextrin-modified polystyrene polymer was first obtained by copper nanopowder click chemistry. The glycopolymer enables self-assembly and controlled encapsulation of tetrazine-naphthalimide, as a model redox-active agent, into nanoparticles via nanoprecipitation. Cyclodextrin host-guest interactions permit encapsulation and internanoparticle cross-linking for the formation of fluorescent compound and clustered self-assemblies with chemically reversible electroactivity in aqueous solution. Light scattering experiments revealed stable particles with hydrodynamic diameters of 138 and 654 nm for nanoparticles prepared with tetrazine, of which 95% of the nanoparticles represent the smaller objects by number. Dynamic light scattering revealed differences as a function of preparation method in terms of size, 3-month stability, polydispersity, radius of gyration, and shape factor. Individual self-assemblies were visualized by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy and monitored in real-time by nanoparticle tracking analysis. UV-vis and fluorescence spectra provided insight into the optical properties and critical evidence for host-guest encapsulation as evidenced by solvachromatism and enhanced tetrazine uptake. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the electrochemical properties and provided further support for encapsulation and an estimate of the tetrazine loading capacity in tandem with light scattering data.

  17. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks doped with redox active species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberding, Brian G.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional coordination polymers that are well known for large pore surface area and their ability to adsorb molecules from both the gaseous and solution phases. In general, MOFs are electrically insulating, but promising opportunities for tuning the electronic structure exist because MOFs possess synthetic versatility; the metal and organic ligand subunits can be exchanged or dopant molecules can be introduced into the pore space. Two such MOFs with demonstrated electrical conductivity are Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2, a.k.a HKUST-1, and Cu[Ni(pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate)2]. Herein, these two MOFs have been infiltrated with the redox active species 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and iodine under solution phase conditions and shown to produce redox products within the MOF pore space. Vibrational bands assignable to TCNQ anion and triiodide anion have been observed in the Mid-IR and Terahertz ranges using FTIR Spectroscopy. The MOF samples have been further investigated by Time-Resolved Terehertz Spectroscopy (TRTS). Using this technique, the charge mobility, separation, and recombination dynamics have been followed on the picosecond time scale following photoexcitation with visible radiation. The preliminary results show that the MOF samples have small inherent photoconductivity with charge separation lifetimes on the order of a few picoseconds. In the case of HKUST-1, the MOF can also be supported by a TiO2 film and initial results show that charge injection into the TiO2 layer occurs with a comparable efficiency to the dye sensitizer N3, [cis-Bis(isothiocyanato)-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato ruthenium(II)], and therefore this MOF has potential as a new light absorbing and charge conducting material in photovoltaic devices.

  18. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  19. Evidence for cysteine sulfinate as a neurotransmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recasens, M.; Varga, V.; Nanopoulos, D.; Saadoun, F.; Vincendon, G.; Benavides, J.

    1982-01-01

    The Na + -independent binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate and L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake were investigated in rat brain membranes and vesicles. Specific binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate was saturable and occurred by a single high affinity process with a Ksub(b) of 100 nM +- 9 and a capacity (Bsub(max)) of 2.4 +- 0.22 pmol/mg protein. The regional distribution of the binding of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate in the brain was found to be heterogeneous. The rate of L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake shows a biphasic dependence on the concentration of L-cysteine sulfinate, corresponding to a high affinity (27.2 μM) and a low affinity (398 μM) transport system. The maximum L-[ 3 H]cysteine sulfinate uptake is reached at 2min and the uptake increases as a function of the sodium concentration. Chloride and potassium ions stimulate the uptake. (Auth.)

  20. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  1. Development of a local anesthetic lidocaine-loaded redox-active injectable gel for postoperative pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Yukio; Mizukoshi, Yutaro; Gao, Zhenyu; Feliciano, Chitho P; Chang, Kyungho; Sekiyama, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-07-15

    Although local anesthesia is commonly applied for pain relief, there are several issues such as its short duration of action and low effectiveness at the areas of inflammation due to the acidic pH. The presence of excessive amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is known to induce inflammation and aggravate pain. To resolve these issues, we developed a redox-active injectable gel (RIG) with ROS-scavenging activity. RIG was prepared by mixing polyamine-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-polyamine with nitroxide radical moieties as side chains on the polyamine segments (PMNT-b-PEG-b-PMNT) with a polyanion, which formed a flower-type micelle via electrostatic complexation. Lidocaine could be stably incorporated in its core. When the temperature of the solution was increased to 37°C, the PIC-type flower micelle transformed to gel. The continuous release of lidocaine from the gel was observed for more than three days, without remarkable initial burst, which is probably owing to the stable entrapment of lidocaine in the PIC core of the gel. We evaluated the analgesic effect of RIG in carrageenan-induced arthritis mouse model. Results showed that lidocaine-loaded RIG has stronger and longer analgesic effect when administered in inflamed areas. In contrast, while the use of non-complexed lidocaine did not show analgesic effect one day after its administration. Note that no effect was observed when PIC-type flower micelle without ROS-scavenging ability was used. These findings suggest that local anesthetic-loaded RIG can effectively reduce the number of injection times and limit the side effects associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for postoperative pain management. 1. We have been working on nanomaterials, which effectively eliminate ROS, avoiding dysfunction of mitochondria in healthy cells. 2. We designed redox injectable gel using polyion complexed flower type micelle, which can eliminates ROS locally. 3. We could prepare local anesthesia-loaded redox injectable

  2. Synthesis and Application of Aurophilic Poly(Cysteine and Poly(Cysteine-Containing Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ulkoski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The redox capacity, as well as the aurophilicity of the terminal thiol side groups, in poly(Cysteine lend a unique characteristic to this poly(amino acid or polypeptide. There are two major application fields for this polymer: (i biomedical applications in drug delivery and surface modification of biomedical devices and (ii as coating for electrodes to enhance their electrochemical sensitivity. The intended application determines the synthetic route for p(Cysteine. Polymers to be used in biomedical applications are typically polymerized from the cysteine N-carboxyanhydride by a ring-opening polymerization, where the thiol group needs to be protected during the polymerization. Advances in this methodology have led to conditions under which the polymerization progresses as living polymerization, which allows for a strict control of the molecular architecture, molecular weight and polydispersity and the formation of block copolymers, which eventually could display polyphilic properties. Poly(Cysteine used as electrode coating is typically polymerized onto the electrode by cyclic voltammetry, which actually produces a continuous, pinhole-free film on the electrode via the formation of covalent bonds between the amino group of Cysteine and the carbon of the electrode. This resulting coating is chemically very different from the well-defined poly(Cysteine obtained by ring-opening polymerizations. Based on the structure of cysteine a significant degree of cross-linking within the coating deposited by cyclic voltammetry can be assumed. This manuscript provides a detailed discussion of the ring-opening polymerization of cysteine, a brief consideration of the role of glutathione, a key cysteine-containing tripeptide, and examples for the utilization of poly(Cysteine and poly(Cysteine-containing copolymers, in both, the biomedical as well as electrochemical realm.

  3. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  4. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a

  5. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  6. Reversible Redox Activity by Ion-pH Dually Modulated Duplex Formation of i-Motif DNA with Complementary G-DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyoung Chang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The unique biological features of supramolecular DNA have led to an increasing interest in biomedical applications such as biosensors. We have developed an i-motif and G-rich DNA conjugated single-walled carbon nanotube hybrid materials, which shows reversible conformational switching upon external stimuli such as pH (5 and 8 and presence of ions (Li+ and K+. We observed reversible electrochemical redox activity upon external stimuli in a quick and robust manner. Given the ease and the robustness of this method, we believe that pH- and ion-driven reversible DNA structure transformations will be utilized for future applications for developing novel biosensors.

  7. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    to that of human PDI, both in rearrangement and oxidation reactions. However, while the a domain active site of the human enzyme is more active than the a'-site, the reverse is the case for yPDI. This prompted us to set up an assay to investigate whether the situation would be different with a native yeast......-site to be most important. We furthermore show that the apparent difference between in vivo and in vitro activities is not due to catalytic contributions from the other PDI homologues found in yeast....

  8. Cysteine Biosynthesis Controls Serratia marcescens Phospholipase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-08-15

    Serratia marcescens causes health care-associated opportunistic infections that can be difficult to treat due to a high incidence of antibiotic resistance. One of the many secreted proteins of S. marcescens is the PhlA phospholipase enzyme. Genes involved in the production and secretion of PhlA were identified by screening a transposon insertion library for phospholipase-deficient mutants on phosphatidylcholine-containing medium. Mutations were identified in four genes ( cyaA , crp , fliJ , and fliP ) that are involved in the flagellum-dependent PhlA secretion pathway. An additional phospholipase-deficient isolate harbored a transposon insertion in the cysE gene encoding a predicted serine O -acetyltransferase required for cysteine biosynthesis. The cysE requirement for extracellular phospholipase activity was confirmed using a fluorogenic phospholipase substrate. Phospholipase activity was restored to the cysE mutant by the addition of exogenous l-cysteine or O -acetylserine to the culture medium and by genetic complementation. Additionally, phlA transcript levels were decreased 6-fold in bacteria lacking cysE and were restored with added cysteine, indicating a role for cysteine-dependent transcriptional regulation of S. marcescens phospholipase activity. S. marcescens cysE mutants also exhibited a defect in swarming motility that was correlated with reduced levels of flhD and fliA flagellar regulator gene transcription. Together, these findings suggest a model in which cysteine is required for the regulation of both extracellular phospholipase activity and surface motility in S. marcescens IMPORTANCE Serratia marcescens is known to secrete multiple extracellular enzymes, but PhlA is unusual in that this protein is thought to be exported by the flagellar transport apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that both extracellular phospholipase activity and flagellar function are dependent on the cysteine biosynthesis pathway. Furthermore, a disruption of cysteine

  9. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  10. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin; Leech, Donal

    2009-01-01

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl) 2 (4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF 6 , to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E 0 '' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  11. Assessing the impact of electrolyte conductivity and viscosity on the reactor cost and pressure drop of redox-active polymer flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Vinay A.; Schuh, Jonathon K.; Montoto, Elena C.; Pavan Nemani, V.; Qian, Shaoyi; Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ewoldt, Randy H.; Smith, Kyle C.

    2017-09-01

    Redox-active small molecules, used traditionally in redox flow batteries (RFBs), are susceptible to crossover and require expensive ion exchange membranes (IEMs) to achieve long lifetimes. Redox-active polymer (RAP) solutions show promise as candidate electrolytes to mitigate crossover through size-exclusion, enabling the use of porous separators instead of IEMs. Here, poly(vinylbenzyl ethyl viologen) is studied as a surrogate RAP for RFBs. For oxidized RAPs, ionic conductivity varies weakly between 1.6 and 2.1 S m-1 for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1 (monomeric repeat unit per kg solvent) and 0.32 mol kg-1 LiBF4 with a minor increase upon reduction. In contrast, viscosity varies between 1.8 and 184.0 mPa s over the same concentration range with weakly shear-thinning rheology independent of oxidation state. Techno-economic analysis is used to quantify reactor cost as a function of electrolyte transport properties for RAP concentrations of 0.13-1.27 mol kg-1, assuming a hypothetical 3V cell and facile kinetics. Among these concentrations, reactor cost is minimized over a current density range of 600-1000 A m-2 with minimum reactor cost between 11-17 per kWh, and pumping pressures below 10 kPa. The predicted low reactor cost of RAP RFBs is enabled by sustained ionic mobility in spite of the high viscosity of concentrated RAP solutions.

  12. Detection of Intracellular Reduced (Catalytically Active) SHP-1 and Analyses of Catalytically Inactive SHP-1 after Oxidation by Pervanadate or H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seeyoung; Love, Paul E

    2018-01-05

    Oxidative inactivation of cysteine-dependent Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs) by cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a critical role in regulating signal transduction in multiple cell types. The phosphatase activity of most PTPs depends upon a 'signature' cysteine residue within the catalytic domain that is maintained in the de-protonated state at physiological pH rendering it susceptible to ROS-mediated oxidation. Direct and indirect techniques for detection of PTP oxidation have been developed (Karisch and Neel, 2013). To detect catalytically active PTPs, cell lysates are treated with iodoacetyl-polyethylene glycol-biotin (IAP-biotin), which irreversibly binds to reduced (S - ) cysteine thiols. Irreversible oxidation of SHP-1 after treatment of cells with pervanadate or H 2 O 2 is detected with antibodies specific for the sulfonic acid (SO 3 H) form of the conserved active site cysteine of PTPs. In this protocol, we describe a method for the detection of the reduced (S - ; active) or irreversibly oxidized (SO 3 H; inactive) form of the hematopoietic PTP SHP-1 in thymocytes, although this method is applicable to any cysteine-dependent PTP in any cell type.

  13. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  14. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1271 L-Cysteine. (a) L-Cysteine is the chemical L-2-amino-3... of total L-cysteine per 100 parts of flour in dough as a dough strengthener as defined in § 170.3(o...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1272 L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. (a) L-Cysteine... ingredient is used to supply up to 0.009 part of total L-cysteine per 100 parts of flour in dough as a dough...

  16. Monitoring the solid-state electrochemistry of Cu(2,7-AQDC) (AQDC = anthraquinone dicarboxylate) in a lithium battery: coexistence of metal and ligand redox activities in a metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongyue; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Awaga, Kunio

    2014-11-19

    By adopting a facile synthetic strategy, we obtained a microporous redox-active metal-organic framework (MOF), namely, Cu(2,7-AQDC) (2,7-H2AQDC = 2,7-anthraquinonedicarboxylic acid) (1), and utilized it as a cathode active material in lithium batteries. With a voltage window of 4.0-1.7 V, both metal clusters and anthraquinone groups in the ligands exhibited reversible redox activity. The valence change of copper cations was clearly evidenced by in situ XANES analysis. By controlling the voltage window of operation, extremely high recyclability of batteries was achieved, suggesting the framework was robust. This MOF is the first example of a porous material showing independent redox activity on both metal cluster nodes and ligand sites.

  17. L-Cysteine Metabolism and Fermentation in Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ohtsu, Iwao

    L-Cysteine is an important amino acid both biologically and commercially. Although most amino acids are industrially produced by microbial fermentation, L-cysteine has been mainly produced by protein hydrolysis. Due to environmental and safety problems, synthetic or biotechnological products have been preferred in the market. Here, we reviewed L-cysteine metabolism, including biosynthesis, degradation, and transport, and biotechnological production (including both enzymatic and fermentation processes) of L-cysteine. The metabolic regulation of L-cysteine including novel sulfur metabolic pathways found in microorganisms is also discussed. Recent advancement in biochemical studies, genome sequencing, structural biology, and metabolome analysis has enabled us to use various approaches to achieve direct fermentation of L-cysteine from glucose. For example, worldwide companies began to supply L-cysteine and its derivatives produced by bacterial fermentation. These companies successfully optimized the original metabolism of their private strains. Basically, a combination of three factors should be required for improving L-cysteine fermentation: that is, (1) enhancing biosynthesis: overexpression of the altered cysE gene encoding feedback inhibition-insensitive L-serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT), (2) weakening degradation: knockout of the genes encoding L-cysteine desulfhydrases, and (3) exploiting export system: overexpression of the gene involved in L-cysteine transport. Moreover, we found that "thiosulfate" is much more effective sulfur source than commonly used "sulfate" for L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli, because thiosulfate is advantageous for saving consumption of NADPH and relating energy molecules.

  18. Long-time treatment by low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine enhances proinflammatory cytokine expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohnishi

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to act as a reactive oxygen species scavenger and used in clinical applications. Previous reports have shown that high-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment inhibits the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in activated macrophages. Here, we have found that long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low-concentration increases phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT, which are essential for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment decreases expressions of protein phosphatases, catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-2A and dual specificity phosphatase 1. On the other hand, we have found that short-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low dose increases p53 expression, which inhibits expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations suggest that long-time low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment increases expressions of proinflammatory cytokines through enhancement of kinase phosphorylation.

  19. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation.

  20. The mitochondrial toxicity of cysteine-S-conjugates: Studies with pentachlorobutadienyl-L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallin, A.

    1990-01-01

    Nephrotoxic cysteine conjugates, arising from mercapturate biosynthesis, can perturb the mitochondrial membrane potential and calcium homeostasis in renal epithelial cells. Activation of these cysteine conjugates to reactive species by mitochondrial β-lyases results in covalent binding and mitochondrial damage. PCBC and related cysteine conjugates inhibit ADP-stimulated respiration in mitochondria respiring on alpha-ketoglutrate/malate and succinate indicating that both dehydrogenases may be targets. The respiratory inhibition is blocked by aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of the β-lyase. Hence, metabolic activation is required implying that covalent binding of reactive intermediates may be important to the mitochondrial injury. Binding of 35 S-fragments has been found for 5 conjugates with varying degrees of mitochondrial toxicity. PCBC is more lipophilic and has a higher affinity for cellular membranes than other cysteine conjugates. PCBC rapidly depolarizes the inner membrane potential resulting in an inhibition of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and calcium upon sequestration. Consequently, mitochondria and renal epithelial cells exposed to PCBC show a sudden release of calcium upon exposure to PCBC which is followed by a later increase in state 4 respiration leading to an inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. The primary effect of other cysteine conjugates is an inhibition of the dehydrogenases, thus inhibiting state 3 respiration

  1. Engineered disulfide bonds increase active-site local stability and reduce catalytic activity of a cold-adapted alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Adalbjörnsson, Björn Vidar; Gylfason, Gudjón Andri

    2007-06-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an extracellular enzyme that is membrane-bound in eukaryotes but resides in the periplasmic space of bacteria. It normally carries four cysteine residues that form two disulfide bonds, for instance in the APs of Escherichia coli and vertebrates. An AP variant from a Vibrio sp. has only one cysteine residue. This cysteine is second next to the nucleophilic serine in the active site. We have individually modified seven residues to cysteine that are on two loops predicted to be within a 5 A radius. Four of them formed a disulfide bond to the endogenous cysteine. Thermal stability was monitored by circular dichroism and activity measurements. Global stability was similar to the wild-type enzyme. However, a significant increase in heat-stability was observed for the disulfide-containing variants using activity as a measure, together with a large reduction in catalytic rates (k(cat)) and a general decrease in Km values. The results suggest that a high degree of mobility near the active site and in the helix carrying the endogenous cysteine is essential for full catalytic efficiency in the cold-adapted AP.

  2. Redox-dependent Regulation of Gluconeogenesis by a Novel Mechanism Mediated by a Peroxidatic Cysteine of Peroxiredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irokawa, Hayato; Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Toshihiko; Matsuyama, Yuka; Motohashi, Hozumi; Ogasawara, Ayako; Iwai, Kenta; Naganuma, Akira; Kuge, Shusuke

    2016-09-16

    Peroxiredoxin is an abundant peroxidase, but its non-peroxidase function is also important. In this study, we discovered that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin of budding yeast cells, is required for the efficient flux of gluconeogenesis. We found that the suppression of pyruvate kinase (Pyk1) via the interaction with Tsa1 contributes in part to gluconeogenic enhancement. The physical interactions between Pyk1 and Tsa1 were augmented during the shift from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis. Intriguingly, a peroxidatic cysteine in the catalytic center of Tsa1 played an important role in the physical Tsa1-Pyk1 interactions. These interactions are enhanced by exogenous H2O2 and by endogenous reactive oxygen species, which is increased during gluconeogenesis. Only the peroxidatic cysteine, but no other catalytic cysteine of Tsa1, is required for efficient growth during the metabolic shift to obtain maximum yeast growth (biomass). This Tsa1 function is separable from the peroxidase function as an antioxidant. This is the first report to demonstrate that peroxiredoxin has a novel nonperoxidase function as a redox-dependent target modulator and that pyruvate kinase is modulated via an alternative mechanism.

  3. Rethinking Cysteine Protective Groups: S-Alkylsulfonyl-l-Cysteines for Chemoselective Disulfide Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Olga; Huesmann, David; Muhl, Christian; Barz, Matthias

    2016-12-12

    The ability to reversibly cross-link proteins and peptides grants the amino acid cysteine its unique role in nature as well as in peptide chemistry. We report a novel class of S-alkylsulfonyl-l-cysteines and N-carboxy anhydrides (NCA) thereof for peptide synthesis. The S-alkylsulfonyl group is stable against amines and thus enables its use under Fmoc chemistry conditions and the controlled polymerization of the corresponding NCAs yielding well-defined homo- as well as block co-polymers. Yet, thiols react immediately with the S-alkylsulfonyl group forming asymmetric disulfides. Therefore, we introduce the first reactive cysteine derivative for efficient and chemoselective disulfide formation in synthetic polypeptides, thus bypassing additional protective group cleavage steps. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  5. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  6. Pulse photolysis of NADH in the presence of cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, H.E.

    1976-01-01

    In the UV irradiation of NADH under anaerobic conditions, cysteine, which often acts as a radioprotective substance, has a sensitizing effect. With the aid of pulse photolysis, it was studied which reaction mechanisms in the presence or absence of cysteine are responsible for the damage to NADH in aqueous solution. In the absence of cysteine, the characteristic NADH absorption at 340 nm is reduced immediately after UV quanta have been absorbed by the adenine fraction of the molecules; in the presence of cysteine, a secondary reaction causes additional damage. The spectra of the intermediate products of NADH and cysteine have been recorded for different cysteine concentrations, and the reaction constants have been determined. These values suggest that the sensitizing effect is due to a reaction of NADH with radical anions produced by photolysis. (orig.) [de

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  8. Diurnal and seasonal trends and source apportionment of redox-active metals in Los Angeles using a novel online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Amirhosein; Sowlat, Mohammad H.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, we identified the sources of four redox-active metals, including Iron (Fe), Chromium (Cr), Cupper (Cu), and Manganese (Mn) and quantified the contribution of these sources to PM2.5 concentrations in central Los Angeles, California, by employing time-resolved measurements (i.e., a time resolution of 2 h) with a recently developed online metal monitor and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Size distribution of ambient PM (14 nm-10 μm) was measured using the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and Optical Particle Sizer (OPS). Auxiliary variables were also collected, including elemental (EC) and organic carbon (OC), gaseous pollutants (NO2 and O3), meteorological parameters (including relative humidity (RH) and temperature), and traffic data (for heavy- (HDVs) and light-duty vehicles (LDVs)). A 4-factor solution was found to be optimum for the chemically-speciated dataset, whereas a 5-factor solution appeared to be most plausible for the size distribution data. The factors included fresh traffic, soil/road dust, urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and nucleation (only resolved for the size distribution data). Fresh traffic was the major contributor to Fe and Cu concentrations, whereas Cr was mostly found in the urban background aerosol (reflecting a mixture of small local sources as well as aged traffic emissions), and Mn mostly came from both soil/road dust and was to a lesser degree found in urban background aerosol. Secondary aerosol did not contribute to the concentrations of any of these metals, but was associated with very high loading of OC, as expected. Even though the urban background aerosol and secondary aerosol appeared to be characterized by "aged" particles and have a rather homogeneous spatial distribution, the reactions and processes involved in their formation are entirely different. Our results provide insights into the sources of redox-active metals in central Los Angeles. They also underscore the benefits of

  9. Modulation of ion transport across rat distal colon by cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eDiener

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of stimulation of endogenous production of H2S by cysteine, the substrate for the two H2S-producing enzymes, cystathionin-beta-synthase and cystathionin-gamma-lyase, on ion transport across rat distal colon. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc induced by cysteine were measured in Ussing chambers. Free cysteine caused a concentration-dependent, transient fall in Isc, which was sensitive to amino-oxyacetate and beta-cyano-L-alanine, i.e. inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes. In contrast, Na cysteinate evoked a biphasic change in Isc, i.e. an initial fall followed by a secondary increase, which was also reduced by these enzyme inhibitors. All responses were dependent on the presence of Cl- and inhibited by bumetanide, suggesting that free cysteine induces an inhibition of transcellular Cl- secretion, whereas Na cysteinate – after a transient inhibitory phase – activates anion secretion. The assumed reason for this discrepancy is a fall in the cytosolic pH induced by free cysteine, but not by Na cysteinate, as observed in isolated colonic crypts loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF. Intracellular acidification is known to inhibit epithelial K+ channels. Indeed, after preinhibition of basolateral K+ channels with tetrapentylammonium or Ba2+, the negative Isc induced by free cysteine was reduced significantly. In consequence, stimulation of endogenous H2S production by Na cysteinate causes, after a short inhibitory response, a delayed activation of anion secretion, which is missing in the case of free cysteine, probably due to the cytosolic acidification. In contrast, diallyl trisulfide, which is intracellularly converted to H2S, only evoked a monophasic increase in Isc without the initial fall observed with Na cysteinate. Consequently, time course and amount of produced H2S seem to strongly influence the functional response of the colonic epithelium evoked by this gasotransmitter.

  10. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  11. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  12. Involvement of the Cys-Tyr cofactor on iron binding in the active site of human cysteine dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjune, Sita; Schwarz, Guenter; Belaidi, Abdel A

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur metabolism has gained increasing medical interest over the last years. In particular, cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been recognized as a potential marker in oncology due to its altered gene expression in various cancer types. Human CDO is a non-heme iron-dependent enzyme, which catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid, which is further metabolized to taurine or pyruvate and sulfate. Several studies have reported a unique post-translational modification of human CDO consisting of a cross-link between cysteine 93 and tyrosine 157 (Cys-Tyr), which increases catalytic efficiency in a substrate-dependent manner. However, the reaction mechanism by which the Cys-Tyr cofactor increases catalytic efficiency remains unclear. In this study, steady-state kinetics were determined for wild type CDO and two different variants being either impaired or saturated with the Cys-Tyr cofactor. Cofactor formation in CDO resulted in an approximately fivefold increase in k cat and tenfold increase in k cat/K m over the cofactor-free CDO variant. Furthermore, iron titration experiments revealed an 18-fold decrease in K d of iron upon cross-link formation. This finding suggests a structural role of the Cys-Tyr cofactor in coordinating the ferrous iron in the active site of CDO in accordance with the previously postulated reaction mechanism of human CDO. Finally, we identified product-based inhibition and α-ketoglutarate and glutarate as CDO inhibitors using a simplified well plate-based activity assay. This assay can be used for high-throughput identification of additional inhibitors, which may contribute to understand the functional importance of CDO in sulfur amino acid metabolism and related diseases.

  13. Arabidopsis ATG4 cysteine proteases specificity toward ATG8 substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunsook; Woo, Jongchan; Dinesh-Kumar, SP

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a regulated intracellular process during which cytoplasmic cargo engulfed by double-membrane autophagosomes is delivered to the vacuole or lysosome for degradation and recycling. Atg8 that is conjugated to phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) during autophagy plays an important role not only in autophagosome biogenesis but also in cargo recruitment. Conjugation of PE to Atg8 requires processing of the C-terminal conserved glycine residue in Atg8 by the Atg4 cysteine protease. The Arabidopsis plant genome contains 9 Atg8 (AtATG8a to AtATG8i) and 2 Atg4 (AtATG4a and AtATG4b) family members. To understand AtATG4’s specificity toward different AtATG8 substrates, we generated a unique synthetic substrate C-AtATG8-ShR (citrine-AtATG8-Renilla luciferase SuperhRLUC). In vitro analyses indicated that AtATG4a is catalytically more active and has broad AtATG8 substrate specificity compared with AtATG4b. Arabidopsis transgenic plants expressing the synthetic substrate C-AtAtg8a-ShR is efficiently processed by endogenous AtATG4s and targeted to the vacuole during nitrogen starvation. These results indicate that the synthetic substrate mimics endogenous AtATG8, and its processing can be monitored in vivo by a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay. The synthetic Atg8 substrates provide an easy and versatile method to study plant autophagy during different biological processes. PMID:24658121

  14. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and w......Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  15. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...... restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...... active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower...

  16. Highly Sensitive Electrochemical Sensor for the Detection of Anions in Water Based on a Redox-Active Monolayer Incorporating an Anion Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Balwinder; Erdmann, Cristiane Andreia; Daniëls, Mathias; Dehaen, Wim; Rafiński, Zbigniew; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2017-12-05

    In the present work, gold electrodes were modified using a redox-active layer based on dipyrromethene complexes with Cu(II) or Co(II) and a dipodal anion receptor functionalized with dipyrromethene. These modified gold electrodes were then applied for the electrochemical detection of anions (Cl - , SO 4 2- , and Br - ) in a highly diluted water solution (in the picomolar range). The results showed that both systems, incorporating Cu(II) as well as Co(II) redox centers, exhibited highest sensitivity toward Cl - . The selectivity sequence found for both systems was Cl - > SO 4 2- > Br - . The high selectivity of Cl - anions can be attributed to the higher binding constant of Cl - with the anion receptor and the stronger electronic effect between the central metal and anion in the complex. The detection limit for the determination of Cl - was found at the 1.0 pM level for both sensing systems. The electrodes based on Co(II) redox centers displayed better selectivity toward Cl - anion detection than those based on Cu(II) centers which can be attributed to the stronger electronic interaction between the receptor-target anion complex and the Co(II)/Co(III) redox centers in comparison to the Cu(II)/Cu(I) system. Applicability of gold electrodes modified with DPM-Co(II)-DPM-AR for the electrochemical determination of Cl - anions was demonstrated using the artificial matrix mimicking human serum.

  17. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems.

  18. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b 5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  19. Redox-Active Star Molecules Incorporating the 4-Benzoylpyridinium Cation - Implications for the Charge Transfer Along Branches vs. Across the Perimeter in Dendrimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas; Yang, Jinua; Fabrizio,Even F.; Rawashdeh, Abdel-Monem M.; Oh, Woon Su; Sotiriou-Leventis, Chariklia

    2004-01-01

    Dendrimers are self-repeating globular branched star molecules, whose fractal structure continues to fascinate, challenge, and inspire. Functional dendrimers may incorporate redox centers, and potential applications include antennae molecules for light harvesting, sensors, mediators, and artificial biomolecules. We report the synthesis and redox properties of four star systems incorporating the 4-benzoyl-N-alkylpyridinium cation; the redox potential varies along the branches but remains constant at fixed radii. Bulk electrolysis shows that at a semi-infinite time scale all redox centers are electrochemically accessible. However, voltammetric analysis (cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry) shows that on1y two of the three redox-active centers in the perimeter are electrochemically accessible during potential sweeps as slow as 20 mV/s and as fast as 10 V/s. On the contrary, both redox centers along branches are accessible electrochemically within the same time frame. These results are explained in terms of slow through-space charge transfer and the globular 3-D folding of the molecules and are discussed in terms of their implications on the design of efficient redox functional dendrimers.

  20. A Redox-Active, Compact Molecule for Cross-Linking Amyloidogenic Peptides into Nontoxic, Off-Pathway Aggregates: In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy and Molecular Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Nam, Younwoo; Oh, Shin Bi; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Earnest, Kaylin G.; Suh, Nayoung; Peck, Kristy L.; Ozbil, Mehmet; Korshavn, Kyle J.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Merino, Edward J.; Shearer, Jason; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-11-25

    Chemical reagents targeting and controlling amyloidogenic peptides have received much attention for helping identify their roles in the pathogenesis of protein-misfolding disorders. Herein, we report a novel strategy for redirecting amyloidogenic peptides into nontoxic, off-pathway aggregates, which utilizes redox properties of a small molecule (DMPD, N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine) to trigger covalent adduct formation with the peptide. In addition, for the first time, biochemical, biophysical, and molecular dynamics simulation studies have been performed to demonstrate a mechanistic understanding for such an interaction between a small molecule (DMPD) and amyloid-β (Aβ) and its subsequent anti-amyloidogenic activity, which, upon its transformation, generates ligand–peptide adducts via primary amine-dependent intramolecular cross-linking correlated with structural compaction. Furthermore, in vivo efficacy of DMPD toward amyloid pathology and cognitive impairment was evaluated employing 5xFAD mice of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such a small molecule (DMPD) is indicated to noticeably reduce the overall cerebral amyloid load of soluble Aβ forms and amyloid deposits as well as significantly improve cognitive defects in the AD mouse model. Overall, our in vitro and in vivo studies of DMPD toward Aβ with the first molecular-level mechanistic investigations present the feasibility of developing new, innovative approaches that employ redox-active compounds without the structural complexity as next-generation chemical tools for amyloid management.

  1. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  2. Investigation of multi-state charge-storage properties of redox-active organic molecules in silicon-molecular hybrid devices for DRAM and Flash applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Srivardhan Shivappa

    Molecular electronics has recently spawned a considerable amount of interest with several molecules possessing charge-conduction and charge-storage properties proposed for use in electronic devices. Hybrid silicon-molecular technology has the promise of augmenting the current silicon technology and provide for a transitional path to future molecule-only technology. The focus of this dissertation work has been on developing a class of hybrid silicon-molecular electronic devices for DRAM and Flash memory applications utilizing redox-active molecules. This work exploits the ability of molecules to store charges with single-electron precision at room temperature. The hybrid devices are fabricated by forming self-assembled monolayers of redox-active molecules on Si and oxide (SiO2 and HfO2) surfaces via formation of covalent linkages. The molecules possess discrete quantum states from which electrons can tunnel to the Si substrate at discrete applied voltages (oxidation process, cell write), leaving behind a positively charged layer of molecules. The reduction (erase) process, which is the process of electrons tunneling back from Si to the molecules, neutralizes the positively charged molecular monolayer. Hybrid silicon-molecular capacitor test structures were electrically characterized with an electrolyte gate using cyclic voltammetry (CyV) and impedance spectroscopy (CV) techniques. The redox voltages, kinetics (write/erase speeds) and charge-retention characteristics were found to be strongly dependent on the Si doping type and densities, and ambient light. It was also determined that the redox energy states in the molecules communicate with the valence band of the Si substrate. This allows tuning of write and read states by modulating minority carriers in n- and p-Si substrates. Ultra-thin dielectric tunnel barriers (SiO2, HfO2) were placed between the molecules and the Si substrate to augment charge-retention for Flash memory applications. The redox response was

  3. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gade, Sudeep Kumar; Bhattacharya, Subarna [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [Heme and Flavo Proteins Laboratory, 204, Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu 632014 (India)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding - (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b{sub 5} in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  4. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  5. DNA sensors and aptasensors based on the hemin/G-quadruplex-controlled aggregation of Au NPs in the presence of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazov-Elkan, Angelica; Golub, Eyal; Sharon, Etery; Balogh, Dora; Willner, Itamar

    2014-07-23

    L-cysteine induces the aggregation of Au nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in a color transition from red to blue due to interparticle plasmonic coupling in the aggregated structure. The hemin/G-quadruplex horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme catalyzes the aerobic oxidation of L-cysteine to cystine, a process that inhibits the aggregation of the NPs. The degree of inhibition of the aggregation process is controlled by the concentration of the DNAzyme in the system. These functions are implemented to develop sensing platforms for the detection of a target DNA, for the analysis of aptamer-substrate complexes, and for the analysis of L-cysteine in human urine samples. A hairpin DNA structure that includes a recognition site for the DNA analyte and a caged G-quadruplex sequence, is opened in the presence of the target DNA. The resulting self-assembled hemin/G-quadruplex acts as catalyst that controls the aggregation of the Au NPs. Also, the thrombin-binding aptamer folds into a G-quadruplex nanostructure upon binding to thrombin. The association of hemin to the resulting G-quadruplex aptamer-thrombin complex leads to a catalytic label that controls the L-cysteine-mediated aggregation of the Au NPs. The hemin/G-qaudruplex-controlled aggregation of Au NPs process is further implemented for visual and spectroscopic detection of L-cysteine concentration in urine samples. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  7. Cysteine peroxidase activity in rat blood plasma | Razygraev ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rat plasma found to be able to accelerate greatly the H2O2-dependent oxidation of cysteine. The activity was a characteristic of a protein fraction precipitated at 30—44% ammonium sulfate saturation, and the specific activity in protein fraction was significantly higher than in plasma. Cysteine:H2O2 oxidoreductase ...

  8. Antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, P J; Olson, J E; Lee, G K; Palmer, J T; Klaus, J L; Rasnick, D

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the antimalarial effects of vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors. A number of vinyl sulfones strongly inhibited falcipain, a Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteinase that is a critical hemoglobinase. In studies of cultured parasites, nanomolar concentrations of three vinyl sulfones inhibited parasite hemoglobin degradation, metabolic activity, and development. The antimalarial effects correlated with the inhibition of falcipain. Our results suggest that vinyl sulfones or...

  9. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  10. Lysosomal cysteine peptidases - Molecules signaling tumor cell death and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pišlar, Anja; Perišić Nanut, Milica; Kos, Janko

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomal cysteine peptidases - cysteine cathepsins - are general intracellular protein-degrading enzymes that control also a variety of specific physiological processes. They can trigger irreversible events leading to signal transduction and activation of signaling pathways, resulting in cell survival and proliferation or cell death. In cancer cells, lysosomal cysteine peptidases are involved in multiple processes during malignant progression. Their translocation from the endosomal/lysosomal pathway to nucleus, cytoplasm, plasma membrane and extracellular space enables the activation and remodeling of a variety of tumor promoting proteins. Thus, lysosomal cysteine peptidases interfere with cytokine/chemokine signaling, regulate cell adhesion and migration and endocytosis, are involved in the antitumor immune response and apoptosis, and promote cell invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. Further, lysosomal cysteine peptidases modify growth factors and receptors involved in tyrosine kinase dependent pathways such as MAPK, Akt and JNK, thus representing key signaling tools for the activation of tumor cell growth and proliferation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  12. Electrostatic influence of local cysteine environments on disulfide exchange kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, G H; Cennerazzo, M J; Karalis, A J; Field, D

    1981-11-10

    The ionic strength dependence of the bimolecular rate constant for reaction of the negative disulfide 5,5'-dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) with cysteines in fragments of naturally occurring proteins was determined by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The Debye-Hückel relationship was applied to determine the effective charge at the cysteine and thereby determine the extent to which nearby neighbors in the primary sequence influence the kinetics. Corrections for the secondary salt effect on cysteine pKs were determined by direct spectrometric pH titration of sulfhydryl groups or by observation of the ionic strength dependence of kinetics of cysteine reaction with the neutral disulfide 2,2'-dithiodipyridine. Quantitative expressions was verified by model studies with N-acetyl-cystein. At ionic strengths equal to or greater than 20 mM, the net charge at the polypeptide cysteine site is the sum of the single negative charge of the thiolate anion and the charges of the amino acids immediately preceding and following the cysteine in the primary sequence. At lower ionic strengths, more distant residues influence kinetics. At pH 7.0, 23 degree C, and an ionic strength of 20 mM, rate constants for reaction of the negative disulfide with a cysteine having two positive neighbors, one positive and one neutral neighbor, or two neutral neighbors are 132000, 3350, and 367 s-1 M-1, respectively. This corresponds to a contribution to the activation energy of 0.65- 1.1 kcal/mol per ion pair involved in collision between the cysteine and disulfide regions. The results permit the estimation that cysteine local environments may provide a means of achieving a 10(6)-fold range in rate constants in disulfide exchange reactions in random-coil proteins. This range may prove useful in developing strategies for directing disulfide pairing in synthetic proteins.

  13. Cysteine sulfoxide derivatives in Petiveria alliacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, R; Musah, R A

    2001-11-01

    Two diastereomers of S-benzyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide have been isolated from fresh roots of Petiveria alliacea. Their structures and absolute configurations have been determined by NMR, MALDI-HRMS, IR and CD spectroscopy and confirmed by comparison with authentic compounds. Both the R(S) and S(S) diastereomers of the sulfoxide are present in all parts of the plant (root, stem, and leaves) with the latter diastereomer being predominant. Their total content greatly varied in different parts of the plant between 0.07 and 2.97 mg g(-1) fr. wt, being by far the highest in the root. S-Benzylcysteine has also been detected in trace amounts (<10 microg g(-1) fr. wt) in all parts of the plant. This represents the first report of the presence of S-benzylcysteine derivatives in nature.

  14. Retaining in-gel zymographic activity of cysteine proteases via a cysteine-supplemented running buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vootukuri Reddy, Sreekanth; Philpott, Mike P; Trigiante, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Zymography is a powerful technique to separate and identify different enzymatic activities on a standard acrylamide gel. For oxidation prone enzymes such as cysteine proteases however, the oxidizing species generated by electrolysis of the gel running buffer may result in partial or complete inactivation, thus compromising the final readout. This can be only partially remedied by subsequent treatment of the gel with reducing agents. We demonstrate the generation of reactive oxidizing species during electrophoresis and discovered that supplementation of the gel running buffer with a minimum of 5 mM cysteine prevents enzyme inactivation and allows retention of proteolytic activity as measured by zymography on model substrate N α-benzoyl-l-arginine p-nitroanilide, without at the same time altering the mobilities of the gel proteins. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Simultaneous electrochemical determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide at carbon ionic liquid electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Ahmadi, Raheleh; Mahyari, Farzaneh Aghakhani

    2014-04-01

    A linear sweep voltammetric method is used for direct simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide (cystine) based on carbon ionic liquid electrode. With carbon ionic liquid electrode as a high performance electrode, two oxidation peaks for L-cysteine (0.62 V) and L-cysteine disulfide (1.3 V) were observed with a significant separation of about 680 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0). The linear ranges were obtained as 1.0-450 and 5.0-700 μM and detection limits were estimated to be 0.298 and 4.258 μM for L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide, respectively. This composite electrode was applied for simultaneous determination of L-cysteine and L-cysteine disulfide in two real samples, artificial urine and nutrient broth. Satisfactory results were obtained which clearly indicate the applicability of the proposed electrode for simultaneous determination of these compounds in complex matrices.

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE, CYSTEINE AND CYSTINE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometric (RP-LC/ESI-MS) method has been developed to confirm the identity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine and glutathione, and their respective dimers. Cysteine, GSH, CSSC...

  17. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorhout, P.K.; Strauss, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  18. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  19. Evidence for anionic redox activity in a tridimensional-ordered Li-rich positive electrode β-Li2IrO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Paul E; Perez, Arnaud J; Rousse, Gwenaelle; Saubanère, Mathieu; Batuk, Dmitry; Foix, Dominique; McCalla, Eric; Abakumov, Artem M; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Doublet, Marie-Liesse; Tarascon, Jean-Marie

    2017-05-01

    Lithium-ion battery cathode materials have relied on cationic redox reactions until the recent discovery of anionic redox activity in Li-rich layered compounds which enables capacities as high as 300 mAh g -1 . In the quest for new high-capacity electrodes with anionic redox, a still unanswered question was remaining regarding the importance of the structural dimensionality. The present manuscript provides an answer. We herein report on a β-Li 2 IrO 3 phase which, in spite of having the Ir arranged in a tridimensional (3D) framework instead of the typical two-dimensional (2D) layers seen in other Li-rich oxides, can reversibly exchange 2.5 e - per Ir, the highest value ever reported for any insertion reaction involving d-metals. We show that such a large activity results from joint reversible cationic (M n+ ) and anionic (O 2 ) n- redox processes, the latter being visualized via complementary transmission electron microscopy and neutron diffraction experiments, and confirmed by density functional theory calculations. Moreover, β-Li 2 IrO 3 presents a good cycling behaviour while showing neither cationic migration nor shearing of atomic layers as seen in 2D-layered Li-rich materials. Remarkably, the anionic redox process occurs jointly with the oxidation of Ir 4+ at potentials as low as 3.4 V versus Li + /Li 0 , as equivalently observed in the layered α-Li 2 IrO 3 polymorph. Theoretical calculations elucidate the electrochemical similarities and differences of the 3D versus 2D polymorphs in terms of structural, electronic and mechanical descriptors. Our findings free the structural dimensionality constraint and broaden the possibilities in designing high-energy-density electrodes for the next generation of Li-ion batteries.

  20. The role of cysteine residues in the sulphate transporter, SHST1: construction of a functional cysteine-less transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Susan M

    2005-05-20

    We investigated the role of cysteine residues in the sulphate transporter, SHST1, with the aim of generating a functional cysteine-less variant. SHST1 contains five cysteine residues and none was essential for function. However, replacement of C421 resulted in a reduction in transport activity. Sulphate transport by C205 mutants was dependent on the size of the residue at this position. Alanine at position 205 resulted in a complete loss of function whereas leucine resulted in a 3-fold increase in sulphate transport relative to wild type SHST1. C205 is located in a putative intracellular loop and our results suggest that this loop may be important for sulphate transport. By replacing C205 with leucine and the other four cysteine residues with alanine, we constructed a cysteine-less variant of SHST1 that has transport characteristics indistinguishable from wild type. This construct will be useful for further structure and function studies of SHST1.

  1. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  2. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  3. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  4. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  5. L-Cysteine metabolism and its nutritional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Yang, Guan; Duan, Jielin; Huang, Xingguo; Fang, Rejun; Li, Chongyong; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong; Hou, Yongqing; Kim, Sung Woo; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-01-01

    L-Cysteine is a nutritionally semiessential amino acid and is present mainly in the form of L-cystine in the extracellular space. With the help of a transport system, extracellular L-cystine crosses the plasma membrane and is reduced to L-cysteine within cells by thioredoxin and reduced glutathione (GSH). Intracellular L-cysteine plays an important role in cellular homeostasis as a precursor for protein synthesis, and for production of GSH, hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), and taurine. L-Cysteine-dependent synthesis of GSH has been investigated in many pathological conditions, while the pathway for L-cysteine metabolism to form H(2)S has received little attention with regard to prevention and treatment of disease in humans. The main objective of this review is to highlight the metabolic pathways of L-cysteine catabolism to GSH, H(2)S, and taurine, with special emphasis on therapeutic and nutritional use of L-cysteine to improve the health and well-being of animals and humans. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  7. A novel colorimetric assay for rapid detection of cysteine and Hg²⁺ based on gold clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Wei; Tang, Shurong; Yang, Huang-Hao; Song, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition and recovery of the catalytic activity of bovine serum albumin-capped gold nanoclusters (BSA-AuNCs) is observed for the first time by introduction of cysteine and Hg(2+). The prepared BSA-AuNCs possess highly intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. It can catalyze the oxidation of 3, 3, 5, 5-tetramethylbenzidine by H2O2 to produce a blue colored product. Based on this phenomenon, a new colorimetric assay for rapid, selective and sensitive detection of cysteine and Hg(2+) in aqueous solution has been demonstrated. The interaction process between target molecule and BSA-AuNCs is very fast, so that the whole test can be completed within ten minutes. Moreover, the fabricated colorimetric sensor is simple and cost-effective, without the need of nucleic acid based recognition element and complicated washing, separation and labeling process, thus holds great promise for routine analysis of cysteine and Hg(2+) in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechmann, Bernd; Tomasić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-10-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine, glutamate, and glycine. Cysteine is the limiting factor for glutathione biosynthesis which can be especially crucial for cyanobacteria, which rely on both the sufficient sulfur supply from the growth media and on the protection of glutathione against ROS that are produced during photosynthesis. In this study, we report a method that allows detection and visualization of the subcellular distribution of glutathione in Synechocystis sp. This method is based on immunogold cytochemistry with glutathione and cysteine antisera and computer-supported transmission electron microscopy. Labeling of glutathione and cysteine was restricted to the cytosol and interthylakoidal spaces. Glutathione and cysteine could not be detected in carboxysomes, cyanophycin granules, cell walls, intrathylakoidal spaces, periplasm, and vacuoles. The accuracy of the glutathione and cysteine labeling is supported by two observations. First, preadsorption of the antiglutathione and anticysteine antisera with glutathione and cysteine, respectively, reduced the density of the gold particles to background levels. Second, labeling of glutathione and cysteine was strongly decreased by 98.5% and 100%, respectively, in Synechocystis sp. cells grown on media without sulfur. This study indicates a strong similarity of the subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria and plastids of plants and provides a deeper insight into glutathione metabolism in bacteria.

  9. Effect of (L)-cysteine on acetaldehyde self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peana, Alessandra T; Muggironi, Giulia; Fois, Giulia R; Zinellu, Manuel; Sirca, Donatella; Diana, Marco

    2012-08-01

    Acetaldehyde (ACD), the first metabolite of ethanol, has been implicated in several behavioural actions of alcohol, including its reinforcing effects. Recently, we reported that l-cysteine, a sequestrating agent of ACD, reduced oral ethanol self-administration and that ACD was orally self-administered. This study examined the effects of l-cysteine pre-treatment during the acquisition and maintenance phases of ACD (0.2%) self-administration as well as on the deprivation effect after ACD extinction and on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule of reinforcement. In a separate PR schedule of reinforcement, the effect of l-cysteine was assessed on the break-point produced by ethanol (10%). Furthermore, we tested the effect of l-cysteine on saccharin (0.2%) reinforcement. Wistar rats were trained to self-administer ACD by nose poking on a fixed ratio (FR1) schedule in 30-min daily sessions. Responses on an active nose-poke caused delivery of ACD solution, whereas responses on an inactive nose-poke had no consequences. l-cysteine reduced the acquisition (40 mg/kg), the maintenance and the deprivation effect (100 mg/kg) of ACD self-administration. Furthermore, at the same dose, l-cysteine (120 mg/kg) decreased both ACD and ethanol break point. In addition, l-cysteine was unable to suppress the different responses for saccharin, suggesting that its effect did not relate to an unspecific decrease in a general motivational state. Compared to saline, l-cysteine did not modify responses on inactive nose-pokes, suggesting an absence of a non-specific behavioural activation. Taken together, these results could support the hypotheses that ACD possesses reinforcing properties and l-cysteine reduces motivation to self-administer ACD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  11. Improved L-cysteine electrocatalysis through a sequential drop dry technique using multi-walled carbon nanotubes and cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyoni, Stephen; Mugadza, Tawanda; Nyokong, Tebello

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A sequential drop dry modification of a glassy carbon electrode where by multiwalled carbon nanotubes are first placed on to the electrode followed by cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine gave a better catalytic response towards the oxidation of L-cysteine than when the two components were mixed, due to the higher catalytic activity of the former as judged by scanning electrochemical microscopy. - Highlights: • A glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine by a sequential drop dry method. • The modified surface gave a better catalytic response towards the oxidation of L-cysteine than when the individual components were mixed. • Scanning electrochemical microscopy was employed for surface characterization. - Abstract: Voltammetry, chronoamperometry, scanning electrochemical microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods are used for characterization of a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)–cobalt tetraaminophthalocyanine (CoTAPc) mixture or sequential drop dry modification technique whereby the MWCNTs are first placed on to the electrode followed by CoTAPc. The sequential drop dry CoTAPc–MWCNTs modified surface gave better catalytic responses with a catalytic rate constant of 2.2 × 10 5 M −1 s −1 , apparent electron transfer rate constant of 0.073 cm s −1 , and a limit of detection of 2.8 × 10 −7 M. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) surface characterization (topography and reactivity) further gave proof the better catalytic perfomance of the sequential drop dry CoTAPc–MWCNTs modified surface

  12. Bipolar Mass Spectrometry of Labile Coordination Complexes, Redox Active Inorganic Compounds, and Proteins Using a Glass Nebulizer for Sonic-Spray Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakis, Manolis M.; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J.; Pergantis, Spiros A.

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [CuII 6LnIII] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  13. Catalytic exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  14. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon-Jung; Lee, Byung Cheon; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. 75 Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K m than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue

  15. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  16. Developing novel anthelmintics from plant cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepek Gillian

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intestinal helminth infections of livestock and humans are predominantly controlled by treatment with three classes of synthetic drugs, but some livestock nematodes have now developed resistance to all three classes and there are signs that human hookworms are becoming less responsive to the two classes (benzimidazoles and the nicotinic acetylcholine agonists that are licensed for treatment of humans. New anthelmintics are urgently needed, and whilst development of new synthetic drugs is ongoing, it is slow and there are no signs yet that novel compounds operating through different modes of action, will be available on the market in the current decade. The development of naturally-occurring compounds as medicines for human use and for treatment of animals is fraught with problems. In this paper we review the current status of cysteine proteinases from fruits and protective plant latices as novel anthelmintics, we consider some of the problems inherent in taking laboratory findings and those derived from folk-medicine to the market and we suggest that there is a wealth of new compounds still to be discovered that could be harvested to benefit humans and livestock.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a novel cysteine protease gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Cysteine proteases can be found in the animal and plant kingdoms as well as in some viruses and bacteria. They have been implemented in many ..... in developing resistance against pathogens and insects in other crops. Acknowledgments.

  18. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  19. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam

    2012-01-01

    Targeting noncatalytic cysteine residues with irreversible acrylamide-based inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity. Nevertheless, concerns about off-target modification motivate the development of reversible cysteine-targeting strategies. Here we...... of these electrophiles into a noncovalent kinase-recognition scaffold produced slowly dissociating, covalent inhibitors of the p90 ribosomal protein S6 kinase RSK2. A cocrystal structure revealed specific noncovalent interactions that stabilize the complex by positioning the electrophilic carbon near the targeted...

  20. Cysteine homeostasis plays an essential role in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Consolación; Bermúdez, M Ángeles; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine is the metabolic precursor of essential biomolecules such as vitamins, cofactors, antioxidants and many defense compounds. The last step of cysteine metabolism is catalysed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), which incorporates reduced sulfur into O-acetylserine to produce cysteine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the main OASTL isoform OAS-A1 and the cytosolic desulfhydrase DES1, which degrades cysteine, contribute to the cytosolic cysteine homeostasis. • Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of knockout plants for OAS-A1 and for DES1 show a high correlation with the biotic stress series in both cases. • The study of the response of knockout mutants to plant pathogens shows that des1 mutants behave as constitutive systemic acquired resistance mutants, with high resistance to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, salicylic acid accumulation and WRKY54 and PR1 induction, while oas-a1 knockout mutants are more sensitive to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. However, oas-a1 knockout mutants lack the hypersensitive response associated with the effector-triggered immunity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 avrRpm1. • Our results highlight the role of cysteine as a crucial metabolite in the plant immune response. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam [Dept. of Fine Chemistry, Cosmetic R and D Center, Cosmetic Industry Coupled Collaboration Center, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jino [Daebong LS. Ltd, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ{sub 50}) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on {sup 1}O{sub 2} -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC{sub 50} ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics.

  2. Synthesis, antioxidative and whitening effects of novel cysteine derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Ji Hoon; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Jeong, Yoon Ju; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Soo Nam; Park, Jino

    2017-01-01

    Recently, development of biocompatibility functional cosmetic agents as antioxidant or whitening agent has increased. In this study, synthetic cysteine derivatives (DBLS-21, -24, and -33) were developed containing syringic acid and cysteine moieties (l-cysteine ethyl ester, N-acetyl cysteine methyl ester, and N-acetyl cysteine ethyl ester), and their antioxidative and whitening activities were evaluated. The cellular protective effect (τ_5_0) of DBLS-21 was 51.1 min at 50 μM on "1O_2 -induced hemolysis of erythrocytes. This activity was slightly higher than that of α-tocopherol (43.6 min) as a lipophilic antioxidant. In the melanogenesis inhibitory effect, DBLS-21, -24, and -33 was 1.6-, 1.8-, and 2.5-fold higher than arbutin, respectively. In particular, DBLS-21 and -33 was 112.8- and 6.1-fold higher than arbutin, respectively (293.4 μM) on tyrosinase inhibition activity (IC_5_0 ). But DBLS-24 had no tyrosinase inhibitory activity. These results suggest that cysteine derivatives possess potential for use as an antioxidant agent (DBLS-21) and whitening agents (all derivatives) in cosmetics

  3. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  4. A p-nitroaniline redox-active solid-state electrolyte for battery-like electrochemical capacitive energy storage combined with an asymmetric supercapacitor based on metal oxide functionalized β-polytype porous silicon carbide electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yoo, Jeeyoung; Kim, Jooheon

    2017-05-23

    A unique redox active flexible solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor with ultra-high capacitance and energy density was fabricated using a composite comprising MgCo 2 O 4 nanoneedles and micro and mesoporous silicon carbide flakes (SiCF) (SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 ) as the positive electrode material. Due to the synergistic effect of the two materials, this hybrid electrode has a high specific capacitance of 516.7 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 in a 1 M KOH aqueous electrolyte. To obtain a reasonable matching of positive and negative electrode pairs, a composite of Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles and SiCF (SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 ) was synthesized for use as a negative electrode material, which shows a high capacitance of 423.2 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 . Therefore, by pairing the SiCF/MgCo 2 O 4 positive electrode and the SiCF/Fe 3 O 4 negative electrode with a redox active quasi-solid-state PVA-KOH-p-nitroaniline (PVA-KOH-PNA) gel electrolyte, a novel solid-state asymmetric supercapacitor device was assembled. Because of the synergistic effect between the highly porous SiCF and the vigorous redox-reaction of metal oxides, the hybrid nanostructure electrodes exhibited outstanding charge storage and transport. In addition, the redox active PVA-KOH-PNA electrolyte adds additional pseudocapacitance, which arises from the nitro-reduction and oxidation and reduction process of the reduction product of p-phenylenediamine, resulting in an enhancement of the capacitance (a specific capacitance of 161.77 F g -1 at a scan rate of 5 mV s -1 ) and energy density (maximum energy density of 72.79 Wh kg -1 at a power density of 727.96 W kg -1 ).

  5. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  6. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  7. Measuring site occupancy: a new perspective on cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Site occupancy is an extremely important aspect of quantification of protein modifications. Knowing the degree of modification of each oxidised cysteine residue is critical to understanding the biological role of these modifications. Yet modification site occupancy is very often overlooked, in part because there are very few analytical tools that allow such measurements. Here we present a new strategy, which provides quantitative analysis of cysteine S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH) simultaneously at the resolution of single cysteine and allows for determination of relative oxidation occupancy of the modification site. We show that, on one hand, heavily modified cysteines are not necessarily involved in the response to oxidative stress. On the other hand residues with low modification level can be dramatically affected by mild oxidative imbalance. We make use of high resolution mass spectrometry. The method relies on differential reduction of "total" cysteines, SNO cysteines and SOH cysteines with TCEP, sodium ascorbate and sodium arsenite respectively followed by iodoTMT(TM) alkylation. Enrichment of iodoTMT(TM)-containing peptides is performed using anti-TMT antibody. In vivo model of mild oxidative stress in Escherichia coli is used. To induce endogenous SNO bacteria were grown anaerobically in minimal media supplemented with fumarate or nitrate. Short-term treatment with submilimolar levels of hydrogen peroxide were used to induce SOH. We have quantified 114 SNO/SOH modified peptides corresponding to 90 proteins. Only 6 modified peptides changed significantly under mild oxidative stress. Quantitative information allowed us to determine relative modification site occupancy of each identified modified residue and pin point heavily modified ones. The method proved to be precise and sensitive enough to detect and quantify endogenous levels of oxidative stress on proteome-wide scale and brings a new perspective on the role of the modification site

  8. On the Dynamical Behavior of the Cysteine Dioxygenase-l-Cysteine Complex in the Presence of Free Dioxygen and l-Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietra, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    In this work, viable models of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and its complex with l-cysteine dianion were built for the first time, under strict adherence to the crystal structure from X-ray diffraction studies, for all atom molecular dynamics (MD). Based on the CHARMM36 FF, the active site, featuring an octahedral dummy Fe(II) model, allowed us observing water exchange, which would have escaped attention with the more popular bonded models. Free dioxygen (O 2 ) and l-cysteine, added at the active site, could be observed being expelled toward the solvating medium under Random Accelerated Molecular Dynamics (RAMD) along major and minor pathways. Correspondingly, free dioxygen (O 2 ), added to the solvating medium, could be observed to follow the same above pathways in getting to the active site under unbiased MD. For the bulky l-cysteine, 600 ns of trajectory were insufficient for protein penetration, and the molecule was stuck at the protein borders. These models pave the way to free energy studies of ligand associations, devised to better clarify how this cardinal enzyme behaves in human metabolism. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  9. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  10. Biotin Switch Assays for Quantitation of Reversible Cysteine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R; Kast, J

    2017-01-01

    Thiol groups in protein cysteine residues can be subjected to different oxidative modifications by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Reversible cysteine oxidation, including S-nitrosylation, S-sulfenylation, S-glutathionylation, and disulfide formation, modulate multiple biological functions, such as enzyme catalysis, antioxidant, and other signaling pathways. However, the biological relevance of reversible cysteine oxidation is typically underestimated, in part due to the low abundance and high reactivity of some of these modifications, and the lack of methods to enrich and quantify them. To facilitate future research efforts, this chapter describes detailed procedures to target the different modifications using mass spectrometry-based biotin switch assays. By switching the modification of interest to a biotin moiety, these assays leverage the high affinity between biotin and avidin to enrich the modification. The use of stable isotope labeling and a range of selective reducing agents facilitate the quantitation of individual as well as total reversible cysteine oxidation. The biotin switch assay has been widely applied to the quantitative analysis of S-nitrosylation in different disease models and is now also emerging as a valuable research tool for other oxidative cysteine modifications, highlighting its relevance as a versatile, robust strategy for carrying out in-depth studies in redox proteomics. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G.; Ward, Richard A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical vs. electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism. PMID:24790966

  12. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  13. New redox-active layer create via epoxy-amine reaction - The base of genosensor for the detection of specific DNA and RNA sequences of avian influenza virus H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecka, Kamila; Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka; Zagórski-Ostoja, Włodzimierz; Dehaen, Wim; Radecka, Hanna; Radecki, Jerzy

    2015-03-15

    This paper concerns the development of a redox-active monolayer and its application for the construction of an electrochemical genosensor designed for the detection of specific DNA and RNA oligonucleotide sequences related to the avian influenza virus (AIV) type H5N1. This new redox layer was created on a gold electrode surface step by step. Cyclic Voltammetry, Osteryoung Square-Wave Voltammetry and Differential Pulse Voltammetry were used for its characterization. This new redox-active layer was applied for the construction of the DNA biosensor. The NH2-NC3 probe (20-mer) was covalently attached to the gold electrode surface via a "click" reaction between the amine and an epoxide group. The hybridization process was monitored using the Osteryoung Square-Wave Voltammetry. The 20-mer DNA and ca. 280-mer RNA oligonucleotides were used as the targets. The constructed genosensor was capable to determine complementary oligonucleotide sequences with a detection limit in the pM range. It is able to distinguish the different position of the part RNA complementary to the DNA probe. The genosensor was very selective. The 20-mer DNA as well as the 280-mer RNA oligonucleotides without a complementary sequence generated a weak signal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  15. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  16. Cysteine peptidases and their inhibitors in breast and genital cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Milan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteinases and their inhibitors probably play the main role in carcinogenesis and metastasis. The metastasis process need external proteolytic activities that pass several barriers which are membranous structures of the connective tissue which includes, the basement membrane of blood vessels. Activities of the proteinases are regulated by endogenous inhibitors and activators. The imbalance between cysteine proteinases and cystatins seems to be associated with an increase in metastatic potential in some tumors. It has also been reported that proteinase inhibitors, specific antibodies for these enzymes and inhibition of the urokinase receptor may prevent cancer cell invasion. Some proteinase inhibitor could serve as agents for cancer treatment.

  17. Catalytic Mechanism of Nitrile Hydratase Proposed by Time-resolved X-ray Crystallography Using a Novel Substrate, tert-Butylisonitrile*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koichi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Kayoko; Noguchi, Takumi; Yohda, Masafumi; Odaka, Masafumi

    2008-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) have an unusual iron or cobalt catalytic center with two oxidized cysteine ligands, cysteine-sulfinic acid and cysteine-sulfenic acid, catalyzing the hydration of nitriles to amides. Recently, we found that the NHase of Rhodococcus erythropolis N771 exhibited an additional catalytic activity, converting tert-butylisonitrile (tBuNC) to tert-butylamine. Taking advantage of the slow reactivity of tBuNC and the photoreactivity of nitrosylated NHase, we present the first structural evidence for the catalytic mechanism of NHase with time-resolved x-ray crystallography. By monitoring the reaction with attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the product from the isonitrile carbon was identified as a CO molecule. Crystals of nitrosylated inactive NHase were soaked with tBuNC. The catalytic reaction was initiated by photo-induced denitrosylation and stopped by flash cooling. tBuNC was first trapped at the hydrophobic pocket above the iron center and then coordinated to the iron ion at 120 min. At 440 min, the electron density of tBuNC was significantly altered, and a new electron density was observed near the isonitrile carbon as well as the sulfenate oxygen of αCys114. These results demonstrate that the substrate was coordinated to the iron and then attacked by a solvent molecule activated by αCys114-SOH. PMID:18948265

  18. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herga, Sameh; Brutus, Alexandre; Vitale, Rosa Maria; Miche, Helene; Perrier, Josette; Puigserver, Antoine; Scaloni, Andrea; Giardina, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure

  20. Cysteine-free peptides in scorpion venom: geographical distribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-12-29

    Dec 29, 2006 ... In 1993, the first cysteine-free peptide was isolated from scorpion venom. ..... Venom is produced by 2 venom glands in the tail and stored in 2 ... The resistance of a variety of bacterial micro-organisms .... Biopolymers 55: 4-30.

  1. A Serendipitous Formation of a Cysteine-bridged Disaccharide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    O-acetyl-b-D-glucopyranosylisothiouronium salt and the iodide or tosyl derivatives of L-serine,3 the desulfurization of disulfide- linked glycosyl cysteine derivatives,4 Lewis acid-catalyzed glycosylation,5,6 and solid phase glycosylation.7. Glycosylation of amino acids has previously relied on the use of amino acids protected ...

  2. Isolation of recombinant cysteine dioxygenase protein from Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašperová, A.; Kunert, J.; Horynová, M.; Weigl, E.; Sebela, M.; Lenobel, René; Raška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2011), E456-E462 ISSN 0933-7407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cysteine dioxygenase * dermatophytes * recombinant protein * keratinolytic fungi * cDNA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2011

  3. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  4. Chemical detection of cysteine-rich circular petides in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cysteine-rich circular peptides (CRCs) comprise a large family of gene encoded and low molecular weight polypeptides that has recently engaged the attention of scientists. This class of peptides exhibit a continuous circular configuration and a cystine knot backbone, which defines their resilient nature-directed structural ...

  5. Targeting cysteine proteases in trypanosomatid disease drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease and human African trypanosomiasis are endemic conditions in Latin America and Africa, respectively, for which no effective and safe therapy is available. Efforts in drug discovery have focused on several enzymes from these protozoans, among which cysteine proteases have been validated as molecular targets for pharmacological intervention. These enzymes are expressed during the entire life cycle of trypanosomatid parasites and are essential to many biological processes, including infectivity to the human host. As a result of advances in the knowledge of the structural aspects of cysteine proteases and their role in disease physiopathology, inhibition of these enzymes by small molecules has been demonstrated to be a worthwhile approach to trypanosomatid drug research. This review provides an update on drug discovery strategies targeting the cysteine peptidases cruzain from Trypanosoma cruzi and rhodesain and cathepsin B from Trypanosoma brucei. Given that current chemotherapy for Chagas disease and human African trypanosomiasis has several drawbacks, cysteine proteases will continue to be actively pursued as valuable molecular targets in trypanosomatid disease drug discovery efforts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Chemoselective PEGylation of Cysteine Analogs of Human Basic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To improve the stability and bioactivity of human basic fibroblast growth factor (hbFGF) by site-specific pegylation. Methods: Four new mutants of hbFGF were designed with substituted Asp68, Lys77, Glu78 and Arg81 with cysteine with the aid of bioinformatics technique, and then cloned into pET21a plasmid, ...

  7. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  8. Vibrio Type III Effector VPA1380 Is Related to the Cysteine Protease Domain of Large Bacterial Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Thomas; Kinch, Lisa N.; Fernandez, Jessie; Salomon, Dor; Grishin, Nick V.; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis. Its genome harbors two Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2), but only T3SS2 is required for enterotoxicity seen in animal models. Effector proteins secreted from T3SS2 have been previously shown to promote colonization of the intestinal epithelium, invasion of host cells, and destruction of the epithelial monolayer. In this study, we identify VPA1380, a T3SS2 effector protein that is toxic when expressed in yeast. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that VPA1380 is highly similar to the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6)-inducible cysteine protease domains of several large bacterial toxins. Mutations in conserved catalytic residues and residues in the putative IP6-binding pocket abolished toxicity in yeast. Furthermore, VPA1380 was not toxic in IP6 deficient yeast cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that VPA1380 is a cysteine protease that requires IP6 as an activator. PMID:25099122

  9. Vibrio type III effector VPA1380 is related to the cysteine protease domain of large bacterial toxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Calder

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium and one of the leading causes of food-borne gastroenteritis. Its genome harbors two Type III Secretion Systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2, but only T3SS2 is required for enterotoxicity seen in animal models. Effector proteins secreted from T3SS2 have been previously shown to promote colonization of the intestinal epithelium, invasion of host cells, and destruction of the epithelial monolayer. In this study, we identify VPA1380, a T3SS2 effector protein that is toxic when expressed in yeast. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that VPA1380 is highly similar to the inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6-inducible cysteine protease domains of several large bacterial toxins. Mutations in conserved catalytic residues and residues in the putative IP6-binding pocket abolished toxicity in yeast. Furthermore, VPA1380 was not toxic in IP6 deficient yeast cells. Therefore, our findings suggest that VPA1380 is a cysteine protease that requires IP6 as an activator.

  10. Cysteine and hydrogen sulfide in the regulation of metabolism:Insights from genetics and pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Roderick N; Morton, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Obesity and diabetes represent a significant and escalating worldwide health burden. These conditions are characterized by abnormal nutrient homeostasis. One such perturbation is altered metabolism of the sulphur?containing amino acid cysteine. Obesity is associated with elevated plasma cysteine, whereas diabetes is associated with reduced cysteine levels. One mechanism by which cysteine may act is through its enzymatic breakdown to produce hydrogen sulphide (H2S), a gasotransmitter ...

  11. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  12. Catalytic zinc site and mechanism of the metalloenzyme PR-AMP cyclohydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ordine, Robert L; Linger, Rebecca S; Thai, Carolyn J; Davisson, V Jo

    2012-07-24

    The enzyme N(1)-(5'-phosphoribosyl) adenosine-5'-monophosphate cyclohydrolase (PR-AMP cyclohydrolase) is a Zn(2+) metalloprotein encoded by the hisI gene. It catalyzes the third step of histidine biosynthesis, an uncommon ring-opening of a purine heterocycle for use in primary metabolism. A three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum has revealed that three conserved cysteine residues occur at the dimer interface and likely form the catalytic site. To investigate the functions of these cysteines in the enzyme from Methanococcus vannielii, a series of biochemical studies were pursued to test the basic hypothesis regarding their roles in catalysis. Inactivation of the enzyme activity by methyl methane thiosulfonate (MMTS) or 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) also compromised the Zn(2+) binding properties of the protein inducing loss of up to 90% of the metal. Overall reaction stoichiometry and the potassium cyanide (KCN) induced cleavage of the protein suggested that all three cysteines were modified in the process. The enzyme was protected from DTNB-induced inactivation by inclusion of the substrate N(1)-(5'-phosphoribosyl)adenosine 5'-monophosphate; (PR-AMP), while Mg(2+), a metal required for catalytic activity, enhanced the rate of inactivation. Site-directed mutations of the conserved C93, C109, C116 and the double mutant C109/C116 were prepared and analyzed for catalytic activity, Zn(2+) content, and reactivity with DTNB. Substitution of alanine for each of the conserved cysteines showed no measurable catalytic activity, and only the C116A was still capable of binding Zn(2+). Reactions of DTNB with the C109A/C116A double mutant showed that C93 is completely modified within 0.5 s. A model consistent with these data involves a DTNB-induced mixed disulfide linkage between C93 and C109 or C116, followed by ejection of the active site Zn(2+) and provides further evidence that the Zn(2+) coordination site involves the

  13. Mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of two regioisomeric mercapturic acids and cysteine S-conjugates of trichloroethylene.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.N.M.; Boogaard, P.J.; Mulder, G.J.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1991-01-01

    The mutagenicity, cytotoxicity and metabolism of two regioisomic l-cysteine- and N-acetyl-l-cysteine-S-conjugates of trichloroethylene were studied. The 1,2-dichlorovinyl(1,2-DCV) isomers of both the cysteine conjugate and the mercapturate were much stronger mutagens in the Ames test with Salmonella

  14. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H M

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  15. Producing armyworm (spodoptera sp.) Bioinsecticide based on cysteine protease of red ginger (zingiber officinale var. Rubrum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, N. T.; Nur, D. F.; Utami, T. S.; Sahlan, M.; Wijanarko, A.; Hermansyah, H.

    2018-03-01

    Armyworm (Spodoptera sp.) is highly polyphagous defoliator on various horticulture and grain plants. Various chemical insecticides have been created to control it. There is a need to create an eco-friendly and specific insecticide which only affect armyworm’s nervous system. This research investigates cysteine-protease’s enzyme activity of red ginger (Zingiber officinale var. Rubrum) which is called zingibain. Its catalytic site matches with residue site in armyworm’s body so it can be used as bioinsecticide raw material which meets the criterias above. Fresh red ginger rhizomes were washed and extracted. The juice was then deposited in low temperature and centrifuged to get rid of its starch content. It was filtrated to remove large contaminants and poured into Potassium Phospate buffer. The liquid was then centrifuged again for 30 minutes before collecting the supernatant. Fresh leaves were then dipped into crude ginger protease extract and fed to fourth instar-armyworms. Leaves dipped into non-diluted extract were barely eaten by armyworm while the 50% and 25% dilution was half eaten and most eaten. The crude red ginger extract was not strong enough to kill them although the research showed its enzymatic activity reaches up to 169 PU. It still needs improvement to be produced as commercial bioinsecticide.

  16. A bacterial cysteine protease effector protein interferes with photosynthesis to suppress plant innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Herva, José J; González-Melendi, Pablo; Cuartas-Lanza, Raquel; Antúnez-Lamas, María; Río-Alvarez, Isabel; Li, Ziduo; López-Torrejón, Gema; Díaz, Isabel; Del Pozo, Juan C; Chakravarthy, Suma; Collmer, Alan; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia

    2012-05-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 suppresses plant innate immunity with effector proteins injected by a type III secretion system (T3SS). The cysteine protease effector HopN1, which reduces the ability of DC3000 to elicit programmed cell death in non-host tobacco, was found to also suppress the production of defence-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and callose when delivered by Pseudomonas fluorescens heterologously expressing a P. syringae T3SS. Purified His(6) -tagged HopN1 was used to identify tomato PsbQ, a member of the oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II (PSII), as an interacting protein. HopN1 localized to chloroplasts and both degraded PsbQ and inhibited PSII activity in chloroplast preparations, whereas a HopN1(D299A) non-catalytic mutant lost these abilities. Gene silencing of NtPsbQ in tobacco compromised ROS production and programmed cell death by DC3000. Our data reveal PsbQ as a contributor to plant immunity responses and a target for pathogen suppression. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Structure and function of C-terminal catalytic region of pasteurella multocida toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitadokoro, Kengo; Kamitami, Shigeki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is one of virulence factors responsible for the pathogenesis in some Pasteurellosis. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of PMT (C-PMT), which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-PMT displays three different domains designated C1, C2 and C3. We found in the C3 domain the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying the Cys-His-Asp triad. Our results demonstrate that PMT is an enzymatic toxin carrying the cysteine-protease like catalytic triad, which is organized only under reducing conditions. (author)

  18. Targeted Quantitation of Site-Specific Cysteine Oxidation in Endogenous Proteins Using a Differential Alkylation and Multiple Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jason M.; Danielson, Steven R.; Behring, Jessica B.; Atsriku, Christian; Britton, David J.; Puckett, Rachel L.; Schilling, Birgit; Campisi, Judith; Benz, Christopher C.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are both physiological intermediates in cellular signaling and mediators of oxidative stress. The cysteine-specific redox-sensitivity of proteins can shed light on how ROS are regulated and function, but low sensitivity has limited quantification of the redox state of many fundamental cellular regulators in a cellular context. Here we describe a highly sensitive and reproducible oxidation analysis approach (OxMRM) that combines protein purification, differential alkylation with stable isotopes, and multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry that can be applied in a targeted manner to virtually any cysteine or protein. Using this approach, we quantified the site-specific cysteine oxidation status of endogenous p53 for the first time and found that Cys182 at the dimerization interface of the DNA binding domain is particularly susceptible to diamide oxidation intracellularly. OxMRM enables analysis of sulfinic and sulfonic acid oxidation levels, which we validate by assessing the oxidation of the catalytic Cys215 of protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B under numerous oxidant conditions. OxMRM also complements unbiased redox proteomics discovery studies as a verification tool through its high sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and throughput. PMID:20233844

  19. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...... site cysteines and by removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. A cDNA clone of the barley key cysteine endoprotease...

  20. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: Parameterization and validation of a simple model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R.; Poole, Leslie B.; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pKas from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pKas. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pKas; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pKas. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pKa values (where the calculation should reproduce the pKa within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pKa in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pKa should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. PMID:22777874

  1. Fluoresence quenching of riboflavin in aqueous solution by methionin and cystein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droessler, P.; Holzer, W.; Penzkofer, A.; Hegemann, P.

    2003-01-01

    The fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence lifetimes of riboflavin in methanol, DMSO, water, and aqueous solutions of the sulphur atom containing amino acids methionin and cystein have been determined. In methanol, DMSO, and water (pH=4-8) only dynamic fluorescence reduction due to intersystem crossing and internal conversion is observed. In aqueous methionin solutions of pH=5.25-9 a pH independent static and dynamic fluorescence quenching occurs probably due to riboflavin anion-methionin cation pair formation. In aqueous cystein solutions (pH range from 4.15 to 9) the fluorescence quenching increases with rising pH due to cystein thiolate formation. The cystein thiol form present at low pH does not react with neutral riboflavin. Cystein thiolate present at high pH seems to react with neutral riboflavin causing riboflavin deprotonation (anion formation) by cystein thiolate reduction to the cystein thiol form

  2. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  3. Divergent unprotected peptide macrocyclisation by palladium-mediated cysteine arylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Anthony J; Zhang, Chi; Vinogradova, Ekaterina V; Buchwald, Nathan H; Reilly, John; Pentelute, Bradley L; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2017-06-01

    Macrocyclic peptides are important therapeutic candidates due to their improved physicochemical properties in comparison to their linear counterparts. Here we detail a method for a divergent macrocyclisation of unprotected peptides by crosslinking two cysteine residues with bis-palladium organometallic reagents. These synthetic intermediates are prepared in a single step from commercially available aryl bis-halides. Two bioactive linear peptides with cysteine residues at i , i + 4 and i , i + 7 positions, respectively, were cyclised to introduce a diverse array of aryl and bi-aryl linkers. These two series of macrocyclic peptides displayed similar linker-dependent lipophilicity, phospholipid affinity, and unique volume of distributions. Additionally, one of the bioactive peptides showed target binding affinity that was predominantly affected by the length of the linker. Collectively, this divergent strategy allowed rapid and convenient access to various aryl linkers, enabling the systematic evaluation of the effect of appending unit on the medicinal properties of macrocyclic peptides.

  4. Carbon Nanotubes Facilitate Oxidation of Cysteine Residues of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Atsushi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Wada, Momoyo; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kataura, Hiromichi

    2017-10-19

    The adsorption of proteins onto nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) governs the early stages of nanoparticle uptake into biological systems. Previous studies regarding these adsorption processes have primarily focused on the physical interactions between proteins and nanoparticles. In this study, using reduced lysozyme and intact human serum albumin in aqueous solutions, we demonstrated that CNTs interact chemically with proteins. The CNTs induce the oxidation of cysteine residues of the proteins, which is accounted for by charge transfer from the sulfhydryl groups of the cysteine residues to the CNTs. The redox reaction simultaneously suppresses the intermolecular association of proteins via disulfide bonds. These results suggest that CNTs can affect the folding and oxidation degree of proteins in biological systems such as blood and cytosol.

  5. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, M.A.; Friedman, B.; Gruskin, E.A.; Schrock, R.D. III; Lloyd, R.S.

    1991-01-01

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  6. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  7. Subcellular distribution of glutathione and cysteine in cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Zechmann, Bernd; Tomašić, Ana; Horvat, Lucija; Fulgosi, Hrvoje

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione plays numerous important functions in eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Whereas it can be found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, its production in prokaryotes is restricted to cyanobacteria and proteobacteria and a few strains of gram-positive bacteria. In bacteria, it is involved in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS), osmotic shock, acidic conditions, toxic chemicals, and heavy metals. Glutathione synthesis in bacteria takes place in two steps out of cysteine,...

  8. Allicin and derivates are cysteine protease inhibitors with antiparasitic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waag, Thilo; Gelhaus, Christoph; Rath, Jennifer; Stich, August; Leippe, Matthias; Schirmeister, Tanja

    2010-09-15

    Allicin and derivatives thereof inhibit the CAC1 cysteine proteases falcipain 2, rhodesain, cathepsin B and L in the low micromolar range. The structure-activity relationship revealed that only derivatives with primary carbon atom in vicinity to the thiosulfinate sulfur atom attacked by the active-site Cys residue are active against the target enzymes. Some compounds also show potent antiparasitic activity against Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of cysteine supplementation on in vitro maturation of bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B Rahim, S Jalal, N Yosef ... Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from abattoir ovaries were matured in vitro in Hepes-TCM 199 supplemented with 0.2 mM sodium pyruvate, 1 μg/ml 17-β-estradiol, 10% fetal calf serum (FCS), 0.5 μg/ml bFSH and 0 (control) and 100 or 500 μM/ml of cysteine for 24 h. When COCs matured in ...

  10. Acid-Mediated Tumor Proteolysis: Contribution of Cysteine Cathepsins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Rothberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the noncellular microenvironmental factors that contribute to malignancy of solid tumors is acidic peritumoral pH. We have previously demonstrated that extracellular acidosis leads to localization of the cysteine pro-tease cathepsin B on the tumor cell membrane and its secretion. The objective of the present study was to determine if an acidic extracellular pH such as that observed in vivo (i.e., pHe 6.8 affects the activity of proteases, e.g., cathepsin B, that contribute to degradation of collagen IV by tumor cells when grown in biologically relevant three-dimensional (3D cultures. For these studies, we used 1 3D reconstituted basement membrane overlay cultures of human carcinomas, 2 live cell imaging assays to assess proteolysis, and 3 in vivo imaging of active tumor proteases. At pHe 6.8, there were increases in pericellular active cysteine cathepsins and in degradation of dye-quenched collagen IV, which was partially blocked by a cathepsin B inhibitor. Imaging probes for active cysteine cathepsins localized to tumors in vivo. The amount of bound probe decreased in tumors in bicarbonate-treated mice, a treatment previously shown to increase peritumoral pHe and reduce local invasion of the tumors. Our results are consistent with the acid-mediated invasion hypothesis and with a role for cathepsin B in promoting degradation of a basement membrane protein substrate, i.e., type IV collagen, in an acidic peritumoral environment.

  11. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  12. Analysis of S-nitrosothiols via Copper Cysteine (2C) and Copper Cysteine - Carbon Monoxide (3C) Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Stephen C.; Gibbons, Lindsey B.; Griffin, Sherraine; Doctor, Allan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the principles of RSNO measurement in the gas phase, utilizing ozone-based chemiluminescence and the copper cysteine (2C) ± carbon monoxide (3C) reagent. Although an indirect method for quantifying RSNOs, this assay represents one of the most robust methodologies available. It exploits the NO• detection sensitivity of ozone based chemiluminscence, which is within the range required to detect physiological concentrations of RSNO metabolites. Additionally, the specificity of the copper cysteine (2C and 3C) reagent for RSNOs negates the need for sample pretreatment, thereby minimizing the likelihood of sample contamination (false positive results), NO species inter-conversion, or the loss of certain highly labile RSNO species. Herein, we outline the principles of this methodology, summarizing key issues, potential pitfalls and corresponding solutions. PMID:23116707

  13. The IRC7 gene encodes cysteine desulphydrase activity and confers on yeast the ability to grow on cysteine as a nitrogen source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Margarita; Gardner, Richard C

    2015-07-01

    Although cysteine desulphydrase activity has been purified and characterized from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the gene encoding this activity in vivo has never been defined. We show that the full-length IRC7 gene, encoded by the YFR055W open reading frame, encodes a protein with cysteine desulphydrase activity. Irc7p purified to homogeneity is able to utilize l-cysteine as a substrate, producing pyruvate and hydrogen sulphide as products of the reaction. Purified Irc7p also utilized l-cystine and some other cysteine conjugates, but not l-cystathionine or l-methionine, as substrates. We further show that, in vivo, the IRC7 gene is both necessary and sufficient for yeast to grow on l-cysteine as a nitrogen source, and that overexpression of the gene results in increased H2 S production. Strains overexpressing IRC7 are also hypersensitive to a toxic analogue, S-ethyl-l-cysteine. While IRC7 has been identified as playing a critical role in converting cysteine conjugates to volatile thiols that are important in wine aroma, its biological role in yeast cells is likely to involve regulation of cysteine and redox homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Structure and mechanism leading to formation of the cysteine sulfinate product complex of a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmann, Madleen; Kumar, Suresh; Chernev, Petko; Nehrkorn, Joscha; Schnegg, Alexander; Kumar, Devesh; Dau, Holger; Limberg, Christian; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-05-11

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a unique nonheme iron enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of cysteine in the body. It contains an iron active site with an unusual 3-His ligation to the protein, which contrasts with the structural features of common nonheme iron dioxygenases. Recently, some of us reported a truly biomimetic model for this enzyme, namely a trispyrazolylborato iron(II) cysteinato complex, which not only has a structure very similar to the enzyme-substrate complex but also represents a functional model: Treatment of the model with dioxygen leads to cysteine dioxygenation, as shown by isolating the cysteine part of the product in the course of the work-up. However, little is known on the conversion mechanism and, so far, not even the structure of the actual product complex had been characterised, which is also unknown in case of the enzyme. In a multidisciplinary approach including density functional theory calculations and X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have now determined the structure of the actual sulfinato complex for the first time. The Cys-SO2 (-) functional group was found to be bound in an η(2) -O,O-coordination mode, which, based on the excellent resemblance between model and enzyme, also provides the first support for a corresponding binding mode within the enzymatic product complex. Indeed, this is again confirmed by theory, which had predicted a η(2) -O,O-binding mode for synthetic as well as the natural enzyme. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Identification of novel malarial cysteine protease inhibitors using structure-based virtual screening of a focused cysteine protease inhibitor library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Falgun; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Gut, Jiri; Legac, Jennifer; Rosenthal, Philip J; Tekwani, Babu L; Avery, Mitchell A

    2011-04-25

    Malaria, in particular that caused by Plasmodium falciparum , is prevalent across the tropics, and its medicinal control is limited by widespread drug resistance. Cysteine proteases of P. falciparum , falcipain-2 (FP-2) and falcipain-3 (FP-3), are major hemoglobinases, validated as potential antimalarial drug targets. Structure-based virtual screening of a focused cysteine protease inhibitor library built with soft rather than hard electrophiles was performed against an X-ray crystal structure of FP-2 using the Glide docking program. An enrichment study was performed to select a suitable scoring function and to retrieve potential candidates against FP-2 from a large chemical database. Biological evaluation of 50 selected compounds identified 21 diverse nonpeptidic inhibitors of FP-2 with a hit rate of 42%. Atomic Fukui indices were used to predict the most electrophilic center and its electrophilicity in the identified hits. Comparison of predicted electrophilicity of electrophiles in identified hits with those in known irreversible inhibitors suggested the soft-nature of electrophiles in the selected target compounds. The present study highlights the importance of focused libraries and enrichment studies in structure-based virtual screening. In addition, few compounds were screened against homologous human cysteine proteases for selectivity analysis. Further evaluation of structure-activity relationships around these nonpeptidic scaffolds could help in the development of selective leads for antimalarial chemotherapy.

  16. Substrate Specificity of Cysteine Proteases Beyond the S2 Pocket: Mutagenesis and Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Fasciola hepatica Cathepsins L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Corvo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are widespread in all life kingdoms, being central to diverse physiological processes based on a broad range of substrate specificity. Paralogous Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L proteases are essential to parasite invasion, tissue migration and reproduction. In spite of similarities in their overall sequence and structure, these enzymes often exhibit different substrate specificity. These preferences are principally determined by the amino acid composition of the active site's S2 subsite (pocket of the enzyme that interacts with the substrate P2 residue (Schetcher and Berger nomenclature. Although secreted FhCL1 accommodates aliphatic residues in the S2 pocket, FhCL2 is also efficient in cleaving proline in that position. To understand these differences, we engineered the FhCL1 S2 subsite at three amino acid positions to render it identical to that present in FhCL2. The substitutions did not produce the expected increment in proline accommodation in P2. Rather, they decreased the enzyme's catalytic efficiency toward synthetic peptides. Nonetheless, a change in the P3 specificity was associated with the mutation of Leu67 to Tyr, a hinge residue between the S2 and S3 subsites that contributes to the accommodation of Gly in S3. Molecular dynamic simulations highlighted changes in the spatial distribution and secondary structure of the S2 and S3 pockets of the mutant FhCL1 enzymes. The reduced affinity and catalytic efficiency of the mutant enzymes may be due to a narrowing of the active site cleft that hinders the accommodation of substrates. Because the variations in the enzymatic activity measured could not be exclusively allocated to those residues lining the active site, other more external positions might modulate enzyme conformation, and, therefore, catalytic activity.

  17. A novel potentiometric biosensor for selective L-cysteine determination using L-cysteine-desulfhydrase producing Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells coupled with sulfide electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, Saad S.M.; El-Baz, Ashraf F.; Abd-Rabboh, Hisham S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Trichosporon jirovecii yeast cells are used for the first time as a source of L-cysteine desulfhydrase enzyme (EC 4.4.1.1) and incorporated in a biosensor for determining L-cysteine. The cells are grown under cadmium stress conditions to increase the expression level of the enzyme. The intact cells are immobilized on the membrane of a solid-state Ag 2 S electrode to provide a simple L-cysteine responsive biosensor. Upon immersion of the sensor in L-cysteine containing solutions, L-cysteine undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis into pyruvate, ammonia and sulfide ion. The rate of sulfide ion formation is potentiometrically measured as a function of L-cysteine concentration. Under optimized conditions (phosphate buffer pH 7, temperature 37 ± 1 deg. C and actual weight of immobilized yeast cells 100 mg), a linear relationship between L-cysteine concentration and the initial rate of sulfide liberation (dE/dt) is obtained. The sensor response covers the concentration range of 0.2-150 mg L -1 (1.7-1250 μmol L -1 ) L-cysteine. Validation of the assay method according to the quality control/quality assurance standards (precision, accuracy, between-day variability, within-day reproducibility, range of measurements and lower limit of detection) reveals remarkable performance characteristics of the proposed biosensor. The sensor is satisfactorily utilized for determination of L-cysteine in some pharmaceutical formulations. The lower limit of detection is ∼1 μmol L -1 and the accuracy and precision of the method are 97.5% and ±1.1%, respectively. Structurally similar sulfur containing compounds such as glutathione, cystine, methionine, and D-cysteine do no interfere

  18. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  19. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling....

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance ... The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also ... cies at room temperature. ..... aldehyde part of Schiff base ligands, catalytic activ- ity of new ...

  1. Enhancement of thioredoxin/glutaredoxin-mediated L-cysteine synthesis from S-sulfocysteine increases L-cysteine production in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli has two L-cysteine biosynthetic pathways; one is synthesized from O-acetyl L-serine (OAS) and sulfate by L-cysteine synthase (CysK), and another is produced via S-sulfocysteine (SSC) from OAS and thiosulfate by SSC synthase (CysM). SSC is converted into L-cysteine and sulfite by an uncharacterized reaction. As thioredoxins (Trx1 and Trx2) and glutaredoxins (Grx1, Grx2, Grx3, Grx4, and NrdH) are known as reductases of peptidyl disulfides, overexpression of such reductases might be a good way for improving L-cysteine production to accelerate the reduction of SSC in E. coli. Results Because the redox enzymes can reduce the disulfide that forms on proteins, we first tested whether these enzymes catalyze the reduction of SSC to L-cysteine. All His-tagged recombinant enzymes, except for Grx4, efficiently convert SSC into L-cysteine in vitro. Overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH enhanced a 15-40% increase in the E. coliL-cysteine production. On the other hand, disruption of the cysM gene cancelled the effect caused by the overexpression of Grx1 and NrdH, suggesting that its improvement was due to the efficient reduction of SSC under the fermentative conditions. Moreover, L-cysteine production in knockout mutants of the sulfite reductase genes (ΔcysI and ΔcysJ) and the L-cysteine synthase gene (ΔcysK) each decreased to about 50% of that in the wild-type strain. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in L-cysteine production between wild-type strain and gene deletion mutant of the upstream pathway of sulfite (ΔcysC or ΔcysH). These results indicate that sulfite generated from the SSC reduction is available as the sulfur source to produce additional L-cysteine molecule. It was finally found that in the E. coliL-cysteine producer that co-overexpress glutaredoxin (NrdH), sulfite reductase (CysI), and L-cysteine synthase (CysK), there was the highest amount of L-cysteine produced per cell. Conclusions In this work, we showed that Grx1 and

  2. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  3. Cysteine Supplementation May be Beneficial in a Subgroup of Mitochondrial Translation Deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsakoulia, Marina; Mϋller, Juliane S; Gomez-Duran, Aurora; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Boczonadi, Veronika; Horvath, Rita

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathies are severe, relentlessly progressive conditions and there are very few effective therapies available to date. We have previously suggested that in two rare forms of reversible mitochondrial disease (reversible infantile respiratory chain deficiency and reversible infantile hepatopathy) supplementation with L-cysteine can improve mitochondrial protein synthesis, since cysteine is required for the 2-thiomodification of mitochondrial tRNAs. We studied whether supplementation with L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) results in any improvement of the mitochondrial function in vitro in fibroblasts of patients with different genetic forms of abnormal mitochondrial translation. We studied in vitro in fibroblasts of patients carrying the common m.3243A>G and m.8344A>G mutations or autosomal recessive mutations in genes affecting mitochondrial translation, whether L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation have an effect on mitochondrial respiratory chain function. Here we show that supplementation with L-cysteine, but not with N-acetyl-cysteine partially rescues the mitochondrial translation defect in vitro in fibroblasts of patients carrying the m.3243A>G and m.8344A>G mutations. In contrast, N-acetyl-cysteine had a beneficial effect on mitochondrial translation in TRMU and MTO1 deficient fibroblasts. Our results suggest that L-cysteine or N-acetyl-cysteine supplementation may be a potential treatment for selected subgroups of patients with mitochondrial translation deficiencies. Further studies are needed to explore the full potential of cysteine supplementation as a treatment for patients with mitochondrial disease.

  4. Enhancement of L-cysteine production by disruption of yciW in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Yusuke; Ohtsu, Iwao; Takumi, Kazuhiro; Tamakoshi, Ai; Nonaka, Gen; Funahashi, Eri; Ihara, Masaki; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Using in silico analysis, the yciW gene of Escherichia coli was identified as a novel L-cysteine regulon that may be regulated by the transcriptional activator CysB for sulfur metabolic genes. We found that overexpression of yciW conferred tolerance to L-cysteine, but disruption of yciW increased L-cysteine production in E. coli. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ferguson, A.G.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  6. Mechanism of Sirt1 NAD+-dependent Protein Deacetylase Inhibition by Cysteine S-Nitrosation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalous, Kelsey S; Wynia-Smith, Sarah L; Olp, Michael D; Smith, Brian C

    2016-12-02

    The sirtuin family of proteins catalyze the NAD + -dependent deacylation of acyl-lysine residues. Humans encode seven sirtuins (Sirt1-7), and recent studies have suggested that post-translational modification of Sirt1 by cysteine S-nitrosation correlates with increased acetylation of Sirt1 deacetylase substrates. However, the mechanism of Sirt1 inhibition by S-nitrosation was unknown. Here, we show that Sirt1 is transnitrosated and inhibited by the physiologically relevant nitrosothiol S-nitrosoglutathione. Steady-state kinetic analyses and binding assays were consistent with Sirt1 S-nitrosation inhibiting binding of both the NAD + and acetyl-lysine substrates. Sirt1 S-nitrosation correlated with Zn 2+ release from the conserved sirtuin Zn 2+ -tetrathiolate and a loss of α-helical structure without overall thermal destabilization of the enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that Zn 2+ loss due to Sirt1 S-nitrosation results in repositioning of the tetrathiolate subdomain away from the rest of the catalytic domain, thereby disrupting the NAD + and acetyl-lysine-binding sites. Sirt1 S-nitrosation was reversed upon exposure to the thiol-based reducing agents, including physiologically relevant concentrations of the cellular reducing agent glutathione. Reversal of S-nitrosation resulted in full restoration of Sirt1 activity only in the presence of Zn 2+ , consistent with S-nitrosation of the Zn 2+ -tetrathiolate as the primary source of Sirt1 inhibition upon S-nitrosoglutathione treatment. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. L-cysteine suppresses ghrelin and reduces appetite in rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGavigan, A K; O'Hara, H C; Amin, A; Kinsey-Jones, J; Spreckley, E; Alamshah, A; Agahi, A; Banks, K; France, R; Hyberg, G; Wong, C; Bewick, G A; Gardiner, J V; Lehmann, A; Martin, N M; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Murphy, K G

    2015-03-01

    High-protein diets promote weight loss and subsequent weight maintenance, but are difficult to adhere to. The mechanisms by which protein exerts these effects remain unclear. However, the amino acids produced by protein digestion may have a role in driving protein-induced satiety. We tested the effects of a range of amino acids on food intake in rodents and identified l-cysteine as the most anorexigenic. Using rodents we further studied the effect of l-cysteine on food intake, behaviour and energy expenditure. We proceeded to investigate its effect on neuronal activation in the hypothalamus and brainstem before investigating its effect on gastric emptying and gut hormone release. The effect of l-cysteine on appetite scores and gut hormone release was then investigated in humans. l-Cysteine dose-dependently decreased food intake in both rats and mice following oral gavage and intraperitoneal administration. This effect did not appear to be secondary to behavioural or aversive side effects. l-Cysteine increased neuronal activation in the area postrema and delayed gastric emptying. It suppressed plasma acyl ghrelin levels and did not reduce food intake in transgenic ghrelin-overexpressing mice. Repeated l-cysteine administration decreased food intake in rats and obese mice. l-Cysteine reduced hunger and plasma acyl ghrelin levels in humans. Further work is required to determine the chronic effect of l-cysteine in rodents and humans on appetite and body weight, and whether l-cysteine contributes towards protein-induced satiety.

  8. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  9. Density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam P De Visser

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical versus electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism.

  10. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  11. Catalytic processes for cleaner fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catani, R.; Marchionna, M.; Rossini, S.

    1999-01-01

    More stringent limitations on vehicle emissions require different measurement: fuel reformulation is one of the most important and is calling for a noticeable impact on refinery assets. Composition rangers of the future fuels have been defined on a time scale. In this scenario the evolution of catalytic technologies becomes a fundamental tool for allowing refinery to reach the fixed-by-law targets. In this paper, the refinery process options to meet each specific requirements of reformulated fuels are surveyed [it

  12. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sumana, Gajjala, E-mail: sumanagajjala@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Tiwari, Ida [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  13. Emission of hydrogen sulfide by leaf tissue in response to L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiya, J.; Schmidt, A.; Wilson, L.G.; Filner, P.

    1982-01-01

    Leaf discs and detached leaves exposed to L-cysteine emitted a volatile sulfur compound which was proven by gas chromatography to be H 2 S. This phenomenon was demonstrated in all nine species tested (Cucumis sativus, Cucurbita pepo, Nicotiana tabacum, Coleus blumei, Beta vulgaris, Phaseolus vulgaris, Medicago sativa, Hordeum vulgare, and Gossypium hirsutum). The emission of volatile sulfur by cucumber leaves occurred in the dark at a similar rate to that in the light. The emission of leaf discs reached the maximal rate, more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, 2 to 4 hours after starting exposure to L-cysteine; then it decreased. In the case of detached leaves, the maximum occurred 5 to 10 h after starting exposure. The average emission rate of H 2 S during the first 4 hours from leaf discs of cucurbits in response to 10 millimolar L-cysteine, was usually more than 40 picomoles per minute per square centimeter, i.e. 0.24 micromoles per hour per square decimeter. Leaf discs exposed to 1 millimolar L-cysteine emitted only 2% as much as did the discs exposed to 10 millimolar L-cysteine. The emission from leaf discs and from detached leaves lasted for at least 5 and 15 hours, respectively. However, several hours after the maximal emission, injury of the leaves, manifested as chlorosis, was evident. H 2 S emission was a specific consequence of exposure to L-cysteine; neither D-cysteine nor L-cysteine elicited H 2 S emission. Aminooxyacetic acid, an inhibitor of pyridoxal phosphate dependent enzymes, inhibited the emission. In a cell free system from cucumber leaves, H 2 S formation and its release occurred in response to L-cysteine. Feeding experiments with [ 35 S]t-cysteine showed that most of the sulfur in H 2 S was derived from sulfur in the L-cysteine supplied

  14. Electrostatics of cysteine residues in proteins: parameterization and validation of a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsbury, Freddie R; Poole, Leslie B; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2012-11-01

    One of the most popular and simple models for the calculation of pK(a) s from a protein structure is the semi-macroscopic electrostatic model MEAD. This model requires empirical parameters for each residue to calculate pK(a) s. Analysis of current, widely used empirical parameters for cysteine residues showed that they did not reproduce expected cysteine pK(a) s; thus, we set out to identify parameters consistent with the CHARMM27 force field that capture both the behavior of typical cysteines in proteins and the behavior of cysteines which have perturbed pK(a) s. The new parameters were validated in three ways: (1) calculation across a large set of typical cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce expected ensemble behavior); (2) calculation across a set of perturbed cysteines in proteins (where the calculations are expected to reproduce the shifted ensemble behavior); and (3) comparison to experimentally determined pK(a) values (where the calculation should reproduce the pK(a) within experimental error). Both the general behavior of cysteines in proteins and the perturbed pK(a) in some proteins can be predicted reasonably well using the newly determined empirical parameters within the MEAD model for protein electrostatics. This study provides the first general analysis of the electrostatics of cysteines in proteins, with specific attention paid to capturing both the behavior of typical cysteines in a protein and the behavior of cysteines whose pK(a) should be shifted, and validation of force field parameters for cysteine residues. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Determination of free and total cyst(e)ine in plasma of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tôrres, Cristina L; Miller, Joshua W; Rogers, Quinton R

    2004-01-01

    In human blood, the amino acid cysteine forms disulfide bonds with itself and with other sulfhydryl compounds in their free form and with sulfhydryls in protein. Protein-bound cysteine is lost when plasma proteins are removed before amino acid analysis. The purpose of this study was to assess the time course and extent of cyst(e)ine (cysteine + half-cystine) loss in dog and cat plasma. An equal volume of 6% sulfosalicylic acid was added to plasma aliquots at 0, 2, 4, 10, 16, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours after separation of blood cells. Tris-2-carboxyethyl-phosphine hydrochloride (TCEP - HCl), a reducing agent, was used to regenerate total plasma cyst(e)ine after 3 months of sample storage (-20 degrees C). Initial free cyst(e)ine concentrations (mean +/- SEM) were higher in canine plasma (77 +/- 4 micromol/L) than in feline plasma (37 +/- 3 micromol/L). Free plasma cyst(e)ine concentrations in dogs and cats decreased after first-order kinetics, with a half-life of 23 and 69 hours, respectively. Total plasma cysteine after TCEP - HCl treatment was similar for dogs (290 micromol/L) and cats (296 micromol/L), but the percentage of free cysteine was higher (P = .02) in dogs (27%) than in cats (13%). Over half of the cyst(e)ine, homocysteine, cysteinylglycine, and glutathione were bound in vivo to plasma proteins. These results emphasize the importance of removing plasma proteins within 1 hour after blood collection for reliable assay of free plasma cyst(e)ine.

  16. Elimination of hydrogen sulphide and β substitution in cystein, catalyzed by the cysteine-lyase of hens yolk-sac and yolk (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapeville, F.; Fromageot, P.

    1961-01-01

    The yolk of incubated hen's eggs contains a pyridoxal phosphate activated enzyme, free of iron, copper, magnesium and calcium. This enzyme activates the β-carbon atom of cysteine. Its reactivity is demonstrated by the ease with which this β-carbon fixes various sulfur containing substances in which the sulfur has reducing properties: inorganic sulfide, sulfide or cysteine itself. In the absence of substances able to react with the β-carbon atom, the active complex, consisting of the enzyme and the aminated tri-carbon chain, is hydrolysed to pyruvic acid and ammonia. The liberation of hydrogen sulfide thus appears to be the consequence either of the substitution of the β-carbon atom of cysteine or of the decomposition of the complex which this aminoacid forms with the enzyme studied. The latter seems therefore to possess an activity which differs from the activity of the desulfhydrases as yet known. We suggest to call this enzyme cystein-lyase. (authors) [fr

  17. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiovascular actions of L-cysteine and L-cysteine sulfinic acid in the nucleus tractus solitarius of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-07-01

    The sulfur-containing excitatory amino acid (EAA) L-cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA), a neurotransmitter candidate, is endogenously synthesized from L-cysteine (Cys). Exogenous Cys administration into the brain produces cardiovascular effects; these effects likely occur via synaptic stimulation of central nervous system (CNS) neurons that regulate peripheral cardiovascular function. However, the cardiovascular responses produced by CNS Cys administration could result from CSA biosynthesized in synapse. The present study examined the role of CSA in Cys-induced cardiovascular responses within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of anesthetized rats. The NTS receives input from various visceral afferents that gate autonomic reflexes, including cardiovascular reflexes. Within the NTS, both Cys and CSA microinjections produced decrease responses in arterial blood pressure and heart rate that were similar to those produced by L-glutamate. Co-injection of the ionotropic EAA receptor antagonist kynurenic acid abolished Cys-, but not CSA-, induced cardiovascular responses. This finding suggests that only Cys-induced cardiovascular responses are mediated by kynurenate-sensitive receptors. This study provides the first demonstration that Cys- and CSA-induced cardiovascular responses occur via different mechanisms in the NTS of rats. Further, this study also indicates that Cys-induced cardiovascular responses do not occur via CSA. Thus, within the NTS, endogenous Cys and/or CSA might be involved in cardiovascular regulation.

  19. Alleviative effects of s-allyl cysteine and s-ethyl cysteine on MCD diet-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-che; Yin, Mei-chin; Liu, Wen-hu

    2008-11-01

    Alleviative effects of s-allyl cysteine (SAC) and s-ethyl cysteine (SEC) upon methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced hepatotoxicity in mice were examined. SAC or SEC at 1g/L was added into drinking water for 7 weeks with MCD diet. MCD feeding significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and elevated the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (P MCD feeding significantly lowered serum and hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) formation, and suppressed the activity and mRNA expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (P MCD feeding significantly enhanced the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) and collagen-alpha1 (P MCD-induced hepatotoxicity.

  20. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power.

  1. Tuning the carbon nanotube photoluminescence enhancement at addition of cysteine through the change of external conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnosov, N.V.; Karachevtsev, M.V.; Leontiev, V.S.; Karachevtsev, V.A., E-mail: karachevtsev@ilt.kharkov.ua

    2017-01-15

    The enhancement of the photoluminescence (PL) from the semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes suspended with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in water observed after amino acids doping is the largest at cysteine addition. The PL intensity increased through the passivation of p-defects on the carbon nanotube sidewall by the cysteine molecules due to thiol group. The effect of several external factors on the cysteine-induced enhancement of PL from carbon nanotubes covered with ssDNA was studied: UV irradiation, tip or bath sonication treatment of the suspension, the ionic strength and pH of aqueous suspension. It turned out that all these factors have an essential influence on the dependence of the PL enhancement on the cysteine concentration through inducing of additional defects on nanotube as well as a change of the nanotube surface coverage with polymer. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that PL from carbon nanotubes can be exploited successfully for the monitoring of cysteine concentration in aqueous solution. - Highlights: • Cysteine doping enhances carbon nanotube emission more than other amino acids do. • SWNT emission dependence on cysteine concentration is tuned by UV irradiation and pH. • Type of sonication treatment influences SWNT PL dependence on cysteine concentration. • Polymer coverage and defectiveness of nanotubes effect on nanotube emission. • Graphic abstract.

  2. Neuronal growth on L- and D-cysteine self-assembled monolayers reveals neuronal chiral sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranes, Koby; Moshe, Hagay; Alon, Noa; Schwartz, Shmulik; Shefi, Orit

    2014-05-21

    Studying the interaction between neuronal cells and chiral molecules is fundamental for the design of novel biomaterials and drugs. Chirality influences all biological processes that involve intermolecular interaction. One common method used to study cellular interactions with different enantiomeric targets is the use of chiral surfaces. Based on previous studies that demonstrated the importance of cysteine in the nervous system, we studied the effect of L- and D-cysteine on single neuronal growth. L-Cysteine, which normally functions as a neuromodulator or a neuroprotective antioxidant, causes damage at elevated levels, which may occur post trauma. In this study, we grew adult neurons in culture enriched with L- and D-cysteine as free compounds or as self-assembled monolayers of chiral surfaces and examined the effect on the neuronal morphology and adhesion. Notably, we have found that exposure to the L-cysteine enantiomer inhibited, and even prevented, neuronal attachment more severely than exposure to the D-cysteine enantiomer. Atop the L-cysteine surfaces, neuronal growth was reduced and degenerated. Since the cysteine molecules were attached to the surface via the thiol groups, the neuronal membrane was exposed to the molecular chiral site. Thus, our results have demonstrated high neuronal chiral sensitivity, revealing chiral surfaces as indirect regulators of neuronal cells and providing a reference for studying chiral drugs.

  3. Therapeutic NOTCH3 cysteine correction in CADASIL using exon skipping: in vitro proof of concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, J.W.; Dauwerse, H.G.; Peters, D.J.; Goldfarb, A.; Venselaar, H.; Haffner, C.; Ommen, G.J. van; Aartsma-Rus, A.M.; Oberstein, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, is a hereditary cerebral small vessel disease caused by characteristic cysteine altering missense mutations in theNOTCH3gene.NOTCH3mutations in CADASIL result in an uneven number of cysteine

  4. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing...

  5. Cysteine: a conditionally essential amino acid in low-birth-weight preterm infants?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riedijk, Maaike A.; van Beek, Ron H. T.; Voortman, Gardi; de Bie, Henrica M. A.; Dassel, Anne C. M.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.

    2007-01-01

    Cyst(e)ine can be synthesized de novo from methionine and serine and is, therefore, a nonessential amino acid in human adults. Several studies have suggested that cyst(e)ine might be a conditionally essential amino acid in preterm infants because of biochemical immaturity. No data are available on

  6. Resolution of oxidative stress by thioredoxin reductase: Cysteine versus selenocysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cunniff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin reductase (TR catalyzes the reduction of thioredoxin (TRX, which in turn reduces mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (PRXs 1–4, thiol peroxidases implicated in redox homeostasis and cell signaling. Typical 2-Cys PRXs are inactivated by hyperoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine to cysteine-sulfinic acid, and regenerated in a two-step process involving retro-reduction by sulfiredoxin (SRX and reduction by TRX. Here transient exposure to menadione and glucose oxidase was used to examine the dynamics of oxidative inactivation and reactivation of PRXs in mouse C10 cells expressing various isoforms of TR, including wild type cytoplasmic TR1 (Sec-TR1 and mitochondrial TR2 (Sec-TR2 that encode selenocysteine, as well as mutants of TR1 and TR2 in which the selenocysteine codon was changed to encode cysteine (Cys-TR1 or Cys-TR2. In C10 cells endogenous TR activity was insensitive to levels of hydrogen peroxide that hyperoxidize PRXs. Expression of Sec-TR1 increased TR activity, reduced the basal cytoplasmic redox state, and increased the rate of reduction of a redox-responsive cytoplasmic GFP probe (roGFP, but did not influence either the rate of inactivation or the rate of retro-reduction of PRXs. In comparison to roGFP, which was reduced within minutes once oxidants were removed reduction of 2-Cys PRXs occurred over many hours. Expression of wild type Sec-TR1 or Sec-TR2, but not Cys-TR1 or TR2, increased the rate of reduction of PRXs and improved cell survival after menadione exposure. These results indicate that expression levels of TR do not reduce the severity of initial oxidative insults, but rather govern the rate of reduction of cellular factors required for cell viability. Because Sec-TR is completely insensitive to cytotoxic levels of hydrogen peroxide, we suggest TR functions at the top of a redox pyramid that governs the oxidation state of peroxiredoxins and other protein factors, thereby dictating a hierarchy of phenotypic

  7. Electronic conductivity of Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95-δ) and Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ): Hebb-Wagner polarisation in the case of redox active dopants and interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2011-01-01

    of the steady state I-V curve from the standard Hebb-Wagner equation was observed for the case of Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ). It is shown that the I-V curve can be successfully reproduced when the presence of the redox active dopant, Pr(3+)/Pr(4+), is taken into account, whereas even better agreement can be reached...

  8. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong

    2012-01-01

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  9. Cysteine 138 mutation in HIV-1 Nef from patients with delayed disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Martin; Laursen, Alex Lund; Gerstoft, J.

    2006-01-01

    on the delayed disease status. However, the results demonstrate a high incidence of a single amino acid polymorphism (cysteine 138) in HIV-1 Nef. The allelic frequency of cysteine 138 between the delayed disease progression group and the progressor group was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.......0139). The phylogeny of isolates was investigated and the variants harbouring the cysteine 138 mutation clustered independently. CONCLUSION: The present study describes a viral genetic polymorphism related to AIDS disease progression. The polymorphism (cysteine 138) has previously been reported to confer decreased...... viral replication (Premkumar DR, et al. AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 1996; 12(4): 337-45). A sequence database search for comparative mutations revealed a high frequency of cysteine 138 in patients with reported SP AIDS...

  10. Intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine against copper corrosion in hydrochloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Daquan; Xie Bin; Gao Lixin; Cai Qirui; Joo, Hyung Goun; Lee, Kang Yong

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion protection of copper by glutamic acid, cysteine, glycine and their derivative (glutathione) in 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution has been studied by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The inhibition efficiency of the organic inhibitors on copper corrosion increases in the order: glutathione > cysteine > cysteine + glutamic acid + glycine > glutamic acid > glycine. Maximum inhibition efficiency for cysteine reaches about 92.9% at 15 mM concentration level. The glutathione can give 96.4% inhibition efficiency at a concentration of 10 mM. The molecular structure parameters were obtained by PM3 (Parametric Method 3) semi-empirical calculation. The intramolecular synergistic effect of glutamic acid, cysteine and glycine moieties in glutathione is attributed to the lower energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (E LUMO ) level and to the excess hetero-atom adsorption centers and the bigger coverage on the copper surface.

  11. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  12. Mass spectrometric analysis of L-cysteine metabolism: physiological role and fate of L-cysteine in the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-11-04

    L-cysteine is essential for virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Besides having a role in the synthesis of virtually all proteins and of taurine, cysteamine, glutathione, and other redox-regulating proteins, L-cysteine has important functions under anaerobic/microaerophilic conditions. In anaerobic or microaerophilic protozoan parasites, such as Entamoeba histolytica, L-cysteine has been implicated in growth, attachment, survival, and protection from oxidative stress. However, a specific role of this amino acid or related metabolic intermediates is not well understood. In this study, using stable-isotope-labeled L-cysteine and capillary electrophoresis-time of flight mass spectrometry, we investigated the metabolism of L-cysteine in E. histolytica. [U-(13)C3, (15)N]L-cysteine was rapidly metabolized into three unknown metabolites, besides L-cystine and L-alanine. These metabolites were identified as thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (T4C), 2-methyl thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (MT4C), and 2-ethyl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (ET4C), the condensation products of L-cysteine with aldehydes. We demonstrated that these 2-(R)-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids serve for storage of L-cysteine. Liberation of L-cysteine occurred when T4C was incubated with amebic lysates, suggesting enzymatic degradation of these L-cysteine derivatives. Furthermore, T4C and MT4C significantly enhanced trophozoite growth and reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels when it was added to cultures, suggesting that 2-(R)-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids are involved in the defense against oxidative stress. Amebiasis is a human parasitic disease caused by the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In this parasite, L-cysteine is the principal low-molecular-weight thiol and is assumed to play a significant role in supplying the amino acid during trophozoite invasion, particularly when the parasites move from the anaerobic intestinal lumen to highly

  13. The titanium tris-anilide cation [Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3](+) stabilized as its perfluoro-tetra-phenylborate salt: structural characterization and synthesis in connection with redox activity of 4,4'-bipyridine dititanium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinney, Heather A; Clough, Christopher R; Cummins, Christopher C

    2015-04-21

    This work explores the reduction of 4,4'-bipyridine using two equivalents of the titanium(iii) complex Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 resulting in formation of a black, crystalline complex, (4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2, for which an X-ray structure determination is reported. The neutral, black, 4,4'-bipyridine-bridged bimetallic was found to be redox active, with mono- and di-anions being accessible electrochemically, and with the mono- and di-cations also being accessible chemically, and isolable, at least when using the weakly coordinating anion [B(C6F5)4](-) as the counter-ion. It proved possible to crystallize the salt [(4,4'-bipy){Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}2][B(C6F5)4]2 for a single-crystal X-ray structure investigation; in this instance it was revealed that the aromaticity of the 4,4'-bipyridine ligand, that had been disrupted upon reduction, had been regained. A rare cationic d(0) metal tris-amide complex, shown by X-ray crystallography to contain an intriguing pyramidal TiN3 core geometry, namely {Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3}(+), could also be isolated when using [B(C6F5)4] as the essentially non-interacting counter-ion. This highly reactive cation should be considered as a potential intermediate in the plethora of reactions wherein Ti(N[(t)Bu]Ar)3 has been shown to effect the reduction of substrates including halogenated organic molecules, carbonyl compounds, organic nitriles, and metal complexes.

  14. Specific inhibition of the redox activity of ape1/ref-1 by e3330 blocks tnf-α-induced activation of IL-8 production in liver cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cesaratto

    Full Text Available APE1/Ref-1 is a main regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress via DNA-repair function and co-activating activity on the NF-κB transcription factor. APE1 is central in controlling the oxidative stress-based inflammatory processes through modulation of cytokines expression and its overexpression is responsible for the onset of chemoresistance in different tumors including hepatic cancer. We examined the functional role of APE1 overexpression during hepatic cell damage related to fatty acid accumulation and the role of the redox function of APE1 in the inflammatory process. HepG2 cells were stably transfected with functional and non-functional APE1 encoding plasmids and the protective effect of APE1 overexpression toward genotoxic compounds or FAs accumulation, was tested. JHH6 cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of E3330, an APE1 redox inhibitor. IL-8 promoter activity was assessed by a luciferase reporter assay, gene expression by Real-Time PCR and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12 levels measured by ELISA. APE1 over-expression did not prevent cytotoxicity induced by lipid accumulation. E3330 treatment prevented the functional activation of NF-κB via the alteration of APE1 subcellular trafficking and reduced IL-6 and IL-8 expression induced by TNF-α and FAs accumulation through blockage of the redox-mediated activation of NF-κB. APE1 overexpression observed in hepatic cancer cells may reflect an adaptive response to cell damage and may be responsible for further cell resistance to chemotherapy and for the onset of inflammatory response. The efficacy of the inhibition of APE1 redox activity in blocking TNF-α and FAs induced inflammatory response opens new perspectives for treatment of inflammatory-based liver diseases.

  15. Specific Inhibition of the Redox Activity of Ape1/Ref-1 by E3330 Blocks Tnf-Α-Induced Activation of Il-8 Production in Liver Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascotto, Carlo; Leonardi, Antonio; Kelley, Mark R.; Tiribelli, Claudio; Tell, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    APE1/Ref-1 is a main regulator of cellular response to oxidative stress via DNA-repair function and co-activating activity on the NF-κB transcription factor. APE1 is central in controlling the oxidative stress-based inflammatory processes through modulation of cytokines expression and its overexpression is responsible for the onset of chemoresistance in different tumors including hepatic cancer. We examined the functional role of APE1 overexpression during hepatic cell damage related to fatty acid accumulation and the role of the redox function of APE1 in the inflammatory process. HepG2 cells were stably transfected with functional and non-functional APE1 encoding plasmids and the protective effect of APE1 overexpression toward genotoxic compounds or FAs accumulation, was tested. JHH6 cells were stimulated with TNF-α in the presence or absence of E3330, an APE1 redox inhibitor. IL-8 promoter activity was assessed by a luciferase reporter assay, gene expression by Real-Time PCR and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, IL-12) levels measured by ELISA. APE1 over-expression did not prevent cytotoxicity induced by lipid accumulation. E3330 treatment prevented the functional activation of NF-κB via the alteration of APE1 subcellular trafficking and reduced IL-6 and IL-8 expression induced by TNF-α and FAs accumulation through blockage of the redox-mediated activation of NF-κB. APE1 overexpression observed in hepatic cancer cells may reflect an adaptive response to cell damage and may be responsible for further cell resistance to chemotherapy and for the onset of inflammatory response. The efficacy of the inhibition of APE1 redox activity in blocking TNF-α and FAs induced inflammatory response opens new perspectives for treatment of inflammatory-based liver diseases. PMID:23967134

  16. Effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songyun; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Jie; Wang, Ruiying; Wang, Mian

    2017-02-15

    Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between diabetes and hippocampal neuron damage. This study aimed to determine the effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits (GCLM and GCLC) in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) rats. At 12weeks after streptozotocin injection, T1DM rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15 each group) to receive no treatment (T1DM), saline (T1DM+saline), alpha-lipoic acid (T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid), and troxerutin (T1DM+troxerutin), respectively, for 6weeks. Meanwhile, 10 control animals (NC group) were assessed in parallel. Learning performance was evaluated by the Morris water maze. After treatment, hippocampi were collected for pathological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Next, hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were assessed. Finally, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA and protein levels were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Compared with T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, escape latency was overtly reduced in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Significantly increased GCLM and GCLC mRNA levels, GCLC protein amounts, SOD activity, and GSH levels, and reduced MDA amounts were observed in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. In T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, H&E staining showed less pyramidal cells in the hippocampus, with disorganized layers, karyopyknosis, decreased endochylema, and cavitation, effects relieved in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Troxerutin alleviates oxidative stress and promotes learning in streptozotocin-induced T1DM rats, a process involving GCLC expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  18. The structure of classical swine fever virus N(pro: a novel cysteine Autoprotease and zinc-binding protein involved in subversion of type I interferon induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Gottipati

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express their genome as a single polypeptide that is subsequently cleaved into individual proteins by host- and virus-encoded proteases. The pestivirus N-terminal protease (N(pro is a cysteine autoprotease that cleaves between its own C-terminus and the N-terminus of the core protein. Due to its unique sequence and catalytic site, it forms its own cysteine protease family C53. After self-cleavage, N(pro is no longer active as a protease. The released N(pro suppresses the induction of the host's type-I interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β response. N(pro binds interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3, the key transcriptional activator of IFN-α/β genes, and promotes degradation of IRF3 by the proteasome, thus preventing induction of the IFN-α/β response to pestivirus infection. Here we report the crystal structures of pestivirus N(pro. N(pro is structurally distinct from other known cysteine proteases and has a novel "clam shell" fold consisting of a protease domain and a zinc-binding domain. The unique fold of N(pro allows auto-catalysis at its C-terminus and subsequently conceals the cleavage site in the active site of the protease. Although many viruses interfere with type I IFN induction by targeting the IRF3 pathway, little information is available regarding structure or mechanism of action of viral proteins that interact with IRF3. The distribution of amino acids on the surface of N(pro involved in targeting IRF3 for proteasomal degradation provides insight into the nature of N(pro's interaction with IRF3. The structures thus establish the mechanism of auto-catalysis and subsequent auto-inhibition of trans-activity of N(pro, and its role in subversion of host immune response.

  19. Aspartic acid-promoted highly selective and sensitive colorimetric sensing of cysteine in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Qin; Deng, Jingjing; Wang, Dalei; Yang, Lifen; Yu, Ping; Mao, Lanqun

    2012-11-06

    Direct selective determination of cysteine in the cerebral system is of great importance because of the crucial roles of cysteine in physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we report a sensitive and selective colorimetric assay for cysteine in the rat brain with gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) as the signal readout. Initially, Au-NPs synthesized with citrate as the stabilizer are red in color and exhibit absorption at 520 nm. The addition of an aqueous solution (20 μL) of cysteine or aspartic acid alone to a 200 μL Au-NP dispersion causes no aggregation, while the addition of an aqueous solution of cysteine into a Au-NP dispersion containing aspartic acid (1.8 mM) causes the aggregation of Au-NPs and thus results in the color change of the colloid from wine red to blue. These changes are ascribed to the ion pair interaction between aspartic acid and cysteine on the interface between Au-NPs and solution. The concentration of cysteine can be visualized with the naked eye and determined by UV-vis spectroscopy. The signal output shows a linear relationship for cysteine within the concentration range from 0.166 to 1.67 μM with a detection limit of 100 nM. The assay demonstrated here is highly selective and is free from the interference of other natural amino acids and other thiol-containing species as well as the species commonly existing in the brain such as lactate, ascorbic acid, and glucose. The basal dialysate level of cysteine in the microdialysate from the striatum of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats is determined to be around 9.6 ± 2.1 μM. The method demonstrated here is facile but reliable and durable and is envisaged to be applicable to understanding the chemical essence involved in physiological and pathological events associated with cysteine.

  20. Development of 68Ga ethyl cysteinate dimer for PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alireza Mirzaei; Jalilian, A.R.; Gholamali Shabani; Ashraf Fakhari; Mehdi Akhlaghi; Davood Beiki

    2016-01-01

    In this work development of 68 Ga-ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 68 Ga-ECD) a 68 Ga tracer for possible cerebral blood flow based on 99m Tc ECD homolog is reported. 68 Ga-ECD was prepared using generator-based 68 GaCl 3 and ECD at optimized conditions. Quality control, stability, partition co-efficient and the biodistribution of the tracer (by tissue counting and PET/CT in rats) was studied. Significant metabolism of the lipophilic tracer into water soluble metabolite(s) led to urinary excretion of the tracer, un-comparable to that of homologous 99m Tc-compound. Cardiac uptake of the complex suggests formation of a possible lipophil cationic complex and/or metabolite. (author)

  1. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  2. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  3. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  4. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  5. De Novo Construction of Redox Active Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C C; Sheehan, M M; Ennist, N M; Kodali, G; Bialas, C; Englander, M T; Discher, B M; Dutton, P L

    2016-01-01

    Relatively simple principles can be used to plan and construct de novo proteins that bind redox cofactors and participate in a range of electron-transfer reactions analogous to those seen in natural oxidoreductase proteins. These designed redox proteins are called maquettes. Hydrophobic/hydrophilic binary patterning of heptad repeats of amino acids linked together in a single-chain self-assemble into 4-alpha-helix bundles. These bundles form a robust and adaptable frame for uncovering the default properties of protein embedded cofactors independent of the complexities introduced by generations of natural selection and allow us to better understand what factors can be exploited by man or nature to manipulate the physical chemical properties of these cofactors. Anchoring of redox cofactors such as hemes, light active tetrapyrroles, FeS clusters, and flavins by His and Cys residues allow cofactors to be placed at positions in which electron-tunneling rates between cofactors within or between proteins can be predicted in advance. The modularity of heptad repeat designs facilitates the construction of electron-transfer chains and novel combinations of redox cofactors and new redox cofactor assisted functions. Developing de novo designs that can support cofactor incorporation upon expression in a cell is needed to support a synthetic biology advance that integrates with natural bioenergetic pathways. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Unusual hydrogen bonding in L-cysteine hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, V S; Ghazaryan, V V; Boldyreva, E V; Petrosyan, A M

    2015-08-01

    L-Cysteine hydrogen fluoride, or bis(L-cysteinium) difluoride-L-cysteine-hydrogen fluoride (1/1/1), 2C3H8NO2S(+)·2F(-)·C3H7NO2S·HF or L-Cys(+)(L-Cys···L-Cys(+))F(-)(F(-)...H-F), provides the first example of a structure with cations of the 'triglycine sulfate' type, i.e. A(+)(A···A(+)) (where A and A(+) are the zwitterionic and cationic states of an amino acid, respectively), without a doubly charged counter-ion. The salt crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the space group P2(1). The dimeric (L-Cys···L-Cys(+)) cation and the dimeric (F(-)···H-F) anion are formed via strong O-H···O or F-H···F hydrogen bonds, respectively, with very short O···O [2.4438 (19) Å] and F···F distances [2.2676 (17) Å]. The F···F distance is significantly shorter than in solid hydrogen fluoride. Additionally, there is another very short hydrogen bond, of O-H···F type, formed by a L-cysteinium cation and a fluoride ion. The corresponding O···F distance of 2.3412 (19) Å seems to be the shortest among O-H···F and F-H···O hydrogen bonds known to date. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction study was complemented by IR spectroscopy. Of special interest was the spectral region of vibrations related to the above-mentioned hydrogen bonds.

  7. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  8. Quercetin targets cysteine string protein (CSPalpha and impairs synaptic transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglian Xu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine string protein (CSPalpha is a synaptic vesicle protein that displays unique anti-neurodegenerative properties. CSPalpha is a member of the conserved J protein family, also called the Hsp40 (heat shock protein of 40 kDa protein family, whose importance in protein folding has been recognized for many years. Deletion of the CSPalpha in mice results in knockout mice that are normal for the first 2-3 weeks of life followed by an unexplained presynaptic neurodegeneration and premature death. How CSPalpha prevents neurodegeneration is currently not known. As a neuroprotective synaptic vesicle protein, CSPalpha represents a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of neurodegenerative disorders.Here, we demonstrate that the flavonoid quercetin promotes formation of stable CSPalpha-CSPalpha dimers and that quercetin-induced dimerization is dependent on the unique cysteine string region. Furthermore, in primary cultures of Lymnaea neurons, quercetin induction of CSPalpha dimers correlates with an inhibition of synapse formation and synaptic transmission suggesting that quercetin interfers with CSPalpha function. Quercetin's action on CSPalpha is concentration dependent and does not promote dimerization of other synaptic proteins or other J protein family members and reduces the assembly of CSPalpha:Hsc70 units (70kDa heat shock cognate protein.Quercetin is a plant derived flavonoid and popular nutritional supplement proposed to prevent memory loss and altitude sickness among other ailments, although its precise mechanism(s of action has been unclear. In view of the therapeutic promise of upregulation of CSPalpha and the undesired consequences of CSPalpha dysfunction, our data establish an essential proof of principle that pharmaceutical agents can selectively target the neuroprotective J protein CSPalpha.

  9. Mutational analysis of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase reveals critical residues for tRNA-dependent cysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgadóttir, Sunna; Sinapah, Sylvie; Söll, Dieter; Ling, Jiqiang

    2012-01-02

    In methanogenic archaea, Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) converts Sep-tRNA(Cys) to Cys-tRNA(Cys). The mechanism of tRNA-dependent cysteine formation remains unclear due to the lack of functional studies. In this work, we mutated 19 conserved residues in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii SepCysS, and employed an in vivo system to determine the activity of the resulting variants. Our results show that three active-site cysteines (Cys39, Cys42 and Cys247) are essential for SepCysS activity. In addition, combined with structural modeling, our mutational and functional analyses also reveal multiple residues that are important for the binding of PLP, Sep and tRNA. Our work thus represents the first systematic functional analysis of conserved residues in archaeal SepCysSs, providing insights into the catalytic and substrate binding mechanisms of this poorly characterized enzyme. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  11. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  13. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  14. Knockout of the murine cysteine dioxygenase gene results in severe impairment in ability to synthesize taurine and an increased catabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Iori; Roman, Heather B.; Valli, Alessandro; Fieselmann, Krista; Lam, Jimmy; Peters, Rachel; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine homeostasis is dependent on the regulation of cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) in response to changes in sulfur amino acid intake. CDO oxidizes cysteine to cysteinesulfinate, which is further metabolized to either taurine or to pyruvate plus sulfate. To gain insight into the physiological function of CDO and the consequence of a loss of CDO activity, mice carrying a null CDO allele (CDO+/− mice) were crossed to generate CDO−/−, CDO+/−, and CDO+/+ mice. CDO−/− mice exhibited postnatal mortality, growth deficit, and connective tissue pathology. CDO−/− mice had extremely low taurine levels and somewhat elevated cysteine levels, consistent with the lack of flux through CDO-dependent catabolic pathways. However, plasma sulfate levels were slightly higher in CDO−/− mice than in CDO+/− or CDO+/+ mice, and tissue levels of acid-labile sulfide were elevated, indicating an increase in cysteine catabolism by cysteine desulfhydration pathways. Null mice had lower hepatic cytochrome c oxidase levels, suggesting impaired electron transport capacity. Supplementation of mice with taurine improved survival of male pups but otherwise had little effect on the phenotype of the CDO−/− mice. H2S has been identified as an important gaseous signaling molecule as well as a toxicant, and pathology may be due to dysregulation of H2S production. Control of cysteine levels by regulation of CDO may be necessary to maintain low H2S/sulfane sulfur levels and facilitate the use of H2S as a signaling molecule. PMID:21693692

  15. Molecular Structures and Dynamics of the Stepwise Activation Mechanism of a Matrix Metalloproteinase Zymogen: Challenging the Cysteine Switch Dogma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblum, G.; Meroueh, S.; Toth, M.; Fisher, J.; Fridman, R.; Mobashery, S.; Sagi, I.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of matrix metalloproteinase zymogen (pro-MMP) is a vital homeostatic process, yet its molecular basis remains unresolved. Using stopped-flow X-ray spectroscopy of the active site zinc ion, we determined the temporal sequence of pro-MMP-9 activation catalyzed by tissue kallikrein protease in milliseconds to several minutes. The identity of three intermediates seen by X-ray spectroscopy was corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The cysteine-zinc interaction that maintains enzyme latency is disrupted via active-site proton transfers that mediate transient metal-protein coordination events and eventual binding of water. Unexpectedly, these events ensue as a direct result of complexation of pro-MMP-9 and kallikrein and occur before proteolysis and eventual dissociation of the pro-peptide from the catalytic site. Here we demonstrate the synergism among long-range protein conformational transitions, local structural rearrangements, and fine atomic events in the process of zymogen activation.

  16. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles is reported. • Synthesis of Highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (∼40 nm) was done in an aqueous medium. • FTIR analysis shows that L-cysteine bound to the nanoparticle surface via thiol group. - Abstract: A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month

  17. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Nikhil, E-mail: nkumar.phd2011.bt@nitrr.ac.in; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan, E-mail: contactlataupadhyay@gmail.com

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles is reported. • Synthesis of Highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles (∼40 nm) was done in an aqueous medium. • FTIR analysis shows that L-cysteine bound to the nanoparticle surface via thiol group. - Abstract: A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month.

  18. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, A. G.; Barison, A.; Oliveira, V. S.; Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A.; Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T.; Schreiner, W. H.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV–Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the μM range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation–reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V 2 O 5 form.

  19. Acetaldehyde Removal from Indoor Air through Chemical Absorption Using L-Cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Noguchi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The irreversible removal of acetaldehyde from indoor air via a chemical reaction with amino acids was investigated. To compare effectiveness, five types of amino acid (glycine, L-lysine, L-methionine, L-cysteine, and L-cystine were used as the reactants. First, acetaldehyde-laden air was introduced into aqueous solutions of each amino acid and the removal abilities were compared. Among the five amino acids, L-cysteine solution showed much higher removal efficiency, while the other amino acids solutions didn’t show any significant differences from the removal efficiency of water used as a control. Next, as a test of the removal abilities of acetaldehyde by semi-solid L-cysteine, a gel containing L-cysteine solution was put in a fluororesin bag filled with acetaldehyde gas, and the change of acetaldehyde concentration was measured. The L-cysteine-containing gel removed 80% of the acetaldehyde in the air within 24 hours. The removal ability likely depended on the unique reaction whereby acetaldehyde and L-cysteine rapidly produce 2-methylthiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid. These results suggested that the reaction between acetaldehyde and L-cysteine has possibilities for irreversibly removing toxic acetaldehyde from indoor air.

  20. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis of Maize Immature Embryos Reveals the Roles of Cysteine in Improving Agrobacterium Infection Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Fu, Junjie; Wang, Guoying; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Yunjun

    2017-01-01

    Maize Agrobacterium-mediated transformation efficiency has been greatly improved in recent years. Antioxidants, such as, cysteine, can significantly improve maize transformation frequency through improving the Agrobacterium infection efficiency. However, the mechanism underlying the transformation improvement after cysteine exposure has not been elucidated. In this study, we showed that the addition of cysteine to the co-cultivation medium significantly increased the Agrobacterium infection efficiency of hybrid HiII and inbred line Z31 maize embryos. Reactive oxygen species contents were higher in embryos treated with cysteine than that without cysteine. We further investigated the mechanism behind cysteine-related infection efficiency increase using transcriptome analysis. The results showed that the cysteine treatment up-regulated 939 genes and down-regulated 549 genes in both Z31 and HiII. Additionally, more differentially expressed genes were found in HiII embryos than those in Z31 embryos, suggesting that HiII was more sensitive to the cysteine treatment than Z31. GO analysis showed that the up-regulated genes were mainly involved in the oxidation reduction process. The up-regulation of these genes could help maize embryos to cope with the oxidative stress stimulated by Agrobacterium infection. The down-regulated genes were mainly involved in the cell wall and membrane metabolism, such as, aquaporin and expansin genes. Decreased expression of these cell wall integrity genes could loosen the cell wall, thereby improving the entry of Agrobacterium into plant cells. This study offers insight into the role of cysteine in improving Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize immature embryos. PMID:29089955

  2. Negative modulation of the GABAA ρ1 receptor function by l-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán González, Andrea N; Vicentini, Florencia; Calvo, Daniel J

    2018-01-01

    l-Cysteine is an endogenous sulfur-containing amino acid with multiple and varied roles in the central nervous system, including neuroprotection and the maintenance of the redox balance. However, it was also suggested as an excitotoxic agent implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. l-Cysteine can modulate the activity of ionic channels, including voltage-gated calcium channels and glutamatergic NMDA receptors, whereas its effects on GABAergic neurotransmission had not been studied before. In the present work, we analyzed the effects of l-cysteine on responses mediated by homomeric GABA A ρ1 receptors, which are known for mediating tonic γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) responses in retinal neurons. GABA A ρ1 receptors were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and GABA-evoked chloride currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp in the presence or absence of l-cysteine. l-Cysteine antagonized GABA A ρ1 receptor-mediated responses; inhibition was dose-dependent, reversible, voltage independent, and susceptible to GABA concentration. Concentration-response curves for GABA were shifted to the right in the presence of l-cysteine without a substantial change in the maximal response. l-Cysteine inhibition was insensitive to chemical protection of the sulfhydryl groups of the ρ1 subunits by the irreversible alkylating agent N-ethyl maleimide. Our results suggest that redox modulation is not involved during l-cysteine actions and that l-cysteine might be acting as a competitive antagonist of the GABA A ρ1 receptors. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  4. Amine binding and oxidation at the catalytic site for photosynthetic water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Anthony J. A.; Anderson, Lorraine B.; Barry, Bridgette A.

    1998-01-01

    Photosynthetic water oxidation occurs at the Mn-containing catalytic site of photosystem II (PSII). By the use of 14C-labeled amines and SDS-denaturing PAGE, covalent adducts derived from primary amines and the PSII subunits, CP47, D2/D1, and the Mn-stabilizing protein, can be observed. When PSII contains the 18- and 24-kDa extrinsic proteins, which restrict access to the active site, no 14C labeling is obtained. NaCl, but not Na2SO4, competes with 14C labeling in Mn-containing PSII preparations, and the concentration dependence of this competition parallels the activation of oxygen evolution. Formation of 14C-labeled adducts is observed in the presence or in the absence of a functional manganese cluster. However, no significant Cl− effect on 14C labeling is observed in the absence of the Mn cluster. Isolation and quantitation of the 14C-labeled aldehyde product, produced from [14C]benzylamine, gives yields of 1.8 ± 0.3 mol/mol PSII and 2.9 ± 0.2 mol/mol in Mn-containing and Mn-depleted PSII, respectively. The corresponding specific activities are 0.40 ± 0.07 μmol(μmol PSII-hr)−1 and 0.64 ± 0.04 μmol(μmol PSII-hr)−1. Cl− suppresses the production of [14C]benzaldehyde in Mn-containing PSII, but does not suppress the production in Mn-depleted preparations. Control experiments show that these oxidation reactions do not involve the redox-active tyrosines, D and Z. Our results suggest the presence of one or more activated carbonyl groups in protein subunits that form the active site of PSII. PMID:9482863

  5. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  6. Dynamics of postirradiation intracellular cysteine and aspartic proteinases profiles in proliferating and nonproliferating mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Osmak, M.; Suhar, A.; Turk, V.; Skrk, J.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamics of postirradiation intracellular cysteine and aspartic proteinases profiles were examined in proliferating and nonproliferating Chinese hamster fibroblasts (V 79). The results show that there are significant alterations in cysteine and aspartic intracellular proteinases activity already in the early postirradiation period, which are different in proliferating and nonproliferating cells. Irradiation of the cells examined to low doses and up to 15 Gy induced an increase in cysteine proteinases activity in the early postexposure period, while at higher irradiation doses applied, the activity of these proteinases was decreased. These observations suggest that intracellular proteinases are actively participating in process involving recovery from radiation injury or cell killing. (orig.) [de

  7. Adsorption Dynamics and Self-Assembled L-cysteine on Au(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Yan, Jiawei

    As the only amino acid with a functional thiol group, L - cysteine offers a strong perspective both for binding to gold and other metals, and for gentle immobilization of biomolecules. Binding to single - crystal, atomically planar surfaces offers the additional perspective that bound L - cysteine...... can be structurally mapped at the single - molecule level . In this work, we have followed the adsorption of L - cysteine on single - crystal Au(100) by measuring the electrode potential dynamics during the adsorption process. In situ STM revealed the structure of the self - assembled ordered layers...

  8. E.S.R. studies of mechanisms of radiation protection effect by cysteine and cystine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue-Peng, L.; Tie-Cheng, T.; Nian-Yun, L.

    1981-01-01

    By means of E.S.R. the repair mechanism of radiation induced spin transfer from dTMP to cysteine in binary system dTMP-cysteine has been confirmed. Furthermore, a new marked radiation protection effect, exerted by cysteine or cystine on thymine irradiated and observed at low temperature, has been detected. Another sort of fast protection mechanism, including electron transfer and excitation transfer, has been proposed, based on recent advances of primary radiation process of pyrimidine bases and analysed by molecular orbital theory. This fast radiation protection mechanism provides the possibility to utilize electrophilic sulfhydryl protectors for realizing excellent protection effect. (author)

  9. Interaction of cysteine and copper ions on the surface of iron: EIS, polarization and XPS study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The current study demonstrates a comprehensive study for Cysteine + Cu(II) ions as an efficient inhibitor as demonstrated by EIS, XPS and potentiodynamic polarization measurements, in addition to traditional weight loss measurements. → The novelty of the current work originates from the combined use of an eco-friendly compound (i.e., cysteine) with a minute amount of copper ions (in the micro molar range) as a corrosion inhibitor for low carbon steel in acidic medium. To this end, cysteine shows only moderate inhibition ca. 60% for iron which jumps up to more than 95% in the presence of micro molar range of Cu(II) ions. → Cysteine-Cu(II) blends are found superior to benzotriazole (BTAH)-Cu(II) blends in terms of their long-term stability in addition to the avoidance of the use of the well-reported highly toxic BTAH. - Abstract: This study addresses the enhancing effect of copper ions on the inhibition efficiency (IE) of cysteine (an eco-friendly compound) against the corrosion of iron in 0.5 M sulphuric acid. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data revealed a significant increase in the polarization resistance (R p ) of the iron/solution interface in the presence of cysteine and Cu(II) ions instead of cysteine alone. That is, IE of 95% is obtained in the presence of 5 mM cysteine and 25 μM Cu(II) ions, compared to 66% in absence of Cu(II) ions. Moreover, electrochemical polarization measurements indicate that cysteine and Cu(II) ions blends act as mixed-type inhibitors for the corrosion of iron. The formation of Cu(I)-cysteinate complex and/or cysteine SAM at Cu atop the iron surface (as evident from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) blocks the underlying iron surface and imparts a pronounced protection against its corrosion. IE of cysteine-Cu(II) blend remains effectively unchanged with immersion time indicating its high stability in the used acidic medium.

  10. Oral Administration of (S)-Allyl-l-Cysteine and Aged Garlic Extract to Rats: Determination of Metabolites and Their Pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taehoon; Oh, Ju-Hee; Lee, Joo Hyun; Park, Sang Cheol; Jang, Young Pyo; Lee, Young-Joo

    2017-11-01

    ( S )-Allyl-l-cysteine is the major bioactive compound in garlic. ( S )-Allyl-l-cysteine is metabolized to ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine, and N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide after oral administration. An accurate LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous quantification of ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine and its metabolites in rat plasma, and the feasibility of using it in pharmacokinetic studies was tested. The analytes were quantified by multiple reaction monitoring using an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer. Because significant quantitative interference was observed between ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine and N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine as a result of the decomposition of N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine at the detector source, chromatographic separation was required to discriminate ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine and its metabolites on a reversed-phase C 18 analytical column with a gradient mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. The calibration curves of ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine, ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine, and N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide were linear over each concentration range, and the lower limits of quantification were 0.1 µg/mL [( S )-allyl-l-cysteine and N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine] and 0.25 µg/mL [( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide and N -acetyl-( S )-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide]. Acceptable intraday and inter-day precisions and accuracies were obtained at three concentration levels. The method satisfied the regulatory requirements for matrix effects, recovery, and stability. The validated LC-MS/MS method was successfully used to determine the concentration of ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine and its metabolites in rat plasma samples after the administration of ( S )-allyl-l-cysteine or aged garlic extract. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  12. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  13. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  14. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  15. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  16. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  17. Differential processing of Arabidopsis ubiquitin-like Atg8 autophagy proteins by Atg4 cysteine proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jongchan; Park, Eunsook; Dinesh-Kumar, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly conserved biological process during which double membrane bound autophagosomes carry intracellular cargo material to the vacuole or lysosome for degradation and/or recycling. Autophagosome biogenesis requires Autophagy 4 (Atg4) cysteine protease-mediated processing of ubiquitin-like Atg8 proteins. Unlike single Atg4 and Atg8 genes in yeast, the Arabidopsis genome contains two Atg4 (AtAtg4a and AtAtg4b) and nine Atg8 (AtAtg8a–AtAtg8i) genes. However, we know very little about specificity of different AtAtg4s for processing of different AtAtg8s. Here, we describe a unique bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based AtAtg8 synthetic substrate to assess AtAtg4 activity in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we developed a unique native gel assay of superhRLUC catalytic activity assay to monitor cleavage of AtAtg8s in vitro. Our results indicate that AtAtg4a is the predominant protease and that it processes AtAtg8a, AtAtg8c, AtAtg8d, and AtAtg8i better than AtAtg4b in vitro. In addition, kinetic analyses indicate that although both AtAtg4s have similar substrate affinity, AtAtg4a is more active than AtAtg4b in vitro. Activity of AtAtg4s is reversibly inhibited in vitro by reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. Our in vivo bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analyses in Arabidopsis transgenic plants indicate that the AtAtg8 synthetic substrate is efficiently processed and this is AtAtg4 dependent. These results indicate that the synthetic AtAtg8 substrate is used efficiently in the biogenesis of autophagosomes in vivo. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing the AtAtg8 synthetic substrate will be a valuable tool to dissect autophagy processes and the role of autophagy during different biological processes in plants. PMID:24379391

  18. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  19. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  20. Oriented immobilization of His-tagged kinase RIO1 protein on redox active N-(IDA-like)-Cu(II) monolayer deposited on gold electrode—The base of electrochemical biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mielecki, Marcin; Wojtasik, Justyn; Zborowska, Magdalena; Kurzątkowska, Katarzyna; Grzelak, Krystyna; Dehaen, Wim; Radecki, Jerzy; Radecka, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The redox active N-(IDA-like)-Cu(II) monolayer is suitable for oriented and stable immobilization of His-tagged kinase Rio1. ► Cu(II) deposited onto the electrode surface play double role: immobilization sites for His-tagged proteins and transduction centres tracking the protein–small molecule interactions. ► The base of biosensor response towards target compound is the change of Rio1 conformation lading to alternation of the permeability of counter ions to Cu(II) redox centres. -- Abstract: The fabrication of electrochemical biosensor consists of the following successive steps: formation of thiol derivative of iminodiacetic acid (IDA-like/N-heterocyclic donor) and N-acetylcysteamine (NAC) self-assembled monolayer on the Au electrode, complexation of Cu(II) by N(IDA-like) attached to the surface of the Au electrode and immobilization of kinase protein Rio1 through N(IDA-like)-Cu(II)-histidine-tag covalent bond formation. Each step of modification was controlled by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectrometry and atomic force microscopy. The interactions between rHis 6 -Rio1 attached to the surface of the electrode and tyrphostin inhibitor (2E)-N-Benzyl-2-cyano-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-acrylamide (AG-490) and its analogue (2-cyano-N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(pyridin-3-yl)prop-2-enamide) (CPE), present in aqueous solution were monitored with Osteryoung square wave voltammetry. The basis of the biosensor response was the change in the electrochemical properties of Cu(II) redox centres upon formation of the rHis 6 -Rio1-inhibitor complex. A linear responses with high reproducibility and stability were observed between 0.10 and 0.40 μM of AG-490 as well as of CPE. The interaction between rHis 6 -Rio1 and AG-490 was stronger than the interaction with its analogue CPE. Cu(II) redox current decrease of 37.9 ± 1.6% and 23.3 ± 1.0% were observed in the presence of 0.40 μM of AG-490 and CPE, respectively. The presented biosensor could be

  1. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  2. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2 isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2 and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  3. Mutation choice to eliminate buried free cysteines in protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xue; Longo, Liam M; Blaber, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Buried free-cysteine (Cys) residues can contribute to an irreversible unfolding pathway that promotes protein aggregation, increases immunogenic potential, and significantly reduces protein functional half-life. Consequently, mutation of buried free-Cys residues can result in significant improvement in the storage, reconstitution, and pharmacokinetic properties of protein-based therapeutics. Mutational design to eliminate buried free-Cys residues typically follows one of two common heuristics: either substitution by Ser (polar and isosteric), or substitution by Ala or Val (hydrophobic); however, a detailed structural and thermodynamic understanding of Cys mutations is lacking. We report a comprehensive structure and stability study of Ala, Ser, Thr, and Val mutations at each of the three buried free-Cys positions (Cys16, Cys83, and Cys117) in fibroblast growth factor-1. Mutation was almost universally destabilizing, indicating a general optimization for the wild-type Cys, including van der Waals and H-bond interactions. Structural response to Cys mutation characteristically involved changes to maintain, or effectively substitute, local H-bond interactions-by either structural collapse to accommodate the smaller oxygen radius of Ser/Thr, or conversely, expansion to enable inclusion of novel H-bonding solvent. Despite the diverse structural effects, the least destabilizing average substitution at each position was Ala, and not isosteric Ser. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  4. Plasma Total Cysteine and Cardiovascular Risk Burden: Action and Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta De Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that redox analysis could provide sensitive markers of the oxidative pathway associated to the presence of an increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (RFs, independently of type. We classified 304 subjects without cardiovascular disease into 4 groups according to the total number of RFs (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, hyperhomocysteinaemia, diabetes, obesity, and their combination. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring plasma total and reduced homocysteine, cysteine (Cys, glutathione, cysteinylglycine, blood reduced glutathione, and malondialdehyde. Twenty-seven percent of subjects were in group 0 RF, 26% in 1 RF, 31% in 2 RF, and 16% in ≥3 RF. By multivariable ordinal regression analysis, plasma total Cys was associated to a higher number of RF (OR = 1.068; 95% CI = 1.027–1.110, =0.002. Total RF burden is associated with increased total Cys levels. These findings support a prooxidant effect of Cys in conjunction with RF burden, and shed light on the pathophysiologic role of redox state unbalance in preclinical atherosclerosis.

  5. Peptidomic Identification of Cysteine-Rich Peptides from Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemu, Xinya; Serra, Aida; Darwis, Dina A; Cornvik, Tobias; Sze, Siu Kwan; Tam, James P

    2018-01-01

    Plant cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) constitute a majority of plant-derived peptides with high molecular diversity. This protocol describes a rapid and efficient peptidomic approach to identify a whole spectrum of CRPs in a plant extract and decipher their molecular diversity and bioprocessing mechanism. Cyclotides from C. ternatea are used as the model CRPs to demonstrate our methodology. Cyclotides exist naturally in both cyclic and linear forms, although the linear forms (acyclotide) are generally present at much lower concentrations. Both cyclotides and acyclotides require linearization of their backbone prior to fragmentation and sequencing. A novel and practical three-step chemoenzymatic treatment was developed to linearize and distinguish both forms: (1) N-terminal acetylation that pre-labels the acyclotides; (2) conversion of Cys into pseudo-Lys through aziridine-mediated S-alkylation to reduce disulfide bonds and to increase the net charge of peptides; and (3) opening of cyclic backbones by the novel asparaginyl endopeptidase butelase 2 that cleaves at the native bioprocessing site. The treated peptides are subsequently analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry using electron transfer dissociation fragmentation and sequences are identified by matching the MS/MS spectra directly with the transcriptomic database.

  6. Differential Expression of Cysteine Dioxygenase 1 in Complex Karyotype Liposarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Altered cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1 gene expression has been observed in several cancers but has not yet been investigated in liposarcomas. The aim of this study was to evaluate CDO1 expression in a cohort of liposarcomas and to determine its association with clinicopathological features. Existing microarray data indicated variable CDO1 expression in liposarcoma subtypes. CDO1 mRNA from a larger cohort of liposarcomas was quantified by real time-PCR, and CDO1 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC in more than 300 tumor specimens. Well-differentiated liposarcomas (WDLSs had significantly higher CDO1 gene expression and protein levels than dedifferentiated liposarcomas (DDLSs ( P < 0.001. Location of the tumor was not predictive of the expression level of CDO1 mRNA in any histological subtype of liposarcoma. Recurrent tumors did not show any difference in CDO1 expression when compared to primary tumors. CDO1 expression was upregulated as human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs undergo differentiation into mature adipocytes. Our results suggest that CDO1 is a marker of liposarcoma progression and adipogenic differentiation.

  7. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; Rahman, Mona N; Maines, Mahin D; Ozolinš, Terence Rs; Szarek, Walter A; Jia, Zongchao; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2016-03-01

    Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys) residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2) isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2) and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD) and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  8. Identification and preliminary characterization of protein-cysteine farnesyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, V.; Roberts, D.; Tobin, A.; O'Rourke, E.; Barbacid, M.; De Virgilio, M.; Meyers, C.; Ahmed, N.; Kurz, B.; Resh, M.; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    1990-01-01

    Ras proteins must be isoprenylated at a conserved cysteine residue near the carboxyl terminus in order to exert their biological activity. Previous studies indicate that an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway, most likely farnesyl pyrophosphate, is the donor of this isoprenyl group. Inhibition of mevalonate synthesis reverts the abnormal phenotypes induced by the mutant RAS2 Valendash19 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and blocks the maturation of Xenopus oocytes induced by an onocogenic Ras p21 protein of human origin. These results have raised the possibility of using inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway to block the transforming properties of ras oncogenes. Unfortunately, mevalonate is a precursor of various end products essential to mammalian cells, such as dolichols, ubiquinones, heme A, and cholesterol. In this study, the authors describe an enzymatic activity(ies) capable of catalyzing the farnesylation of unprocessed Ras p21 proteins in vitro at the correct (Cys-186) residue. Gel filtration analysis of a partially purified preparation of protein farnesyltransferase revealed two peaks of activity at 250-350 kDa and 80-130 kDa. Availability of an in vitro protein farnesyltransferase assay should be useful in screening for potential inhibitors of ras oncogene function that will not interfere with other aspects of the mevalonate pathway

  9. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells.

  10. Enzymatic synthesis of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin hydrolysis industries wastewater with tryptophan synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lisheng; Wang, Zhiyuan; Mao, Pingting; Liu, Junzhong; Zhang, Hongjuan; Liu, Qian; Jiao, Qing-Cai

    2013-04-01

    An economical method for production of S-phenyl-L-cysteine from keratin acid hydrolysis wastewater (KHW) containing L-serine was developed by recombinant tryptophan synthase. This study provides us with an alternative KHW utilization strategy to synthesize S-phenyl-L-cysteine. Tryptophan synthase could efficiently convert L-serine contained in KHW to S-phenyl-L-cysteine at pH 9.0, 40°C and Trion X-100 of 0.02%. In a scale up study, L-serine conversion rate reach 97.1% with a final S-phenyl-L-cysteine concentration of 38.6 g l(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Facile and green synthesis of highly stable L-cysteine functionalized copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan

    2016-11-01

    A simple eco-friendly method for L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticles (CCNPs) synthesis in aqueous solution has been developed. Glucose and L-cysteine were used as reducing agent and capping/functionalizing agent, respectively. Different parameters such as capping agent concentration, pH, reaction temperature, and reducing agent concentration were optimized during the synthesis. The L-cysteine capped copper nanoparticle were characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Particle size and zeta potential analyser, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Spherical shaped cysteine functionalized/capped copper nanoparticles with an average size of 40 nm were found to be highly stable at room temperature (RT) for a period of 1 month

  12. The Cysteine S-Alkylation Reaction as a Synthetic Method to Covalently Modify Peptide Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calce, Enrica; De Luca, Stefania

    2017-01-05

    Synthetic methodologies to chemically modify peptide molecules have long been investigated for their impact in the field of chemical biology. They allow the introduction of biochemical probes useful for studying protein functions, for manipulating peptides with therapeutic potential, and for structure-activity relationship investigations. The commonly used approach was the derivatization of an amino acid side chain. In this regard, the cysteine, for its unique reactivity, has been widely employed as the substrate for such modifications. Herein, we report on methodologies developed to modify the cysteine thiol group through the S-alkylation reaction. Some procedures perform the alkylation of cysteine derivatives, in order to prepare building blocks to be used during the peptide synthesis, whilst some others selectively modify peptide sequences containing a cysteine residue with a free thiol group, both in solution and in the solid phase. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Chiral supramolecular gold-cysteine nanoparticles: Chiroptical and nonlinear optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Russier-Antoine

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid that easily coordinates to soft metal ions and grafts to noble metal surfaces. We report a simple synthetic approach for the production of chiral gold-cysteine polymeric nanoparticles soluble in water. Conjugation of cysteine with gold in a polymeric way, leading to ~50 nm diameter nanoparticles, resulted in the generation of new characteristic circular dichroism (CD signals in the region of 250–400 nm, whereas no CD signal changes were found with cysteine alone. We also investigate their nonlinear optical properties after two-photon absorption. Two-photon emission spectra and first hyper-polarizabilities, as obtained by the hyper-Rayleigh scattering technique, of these particles are presented.

  14. Development of a cysteine-deprived and C-terminally truncated GLP-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Garibay, Patrick W.

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to family B of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and has become a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the development and characterization of a fully functional cysteine-deprived and C......-terminally truncated GLP-1R. Single cysteines were initially substituted with alanine, and functionally redundant cysteines were subsequently changed simultaneously. Our results indicate that Cys174, Cys226, Cys296 and Cys403 are important for the GLP-1-mediated response, whereas Cys236, Cys329, Cys341, Cys347, Cys438...... that the membrane proximal part of the C-terminal is involved in receptor expression at the cell surface. The results show that seven cysteines and more than half of the C-terminal tail can be removed from GLP-1R without compromising GLP-1 binding or function....

  15. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yugui

    2013-11-21

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  16. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yugui; Cao, Ning; Pan, Jun; Sun, Yichen; Jin, Cheng; Song, Yang

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  17. 7-cysteine-pyrrole conjugate: A new potential DNA reactive metabolite of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaobo; Xia, Qingsu; Ma, Liang; Fu, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) require metabolic activation to exert cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and tumorigenicity. We previously reported that (±)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine (DHP)-derived DNA adducts are responsible for PA-induced liver tumor formation in rats. In this study, we determined that metabolism of riddelliine and monocrotaline by human or rat liver microsomes produced 7-cysteine-DHP and DHP. The metabolism of 7-glutathionyl-DHP by human and rat liver microsomes also generated 7-cysteine-DHP. Further, reaction of 7-cysteine-DHP with calf thymus DNA in aqueous solution yielded the described DHP-derived DNA adducts. This study represents the first report that 7-cysteine-DHP is a new PA metabolite that can lead to DNA adduct formation.

  18. High-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence assay of pyruvic acid to determine cysteine conjugate beta-lyase activity : application to S-1,2-dichlorovinyl-L-cysteine and S-2-benzothiazolyl-L-cysteine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijntjes, G.J.; te Koppele, J.M.; Vermeulen, N P

    1992-01-01

    An HPLC-fluorescence assay has been developed for the determination of the activity of rat renal cytosolic cysteine conjugate beta-lyase. The method is based on isocratic HPLC separation and fluorescence detection of pyruvic acid, derivatized with o-phenylenediamine (OPD), and is shown to be rapid,

  19. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  20. Mechanism of S-oxygenation by a cysteine dioxygenase model complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Devesh; Sastry, G. Narahari; Goldberg, David P.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present the first computational study on a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model complex, [FeII(LN3S)]+ where LN3S is a tetradentate ligand with a bis(imino)pyridyl scaffold and a pendant arylthiolate group. The reaction mechanism of sulfur dioxygenation with O2 was examined by density functional theory (DFT) methods, and compared to results obtained for cysteine dioxygenase. The reaction proceeds via multistate reactivity patterns on competing singlet, triplet and quintet spi...

  1. [Protective Effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine against DNA Damage in Irradiated Mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi-sheng; Yu, Guang-yun; He, Xin; Jiang, Ming; Chu, Xiao-fei; Zhao, Shu-yi; Fan, Sai-jun; Liu, Pei-xun

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the protective effect of S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine,a new cysteine derivative,on DNA damage induced by radiation by using acute radiation injury animal models. Forty ICR mice were randomly divided into five groups:the control group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation group,1.0Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,7.2Gy gamma irradiation group,and 7.2Gy gamma irradiation combined with S-isopentenyl-L-cysteine group,with 8 mice in each group.The comet assay and bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiments were performed to evaluate the double-strand DNA breaks in ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray, respectively. The tail DNA percentage,tail length,tail moment,and olive tail moment of peripheral blood lymphocytes in 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group were significantly higher than that of the control group (PL-cysteine group was significantly less than that of 7.2Gy gamma irradiation group (PL-cysteine before irradiation,the micronucleus rate of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray decreased from (39.5000 ± 3.3141)‰ to (28.1667±4.1345)‰ (P=0.033) and from (76.5000 ± 4.6242)‰ to (22.8333 ± 3.6553)‰(P=0.000),respectively. The bone marrow polychromatic micronucleus experiment indicated that the value of polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE)/normochromatic erythrocyte(NCE) of ICR mice exposed to 1.0 and 7.2Gy gamma-ray was less than the control group(PL-cysteine before irradiation was significantly higher than the corresponding groups (PL-cysteine has a good protective effect against DNA damage induced by radiation.

  2. Transamination of cysteine-sulfinic acid by extracts of oat leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Milan, H.; Schuack, J.; Fromageot, P.

    1960-01-01

    An aqueous extract of oat leaves catalyses a transamination between cysteine-sulfinic acid and α-ketoglutaric acid. Under the conditions utilized pyruvic acid is not an acceptor of the amino group. Neither cysteic nor aspartic acid are a substrate for the transaminase of cysteine-sulfinic acid. Reprint of a paper published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Vol. 36, 1959, p. 73-83 [fr

  3. Study of the histochemical detection of cysteine desulfhydrase in the vitellin sac of birds (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapeville, F.; Khau Van Kien, L.

    1961-01-01

    We have developed a method for the histochemical detection of cysteine desulfhydrase in the vitellin sac of the chicken embryo. The enzyme is localized in the presence of a lead salt by lead sulphide formed in situ from hydrogen sulphide liberated from the cysteine. The micrographs obtained are histological and show the presence of the enzyme in the different types of endoderm cell. (authors) [fr

  4. Correlation of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine with diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lei; Song, Hai-Yan; Liu, Kai; An, Meng-Meng

    2015-01-01

    To detect the serum concentrations of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) in patients with diabetic nephropathy and SPARC mRNA and protein expressions in renal tissue of db/db mice (C57BL/KsJ, diabetic nephropathy mice), thus preliminary exploration on the role of secreted protein acidic riches in cysteine in the development of diabetic nephropathy were carried out. Serum SPARC levels in normal subjects, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without diabetic nephropathy), c...

  5. Preparation and application of L-cysteine-doped Keggin polyoxometalate microtubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yan; Peng Jun; Zhang Huanqiu; Meng Cuili; Zhang Fang

    2012-01-01

    L-cysteine-doped tungstosilicate (Lcys-SiW 12 ) microtubes are prepared, and the amount of L-cysteine doped in the microtubes can be tuned to some extent. The as-prepared Lcys-SiW 12 microtubes are sensitive to ammonia gas exhibited through the distinct color change of the microtubes from light purple to dark blue after exposing to ammonia gas. A possible mechanism of the coloration is that the adsorbed ammonia molecules increase the basicity of the Lcys-SiW 12 microtubes and promote the redox reaction between L-cysteine and polyoxometalate. This is a pH-dependent solid–solid redox reaction, which is triggered by proton capture agent. The Lcys-SiW 12 microtubes show application in chemical sensors for alkaline gases. - Graphical abstract: The Lcys-SiW 12 microtubes were formed during transformation of the monolacunary Keggin-type [α-SiW 11 O 39 ] 8− to the saturated Keggin-type [α-SiW 12 O 40 ] 4− , meanwhile L-cysteine molecules were doped during the growth of the microtubes. Highlights: ► L-cysteine-doped polyoxometalate microtubes are prepared. ► Amount of L-cysteine doped in the microtubes can be tuned to some extent. ► Lcys-SiW 12 microtubes can be applied as a sensor for detecting alkaline gases. ► This is a proton capture agent-triggered solid–solid redox reaction.

  6. Structural influence in the interaction of cysteine with five coordinated copper complexes: Theoretical and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Aguilar, Carlos Alberto; Thangarasu, Pandiyan; Mora, Jesús Gracia

    2018-04-01

    Copper complexes of N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,2-diaminoethane (L1) and N,N,N‧,N‧-tetrakis(pyridyl-2-ylmethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (L2) prepared were characterized completely by different analytical methods. The X-structure of the complexes shows that Cu(II) presents in trigonal bi-pyramidal (TBP) geometry, consisting with the electronic spectra where two visible bands corresponding to five coordinated structure were observed. Thus TD-DFT was used to analyze the orbital contribution to the electronic transitions for the visible bands. Furthermore, the interaction of cysteine with the complexes was spectrally studied, and the results were explained through DFT analysis, observing that the geometrical parameters and oxidation state of metal ions play a vital role in the binding of cysteine with copper ion. It appears that the TBP structure is being changed into octahedral geometry during the addition of cysteine to the complexes as two bands (from complex) is turned to a broad band in visible region, signifying the occupation of cysteine molecule at sixth position of octahedral geometry. In the molecular orbital analysis, the existence of a strong overlapping of HOMOs (from cysteine) with LUMOs of Cu ion was observed. The total energy of the systems calculated by DFT shows that cysteine binds favorably with copper (I) than that with Cu(II).

  7. Electrochemical behavior of cysteine at a CuGeO3 nanowires modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yongping; Pei Lizhai; Chu Xiangfeng; Zhang Wangbing; Zhang Qianfeng

    2010-01-01

    A CuGeO 3 nanowire modified glassy carbon electrode was fabricated and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveal that electron transfer through nanowire film is facile compared with that of bare glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode exhibited a novel electrocatalytic behavior to the electrochemical reactions of L-cysteine in neutral solution, which was not reported previously. Two pairs of semi-reversible electrochemical peaks were observed and assigned to the processes of oxidation/reduction and adsorption/desorption of cysteine at the modified electrode, respectively. The electrochemical response of cysteine is poor in alkaline condition and is enhanced greatly in acidic solution, suggesting that hydrogen ions participate in the electrochemical oxidation process of cysteine. The intensities of two anodic peaks varied linearly with the concentration of cysteine in the range of 1 x 10 -6 to 1 x 10 -3 mol L -1 , which make it possible to sensitive detection of cysteine with the CuGeO 3 nanowire modified electrode. Furthermore, the modified electrode exhibited good reproducibility and stability.

  8. Electrochemical behaviour of dopamine at covalent modified glassy carbon electrode with l-cysteine: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Martínez-Huitle

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The surface of glassy carbon (GC electrode has been modified by oxidation of L-cysteine. The covalent modified GC electrode with L-Cysteine has been studied, according the supporting electrolyte used. Favourable interactions between the L-cysteine film and DA enhance the current response compared to that at the Nafion GC and bare GC electrodes, achieving better performances than those other electrodes. This behaviour was as result of the adsorption of the cysteine layer film, compact and uniform formation; depending on L-cysteine solution (phosphate buffer or chloridric acid supporting electrolyte used for modifying GC surface. In cyclic voltammetric measurements, modified electrodes can successfully separate the oxidation/reduction DA peaks in different buffer solutions, but an evident dependence in the response was obtained as function of pH and modified electrode. The modified electrode prepared with L-cysteine/HCl solution was used to obtain the calibration curve and it exhibited a stable and sensitive response to DA. The results are described and discussed in the light of the existing literature.

  9. Depletion of circulating cyst(e)ine by oral and intravenous mesna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofer-Vogel, B.; Cerny, T.; Küpfer, A.; Junker, E.; Lauterburg, B. H.

    1993-01-01

    The sulfhydryl status of normal and tumour cells is critically important in determining their susceptibility to various cytostatic agents. As a sulfhydryl compound, mesna (sodium 2-mercaptoethane-sulfonate) which is used in large doses to prevent haemorrhagic cystitis associated with certain chemotherapeutic regimens might derange cellular thiol homeostasis. In order to investigate the effects of mesna on the concentrations of thiols in plasma, cysteine, glutathione and their disulfides were measured by HPLC following the oral and intravenous administration of mesna to healthy volunteers. After 7.3 mmol mesna i.v. free cysteine rose from 8.2 (95% CI 7.0-9.4) nmol ml-1 to 53.6 (47.4-59.8) nmol ml-1 at 5 min, most likely due to reduction of circulating cystine by the sulfhydryl drug. This initial rise was followed by a marked decrease of total cyst(e)ine in plasma from 276 (215-337) nmol ml-1 to a nadir of 102 (89-115) nmol ml-1 between 30-120 min after infusion, most likely due to an increased uptake of cysteine into cells and an increased urinary excretion of cyst(e)ine. Qualitatively similar changes were seen after oral mesna. The present data indicate that mesna depletes circulating cyst(e)ine and may thereby markedly alter the sulfhydryl status of cells in vivo although the drug itself is not taken up by most cells. PMID:8353049

  10. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  11. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  12. Efficient catalytic combustion in integrated micropellistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bársony, I; Ádám, M; Fürjes, P; Dücső, Cs; Lucklum, R; Hirschfelder, M; Kulinyi, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses two of the key issues of the development of catalytic combustion-type sensors: the selection and production of active catalytic particles on the micropellistor surface as well as the realization of a reliable thermal conduction between heater element and catalytic surface, for the sensing of temperature increase produced by the combustion. The report also demonstrates that chemical sensor product development by a MEMS process is a continuous struggle for elimination of all uncertainties influencing reliability and sensitivity of the final product

  13. L-Cysteine halogenides: A new family of salts with an L-cysteine⋯L-cysteinium dimeric cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaryan, V. V.; Minkov, V. S.; Boldyreva, E. V.; Petrosyan, A. M.

    2016-10-01

    Two L-cysteinium-halogenides with (L-cysteine···L-cysteinium) dimeric cations have been obtained, (L-Cys⋯L-Cys+)·Cl-, and (L-Cys⋯L-Cys+)·Br-. Both salts crystallize in monoclinic space group P21. Although these salts have the same dimeric cations and isotypical halogen anions, crystal packing is different. The main difference between the two salts rests in the conformation of (L-Cys⋯L-Cys+) dimeric cation, which also differs from that of the dimeric cation in the previously reported compound L-Cys+(L-Cys⋯L-Cys+)·F-·(F-⋯HF). The dimeric cation is formed by a very short O-H⋯O hydrogen bond with d(O···O) of 2.449(2) Å and 2.435(11) Å in the chloride and bromide, respectively. In addition to crystal structure analysis, Infrared and Raman spectra have been registered and discussed with a particular focus on intermolecular interactions. The L-Cys+·Br-·H2O salt with a simple L-cysteinium cation was also obtained and the crystal structure solved. It resembles its chloride analogue, L-Cys+·Cl-·H2O.

  14. Transcription factor DecR (YbaO) controls detoxification of L-cysteine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2016-09-01

    YbaO is an uncharacterized AsnC-family transcription factor of Escherichia coli. In both Salmonella enterica and Pantoea ananatis, YbaO homologues were identified to regulate the adjacent gene encoding cysteine desulfhydrase for detoxification of cysteine. Using the genomic SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) screening system, we identified the yhaOM operon, located far from the ybaO gene on the E. coli genome, as a single regulatory target of YbaO. In both gel shift assay in vitro and reporter and Northern blot assays in vivo, YbaO was found to regulate the yhaOM promoter. The growth of mutants lacking either ybaO or its targets yhaOM was delayed in the presence of cysteine, indicating involvement of these genes in cysteine detoxification. In the major pathway of cysteine degradation, hydrogen sulfide is produced in wild-type E. coli, but its production was not observed in each of the ybaO, yhaO and yhaM mutants. The yhaOM promoter was activated in the presence of cysteine, implying the role of cysteine in activation of YbaO. Taken together, we propose that YbaO is the cysteine-sensing transcriptional activator of the yhaOM operon, which is involved in the detoxification of cysteine. We then propose the naming of ybaO as decR (regulator of detoxification of cysteine).

  15. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  16. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of the project is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulphur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with goods yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white and black oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues.

  17. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat kidney tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De La Rosa, J.; Stipanuk, M.H.

    1986-01-01

    In studies with rat hepatocytes, hypotaurine plus taurine production accounted for less than 5% of the total amount of cysteine (CYS) catabolized, whereas more than 90% of the metabolized cysteinesulfinate (CSA) was converted to taurine plus hypotaurine. Similar studies have been carried out with kidney tubules isolated from fed rats and incubated with 2 mM [1- 14 C]CYS or 25 mM [1- 14 C]CSA at 37 0 C for up to 40 min. The production of 14 CO 2 from CSA (3.1 +/- 1.3 nmol/sup ./ min -1 /sup ./ mg dry wt -1 ) was equivalent to the accumulation of N in NH 4 + plus glutamate. Substantial oxidation of CYS was observed (16 +/- 11 nmol CO 2 x min -1 x mg dry wt -1 ), but only 12% of the expected amount of N was recovered as NH 4 + plus glutamate. Accumulation of hypotaurine plus taurine was equivalent to 20% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CSA but accounted for only 2% of the observed rate of 14 CO 2 production from CYS. Addition of unlabeled CSA to incubations with varying levels of CYS had no effect on production of 14 CO 2 . Addition of 2 mM α-ketoglutarate to the incubation mixtures resulted in an increased in 14 CO 2 production from CSA to 290% of the control level but had no effect on CYS oxidation. In agreement with the authors findings for rat hepatocytes, these data suggest that most metabolism of CYS by the rat kidney tubule occurs by a CSA-independent pathway. However, in contrast to the metabolism of CSA almost entirely to taurine in the hepatocyte, kidney tubules appeared to metabolize CSA primarily by the transamination pathway

  18. Chemistry and engineering of catalytic hydrodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1973-01-01

    A review with 74 refs. on catalytic hydrodesulfurization of pure compds. and petroleum feedstocks, with emphasis on reaction intermediates and structures of Al2O3-supported Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts. [on SciFinder (R)

  19. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  20. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemler, Sherry R; Bovino, Michael T

    2013-06-07

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review.

  1. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  2. Evaluation of the Effects of S-Allyl-L-cysteine, S-Methyl-L-cysteine, trans-S-1-Propenyl-L-cysteine, and Their N-Acetylated and S-Oxidized Metabolites on Human CYP Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Three major organosulfur compounds of aged garlic extract, S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC), S-methyl-L-cysteine (SMC), and trans-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine (S1PC), were examined for their effects on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP enzymes: CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4. The metabolite formation from probe substrates for the CYP isoforms was examined in human liver microsomes in the presence of organosulfur compounds at 0.01-1 mM by using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Allicin, a major component of garlic, inhibited CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 activity by 21-45% at 0.03 mM. In contrast, a CYP2C9-catalyzed reaction was enhanced by up to 1.9 times in the presence of allicin at 0.003-0.3 mM. SAC, SMC, and S1PC had no effect on the activities of the five isoforms, except that S1PC inhibited CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1'-hydroxylation by 31% at 1 mM. The N-acetylated metabolites of the three compounds inhibited the activities of several isoforms to a varying degree at 1 mM. N-Acetyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-methyl-L-cysteine inhibited the reactions catalyzed by CYP2D6 and CYP1A2, by 19 and 26%, respectively, whereas trans-N-acetyl-S-1-propenyl-L-cysteine showed weak to moderate inhibition (19-49%) of CYP1A2, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 activities. On the other hand, both the N-acetylated and S-oxidized metabolites of SAC, SMC, and S1PC had little effect on the reactions catalyzed by the five isoforms. These results indicated that SAC, SMC, and S1PC have little potential to cause drug-drug interaction due to CYP inhibition or activation in vivo, as judged by their minimal effects (IC 50 >1 mM) on the activities of five major isoforms of human CYP in vitro.

  3. Aggregation mechanism of Pd nanoparticles in L-cysteine aqueous solution studied by NEXAFS and AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, C.; Ogawa, S.; Mizutani, T.; Kutluk, G.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Yagi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlight: ► We focus on the biocompatibility of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) for L-cysteine under water environment. ► The Pd NPs have been fabricated and deposited on Si wafer by gas evaporation method. ► When the Pd NPs/Si has been dipped into L-cysteine aqueous solution, the L-cysteine has selectively adsorbed on Pd NPs surface and existed as the L-cysteine thiolate, atomic S and L-cystine. ► Moreover, the aggregation of Pd NPs occurs by the migration of Pd NPs on Si and the cross-linked reaction between L-cysteine thiolate molecules adsorbed on Pd NPs. - Abstract: We focus on the biocompatibility of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) from the point of microscopic view. Thus, as the basic research for the biocompatibility, we have investigated the adsorbates on the Pd NPs surface and the aggregation mechanism for the Pd NPs on Si substrate after dipping into L-cysteine aqueous solution by means of NEXAFS measurement and AFM observation. The Pd NPs have been fabricated and deposited on the Si wafer by the gas evaporation method. Judging from the results of NEXAFS measurement, it is clear that the L-cysteine thiolate and atomic S exist on the Pd NPs surface. The results of AFM observation show that the Pd NPs aggregate. It is thought that the aggregation of the Pd NPs occurs by both the migration of the Pd NPs on Si wafer and the cross-linked reaction.

  4. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  5. L-Cysteine Production in Escherichia coli Based on Rational Metabolic Engineering and Modular Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Han; Fang, Guochen; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2018-05-01

    L-cysteine is an amino acid with important physiological functions and has a wide range of applications in medicine, food, animal feed, and cosmetics industry. In this study, the L-cysteine synthesis in Escherichia coliEscherichia coli is divided into four modules: the transport module, sulfur module, precursor module, and degradation module. The engineered strain LH03 (overexpression of the feedback-insensitive cysE and the exporter ydeD in JM109) accumulated 45.8 mg L -1 of L-cysteine in 48 hr with yield of 0.4% g/g glucose. Further modifications of strains and culture conditions which based on the rational metabolic engineering and modular strategy improved the L-cysteine biosynthesis significantly. The engineered strain LH06 (with additional overexpression of serA, serC, and serB and double mutant of tnaA and sdaA in LH03) produced 620.9 mg L -1 of L-cysteine with yield of 6.0% g/g glucose, which increased the production by 12 times and the yield by 14 times more than those of LH03 in the original condition. In fed-batch fermentation performed in a 5-L reactor, the concentration of L-cysteine achieved 5.1 g L -1 in 32 hr. This work demonstrates that the combination of rational metabolic engineering and module strategy is a promising approach for increasing the L-cysteine production in E. coli. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  7. Dietary L-cysteine improves the antioxidative potential and lipid metabolism in rats fed a normal diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seulki; Han, Kyu-Ho; Nakamura, Yumi; Kawakami, Sakura; Shimada, Ken-ichiro; Hayakawa, Touru; Onoue, Hirotake; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    L-cysteine works as a precursor of the antioxidant, glutathione. We investigated the effects of L-cysteine (1% and 2%) on lipid metabolism and the antioxidative system in rats fed a normal diet. Administering L-cysteine dependently decreased the food intake, fat mass weight and body weight dose. Dietary L-cysteine also decreased the triglyceride levels in the serum and liver. However, there were no significant differences in the hepatic TBARS and glutathione (GSH) levels among the groups. The activities of catalase and glutathione reductase in the rats receiving 2% L-cysteine were significantly higher (pL-cysteine dose-dependently affected the antioxidative enzyme activities, and the lipid levels in the serum and liver which might be related to the reduced food intake.

  8. Characterization of the gene encoding serine acetyltransferase, a regulated enzyme of cysteine biosynthesis from the protist parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Regulation and possible function of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway in Entamoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, T; Asai, T; Sanchez, L B; Kobayashi, S; Nakazawa, M; Takeuchi, T

    1999-11-05

    The enteric protist parasites Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar possess a cysteine biosynthetic pathway, unlike their mammalian host, and are capable of de novo production of L-cysteine. We cloned and characterized cDNAs that encode the regulated enzyme serine acetyltransferase (SAT) in this pathway from these amoebae by genetic complementation of a cysteine-auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain with the amoebic cDNA libraries. The deduced amino acid sequences of the amoebic SATs exhibited, within the most conserved region, 36-52% identities with the bacterial and plant SATs. The amoebic SATs contain a unique insertion of eight amino acids, also found in the corresponding region of a plasmid-encoded SAT from Synechococcus sp., which showed the highest overall identities to the amoebic SATs. Phylogenetic reconstruction also revealed a close kinship of the amoebic SATs with cyanobacterial SATs. Biochemical characterization of the recombinant E. histolytica SAT revealed several enzymatic features that distinguished the amoebic enzyme from the bacterial and plant enzymes: 1) inhibition by L-cysteine in a competitive manner with L-serine; 2) inhibition by L-cystine; and 3) no association with cysteine synthase. Genetically engineered amoeba strains that overproduced cysteine synthase and SAT were created. The cysteine synthase-overproducing amoebae had a higher level of cysteine synthase activity and total thiol content and revealed increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate that the cysteine biosynthetic pathway plays an important role in antioxidative defense of these enteric parasites.

  9. Modeling of catalytically active metal complex species and intermediates in reactions of organic halides electroreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S; Kolotilov, Sergey V; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Eremenko, Igor L; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2015-02-28

    The results of quantum chemical modeling of organic and metal-containing intermediates that occur in electrocatalytic dehalogenation reactions of organic chlorides are presented. Modeling of processes that take place in successive steps of the electrochemical reduction of representative C1 and C2 chlorides - CHCl3 and Freon R113 (1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane) - was carried out by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). It was found that taking solvation into account using an implicit solvent model (conductor-like screening model, COSMO) or considering explicit solvent molecules gave similar results. In addition to modeling of simple non-catalytic dehalogenation, processes with a number of complexes and their reduced forms, some of which were catalytically active, were investigated by DFT. Complexes M(L1)2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, L1H = Schiff base from 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde and the hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Ni(L2) (H2L2 is the Schiff base from salicylaldehyde and 1,2-ethylenediamine, known as salen) and Co(L3)2Cl2, representing a fragment of a redox-active coordination polymer [Co(L3)Cl2]n (L3 is the dithioamide of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid), were considered. Gradual changes in electronic structure in a series of compounds M(L1)2 were observed, and correlations between [M(L1)2](0) spin-up and spin-down LUMO energies and the relative energies of the corresponding high-spin and low-spin reduced forms, as well as the shape of the orbitals, were proposed. These results can be helpful for determination of the nature of redox-processes in similar systems by DFT. No specific covalent interactions between [M(L1)2](-) and the R113 molecule (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) were found, which indicates that M(L1)2 electrocatalysts act rather like electron transfer mediators via outer-shell electron transfer. A relaxed surface scan of the adducts {M(L1)2·R113}(-) (M = Ni or Co) versus the distance between the

  10. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  11. The effect of L-cysteine on the portion-selective uptake of cadmium in the renal proximal tubule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Masataka; Sano, Kenichi; Webb, M.

    1987-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), co-administered with an excess of L-cysteine, accumulates rapidly in the kidneys of the rat. After subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of 3 μmol CdCl 2 /kg body wt the concentrations of Cd in the blood and kidneys increase with the dose of cysteine over the range 0.06-5.0 mmol/kg body wt. At cysteine doses of less than 1.5 mmol/kg body wt the ratio of the concentrations of Cd in the outer medulla and cortex of the kidney remains the same as that after the injection of Cd alone. This ratio, however, is more than doubled at dose levels of 5-10 mmol cysteine/kg body wt. Hepatic uptake of Cd is unaffected by doses of cysteine below 1.5 mmol/kg body wt but decreases markedly at higher doses. In animals that are dosed simultaneously with 5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt, renal uptake of 109 Cd is known to occur in the straight segments of the proximal tubules. At a dose level of less than 1.5 mmol cysteine/kg body wt the present autoradiographical studies show that 109 Cd is taken up predominantly by the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney cortex. At the critical dose level (1.5 mmol/kg body wt), cysteine decreases the retention of Cd at the s.c. injection site, but probably has little effect on the distribution of Cd between protein and other carrier molecules in the blood. This distribution, however, is altered at higher cysteine dose levels. It is suggested that, under the latter conditions, stable Cd-cysteine complexes are formed in the blood and are filtered readily through the glomeruli. These complexes are taken up in the kidney at the sites of cysteine reabsorption which, by studies with L-[ 35 S]-cysteine, are identified as the straight segments of the proximal tubules. (orig.)

  12. L-Cysteine and L-AP4 microinjections in the rat caudal ventrolateral medulla decrease arterial blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2014-12-01

    The thiol amino acid L-cysteine increases arterial blood pressure (ABP) when injected into the cerebrospinal fluid space in conscious rats, indicating a pressor response to centrally acting L-cysteine. A prior synaptic membrane binding assay suggests that L-cysteine has a strong affinity for the L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) binding site. The central action of L-cysteine may be vial-AP4 sensitive receptors. The present study investigated cardiovascular responses to L-cysteine and L-ap4 microinjected into the autonomic area of the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) where inhibitory neurons regulate ABP via pre-sympathetic vasomotor neurons. Both the injection of L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM sites identified with L-glutamate produced the same depressor and bradycardic responses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Neither a prior antagonist microinjection of MK801 for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor nor CNQX for the non-NMDA receptor attenuated the responses to L-cysteine, but the combination of the two receptor blocking with an additional prior injection abolished the response. In contrast, either receptor blockade alone abolished the response to L-AP4, indicating distinct mechanisms between responses to L-cysteine and L-AP4 in the CVLM. The results indicate that the CVLM is a central active site for L-cysteine's cardiovascular response. Central L-cysteine's action could be independent of the L-AP4 sensitive receptors. Cardiovascular regulation may involve endogenous L-cysteine in the CVLM. Further multidisciplinary examinations are required to elaborate on L-cysteine's functional roles in the CVLM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judge Bryan S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from non-acetaminophen hepatotoxins have not been well characterized. The objective of this study is to describe APAP-CYS concentrations in these clinical settings as well as to further characterize the concentrations observed following acetaminophen overdose. Methods Samples were collected during three clinical trials in which subjects received 4 g/day of acetaminophen and during an observational study of acetaminophen overdose patients. Trial 1 consisted of non-drinkers who received APAP for 10 days, Trial 2 consisted of moderate drinkers dosed for 10 days and Trial 3 included subjects who chronically abuse alcohol dosed for 5 days. Patients in the observational study were categorized by type of acetaminophen exposure (single or repeated. Serum APAP-CYS was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Trial 1 included 144 samples from 24 subjects; Trial 2 included 182 samples from 91 subjects and Trial 3 included 200 samples from 40 subjects. In addition, we collected samples from 19 subjects with acute acetaminophen ingestion, 7 subjects with repeated acetaminophen exposure and 4 subjects who ingested another hepatotoxin. The mean (SD peak APAP-CYS concentrations for the Trials were: Trial 1- 0.4 (0.20 nmol/ml, Trial 2- 0.1 (0.09 nmol/ml and Trial 3- 0.3 (0.12 nmol/ml. APAP-CYS concentrations varied substantially among the patients with acetaminophen toxicity (0.10 to 27.3 nmol/ml. No subject had detectable APAP

  14. Experimental and theoretical investigation on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy by L-cysteine in alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin; Zhang, Daquan; Yang, Dong; Wang, Hongxia; Lin, Tong

    2016-01-01

    The corrosion inhibition of L-cysteine on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 mol/L NaOH solution was investigated by hydrogen gas evolution experiment, polarisation curve, galvanostatic discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of L-cysteine on aluminium alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The polarisation curves indicated that L-cysteine acted as a cathodic inhibitor to inhibit cathodic reaction. The inhibition mechanism was dominated by the geometric covering effect. The galvanostatic discharge shows that the additives restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that L-cysteine molecules mainly interacted with on the carboxyl groups on the aluminium alloy surface. A strong hybridization occurred between the s-orbital and p-orbital of reactive sites in the L-cysteine molecule and the sp-orbital of Aluminium. - Highlights: • L-cysteine was used as corrosion inhibitor for Al alloy in alkaline solution. • Adsorption of L-cysteine on Al alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's isotherm. • L-cysteine molecules interacted with the carboxyl groups on the Al alloy surface. • A strong orbital hybridization occurred between the reactive sites in L-cysteine and Al.

  15. Pressor response to L-cysteine injected into the cisterna magna of conscious rats involves recruitment of hypothalamic vasopressinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Yumi

    2013-03-01

    The sulfur-containing non-essential amino acid L-cysteine injected into the cisterna magna of adult conscious rats produces an increase in blood pressure. The present study examined if the pressor response to L-cysteine is stereospecific and involves recruitment of hypothalamic vasopressinergic neurons and medullary noradrenergic A1 neurons. Intracisternally injected D-cysteine produced no cardiovascular changes, while L-cysteine produced hypertension and tachycardia in freely moving rats, indicating the stereospecific hemodynamic actions of L-cysteine via the brain. The double labeling immunohistochemistry combined with c-Fos detection as a marker of neuronal activation revealed significantly higher numbers of c-Fos-positive vasopressinergic neurons both in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei and tyrosine hydroxylase containing medullary A1 neurons, of L-cysteine-injected rats than those injected with D-cysteine as iso-osmotic control. The results indicate that the cardiovascular responses to intracisternal injection of L-cysteine in the conscious rat are stereospecific and include recruitment of hypothalamic vasopressinergic neurons both in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, as well as of medullary A1 neurons. The findings may suggest a potential function of L-cysteine as an extracellular signal such as neuromodulators in central regulation of blood pressure.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation on corrosion inhibition of AA5052 aluminium alloy by L-cysteine in alkaline solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dapeng; Gao, Lixin [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Zhang, Daquan, E-mail: zhangdaquan@shiep.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Yang, Dong [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University of Electric Power, Shanghai 200090 (China); Wang, Hongxia; Lin, Tong [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition of L-cysteine on AA5052 aluminium alloy in 4 mol/L NaOH solution was investigated by hydrogen gas evolution experiment, polarisation curve, galvanostatic discharge, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements and quantum chemical calculations. The adsorption of L-cysteine on aluminium alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's adsorption isotherm. The polarisation curves indicated that L-cysteine acted as a cathodic inhibitor to inhibit cathodic reaction. The inhibition mechanism was dominated by the geometric covering effect. The galvanostatic discharge shows that the additives restrain the hydrogen evolution and increase the anodic utilization rate. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that L-cysteine molecules mainly interacted with on the carboxyl groups on the aluminium alloy surface. A strong hybridization occurred between the s-orbital and p-orbital of reactive sites in the L-cysteine molecule and the sp-orbital of Aluminium. - Highlights: • L-cysteine was used as corrosion inhibitor for Al alloy in alkaline solution. • Adsorption of L-cysteine on Al alloy surface obeyed the amended Langmuir's isotherm. • L-cysteine molecules interacted with the carboxyl groups on the Al alloy surface. • A strong orbital hybridization occurred between the reactive sites in L-cysteine and Al.

  17. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  18. Cysteine-mediated gene expression and characterization of the CmbR regulon in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Afzal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 to cysteine. Transcriptome comparison of the D39 wild-type strain grown at a restricted concentration of cysteine (0.03 mM to one grown at a high concentration of cysteine (50 mM in chemically-define medium (CDM revealed elevated expression of various genes/operons, i.e. spd-0150, metQ, spd-0431, metEF, gshT, spd-0618, fhs, tcyB, metB-csd, metA, spd-1898, yvdE, and cysK, likely to be involved in the transport and utilization of cysteine and/or methionine. Microarray-based data were further confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. Promoter lacZ-fusion studies and quantitative RT-PCR data showed that the transcriptional regulator CmbR acts as a transcriptional repressor of spd-0150, metEF, gshT, spd-0618, tcyB, metA, and yvdE, putatively involved in cysteine uptake and utilization. The operator site of CmbR in the promoter regions of CmbR-regulated genes is predicted and confirmed by mutating or deleting CmbR operator sites from the promoter regions of these genes.

  19. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schröder

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases.

  20. Selective chromogenic and fluorogenic peptide substrates for the assay of cysteine peptidases in complex mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semashko, Tatiana A; Vorotnikova, Elena A; Sharikova, Valeriya F; Vinokurov, Konstantin S; Smirnova, Yulia A; Dunaevsky, Yakov E; Belozersky, Mikhail A; Oppert, Brenda; Elpidina, Elena N; Filippova, Irina Y

    2014-03-15

    This study describes the design, synthesis, and use of selective peptide substrates for cysteine peptidases of the C1 papain family, important in many biological processes. The structure of the newly synthesized substrates is Glp-Xaa-Ala-Y (where Glp=pyroglutamyl; Xaa=Phe or Val; and Y=pNA [p-nitroanilide], AMC [4-amino-7-methylcoumaride], or AFC [4-amino-7-trifluoromethyl-coumaride]). Substrates were synthesized enzymatically to guarantee selectivity of the reaction and optical purity of the target compounds, simplifying the scheme of synthesis and isolation of products. The hydrolysis of the synthesized substrates was evaluated by C1 cysteine peptidases from different organisms and with different functions, including plant enzymes papain, bromelain, ficin, and mammalian lysosomal cathepsins B and L. The new substrates were selective for C1 cysteine peptidases and were not hydrolyzed by serine, aspartic, or metallo peptidases. We demonstrated an application of the selectivity of the synthesized substrates during the chromatographic separation of a multicomponent set of digestive peptidases from a beetle, Tenebrio molitor. Used in combination with the cysteine peptidase inhibitor E-64, these substrates were able to differentiate cysteine peptidases from peptidases of other classes in midgut extracts from T. molitor larvae and larvae of the genus Tribolium; thus, they are useful in the analysis of complex mixtures containing peptidases from different classes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K., E-mail: e7141@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Tsujibayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Azuma, J. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Kakimoto, K. [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kamada, M. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. {yields} The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. {yields} The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. {yields} The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. {yields} The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  2. Cysteine regulation of protein function--as exemplified by NMDA-receptor modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Choi, Yun-Beom; Takahashi, Hiroto; Zhang, Dongxian; Li, Weizhong; Godzik, Adam; Bankston, Laurie A

    2002-09-01

    Until recently cysteine residues, especially those located extracellularly, were thought to be important for metal coordination, catalysis and protein structure by forming disulfide bonds - but they were not thought to regulate protein function. However, this is not the case. Crucial cysteine residues can be involved in modulation of protein activity and signaling events via other reactions of their thiol (sulfhydryl; -SH) groups. These reactions can take several forms, such as redox events (chemical reduction or oxidation), chelation of transition metals (chiefly Zn(2+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) or S-nitrosylation [the catalyzed transfer of a nitric oxide (NO) group to a thiol group]. In several cases, these disparate reactions can compete with one another for the same thiol group on a single cysteine residue, forming a molecular switch composed of a latticework of possible redox, NO or Zn(2+) modifications to control protein function. Thiol-mediated regulation of protein function can also involve reactions of cysteine residues that affect ligand binding allosterically. This article reviews the basis for these molecular cysteine switches, drawing on the NMDA receptor as an exemplary protein, and proposes a molecular model for the action of S-nitrosylation based on recently derived crystal structures.

  3. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K.; Tsujibayashi, T.; Takahashi, K.; Azuma, J.; Kakimoto, K.; Kamada, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. → The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. → The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. → The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. → The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  4. The effect of cysteine on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel in sulphuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.B.; Agostinho, S.M.L.; Barcia, O.E.; Cordeiro, G.G.O.; D'Elia, E.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of cysteine on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel in 1 mol l -1 H 2 SO 4 was studied using open-circuit potential measurements, anodic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All the electrochemical measurements obtained in the presence of low cysteine concentration (10 -6 -10 -5 mol l -1 ) presented the same behaviour as those obtained in the absence of cysteine, a passivated steel surface. However, for higher cysteine concentrations (10 -4 -10 -2 mol l -1 ), a different behaviour was observed: the corrosion potential stabilized at a more negative value; an active region was observed in the anodic polarization curves and the electrochemical impedance diagrams showed an inductive loop at lower frequencies and a much lower polarization resistance. These results show that the presence of cysteine at high concentration turns the surface of 304L stainless steel electrochemically active, probably dissolving the passivation layer and promoting the stainless steel anodic dissolution. SEM experiments performed after immersion experiments at corrosion potential were in good agreement with the electrochemical results

  5. Effects of L-cysteine on lead acetate induced neurotoxicity in albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Y I; Sayed, S S

    2016-07-01

    Lead is a toxic heavy metal that adversely affects nervous tissues; it often occurs as an environmental pollutant. We investigated histological changes in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of adult albino mice following exposure to lead acetate. We also studied the possible ameliorative effect of the chelating agent, L-cysteine, on lead-induced neurotoxicity. We divided albino mice into six groups: 1) vehicle-only control, 2) L-cysteine control, 3 and 4) treated for 7 days with 20 and 40 mg/kg lead acetate, respectively, and 5 and 6) treated for 7 days with 20 and 40 mg/kg lead acetate, respectively, followed by 50 mg/kg L-cysteine for 7 days. Lead acetate administration caused disorganization of cell layers, neuronal loss and degeneration, and neuropil vacuolization. Brain sections from lead-intoxicated mice treated with L-cysteine showed fewer pathological changes; the neuropil showed less vacuolization and the neurons appeared less damaged. L-cysteine at the dose we used only marginally alleviated lead-induced toxicity.

  6. CMD: A Database to Store the Bonding States of Cysteine Motifs with Secondary Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Bostan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches to the disulphide bonding state and its connectivity pattern prediction are based on various descriptors. One descriptor is the amino acid sequence motifs flanking the cysteine residue motifs. Despite the existence of disulphide bonding information in many databases and applications, there is no complete reference and motif query available at the moment. Cysteine motif database (CMD is the first online resource that stores all cysteine residues, their flanking motifs with their secondary structure, and propensity values assignment derived from the laboratory data. We extracted more than 3 million cysteine motifs from PDB and UniProt data, annotated with secondary structure assignment, propensity value assignment, and frequency of occurrence and coefficiency of their bonding status. Removal of redundancies generated 15875 unique flanking motifs that are always bonded and 41577 unique patterns that are always nonbonded. Queries are based on the protein ID, FASTA sequence, sequence motif, and secondary structure individually or in batch format using the provided APIs that allow remote users to query our database via third party software and/or high throughput screening/querying. The CMD offers extensive information about the bonded, free cysteine residues, and their motifs that allows in-depth characterization of the sequence motif composition.

  7. Cysteine Cathepsins as Regulators of the Cytotoxicity of NK and T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić Nanut, Milica; Sabotič, Jerica; Jewett, Anahid; Kos, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal peptidases involved at different levels in the processes of the innate and adaptive immune responses. Some, such as cathepsins B, L, and H are expressed constitutively in most immune cells. In cells of innate immunity they play a role in cell adhesion and phagocytosis. Other cysteine cathepsins are expressed more specifically. Cathepsin X promotes dendritic cell maturation, adhesion of macrophages, and migration of T cells. Cathepsin S is implicated in major histocompatibility complex class II antigen presentation, whereas cathepsin C, expressed in cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, is involved in processing pro-granzymes into proteolytically active forms, which trigger cell death in their target cells. The activity of cysteine cathepsins is controlled by endogenous cystatins, cysteine protease inhibitors. Of these, cystatin F is the only cystatin that is localized in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles. After proteolytic removal of its N-terminal peptide, cystatin F becomes a potent inhibitor of cathepsin C with the potential to regulate pro-granzyme processing and cell cytotoxicity. This review is focused on the role of cysteine cathepsins and their inhibitors in the molecular mechanisms leading to the cytotoxic activity of T lymphocytes and NK cells in order to address new possibilities for regulation of their function in pathological processes. PMID:25520721

  8. Redox-active triazatruxene-based conjugated microporous polymers for high-performance supercapacitors† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthetic procedures and characterization data for all new compounds; general experimental method; thermogravimetry curves; PXRD patterns; SEM and TEM images; XPS spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc05532j Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Chun; Zhang, Yizhou; Wang, Chun-Yu; Wan, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Conjugated polymers (CPs) have been intensively explored for various optoelectronic applications in the last few decades. Nevertheless, CP based electrochemical energy storage devices such as supercapacitors remain largely unexplored. This is mainly owing to the low specific capacitance, poor structural/electrochemical stability, and low energy density of most existing CPs. In this contribution, a novel set of redox-active conjugated microporous polymers, TAT-CMP-1 and TAT-CMP-2, based on nitrogen-rich and highly conductive triazatruxene building blocks, were successfully designed and synthesized to explore their potential application as efficient and stable electrode materials for supercapacitors. Despite a moderate surface area of 88 m2 g–1 for TAT-CMP-1 and 106 m2 g–1 for TAT-CMP-2, exceptional specific capacitances of 141 F g–1 and 183 F g–1 were achieved at a current density of 1 A g–1. The resulting polymers exhibited unusually high areal specific capacitance (>160 μF cm–2), which is attributed to the pseudocapacitance resulting from redox-active structures with high nitrogen content. More importantly, the TAT-CMP-2 electrode exhibits excellent cycling stability: only 5% capacitance fading is observed after 10 000 cycles at a high current density of 10 A g–1, enabling the possible use of these materials as electrodes in electrochemical devices. PMID:28451362

  9. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  10. Characterization of a 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin from big-belly seahorse (Hippocampus abdominalis); insights into host antioxidant defense, molecular profiling and its expressional response to septic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Jayasooriya, R G P T; Kim, Gi-Young; Lee, Jehee

    2016-10-01

    1-cysteine peroxiredoxin (Prx6) is an antioxidant enzyme that protects cells by detoxifying multiple peroxide species. This study aimed to describe molecular features, functional assessments and potential immune responses of Prx6 identified from the big-belly seahorse, Hippocampus abdominalis (HaPrx6). The complete ORF (666 bp) of HaPrx6 encodes a polypeptide (24 kDa) of 222 amino acids, and harbors a prominent peroxiredoxin super-family domain, a peroxidatic catalytic center, and a peroxidatic cysteine. The deduced amino acid sequence of HaPrx6 shares a relatively high amino acid sequence similarity and close evolutionary relationship with Oplegnathus fasciatus Prx6. The purified recombinant HaPrx6 protein (rHaPrx6) was shown to protect plasmid DNA in the Metal Catalyzed Oxidation (MCO) assay and, together with 1,4-Dithiothreitol (DTT), protected human leukemia THP-1 cells from extracellular H2O2-mediated cell death. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR revealed that HaPrx6 mRNA was constitutively expressed in 14 different tissues, with the highest expression observed in liver tissue. Inductive transcriptional responses were observed in liver and kidney tissues of fish after treating them with bacterial stimuli, including LPS, Edwardsiella tarda, and Streptococcus iniae. These results suggest that HaPrx6 may play an important role in the immune response of the big-belly seahorse against microbial infection. Collectively, these findings provide structural and functional insights into HaPrx6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  12. Anti-trypanosomal activity of non-peptidic nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtoloso, Antonio C B; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Furber, Mark; Gomes, Juliana C; Gonçalez, Cristiana; Kenny, Peter W; Leitão, Andrei; Montanari, Carlos A; Quilles, José Carlos; Ribeiro, Jean F R; Rocha, Josmar R

    2017-02-01

    The cysteine protease cruzipain is considered to be a validated target for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of Chagas disease. Anti-trypanosomal activity against the CL Brener strain of T. cruzi was observed in the 0.1 μM to 1 μM range for three nitrile-based cysteine protease inhibitors based on two scaffolds known to be associated with cathepsin K inhibition. The two compounds showing the greatest potency against the trypanosome were characterized by EC50 values (0.12 μM and 0.25 μM) that were an order of magnitude lower than the corresponding Ki values measured against cruzain, a recombinant form of cruzipain, in an enzyme inhibition assay. This implies that the anti-trypanosomal activity of these two compounds may not be explained only by the inhibition of the cruzain enzyme, thereby triggering a putative polypharmacological profile towards cysteine proteases.

  13. Optical Absorption and Electric Resistivity of an l-Cysteine Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Masao; Hideshima, Takuya; Azuma, Junpei; Yamamoto, Isamu; Imamura, Masaki; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2016-12-01

    The optical and electric properties of an l-cysteine film have been investigated to understand its applicability to bioelectronics. The fundamental absorption is the allowed transition having the threshold at 5.8 eV and the absorption is due to the charge-transfer type transition from sulfur-3sp to oxygen-2p and/or carbon-2p states, while absorptions more than 9 eV can be explained with intra-atomic transitions in the functional groups. The electric resistivity is 2.0 × 104 Ω m at room temperature and increases as the sample temperature decreases. The results indicate that the l-cysteine film is a p-type semiconductor showing the hole conduction caused by the sulfur-3sp occupied states and unknown impurity or defect states as acceptors. The electron affinity of the l-cysteine film is derived as ≦-0.3 eV.

  14. Influence of cysteine and selenodicysteine on the uptake of zinc by Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czauderna, M.; Samochocka, K.

    1982-01-01

    The uptake of zinc labelled with radioactive 65 Zn in the presence of cysteine and selenodicysteine by Chlorella vulgaris was examined. The concentration of zinc ions in the medium was 20 mg per 1. The uptake yield was found to be enhanced by selenodicysteine. At concentration of 10 - 7 -10 - 6 M the growth rate of Chlorella vulgaris was accelerated by the latter, provided that the specific activity of 65 Zn was 3.7 MBq/1. At this specific zinc activity cysteine increased the uptake yield during the initial 50 h of the incubation process. At specific 65 Zn-activity of 55.5 MBq/1 selenodicysteine and cysteine only slightly influenced the zinc uptake by Chlorella vulgaris. No increment in the biomass was observed at this specific zinc radioactivity. (author)

  15. L-Cysteine Capped CdSe Quantum Dots Synthesized by Photochemical Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Avinash; Kunwar, Amit; Rath, M C

    2018-05-01

    L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots were synthesized via photochemical route in aqueous solution under UV photo-irradiation. The as grown CdSe quantum dots exhibit broad fluorescence at room temperature. The CdSe quantum dots were found to be formed only through the reactions of the precursors, i.e., Cd(NH3)2+4 and SeSO2-3 with the photochemically generated 1-hydroxy-2-propyl radicals, (CH3)2COH radicals, which are formed through the process of H atom abstraction by the photoexcited acetone from 2-propanol. L-Cysteine was found to act as a suitable capping agent for the CdSe quantum dots and increases their biocompatability. Cytotoxicty effects of these quantum dots were evaluated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) epithelial cells, indicated a significant lower level for the L-cysteine capped CdSe quantum dots as compare to the bare ones.

  16. Reduction of mercury from mackerel fillet using combined solution of cysteine, EDTA, and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, P; Jinap, S

    2012-06-13

    An acidic solution containing mercury chelating agents to eliminate mercury in raw fish (mackerel) fillet was developed. The solution contained hydrochloric acid, sodium hydroxide, cysteine, EDTA, and NaCl. The optimum conditions for mercury reduction were achieved using response surface methodology (RSM) at cysteine concentration of 1.25%, EDTA of 275 mg/L, NaCl of 0.5%, pH of 3.75, and exposure time of 18 min. The optimized conditions produced a solution which can remove up to 91% mercury from raw fish fillet. Cysteine and EDTA were identified as potential chelating agents with the greatest potential for use. The solution can be employed in fish industries to reduce mercury in highly contaminated fish.

  17. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...... to control conditions. We therefore hypothesize that cysteine residues increase TRPC6 channel protein expression in humans....

  18. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hilda M.; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis. PMID:25348828

  19. S-Substituted cysteine derivatives and thiosulfinate formation in Petiveria alliacea-part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubec, Roman; Kim, Seokwon; Musah, Rabi A

    2002-11-01

    Three cysteine derivatives, (R)-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine, together with (R(S)R(C))- and (S(S)R(C))-S-(2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine sulfoxides, have been isolated from the roots of Petiveria alliacea. Furthermore, three additional amino acids, S-methyl-, S-ethyl-, and S-propylcysteine derivatives, were detected. They were present only in trace amounts (<3 microg g(-1) fr. wt), precluding determination of their absolute configurations and oxidation states. In addition, four thiosulfinates, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) (2-hydroxyethane)-, S-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenylmethane-, S-benzyl (2-hydroxyethane)- and S-benzyl phenylmethanethiosulfinates, have been found in a homogenate of the roots. The formation pathways of various benzyl/phenyl-containing compounds previously found in the plant were also discussed.

  20. The proteins of Fusobacterium spp. involved in hydrogen sulfide production from L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic, Amina; Blomqvist, Madeleine; Dahlén, Gunnar; Svensäter, Gunnel

    2017-03-14

    Hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is a toxic foul-smelling gas produced by subgingival biofilms in patients with periodontal disease and is suggested to be part of the pathogenesis of the disease. We studied the H 2 S-producing protein expression of bacterial strains associated with periodontal disease. Further, we examined the effect of a cysteine-rich growth environment on the synthesis of intracellular enzymes in F. nucleatum polymorphum ATCC 10953. The proteins were subjected to one-dimensional (1DE) and two-dimensional (2DE) gel electrophoresis An in-gel activity assay was used to detect the H 2 S-producing enzymes; Sulfide from H 2 S, produced by the enzymes in the gel, reacted with bismuth forming bismuth sulfide, illustrated as brown bands (1D) or spots (2D) in the gel. The discovered proteins were identified with liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Cysteine synthase and proteins involved in the production of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'phosphate (that catalyzes the production of H 2 S) were frequently found among the discovered enzymes. Interestingly, a higher expression of H 2 S-producing enzymes was detected from bacteria incubated without cysteine prior to the experiment. Numerous enzymes, identified as cysteine synthase, were involved in the production of H 2 S from cysteine and the expression varied among Fusobacterium spp. and strains. No enzymes were detected with the in-gel activity assay among the other periodontitis-associated bacteria tested. The expression of the H 2 S-producing enzymes was dependent on environmental conditions such as cysteine concentration and pH but less dependent on the presence of serum and hemin.

  1. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh M; Bragin, O V

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  2. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  3. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  4. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis and mathematical modeling are essential components of the continuing search for better utilization of raw materials and energy, with reduced impact on the environment. Numerical modeling of chemical systems has progressed rapidly due to increases in computer power, and is used extensively for analysis, design and development of catalytic reactors and processes. This book presents reviews of the state-of-the-art in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic reactors and processes. Reviews by leading authorities in the respective areas Up-to-date reviews of latest techniques in modeling of catalytic processes Mix of US and European authors, as well as academic/industrial/research institute perspectives Connections between computation and experimental methods in some of the chapters.

  5. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L–Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles–graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Hamid R., E-mail: hrzare@yazd.ac.ir; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Quercetin AgNPs graphene nanosheets modified GCE (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) was prepared as a new sensor. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. • In DPV, the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. • The proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of AA, UA and L–Cys. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE was satisfactorily used for the determination of AA, UA and L–Cys in real samples. - Abstract: By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L–Cys peak potential at Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs–GCE or AgNPs–GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k′, for the oxidation of L–Cys at the Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L–Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L–Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L–Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  6. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L–Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles–graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Quercetin AgNPs graphene nanosheets modified GCE (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) was prepared as a new sensor. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. • In DPV, the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. • The proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of AA, UA and L–Cys. • Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE was satisfactorily used for the determination of AA, UA and L–Cys in real samples. - Abstract: By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L–Cysteine (L–Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L–Cys peak potential at Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs–GCE or AgNPs–GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k′, for the oxidation of L–Cys at the Q–AgNPs–GNs–GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L–Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9–12.4 μM and 12.4–538.5 μM of L–Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L–Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L–Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  7. An Assay Study of Molecular Recognition of Amino Acids in Water: Covalent Imprinting of Cysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Yu, Donghong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic N-(9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH) receptor was pre- pared by co-polymerizing (9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-S-(1-propene-2-thiol)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SCH2CHCH2)-OH) and a non-imprinted polymer prepared from 1-propene-1-thiol photo-chemically 15 h...... at room temperature and additional 3 h thermally at 80℃. Subsequently, disulfides were reduced with lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) from imprinted polymers. The imprinted polymers selectively recognized Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH with high binding constants in aqueous and protic solvents by thiol...

  8. A simple synthesis of L-[35S]cysteine sulfinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, R.M.; Martin, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of L-[ 35 S]cysteine sulfinic acid (L-2-amino-3-[ 35 S]sulfino-propanoic acid) in 65% yield from S-[ 35 S]cystine is described. The procedure was designed for use with milligram quantities of starting material and requires no purification of intermediates. L-[ 35 S]Cystine was converted first to its thiosulfonate. Subsequent reaction of the thiosulfonate with ammonium hydroxide generated L-[ 35 S]cysteine sulfinic acid and L-[ 35 S]cystine as the major products. The L-[ 35 S]cystine was recovered and reprocessed thereby increasing the yield. (author)

  9. Parameters optimization defined by statistical analysis for cysteine-dextran radiolabeling with technetium tricarbonyl core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo Fernández; Faintuch, Bluma Linkowski; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Wiecek, Danielle Pereira; da Silva, Natanael Gomes; Papadopoulos, Minas; Pelecanou, Maria; Pirmettis, Ioannis; de Oliveira Filho, Renato Santos; Duatti, Adriano; Pasqualini, Roberto

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was the development of a statistical approach for radiolabeling optimization of cysteine-dextran conjugates with Tc-99m tricarbonyl core. This strategy has been applied to the labeling of 2-propylene-S-cysteine-dextran in the attempt to prepare a new class of tracers for sentinel lymph node detection, and can be extended to other radiopharmaceuticals for different targets. The statistical routine was based on three-level factorial design. Best labeling conditions were achieved. The specific activity reached was 5 MBq/μg. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parameters optimization defined by statistical analysis for cysteine-dextran radiolabeling with technetium tricarbonyl core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Nunez, Eutimio Gustavo, E-mail: eutimiocu@yahoo.co [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Linkowski Faintuch, Bluma; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Pereira Wiecek, Danielle; Gomes da Silva, Natanael [Radiopharmacy Center, Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, Sao Paulo, SP 05508-000 (Brazil); Papadopoulos, Minas [Institute of Radioisotopes, Radiodiagnostic Products, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Pelecanou, Maria [Institute of Biology, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Pirmettis, Ioannis [Institute of Radioisotopes, Radiodiagnostic Products, National Center for Scientific Research ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Santos Oliveira Filho, Renato de [Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Duatti, Adriano [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Pasqualini, Roberto [CIS Bio International, Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2011-04-15

    The objective of this study was the development of a statistical approach for radiolabeling optimization of cysteine-dextran conjugates with Tc-99m tricarbonyl core. This strategy has been applied to the labeling of 2-propylene-S-cysteine-dextran in the attempt to prepare a new class of tracers for sentinel lymph node detection, and can be extended to other radiopharmaceuticals for different targets. The statistical routine was based on three-level factorial design. Best labeling conditions were achieved. The specific activity reached was 5 MBq/{mu}g.

  11. Formation of Hg(II) Tetrathiolate Complexes with Cysteine at Neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Thomas; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Mercury(II) ions precipitate from aqueous cysteine (H 2 Cys) solutions containing H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 2.0 as Hg( S -HCys) 2 . In absence of additional cysteine, the precipitate dissolves at pH ~12 with the [Hg( S,N -Cys) 2 ] 2- complex dominating. With excess cysteine (H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratio ≥ 4.0), higher complexes form and the precipitate dissolves at lower pH values. Previously, we found that tetrathiolate [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complexes form at pH = 11.0; in this work we extend the investigation to pH values of physiological interest. We examined two series of Hg(II)-cysteine solutions in which C Hg(II) varied between 8 - 9 mM and 80 - 100 mM, respectively, with H 2 Cys/Hg(II) mole ratios from 4 to ~20. The solutions were prepared in the pH range 7.1 - 8.8, at the pH at which the initial Hg( S -HCys) 2 precipitate dissolved. The variations in the Hg(II) speciation were followed by 199 Hg NMR, X-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopic techniques. Our results show that in the dilute solutions ( C Hg(II) = 8 - 9 mM), mixtures of di-, tri- (major) and tetrathiolate complexes exist at moderate cysteine excess ( C H2Cys ~ 0.16 M) at pH 7.1. In the more concentrated solutions ( C Hg(II) = 80 - 100 mM) with high cysteine excess ( C H2Cys > 0.9 M), tetrathiolate [Hg( S -cysteinate) 4 ] m -6 ( m = 0 - 4) complexes dominate in the pH range 7.3 - 7.8, with lower charge than for the [Hg( S -Cys) 4 ] 6- complex due to protonation of some ( m ) of the amino groups of the coordinated cysteine ligands. The results of this investigation could provide a key to the mechanism of biosorption and accumulation of Hg(II) ions in biological / environmental systems.

  12. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics has considerable potential, but the evidence needs to be further substantiated. Vitamin A, iron, and zinc have been associated with adverse effects and caution is warranted for their use. PMID:22254046

  13. Labeling of human serum albumin with 105Rh-cysteine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, J.M.; Pillai, M.R.A.; John, C.S.; Troutner, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    The conjugation of a complex formed by reacting RhCl 3 with cysteine to human serum albumin has been investigated. Approximately 50% of the rhodium (labelled with 105 Rh) was converted to the complex. Conjugation of the complex to HSA via the ECDI method resulted in yields of ∼ 40% of the total rhodium or ∼ 80% of the Rh-cysteine complex. No conjugation was observed in the absence of the ECDI. At approximately equal molar concentrations of rhodium and HSA, an average of ∼ 0.4 rhodium atoms per HSA molecule was achieved. (author)

  14. A comparison of cationic polymerization and esterification for end-point detection in the catalytic thermometric titration of organic bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Greenhow, E; Viñas, P

    1984-08-01

    A systematic comparison has been made of two indicator systems for the non-aqueous catalytic thermometric titration of strong and weak organic bases. The indicator reagents, alpha-methylstyrene and mixtures of acetic anhydride and hydroxy compounds, are shown to give results (for 14 representative bases) which do not diner significantly in coefficient of variation or titration error. Calibration graphs for all the samples, in the range 0.01-0.1 meq, are linear, with correlation coefficients of 0.995 or better. Aniline, benzylamine, n-butylamine, morpholine, pyrrole, l-dopa, alpha-methyl-l-dopa, dl-alpha-alanine, dl-leucine and l-cysteine cannot be determined when acetic anhydride is present in the sample solution, but some primary and second amines can. This is explained in terms of rates of acetylation of the amino groups.

  15. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  16. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  18. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  19. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  20. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  1. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)

  2. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  3. Isolation and molecular characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease cDNAs from Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, A.G.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are predominant in thrips guts (TGs) and, therefore, a suitable target for selecting effective protease inhibitors against western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). We report the isolation of four full-length cysteine protease cDNA clones from thrips in a two-step PCR

  4. Participation of intracellular cysteine proteinases, in particular cathepsin B, in degradation of collagen in periosteal tissue explants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, L. B.; Hoeben, K. A.; Jansen, D. C.; Buttle, D. J.; Beertsen, W.; Everts, V.

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of cysteine proteinases in the degradation of soft connective tissue collagen was studied in cultured periosteal explants. Using cysteine proteinase inhibitors that were active intracellularly or extracellularly (Ep453 and Ep475, respectively), it was shown that over-all collagen

  5. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Mao, Jie-Li; Zhao, Ying-Jun; Li, Chuan-You; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2015-02-01

    L-Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabolism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L-cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage-dependent manner. Elevating cellular L-cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L-cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O-acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cell marker as well as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L-cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cell specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L-cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post-transcriptional mechanism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L-cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cell niche by regulating basal- and auxin-induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L-Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. Cysteine Addition Promotes Sulfide Production and 4-Fold Hg(II)-S Coordination in Actively Metabolizing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sara A; Gaillard, Jean-François

    2017-04-18

    The bacterial uptake of mercury(II), Hg(II), is believed to be energy-dependent and is enhanced by cysteine in diverse species of bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To gain insight into this Hg(II) biouptake pathway, we have employed X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to investigate the relationship between exogenous cysteine, cellular metabolism, cellular localization, and Hg(II) coordination in aerobically respiring Escherichia coli (E. coli). We show that cells harvested in exponential growth phase consistently display mixtures of 2-fold and 4-fold Hg(II) coordination to sulfur (Hg-S 2 and Hg-S 4 ), with added cysteine enhancing Hg-S 4 formation. In contrast, cells in stationary growth phase or cells treated with a protonophore causing a decrease in cellular ATP predominantly contain Hg-S 2 , regardless of cysteine addition. Our XAS results favor metacinnabar (β-HgS) as the Hg-S 4 species, which we show is associated with both the cell envelope and cytoplasm. Additionally, we observe that added cysteine abiotically oxidizes to cystine and exponentially growing E. coli degrade high cysteine concentrations (100-1000 μM) into sulfide. Thermodynamic calculations confirm that cysteine-induced sulfide biosynthesis can promote the formation of dissolved and particulate Hg(II)-sulfide species. This report reveals new complexities arising in Hg(II) bioassays with cysteine and emphasizes the need for considering changes in chemical speciation as well as growth stage.

  7. Structural and catalytic characterization of a thermally stable and acid-stable variant of human carbonic anhydrase II containing an engineered disulfide bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Christopher D.; Habibzadegan, Andrew [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Tu, Chingkuang; Silverman, David N. [University of Florida, PO Box 100267, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McKenna, Robert, E-mail: rmckenna@ufl.edu [University of Florida, PO Box 100245, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) has been solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are a family of mostly zinc metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of CO{sub 2} to bicarbonate and a proton. Recently, there has been industrial interest in utilizing CAs as biocatalysts for carbon sequestration and biofuel production. The conditions used in these processes, however, result in high temperatures and acidic pH. This unfavorable environment results in rapid destabilization and loss of catalytic activity in CAs, ultimately resulting in cost-inefficient high-maintenance operation of the system. In order to negate these detrimental industrial conditions, cysteines at residues 23 (Ala23Cys) and 203 (Leu203Cys) were engineered into a wild-type variant of human CA II (HCAII) containing the mutation Cys206Ser. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the disulfide-containing HCAII (dsHCAII) was solved to 1.77 Å resolution and revealed that successful oxidation of the cysteine bond was achieved while also retaining desirable active-site geometry. Kinetic studies utilizing the measurement of {sup 18}O-labeled CO{sub 2} by mass spectrometry revealed that dsHCAII retained high catalytic efficiency, and differential scanning calorimetry showed acid stability and thermal stability that was enhanced by up to 14 K compared with native HCAII. Together, these studies have shown that dsHCAII has properties that could be used in an industrial setting to help to lower costs and improve the overall reaction efficiency.

  8. Synthesis of l-cysteine derivatives containing stable sulfur isotopes and application of this synthesis to reactive sulfur metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Katsuhiko; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Sezaki, Hiroshi; Ihara, Hideshi; Wei, Fan-Yan; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2017-05-01

    Cysteine persulfide is an L-cysteine derivative having one additional sulfur atom bound to a cysteinyl thiol group, and it serves as a reactive sulfur species that regulates redox homeostasis in cells. Here, we describe a rapid and efficient method of synthesis of L-cysteine derivatives containing isotopic sulfur atoms and application of this method to a reactive sulfur metabolome. We used bacterial cysteine syntheses to incorporate isotopic sulfur atoms into the sulfhydryl moiety of L-cysteine. We cloned three cysteine synthases-CysE, CysK, and CysM-from the Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium LT2, and we generated their recombinant enzymes. We synthesized 34 S-labeled L-cysteine from O-acetyl-L-serine and 34 S-labeled sodium sulfide as substrates for the CysK or CysM reactions. Isotopic labeling of L-cysteine at both sulfur ( 34 S) and nitrogen ( 15 N) atoms was also achieved by performing enzyme reactions with 15 N-labeled L-serine, acetyl-CoA, and 34 S-labeled sodium sulfide in the presence of CysE and CysK. The present enzyme systems can be applied to syntheses of a series of L-cysteine derivatives including L-cystine, L-cystine persulfide, S-sulfo-L-cysteine, L-cysteine sulfonate, and L-selenocystine. We also prepared 34 S-labeled N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) by incubating 34 S-labeled L-cysteine with acetyl coenzyme A in test tubes. Tandem mass spectrometric identification of low-molecular-weight thiols after monobromobimane derivatization revealed the endogenous occurrence of NAC in the cultured mammalian cells such as HeLa cells and J774.1 cells. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated, by using 34 S-labeled NAC, metabolic conversion of NAC to glutathione and its persulfide, via intermediate formation of L-cysteine, in the cells. The approach using isotopic sulfur labeling combined with mass spectrometry may thus contribute to greater understanding of reactive sulfur metabolome and redox biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  9. Key Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis and Subcellular Localization of Sulfur Oxygenase-Reductase of Acidianus tengchongensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; She, Qunxin

    2005-01-01

    ). The thio-modifying reagent N-ethylmaleimide and Zn2+ strongly inhibited the activities of the SORs of A. tengchongensis, suggesting that cysteine residues are important. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct four mutant SORs with cysteines replaced by serine or alanine. The purified mutant......Analysis of known sulfur oxygenase-reductases (SORs) and the SOR-like sequences identified from public databases indicated that they all possess three cysteine residues within two conserved motifs (V-G-P-K-V-C31 and C101-X-X-C104; numbering according to the Acidianus tengchongensis numbering system...... proteins were investigated in parallel with the wild-type SOR. Replacement of any cysteine reduced SOR activity by 98.4 to 100%, indicating that all the cysteine residues are crucial to SOR activities. Circular-dichroism and fluorescence spectrum analyses revealed that the wild-type and mutant SORs have...

  10. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  11. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  12. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased

  13. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  14. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...... understanding of the nature of the electrochemical promotion is also presented....

  15. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  16. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  17. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) with the oxidation of Celestine blue .... water samples were filtered through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter to remove suspended .... slope of the calibration graph as the optimization criterion. ..... In presence of Phen as stability enhancement agent in indicator system. ( ) +.

  18. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the alkaloid (+)-myrtine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizzuti, Maria Gabriefla; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    A new protocol for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-2,6-disubstituted-4-piperidones has been developed using a catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reaction in combination with a diastereoselective lithiation-substitution sequence; an efficient synthesis of (+)-myrtine has been achieved

  19. Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a precursor and characterized by chemical analysis using the ICP–AES method, XRD, TEM, FTIR and BET surface area determination. The oxidation reaction was carried out at 70°C under atmospheric pressure. The results showed the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 as being very high in terms of turnover frequency.

  20. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  1. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  2. Lifespan extension and increased resistance to environmental stressors by N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Il Oh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a modified sulfur-containing amino acid that acts as a strong cellular antioxidant, on the response to environmental stressors and on aging in C. elegans. METHOD: The survival of worms under oxidative stress conditions induced by paraquat was evaluated with and without in vivo N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the response to other environmental stressors, including heat stress and ultraviolet irradiation (UV, was also monitored. To investigate the effect on aging, we examined changes in lifespan, fertility, and expression of age-related biomarkers in C. elegans after N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. RESULTS: Dietary N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly increased resistance to oxidative stress, heat stress, and UV irradiation in C. elegans. In addition, N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly extended both the mean and maximum lifespan of C. elegans. The mean lifespan was extended by up to 30.5% with 5 mM N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment, and the maximum lifespan was increased by 8 days. N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation also increased the total number of progeny produced and extended the gravid period of C. elegans. The green fluorescent protein reporter assay revealed that expression of the stress-responsive genes, sod-3 and hsp-16.2, increased significantly following N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. CONCLUSION: N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation confers a longevity phenotype in C. elegans, possibly through increased resistance to environmental stressors.

  3. Drug susceptibility testing in microaerophilic parasites: Cysteine strongly affects the effectivities of metronidazole and auranofin, a novel and promising antimicrobial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Leitsch

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The microaerophilic parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Giardia lamblia annually cause hundreds of millions of human infections which are treated with antiparasitic drugs. Metronidazole is the most often prescribed drug but also other drugs are in use, and novel drugs with improved characteristics are constantly being developed. One of these novel drugs is auranofin, originally an antirheumatic which has been relabelled for the treatment of parasitic infections. Drug effectivity is arguably the most important criterion for its applicability and is commonly assessed in susceptibility assays using in vitro cultures of a given pathogen. However, drug susceptibility assays can be strongly affected by certain compounds in the growth media. In the case of microaerophilic parasites, cysteine which is added in large amounts as an antioxidant is an obvious candidate because it is highly reactive and known to modulate the toxicity of metronidazole in several microaerophilic parasites.In this study, it was attempted to reduce cysteine concentrations as far as possible without affecting parasite viability by performing drug susceptibility assays under strictly anaerobic conditions in an anaerobic cabinet. Indeed, T. vaginalis and E. histolytica could be grown without any cysteine added and the cysteine concentration necessary to maintain G. lamblia could be reduced to 20%. Susceptibilities to metronidazole were found to be clearly reduced in the presence of cysteine. With auranofin the protective effect of cysteine was extreme, providing protection to concentrations up to 100-fold higher as observed in the absence of cysteine. With three other drugs tested, albendazole, furazolidone and nitazoxanide, all in use against G. lamblia, the effect of cysteine was less pronounced. Oxygen was found to have a less marked impact on metronidazole and auranofin than cysteine but bovine bile which is standardly used in growth media for G

  4. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  5. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  6. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a cysteine xyloglucan conjugate as mucoadhesive polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh Bhalekar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to improve the mucoadhesive potential of xyloglucan polymer by the covalent attachment of cysteine as thiol moiety. The parent polymer xyloglucan was chemically modified by introducing sulphydryl bearing compound L-cysteine HCl. Different batches of xyloglucan-cysteine conjugates were prepared at varying reaction pH (2-6 and evaluated for optimum thiol incorporation, disulphide group content, swelling behavior, rheological properties and mucoadhesive properties. The obtained conjugates characterized in vitro by quantification of immobilized thiol groups; showed maximum thiol incorporation on xyloglucan (7.67 ± 0.14 % at pH 5. The disulphide group content was found maximum (2.83 ± 0.12 at pH 6. The water uptake at end of 4 h was 5.0 for xyloglucan and was found to decrease in thiolated derivatives with increase in thiolation. Mucoadhesion studies revealed that mucoadhesion of xyloglucan-cysteine conjugate increased more than twice compared to the unmodified polymer. The viscosity of thiomer was more than that of xyloglucan because of formation of disulphide bonds.

  8. Synthesis, characterization, mucoadhesion and biocompatibility of thiolated carboxymethyl dextran-cysteine conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahnaz, G; Perera, G; Sakloetsakun, D; Rahmat, D; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2010-05-21

    This study was aimed at improving the mucoadhesive properties of carboxymethyl dextran by the covalent attachment of cysteine. Mediated by a carbodiimide, l-cysteine was covalently attached to the polymer. The resulting CMD-cysteine conjugate (CMD-(273) conjugate) displayed 273+/-20 micromol thiol groups per gram of polymer (mean+/-S.D.; n=3). Within 2h the viscosity of an aqueous mucus/CMD-(273) conjugate mixture pH 7.4 increased at 37 degrees C by more than 85% compared to a mucus/carboxymethyl dextran mixture indicating enlarged interactions between the mucus and the thiolated polymer. Due to the immobilization of cysteine, the swelling velocity of the polymer was significantly accelerated (ppolymer disintegrated within 15 min, whereas tablets of the CMD-(273) conjugate remained stable for 160 min (means+/-S.D.; n=3). Results from LDH and MTT assays on Caco-2 cells revealed 4.96+/-0.98% cytotoxicity and 94.1+/-0.9% cell viability for the CMD-(273) conjugate, respectively. Controlled release of model compound from CMD-(273) conjugate tablets was observed over 6h. These findings suggest that CMD-(273) conjugate is a promising novel polymer for drug delivery systems providing improved mucoadhesive and cohesive properties, greater stability and biocompatibility. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Visible-light-mediated selective arylation of cysteine in batch and flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottecchia, C.; Rubens, M.; Gunnoo, S.B.; Hessel, V.; Madder, A.

    2017-01-01

    A mild visible-light-mediated strategy for cysteine arylation is presented. The method relies on the use of eosin Y as a metal-free photocatalyst and aryldiazonium salts as arylating agents. The reaction can be significantly accelerated in a microflow reactor, whilst allowing the in situ formation

  10. Studies of the structures of rhenium complexes with sulphur-containing amino acids: cysteine and homocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkowska, A.; Wojciechowski, W.

    1979-01-01

    Two rhenium compounds have been synthesized: compound 1 with cysteine HS-CH 2 -CH-NH 2 -COOH and compound 2 with homocysteine HS-CH 2 -CH 2 -CH-NH 2 -COOH. On the basis of spectroscopic measurements (IR, far IR, Raman, VIS and UV spectra) and magnetic susceptibility measurements their probable electronic and molecular structures have been determined. (author)

  11. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  12. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadi, Reza; Malek, Mahrooz; Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Masoudi, Afshin; Gu Ning; Zhang Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. ► pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. ► Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. ► MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  13. Use of equimolar cysteine/ascorbic acids to recover MCP synthesized Ti(Mg) alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mushove, T

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution of waste by-products of mechanochemical processing (MCP) synthesis of Ti(Mg) alloy, from TiO2 and 15 wt.% excess Mg, was conducted in equimolar cysteine/ascorbic acids. The synthesized alloy is inherently mixed with MgO and other oxides...

  14. Mutations at the cysteine codons of the recA gene of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisemann, J.M.; Weinstock, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    Each of the three cysteine residues in the Escherichia coli RecA protein was replaced with a number of other amino acids. To do this, each cysteine codon was first converted to a chain-terminating amber codon by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. These amber mutants were then either assayed for function in different suppressor strains or reverted by a second round of mutagenesis with oligonucleotides that had random sequences at the amber codon. Thirty-three different amino acid substitutions were obtained. Mutants were tested for three functions of RecA: survival following UV irradiation, homologous recombination, and induction of the SOS response. It was found that although none of the cysteines is essential for activity, mutations at each of these positions can affect one or more of the activities of RecA, depending on the particular amino acid substitution. In addition, the cysteine at position 116 appears to be involved in the RecA-promoted cleavage of the LexA protein

  15. Effect of free cysteine on the denaturation and aggregation of holo α-lactalbumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line R.; Lund, Marianne N.; Davies, Michael J.

    2018-01-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-LA) is a key commercial whey protein for nutritional purposes. The holo protein (calcium saturated) is considered the most heat stable whey protein, capable of refolding from unfolded states under many conditions. This is due to the absence of free thiols (cysteine residues......) that are typically involved in thermal aggregation and thiol–disulphide exchange reactions of other whey proteins. Heating (0–120 min at 90 °C, pH 7.0) holo α-LA generates free thiols through thermal cleavage of disulphide bonds, resulting in aggregates comprising unfolded α-LA species. The addition of free cysteine...... promotes the formation of soluble aggregates, effectively decreasing the holding time required to reach a particular aggregate size in a dose-dependent manner (0.35–1.4 mM cysteine). Excess cysteine (≥14 mM) causes a destabilisation of α-LA, shown by decreased denaturation temperature and gel formation...

  16. Cysteine proteases and wheat (Triticum aestivum L) under drought: A still greatly unexplored association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Anna-Maria; Kunert, Karl J; Cullis, Christopher A

    2017-09-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) provides about 19% of global dietary energy. Environmental stress, such as drought, affects wheat growth causing premature plant senescence and ultimately plant death. A plant response to drought is an increase in protease-mediated proteolysis with rapid degradation of proteins required for metabolic processes. Among the plant proteases that are increased in their activity following stress, cysteine proteases are the best characterized. Very little is known about particular wheat cysteine protease sequences, their expression and also localization. The current knowledge on wheat cysteine proteases belonging to the five clans (CA, CD, CE, CF and CP) is outlined, in particular their expression and possible function under drought. The first successes in establishing an annotated wheat genome database are further highlighted which has allowed more detailed mining of cysteine proteases. We also share our thoughts on future research directions considering the growing availability of genomic resources of this very important food crop. Finally, we also outline future application of developed knowledge in transgenic wheat plants for environmental stress protection and also as senescence markers to monitor wheat growth under environmental stress conditions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Formation of elemental sulfur by Chlorella fusca during growth on L-cysteine ethylester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, F.; Schafer, W.; Schmidt, A.

    1984-01-01

    During growth on L-cysteine ethylester, Chlorella fusca (211-8b) accumulated a substance which contained bound sulfide, which could be liberated by reduction with dithioerythritol (DTE) as inorganic sulfide. This substance was extracted with hot methanol and purified by thin layer chromatography. This substance liberated free sulfide when incubated with mono- and dithiols, and thiocyanate was formed after heating with KCN. The isolated substance cochromatographed with authentic sulfur flower using different solvent systems for thin layer chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography, and the identical spectrum with a relative ..beta..max at 263 nm was found. The chemical structure was confirmed by mass spectrometry showing a molecular weight of 256 m/e for the S/sub 8/ configuration. No labeled elemental sulfur was detected when the cells were grown on (/sup 35/S)sulfate and L-cysteine ethylester. C. fusca seems to have enzymes for the metabolism of elemental sulfur, since it disappeared after prolonged growth into the stationary phase. Cysteine was formed from O-acetyl-L-serine and elemental sulfur in the presence of thiol groups and purified cysteine synthase from spinach or Chlorella.

  18. Electronic structure of the L-cysteine films on dental alloys studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, K; Takahashi, K; Azuma, J; Kamada, M; Tsujibayashi, T; Ichimiya, M

    2013-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of the dental alloys, type 1, type 3, K14, and MC12 and their interaction with L-cysteine have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the electronic structures of the type-1 and type-3 dental alloys are similar to that of polycrystalline Au, while that of the K14 dental alloy is much affected by Cu. The electronic states of the MC12 dental alloy originate dominantly from Cu 3d states and Pd 4d states around the top of the valence bands, while the 4∼7-eV electronic structure of MC12 originates from the Ag 4d states. The peak shift and the change in shape due to alloying are observed in all the dental alloys. For the L-cysteine thin films, new peak or structure observed around 2 eV on all the dental alloys is suggested to be due to the bonding of S 3sp orbitals with the dental alloy surfaces. The Cu-S bond as well as the Au-S and Au-O bonds may cause the change in the electronic structure of the L-cysteine on type 1, type 3 and K14. For MC12, the interaction with L-cysteine may be dominantly due to the Pd-S, Cu-S, and Ag-O bonds, while the contribution of the Ag-S bond is small.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of arsenic-doped cysteine-capped thoria-based nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, F. J.; Díez, M. T.; Aller, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    Thoria materials have been largely used in the nuclear industry. Nonetheless, fluorescent thoria-based nanoparticles provide additional properties to be applied in other fields. Thoria-based nanoparticles, with and without arsenic and cysteine, were prepared in 1,2-ethanediol aqueous solutions by a simple precipitation procedure. The synthesized thoria-based nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (ED-XRS), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The presence of arsenic and cysteine, as well as the use of a thermal treatment facilitated fluorescence emission of the thoria-based nanoparticles. Arsenic-doped and cysteine-capped thoria-based nanoparticles prepared in 2.5 M 1,2-ethanediol solutions and treated at 348 K showed small crystallite sizes and strong fluorescence. However, thoria nanoparticles subjected to a thermal treatment at 873 K also produced strong fluorescence with a very narrow size distribution and much smaller crystallite sizes, 5 nm being the average size as shown by XRD and TEM. The XRD data indicated that, even after doping of arsenic in the crystal lattice of ThO 2 , the samples treated at 873 K were phase pure with the fluorite cubic structure. The Raman and FT-IR spectra shown the most characteristics vibrational peaks of cysteine together with other peaks related to the bonds of this molecule to thoria and arsenic when present

  20. Indirect flow injection determination of N-acetyl-L-cysteine using cerium(IV) and ferroin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Heberth Juliano; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2005-01-01

    An indirect flow injection spectrophotometric procedure is proposed for the determination of N-acetyl-L-cysteine in pharmaceutical formulations. In this system, ferroin ([Fe(II)-(fen) 2 ] 2+ ) in excess, with a strong absorption at 500 nm, is oxidized by cerium(IV) yielding cerium(III) and [Fe(III)-(fen) 2 ] 3+ (colorless), thus producing a baseline. When N-acetyl-L-cysteine solution is introduced into the flow injection system, it reacts with cerium(IV) increasing the analytical signal in proportion to the drug concentration. Under optimal experimental conditions, the linearity of the analytical curve for N-acetyl-L-cysteine ranged from 6.5x10 -6 to 1.3x10 -4 mol L -1 . The detection limit was 5.0x10 -6 mol L -1 and recoveries between 98.0 and 106% were obtained. The sampling frequency was 60 determinations per hour and the RSD was smaller than 1.4% for 2.2x10 -5 mol L -1 N-acetyl-L-cysteine. (author)

  1. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, Mitsunori, E-mail: honda.mitsunori@jaea.go.jp; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-04-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds.

  2. Electrochemical immobilization of biomolecules on gold surface modified with monolayered L-cysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Mitsunori; Baba, Yuji; Sekiguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Hirao, Norie

    2014-01-01

    Immobilization of organic molecules on the top of a metal surface is not easy because of lattice mismatch between organic and metal crystals. Gold atoms bind to thiol groups through strong chemical bonds, and a self-assembled monolayer of sulfur-terminated organic molecules is formed on the gold surface. Herein, we suggested that a monolayer of L-cysteine deposited on a gold surface can act as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules on the metal surface. We selected lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule because it is one of the simplest carboxyl-containing biomolecules. The immobilization of lactic acid on the metal surface was carried out by an electrochemical method in an aqueous environment under the potential range varying from − 0.6 to + 0.8 V. The surface chemical states before and after the electrochemical reaction were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The N 1s and C 1s XPS spectra showed that the L-cysteine-modified gold surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds. This technique might enable the immobilization of large organic molecules and biomolecules. - Highlights: • Monolayer l-cysteine deposited on Au surface as a buffer layer to immobilize biomolecules. • Lactic acid as the immobilized biomolecule as it is simple carboxyl-containing biomolecule. • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of surface chemical states, before and after. • L-cysteine-modified Au surface can immobilize lactic acid via peptide bonds

  3. Urinary excretion of N-acetyl-S-allyl-L-cystein upon garlic consumption by human volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, B.M.; Boogaard, P.J.; Rijksen, D.A.; Commandeur, J.N.M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1996-01-01

    N-Acetyl-S-allyl-L-cysteine (allylmercapturic acid, ALMA) was previously detected in urine from humans consuming garlic. Exposure of rats to allyl halides is also known to lead to excretion of ALMA in urine. ALMA is a potential biomarker for exposure assessment of workers exposed to allyl halides.

  4. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G.K. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical

  5. Evaluation of cysteine ethyl ester as efficient inducer for glutathione overproduction in Saccharomyces spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Eric; Schmacht, Maximilian; Senz, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Economical yeast based glutathione (GSH) production is a process that is influenced by several factors like raw material and production costs, biomass production and efficient biotransformation of adequate precursors into the final product GSH. Nowadays the usage of cysteine for the microbial conversion into GSH is industrial state of practice. In the following study, the potential of different inducers to increase the GSH content was evaluated by means of design of experiments methodology. Investigations were executed in three natural Saccharomyces strains, S. cerevisiae, S. bayanus and S. boulardii, in a well suited 50ml shake tube system. Results of shake tube experiments were confirmed in traditional baffled shake flasks and finally via batch cultivation in lab-scale bioreactors under controlled conditions. Comprehensive studies showed that the usage of cysteine ethyl ester (CEE) for the batch-wise biotransformation into GSH led up to a more than 2.2 times higher yield compared to cysteine as inducer. Additionally, the intracellular GSH content could be significantly increased for all strains in terms of 2.29±0.29% for cysteine to 3.65±0.23% for CEE, respectively, in bioreactors. Thus, the usage of CEE provides a highly attractive inducing strategy for the GSH overproduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutathione provides a source of cysteine essential for intracellular multiplication of Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Alkhuder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. Its ability to multiply and survive in macrophages is critical for its virulence. By screening a bank of HimarFT transposon mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS to isolate intracellular growth-deficient mutants, we selected one mutant in a gene encoding a putative gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT. This gene (FTL_0766 was hence designated ggt. The mutant strain showed impaired intracellular multiplication and was strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. Here we present evidence that the GGT activity of F. tularensis allows utilization of glutathione (GSH, gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine dipeptide as cysteine sources to ensure intracellular growth. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of a nutrient acquisition system in the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. GSH is the most abundant source of cysteine in the host cytosol. Thus, the capacity this intracellular bacterial pathogen has evolved to utilize the available GSH, as a source of cysteine in the host cytosol, constitutes a paradigm of bacteria-host adaptation.

  7. Irreversible Cysteine-Selective Protein Labeling Employing Modular Electrophilic Tetrafluoroethylation Reagents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, Jiří; Zschoche, R.; Klimánková, Iveta; Matoušek, V.; Beier, Petr; Hilvert, D.; Togni, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 27 (2017), s. 6490-6494 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-00598S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : bioconjugation * cysteine * enzymes * fluorine * fluoroalkylation * hypervalent iodine Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  8. Covalent binding of nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue in human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jansen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Covalent binding of various clinically important nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin, in vitro and in vivo, is demonstrated. A rapid method for detection of these adducts is presented, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the adducted

  9. Role of conserved cysteine residues in Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Baura, Valter A; Aquino, Bruno; Huergo, Luciano F; Kadowaki, Marco A S; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Wassem, Roseli; Monteiro, Rose A

    2009-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium that associates with economically important crops. NifA protein, the transcriptional activator of nif genes in H. seropedicae, binds to nif promoters and, together with RNA polymerase-sigma(54) holoenzyme, catalyzes the formation of open complexes to allow transcription initiation. The activity of H. seropedicae NifA is controlled by ammonium and oxygen levels, but the mechanisms of such control are unknown. Oxygen sensitivity is attributed to a conserved motif of cysteine residues in NifA that spans the central AAA+ domain and the interdomain linker that connects the AAA+ domain to the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Here we mutagenized this conserved motif of cysteines and assayed the activity of mutant proteins in vivo. We also purified the mutant variants of NifA and tested their capacity to bind to the nifB promoter region. Chimeric proteins between H. seropedicae NifA, an oxygen-sensitive protein, and Azotobacter vinelandii NifA, an oxygen-tolerant protein, were constructed and showed that the oxygen response is conferred by the central AAA+ and C-terminal DNA binding domains of H. seropedicae NifA. We conclude that the conserved cysteine motif is essential for NifA activity, although single cysteine-to-serine mutants are still competent at binding DNA.

  10. Micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics and prebiotics, a review of effectiveness in reducing HIV progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical

  11. Effects of N-acetyl cysteine on lipid levels and on leukocyte and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Many of studies have shown that increased lipid levels play a significant role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis after splenectomy. We investigated the effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) on lipid parameters and leukocyte and platelet (PLT) levels following splenectomy. Materials and Methods: 32 Sprague.

  12. Cyst(e)ine requirements in enterally fed very low birth weight preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedijk, Maaike A; Voortman, Gardi; van Beek, Ron H T; Baartmans, Martin G A; Wafelman, Leontien S; van Goudoever, Johannes B

    2008-03-01

    Optimal nutrition is of utmost importance for the preterm infant's later health and developmental outcome. Amino acid requirements for preterm infants differ from those for term and older infants, because growth rates differ. Some nonessential amino acids, however, cannot be sufficiently synthesized endogenously. Cyst(e)ine is supposed to be such a conditionally essential amino acid in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to determine, at 32 and 35 weeks' postmenstrual age, cyst(e)ine requirements in fully enterally fed very low birth weight preterm infants with gestational ages of ine requirement was determined with the indicator amino acid oxidation technique ([1-(13)C]phenylalanine) after 24-hour adaptation. Fractional [1-(13)C]phenylalanine oxidation was established in 47 very low birth weight preterm infants (mean gestational age: 28 weeks +/- 1 week SD; birth weight: 1.07 kg +/- 0.21 kg SD). Increase in dietary cyst(e)ine intake did not result in a decrease in fractional [1-(13)C]phenylalanine oxidation. These data do not support the hypothesis that endogenous cyst(e)ine synthesis is limited in very low birth weight preterm infants with gestational ages of ine requirement is ine is probably not a conditionally essential amino acid in these infants.

  13. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  14. Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cysteine Using Silver and Copper Solid Amalgam Electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Novotný, Ladislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2002), s. 971-976 ISSN 0039-9140 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silver or copper solid amalgam electrode * cysteine * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.054, year: 2002

  15. Effect of cysteine and cystine addition on sensory profile and potent odorants of extruded potato snacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majcher, Małgorzata A; Jeleń, Henryk H

    2007-07-11

    Aromas generated in extruded potato snacks without and with addition of 0.25, 0.5, and 1% (w/w) of flavor precursors, cysteine and cystine, were compared and evaluated by descriptive sensory profiling. The results showed that high addition of cysteine (0.5 and 1%) resulted in the formation of undesirable odor and taste described as mercaptanic/sulfur, onion-like, and bitter; on the contrary, addition of cystine even at high concentration gave product with pleasant odor and taste, slightly changed into breadlike notes. GC/O analysis showed cysteine to be a much more reactive flavor precursor than cystine, stimulating formation of 12 compounds with garlic, sulfury, burnt, pungent/beer, cabbage/mold, meatlike, roasted, and popcorn odor notes. Further analysis performed by the AEDA technique identified 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (FD 2048) as a most potent odorant of extruded potato snacks with 1% addition of cysteine. Other identified compounds with high FD were butanal, 3-methyl-2-butenethiol, 2-methylthiazole, methional, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, and 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone. In the case of cystine addition (1%) the highest FD factors were calculated for butanal, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, benzenemethanethiol, methional, phenylacetaldehyde, dimethyltrisulfide, 1-octen-3-ol, 1,5-octadien-3-one, and 2-acetylpyrazine.

  16. Catalytic site identification—a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Daniel A.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov. PMID:23680785

  17. Cyst(e)ine imbalance and its effect on methionine precursor utilization in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, R N; Baker, D H

    2008-08-01

    Five 9- or 12-d chick growth bioassays were done in batteries using 2 Met-deficient diets: a purified AA-based diet containing (by analysis, as-fed) 20.3% CP, 0.12% Met, and 0.05% cyst(e)ine; and an AA-fortified corn-peanut meal diet containing (by analysis, as-fed) 19.0% CP, 0.22% Met, and 0.23% cyst(e) ine. Feed-grade DL-Met (dl-M; 99%) was compared with feed-grade DL-OH-Met, Ca (OH-M; 84%). When the purified diet was modified to contain 0.12% Met and 0.20% or greater cyst(e)ine, slope-ratio assays involving graded dosing of DL-M (0, 404, 808, and 1,212 mg of DL-M/kg) or isosulfurous levels of OH-M resulted in linear (P ine [i.e., 0.12% Met, 0.12% cyst(e)ine]. When this diet was supplemented with either 404 mg of DL-M/kg or 476 mg of OH-M/kg, BW gain and G:F responded (P 0.10). Assays 4 and 5 used the corn-peanut meal basal diet containing 0.22% total Met and 0.23% total cyst(e)ine. In both assays, addition of either 465 mg of DL-M/kg or 554 mg of OH-M/kg resulted in increased (P ine concentration. In the absence of excess cyst(e)ine, BW gain responses to DL-M and OH-M were similar, but when 0.10% excess cyst(e)ine was provided as L-cystine or feather meal, DL-M responses tended to exceed those of OH-M. Moreover, this small excess of dietary cyst(e)ine, regardless of source, depressed (P ine, when included in Met-deficient diets, has the potential to be both anorexigenic and pernicious to OH-M utilization.

  18. Preparation and characterization of a cysteine based DTPA derivative and its immunoconjugate for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Hong, Y. D.; Choi, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, radioimmunotherapy (RIT), which uses a monoclonal antibody in addition to a radionuclide to deliver radiation to the sites of a disease, has been extensively studied in this population. To label an antibody with radionuclides it is necessary to introduce a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA) such a DTPA since it can not be directly labeled to a radionuclide. Therefore, developing a better BFCA for chelating biomolecule and radionuclide has been of major interest in developing radioimmunotherapeutic agents. Thereby, we describe the entantiospecific synthesis of a DTPA analogue which is derived from L-cysteine via bis N-alkylation. And the prepared DTPA derivative was conjugated with human Immunoglobulin G, and a characterization of the immunoconjugate was carried out. N, N-Bis[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)methyl]-2-ethanolamine, N, N-Bis[(tert-butoxycarbony)methyl]-2-bromoethyl-amine, 2-(4-N-Boc-aminophenyl) ethanol, 1-(4-N-Boc-aminophenyl)-2-bromoethane, S-((4-N-Boc-arninophenyl)-1-ethyl)-cysteine methylester, S-(N-Boc-aminophenyl)-Cys(tBu4-DTPA) methylester, -aminophenylethyl-Cys-DTPA, isothiocyanate-cysteine-DTPA, Immunoconjugation with IgG. The optimal molar DTPA derivative to IgG conjugation ratio was 1: 1. At higher amounts of DTPA derivative, amounts of unbounded DTPA derivative increased, and the immunoactivities of immunoconjugates reduced. Gel electrophoresis analysis of the immunoconjugates showed no degradation products or other impurities. This demonstrates the stability of the IgG in DTPA derivative. We established the preparation of an amino acid based DTPA by producing 4-Ethylaniline-DTPA-L-Cysteine. At the same molar this DTPA derivative to IgG, the immunoconjugate has stable molecular structure. In conclusion, 4-Ethylaniline-DTPA-L-Cysteine as a BFCA will show good properties for preparing a specific regional delivery system such as in radiopharmaceuticals, as a radiotracer, and NMR contrasting agents

  19. Solid state radiolysis of sulphur-containing amino acids. Cysteine, cystine and methionine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco Cataldo; Pietro Ragni; Susana Iglesias-Groth; Arturo Manchado

    2011-01-01

    The sulphur-containing proteinaceous amino acids l-cysteine, l-cystine and l-methionine were irradiated in the solid state to a dose of 3.2 MGy. This dose corresponds to that delivered by radionuclide decay in a timescale of 1.05 x 10 9 years to the organic matter buried at a depth >20 m in comets and asteroids. The purity of the sulphur-containing amino acids was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) before and after the solid state radiolysis and the preservation of the chirality after the radiolysis was studied by chirooptical methods (optical rotatory dispersion, ORD) and by FT-IR spectroscopy. Although the high radiation dose of 3.2 MGy delivered, all the amino acids studied show a high radiation resistance. The best radiation resistance was offered by l-cysteine. The radiolysis of l-cysteine leads to the formation of l-cystine. The radiation resistance of l-methionine is not at the level of l-cysteine but also l-methionine is able to survive the dose of 3.2 MGy. Furthermore in all cases examined the preservation of chirality after radiolysis was clearly observed by the ORD spectroscopy although a certain level of radioracemization was measured in all cases. The radioracemization is minimal in the case of l-cysteine and is more pronounced in the case of l-methionine. In conclusion, the study shows that the sulphur-containing amino acids can survive for 1.05 x 10 9 years and, after extrapolation of the data, even to the age of the Solar System i.e. to 4.6 x 10 9 years. (author)

  20. Metabolism, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of S-allyl-L-cysteine in rats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Itoh, Kenji; Kodera, Yukihiro

    2015-05-01

    The metabolism, excretion, and pharmacokinetics of S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC), an active key component of garlic supplements, were examined in rats and dogs. A single dose of SAC was administered orally or i.v. to rats (5 mg/kg) and dogs (2 mg/kg). SAC was well absorbed (bioavailability >90%) and its four metabolites-N-acetyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine (NAc-SAC), N-acetyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (NAc-SACS), S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (SACS), and l-γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine-were identified in the plasma and/or urine. Renal clearance values (l/h/kg) of SAC indicated its extensive renal reabsorption, which contributed to the long elimination half-life of SAC, especially in dogs (12 hours). The metabolism of SAC to NAc-SAC, principal metabolite of SAC, was studied in vitro and in vivo. Liver and kidney S9 fractions of rats and dogs catalyzed both N-acetylation of SAC and deacetylation of NAc-SAC. After i.v. administration of NAc-SAC, SAC appeared in the plasma and its concentration declined in parallel with that of NAc-SAC. These results suggest that the rate and extent of the formation of NAc-SAC are determined by the N-acetylation and deacetylation activities of liver and kidney. Also, NAc-SACS was detected in the plasma after i.v. administration of either NAc-SAC or SACS, suggesting that NAc-SACS could be formed via both N-acetylation of SACS and S-oxidation of NAc-SAC. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the pharmacokinetics of SAC in rats and dogs is characterized by its high oral bioavailability, N-acetylation and S-oxidation metabolism, and extensive renal reabsorption, indicating the critical roles of liver and kidney in the elimination of SAC. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.