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Sample records for catalytic redox-active cysteine

  1. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-09-24

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases.

  2. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  3. A Methionine Residue Promotes Hyperoxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geumsoo; Levine, Rodney L

    2016-06-28

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (msrA) reduces methionine sulfoxide in proteins back to methionine. Its catalytic cysteine (Cys72-SH) has a low pKa that facilitates oxidation by methionine sulfoxide to cysteine sulfenic acid. If the catalytic cycle proceeds efficiently, the sulfenic acid is reduced back to cysteine at the expense of thioredoxin. However, the sulfenic acid is vulnerable to "irreversible" oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid that inactivates msrA (hyperoxidation). We observed that human msrA is resistant to hyperoxidation while mouse msrA is readily hyperoxidized by micromolar concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. We investigated the basis of this difference in susceptibility to hyperoxidation and established that it is controlled by the presence or absence of a Met residue in the carboxyl-terminal domain of the enzyme, Met229. This residue is Val in human msrA, and when it was mutated to Met, human msrA became sensitive to hyperoxidation. Conversely, mouse msrA was rendered insensitive to hyperoxidation when Met229 was mutated to Val or one of five other residues. Positioning of the methionine at residue 229 is not critical, as hyperoxidation occurred as long as the methionine was located within the group of 14 carboxyl-terminal residues. The carboxyl domain of msrA is known to be flexible and to have access to the active site, and Met residues are known to form stable, noncovalent bonds with aromatic residues through interaction of the sulfur atom with the aromatic ring. We propose that Met229 forms such a bond with Trp74 at the active site, preventing formation of a protective sulfenylamide with Cys72 sulfenic acid. As a consequence, the sulfenic acid is available for facile, irreversible oxidation to cysteine sulfinic acid. PMID:27259041

  4. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of Cu2+ ion based on catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Li, Bowei; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-02-15

    As an essential element, copper ion (Cu(2+)) plays important roles in human beings for its participation in diverse metabolic processes as a cofactor and/or a structural component of enzymes. However, excessive uptake of Cu(2+) ion gives rise to the risk of certain diseases. So, it is important to develop simple ways to monitor and detect Cu(2+) ion. In this study, a simple, facile colorimetric sensor for the ultrasensitive determination of Cu(2+) ion was developed based on the following principle: L-cysteine and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) could be conjugated to form the yellow product 2,4-dinitrophenylcysteine (DNPC), which was measurable at 355nm; however, upon addition of Cu(2+) ion, the absorbance of DNPC would be decreased owing to the Cu(2+) ion catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cystine in the presence of O2. Thus, the colorimetric detection of Cu(2+) ion could be achieved. The optimal pH, buffer, temperature and incubation time for the colorimetric sensor were obtained of pH 6.8 in 0.1M HEPES solution, 90 °C and 50 min, respectively. A good linearity within the range of 0.8-10 nM (r = 0.996) was attained, with a high detectability up to 0.5nM. Analyses of Cu(2+) ion in drinking water, lake water, seawater and biological samples were carried out and the method performances were found to agree well with that obtained by ICP-MS. The developed simple colorimetric sensor proved applicable for Cu(2+) ion determination in real samples with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25194800

  5. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe3O4), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  6. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  7. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. McWhinney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5 × 10−4 m3 μg−1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  8. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  9. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  10. An iron–oxygen intermediate formed during the catalytic cycle of cysteine dioxygenase† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental and computational details. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cc03904a Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchesnokov, E. P.; Faponle, A. S.; Davies, C. G.; Quesne, M. G.; Turner, R.; Fellner, M.; Souness, R. J.; Wilbanks, S. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a key enzyme in the breakdown of cysteine, but its mechanism remains controversial. A combination of spectroscopic and computational studies provides the first evidence of a short-lived intermediate in the catalytic cycle. The intermediate decays within 20 ms and has absorption maxima at 500 and 640 nm. PMID:27297454

  11. Modulation of the catalytic activity of cruzipain, the major cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, by temperature and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvati, L; Mattu, M; Polticelli, F; Tiberi, F; Gradoni, L; Venturini, G; Bolognesi, M; Ascenzi, P

    2001-06-01

    Cysteine proteinases are relevant to several aspects of the parasite life cycle and of parasite-host relationships. Here, a quantitative investigation of the effect of temperature and pH on the total substrate inhibition of cruzipain, the major papain-like cysteine proteinase from Trypanosoma cruzi, is reported. Values of the apparent catalytic and inhibition parameters Km, Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) for the cruzipain-catalysed hydrolysis of N-alpha-benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginine-(7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) (Z-Phe-Arg-AMC) and azocasein were determined between 10.0 degrees C and 40.0 degrees C and between pH 4.5 and 8.5. Values of Km were independent of temperature and pH, whereas values of Vmax, Vmax/Km, and K(i) were temperature-dependent and pH-dependent. Over the whole pH range explored, values of logVmax, log(Vmax/Km), and logK(i) increased linearly with respect to T(-1). Values of Vmax and Vmax/Km were affected by the acid-base equilibrium of one temperature-independent ionizing group (i.e. pK(unl)' = pK(lig)' = 5.7 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C). Moreover, values of K(i) were affected by the alkaline pK shift of one ionizing group of active cruzipain (from pK(unl)" = 5.7 +/- 0.1 to pK(lig)" = 6.1 +/- 0.1, at 25.0 degrees C) upon Z-Phe-Arg-AMC binding. Values of logK(unl)', logK(lig)', and logK(lig)" were temperature-independent. Conversely, values of logK(unl)" were linearly dependent on T(-1). As a whole, total substrate inhibition of cruzipain decreased with increasing temperature and pH. These data suggest that both synthetic and protein substrates can bind to the unique active centre of cruzipain either productively or following a binding mode which results in enzyme inhibition. However, allosteric effect(s) cannot be excluded.

  12. Cloning, expression, and purification of human cyclophilin in Escherichia coli and assessment of the catalytic role of cysteines by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cDNA encoding human cyclophilin from the Jurkat T-cell lymphoma line has been cloned by the expression cassette polymerase chain reaction and sequenced, and an expression vector has been constructed under control of the tac promoter for efficient expression in Escherichia coli. Active cyclophilin is produced at up to 40% of soluble cell protein, facilitating a one-column purification to homogeneity. Wild-type cyclophilin was characterized for binding of the potent immunosuppressant agent cyclosporin A by tryptophan fluorescence enhancement and for inhibition of cyclophilin's peptidyl-proly cis-trans isomerase (rotamase) activity. With N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as the substrate, recombinant human cyclophilin has a high catalytic efficiency. To test the prior suggestion that a cysteine residue may be essential for catalysis and immunosuppressant binding, the four cysteines at positions 52, 62, 115, and 161 were mutated individually to alanine and the purified mutant proteins were shown to retain full affinity for cyclosporin A and equivalent catalytic efficiency as a rotamase. Clearly the cysteines play no essential role in catalysis or cyclosporin A binding. These results rule out the recently proposed mechanism. Involving the formation of tetrahedral hemithioorthoamide. Whereas mechanisms that embody other tetrahedral intermediates may be operative, an alternative mechanism is considered that involves distortion of bound substrate with a twisted (90 degree) peptidyl-prolyl amide bond

  13. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries.

  14. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries. PMID:27070768

  15. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  16. A new redox-active coordination polymer with cobalticinium dicarboxylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Mitsuru; Hayakawa, Yuri; Miyazawa, Makoto; Oyama, Aiko; Unoura, Kei; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki; Naito, Tetsuyoshi; Maeda, Kenji; Uchida, Fumio

    2004-09-20

    A new two-dimensional coordination polymer with cobalticinium 1,1'-dicarboxylate (ccdc) incorporated in the framework has been prepared, the ccdc functioning as unique monoanionic dicarboxylate ligands. The compound shows a high redox activity based on the ccdc units.

  17. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  18. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Water oxidation chemistry of a synthetic dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Koji; Shen, Jian-Ren; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2014-04-21

    We investigated theoretically the catalytic mechanism of electrochemical water oxidation in aqueous solution by a dinuclear ruthenium complex containing redox-active quinone ligands, [Ru2(X)(Y)(3,6-tBu2Q)2(btpyan)](m+) [X, Y = H2O, OH, O, O2; 3,6-tBu2Q = 3,6-di-tert-butyl-1,2-benzoquinone; btpyan =1,8-bis(2,2':6',2″-terpyrid-4'-yl)anthracene] (m = 2, 3, 4) (1). The reaction involves a series of electron and proton transfers to achieve redox leveling, with intervening chemical transformations in a mesh scheme, and the entire molecular structure and motion of the catalyst 1 work together to drive the catalytic cycle for water oxidation. Two substrate water molecules can bind to 1 with simultaneous loss of one or two proton(s), which allows pH-dependent variability in the proportion of substrate-bound structures and following pathways for oxidative activation of the aqua/hydroxo ligands at low thermodynamic and kinetic costs. The resulting bis-oxo intermediates then undergo endothermic O-O radical coupling between two Ru(III)-O(•) units in an anti-coplanar conformation leading to bridged μ-peroxo or μ-superoxo intermediates. The μ-superoxo species can liberate oxygen with the necessity for the preceding binding of a water molecule, which is possible only after four-electron oxidation is completed. The magnitude of catalytic current would be limited by the inherent sluggishness of the hinge-like bending motion of the bridged μ-superoxo complex that opens up the compact, hydrophobic active site of the catalyst and thereby allows water entry under dynamic conditions. On the basis of a newly proposed mechanism, we rationalize the experimentally observed behavior of electrode kinetics with respect to potential and discuss what causes a high overpotential for water oxidation by 1.

  20. The structure of a dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A-PKC412 complex reveals disulfide-bridge formation with the anomalous catalytic loop HRD(HCD) cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeva, Marina; Åberg, Espen; Engh, Richard A; Rothweiler, Ulli

    2015-05-01

    Dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) is a protein kinase associated with neuronal development and brain physiology. The DYRK kinases are very unusual with respect to the sequence of the catalytic loop, in which the otherwise highly conserved arginine of the HRD motif is replaced by a cysteine. This replacement, along with the proximity of a potential disulfide-bridge partner from the activation segment, implies a potential for redox control of DYRK family activities. Here, the crystal structure of DYRK1A bound to PKC412 is reported, showing the formation of the disulfide bridge and associated conformational changes of the activation loop. The DYRK kinases represent emerging drug targets for several neurological diseases as well as cancer. The observation of distinct activation states may impact strategies for drug targeting. In addition, the characterization of PKC412 binding offers new insights for DYRK inhibitor discovery. PMID:25945585

  1. Site-specific incorporation of redox active amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonta, Lital; Schultz, Peter G.; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2009-02-24

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate redox active amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with redox active amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  2. Aluminum complexes of the redox-active [ONO] pincer ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szigethy, Géza; Heyduk, Alan F

    2012-07-14

    A series of aluminum complexes containing the tridentate, redox-active ligand bis(3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-phenol)amine ([ONO]H(3)) in three different oxidation states were synthesized. The aluminum halide salts AlCl(3) and AlBr(3) were reacted with the doubly deprotonated form of the ligand to afford five-coordinate [ONHO(cat)]AlX(solv) complexes (1a, X = Cl, solv = OEt(2); 1b, X = Br, solv = THF), each having a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry at the aluminum and containing the [ONHO(cat)](2-) ligand with a protonated, sp(3)-hybridized nitrogen donor. The [ONO] ligand platform may also be added to aluminum through the use of the oxidized ligand salt [ONO(q)]K, which was reacted with AlCl(3) in the presence of either diphenylacetylacetonate (acacPh(2)(-)) or 8-oxyquinoline (quinO(-)) to afford [ONO(q)]Al(acacPh(2))Cl (2) or [ONO(q)]Al(quinO)Cl (3), respectively, with well-defined [ONO(q)](-) ligands. Quinonate complexes 2 and 3 were reduced by one electron to afford the corresponding complexes K{[ONO(sq)]Al(acacPh(2))(py)} (4) and K{[ONO(sq)]Al(quinO)(py)} (5), respectively, containing well-defined [ONO(sq)](2-) ligands. The addition of tetrachloro-1,2-quinone to 1a in the presence of pyridine resulted in the expulsion of HCl and the formation of an aluminum complex with two different redox active ligands, [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(6)Cl(4))(py) (6). Similar results were obtained when 1a was reacted with 9,10-phenanthrenequinone to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(14)H(8))(py) (7) or with pyrene-4,5-dione to afford [ONO]Al(o-O(2)C(16)H(8))(py) (8). Structural, spectroscopic and preliminary magnetic measurements on 6-8 suggest ligand non-innocent redox behavior in these complexes. PMID:22669327

  3. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  4. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Ton); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  5. Self-assembled monolayers of Aβ peptides on Au electrodes: an artificial platform for probing the reactivity of redox active metals and cofactors relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanik, Debajyoti; Sengupta, Kushal; Mukherjee, Soumya; Dey, Somdatta Ghosh; Dey, Abhishek

    2012-07-25

    The water-soluble hydrophilic part of human Aβ peptide has been extended to include a C-terminal cysteine residue. Utilizing the thiol functionality of this cysteine residue, self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of these peptides are formed on Au electrodes. Atomic force microscopy imaging confirms formation of small Aβ aggregates on the surface of the electrode. These aggregates bind redox active metals like Cu and cofactors like heme, both of which are proposed to generate toxic partially reduced oxygen species (PROS) and play a vital role in Alzheimer's disease. The spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of these Cu and heme bound Aβ SAM are similar to those reported for the soluble Cu and heme bound Aβ peptide. Experiments performed on these Aβ-SAM electrodes clearly demonstrate that (1) heme bound Aβ is kinetically more competent in reducing O(2) than Cu bound Aβ, (2) under physiological conditions the reduced Cu site produces twice as much PROS (measured in situ) than the reduced heme site, and (3) chelators like clioquinol remove Cu from these aggregates, while drugs like methylene blue inhibit O(2) reactivity of the heme cofactor. This artificial construct provides a very easy platform for investigating potential drugs affecting aggregation of human Aβ peptides and PROS generation by its complexes with redox active metals and cofactors.

  6. Protein cysteine modifications: (2) reactivity specificity and topics of medicinal chemistry and protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Ryo; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Cysteine (cysteinyl residue) modifications in proteins result in diversity in protein functions. The reaction specificity of a protein with a modified cysteine residue is determined by the overall conditions of the protein, including the spatial position of the cysteine residue, electrostatic interactions between cysteine residue and other charged residues, spatial interactions between the cysteine residue and a chemical compound, electrophilicity of the chemical compound, and the pH of the solution. In cysteine-dependant enzymes, each specific type of cysteine modification characterizes the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Recently, the catalytic mechanisms of peroxiredoxins and cysteine proteases, which contain a cysteine residue(s) in their catalytic sites, have been elucidated. In the catalytic process of peroxiredoxins, a sulfenyl intermediate is formed by oxidation of the catalytic cysteine residue. On the other hand, in cysteine proteases, the catalytic cysteine residue reacts with the carboxyl carbon of a peptide substrate to form an intermediate complex via S-alkylation. In this review, we introduce the most current information on the applications of cysteine thiol chemistry for in vitro glycoprotein synthesis. Recently, a glycoprotein (monocyte chemotactic protein-3), containing an intact human complex-type sialyloligosaccharide has been chemically synthesized. The procedure used for this could have applications in the development of new protein-based drugs, including antineoplastic drugs and antibiotics. It can also potentially be applied for improving the half-life and reducing the toxicity of these drugs, and for preventing the development of multidrug resistance.

  7. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  8. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhu; Qiliang Li

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent...

  9. Chemical evidence for the pH-dependent control of ion-pair geometry in cathepsin B. Benzofuroxan as a reactivity probe sensitive to differences in the mutual disposition of the thiolate and imidazolium components of cysteine proteinase catalytic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbrock, F; Brocklehurst, K

    1986-08-15

    Benzofuroxan reacts with the catalytic-site thiol group of cathepsin B (EC 3.4.22.1) to produce stoichiometric amount of the chromophoric reduction product, o-benzoquinone dioxime. In a study of the pH-dependence of the kinetics of this reaction, most data were collected for the bovine spleen enzyme, but the more limited data collected for the rat liver enzyme were closely similar both in the magnitude of the values of the second-order rate constants (k) and in the shape of the pH-k profile. In acidic and weakly alkaline media, the reaction is faster than the reactions of benzofuroxan with some other cysteine proteinases. For example, in the pH region around 5-6, the reaction of cathepsin B is about 10 times faster than that of papain, 15 times faster than that of stem bromelain and 6 times faster than that of ficin. The pH-dependence of k for the reaction of cathepsin B with benzofuroxan was determined in the pH range 2.7-8.3. In marked contrast with the analogous reactions of papain, ficin and stem bromelain [reported by Shipton & Brocklehurst (1977) Biochem. J. 167, 799-810], the pH-k profile for the cathepsin B reaction contains a sigmoidal component with pKa 5.2 in which k increases with decrease in pH. This modulation of the reactivity of the catalytic-site -S-/-ImH+ ion-pair state of cathepsin B (produced by protonic dissociation from -SH/-ImH+ with pKa approx. 3) towards a small, rigid, electrophilic reagent, in a reaction that appears to involve both components of the ion-pair for efficient reaction, suggests that the state of ionization of a group associated with a molecular pKa of approx. 5 may control ion-pair geometry. This might account for the remarkable finding [reported by Willenbrock & Brocklehurst (1984) Biochem. J. 222, 805-814] that, although the ion-pair appears to be generated in cathepsin B as the pH is increased across pKa 3.4, catalytic competence is not generated until the pH is increased across pKa 5-6.

  10. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Banerjee, Debasis [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jian [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Schaef, Herbert T. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Fernandez, Carlos A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nie, Zimin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nune, Satish K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Motkuri, Radha K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hayes, James C. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Silvers, Kurt L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Krishna, Rajamani [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam The Netherlands; McGrail, B. Peter [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Liu, Jun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-03-08

    Incorporating, a redox active organometallic molIncorporating, a redox active organometallic molecule within a porous matrix is a useful strategy to form redox active composite materials for emerging applications such as energy storage, electro-catalysis and electro-magnetic separation. Herein we report a new class of stable, redox active metal organic composites for oxygen/air separation with exceptional efficiency. In particular, Ferrocene impregnated in a thermally stable hierarchical porous framework showed a saturation uptake capacity of >51 mg/g for oxygen at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.06. The material shows excellent O2 selectivity from air as evident from experimental and simulated breakthrough experiments. In detail structural analysis using 57Fe-Mössbauer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis show that of O2 adsorption affinity and selectivity originates by the formation Fe3+-O oxide due to the highly reactive nature of the organometallics imbedded in the porous matrix.

  12. Halogen bonding-enhanced electrochemical halide anion sensing by redox-active ferrocene receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jason Y C; Cunningham, Matthew J; Davis, Jason J; Beer, Paul D

    2015-10-01

    The first examples of halogen bonding redox-active ferrocene receptors and their anion electrochemical sensing properties are reported. Halogen bonding was found to significantly amplify the magnitude of the receptor's metallocene redox-couple's voltammetric responses for halide sensing compared to their hydrogen bonding analogues in both acetonitrile and aqueous-acetonitrile solvent media. PMID:26289779

  13. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Banerjee, Debasis [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jian [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Schaef, Herbert T. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Fernandez, Carlos A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nie, Zimin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nune, Satish K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Motkuri, Radha K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hayes, James C. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Silvers, Kurt L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Krishna, Rajamani [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam The Netherlands; McGrail, B. Peter [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Liu, Jun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-03-08

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O-2 adsorption over N-2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O-2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material.

  14. Aminotroponiminates as tunable, redox-active ligands: reversible single electron transfer and reductive dimerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, C; Krummenacher, I

    2016-08-21

    Aminotroponiminates (atis) are shown to be redox-active ligands. Under strongly reducing conditions, the result of electron transfer can be controlled by the choice of the metal bound to the ati ligand. Either reversible electron transfer or a reductively induced dimerisation is observed. The latter reaction is (regio- and diastereo-) selective and chemically reversible. PMID:27452905

  15. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many pathogenic fungi are becoming resistant to currently available drugs. Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that...

  16. Selective modification of phosphoribulokinase cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, T.J.; Mende-Mueller, L.M.; Miziorko, H.M.

    1987-05-01

    The most reactive sulfhydryl in native phosphoribulokinase can be selectively alkylated with iodoacetate; complete loss of activity results. Composition and N-terminal analyses of the peptide bearing this -SH show that cys-16 is the modification site. In the presence of Mg and ATP, a nonessential -SH is modified; catalytic activity is unchanged. The peptide bearing this cysteine has been characterized by amino acid composition and N-terminal analyses (Phe-Phe-Asn-Pro-Val-Tyr-(Ile/Leu)...). Enzyme alkylated at this site is subject to reversible oxidative inactivation, showing that this cysteine is not involved in regulation of activity. A cysteine distinct from this nonessential residue is suggested by crosslinking studies to be close (5a) to cys-16. The site-directed inhibitor fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) inactivates enzyme by modifying cys-16. Carboxymethylation of enzyme after FSBA incorporation, followed by DTT treatment, unmasks the initial modification site and allows (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate labeling. The tryptic peptide bearing this residue co-chromatographs with and is identical in composition to the cys-16 containing peptide.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan; (UC)

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  18. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  19. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: Different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Biao; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Mirkin, Michael V.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransform...

  1. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia von Montfort; Lirija Alili; Sarah Teuber-Hanselmann; Peter Brenneisen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce) oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria) are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and red...

  2. Unraveling the photoelectrochemical properties of ionic liquids: cognizance of partially reversible redox activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipal B; Chauhan, Khushbu R; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2014-11-01

    Ionic liquid based electrolytes are gaining great interest in the field of photoenergy conversion. We have found that the ionic liquids namely BMIm Cl, BMIm PF6 and BMIm Tf2N inherently offer redox activity. The device performance of the photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells of the configuration PbOx (0.25 cm(2))|blank ionic liquids|platinum (2 cm(2)) was analyzed in detail to get insights into the working principle of such systems. It was found that partially reversible redox ion pairs diminish the performance of such cells as power generating devices. The partial redox activity of the ionic liquids was confirmed by a number of observations derived from the PEC spectra. The important parameter, Vredox, which determines the performance of any PEC cell was also calculated for all the ionic liquids. The difficulties that arise in high frequency C-V measurements for ionic liquid systems were overcome by choosing the appropriate probing frequency. The evaluated Vredox of BMIm Cl, BMIm PF6 and BMIm Tf2N ionic liquids was found to be -0.30, -0.20 and -0.78 V (vs. NHE), respectively. This study will be beneficial to understand the role of ionic liquids as redox active electrolyte media in several applications.

  3. Practical Ni-Catalyzed Aryl-Alkyl Cross-Coupling of Secondary Redox-Active Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornella, Josep; Edwards, Jacob T; Qin, Tian; Kawamura, Shuhei; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Gianatassio, Ryan; Schmidt, Michael; Eastgate, Martin D; Baran, Phil S

    2016-02-24

    A new transformation is presented that enables chemists to couple simple alkyl carboxylic acids with aryl zinc reagents under Ni-catalysis. The success of this reaction hinges on the unique use of redox-active esters that allow one to employ such derivatives as alkyl halides surrogates. The chemistry exhibits broad substrate scope and features a high degree of practicality. The simple procedure and extremely inexpensive nature of both the substrates and pre-catalyst (NiCl2·6H2O, ca. $9.5/mol) bode well for the immediate widespread adoption of this method. PMID:26835704

  4. Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Redox-Active Esters with Boronic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Qin, Tian; Chen, Tie-Gen; Wimmer, Laurin; Edwards, Jacob T; Cornella, Josep; Vokits, Benjamin; Shaw, Scott A; Baran, Phil S

    2016-08-01

    A transformation analogous in simplicity and functional group tolerance to the venerable Suzuki cross-coupling between alkyl-carboxylic acids and boronic acids is described. This Ni-catalyzed reaction relies upon the activation of alkyl carboxylic acids as their redox-active ester derivatives, specifically N-hydroxy-tetrachlorophthalimide (TCNHPI), and proceeds in a practical and scalable fashion. The inexpensive nature of the reaction components (NiCl2 ⋅6 H2 O-$9.5 mol(-1) , Et3 N) coupled to the virtually unlimited commercial catalog of available starting materials bodes well for its rapid adoption. PMID:27380912

  5. A redox-active porous coordination network film based on a Ru complex as a building block on an ITO electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Takuya; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Mutoh, Yuichiro; Haga, Masa-Aki

    2013-12-01

    The combination of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) and layer-by-layer (LbL) growth methods for the construction of a surface porous film has the potential to incorporate a wide range of chemical functionalities on a solid surface. A novel redox-active Ru complex with 2,6-bis(N-pyridylbenzimidazolyl)-pyridine ligands (Ru complex 1), in which four peripheral pyridine groups act as coordination sites, was used as a building block for a porous coordination network film. By using (4-pyridyl)phenylphosphonic acid as a SAM primer layer on an ITO surface, the Ru complex 1 was immobilized by the successive reaction of PdCl2 on the ITO electrode in the LbL growth method. Multilayer growth was monitored by UV-vis spectra and cyclic voltammetry, in which the linear increases of both absorbance and the peak current were observed. This result indicated that the regular accumulation of Ru complex 1 onto the ITO surface took place. The permselectivity of the present porous coordination network structure was examined using redox-active molecular probes with different sizes and charges such as ferrocene, trimethylaminomethylferrocene, the Os bis(2,6-bis(N-methylbenzimidazolyl)-pyridine) complex, and tetrathiofulvarene (TTF). With the Os complex and cationic ferrocene, only the catalytic peak was observed as a prewave of the adsorbed Ru(II/III) peak at +0.73 V. On the other hand, the oxidation peak of ferrocene was observed around 0 V vs. Fc(+)/Fc even for nine-layered films in addition to the adsorbed Ru(II/III) peak. From these results, not only molecular size but also electrostatic interaction plays an important role in the permeation into the Ru complex 1 porous network film.

  6. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides.

  7. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. (paper)

  8. Principles for microscale separations based on redox-active surfactants and electrochemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslee, C A; Abbott, N L

    2001-10-15

    We report principles for microscale separations based on selective solubilization and deposition of sparingly water-soluble compounds by an aqueous solution of a redox-active surfactant. The surfactant, (11-ferrocenylundecyl)trimethylammonium bromide, undergoes a reversible change in micellization upon oxidation or reduction. This change in aggregation is exploited in a general scheme in which micelles of reduced surfactant are formed and then put in contact with a mixture of hydrophobic compounds leading to selective solubilization of the compounds. The micelles are then electrochemically disrupted, leading to the selective deposition of their contents. We measured the selectivity of the solubilization and deposition processes using mixtures of two model drug-like compounds, o-tolueneazo-beta-naphthol (I) and 1-phenylazo-2-naphthylamine (II). By repeatedly solubilizing and depositing a mixture that initially contained equal mole fractions of each compound, we demonstrate formation of a product that contains 98.4% of I after six cycles. Because the aggregation states of redox-active surfactants are easily controlled within simple microfabricated structures, including structures that define small stationary volumes (e.g., wells of a microtiter plate) or flowing volumes of liquids (e.g., microfabricated channels), we believe these principles may be useful for the purification or analysis of compounds in microscale chemical process systems. When used for purification, these principles provide separation of surfactant and product.

  9. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Lei, Xiao-Yu; Chen, Lian-Fu; Bian, Yin-Bing; Yang, Hong; Ibrahim, Salam A; Huang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecular basis of the function of Lecsl. Our analysis revealed Lecsl to be a novel cysteine desulfurase and not a type of cysteine sulfoxide lyase. The pyridoxal-5-phosphate (PLP) molecule bonded tightly to Lecsl to form a Lecsl-PLP complex. Moreover, the Lecsl had one active center that served to bind two kinds of substrates, S-methyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and L-cysteine, and had both cysteine sulfoxide lyase and cysteine desulfurase activity. We found that the amino acid residue Asn393 was essential for the catalytic activity of Lecsl and that the gene Csl encoded a novel cysteine desulfurase to influence organosulfur compounds in L. edodes. Our results provide a new insight into understanding the formation of the unique aroma of L. edodes.

  10. Structure and mechanism of mouse cysteine dioxygenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G.; Bailey, Lucas J.; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips, George N.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the oxidation of l-cysteine to cysteine sulfinic acid. Deficiencies in this enzyme have been linked to autoimmune diseases and neurological disorders. The x-ray crystal structure of CDO from Mus musculus was solved to a nominal resolution of 1.75 Å. The sequence is 91% identical to that of a human homolog. The structure reveals that CDO adopts the typical β-barrel fold of the cupin superfamily. The NE2 atoms of His-86, -88, and -140 provide the metal binding site. The structure further revealed a covalent linkage between the side chains of Cys-93 and Tyr-157, the cysteine of which is conserved only in eukaryotic proteins. Metal analysis showed that the recombinant enzyme contained a mixture of iron, nickel, and zinc, with increased iron content associated with increased catalytic activity. Details of the predicted active site are used to present and discuss a plausible mechanism of action for the enzyme. PMID:16492780

  11. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of copper(II) complexes containing a redox-active benzoxazole iminosemiquinone ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaghi, S Esmael; Safaei, Elham; Chiang, Linus; Wong, Edwin W Y; Savard, Didier; Clarke, Ryan M; Storr, Tim

    2013-05-21

    A tridentate benzoxazole-containing aminophenol ligand HL(BAP) was synthesized and complexed with Cu(II). The resulting Cu(II) complexes were characterized by X-ray, IR, UV-vis-NIR spectroscopies, and magnetic susceptibility studies, demonstrating that the ligand is oxidized to the o-iminosemiquinone form [L(BIS)](-) in the isolated complexes. L(BIS)Cu(II)Cl exhibits a distorted tetrahedral geometry, while L(BIS)Cu(II)OAc is square pyramidal. In both solid state structures the ligand is coordinated to Cu(II)via the benzoxazole, as well as the nitrogen and oxygen atoms from the o-iminosemiquinone moiety. The chloride, or acetate group occupies the fourth and/or fifth positions in L(BIS)Cu(II)Cl and L(BIS)Cu(II)OAc, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that both complexes are diamagnetic due to antiferromagnetic coupling between the d(9) Cu(II) centre and iminosemiquinone ligand radical. Electrochemical studies of the complexes demonstrate both a quasi-reversible reduction and oxidation process for the Cu complexes. While L(BIS)Cu(II)X (X = Cl) is EPR-silent, chemical oxidation affords a species with an EPR signal consistent with ligand oxidation to form a d(9) Cu(II) iminoquinone species. In addition, chemical reduction results in a Cu(II) centre most likely bound to an amidophenoxide. Mild and efficient oxidation of alcohol substrates to the corresponding aldehydes was achieved with molecular oxygen as the oxidant and L(BIS)Cu(II)X-Cs2CO3 as the catalyst.

  12. Electroanalysis of NADH Using Conducting and Redox Active Polymer/Carbon Nanotubes Modified Electrodes-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Ming Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Past few decades, conducting and redox active polymers play a critical role in the development of transducers for biosensing. It has been evidenced by increasing numerous reports on conducting and redox active polymers incorporated electrodes for assay of biomolcules. This review highlights the potential uses of electrogenerated polymer modified electrodes and polymer/carbon nanotubes composite modified electrodes for electroanalysis of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinuceltoide (NADH. In addition, carbon electrodes modified with organic and inorganic materials as modifier have been discussed in detail for the quantification of NADH based on mediator or mediator-less methods.

  13. A Heterobimetallic W-Ni Complex Containing a Redox-Active W[SNS]2 Metalloligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkoetter, Kyle E; Ziller, Joseph W; Heyduk, Alan F

    2016-07-01

    The tungsten complex W[SNS]2 ([SNS]H3 = bis(2-mercapto-4-methylphenyl)amine) was bound to a Ni(dppe) [dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] fragment to form the new heterobimetallic complex W[SNS]2Ni(dppe). Characterization of the complex by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of a short W-Ni bond, which renders the complex diamagnetic despite formal tungsten(V) and nickel(I) oxidation states. The W[SNS]2 unit acts as a redox-active metalloligand in the bimetallic complex, which displays four one-electron redox processes by cyclic voltammetry. In the presence of the organic acid 4-cyanoanilinium tetrafluoroborate, W[SNS]2Ni(dppe) catalyzes the electrochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen coincident with the first reduction of the complex. PMID:27300501

  14. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  15. Redox-Active-Ligand-Mediated Formation of an Acyclic Trinuclear Ruthenium Complex with Bridging Nitrido Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagh, Bidraha; Broere, Daniël L J; Siegler, Maxime A; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2016-07-11

    Coordination of a redox-active pyridine aminophenol ligand to Ru(II) followed by aerobic oxidation generates two diamagnetic Ru(III) species [1 a (cis) and 1 b (trans)] with ligand-centered radicals. The reaction of 1 a/1 b with excess NaN3 under inert atmosphere resulted in the formation of a rare bis(nitrido)-bridged trinuclear ruthenium complex with two nonlinear asymmetrical Ru-N-Ru fragments. The spontaneous reduction of the ligand centered radical in the parent 1 a/1 b supports the oxidation of a nitride (N(3-) ) to half an equivalent of N2 . The trinuclear omplex is reactive toward TEMPO-H, tin hydrides, thiols, and dihydrogen. PMID:27321547

  16. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Rotenberg, S A; Mirkin, M V

    2000-08-29

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells, breast cells with a high level of motility (engendered by overexpression of protein kinase Calpha), and highly metastatic breast cancer cells. SECM analysis of the three cell lines reveals reproducible differences with respect to the kinetics of charge transfer by several redox mediators. PMID:10963658

  17. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  18. Progress in conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janošević Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in synthesis, characterization and application of the selected conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines are reviewed. A brief historical background of the selected topics is given. The overview of the preparation, structure and properties of polyaniline, substituted polyanilines, especially those obtained by the oxidative polymerization of p-substituted anilines, poly(1-aminonaphthalene and its derivatives, carbocyclic and heterocyclic polyaryldiamines such as poly(p-phenylenediamine and polydiaminoacridines, is presented. The mechanism of formation of polyaniline nanostructures is discussed. Recent approaches to the preparation of one-dimensional polyaniline nanostructures are concisely reviewed, with special attention paid to the template-free falling-pH method. Current and potential future applications of oligo/polyarylamines are briefly discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 172043

  19. Electronic Structure and Multicatalytic Features of Redox-Active Bis(arylimino)acenaphthene (BIAN)-Derived Ruthenium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha Hazari, Arijit; Ray, Ritwika; Hoque, Md Asmaul; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-08-15

    The article examines the newly designed and structurally characterized redox-active BIAN-derived [Ru(trpy)(R-BIAN)Cl]ClO4 ([1a]ClO4-[1c]ClO4), [Ru(trpy)(R-BIAN)(H2O)](ClO4)2 ([3a](ClO4)2-[3c](ClO4)2), and BIAO-derived [Ru(trpy)(BIAO)Cl]ClO4 ([2a]ClO4) (trpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, R-BIAN = bis(arylimino)acenaphthene (R = H (1a(+), 3a(2+)), 4-OMe (1b(+), 3b(2+)), 4-NO2 (1c(+), 3c(2+)), BIAO = [N-(phenyl)imino]acenapthenone). The experimental (X-ray, (1)H NMR, spectroelectrochemistry, EPR) and DFT/TD-DFT calculations of 1a(n)-1c(n) or 2a(n) collectively establish {Ru(II)-BIAN(0)} or {Ru(II)-BIAO(0)} configuration in the native state, metal-based oxidation to {Ru(III)-BIAN(0)} or {Ru(III)-BIAO(0)}, and successive electron uptake processes by the α-diimine fragment, followed by trpy and naphthalene π-system of BIAN or BIAO, respectively. The impact of the electron-withdrawing NO2 function in the BIAN moiety in 1c(+) has been reflected in the five nearby reduction steps within the accessible potential limit of -2 V versus SCE, leading to a fully reduced BIAN(4-) state in [1c](4-). The aqua derivatives ({Ru(II)-OH2}, 3a(2+)-3c(2+)) undergo simultaneous 2e(-)/2H(+) transfer to the corresponding {Ru(IV)═O} state and the catalytic current associated with the Ru(IV)/Ru(V) response probably implies its involvement in the electrocatalytic water oxidation. The aqua derivatives (3a(2+)-3c(2+)) are efficient and selective precatalysts in transforming a wide variety of alkenes to corresponding epoxides in the presence of PhI(OAc)2 as an oxidant in CH2Cl2 at 298 K as well as oxidation of primary, secondary, and heterocyclic alcohols with a large substrate scope with H2O2 as the stoichiometric oxidant in CH3CN at 343 K. The involvement of the {Ru(IV)═O} intermediate as the active catalyst in both the oxidation processes has been ascertained via a sequence of experimental evidence. PMID:27482834

  20. Intramolecular redox-active ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer : Radical reactivity with a palladium(II) complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broere, Daniël L J; De Bruin, Bas; Reek, Joost N H; Lutz, Martin; Dechert, Sebastian; Van Der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2014-01-01

    Coordination of the redox-active tridentate NNO ligand LH2 to PdII yields the paramagnetic iminobenzosemiquinonato complex 3. Single-electron reduction of 3 yields diamagnetic amidophenolato complex 4, capable of activating aliphatic azide 5. Experimental and computational studies suggest a redox-no

  1. Redox Sensitivities of Global Cellular Cysteine Residues under Reductive and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kazutaka; Kusano, Hidewo; Sasaki, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Riko; Hatta, Tomohisa; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Natsume, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The protein cysteine residue is one of the amino acids most susceptible to oxidative modifications, frequently caused by oxidative stress. Several applications have enabled cysteine-targeted proteomics analysis with simultaneous detection and quantitation. In this study, we employed a quantitative approach using a set of iodoacetyl-based cysteine reactive isobaric tags (iodoTMT) and evaluated the transient cellular oxidation ratio of free and reversibly modified cysteine thiols under DTT and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatments. DTT treatment (1 mM for 5 min) reduced most cysteine thiols, irrespective of their cellular localizations. It also caused some unique oxidative shifts, including for peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX2), uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and thioredoxin (TXN), proteins reportedly affected by cellular reactive oxygen species production. Modest H2O2 treatment (50 μM for 5 min) did not cause global oxidations but instead had apparently reductive effects. Moreover, with H2O2, significant oxidative shifts were observed only in redox active proteins, like PRDX2, peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1), TXN, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Overall, our quantitative data illustrated both H2O2- and reduction-mediated cellular responses, whereby while redox homeostasis is maintained, highly reactive thiols can potentiate the specific, rapid cellular signaling to counteract acute redox stress.

  2. Innocent or guilty? Redox activity in and magnetic and optical behaviour of dinuclear molydenum complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jon A McCleverty; Michael D Ward

    2002-08-01

    The phenomenon of `non-innocence’, first articulated by Jørgensen in 1966, is briefly reviewed. Spectroelectrochemical studies of a range of dinuclear complexes of the type [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = dipyridyls) and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = diphenolates) which are redox active, show that oxidised or reduced forms of these species exhibit `non-innocence’. The spectral behaviour is associated with metal-to-ligand or ligand-to-metal charge transfer phenomena, probably the first time that monodentate bridging ligands have been implicated in `non-innocent’ behaviour. These bridging ligands also determine the nature and extent of magnetic interaction between the unpaired spins in [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)], the dominant mechanism of spin-exchange relying on the extent of $\\eth$-delocalisation within the bridging ligands. The unusual optical behaviour of these dinuclear complexes when oxidised (oxomolybdenum diphenolates) or reduced (nitrosyl molybdenum dipyridyls) has led to the exploration of electrochromism as a means to develop variable optical attenuators operating in the near-infrared region.

  3. ssDNA-Functionalized Nanoceria: A Redox-Active Aptaswitch for Biomolecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of biomolecular binding events is a critical step for the development of biorecognition assays for diagnostics and therapeutic applications. This paper reports the design of redox-active switches based on aptamer conjugated nanoceria for detection and quantification of biomolecular recognition. It is shown that the conformational transition state of the aptamer on nanoceria, combined with the redox properties of these particles can be used to create surface based structure switchable aptasensing platforms. Changes in the redox properties at the nanoceria surface upon binding of the ssDNA and its target analyte enables rapid and highly sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions. This concept is demonstrated as a general applicable method to the colorimetric detection of DNA binding events. An example of a nanoceria aptaswitch for the colorimetric sensing of Ochratoxin A (OTA) and applicability to other targets is provided. The system can sensitively and selectivity detect as low as 0.15 × 10(-9) m OTA. This novel assay is simple in design and does not involve oligonucleotide labeling or elaborate nanoparticle modification steps. The proposed mechanism discovered here opens up a new way of designing optical sensing methods based on aptamer recognition. This approach can be broadly applicable to many bimolecular recognition processes and related applications. PMID:26844813

  4. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E 0-values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase

  5. Sodium-ion supercapacitors based on nanoporous pyroproteins containing redox-active heteroatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Se Youn; Yoon, Hyeon Ji; Kim, Na Rae; Yun, Young Soo; Jin, Hyoung-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials fabricated via simple methods from renewable bio-resources have great potential in rechargeable energy storage systems. In this study, nanoporous pyroproteins containing a large amount of redox-active heteroatoms (H-NPs) were fabricated from silk fibroin by an in situ carbonization/activation method. The H-NPs have a large surface area of ∼3050 m2 g-1, which is mainly comprised of nanometer-scale pores. Also, these H-NPs have oxygen and nitrogen heteroatoms of 17.4 wt% and 2.9 wt%, respectively. Synergistic sodium ion storage behaviors originate from electrochemical double layer capacitance and pseudocapacitance, leading to very high electrochemical performances of H-NPs in aqueous and non-aqueous electrolyte systems. Sodium-ion supercapacitors (NISs) based on commercial graphite//H-NPs show a high specific power of ∼1900 W kg-1 at ∼77 Wh kg-1. Also, NISs based on commercial hard carbon//H-NPs exhibit a high specific energy of ∼217 Wh kg-1 at ∼42 W kg-1. In addition, outstanding cycling performances over 30,000 cycles are achieved for symmetric NISs.

  6. Extraction and recovery of nuclear fission products using hydrophobic, redox-active organometallic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating a new strategy for liquid-liquid extraction and recovery of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from aqueous nuclear waste and contaminated groundwater. The extractants are hydrophobic, redox-active derivatives of Ni(C2B9H11) and FeCp(C2B9H11). They are activated for extraction by reduction to the corresponding monoanions. The cesium and strontium cations are recovered from the organic phase by reoxidation (deactivation) of the anionic extractants back to the neutral species, which also allows for recovery and reuse (i.e., recycling) of the extractants. The reduction potentials of the parent compounds are 0.18 V and -0.08V respectively (acetonitrile, SCE). Therefore, the derivatives can be easily reduced and re-oxidized by many common substances. The redox potentials, relative solubilities in organic solvents and aqueous solution, and D values for extraction and recovery, which vary as a function of substituent groups on the ligands, will be discussed

  7. Improvement of human keratinocyte migration by a redox active bioelectric dressing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaideep Banerjee

    Full Text Available Exogenous application of an electric field can direct cell migration and improve wound healing; however clinical application of the therapy remains elusive due to lack of a suitable device and hence, limitations in understanding the molecular mechanisms. Here we report on a novel FDA approved redox-active Ag/Zn bioelectric dressing (BED which generates electric fields. To develop a mechanistic understanding of how the BED may potentially influence wound re-epithelialization, we direct emphasis on understanding the influence of BED on human keratinocyte cell migration. Mapping of the electrical field generated by BED led to the observation that BED increases keratinocyte migration by three mechanisms: (i generating hydrogen peroxide, known to be a potent driver of redox signaling, (ii phosphorylation of redox-sensitive IGF1R directly implicated in cell migration, and (iii reduction of protein thiols and increase in integrinαv expression, both of which are known to be drivers of cell migration. BED also increased keratinocyte mitochondrial membrane potential consistent with its ability to fuel an energy demanding migration process. Electric fields generated by a Ag/Zn BED can cross-talk with keratinocytes via redox-dependent processes improving keratinocyte migration, a critical event in wound re-epithelialization.

  8. Improvement of human keratinocyte migration by a redox active bioelectric dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jaideep; Das Ghatak, Piya; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Sequin, Emily K; Bellman, Karen; Dickinson, Bryan C; Suri, Prerna; Subramaniam, Vish V; Chang, Christopher J; Sen, Chandan K

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous application of an electric field can direct cell migration and improve wound healing; however clinical application of the therapy remains elusive due to lack of a suitable device and hence, limitations in understanding the molecular mechanisms. Here we report on a novel FDA approved redox-active Ag/Zn bioelectric dressing (BED) which generates electric fields. To develop a mechanistic understanding of how the BED may potentially influence wound re-epithelialization, we direct emphasis on understanding the influence of BED on human keratinocyte cell migration. Mapping of the electrical field generated by BED led to the observation that BED increases keratinocyte migration by three mechanisms: (i) generating hydrogen peroxide, known to be a potent driver of redox signaling, (ii) phosphorylation of redox-sensitive IGF1R directly implicated in cell migration, and (iii) reduction of protein thiols and increase in integrinαv expression, both of which are known to be drivers of cell migration. BED also increased keratinocyte mitochondrial membrane potential consistent with its ability to fuel an energy demanding migration process. Electric fields generated by a Ag/Zn BED can cross-talk with keratinocytes via redox-dependent processes improving keratinocyte migration, a critical event in wound re-epithelialization.

  9. Portable Enzyme-Paper Biosensors Based on Redox-Active CeO2 Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Othman, A; Andreescu, S

    2016-01-01

    Portable, nanoparticle (NP)-enhanced enzyme sensors have emerged as powerful devices for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a variety of analytes for biomedicine, environmental applications, and pharmaceutical fields. This chapter describes a method for the fabrication of a portable, paper-based, inexpensive, robust enzyme biosensor for the detection of substrates of oxidase enzymes. The method utilizes redox-active NPs of cerium oxide (CeO2) as a sensing platform which produces color in response to H2O2 generated by the action of oxidase enzymes on their corresponding substrates. This avoids the use of peroxidases which are routinely used in conjunction with glucose oxidase. The CeO2 particles serve dual roles, as high surface area supports to anchor high loadings of the enzyme as well as a color generation reagent, and the particles are recycled multiple times for the reuse of the biosensor. These sensors are small, light, disposable, inexpensive, and they can be mass produced by standard, low-cost printing methods. All reagents needed for the analysis are embedded within the paper matrix, and sensors stored over extended periods of time without performance loss. This novel sensor is a general platform for the in-field detection of analytes that are substrates for oxidase enzymes in clinical, food, and environmental samples. PMID:27112400

  10. Impedance aspect of charge storage at graphite and glassy carbon electrodes in potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) redox active electrolyte

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Magdić; Višnja Horvat-Radošević; Krešimir Kvastek

    2016-01-01

    Different types of charge storage mechanisms at unmodified graphite vs. glassy carbon electrodes in acid sulphate supporting solution containing potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) redox active electrolyte, have been revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and supported by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Reversible charge transfer of Fe(CN)63-/4- redox reaction detected by assessment of CVs of glassy carbon electrode, is in impedance spectra indicated by presence of bulk diffusion impe...

  11. Mechanism of electrochemical lithiation of a metal-organic framework without redox-active nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bohejin; Huang, Shuping; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Jinbo; Malonzo, Camille; Truhlar, Donald G.; Stein, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many potential uses for separations, storage, and catalysis, but their use as intercalation hosts for batteries has been scarce. In this article, we examine the mechanism of Li insertion in a MOF to provide guidance to future design efforts in this area. As a model system, we choose UiO-66, a MOF with the formula (Zr6O4(OH)4)4(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)6, as an electrode material for lithium-ion batteries; this MOF is of special interest because the zirconium is not redox active. We report both quantum mechanical characterization of the mechanism and experimental studies in which the material is synthesized as nanoparticles to reduce diffusion lengths for lithium ions and increase the contact area with a conductive carbon phase. The calculated changes in the IR spectra of UiO-66 and lithiated UiO-66 are consistent with the experimental FTIR results. We found experimentally that this MOF can maintain a specific discharge capacity of at least 118 mAh/g for 30 lithiation and delithiation cycles at a rate of C/5, exhibiting good cyclability. Density functional electronic structure calculations show that the charge transfer during lithiation is mainly from Li to node oxygens and carboxylate oxygens, that is, it involves anions rather than cations or aromatic rings, and they provide a mechanistic understanding of the potential for increased Li capacity because the theoretical capacity of UiO-66 with Li at the oxygens in the metal oxide nodes and the carboxylate linkers is more than 400 mAh/g. The lithiation process greatly decreases the bandgap of UiO-66, which is expected to increase its electronic conductivity. The electrode material was also characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which were consistent in confirming that smaller particle sizes were obtained in lower-temperature syntheses.

  12. A comprehensive evaluation of catalase-like activity of different classes of redox-active therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Maia, Clarissa G C; Weitner, Tin; Carballal, Sebastián; Sampaio, Romulo S; Lieb, Dominik; Ghazaryan, Robert; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Radi, Rafael; Reboucas, Julio S; Spasojevic, Ivan; Benov, Ludmil; Batinic-Haberle, Ines

    2015-09-01

    Because of the increased insight into the biological role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) under physiological and pathological conditions and the role it presumably plays in the action of natural and synthetic redox-active drugs, there is a need to accurately define the type and magnitude of reactions that may occur with this intriguing and key species of redoxome. Historically, and frequently incorrectly, the impact of catalase-like activity has been assigned to play a major role in the action of many redox-active drugs, mostly SOD mimics and peroxynitrite scavengers, and in particular MnTBAP(3-) and Mn salen derivatives. The advantage of one redox-active compound over another has often been assigned to the differences in catalase-like activity. Our studies provide substantial evidence that Mn(III) N-alkylpyridylporphyrins couple with H2O2 in actions other than catalase-related. Herein we have assessed the catalase-like activities of different classes of compounds: Mn porphyrins (MnPs), Fe porphyrins (FePs), Mn(III) salen (EUK-8), and Mn(II) cyclic polyamines (SOD-active M40403 and SOD-inactive M40404). Nitroxide (tempol), nitrone (NXY-059), ebselen, and MnCl2, which have not been reported as catalase mimics, were used as negative controls, while catalase enzyme was a positive control. The dismutation of H2O2 to O2 and H2O was followed via measuring oxygen evolved with a Clark oxygen electrode at 25°C. The catalase enzyme was found to have kcat(H2O2)=1.5×10(6)M(-1) s(-1). The yield of dismutation, i.e., the maximal amount of O2 evolved, was assessed also. The magnitude of the yield reflects an interplay between the kcat(H2O2) and the stability of compounds toward H2O2-driven oxidative degradation, and is thus an accurate measure of the efficacy of a catalyst. The kcat(H2O2) values for 12 cationic Mn(III) N-substituted (alkyl and alkoxyalkyl) pyridylporphyrin-based SOD mimics and Mn(III) N,N'-dialkylimidazolium porphyrin, MnTDE-2-ImP(5+), ranged from 23 to 88M(-1) s

  13. Signal transduction in light–oxygen–voltage receptors lacking the adduct-forming cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Estella F.; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Vaidya, Anand T.; Borbat, Peter P.; Engelhard, Christopher; Freed, Jack H.; Bittl, Robert; Möglich, Andreas; Crane, Brian R.

    2015-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) receptors sense blue light through the photochemical generation of a covalent adduct between a flavin-nucleotide chromophore and a strictly conserved cysteine residue. Here we show that, after cysteine removal, the circadian-clock LOV-protein Vivid still undergoes light-induced dimerization and signalling because of flavin photoreduction to the neutral semiquinone (NSQ). Similarly, photoreduction of the engineered LOV histidine kinase YF1 to the NSQ modulates activity and downstream effects on gene expression. Signal transduction in both proteins hence hinges on flavin protonation, which is common to both the cysteinyl adduct and the NSQ. This general mechanism is also conserved by natural cysteine-less, LOV-like regulators that respond to chemical or photoreduction of their flavin cofactors. As LOV proteins can react to light even when devoid of the adduct-forming cysteine, modern LOV photoreceptors may have arisen from ancestral redox-active flavoproteins. The ability to tune LOV reactivity through photoreduction may have important implications for LOV mechanism and optogenetic applications. PMID:26648256

  14. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  15. Interaction between pyrite and cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; LI Bang-mei; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of cysteine on pyrite was studied by amounts adsorbed, FTIR and XRD measurements. The results obtained by adsorption experiment suggest that as the mass ratio of mineral to cysteine mp/mc is greater than 5, the amounts adsorbed on mineral is stable after adsorption for 15 min and cysteine adsorbing with mp/mc shows the same tendency. It can be inferred by its Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm that chemical interaction governs the entire adsorption process. The results from FTIR and XRD prove that the functional groups of cysteine appear with blue shift of their characteristic adsorption peak in FTIR spectrum; meanwhile, the lattice constant obviously decreases and the widening of crystal planes such as (210), (220) and (211) is found after cysteine adsorbing on mineral.

  16. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  17. Cellular Interaction and Toxicity Depends on Physiochemical Properties and Surface Modification of Redox Active Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dowding, Janet M.; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X. T.; Sayle, Dean C.; von Kalm, Laurence; SEAL, SUDIPTA; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 NPs (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exists regarding the toxicity of CNP. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CeO2 NPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physiochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs us...

  18. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe2NiO(Piv)6 (Piv=O2CC(CH3)3) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N2 and H2 adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics

  19. Cysteine and cysteine-related signaling pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Luis C; Aroca, M Ángeles; Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia

    2014-02-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor molecule involved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its derivative molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine is synthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resulting in a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools. In recent years, significant progress has been made in Arabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the discovery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCS with S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions. Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signaling molecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essential role in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which is essential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  20. Challenging a Paradigm: Theoretical Calculations of the Protonation State of the Cys25-His159 Catalytic Diad in Free Papain

    OpenAIRE

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    A central mechanistic paradigm of cysteine proteases is that the His – Cys catalytic diad forms an ion-pair NH(+)/S(−) already in the catalytically active free enzyme. Most molecular modeling studies of cysteine proteases refer to this paradigm as their starting point. Nevertheless, several recent kinetics and X-ray crystallography studies of viral and bacterial cysteine proteases depart from the ion-pair mechanism, suggesting general base catalysis. We challenge the postulate of the ion-pair...

  1. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  2. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  3. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  4. Redox active copper chelate overcomes multidrug resistance in T-lymphoblastic leukemia cell by triggering apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Avishek; Basu, Soumya; Banerjee, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Paramita; Sarkar, Avijit; Chatterjee, Mitali; Chaudhuri, Soumitra Kumar

    2011-05-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by the over expression of drug efflux protein P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is one of the major impediments to successful treatment of cancer. P-gp acts as an energy-dependent drug efflux pump and reduces the intracellular concentration of structurally unrelated drugs inside the cells. Therefore, there is an urgent need for development of new molecules that are less toxic to normal cell and preferentially effective against drug resistant malignant cells. In this preclinical study we report the apoptotic potential of copper N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (CuNG) on doxorubicin resistant T lymphoblastic leukaemia cells (CEM/ADR5000). To evaluate the cytotoxic effect of CuNG, we used different normal cell lines (NIH 3T3, Chang liver and human PBMC) and cancerous cell lines (CEM/ADR5000, parental sensitive CCRF-CEM, SiHa and 3LL) and conclude that CuNG preferentially kills cancerous cells, especially both leukemic cell types irrespective of their MDR status, while leaving normal cell totally unaffected. Moreover, CuNG involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) for induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This is substantiated by our observation that antioxidant N-acetyle-cysteine (NAC) and PEG catalase could completely block ROS generation and, subsequently, abrogates CuNG induced apoptosis. On the other hand, uncomplexed ligand N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone) glycinate (NG) fails to generate a significant amount of ROS and concomitant induction of apoptosis in CEM/ADR5000 cells. Therefore, CuNG induces drug resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis and proves to be a molecule having therapeutic potential to overcome MDR in cancer.

  5. Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Janet M; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C; von Kalm, Laurence; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2013-06-25

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exist regarding the toxicity of CNPs. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CNPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physicochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer; H2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2), or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physicochemical properties of these CNPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 was readily taken into endothelial cells and the aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CNPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest that the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs and may suggest that ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications. PMID:23668322

  6. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  7. Electrochemical Oxidation of L-Cysteine in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Admicelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中春; 刘天晴; 郭荣

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of L-cysteine can be catalyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) admicelles. The catalytic efficiency increases hardly when SDS concentration is lower than the critical admicelle concentration (CAC) and increases rapidly when SDS concentration is between CAC and the critical micelle concentration (CMC), but decreases when SDS concentration is higher than CMC. Both results of rate constant k0 and Gibbs free energy ΔGck accord with that of catalytic efficiency.

  8. Role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of different families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, V; Swann, S L; Spedaliere, C J; Mueller, E G

    1999-10-01

    The pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine in RNA molecules. An attractive mechanism was proposed based on that of thymidylate synthase, in which the thiol(ate) group of a cysteine side chain serves as the nucleophile in a Michael addition to C6 of the isomerized uridine. Such a role for cysteine in the pseudouridine synthase TruA (also named Psi synthase I) has been discredited by site-directed mutagenesis, but sequence alignments have led to the conclusion that there are four distinct "families" of pseudouridine synthases that share no statistically significant global sequence similarity. It was, therefore, necessary to probe the role of cysteine residues in pseudouridine synthases of the families that do not include TruA. We examined the enzymes RluA and TruB, which are members of different families than TruA and each other. Substitution of cysteine for amino acids with nonnucleophilic side chains did not significantly alter the catalytic activity of either pseudouridine synthase. We conclude, therefore, that neither TruB nor RluA require thiol(ate) groups to effect catalysis, excluding their participation in a Michael addition to C6 of uridine, although not eliminating that mechanism (with an alternate nucleophile) from future consideration.

  9. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  10. Impact of redox-active polymer molecular weight on the electrochemical properties and transport across porous separators in nonaqueous solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarjuna, Gavvalapalli; Hui, Jingshu; Cheng, Kevin J; Lichtenstein, Timothy; Shen, Mei; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2014-11-19

    Enhancing the ionic conductivity across the electrolyte separator in nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NRFBs) is essential for improving their performance and enabling their widespread utilization. Separating redox-active species by size exclusion without greatly impeding the transport of supporting electrolyte is a potentially powerful alternative to the use of poorly performing ion-exchange membranes. However, this strategy has not been explored possibly due to the lack of suitable redox-active species that are easily varied in size, remain highly soluble, and exhibit good electrochemical properties. Here we report the synthesis, electrochemical characterization, and transport properties of redox-active poly(vinylbenzyl ethylviologen) (RAPs) with molecular weights between 21 and 318 kDa. The RAPs reported here show very good solubility (up to at least 2.0 M) in acetonitrile and propylene carbonate. Ultramicroelectrode voltammetry reveals facile electron transfer with E1/2 ∼ -0.7 V vs Ag/Ag(+)(0.1 M) for the viologen 2+/+ reduction at concentrations as high as 1.0 M in acetonitrile. Controlled potential bulk electrolysis indicates that 94-99% of the nominal charge on different RAPs is accessible and that the electrolysis products are stable upon cycling. The dependence of the diffusion coefficient on molecular weight suggests the adequacy of the Stokes-Einstein formalism to describe RAPs. The size-selective transport properties of LiBF4 and RAPs across commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) separators such as Celgard 2400 and Celgard 2325 were tested. COTS porous separators show ca. 70 times higher selectivity for charge balancing ions (Li(+)BF4(-)) compared to high molecular weight RAPs. RAPs rejection across these separators showed a strong dependence on polymer molecular weight as well as the pore size; the rejection increased with both increasing polymer molecular weight and reduction in pore size. Significant rejection was observed even for rpoly/rpore (polymer

  11. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  12. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  13. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  14. Utility of a redox-active pyridine(diimine) chelate in facilitating two electron oxidative addition chemistry at uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernicki, John J; Fanwick, Phillip E; Bart, Suzanne C

    2014-08-01

    Exposure of the uranium(IV) complex, Cp(P)U((Mes)PDI(Me)) (1) ((Mes)PDI(Me) = 2,6-((Mes)N=CMe)2–C5H3N; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl; Cp(P) = 1-(7,7-dimethylbenzyl)cyclopentadienyl), which contains a [(Mes)PDI(Me)](3−) chelate, to I2, Cl2, PhSeCl, and PhEEPh (E = S, Se, Te) results in oxidative addition to form the uranium(IV) family, Cp(P)U(XX′)((Mes)PDI(Me)) (X = X′ = I, Cl, EPh; X = SePh, X′ = Cl). Spectroscopic and structural studies support products with [(Mes)PDI(Me)](1−), indicating the reducing equivalents derive from this redox-active chelate.

  15. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C;

    1999-01-01

    The ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) are a family of multidomain proteins that are believed to play key roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. We have shown recently that human ADAM 12-S (meltrin alpha) is an active metalloprotease. It is synthesized as a zymogen......, with the prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition...... of the protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity...

  16. Solid-phase organic synthesis of 2-tridecanyl-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-tridecanyl-1,4-naphthodiol that form redox-active micelles and vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugarin, Alejandro; Martinez, Luis E; Cooke, Peter; Islam, Tadiqul; Noveron, Juan C

    2014-10-01

    The solid-phase synthesis of new amphiphilic compounds is reported. It is based on a newly designed 1,4-naphthoquinone derivative that contains polar and nonpolar groups and self-assembles into micelles or vesicles in water depending on the concentration. They also display redox-active properties.

  17. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals.

  18. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes: expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L.J. Broere; R. Plessius; J.I. van der Vlugt

    2015-01-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This r

  19. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals. PMID:26148803

  20. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  1. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  2. Self-assembled monolayer and multilayer formation using redox-active Ru complex with phosphonic acids on silicon oxide surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of self-assembled monolayer and multilayer using redox-active Ru complex molecules with phosphonic acids on SiO2 surface has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, and time of flight secondary mass-ion spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). We found that an introduction of a Zr adlayer leads to higher surface molecular density of Ru complex SAMs on the SiO2 surface, compared to that of obtained from the direct adsorption of Ru complex monolayer on the SiO2 surface. We further tried to fabricate a multilayer film using this molecule with Zr(IV) ion acting as a chemical glue by a successive immersion process. The XPS data revealed that the molecular densities of the multilayers were also higher for the immobilization with Zr adlayer between Ru complex and SiO2 surface than those without the Zr adlayer, suggesting that Zr adlayer is effective in forming highly packed molecular layer of phosphonic acids on SiO2 surface. We found the film growth reached a saturation point after 6 layers on the SiO2 surface. The film growth saturation can be explained by a molecular domain boundary effect encountered due to the large tilt angle of the molecular layer.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Bradbury, Mark; Ostrikov, Kostya; Murphy, Anthony B

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med), with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min) may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mai-Prochnow

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS, excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med, with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  5. Deformation of redox-active polymer gel based on polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Toshihiro; Tanaka, Hideki; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Ohta, Akira; Kimura, Mutsumi

    2014-12-01

    Redox-active polymer gels consisting of polysiloxane backbone and bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units have been designed and synthesized. The bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units, which undergo interconversion between cyclic form and opened dicationic form, have been incorporated into polysiloxane backbone via hydrosilylation of vinyl-terminated bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl derivative and poly(methylhydrosiloxane) (PMHS) or poly(dimethylsiloxane-co-hydrogenmethylsiloxane) (PDMS-co-PMHS), resulting in polymer gels cross-linked with bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl units. After the incorporation of M1 into polysiloxane backbone, these polymer gels (P1 and P2) also exhibit redox responses associated with the electrochemical interconversion of the bis(benzodithiolyl)bithienyl moieties. The polymer gels show swelling behavior upon chemical oxidization, and bending behavior has been observed for the polymer gel immobilized poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVdF) film. These results provide a useful perspective for fabricating redox-triggered polymer gel actuators based on the conformational change of the functional molecular unit. PMID:25400032

  6. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, Daniel; Tempas, Christopher D.; Bukowski, Gregory S.; Smith, Kevin A.; Tait, Steven L., E-mail: tait@indiana.edu [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, 800 E. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts.

  7. Redox-active tetrathiafulvalene and dithiolene compounds derived from allylic 1,4-diol rearrangement products of disubstituted 1,3-dithiole derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe Vilela; Skabara, Peter J; Mason, Christopher R.; Thomas D. J. Westgate; Asun Luquin; Coles, Simon J.; Hursthouse, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a series of compounds by exploiting the unusual 1,4-aryl shift observed for electron-rich 1,3-dithiole-2-thione and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivatives in the presence of perchloric acid. The mechanistic features of this rearrangement are discussed since this synthetic strategy provides an alternative route for the synthesis and functionalisation of sulfur rich compounds including redox active compounds of TTFs, and a Ni dithiolene.

  8. Inhibition of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity with APX3330 blocks retinal angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Aihua; Gao, Hua; Kelley, Mark R; Qiao, Xiaoxi

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the role of APE1/Ref-1 in the retina and its potential as a therapeutic target for inhibiting retinal angiogenesis. APE1/Ref-1 expression was quantified by Western blot. The role of APE1/Ref-1 redox function in endothelial cell in vitro angiogenesis was examined by treating retinal vascular endothelial cells (RVECs) with APX3330, a small molecule inhibitor of APE1/Ref-1 redox activity. In vitro methods included a proliferation assay, a transwell migration assay, a Matrigel tube formation assay, and a Real-Time Cell Analysis (RTCA) using the xCELLigence System. In vivo functional studies of APE1/Ref-1 were carried out by treating very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor knockout mice (Vldlr(-/-)) with intravitreal injection of APX3330, and subsequent measurement of retinal angiomatous proliferation (RAP)-like neovascularization for one week. APE1/Ref-1 was highly expressed in the retina and in RVECs and pericytes in mice. APX3330 (1-10 μM) inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation of RVECs in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Vldlr(-/-) RVECs were more sensitive to APX3330 than wild-type RVECs. In Vldlr(-/-) mice, a single intravitreal injection of APX3330 at the onset of RAP-like neovascularization significantly reduced RAP-like neovascularization development. APE1/Ref-1 is expressed in retinal vascular cells. APX3330 inhibits RVEC angiogenesis in vitro and significantly reduces RAP-like neovascularization in Vldlr(-/-) mice. These data support the conclusion that APE1/Ref-1 redox function is required for retinal angiogenesis. Thus, APE1/Ref-1 may have potential as a therapeutic target for treating neovascular age-related macular degeneration and other neovascular diseases.

  9. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  10. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols. PMID:14986994

  11. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  12. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  13. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    PDI) has been analysed by exchanging the active-site cysteine residues for serine residues. The activity of the mutant forms of yPDI was determined quantitatively by following the refolding of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor in vitro. In this assay the activity of the wild-type yPDI is quite similar...... to that of human PDI, both in rearrangement and oxidation reactions. However, while the a domain active site of the human enzyme is more active than the a'-site, the reverse is the case for yPDI. This prompted us to set up an assay to investigate whether the situation would be different with a native yeast...

  14. Getting a Knack for NAC: N-Acetyl-Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl cysteine, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine are all designations for the same compound, which is abbreviated as NAC. NAC is a precursor to the amino acid cysteine, which ultimately plays two key metabolic roles. Through its metabolic contribution to glutathione production, cysteine participates in the general antioxidant activities of the body. Through its role as a modulator of the glutamatergic system, cysteine influences the reward-reinforcement pathway....

  15. Understanding the Adsorption Interface of Polyelectrolyte Coating on Redox Active Nanoparticles Using Soft Particle Electrokinetics and Its Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The application of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) for therapeutic purposes requires a stable dispersion of nanoparticles in a biological environment. The objective of this study is to tailor the properties of polyelectrolyte coated CNPs as a function of molecular weight to achieve a stable and catalytic active dispersion. The coating of CNPs with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has increased the dispersion stability of CNPs and enhanced the catalytic ability. The stability of PAA coating was analyzed using the change in the Gibbs free energy computed by the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption isotherms were determined using soft particle electrokinetics which overcomes the challenges presented by other techniques. The change in Gibbs free energy was highest for CNPs coated with PAA of 250 kg/mol indicating the most stable coating. The change in free energy for PAA of 100 kg/mol coated CNPs was 85% lower than the PAA of 250 kg/mol coated CNPs. This significant difference is caused by the strong adsorption of PAA of 100 kg/mol on CNPs. Catalytic activity of PAA-CNPs is assessed by the catalase enzymatic mimetic activity of nanoparticles. The catalase activity was higher for PAA coated CNPs as compared to bare CNPs which indicated preferential adsorption of hydrogen peroxide induced by coating. This indicates that the catalase activity is also affected by the structure of the coating layer. PMID:24673655

  16. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  17. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Mercury and other highly-toxic heavy metals such as cadmium and lead are present in many aquatic environments, and the remediation of such environments or the avoidance of heavy-metal contamination in the first place is an area of active interest. In recent years tougher environmental regulations and the high initial cost of new, more effective, and more selective extractants has made the reuse of extractant materials and the minimization of secondary waste volume a focus of their scientific effort. The authors research has involved the investigation of redox-active layered metal chalcogenides as selective, effective, and redox-recyclable extractants for heavy metals from aqueous solution.'

  18. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur J. L. Cooper; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Pinto, John T.; Bruschi, Sam A.

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-containing enzymes that catalyze the conversion of cysteine S-conjugates [RSCH2CH(NH3+)CO2−] and selenium Se-conjugates [RSeCH2CH(NH3+)CO2−] that contain a leaving group in the β position to pyruvate, ammonium and a sulfur-containing fragment (RSH) or selenium-containing fragment (RSeH), respectively. At least ten PLP enzymes catalyze β-elimination reactions with such cysteine S-conjugates. All are enzymes involved in amino acid m...

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis and mutagenesis predict involvement of multiple cysteines in redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V Petrotchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evgeniy V Petrotchenko1,2,4, Naohiro Yamaguchi1,3,4, Daniel A Pasek1, Christoph H Borchers1,2, Gerhard Meissner11Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2University of Victoria, Genome BC Proteomics Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; 3Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA 4Contributed equally to the workAbstract: The tetrameric skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex (RyR1 contains a large number of free cysteines that are potential targets for redox-active molecules. Here, we report the mass spectrometric analysis of free thiols in RyR1 using the lipophilic, thiol-specific probe monobromobimane (MBB. In the presence of reduced glutathione, MBB labeled 14 cysteines per RyR1 subunit in tryptic peptides in five of five experiments. Forty-six additional MBB-labeled cysteines per RyR1 subunit were detected with lower frequency in tryptic peptides, bringing the total number of MBB-labeled cysteines to 60 per RyR1 subunit. A combination of fluorescence detection and mass spectrometry of RyR1, labeled in the presence of reduced and oxidized glutathione, identified two redox-sensitive cysteines (C1040 and C1303. Regulation of RyR activity by reduced and oxidized glutathione was investigated in skeletal muscle mutant RyR1s in which 18 cysteines were substituted with serine or alanine, using a [3H]ryanodine ligand binding assay. Three single-site RyR1 mutants (C1781S, C2436S, and C2606S and two multisite mutants with five and seven substituted cysteines exhibited a reduced redox response compared with wild-type RyR1. The results suggest that multiple cysteines determine the redox state and activity of RyR1.Keywords: mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, ryanodine receptor, redox modification of cysteines

  20. Long-term cysteine fortification impacts cysteine/glutathione homeostasis and food intake in ageing rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Karine; Breuille, Denis; Serrant, Patrick; Denis, Philippe; Glomot, Francoise; Bechereau, Fabienne; PAPET, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Healthy ageing is associated with higher levels of glutathione. The study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary fortification with cysteine increases cysteine and glutathione pools, thus alleviating age-associated low-grade inflammation and resulting in global physiological benefits. The effect of a 14-week dietary fortification with cysteine was studied in non-inflamed (NI, healthy at baseline) and in spontaneously age-related low-grade inflamed (LGI, prefrail at baseline) 21-month-ol...

  1. Contributions of Open Burning to PM2.5 in Suburban Tokyo and the Impact of Biomass Smoke on Cellular Redox Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fushimi, A.; Villalobos, A. M.; Takami, A.; Tanabe, K.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Fine atmospheric particles (PM2.5) in suburban Tokyo (Tsukuba), Japan were collected for 24 h every week over the course of a full year (2012-2013) to estimate the source contributions with a focus on open burning of crop residues. Using the quartz fiber filter-collected samples, elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), inorganic ionic species, and organic markers were measured. More than 100 organic markers including levoglucosan, a marker of open burning, were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) after derivatization. Using the Teflon filter-collected samples, particulate mass, elements, and biological redox activity using an in-vitro rat alveolar macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay were measured. The PM2.5 concentrations were higher in February-March and the annual average was 13.6 μg m-3. The EC and OC concentrations were higher in March and September. Levoglucosan concentrations were remarkably higher in fall and winter (September-March) with maximum in November, suggesting enhanced biomass burning contribution. The ROS activity of the PM2.5 (per air volume) was higher in spring (April) and summer (July). PM2.5 sources as estimated by a chemical mass balance model using the organic markers, and relationships of redox activity with chemical species and emission sources will be presented.

  2. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF6, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E0'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  3. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie

    2009-02-28

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl){sub 2}(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF{sub 6}, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E{sup 0}'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period.

  4. Electrochemical determination of cysteine based on conducting polymers/gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ya-Ping; Su, Wan-Yu; Cheng, Jin-Ru [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou Hsien 545, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Shu-Hua, E-mail: shcheng@ncnu.edu.t [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou Hsien 545, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of a conducting polymer and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is fabricated onto a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). A thin layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is coated electrochemically on a bare SPCE; then, the nano-sized AuNPs are embedded by electrochemical deposition. The resultant SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode is characterized by electrochemical methods, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode possesses great catalytic activity for the oxidation of cysteine in various pH buffer solutions (pH 2.0-8.0). The selectivity of the method is demonstrated by the separation of the oxidation peaks at up to 240 mV for cysteine and glutathione in pH 6.0 buffer solutions. The effects of the oxidizable interferences are also investigated. Flow-injection amperometry is performed for 0.5-200 {mu}M of cysteine in pH 4.0 buffer solutions, and a linear calibration plot with a slope of 0.115 {mu}A/{mu}M is obtained. The detection limit (S/N = 3) is 0.05 {mu}M. Additionally, the proposed methods obtain satisfactory results in the detection of cysteine-containing medicine samples.

  5. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a solut

  6. Reconstruction of Cysteine Biosynthesis Using Engineered Cysteine-Free and Methionine-Free Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kendrick; Fujishima, Kosuke; Abe, Nozomi; Nakahigashi, Kenji; Endy, Drew; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    Ten of the proteinogenic amino acids can be generated abiotically while the remaining thirteen require biology for their synthesis. Paradoxically, the biosynthesis pathways observed in nature require enzymes that are made with the amino acids they produce. For example, Escherichia coli produces cysteine from serine via two enzymes that contain cysteine. Here, we substituted alternate amino acids for cysteine and also methionine, which is biosynthesized from cysteine, in serine acetyl transferase (CysE) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (CysM). CysE function was rescued by cysteine-and-methionine-free enzymes and CysM function was rescued by cysteine-free enzymes. Structural modeling suggests that methionine stabilizes CysM and is present in the active site of CysM. Cysteine is not conserved among CysE and CysM protein orthologs, suggesting that cysteine is not functionally important for its own synthesis. Engineering biosynthetic enzymes that lack the amino acids being synthesized provides insights into the evolution of amino acid biosynthesis and pathways for bioengineering.

  7. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  8. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  9. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers. Part 4: Kinetics of Redox Enzymes Coupled With Electron Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed kinetic analysis of the pertinent physical processes underlying the operation of enzyme electrodes immobilized within alkane thiol self assembled monolayers is developed. These electrodes utilize a soluble mediator, which partitions into the monolayer, regenerates the active catalytic form of the enzyme and is re-oxidized at the underlying support electrode surface giving rise to a current which reflects kinetic events at the enzyme surface. Both the enzyme/substrate and enzyme mediator kinetics have been quantified fully in terms of a ping-pong mechanism for the former and Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the latter. The effect of substrate and mediator diffusion in solution have also been specifically considered and the latter processes have been shown to result in a complex expression for the reaction flux. Four limiting kinetic cases have been enumerated and simple expressions for the reaction flux in each of these rate limiting situations have been developed. Kinetic case diagrams have been presented as an aid to mechanistic diagnosis. The complicating effects of diffusive loss of reduced mediator from the enzyme layer have also been examined and the relation between the observed flux corresponding to reduced mediator oxidation at the support electrode and the substrate reaction flux in the enzyme layer have been quantified in terms of an efficiency factor. Results extracted from recently published practical realizations of immobilized monolayer enzyme systems have been discussed in the context of the proposed model analysis.

  10. Molecular Bases for the Recognition of Short Peptide Substrates and Cysteine-Directed Modifications of Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen (UC)

    2009-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid {beta} (A{beta}). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located 30 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K{sub m} values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  11. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid β (Aβ). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located ~30Å away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9Å crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite, and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high Km values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all thirteen cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitroso-glutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing towards an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:18986166

  12. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  13. Highly Catalytic Nanodots with Renal Clearance for Radiation Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Jinxuan; Wang, Junying; Yang, Jiang; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiu; Deng, Jiao; Deng, Dehui; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Changlong; Li, Meixian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (gamma and x-ray) is widely used in industry and medicine, but it can also pose a significant hazardous effect on health and induce cancer, physical deformity and even death, due to DNA damages and invasion of free radicals. There is therefore an urgent unmet demand in designing highly efficient radioprotectants with synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and low toxicity. In this study, we designed ultrasmall (sub-5 nm) highly catalytically active and cysteine...

  14. Self-assembly, redox activity, and charge transport of functional surface nano-architectures by molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, Daniel

    Surface-assisted molecular self-assembly is a promising strategy to program the structure and chemical state of atoms and molecules in nano-architectures to achieve a specific function. The experiments described in this thesis demonstrate that the design and programming of basic organic components leads to desired characteristics by self-assembly. The fabrication of uniform single-site metal centers at surfaces, important for high selectivity in next-generation catalysts, was accomplished by coordination to redox non-innocent phenanthroline and tetrazine-based ligands. These examples were the first demonstrating tuning of the metal oxidation state in surface coordination architectures through rational ligand design. The molecular-scale coordination architectures were the first formed from chromium and vanadium, and the first from platinum in a non-porphyrin system. The first mixed valence metal-ligand surface structure was fabricated that attained the same ligand coordination number for all metal sites. A new surface reaction method was demonstrated between an inexpensive sodium chloride reagent and carboxylate ligands. High-temperature, molecular-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy of the ordered metal-organic structures demonstrated thermal stability up to 300 °C, the highest molecular-level thermal stability in organic surface nanostructures yet achieved, making such systems potential candidates for moderate-temperature catalytic reactions. Molecular self-assembly was expanded into organic semiconductor thin films. In a two-component, bi-layered system, hydrogen bonding between carboxylates and carboxylic acid-substituted thiophenes was utilized, yielding the first real-space images of phenyl-thiophene stacking. In a one-component system, multiple donor-acceptor pi-pi contacts between phenyltriazole building blocks accomplished assembly of flat-lying molecules from a surface with molecular-scale precision through more than twenty molecular layers. Sufficient

  15. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  16. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-08-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  17. Selectively colorimetric detection of cysteine with triangular silver nanoprisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Wu; Yuan Fang Li; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2009-01-01

    Triangular silver nanoprisms were prepared and applied to make colorimetric detection of cysteine based on our findings that cysteine could lead to the blue shift of the dipole plasmon resonance absorption,but other 19 kinds of natural amino acids could not.Cysteine with a concentration 160 nmol/L can result in a color change that can be discerned with naked eyes.

  18. Cysteine and Cysteine-Related SignalingPathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor moleculeinvolved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its deriva-tive molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine issynthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed byO-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resultingin a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools, in recent years, significant progress has been made inArabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the dis-covery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCSwith S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions.Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signalingmolecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essentialrole in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which isessential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  19. Hierarchical networks of redox-active reduced crumpled graphene oxide and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes for rapid electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongyong; Lee, Chongmin; Liu, Tianyuan; Eom, Kwangsup; Chen, Zhongming; Noda, Suguru; Fuller, Thomas F.; Jang, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-06-01

    Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes consisting of conventional 2D reduced graphene oxide and f-FWNTs. These results highlight the importance of microstructure design coupled with oxygen chemistry control, to maximize the surface redox reactions on functionalized graphene based electrodes.Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes

  20. Application of 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid as a suitable mediator and multiwall carbon nanotubes as a sensor for the electrocatalytic determination of L-cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohsen Keyvanfard; Rasoul Salmani-mobarakeh; Hassan Karimi-Maleh; Khadijeh Alizad

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor was prepared for the determination of L-cysteine using a modified multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode in the presence of 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid (3,4-DHCA) as a mediator, based on an electrocatalytic process. The results indicate that the elec-trode is electrocatalytically efficient for the oxidation of L-cysteine in the presence of 3,4-DHCA. The interaction between the mediator and L-cysteine can be used for its sensitive and selective deter-mination. Using chronoamperometry, the catalytic reaction rate constant was calculated to be 2.37 × 102 mol-1 L s-1. The catalytic peak current was linearly dependent on the L-cysteine concentration in the range of 0.4-115 μmol/L. The detection limit obtained by linear sweep voltammetry was 0.25 μmol/L. Finally, the modified electrode was examined as a selective, simple, and precise new elec-trochemical sensor for the determination of L-cysteine in real samples.

  1. [Growth-inhibitory activity of Cladosporium cladosporioides by cysteine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Ueno, Yukihiro; Ogasawara, Ayako; Mikami, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tatsuji

    2007-07-01

    When Cladosporium cladosporioides was cultured with cysteine, its growth was completely inhibited statically. The growth of C. cladosporioides cultured on potato-dextrose agar plates was also inhibited by the addition of cysteine. The production of ATP in C. cladosporioides was inhibited by cysteine. When a silicone block was incubated with C. cladosporioides, the surface of the block was coated with the biofilm of C. cladosporioides. However, the block containing cysteine was not covered with biofilm. These results indicate that cysteine is useful as a material to prevent the growth of C. cladosporioides.

  2. Primary hepatocytes from mice lacking cysteine dioxygenase show increased cysteine concentrations and higher rates of metabolism of cysteine to hydrogen sulfide and thiosulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowska, Halina; Roman, Heather B; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Sasakura, Kiyoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Krijt, Jakub; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2014-05-01

    The oxidation of cysteine in mammalian cells occurs by two routes: a highly regulated direct oxidation pathway in which the first step is catalyzed by cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) and by desulfhydration-oxidation pathways in which the sulfur is released in a reduced oxidation state. To assess the effect of a lack of CDO on production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and thiosulfate (an intermediate in the oxidation of H2S to sulfate) and to explore the roles of both cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH) and cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) in cysteine desulfhydration by liver, we investigated the metabolism of cysteine in hepatocytes isolated from Cdo1-null and wild-type mice. Hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice produced more H2S and thiosulfate than did hepatocytes from wild-type mice. The greater flux of cysteine through the cysteine desulfhydration reactions catalyzed by CTH and CBS in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice appeared to be the consequence of their higher cysteine levels, which were due to the lack of CDO and hence lack of catabolism of cysteine by the cysteinesulfinate-dependent pathways. Both CBS and CTH appeared to contribute substantially to cysteine desulfhydration, with estimates of 56 % by CBS and 44 % by CTH in hepatocytes from wild-type mice, and 63 % by CBS and 37 % by CTH in hepatocytes from Cdo1-null mice.

  3. One-step electrochemically co-assembled redox-active [Ru(bpy)2(tatp)]2+-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid film for non-redox protein biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shi-Bo; Yan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Jun-Wen; Chen, Lin-Lin; Li, Hong

    2013-01-15

    A redox-active [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, tatp=1,4,8,9-tetra-aza-triphenylene, BSA=bovine serum albumin, SWCNTs=single-walled carbon nanotubes) hybrid film is fabricated on an indium-tin oxide (ITO) electrode via one-step electrochemical co-assembly approach. BSA is inherently dispersive and therefore served as the linking mediator of SWCNTs, which facilitate the redox reactions of [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+) employed as a reporter of BSA. The evidences from differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscope, emission spectroscopy and fluorescence microscope reveal that the [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid can be electrochemically co-assembled on the ITO electrode, showing two pairs of well-defined Ru(II)-based redox waves. Furthermore, the electrochemical co-assembly of the [Ru(bpy)(2)(tatp)](2+)-BSA-SWCNTs hybrid is found to be strongly dependent on the simultaneous presence of BSA and SWCNTs, indicating a good linear response to BSA in the range from 6 to 50mgL(-1). The results from this study provide an electrochemical co-assembly method for the development of non-redox protein biosensors.

  4. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Frameworks: Highly Stable Charge-Separated States through Strut/Guest-to-Strut Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Nivedita; Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Kiran, Venkayala; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, Srinivasan; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-08-10

    Molecular organization of donor and acceptor chromophores in self-assembled materials is of paramount interest in the field of photovoltaics or mimicry of natural light-harvesting systems. With this in mind, a redox-active porous interpenetrated metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Cd(bpdc)(bpNDI)]⋅4.5 H2 O⋅DMF}n (1) has been constructed from a mixed chromophoric system. The μ-oxo-bridged secondary building unit, {Cd2 (μ-OCO)2 }, guides the parallel alignment of bpNDI (N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) acceptor linkers, which are tethered with bpdc (bpdcH2 =4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) linkers of another entangled net in the framework, resulting in photochromic behaviour through inter-net electron transfer. Encapsulation of electron-donating aromatic molecules in the electron-deficient channels of 1 leads to a perfect donor-acceptor co-facial organization, resulting in long-lived charge-separated states of bpNDI. Furthermore, 1 and guest encapsulated species are characterised through electrochemical studies for understanding of their redox properties. PMID:26206156

  5. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems.

  6. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-28

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems. PMID:26961352

  7. Formation of redox-active self-assembled polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes integrating glucose oxidase on electrodes: Influence of the self-assembly solvent on the signal generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, M Lorena; Ceolín, Marcelo; Azzaroni, Omar; Battaglini, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    In this work the effects of the self-assembly solvent on the structure and electrochemical behavior of redox-active polyelectrolyte–surfactant complexes cast on electrode supports from aqueous and DMF solutions are presented. The complex studied is formed by complexation of osmium complex-modified polyallylamine (OsPA) with dodecyl sulfate (DS) surfactants. The structure of the films was characterized by GISAXS, showing that films present a lamellar mesostructure. However, when they are exposed to humid environments, films cast from aqueous solutions (OsPA–DSaq) undergo a structural transition that ultimately leads to the disappearance of the mesostructural order. On the other hand, OsPA–DS films cast from DMF solutions (OsPA–DSorg) revealed no significant changes upon exposure to humid environments. Both types of films were exposed to glucose oxidase (GOx), showing similar adsorption characteristics. Notwithstanding these similarities in GOx and content, OsPA–DSaq films revealed a more sensitive bioelectrocatalytical response to glucose as compared to OsPA–DSorg films. PMID:26094060

  8. Redox-Active Profile Characterization of Remirea maritima Extracts and It Cytotoxic Effect in Mouse Fibroblasts (L929 and Melanoma (B16F10 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Anne A. Dória

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Remirea maritima is a tropical plant with a reticulated root system belonging to the family Cyperaceae, also known to have biologically active secondary metabolites. However, very few data on R. maritima’s biological actions are available and there are no reports regarding the redox-active profile of this plant. In this study, we examined the total phenolic content of Remirea maritima hydroalcoholic (RMHA extracts, redox properties against different reactive species generated in vitro and their cytotoxic effect against fibroblasts (L929 and melanoma (B16F10 cells. Total reactive antioxidant potential index (TRAP and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR results revealed that RMHA at all concentrations tested showed significant antioxidant capacity. RMHA was also effective against hydroxyl radical formation, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in scavenging nitric oxide (NO radicals. In vitro, the level of lipid peroxidation was reduced by RMHA extract and the data showed significant oxidative damage protection. The RMHA cytotoxicity was evaluated by a neutral red assay in fibroblast (L929 and melanome (B16F10 cells. The obtained results showed that the RMHA (40 and 80 µg/mL, respectively reduced 70% of the viable cells. In conclusion, this study represents the first report regarding the antioxidant and anti-proliferative potential of R. maritima against B16F10 melanoma cells.

  9. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  10. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  11. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  12. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  13. Long-time treatment by low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine enhances proinflammatory cytokine expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohnishi

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to act as a reactive oxygen species scavenger and used in clinical applications. Previous reports have shown that high-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment inhibits the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in activated macrophages. Here, we have found that long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low-concentration increases phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT, which are essential for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment decreases expressions of protein phosphatases, catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-2A and dual specificity phosphatase 1. On the other hand, we have found that short-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low dose increases p53 expression, which inhibits expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations suggest that long-time low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment increases expressions of proinflammatory cytokines through enhancement of kinase phosphorylation.

  14. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa. PMID:26546840

  15. 体重指数与谷氨酰半胱氨酸合成酶催化亚基基因多态性的交互作用对女性乳腺癌风险的影响%Interaction of body mass index and a polymorphism in gene of catalytic subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase on breast cancer risk among Chinese women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林威; 唐录英; 岑玉玲; 林颖; 苏逢锡; 贾卫华; 任泽舫

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨谷氨酰半胱氨酸合成酶催化亚基(GCLC)rs17883901多态性位点对BMI与乳腺癌关联的影响.方法 于2008年10月至2010年6月对中山大学3所附属医院新诊断的839例乳腺癌患者(病例组)在接受治疗前及同时期863名年龄频数匹配的对照(对照组)进行问卷调查和收集血样;采用基质辅助激光解吸-飞行时间质谱仪(MALDI-TOF-MS),在Sequenom平台检测rs17883901位点基因型;采用非条件logistic回归分析计算BMI和GCLC与乳腺癌关联的OR值及其95%CI.结果 (1)病例组和对照组接受调查时当前的BMI、20岁时的BMI和GCLCrs17883901位点分布的差异均无统计学意义(P=0.44、0.52和0.47);(2)未发现当前的BMI与绝经前及绝经后乳腺癌风险相关,20岁时BMI为18.5~22.9 kg/m2可降低绝经前乳腺癌风险(OR=0.69,95%CI:0.48~1.00),而未发现其与绝经后乳腺癌风险相关;(3)在GCLC rs17883901位点突变型CT/TT人群中,当前的BMI≥25 kg/m2显著增加乳腺癌风险(OR=1.91,95%CI:1.09~ 3.36),而20岁时BMI为18.5 ~ 22.9 kg/m2与降低乳腺癌风险有关(OR=0.56,95%CI:0.31 ~ 0.99).当前的BMI与GCLC基因多态性对乳腺癌发生风险存在交互作用(P=0.043),而20岁时的BMI与GCLC交互项无统计学意义(P=0.15).结论 20岁时增加BMI可能是绝经前乳腺癌的保护因素;GCLCrs17883901位点本身与乳腺癌发生风险无显著关联,但其变异基因型可使当前的肥胖状态(BMI≥25 kg/m2)显著增加乳腺癌发生风险.%Objective To investigate the interaction of body mass index (BMI) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP,rs17883901) in catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLC) on breast cancer risk.Methods A total of 839 women with incident breast cancer and 863 age-matched controls without cancer were recruited at the same period in three affiliated hospitals of Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou from October 2008 to June 2010.GCLC rs17883901 was genotyped

  16. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  17. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione r...

  18. Thorium and uranium redox-active ligand complexes; reversible intramolecular electron transfer in U(dpp-BIAN)2/ U(dpp-BIAN)2(THE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelter, Eric John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wu, Ruilian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Joe D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, David E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Actinide complexes of the redox-active ligand dpp-BIAN{sup 2-} (dpp-BIAN = bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)acenaphthylene), An(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} (An = Th, n = 1; An = U, n = 0, 1) have been prepared. Solid-state magnetic and single-crystal X-ray data for U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2}(THF){sub n} show when n = 0, the complex exists in an f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} configuration; whereas an intramolecular electron transfer occurs for n = 1, resulting in an f{sup 3}-{pi}*{sup 3} ground configuration. The magnetic data also indicate that interconversion between the two forms of the complex is possible, limited only by the ability of THF vapor to penetrate the solid on cooling of the sample. Spectroscopic data indicate the complex exists solely in the f{sup 2}-{pi}*{sup 4} form in solution, evidenced by the appearance of only small changes in the electronic absorption spectra of the U(dpp-BIAN){sub 2} complex on titration with THF and by measurement of the solution magnetic moment m d{sub 8}-tetrahydrofuran using Evans method. Electrochemistry of the complexes is reported, with small differences observed in wave potentials between metals and in the presence of THF. These data represent the first example of a well-defined, reversible intramolecular electron transfer in an f-element complex and the second example of oxidation state change through dative interaction with a metal ion.

  19. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  20. Synthesis, molecular and electronic structures of six-coordinate transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) complexes with redox-active 9-hydroxyphenoxazin-1-one ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, Eugeny P; Starikov, Andrey G; Minkin, Vladimir I; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Antipin, Mikhail Yu; Simakov, Vladimir I; Korobov, Mikhail S; Borodkin, Gennady S; Knyazev, Pavel A

    2011-08-01

    A series of pseudo-octahedral metal (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) complexes 4 of a new redox-active ligand, 2,4,6,8-tetra(tert-butyl)-9-hydroxyphenoxazin-1-one 3, have been synthesized, and their molecular structures determined with help of X-ray crystallography. The effective magnetic moments of complexes 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) measured in the solid state and toluene solution point to the stabilization of their high-spin electronic ground states. Detailed information on the electronic structure of the complexes and their redox-isomeric forms has been obtained using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP*/6-311++G(d,p) calculations. The energy disfavored low-spin structures of manganese, iron, and cobalt complexes have been located, and based on the computed geometries and distribution of spin densities identified as Mn(IV)[(Cat-N-SQ)](2), Fe(II)[Cat-N-BQ)](2), and Co(II)[Cat-N-BQ)](2) compounds, respectively. It has been shown that stabilization of the high-spin structures of complexes 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co) is caused by the rigidity of the molecular framework of ligands 3 that sterically inhibits interconversions between the redox-isomeric forms of the complexes. The calculations performed on complex 4 (M = Co) predict that a suitable structural modification that might provide for stabilization of the low-spin electromeric forms and create conditions for the valence tautomeric rearrangement via stabilization of the low-spin electromer and narrowing energy gap between the low-spin ground state tautomer and the minimal energy crossing point on the intersection of the potential energy surfaces of the interconverting structures consists in the replacement of an oxygen in the oxazine ring by a bulkier sulfur atom. PMID:21718042

  1. Modulation of ion transport across rat distal colon by cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eDiener

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of stimulation of endogenous production of H2S by cysteine, the substrate for the two H2S-producing enzymes, cystathionin-beta-synthase and cystathionin-gamma-lyase, on ion transport across rat distal colon. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc induced by cysteine were measured in Ussing chambers. Free cysteine caused a concentration-dependent, transient fall in Isc, which was sensitive to amino-oxyacetate and beta-cyano-L-alanine, i.e. inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes. In contrast, Na cysteinate evoked a biphasic change in Isc, i.e. an initial fall followed by a secondary increase, which was also reduced by these enzyme inhibitors. All responses were dependent on the presence of Cl- and inhibited by bumetanide, suggesting that free cysteine induces an inhibition of transcellular Cl- secretion, whereas Na cysteinate – after a transient inhibitory phase – activates anion secretion. The assumed reason for this discrepancy is a fall in the cytosolic pH induced by free cysteine, but not by Na cysteinate, as observed in isolated colonic crypts loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF. Intracellular acidification is known to inhibit epithelial K+ channels. Indeed, after preinhibition of basolateral K+ channels with tetrapentylammonium or Ba2+, the negative Isc induced by free cysteine was reduced significantly. In consequence, stimulation of endogenous H2S production by Na cysteinate causes, after a short inhibitory response, a delayed activation of anion secretion, which is missing in the case of free cysteine, probably due to the cytosolic acidification. In contrast, diallyl trisulfide, which is intracellularly converted to H2S, only evoked a monophasic increase in Isc without the initial fall observed with Na cysteinate. Consequently, time course and amount of produced H2S seem to strongly influence the functional response of the colonic epithelium evoked by this gasotransmitter.

  2. Two pathways for cysteine biosynthesis in Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Roderick A. M.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Genome mining and biochemical analyses have shown that L. major possesses two pathways for cysteine synthesis - the de novo biosynthesis pathway comprising serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS) and the reverse transsulfuration (RTS) pathway comprising cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL). The L. major CS (LmjCS) is similar to the type A CSs of bacteria and catalyses the synthesis of cysteine using O-acetyserine and sulfide...

  3. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K.

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  4. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  5. Direct targeting of Arabidopsis cysteine synthase complexes with synthetic polypeptides to selectively deregulate cysteine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyńska, Anna; Kurzyk, Agata; Mierzwińska, Monika; Płochocka, Danuta; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Biosynthesis of cysteine is one of the fundamental processes in plants providing the reduced sulfur for cell metabolism. It is accomplished by the sequential action of two enzymes, serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL). Together they constitute the hetero-oligomeric cysteine synthase (CS) complex through specific protein-protein interactions influencing the rate of cysteine production. The aim of our studies was to deregulate the CS complex formation in order to investigate its function in the control of sulfur homeostasis and optimize cysteine synthesis. Computational modeling was used to build a model of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial CS complex. Several polypeptides based on OAS-TL C amino-acid sequence found at SAT-OASTL interaction sites were designed as probable competitors for SAT3 binding. After verification of the binding in a yeast two-hybrid assay, the most strongly interacting polypeptide was introduced to different cellular compartments of Arabidopsis cell via genetic transformation. Moderate increase in total SAT and OAS-TL activities, but not thiols content, was observed dependent on the transgenic line and sulfur availability in the hydroponic medium. Though our studies demonstrate the proof of principle, they also suggest more complex interaction of both enzymes underlying the mechanism of their reciprocal regulation. PMID:23602110

  6. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B;

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and w......Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned...

  7. Identification of zinc-ligated cysteine residues based on 13Calpha and 13Cbeta chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornhaber, Gregory J; Snyder, David; Moseley, Hunter N B; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2006-04-01

    Although a significant number of proteins include bound metals as part of their structure, the identification of amino acid residues coordinated to non-paramagnetic metals by NMR remains a challenge. Metal ligands can stabilize the native structure and/or play critical catalytic roles in the underlying biochemistry. An atom's chemical shift is exquisitely sensitive to its electronic environment. Chemical shift data can provide valuable insights into structural features, including metal ligation. In this study, we demonstrate that overlapped 13Cbeta chemical shift distributions of Zn-ligated and non-metal-ligated cysteine residues are largely resolved by the inclusion of the corresponding 13Calpha chemical shift information, together with secondary structural information. We demonstrate this with a bivariate distribution plot, and statistically with a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and hierarchical logistic regression analysis. Using 287 13Calpha/13Cbeta shift pairs from 79 proteins with known three-dimensional structures, including 86 13Calpha and 13Cbeta shifts for 43 Zn-ligated cysteine residues, along with corresponding oxidation state and secondary structure information, we have built a logistic regression model that distinguishes between oxidized cystines, reduced (non-metal ligated) cysteines, and Zn-ligated cysteines. Classifying cysteines/cystines with a statistical model incorporating all three phenomena resulted in a predictor of Zn ligation with a recall, precision and F-measure of 83.7%, and an accuracy of 95.1%. This model was applied in the analysis of Bacillus subtilis IscU, a protein involved in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. The model predicts that all three cysteines of IscU are metal ligands. We confirmed these results by (i) examining the effect of metal chelation on the NMR spectrum of IscU, and (ii) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. To gain further insight into the frequency of occurrence of non-cysteine Zn

  8. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  9. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  10. Bipolar mass spectrometry of labile coordination complexes, redox active inorganic compounds, and proteins using a glass nebulizer for sonic-spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakis, Manolis M; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [Cu(II) 6Ln(III)] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  11. Fe2O3 nanoparticles suppress Kv1.3 channels via affecting the redox activity of Kvβ2 subunit in Jurkat T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Wei-Xia; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Xiong, Fei; Gu, Ning; Hao, Wei; Gao, Xue; Cao, Ji-Min

    2015-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are promising nanomaterials in medical practice due to their special magnetic characteristics and nanoscale size. However, their potential impacts on immune cells are not well documented. This study aims to investigate the effects of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (Fe2O3-NPs) on the electrophysiology of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat T cells. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that incubation of Jurkat cells with Fe2O3-NPs dose- and time-dependently decreased the current density and shifted the steady-state inactivation curve and the recovery curve of Kv1.3 channels to a rightward direction. Fe2O3-NPs increased the NADP level but decreased the NADPH level of Jurkat cells. Direct induction of NADPH into the cytosole of Jurkat cells via the pipette abolished the rightward shift of the inactivation curve. In addition, transmission electron microscopy showed that Fe2O3-NPs could be endocytosed by Jurkat cells with relatively low speed and capacity. Fe2O3-NPs did not significantly affect the viability of Jurkat cells, but suppressed the expressions of certain cytokines (TNFα, IFNγ and IL-2) and interferon responsive genes (IRF-1 and PIM-1), and the time courses of Fe2O3-NPs endocytosis and effects on the expressions of cytokines and interferon responsive genes were compatible. We conclude that Fe2O3-NPs can be endocytosed by Jurkat cells and act intracellularly. Fe2O3-NPs decrease the current density and delay the inactivation and recovery kinetics of Kv1.3 channels in Jurkat cells by oxidizing NADPH and therefore disrupting the redox activity of the Kvβ2 auxiliary subunit, and as a result, lead to changes of the Kv1.3 channel function. These results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles may affect T cell function by disturbing the activity of Kv1.3 channels. Further, the suppressing effects of Fe2O3-NPs on the expressions of certain inflammatory cytokines and interferon responsive genes suggest that iron

  12. Colorimetric Strategy for Highly Sensitive and Selective Simultaneous Detection of Histidine and Cysteine Based on G-Quadruplex-Cu(II) Metalloenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changtong; Fan, Daoqing; Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-03-01

    In this present work, we proposed a colorimetric strategy for simultaneous detection of histidine and cysteine based on G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme for the first time. Because of the adding of histidine or cysteine, the formation of G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme will be disturbed, thus the catalytic activity to TMB-H2O2 reaction is inversely proportional to the concentration of histidine or cysteine. With this strategy, the limit of detection in experimental measurement for histidine and cysteine is 10 nM and 5 nM, respectively, which are both lower than previous colorimetric arrays. With the help of NEM, cysteine is alkylated and the reaction between Cu(2+) is inhibited, so the selectivity can also be guaranteed. The cost is quite low since the developed array is label free and enzyme free by using low-cost DNA and Cu(2+). More importantly, the colorimetric detection operation is very simple without any further modification process. PMID:26832965

  13. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  14. Nanoscaled redox active protein adsorption on Au-dot arrays: An electrochemical scanning probe microscopic investigation for application in nano-biodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Jung, Mi; Kim, Sang-Uk [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [College of Bionanotechnology, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Seongnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.k [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Highly dense and uniform protein dot arrays on Au-nanodots using size controllable method were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate in order to develop an electrochemical nanobiochip. Cysteine modified azurin was directly immobilized on the fabricated Au-nanodots without any linker materials. Atomic force microscopy was used for characterizing Au-dots formed on ITO substrate. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) revealed the monolayer formation with an in situ cyclic voltammetry to observe redox behaviour of both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots. I-V characteristics were obtained on both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots structured on ITO conductive electrodes.

  15. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  16. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  17. Posttranslational heterocyclization of cysteine and serine residues in the antibiotic microcin B17: distributivity and directionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, N L; Hendrickson, C L; Walsh, C T

    1999-11-23

    To produce the antibiotic Microcin B17, four Cys and four Ser residues are converted into four thiazoles and four oxazoles by the three subunit Microcin B17 synthetase. High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) was used to monitor the kinetics of posttranslational heterocyclic ring formation (-20 Da per ring) and demonstrated the accumulation of all intermediates, from one to seven rings, indicating distributive processing. All of the intermediates could be converted by the enzyme to the eight ring product. Enzymatic chemoselectivity (Cys vs Ser cyclization rates) was assessed using iodoacetamido-salicylate to alkylate unreacted cysteines (+193 Da) in the 8 kDa biosynthetic intermediates; three of the first four rings formed were thiazoles, and by the five ring stage, all four of the cysteines had been heterocyclized while three of the original four serines remained uncyclized. Finally, tandem MS using a 9.4 T Fourier transform instrument with electrospray ionization was used to elaborate the major processing pathway: the first two rings formed are at the most amino proximal sites (Cys(41) then Ser(40)) followed by the remaining three cysteines at positions 48, 51, and 55. The cyclization of serines at positions 56, 62, and 65 then follows, with Ser(62) and Ser(65) the last to heterocyclize and the first of these at a slower rate. Thus, despite free dissociation of intermediates after each of seven ring-forming catalytic cycles, there is an overall directionality of ring formation from N-terminal to C-terminal sites. This remarkable regioselectivity is determined more by the substrate than the enzyme, due to a combination of (1) initial high-affinity binding of the posttranslational catalyst to the N-terminal propeptide of substrate 88mer, and (2) a chemoselectivity for thiazole over oxazole formation. This mechanism is consistent with antibiotic biosynthesis in vivo, yielding microcin with six, seven, and eight rings, all with bioactivity.

  18. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding cysteine proteases from senescent leaves of Gossypium hirsutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Fafu; YU Shuxun; HAN Xiulan; FAN Shuli

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding a cysteine proteinase was isolated from senescent leave of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cv liaomian No. 9 by utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), and a set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal the conserved sequences of plant cysteine protease genes. The cDNA, which designated Ghcysp gene, contained 1368 bp terminating in a poly(A)+ trail, and included a putative 5′(98 bp) and a 3′(235 bp) non-coding region. The opening reading frame (ORF) encodes polypeptide 344 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.88 kD and theoretical pI of 4.80. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence in the GenBank database has shown considerable sequence similarity to a novel family of plant cysteine proteases. This putative cotton Ghcysp protein shows from 67% to 82% identity to the other plants. All of them share catalytic triad of residues, which are highly conserved in three regions. Hydropaths analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that the Ghcysp is a potential membrane protein and localizes to the vacuole, which has a transmembrane helix between resides 7-25. A characteristic feature of Ghcysp is the presence of a putative vacuole-targeting signal peptide of 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal region. The expression of Ghcysp gene was determined using northern blot analysis. The Ghcysp mRNA levels are high in development senescent leaf but below the limit of detection in senescent root, hypocotyl, faded flower, 6 d post anthesis ovule, and young leaf.

  20. Mechanism of S-oxygenation by a cysteine dioxygenase model complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastry, G. Narahari

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the first computational study on a biomimetic cysteine dioxygenase model complex, [FeII(LN3S)]+ where LN3S is a tetradentate ligand with a bis(imino)pyridyl scaffold and a pendant arylthiolate group. The reaction mechanism of sulfur dioxygenation with O2 was examined by density functional theory (DFT) methods, and compared to results obtained for cysteine dioxygenase. The reaction proceeds via multistate reactivity patterns on competing singlet, triplet and quintet spin state surfaces. The reaction mechanism is analogous to that found for cysteine dioxygenase enzymes [Kumar, D.; Thiel, W.; de Visser, S. P. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011, 133, 3869–3882], hence the computations indicate that this complex can closely mimic the enzymatic process. The catalytic mechanism starts from an iron(III)-superoxo complex and the attack of the terminal oxygen atom of the superoxo group on the sulfur atom of the ligand. Subsequently, the dioxygen bond breaks to form an iron(IV)-oxo complex with a bound sulfenato group. After reorganization the second oxygen atom is transferred to the substrate to give a sulfinic acid product. An alternative mechanism involving the direct attack of dioxygen on the sulfur, without involving any iron-oxygen intermediates, was also examined. Importantly, a significant energetic preference for dioxygen coordinating to the iron center prior to attack at sulfur was discovered and serves to elucidate the function of the metal ion in the reaction process. The computational results are in good agreement with experimental observations, and the differences and similarities of the biomimetic complex and the enzymatic CDO center are highlighted. PMID:22091701

  1. A functional model for the cysteinate-ligated non-heme iron enzyme superoxide reductase (SOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Terutaka; Dey, Abhishek; Lugo-Mas, Priscilla; Benedict, Jason B; Kaminsky, Werner; Solomon, Edward; Kovacs, Julie A

    2006-11-15

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are cysteine-ligated, non-heme iron enzymes that reduce toxic superoxide radicals (O2-). The functional role of the trans cysteinate, as well as the mechanism by which SOR reduces O2-, is unknown. Herein is described a rare example of a functional metalloenzyme analogue, which catalytically reduces superoxide in a proton-dependent mechanism, via a trans thiolate-ligated iron-peroxo intermediate, the first example of its type. Acetic-acid-promoted H2O2 release, followed by Cp2Co reduction, regenerates the active Fe(II) catalyst. The thiolate ligand and its trans positioning relative to the substrate are shown to contribute significantly to the catalyst's function, by lowering the redox potential, changing the spin state, and dramatically lowering the nuFe-O stretching frequency well-below that of any other reported iron-peroxo, while leaving nuO-O high, so as to favor superoxide reduction and Fe-O, as opposed to O-O, bond cleavage. Thus we provide critical insight into the relationship between the SOR structure and its function, as well as important benchmark parameters for characterizing highly unstable thiolate-ligated iron-peroxo intermediates. PMID:17090014

  2. Structural and Functional Studies of the Mitochondrial Cysteine Desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeria R; Turowski; Maria V.Busi; Diego F.Gomez-Casati

    2012-01-01

    AtNfs1 is the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial homolog of the bacterial cysteine desulfurases NifS and lscS,having an essential role in cellular Fe-S cluster assembly.Homology modeling of AtNfs1m predicts a high global similarity with E.coli IscS showing a full conservation of residues involved in the catalytic site,whereas the chloroplastic AtNfs2 is more similar to the Synechocystis sp.SufS.Pull-down assays showed that the recombinant mature form,AtNfs1m,specifically binds to Arabidopsis frataxin (AtFH).A hysteretic behavior,with a lag phase of several minutes,was observed and hysteretic parameters were affected by pre-incubation with AtFH.Moreover,AtFH modulates AtNfs1m kinetics,increasing Vmax and decreasing the S0.5 value for cysteine.Results suggest that AtFH plays an important role in the early steps of Fe-S cluster formation by regulating AtNfs1 activity in olant mitochondria.

  3. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  4. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the diffusi

  5. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  6. Purification and characterization of cysteine aminotransferase from rat liver cytosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Reiko

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine aminotransferase (L-cysteine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.3 was purified over 400-fold from the high-speed supernatant fraction of rat liver. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by gel filtration, isoelectric focusing and disc electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was about 74,000 by gel filtration and the isoelectric point was 6.2 (4 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed transamination between L-cysteine and 2-oxoglutarate and the reverse reaction. The optimum pH was 9.7. The Km value for L-cysteine was 22.2 mM, and that for 2-oxoglutaric acid was 0.06 mM. L-Aspartate was a potent inhibitor of the cysteine aminotransferase reaction. The enzyme was very active toward L-alanine 3-sulfinic acid at pH 8.0, and was also very active toward L-aspartic acid (Km = 1.6 mM. Ratios of activities for L-aspartic acid and L-cysteine were essentially constant during the purification of the enzyme. Evidence based on substrate specificity, enzyme inhibition, and physicochemical properties indicates that cytosolic cysteine aminotransferase is identical with cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase (L-aspartate: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1.

  7. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  8. Molecular cloning and analysis of Ancylostoma ceylanicum glutamate-cysteine ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Marcin; Lapiński, Maciej; Zdziarska, Anna; Długosz, Ewa; Bąska, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) is a heterodimer enzyme composed of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a modifier subunit (GCLM). This enzyme catalyses the synthesis of γ-glutamylcysteine, a precursor of glutathione. cDNAs of the putative glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (Ace-GCLC) and modifier subunits (Ace-GCLM) of Ancylostoma ceylanicum were cloned using the RACE-PCR amplification method. The Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm cDNAs encode proteins with 655 and 254 amino acids and calculated molecular masses of 74.76 and 28.51kDa, respectively. The Ace-GCLC amino acid sequence shares about 70% identity and 80% sequence similarity with orthologs in Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum, whereas the Ace-GCLM amino acid sequence has only about 30% sequence identity and 50% similarity to homologous proteins in those species. Real-time PCR analysis of mRNA expression in L3, serum stimulated L3 and adult stages of A. ceylanicum showed the highest level of Ace-GCLC and Ace-GCLM expression occurred in adult worms. No differences were detected among adult hookworms harvested 21 and 35dpi indicating expression of Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm in adult worms is constant during the course of infection. Positive interaction between two subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was detected using the yeast two-hybrid system, and by specific enzymatic reaction. Ace-GCL is an intracellular enzyme and is not exposed to the host immune system. Thus, as expected, we did not detect IgG antibodies against Ace-GCLC or Ace-GCLM on days 21, 60 and 120 of A. ceylanicum infection in hamsters. Furthermore, vaccination with one or both antigens did not reduce worm burdens, and resulted in no improvement of clinical parameters (hematocrit and hemoglobin) of infected hamsters. Therefore, due to the significant role of the enzyme in parasite metabolism, our analyses raises hope for the development of a successful new drug against ancylostomiasis based on the specific GCL inhibitor. PMID

  9. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  10. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  11. Designing Novel Synthetic Enzyme-Like Structures with Inducible Dynamic Catalytic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michelle Lillian

    Over the past three decades considerable efforts have been made to create synthetic versions of enzymes, sometimes called synzymes. Most have failed, and the few so-called successes are at best only marginal exhibiting properties that can barely be described as catalytic. While these synthetic nano-structures look similar to the enzyme active site, they do not have the unique mechanical or dynamic catalytic properties to transform a substrate molecule into the desired product molecule with turnover capability. In our study, a series of synzymes that mimics the active catalytic site of proteases which utilizes serine/hydroxyl, cysteine/sulfhydryl, histidine/imidazole and aspartate/carboxyl groups were designed and fabricated. The acetylation and the deacylation kinetics of the synzyme peptides were studied through molecular modeling and UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The intramolecular interactions of synzyme residues were measured with proton NMR. These synzymes were shown to be able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate esters and acetic anhydride. Synzymes with phenylalanines between the cysteine and histidine yield a significantly higher deacylation rate, suggesting that the large bulky R-groups of phenylalanine bends the backbone of the synzyme, thus bringing the cysteine thiol group and the histidine imidazole group closer for acetyl exchange. When oscillating pulse electric field was applied to the synzymes, an increase in acetylation rate is observed, suggesting the possibility that PEF treatment aids the electroconformation change of the synzyme during the catalysis process, which in turn increased its deacylation ability and turnover rate.

  12. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam;

    2012-01-01

    show that electron-deficient olefins, including acrylamides, can be tuned to react with cysteine thiols in a rapidly reversible manner. Installation of a nitrile group increased the olefins' intrinsic reactivity, but, paradoxically, eliminated the formation of irreversible adducts. Incorporation...

  13. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-11-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signaling including PR-gene expression. Therefore the inhibition of apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases by CC9 is essential to suppress host immunity during U. maydis infection. Here were present new experimental data on the cysteine protease-cystatin interaction and provide an in silco analysis of plant cystatins and the identified apoplastic cysteine proteases.

  14. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  15. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  16. Simultaneous Enrichment of Cysteine-containing Peptides and Phosphopeptides Using a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) in Combination with titanium dioxide (TiO2) Chromatography*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Honggang; Haar Petersen, Martin; Ibañez-Vea, Maria; Lassen, Pernille S.; Larsen, Martin R.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine is a rare and conserved amino acid involved in most cellular functions. The thiol group of cysteine can be subjected to diverse oxidative modifications that regulate many physio-pathological states. In the present work, a Cysteine-specific Phosphonate Adaptable Tag (CysPAT) was synthesized to selectively label cysteine-containing peptides (Cys peptides) followed by their enrichment with titanium dioxide (TiO2) and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The CysPAT strategy was developed using a synthetic peptide, a standard protein and subsequently the strategy was applied to protein lysates from Hela cells, achieving high specificity and enrichment efficiency. In particular, for Cys proteome analysis, the method led to the identification of 7509 unique Cys peptides from 500 μg of HeLa cell lysate starting material. Furthermore, the method was developed to simultaneously enrich Cys peptides and phosphorylated peptides. This strategy was applied to SILAC labeled Hela cells subjected to 5 min epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. In total, 10440 unique reversibly modified Cys peptides (3855 proteins) and 7339 unique phosphopeptides (2234 proteins) were simultaneously identified from 250 μg starting material. Significant regulation was observed in both phosphorylation and reversible Cys modification of proteins involved in EGFR signaling. Our data indicates that EGF stimulation can activate the well-known phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream signaling molecules, such as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK1 and MAPK3), however, it also leads to substantial modulation of reversible cysteine modifications in numerous proteins. Several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) showed a reduction of the catalytic Cys site in the conserved putative phosphatase HC(X)5R motif indicating an activation and subsequent de-phosphorylation of proteins involved in the EGF signaling pathway. Overall, the CysPAT strategy is a straight forward, easy and promising

  17. Cysteine homeostasis plays an essential role in plant immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Consolación; Bermúdez, M Ángeles; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine is the metabolic precursor of essential biomolecules such as vitamins, cofactors, antioxidants and many defense compounds. The last step of cysteine metabolism is catalysed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), which incorporates reduced sulfur into O-acetylserine to produce cysteine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the main OASTL isoform OAS-A1 and the cytosolic desulfhydrase DES1, which degrades cysteine, contribute to the cytosolic cysteine homeostasis. • Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of knockout plants for OAS-A1 and for DES1 show a high correlation with the biotic stress series in both cases. • The study of the response of knockout mutants to plant pathogens shows that des1 mutants behave as constitutive systemic acquired resistance mutants, with high resistance to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, salicylic acid accumulation and WRKY54 and PR1 induction, while oas-a1 knockout mutants are more sensitive to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. However, oas-a1 knockout mutants lack the hypersensitive response associated with the effector-triggered immunity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 avrRpm1. • Our results highlight the role of cysteine as a crucial metabolite in the plant immune response.

  18. Effects of a Buried Cysteine-To-Serine Mutation on Yeast Triosephosphate Isomerase Structure and Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Santoyo, Alejandra; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Reyes-López, César A.; González-Mondragón, Edith; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2012-01-01

    All the members of the triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) family possess a cystein residue (Cys126) located near the catalytically essential Glu165. The evolutionarily conserved Cys126, however, does not seem to play a significant role in the catalytic activity. On the other hand, substitution of this residue by other amino acid residues destabilizes the dimeric enzyme, especially when Cys is replaced by Ser. In trying to assess the origin of this destabilization we have determined the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TIM (ScTIM) at 1.86 Å resolution in the presence of PGA, which is only bound to one subunit. Comparisons of the wild type and mutant structures reveal that a change in the orientation of the Ser hydroxyl group, with respect to the Cys sulfhydryl group, leads to penetration of water molecules and apparent destabilization of residues 132–138. The latter results were confirmed by means of Molecular Dynamics, which showed that this region, in the mutated enzyme, collapses at about 70 ns. PMID:22949845

  19. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  20. Mutant form C115H of Clostridium sporogenes methionine γ-lyase efficiently cleaves S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to antibacterial thiosulfinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikova, Vitalia V; Anufrieva, Natalya V; Revtovich, Svetlana V; Chernov, Alexander S; Telegin, Georgii B; Morozova, Elena A; Demidkina, Tatyana V

    2016-10-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent methionine γ-lyase (MGL) catalyzes the β-elimination reaction of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides to thiosulfinates, which possess antimicrobial activity. Partial inactivation of the enzyme in the course of the reaction occurs due to oxidation of active site cysteine 115 conserved in bacterial MGLs. In this work, the C115H mutant form of Clostridium sporogenes MGL was prepared and the steady-state kinetic parameters of the enzyme were determined. The substitution results in an increase in the catalytic efficiency of the mutant form towards S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides compared to the wild type enzyme. We used a sulfoxide/enzyme system to generate antibacterial activity in situ. Two-component systems composed of the mutant enzyme and three S-substituted l-cysteine sulfoxides were demonstrated to be effective against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and three clinical isolates from mice. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):830-835, 2016.

  1. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  2. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  3. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  4. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  5. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come.

  6. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  7. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  8. Biochemical Properties of Cysteine Desulfurase and Its Mechanism for the Desulfuration of L-Cysteine%半胱氨酸脱硫酶的生化特性及其脱硫作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭加平; 韦平和; 周锡樑

    2011-01-01

    半胱氨酸脱硫酶是一类依赖磷酸吡哆醛的酶,为同质二聚体,能催化L-半胱氨酸脱硫生成L-丙氨酸和硫.NifS首先在棕色固氮菌中发现,并被认为在固氮酶铁硫簇的形成中起重要作用.NifS同系物也存在于许多非固氮的原核及真核生物中,它们在分子质量、分光光度特性、底物选择性、氨基酸序列和生物学功能等方面非常相似.根据氨基酸序列的相似性,将NifS同系物分成二组,Ⅰ组包括NifS和IscS等,Ⅱ组包括CSD和CsdB等.半胱氨酸脱硫酶均具有保守的赖氨酸和半胱氨酸残基,前者与PLP形成Schiff碱,后者参与半胱氨酸过硫化物中间物形成.半胱氨酸脱硫酶的作用机理涉及半胱氨酸残基亲核攻击底物L-半胱氨酸上的巯基,形成与酶结合的半胱氨酸过硫化物中间物,该过硫化物中间物作为供硫体,参与生物素、硫胺素、钼碟呤以及铁硫簇、硫代核苷等含硫分子的生物合成.%Cysteine desulfurases are pyridoxal phosphate dependent homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the desulfuration of L-cyste-ine to yield L-alanine and free sulfur. The enzyme NifS was first identified in Azotobacter vinelandii, indicating that it might serve a general role in the formation of Fe-S clusters in nitrogenase. NifS homologs also occur in many nondiazotrophic prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and they are very similar in molecular weight, spectrophotometric property, substrate specificity, amino acid sequence, and function to the A. Vinelandii NifS. On the basis of sequence similarity relationships, the NifS homologs are divided into groups I and II. NifS and IscS are group I enzymes, whereas CSD and CsdB are members of group II. All cysteine desulfurases contain a conserved lysine that forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor in the resting state and a conserved catalytic cysteine involved in transient persulfide formation. The mechanism for desulfuration of L-cysteine catalyzed by cysteine

  9. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  10. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  11. Orchestrating redox signaling networks through regulatory cysteine switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Candice E; Carroll, Kate S

    2010-01-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) acts as a second messenger that can mediate intracellular signal transduction via chemoselective oxidation of cysteine residues in signaling proteins. This Review presents current mechanistic insights into signal-mediated H(2)O(2) production and highlights recent advances in methods to detect reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cysteine oxidation both in vitro and in cells. Selected examples from the recent literature are used to illustrate the diverse mechanisms by which H(2)O(2) can regulate protein function. The continued development of methods to detect and quantify discrete cysteine oxoforms should further our mechanistic understanding of redox regulation of protein function and may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  12. Phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase, a near-universal lyase for cysteine-84-binding sites in cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kai-Hong; Su, Ping; Tu, Jun-Ming; Wang, Xing; Liu, Hui; Plöscher, Matthias; Eichacker, Lutz; Yang, Bei; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo

    2007-09-01

    Phycobilisomes, the light-harvesting complexes of cyanobacteria and red algae, contain two to four types of chromophores that are attached covalently to seven or more members of a family of homologous proteins, each carrying one to four binding sites. Chromophore binding to apoproteins is catalyzed by lyases, of which only few have been characterized in detail. The situation is complicated by nonenzymatic background binding to some apoproteins. Using a modular multiplasmidic expression-reconstitution assay in Escherichia coli with low background binding, phycobilin:cystein-84 biliprotein lyase (CpeS1) from Anabaena PCC7120, has been characterized as a nearly universal lyase for the cysteine-84-binding site that is conserved in all biliproteins. It catalyzes covalent attachment of phycocyanobilin to all allophycocyanin subunits and to cysteine-84 in the beta-subunits of C-phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin. Together with the known lyases, it can thereby account for chromophore binding to all binding sites of the phycobiliproteins of Anabaena PCC7120. Moreover, it catalyzes the attachment of phycoerythrobilin to cysteine-84 of both subunits of C-phycoerythrin. The only exceptions not served by CpeS1 among the cysteine-84 sites are the alpha-subunits from phycocyanin and phycoerythrocyanin, which, by sequence analyses, have been defined as members of a subclass that is served by the more specialized E/F type lyases.

  13. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  14. A catalytic cracking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, T.F.; Helton, T.E.

    1995-07-20

    Heavy oils are subjected to catalytic cracking in the absence of added hydrogen using a catalyst containing a zeolite having the structure of ZSM-12 and a large-pore crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index less than about 1. The process is able to effect a bulk conversion of the oil at the same time yielding a higher octane gasoline and increased light olefin content. (author)

  15. Catalytic combustion of methane by perovskite-type oxide nanoparticles as pollution prevention strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, F.; Luisetto, I.; Serra, E.; Tuti, S.; Pasquali, M.

    2016-06-01

    The transition from the existing brown economy towards the desired green economy drives the research efforts to the development of advanced technologies promoting the efficient utilization of energy sources. Catalysis science offers to combustion technology significant opportunity to increase the fuel efficiency by lowering the internal temperature gradients and reduce the environmental impact by lowering local peak temperature and, consequently, thermodynamically inhibiting the nitrogen oxides formation. Alternative catalytic materials are transition metals oxide, including complex oxides with perovskite crystalline structure. The aim of this work is to synthetize lanthanum ferrite perovskites with lanthanum ions partially substituted by strontium ions in order to study the substitution effects on structural properties and redox activity of the original oxide. Lanthanum ferrite oxides partially substituted with different Strontium amount were synthesized by solution combustion method. The perovskite nanopowders obtained were characterized by XRD, SEM, TPR analyses for defining crystalline structure, morphology and redox properties. Finally, the catalytic activity for methane combustion was tested. The most performing catalysts was La0.6Sr0.4FeO3 having the highest oxygen vacancy concentration as revealed by TPR analysis.

  16. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts—this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity.

  17. Crystal structure and catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal kinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meong Il; Hong, Minsun

    2016-09-01

    Pyridoxal kinase is a ubiquitous enzyme essential for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) homeostasis since PLP is required for the catalytic activity of a variety of PLP-dependent enzymes involved in amino acid, lipid, and sugar metabolism as well as neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Previously, two catalytic mechanisms were proposed with regard to Pdx kinases, in which either the aspartate or the cysteine residue is involved as a catalytic residue. Because the Pdx kinase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaPdxK) contains both residues, the catalytic mechanism of PaPdxK remains elusive. To elucidate the substrate-recognition and catalytic mechanisms of PaPdxK, the crystal structure of PaPdxK was determined at a 2.0 Å resolution. The PaPdxK structure possesses a channel that can accommodate substrates and a metallic cofactor. Our structure-based biochemical and mutational analyses in combination with modeling studies suggest that PaPdxK catalysis is mediated by an acid-base mechanism through the catalytic acid Asp225 and a helical dipole moment. PMID:27425248

  18. Bioactivation of cysteine conjugates of 1-nitropyrene oxides by cysteine conjugate beta-lyase purified from Peptostreptococcus magnus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, K; Kinouchi, T; Akimoto, S; Ohnishi, Y

    1995-01-01

    To determine the role of cysteine conjugate beta-lyase (beta-lyase) in the metabolism of mutagenic nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, we determined the effect of beta-lyase on the mutagenicities and DNA binding of cysteine conjugates of 4,5-epoxy-4,5-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 4,5-oxide) and 9,10-epoxy-9,10-dihydro-1-nitropyrene (1-NP 9,10-oxide), which are detoxified metabolites of the mutagenic compound 1-nitropyrene. We purified beta-lyase from Peptostreptococcus magnus GAI0663, since...

  19. DISULFIND: A DISULFIDE BONDING STATE AND CYSTEINE CONNECTIVITY PREDICTION SERVER

    OpenAIRE

    Ceroni, A; Passerini, A.; Vullo,A; Frasconi, P.

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at .

  20. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved in...

  1. Structure and Reactivity of the Cysteine Methyl Ester Radical Cation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osburn, S.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.; O' Hair, R. A. J.; Van Stipdonk, M.; Ryzhov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The structure and reactivity of the cysteine methyl ester radical cation, CysOMe(center dot+), have been examined in the gas phase using a combination of experiment and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. CysOMe(center dot+) undergoes rapid ion molecule reactions with dimethyl disulfide, a

  2. Chloro(triphenylphosphole)gold(I) - A selective Chemosensor for Cysteine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Photophysical studies of luminescent gold complex of triphenylphosphole has been described. Addition of biologically relevant thio compounds was found to quench its fluorescence in methanol solution. Based on this, a simple and selective luminescence sensing method for cysteine detection has been developed.

  3. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-01-01

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers. PMID:27501061

  4. Cysteine catabolism: a novel metabolic pathway contributing to glioblastoma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Antony; Sarcar, Bhaswati; Kahali, Soumen; Yuan, Zhigang; Johnson, Joseph J; Adam, Klaus-Peter; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Chinnaiyan, Prakash

    2014-02-01

    The relevance of cysteine metabolism in cancer has gained considerable interest in recent years, largely focusing on its role in generating the antioxidant glutathione. Through metabolomic profiling using a combination of high-throughput liquid and gas chromatography-based mass spectrometry on a total of 69 patient-derived glioma specimens, this report documents the discovery of a parallel pathway involving cysteine catabolism that results in the accumulation of cysteine sulfinic acid (CSA) in glioblastoma. These studies identified CSA to rank as one of the top metabolites differentiating glioblastoma from low-grade glioma. There was strong intratumoral concordance of CSA levels with expression of its biosynthetic enzyme cysteine dioxygenase 1 (CDO1). Studies designed to determine the biologic consequence of this metabolic pathway identified its capacity to inhibit oxidative phosphorylation in glioblastoma cells, which was determined by decreased cellular respiration, decreased ATP production, and increased mitochondrial membrane potential following pathway activation. CSA-induced attenuation of oxidative phosphorylation was attributed to inhibition of the regulatory enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase. Studies performed in vivo abrogating the CDO1/CSA axis using a lentiviral-mediated short hairpin RNA approach resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition in a glioblastoma mouse model, supporting the potential for this metabolic pathway to serve as a therapeutic target. Collectively, we identified a novel, targetable metabolic pathway involving cysteine catabolism contributing to the growth of aggressive high-grade gliomas. These findings serve as a framework for future investigations designed to more comprehensively determine the clinical application of this metabolic pathway and its contributory role in tumorigenesis.

  5. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M;

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences...... its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated...... by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1...

  6. Assay of Cysteine in Human Serum with Quinine-Ce4+ Chemiluminescence System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for the determination of cysteine. This method is based on that the weak CL of cysteine oxidized with cerium (IV) can be greatly enhanced by quinine, and the total cysteine in human serum can be detected through simply diluting with water, showing a simpler analytical characteristic.

  7. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  8. Proteolytic Activation of the Essential Parasitophorous Vacuole Cysteine Protease SERA6 Accompanies Malaria Parasite Egress from Its Host Erythrocyte*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruecker, Andrea; Shea, Michael; Hackett, Fiona; Suarez, Catherine; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Milutinovic, Katarina; Withers-Martinez, Chrislaine; Blackman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV). The PV and host cell membranes eventually rupture, releasing merozoites in a process called egress. Certain inhibitors of serine and cysteine proteases block egress, indicating a crucial role for proteases. The Plasmodium falciparum genome encodes nine serine-repeat antigens (SERAs), each of which contains a central domain homologous to the papain-like (clan CA, family C1) protease family. SERA5 and SERA6 are indispensable in blood-stage parasites, but the function of neither is known. Here we show that SERA6 localizes to the PV where it is precisely cleaved just prior to egress by an essential serine protease called PfSUB1. Mutations that replace the predicted catalytic Cys of SERA6, or that block SERA6 processing by PfSUB1, could not be stably introduced into the parasite genomic sera6 locus, indicating that SERA6 is an essential enzyme and that processing is important for its function. We demonstrate that cleavage of SERA6 by PfSUB1 converts it to an active cysteine protease. Our observations reveal a proteolytic activation step in the malarial PV that may be required for release of the parasite from its host erythrocyte. PMID:22984267

  9. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  10. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure

  11. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of l-Cysteine Metabolism: Physiological Role and Fate of l-Cysteine in the Enteric Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT l-Cysteine is essential for virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Besides having a role in the synthesis of virtually all proteins and of taurine, cysteamine, glutathione, and other redox-regulating proteins, l-cysteine has important functions under anaerobic/microaerophilic conditions. In anaerobic or microaerophilic protozoan parasites, such as Entamoeba histolytica, l-cysteine has been implicated in growth, attachment, survival, and protection from ox...

  12. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  13. Heterologous expression and purification of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    The mobilization of protein during germination of barley seeds is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction...... of the active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. The barley key cysteine protease, endoprotease...

  14. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  15. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  16. Identification of essential residues in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. Chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of cysteine and histidine residues in enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Gravel, M; Gao, E; O'Neill, R C; Braun, P E

    2001-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP; EC ) catalyzes in vitro hydrolysis of 3'-phosphodiester bonds in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides to produce 2'-nucleotides exclusively. N-terminal deletion mapping of the C-terminal two-thirds of recombinant rat CNP1 identified a region that possesses the catalytic domain, with further truncations abolishing activity. Proteolysis and kinetic analysis indicated that this domain forms a compact globular structure and contains all of the catalytically essential features. Subsequently, this catalytic fragment of CNP1 (CNP-CF) was used for chemical modification studies to identify amino acid residues essential for activity. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification studies and kinetic analysis of cysteine CNP-CF mutants revealed the nonessential role of cysteines for enzymatic activity. On the other hand, modification studies with diethyl pyrocarbonate indicated that two histidines are essential for CNPase activity. Consequently, the only two conserved histidines, His-230 and His-309, were mutated to phenylalanine and leucine. All four histidine mutants had k(cat) values 1000-fold lower than wild-type CNP-CF, but K(m) values were similar. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated that the low catalytic activities of the histidine mutants were not due to gross changes in secondary structure. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both histidines assume critical roles for catalysis. PMID:11278504

  17. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  18. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  19. Discovering mechanisms of signaling-mediated cysteine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Leslie B; Nelson, Kimberly J

    2008-02-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals hydrogen peroxide as a key player both as a damaging agent and, from emerging evidence over the past decade, as a second messenger in intracellular signaling. This rather mild oxidant acts upon downstream targets within signaling cascades to modulate the activity of a host of enzymes (e.g. phosphatases and kinases) and transcriptional regulators through chemoselective oxidation of cysteine residues. With the recent development of specific detection reagents for hydrogen peroxide and new chemical tools to detect the generation of the initial oxidation product, sulfenic acid, on reactive cysteines within target proteins, the scene is set to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms through which hydrogen peroxide acts as a second messenger in cell signaling.

  20. DNA repair and redox activities and inhibitors of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1): a comparative analysis and their scope and limitations toward anticancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Cholia, Ravi P; Mantha, Anil K; Kumar, Raj

    2014-12-26

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox effector factor 1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in DNA repair and activation of transcription factors through its redox function. The evolutionarily conserved C- and N-termini are involved in these functions independently. It is also reported that the activity of APE1/Ref-1 abruptly increases several-fold in various human cancers. The control over the outcomes of these two functions is emerging as a new strategy to combine enhanced DNA damage and chemotherapy in order to tackle the major hurdle of increased cancer cell growth and proliferation. Studies have targeted these two domains individually for the design and development of inhibitors for APE1/Ref-1. Here, we have made, for the first time, an attempt at a comparative analysis of APE1/Ref-1 inhibitors that target both DNA repair and redox activities simultaneously. We further discuss their scope and limitations with respect to the development of potential anticancer agents.

  1. Discovering mechanisms of signaling-mediated cysteine oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Poole, Leslie B.; Kimberly J Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating evidence reveals hydrogen peroxide as a key player both as a damaging agent and, from emerging evidence over the last decade, as a second messenger in intracellular signaling. This rather mild oxidant acts upon downstream targets within signaling cascades to modulate the activity of a host of enzymes (e.g. phosphatases and kinases) and transcriptional regulators through chemoselective oxidation of cysteine residues. With the recent development of specific detection reagents for h...

  2. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  3. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoruiko, A N [G.K. Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  4. Plant collagenase: unique collagenolytic activity of cysteine proteases from ginger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Misook; Hamilton, Susan E; Guddat, Luke W; Overall, Christopher M

    2007-12-01

    Two cysteine proteases, GP2 and GP3, have been isolated from ginger rhizomes (Zingiber officinale). GP2 is virtually identical to a previously identified ginger protease GPII [K.H. Choi, and R.A. Laursen, Amino-acid sequence and glycan structures of cysteine proteases with proline specificity from ginger rhizome Zingiber officinale, Eur. J. Biochem. 267 (2000) 1516-1526.], and cleaves native type I collagen at multiple discrete sites, which are in the interior of the triple helical region of this molecule. In reaction with proline-containing peptides GP2 shows preference for Pro in the P2 position, and at least 10-fold higher efficiency of hydrolysis than papain. Comparison of models of GP2 and GP3 with the crystal structure of papain shows that the three enzymes have different S2 pocket structures. The S2 pocket in GP2 and GP3 is half the size of that of papain. GP2 is the only reported plant cysteine protease with a demonstrated ability to hydrolyse native collagen. The results support a role for ginger proteases as an alternative to papain, in commercial applications such as meat tenderization, where collagen is the target substrate. PMID:17920199

  5. Coordination behavior of ligand based on NNS and NNO donors with ruthenium(III) complexes and their catalytic and DNA interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, R.; Viswnathamurthi, P.

    2012-11-01

    Reactions of 2-acetylpyridine-thiosemicarbazone HL1, 2-acetylpyridine-4-methyl-thiosemicarbazone HL2, 2-acetylpyridine-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone HL3 and 2-acetylpyridine-semicarbazone HL4 with ruthenium(III) precursor complexes were studied and the products were characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, EPR and EI-MS) methods. The ligands coordinated with the ruthenium(III) ion via pyridine nitrogen, azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur/enolate oxygen. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the complexes based on the studies. All the complexes are redox active and display an irreversible and quasireversible metal centered redox processes. Further, the catalytic activity of the new complexes has been investigated for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones in the presence of isopropanol/KOH and the Kumada-Corriu coupling of aryl halides with aryl Grignard reagents. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  6. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  7. Evidence for several cysteine transport mechanisms in the mitochondrial membranes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Pong; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine is essential for many mitochondrial processes in plants, including translation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and cyanide detoxification. Its biosynthesis is carried out by serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine (thiol) lyase (OAS-TL) which can be found in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria. Mutants lacking one compartment-specific OAS-TL isoform show viable phenotypes, leading to the hypothesis that the organellar membranes are permeable to substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. In this report, we show that exogenouslly supplied [(35)S]cysteine accumulates in the mitochondrial fraction and is taken up into isolated mitochondria for in organello protein synthesis. Analysis of cysteine uptake by isolated mitochondria and mitoplasts indicates that cysteine is transported by multiple facilitated mechanisms that operate in a concentration gradient-dependent manner. In addition, cysteine uptake is dependent mainly on the ΔpH across the inner membrane. The rates of mitochondrial cysteine transport can be mildly altered by specific metabolites in the cyanide detoxification-linked sulfide oxidation, but not by most substrates and products of the cysteine biosynthetic pathway. Based on these results, we propose that the transport of cysteine plays a pivotal role in regulating cellular cysteine biosynthesis as well as modulating the availability of sulfur for mitochondrial metabolism.

  8. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  9. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  10. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  11. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn 175 in plant thiol protease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas K Nandi; Hridoy R Bairagya; Bishnu P Mukhopadhyay; K Sekar; Dipankar Sukul; Asim K Bera

    2009-03-01

    The role of invariant water molecules in the activity of plant cysteine protease is ubiquitous in nature. On analysing the 11 different Protein DataBank (PDB) structures of plant thiol proteases, the two invariant water molecules W1 and W2 (W220 and W222 in the template 1PPN structure) were observed to form H-bonds with the Ob atom of Asn 175. Extensive energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation studies up to 2 ns on all the PDB and solvated structures clearly revealed the involvement of the H-bonding association of the two water molecules in fixing the orientation of the asparagine residue of the catalytic triad. From this study, it is suggested that H-bonding of the water molecule at the W1 invariant site better stabilizes the Asn residue at the active site of the catalytic triad.

  12. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  13. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪文明; 王梓坤

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brown-ian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d = 3.

  14. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  15. Cysteine 904 is required for maximal insulin degrading enzyme activity and polyanion activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available Cysteine residues in insulin degrading enzyme have been reported as non-critical for its activity. We found that converting the twelve cysteine residues in rat insulin degrading enzyme (IDE to serines resulted in a cysteine-free form of the enzyme with reduced activity and decreased activation by polyanions. Mutation of each cysteine residue individually revealed cysteine 904 as the key residue required for maximal activity and polyanion activation, although other cysteines affect polyanion binding to a lesser extent. Based on the structure of IDE, Asn 575 was identified as a potential hydrogen bond partner for Cys904 and mutation of this residue also reduced activity and decreased polyanion activation. The oligomerization state of IDE did not correlate with its activity, with the dimer being the predominant form in all the samples examined. These data suggest that there are several conformational states of the dimer that affect activity and polyanion activation.

  16. Biosynthesis and Reactivity of Cysteine Persulfides in Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pramod K; Martinov, Michael; Vitvitsky, Victor; Seravalli, Javier; Wedmann, Rudolf; Filipovic, Milos R; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-13

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) elicits pleiotropic physiological effects ranging from modulation of cardiovascular to CNS functions. A dominant method for transmission of sulfide-based signals is via posttranslational modification of reactive cysteine thiols to persulfides. However, the source of the persulfide donor and whether its relationship to H2S is as a product or precursor is controversial. The transsulfuration pathway enzymes can synthesize cysteine persulfide (Cys-SSH) from cystine and H2S from cysteine and/or homocysteine. Recently, Cys-SSH was proposed as the primary product of the transsulfuration pathway with H2S representing a decomposition product of Cys-SSH. Our detailed kinetic analyses demonstrate a robust capacity for Cys-SSH production by the human transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine beta-synthase and γ-cystathionase (CSE) and for homocysteine persulfide synthesis from homocystine by CSE only. However, in the reducing cytoplasmic milieu where the concentration of reduced thiols is significantly higher than of disulfides, substrate level regulation favors the synthesis of H2S over persulfides. Mathematical modeling at physiologically relevant hepatic substrate concentrations predicts that H2S rather than Cys-SSH is the primary product of the transsulfuration enzymes with CSE being the dominant producer. The half-life of the metastable Cys-SSH product is short and decomposition leads to a mixture of polysulfides (Cys-S-(S)n-S-Cys). These in vitro data, together with the intrinsic reactivity of Cys-SSH for cysteinyl versus sulfur transfer, are consistent with the absence of an observable increase in protein persulfidation in cells in response to exogenous cystine and evidence for the formation of polysulfides under these conditions. PMID:26667407

  17. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling sys...

  18. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is ...

  19. Functional contribution of cysteine residues to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope.

    OpenAIRE

    Tschachler, E; Buchow, H; Gallo, R C; Reitz, M S

    1990-01-01

    Although the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 shows considerable strain variability, cysteine residues of the envelope protein are strongly conserved, suggesting that they are important to the envelope structure. We constructed and analyzed mutants of a biologically active molecular clone of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in which different cysteines were replaced by other amino acids in order to determine their functional importance. Substitution of cysteines 296 and...

  20. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Gibson, Bradford W.; Andersen, Julie K.

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in muri...

  1. A novel cysteine desulfurase influencing organosulfur compounds in Lentinula edodes

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liu; Xiao-Yu Lei; Lian-Fu Chen; Yin-Bing Bian; Hong Yang; Ibrahim, Salam A.; Wen Huang

    2015-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds are the basis for the unique aroma of Lentinula edodes, and cysteine sulfoxide lyase (C-S lyase) is the key enzyme in this trait. The enzyme from Alliium sativum has been crystallized and well-characterized; however, there have been no reports of the characterization of fungi C-S lyase at the molecular level. We identified a L. edodes C-S lyase (Lecsl), cloned a gene of Csl encoded Lecsl and then combined modeling, simulations, and experiments to understand the molecula...

  2. Characterization of Cysteine Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Ahmadi; Ning Gu; Hamid Reza Madaah Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a kind of stabilized ferrofluid based on magnetite nanoparticles (mean core and its coating size about 21.9 and 1.6 nm, respectively) was synthesized via coprecipitation method. Cysteine was used as surfactant due to its proper conjunction to the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. Coating density and synthesized ferrofluids were characterized by using transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, dynamic light scattering and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the synthesized ferrofluid can be used as a potential contrast enhancement agent especially for imaging lymphatic system.

  3. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS FOR METAL BINDING CAPACITY OF CYSTEINE BY USING UV-VIS SPECTROPHOTOMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivendu Ranjan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The metal binding capacity of cysteine with three different metals Nickel, Copper and Lead was studied using UV-Vis spectrophotometer for which absorbance values were taken after interaction of cysteine with metal salt solutions (10ppm and 100ppm. Before taking above absorbance dilution factor was set using cysteine stock. The increase in peak intensity was observed when metal salt solution and metal saltcysteine solution were compared. Based on peak shift and peak intensity finally it can be concluded that the binding capacity of cysteine with Nickel is more, followed by lead and copper. The normal chromophore activity in cysteine is due to the sulphur in which the transition takes place from non bonding orbital’s to the excited antibonding orbital in the range of 210-215nm range. The binding of the metals with cysteine may affect the chromophore activity and may also lead to structural damage of the chromophore. This can give the decrease in the peak intensity or the complete shift in the peak. These results suggest that cysteine metal binding ability can be used for the removal of the metals in water purification. Also this property can be used in removal of metals from our body considering the fact that cysteine may not show adverse effect in the system. So we can go for designing a new type of drug containing cysteine which helps to prevent the accumulation of such metals and thus prevent us from adverse effect.

  4. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinde Zheng; Tony Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Pink1,a mitochondrial kinase,and Parkin,an E3 ubiquitin ligase,function in mitochondrial maintenance.Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria,where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-1inked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy.Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 iigase family.Recently,it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine-ubiquitin enzyme intermediate,in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases.However,direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing.Here,we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteinemediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy.Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S)traps ubiquitin,and surprisingly,also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation,indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation.We found that Parkin can bind to K63-1inked ubiquitin chains,and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization.We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism.

  5. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Pink1, a mitochondrial kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, function in mitochondrial maintenance. Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria, where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-linked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy. Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 ligase family. Recently, it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine∼ubiquitin enzyme intermediate, in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases. However, direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing. Here, we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteine-mediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy. Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S) traps ubiquitin, and surprisingly, also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation, indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation. We found that Parkin can bind to K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization. We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism. PMID:23670163

  6. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Jaspreet S; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K; Burchmore, Richard J; Coombs, Graham H; Schnaufer, Achim; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His(99) and Cys(136)), and an Asp (Asp(134)) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  7. Functional significance of glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier for erythrocyte survival in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, M; Harris, I S; Elia, A; John, R; Lang, F; Kavanagh, T J; Mak, T W

    2013-10-01

    Erythrocytes endure constant exposure to oxidative stress. The major oxidative stress scavenger in erythrocytes is glutathione. The rate-limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis is glutamate-cysteine ligase, which consists of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a modifier subunit (GCLM). Here, we examined erythrocyte survival in GCLM-deficient (gclm(-/-)) mice. Erythrocytes from gclm(-/-) mice showed greatly reduced intracellular glutathione. Prolonged incubation resulted in complete lysis of gclm(-/-) erythrocytes, which could be reversed by exogenous delivery of the antioxidant Trolox. To test the importance of GCLM in vivo, mice were treated with phenylhydrazine (PHZ; 0.07 mg/g b.w.) to induce oxidative stress. Gclm(-/-) mice showed dramatically increased hemolysis compared with gclm(+/+) controls. In addition, PHZ-treated gclm(-/-) mice displayed markedly larger accumulations of injured erythrocytes in the spleen than gclm(+/+) mice within 24 h of treatment. Iron staining indicated precipitations of the erythrocyte-derived pigment hemosiderin in kidney tubules of gclm(-/-) mice and none in gclm(+/+) controls. In fact, 24 h after treatment, kidney function began to diminish in gclm(-/-) mice as evident from increased serum creatinine and urea. Consequently, while all PHZ-treated gclm(+/+) mice survived, 90% of PHZ-treated gclm(-/-) mice died within 5 days of treatment. In vitro, upon incubation in the absence or presence of additional oxidative stress, gclm(-/-) erythrocytes exposed significantly more phosphatidylserine, a cell death marker, than gclm(+/+) erythrocytes, an effect at least partially due to increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. Under resting conditions, gclm(-/-) mice exhibited reticulocytosis, indicating that the enhanced erythrocyte death was offset by accelerated erythrocyte generation. GCLM is thus indispensable for erythrocyte survival, in vitro and in vivo, during oxidative stress.

  8. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  9. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  10. Hydrogen bonding to the cysteine ligand of superoxide reductase: acid-base control of the reaction intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremey, Emilie; Bonnot, Florence; Moreau, Yohann; Berthomieu, Catherine; Desbois, Alain; Favaudon, Vincent; Blondin, Geneviève; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Nivière, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron metalloenzyme that detoxifies superoxide radical in microorganisms. Its active site consists of an unusual non-heme Fe(2+) center in a [His4Cys1] square pyramidal pentacoordination, with the axial cysteine ligand proposed to be an essential feature in catalysis. Two NH peptide groups from isoleucine 118 and histidine 119 establish hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand (Desulfoarculus baarsii SOR numbering). To investigate the catalytic role of these hydrogen bonds, the isoleucine 118 residue of the SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii was mutated into alanine, aspartate, or serine residues. Resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the mutations specifically induced an increase of the strength of the Fe(3+)-S(Cys) and S-Cβ(Cys) bonds as well as a change in conformation of the cysteinyl side chain, which was associated with the alteration of the NH hydrogen bonding involving the sulfur ligand. The effects of the isoleucine mutations on the reactivity of SOR with O2 (•-) were investigated by pulse radiolysis. These studies showed that the mutations induced a specific increase of the pK a of the first reaction intermediate, recently proposed to be an Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) species. These data were supported by density functional theory calculations conducted on three models of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) intermediate, with one, two, or no hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand. Our results demonstrated that the hydrogen bonds between the NH (peptide) and the cysteine ligand tightly control the rate of protonation of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) reaction intermediate to form an Fe(3+)-OOH species. PMID:23917995

  11. Density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visser, Sam; Quesne, Matthew; Ward, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical versus electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism.

  12. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  13. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  15. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  16. RhCl(PPh3)3-mediated C-H oxyfunctionalization of pyrrolido-functionalized bisazoaromatic pincers: a combined experimental and theoretical scrutiny of redox-active and spectroscopic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorui, Tapas; Roy, Sima; Pramanik, Shuvam; Pramanik, Kausikisankar

    2016-04-01

    A potentially symmetrical NNN pyrrolido-functionalized pincer ligand, HL = 2,5-bis(phenylazo)-1H-pyrrole, reacts with [Rh(I)Cl(PPh3)3] in toluene in the presence of air, affording an emerald crystalline solid of the composition [Rh(III)(L(O))Cl(PPh3)2]. A spontaneous C-H oxyfunctionalization of the aromatic ring with atmospheric oxygen leads to phenoxido functionalized organic transformation at room temperature. X-ray diffraction and MASS spectral analyses authenticate the unsymmetrical NNO coordination of the title ligand with a dangling phenylazo moiety. Cyclic voltammetry of redox innocent Rh(iii) complexes exhibits a reversible oxidative response at E1/2≈ 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl along with a quasi-reversible reductive response near -1.0 V. The electronic structures of the electro-active species are scrutinized by DFT calculations at the B3LYP-level of theory and both the responses are found to be ligand-centered (LC) in nature. Furthermore, an EPR study of the one-electron oxidized radical cation [Rh(III)(L(O))Cl(PPh3)2]˙(+) validates that the oxidation process is confined exclusively on the ligand framework (spin density: ρPhenoxido≈-0.50 and ρPyrrolido≈-0.40). Moreover, an appreciable involvement of the pyrrolido function apart from the phenoxido group of the redox-active ligand (L(O)) is apparent in the oxidation process from the nature of HOMO and thus, this type of ligand system provides two oxidizable domains within the single ligand backbone. A comparison of the relative oxidizability power between the two potential oxidizable centers viz. pyrrolido and phenoxido rings reveals that the former is somewhat less efficient for oxidation. In contrast, reductive response is mainly associated with both the coordinated and free azo chromophores. Time-dependent DFT and natural transition orbital (NTO) analyses on the complexes elucidate the origin of UV-vis absorptions. PMID:26931368

  17. Triple-stranded helicates of zinc(II) and cadmium(II) involving a new redox-active multiring nitrogenous heterocyclic ligand: synthesis, structure, and electrochemical and photophysical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Nabanita; Abtab, Sk Md Towsif; Kundu, Sanchita; Endo, Akira; Teat, Simon J; Chaudhury, Muktimoy

    2012-02-20

    The protonated form [H(2)(L)](CF(3)SO(3))(2) (1) of a new redox-active bis-bidentate nitrogenous heterocyclic ligand, viz., 3,3'-dipyridin-2-yl[1,1']bi[imidazo[1,5-a]pyridinyl] (L), and its zinc(II) and cadmium(II) complexes (2 and 3) have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. In the solid state, both 2 and 3 have triple-stranded helical structures involving ligands that experience twisting and bending to the extent needed by the stereoelectronic demand of the central metal ion. The metal centers in the zinc(II) complex [Zn(2)(L)(3)](ClO(4))(4) (2) are equivalent, each having a distorted octahedral geometry, flattened along the C(3) axis with a Zn1···Zn1# separation of 4.8655(13) Å. The cadmium complex [Cd(2)(L)(3)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(4) (3), on the other hand, has a rare type of helical structure, showing coordination asymmetry around the metal centers with a drastically reduced Cd1···Cd2 separation of 4.070 Å. The coordination environment around Cd1 is a distorted pentagonal bipyramid involving a N(6)O donor set with the oxygen atom coming from a coordinated water, leaving the remaining metal center Cd2 with a distorted octahedral geometry. The structures of 2 and 3 also involve anion-π- and CH-π-type noncovalent interactions that play dominant roles in shaping the extended structures of these molecules in the solid state. In solution, these compounds exhibit strong fluxional behavior, making the individual ligand strands indistinguishable from one another, as revealed from their (1)H NMR spectra, which also provide indications about these molecules retaining their helical structures in solution. Electrochemically, these compounds are quite interesting, undergoing ligand-based oxidations in two successive one-electron steps at E(1/2) of ca. 0.65 and 0.90 V versus a Ag/AgCl (3 M NaCl) reference. These molecules are all efficient emitters in the red and blue regions because of ligand-based π*-π fluorescent

  18. Polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates as platforms for oral polypeptide delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernkop-Schnürch, A; Thaler, S C

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates as carrier systems for orally administered peptide and protein drugs. Mediated by a carbodiimide, cysteine was covalently attached to polycarbophil. The properties of resulting conjugates, displaying 35-50 microM thiol groups per gram of polymer, to bind polypeptides and to inhibit pancreatic proteases was evaluated in vitro. Results demonstrated that only some polypeptides are immobilized to the polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate. Due to the covalent attachment of cysteine to polycarbophil, the inhibitory effect of the polymer toward carboxypeptidase A (EC 3.4. 17.1) and carboxypeptidase B (EC 3.4.17.2) could be significantly (p polycarbophil could be improved by the covalent attachment of cysteine, the raised inhibitory effect seems to be based on the complexation of this divalent cation from the enzyme structure. Whereas the covalent attachment of cysteine on polycarbophil had no influence on the enzymatic activity of trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) and elastase (EC 3.4.21. 36), the inhibitory effect of the polymer-cysteine conjugate toward chymotrypsin (EC 3.4.21.1) was significantly (p polycarbophil-cysteine conjugates seem to be a promising tool in protecting orally administered therapeutic polypeptides, which are not bound to the polymer, from presystemic metabolism in the intestine.

  19. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...

  20. Effects of a block in cysteine catabolism on energy balance and fat metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiadomski, Julie; Zhou, James Q; Roman, Heather B; Liu, Xiaojing; Hirschberger, Lawrence L; Locasale, Jason W; Stipanuk, Martha H

    2016-01-01

    To gain further insights into the effects of elevated cysteine levels on energy metabolism and the possible mechanisms underlying these effects, we conducted studies in cysteine dioxygenase (Cdo1)-null mice. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) catalyzes the first step of the major pathway for cysteine catabolism. When CDO is absent, tissue and plasma cysteine levels are elevated, resulting in enhanced flux of cysteine through desulfhydration reactions. When Cdo1-null mice were fed a high-fat diet, they gained more weight than their wild-type controls, regardless of whether the diet was supplemented with taurine. Cdo1-null mice had markedly lower leptin levels, higher feed intakes, and markedly higher abundance of hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) compared to wild-type control mice, and these differences were not affected by the fat or taurine content of the diet. Thus, reported associations of elevated cysteine levels with greater weight gain and with elevated hepatic Scd1 expression are also seen in the Cdo1-null mouse model. Hepatic accumulation of acylcarnitines suggests impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acids in Cdo1-null mice. The strong associations of elevated cysteine levels with excess H2 S production and impairments in energy metabolism suggest that H2 S signaling could be involved.

  1. Identification of Covalent Binding Sites Targeting Cysteines Based on Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Danfeng; Tian, Haozhong; Jiao, Yu; Shi, Zhihao; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Qiao, Xin; Pan, Jing; Yin, Lingfeng; Zhou, Weineng; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Covalent drugs have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to good inhibitory activity and selectivity. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with irreversible inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity because cysteines can form covalent bonds with inhibitors through their nucleophilic thiol groups. However, most human kinases have multiple noncatalytic cysteines within the active site; to accurately predict which cysteine is most likely to form covalent bonds is of great importance but remains a challenge when designing irreversible inhibitors. In this work, FTMap was first applied to check its ability in predicting covalent binding site defined as the region where covalent bonds are formed between cysteines and irreversible inhibitors. Results show that it has excellent performance in detecting the hot spots within the binding pocket, and its hydrogen bond interaction frequency analysis could give us some interesting instructions for identification of covalent binding cysteines. Furthermore, we proposed a simple but useful covalent fragment probing approach and showed that it successfully predicted the covalent binding site of seven targets. By adopting a distance-based method, we observed that the closer the nucleophiles of covalent warheads are to the thiol group of a cysteine, the higher the possibility that a cysteine is prone to form a covalent bond. We believe that the combination of FTMap and our distance-based covalent fragment probing method can become a useful tool in detecting the covalent binding site of these targets. PMID:27483186

  2. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-03-01

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d5) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) at 77 K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (RuIII-RuIII/RuIV-RuIV; RuIII-RuIII/RuII-RuII) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86 V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent RuVdbnd O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  3. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklos, Marton; BenAissa, Manel; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2015-11-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families of cysteine proteases and their isozymes is problematic. This review provides a general update on strategies for cysteine protease inhibitor design and a focus on cathepsin B and calpain 1 as drug targets for neurodegenerative disorders; the latter focus providing an interesting query for the contemporary assumptions that irreversible, covalent protein modification and low selectivity are anathema to therapeutic safety and efficacy.

  4. Production of hydrogen sulfide from D-cysteine and its therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro eShibuya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that H2S has physiological functions in various tissues and organs. It includes regulation of neuronal activity, vascular tension, a release of insulin, and protection of the heart, kidney and brain from ischemic insult. H2S is produced by enzymes from L-cysteine; cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT. We recently discovered an additional pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine. D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO provides 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP for 3MST to produce H2S. D-Cysteine protects cerebellar neurons from oxidative stress and attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury caused in the kidney more effectively than L-cysteine. This review focuses on a novel pathway for the production of H2S and its therapeutic application especially to the renal diseases.

  5. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  6. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  7. Cysteine Conjugate β-Lyase Activity of Rat Erythrocytes and Formation of β-Lyase-Derived Globin Monoadducts and Cross-Links after in Vitro Exposure of Erythrocytes to S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Barshteyn, Nella; Elfarra, Adnan A.

    2009-01-01

    S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), a mutagenic and nephrotoxic metabolite of trichloroethylene can be bioactivated to reactive metabolites, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) or chlorothioketene and/or 2-chlorothionoacetyl chloride, by cysteine conjugate S-oxidase (S-oxidase) and cysteine conjugate β-lyase (β-lyase), respectively. Previously, we characterized reactivity of DCVCS with Hb upon incubation of erythrocytes with DCVCS and provided evidence for formation of dis...

  8. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  9. Simple, chemoselective, catalytic olefin isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Steven W M; Barabé, Francis; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-12-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(Sal(tBu,tBu))Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated.

  10. The role of lysosomal cysteine proteases in crustacean immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FL Garcia-Carreño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the long course of evolution and under the selective pressure exerted by pathogens and parasites, animals have selectively fixed a number of defense mechanisms against the constant attack of intruders. The immune response represents a key component to optimize the biological fitness of individuals. Two decades ago, prevention and control of diseases in crustacean aquaculture systems were considered priorities in most shrimp-producing countries, but knowledge was scarce and various pathogens have severely affected aquaculture development around the world. Scientific contributions have improved our understanding of the crustacean immune response. Several studies confirm the central role played by proteases in the immune response of animals, and the cooperative interaction of these enzymes in a wide variety of organisms is well known. This review summarizes the current information regarding the role of cysteine proteases in the immune system of Crustacea and points to aspects that are needed to provide a better integration of our knowledge.

  11. Investigation of redox activities of soil humic acids using 3D excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy%基于三维荧光光谱特征研究土壤腐殖质氧化还原特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜杰; 李黎; 孙国新

    2012-01-01

    Humic substances serve as electron shuttles in the soil environment. They not only stimulate the element migration, but also accelerate containment degradation and environment remediation. In this study, a standard humic acid and two extracted humic acids from soil samples were reduced by H2, and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM) was employed to characterize these humic acids. The results of 3DEEMs revealed the differences between native and reduced humic acids. Fluorescence peak intensity of humic acids in the reduced state was lower than those in the natural state, which can be explained by the changes of chemical structures of humic acids, such as the loss of π-π bonds. As a model compound of quinone groups in humic acids, benzoquinone reduction and 3DEEM analysis were carried out under the same conditions. It was observed that there was a decrease of fluorescence with benzoquinone reduction. Potassium ferricyanide method was used to measure the reducing capacity of native extracted humic acids, which was found to be 0. 998 and 0. 465 meq. g-1 C for Yingtan and Taoyuan soils, respectively. Electron accepting capacities of humic acids were 3. 384 and 1.187 meq-g 1 C for Yingtan and Taoyuan soils, respectively. Determination of electron accepting capacities, quantification of redox-active functional groups and prediction of redox reaction processes in soil are all important applications of 3 DEEM in the investigation of humic acid redox-activities.%以国际腐殖质协会腐殖酸和实验室提纯腐殖酸为研究对象,发现被H2还原前后腐殖酸的三维荧光光谱明显不同,但有共同的变化趋势:还原态腐殖酸的三维荧光光谱图的波峰荧光强度均明显低于还原前,说明腐殖酸还原过程有类似π-π化学键断开的结构变化.对苯醌是腐殖酸氧化还原醌基官能团的代表化合物,将其还原前后与腐殖酸还原前后的荧光光

  12. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  13. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Pelayo, José; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic Cluster Collisions (7th International Symposium)", edited by G. Delgado Barrio, A. Solov'Yov, P. Villarreal, R. Prosmiti.

  14. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  15. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  16. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  17. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis

  18. The structure of classical swine fever virus N(pro: a novel cysteine Autoprotease and zinc-binding protein involved in subversion of type I interferon induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keerthi Gottipati

    Full Text Available Pestiviruses express their genome as a single polypeptide that is subsequently cleaved into individual proteins by host- and virus-encoded proteases. The pestivirus N-terminal protease (N(pro is a cysteine autoprotease that cleaves between its own C-terminus and the N-terminus of the core protein. Due to its unique sequence and catalytic site, it forms its own cysteine protease family C53. After self-cleavage, N(pro is no longer active as a protease. The released N(pro suppresses the induction of the host's type-I interferon-α/β (IFN-α/β response. N(pro binds interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3, the key transcriptional activator of IFN-α/β genes, and promotes degradation of IRF3 by the proteasome, thus preventing induction of the IFN-α/β response to pestivirus infection. Here we report the crystal structures of pestivirus N(pro. N(pro is structurally distinct from other known cysteine proteases and has a novel "clam shell" fold consisting of a protease domain and a zinc-binding domain. The unique fold of N(pro allows auto-catalysis at its C-terminus and subsequently conceals the cleavage site in the active site of the protease. Although many viruses interfere with type I IFN induction by targeting the IRF3 pathway, little information is available regarding structure or mechanism of action of viral proteins that interact with IRF3. The distribution of amino acids on the surface of N(pro involved in targeting IRF3 for proteasomal degradation provides insight into the nature of N(pro's interaction with IRF3. The structures thus establish the mechanism of auto-catalysis and subsequent auto-inhibition of trans-activity of N(pro, and its role in subversion of host immune response.

  19. Electrocatalytic determination of L-cysteine using a modified carbon nanotube paste electrode: Application to the analysis of some real samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malihe Ahmadipour; Mohammad Ali Taher; Hadi Beitollahi; Rahman Hosseinzadeh

    2012-01-01

    The electrooxidation of L-cysteine (L-Cys) was studied using a benzoylferrocene (BF) modified multi-wall carbon nanotube paste electrode (BFCNPE) using cyclic voltammetry (CV),square wave voltammetry (SWV) and chronoamperometry (CHA).Under optimum pH in CV the oxidation of L-Cys occurs at a potential about 215 mV less positive than that at the surface of unmodified carbon paste electrode.The catalytic oxidation peak currents were dependent on the L-Cys concentration and a linearcalibration curve was obtained in the range 0.7-350.0 μmol/L of L-Cys with SWV method.The detection limit (3σ) was determined as 0.1 μmolL.This method was also used for the determination of L-Cys in some real samples.

  20. Copper inorganic-organic hybrid coordination compound as a novel L-cysteine electrochemical sensor: Synthesis, characterization, spectroscopy and crystal structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zohreh Derikvand; Azadeh Azadbakht

    2015-11-01

    Dinuclear coordination compound of Cu(II), namely, [Cu2(pydc)2(pz)(H2O)2]·2H2O, where pydc = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (dipicolinic acid) and pz = pyrazine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectra (IR, UV-Vis), thermal (TG/DTG) analysis, magnetic measurements and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the dimeric structure, the planar tridentate pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid dianion coordinates to a Cu(II) ion in a meridional fashion and defines the basal plane of the complex. The fourth equatorial coordination site is then occupied by a pyrazine molecule that functions as a linear bidentate ligand bridging two Cu(II) complexes to form a dimer. The axial positions of each Cu(II) complex are occupied by one water molecule to form a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The complicated hydrogen bonding network accompanied with C–O· · · and C–H· · · stacking interactions assemble the crystal structure of 1 into a fascinating supramolecular architecture. Electrochemical behavior of [Cu2(pydc)2(pz)(H2O)2] (Cu-PDAP) on the surface of carbon nanotube (CNTs) glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is described. Oxidation of cysteine on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the Cu-PDAP/CNTs film displays excellent electrochemical catalytic activities towards L-cysteine oxidation.

  1. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  2. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  3. Highly Catalytic Nanodots with Renal Clearance for Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Junying; Yang, Jiang; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiu; Deng, Jiao; Deng, Dehui; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Changlong; Li, Meixian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (gamma and x-ray) is widely used in industry and medicine, but it can also pose a significant hazardous effect on health and induce cancer, physical deformity and even death, due to DNA damages and invasion of free radicals. There is therefore an urgent unmet demand in designing highly efficient radioprotectants with synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and low toxicity. In this study, we designed ultrasmall (sub-5 nm) highly catalytically active and cysteine-protected MoS2 dots as radioprotectants and investigated their application in protection against ionizing radiation. In vivo preclinical studies showed that the surviving fraction of MoS2-treated mice can appreciably increase to up to 79 % when they were exposed to high-energy ionizing radiation. Furthermore, MoS2 dots can contribute in cleaning up the accumulated free radicals within the body, repairing DNA damages and recovering all vital chemical and biochemical indicators, suggesting their unique role as free radical...

  4. Molecular Structures and Dynamics of the Stepwise Activation Mechanism of a Matrix Metalloproteinase Zymogen: Challenging the Cysteine Switch Dogma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum,G.; Meroueh, S.; Toth, M.; Fisher, J.; Fridman, R.; Mobashery, S.; Sagi, I.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of matrix metalloproteinase zymogen (pro-MMP) is a vital homeostatic process, yet its molecular basis remains unresolved. Using stopped-flow X-ray spectroscopy of the active site zinc ion, we determined the temporal sequence of pro-MMP-9 activation catalyzed by tissue kallikrein protease in milliseconds to several minutes. The identity of three intermediates seen by X-ray spectroscopy was corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The cysteine-zinc interaction that maintains enzyme latency is disrupted via active-site proton transfers that mediate transient metal-protein coordination events and eventual binding of water. Unexpectedly, these events ensue as a direct result of complexation of pro-MMP-9 and kallikrein and occur before proteolysis and eventual dissociation of the pro-peptide from the catalytic site. Here we demonstrate the synergism among long-range protein conformational transitions, local structural rearrangements, and fine atomic events in the process of zymogen activation.

  5. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  6. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  7. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  8. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power. PMID:1283938

  9. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  10. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  11. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine cysteine as an alternative to benzotriazole (BTA) for the conservation of archaeological objects with bronze disease. Investigation of the two inhibitors involved the use of electrochemical techniques, measurements of weight change in high humidity and comparative...... studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing...

  12. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. PMID:27451206

  13. Catalytic Thr or Ser Residue Modulates Structural Switches in 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin by Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairum, Carlos A.; Santos, Melina Cardoso; Breyer, Carlos A.; Geyer, R. Ryan; Nieves, Cecilia J.; Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Toledo, José Carlos; Toyama, Marcos H.; Augusto, Ohara; Netto, Luis E. S.; de Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2016-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) reduce hydroperoxides with extraordinary rates due to an active site composed of a catalytic triad, containing a peroxidatic cysteine (CP), an Arg, and a Thr (or Ser). 2-Cys Prx are involved in processes such as cancer; neurodegeneration and host-pathogen interactions. During catalysis, 2-Cys Prxs switch between decamers and dimers. Analysis of 2-Cys Prx structures in the fully folded (but not locally unfolded) form revealed a highly conserved, non-conventional hydrogen bond (CH-π) between the catalytic triad Thr of a dimer with an aromatic residue of an adjacent dimer. In contrast, structures of 2-Cys Prxs with a Ser in place of the Thr do not display this CH-π bond. Chromatographic and structural data indicate that the Thr (but not Ser) destabilizes the decamer structure in the oxidized state probably through steric hindrance. As a general trend, mutations in a yeast 2-Cys Prx (Tsa1) favoring the dimeric state also displayed a decreased catalytic activity. Remarkably, yeast naturally contains Thr-Ser variants (Tsa1 and Tsa2, respectively) with distinct oligomeric stabilities in their disulfide states. PMID:27629822

  14. Mechanistic studies of the spore photoproduct lyase via a single cysteine mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Lin, Gengjie; Nelson, Renae S; Jian, Yajun; Telser, Joshua; Li, Lei

    2012-09-11

    5-Thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine (also called spore photoproduct or SP) is the exclusive DNA photodamage product in bacterial endospores. It is repaired by a radical SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) enzyme, the spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), at the bacterial early germination phase. Our previous studies proved that SPL utilizes the 5'-dA• generated by the SAM cleavage reaction to abstract the H(6proR) atom to initiate the SP repair process. The resulting thymine allylic radical was suggested to take an H atom from an unknown protein source, most likely cysteine 141. Here we show that C141 can be readily alkylated in the native SPL by an iodoacetamide treatment, suggesting that it is accessible to the TpT radical. SP repair by the SPL C141A mutant yields TpTSO(2)(-) and TpT simultaneously from the very beginning of the reaction; no lag phase is observed for TpTSO(2)(-) formation. Should any other protein residue serve as the H donor, its presence would result in TpT being the major product at least for the first enzyme turnover. These observations provide strong evidence to support C141 as the direct H atom donor. Moreover, because of the lack of this intrinsic H donor, the C141A mutant produces TpT via an unprecedented thymine cation radical reduction (proton-coupled electron transfer) process, contrasting to the H atom transfer mechanism in the wild-type (WT) SPL reaction. The C141A mutant repairs SP at a rate that is ~3-fold slower than that of the WT enzyme. Formation of TpTSO(2)(-) and TpT exhibits a V(max) deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.7 ± 0.2, which is smaller than the (D)V(max) KIE of 2.8 ± 0.3 determined for the WT SPL reaction. These findings suggest that removing the intrinsic H atom donor disturbs the rate-limiting process during enzyme catalysis. As expected, the prereduced C141A mutant supports only ~0.4 turnover, which is in sharp contrast to the >5 turnovers exhibited by the WT SPL reaction, suggesting that the enzyme catalytic cycle (SAM

  15. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme. PMID:22543019

  16. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Studies of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Cysteine Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Compton, Jaimee R; Leary, Dagmar H; Olson, Mark A; Lee, Michael S; Cheung, Jonah; Ye, Wenjuan; Ferrer, Mark; Southall, Noel; Jadhav, Ajit; Morazzani, Elaine M; Glass, Pamela J; Marugan, Juan; Legler, Patricia M

    2016-05-31

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.-) is essential for viral replication and is involved in the cytopathic effects (CPE) of the virus. The VEEV nsP2 protease is a member of MEROPS Clan CN and characteristically contains a papain-like protease linked to an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. The protease contains an alternative active site motif, (475)NVCWAK(480), which differs from papain's (CGS(25)CWAFS), and the enzyme lacks a transition state-stabilizing residue homologous to Gln-19 in papain. To understand the roles of conserved residues in catalysis, we determined the structure of the free enzyme and the first structure of an inhibitor-bound alphaviral protease. The peptide-like E64d inhibitor was found to bind beneath a β-hairpin at the interface of the SAM MTase and protease domains. His-546 adopted a conformation that differed from that found in the free enzyme; one or both of the conformers may assist in leaving group departure of either the amine or Cys thiolate during the catalytic cycle. Interestingly, E64c (200 μM), the carboxylic acid form of the E64d ester, did not inhibit the nsP2 protease. To identify key residues involved in substrate binding, a number of mutants were analyzed. Mutation of the motif residue, N475A, led to a 24-fold reduction in kcat/Km, and the conformation of this residue did not change after inhibition. N475 forms a hydrogen bond with R662 in the SAM MTase domain, and the R662A and R662K mutations both led to 16-fold decreases in kcat/Km. N475 forms the base of the P1 binding site and likely orients the substrate for nucleophilic attack or plays a role in product release. An Asn homologous to N475 is similarly found in coronaviral papain-like proteases (PLpro) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus. Mutation of another motif residue, K480A, led to a 9

  17. Cysteine dietary supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I induced by methionine restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, A; Gomez, J; Lopez Torres, M; Naudi, A; Mota-Martorell, N; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2015-06-01

    It has been described that dietary cysteine reverses many of the beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction in aging rodents. In this investigation male Wistar rats were subjected to diets low in methionine, supplemented with cysteine, or simultaneously low in methionine and supplemented with cysteine. The results obtained in liver showed that cysteine supplementation reverses the decrease in mitochondrial ROS generation induced by methionine restriction at complex I. Methionine restriction also decreased various markers of oxidative and non-oxidative stress on mitochondrial proteins which were not reversed by cysteine. Instead, cysteine supplementation also lowered protein damage in association with decreases in mTOR activation. The results of the present study add the decrease in mitochondrial ROS production to the various beneficial changes induced by methionine restriction that are reversed by cysteine dietary supplementation.

  18. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  19. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  20. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  1. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  2. N-acetyl cysteine therapy in acute viral hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huseyin Gunduz; Oguz Karabay; Ali Tamer; Resat Ozaras; Ali Mert; Omer Fehmi Tabak

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC)on acute viral hepatitis (AVH).METHODS: We administered 200 mg oral NAC three times daily (600 mg/day) to the study group and placebo capsules to the control group. All patients were hospitalized and diagnosed as AVH. Blood total and direct bilirubin, ALT, AST,alkaline phosphatese, albumin and globulin levels of each patient were measured twice weekly until total bilirubin level dropped under 2 mg/dl, ALT level under 100 U/L, follow up was continued and then the patients were discharged.RESULTS: A total of 41(13 female and 28 male) AVH patients were included in our study. The period for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin in the study group was 19.7±6.9 days and 13.7±8.5 days respectively. In the control group it was 20.4±6.5 days and 16.9±7.8 days respectively (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: NAC administration effected neither the time necessary for normalization of ALT and total bilirubin values nor duration of hospitalization, so we could not suggest NAC for the treatment of icteric AVH cases. However, our results have shown that this drug is not harmful to patients with AVH.

  3. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  4. A Highly Selective Colorimetric Sensor for Cysteine in Water Solution and Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Shang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple colorimetric sensor, 2-bromonaphthalene-1,4-dione, has been developed for the Cysteine detection. The sensor showed its best performance in a mixture of ethanol and HEPES (5 : 5, v/v solution at pH of 7.0. The results of UV-vis and fluorescence indicated that 2-bromonaphthalene-1,4-dione was selective and sensitive for Cysteine detection without the interference of other amino acids (Cysteine, Alanine, Arginine, Aspartinie, Glutamine, Glycine, Histidine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Proline, Serine, Threonine, Phenylalanine, Valine, Tryptophan, and Hydroxyproline. 2-Bromonaphthalene-1,4-dione also showed binding ability for Cysteine in bovine serum albumin and could be used as a potential colorimetric sensor among eighteen kinds of natural amino acids. Importantly, the recognition of CySH could be observed by naked eye.

  5. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  6. Formation scheme and antioxidant activity of a novel Maillard pigment, pyrrolothiazolate, formed from cysteine and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Kyoko; Terasawa, Naoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2016-06-15

    We recently identified 6-hydroxy-3[R],7a[S]-dimethyl-7-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]thiazole-3-calboxylic acid, a novel pyrrolothiazole derivative carrying a carboxy group and named pyrrolothiazolate, as a Mallard pigment formed from l-cysteine and d-glucose. Here we described the formation of its enantiomer, the plausible formation scheme of pyrrolothiazolate, and its antioxidant activity. When d-cysteine was used instead of l-cysteine in the reaction mixture, the enantiomer of pyrrolothiazolate was obtained. The carbon at position 1 of glucose was incorporated into two methyl groups of pyrrolothiazolate. The pigment was considered to be formed through 1-deoxyglucosone (1-DG). The dehydrated isomer of 1-DG would be condensed with the thiol and amino groups of cysteine. This condensate was dehydrated and cyclized to form pyrrolothiazolate. This compound was an antioxidant showing radical scavenging activity. PMID:26987433

  7. Cysteine-Free Proteins in the Immunobiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Santiago Mejia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identify epitopes that could be used in the design of vaccines to control several arthropod-borne diseases simultaneously is to look for common structural features in the secretome of the pathogens that cause them. Using a novel bioinformatics technique, cysteine-abundance and distribution analysis, we found that many different proteins secreted by several arthropod-borne pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and eight species of Proteobacteria, are devoid of cysteine residues. The identification of three cysteine-abundance and distribution patterns in several families of proteins secreted by pathogenic and nonpathogenic Proteobacteria, and not found when the amino acid analyzed was tryptophan, provides evidence of forces restricting the content of cysteine residues in microbial proteins during evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of protein structure and function, antigenicity and immunogenicity, and host-parasite relationships.

  8. The SNO/SOH TMT strategy for combinatorial analysis of reversible cysteine oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Redox homeostasis is essential for normal function of cells and redox imbalance has been recognised as a pathogenic factor of numerous human diseases. Oxidative modifications of cysteine thiols modulate function of many proteins, mediate signalling, and fine-tune transcriptional and...... metabolic processes. In this study we present the SNO/SOH TMT strategy, which enables simultaneous analysis of two different types of cysteine modification: S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH). The method facilitates quantitation of modification changes corrected by changes in protein abundance...... strategy is a viable alternative to existing methods for cysteine oxidation analysis and provides new features that will facilitate our understanding of the interplay between SNO and SOH. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: SNO/SOH TMT strategy outperforms other available strategies for cysteine oxidation analysis...

  9. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yugui

    2013-11-21

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  10. Generation of thiols by biotransformation of cysteine-aldehyde conjugates with baker's yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh-Ba, Tuong; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Fay, Laurent B; Bel Rhlid, Rachid

    2003-06-01

    Baker's yeast was shown to catalyze the transformation of cysteine-furfural conjugate into 2-furfurylthiol. The biotransformation's yield and kinetics were influenced by the reaction parameters such as pH, incubation mode (aerobic and anaerobic), and substrate concentration. 2-Furfurylthiol was obtained in an optimal 37% yield when cysteine-furfural conjugate at a 20 mM concentration was anaerobically incubated with whole cell baker's yeast at pH 8.0 and 30 degrees C. Similarly to 2-furfurylthiol, 5-methyl-2-furfurylthiol (11%), benzylthiol (8%), 2-thiophenemethanethiol (22%), 3-methyl-2-thiophenemethanethiol (3%), and 2-pyrrolemethanethiol (6%) were obtained from the corresponding cysteine-aldehyde conjugates by incubation with baker's yeast. This work indicates the versatile bioconversion capacity of baker's yeast for the generation of thiols from cysteine-aldehyde conjugates. Thanks to its food-grade character, baker's yeast provides a biochemical tool to produce thiols, which can be used as flavorings in foods and beverages.

  11. Cysteine Mutagenesis and Computer Modeling of the S6 Region of an Intermediate Conductance IKCa Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Simoes, Manuel; Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Banderali, Umberto; Hobeila, Fadi; Roux, Benoit; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (SCAM) and computer-based modeling were used to investigate key structural features of the S6 transmembrane segment of the calcium-activated K+ channel of intermediate conductance IKCa. Our SCAM results show that the interaction of [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) with cysteines engineered at positions 275, 278, and 282 leads to current inhibition. This effect was state dependent as MTSET appeared less effective at inhibiting IKCa...

  12. Elevation of cysteine consumption in tamoxifen-resistant MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Chang Seon; Kwak, Hui Chan; Lee, Ji-Yoon; Oh, Soo Jin; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Thuy; Kang, Keon Wook; Kim, Sang Kyum

    2013-01-15

    Tamoxifen (TAM) resistance is a main cause of therapeutic failure in breast cancers. Although methionine dependency is a phenotypic characteristic of tumor cells, the role of sulfur amino acid metabolism in chemotherapy resistance remains to be elucidated. This study compared metabolite profiles of sulfur amino acid metabolism from methionine to taurine or glutathione (GSH) between normal MCF-7 and TAM-resistant MCF-7 (TAMR-MCF-7) cells. TAMR-MCF-7 cells showed elevated levels and activities of enzymes involved in both transsulfuration from methionine to cysteine and metabolism of cysteine to GSH and taurine. Cysteine concentrations in TAMR-MCF-7 cells and medium conditioned by cell culture for 42h were markedly decreased, while GSH, hypotaurine, and taurine concentrations in the medium were increased. These results show that TAMR-MCF-7 cells display enhanced cysteine utilization. The addition of propargylglycine, a specific cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor, and buthionine sulfoximine, a specific γ-glutamylcysteine ligase inhibitor, to TAMR-MCF-7 cells, but not to MCF-7 cells, resulted in cytotoxicity after sulfur amino acid deprivation. These results suggest that cell viability of TAMR-MCF-7 cells is affected by inhibition of sulfur amino acid metabolism, particularly cysteine synthesis from homocysteine and GSH synthesis from cysteine. Additionally, the S-adenosylmethionine/S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, an index of transmethylation potential, in TAMR-MCF-7 cells increased to ~3.6-fold relative to that in MCF-7 cells, a finding that may result from upregulation of methionine adenosyltransferase IIa and S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. In conclusion, this study suggests that TAMR-MCF-7 cells display enhanced cysteine utilization for synthesis of GSH and taurine, and are sensitive to inhibition of cysteine metabolism.

  13. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...

  14. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  15. Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Lin, E-mail: liu_x_l@sina.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000 (China); Zhu, Ying-Jie [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Bin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium sulfide polycrystalline nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted transformation method using Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires as the source material and template in ethylene glycol at 160 °C or ethanol at 60 °C. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires were successfully synthesized in alkaline solution. ► CdS nanotubes were prepared by templated microwave-assisted transformation method. ► CdS nanotubes can well duplicate the size and morphology of precursor nanowires. ► This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost. -- Abstract: We report the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes. In this method, the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are synthesized using CdCl{sub 2}·2.5H{sub 2}O, L-cysteine and ethanolamine in water at room temperature. The Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are used as the source material and template for the subsequent preparation of CdS nanotubes by a microwave-assisted transformation method using ethylene glycol or ethanol as the solvent. This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost, and may be extended to the synthesis of nanotubes of other compounds. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  16. The cysteine releasing pattern of some antioxidant thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen Bayram, F Esra; Sipahi, Hande; Acar, Ebru Türköz; Kahveci Ulugöl, Reyhan; Buran, Kerem; Akgün, Hülya

    2016-05-23

    Oxidative stress that corresponds to a significant increase in free radical concentration in cells can cause considerable damage to crucial biological macromolecules if not prevented by cellular defense mechanisms. The low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione (GSH) constitutes one of the main intracellular antioxidants. It is synthesized via cysteine, an amino acid found only in limited amounts in cells because of its neurotoxicity. Thus, to ensure an efficient GSH synthesis in case of an oxidative stress, cysteine should be provided extracellularly. Yet, given its nucleophilic properties and its rapid conversion into cystine, its corresponding disulfide, cysteine presents some toxicity and therefore is usually supplemented in a prodrug approach. Here, some thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids were synthesized and evaluated for their antioxidant properties via the DDPH and CUPRAC assays. Then, the cysteine releasing capacity of the obtained compounds was investigated in aqueous and organic medium in order to correlate the relevant antioxidant properties of the molecules with their cysteine releasing pattern. As a result, the structures' antioxidative properties were not only attributed to cysteine release but also to the thiazolidine cycle itself. PMID:27017266

  17. Spectroscopic evidence for an engineered, catalytically active Trp radical that creates the unique reactivity of lignin peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew T; Doyle, Wendy A; Dorlet, Pierre; Ivancich, Anabella

    2009-09-22

    The surface oxidation site (Trp-171) in lignin peroxidase (LiP) required for the reaction with veratryl alcohol a high-redox-potential (1.4 V) substrate, was engineered into Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CiP) by introducing a Trp residue into a heme peroxidase that has similar protein fold but lacks this activity. To create the catalytic activity toward veratryl alcohol in CiP, it was necessary to reproduce the Trp site and its negatively charged microenvironment by means of a triple mutation. The resulting D179W+R258E+R272D variant was characterized by multifrequency EPR spectroscopy. The spectra unequivocally showed that a new Trp radical [g values of g(x) = 2.0035(5), g(y) = 2.0027(5), and g(z) = 2.0022(1)] was formed after the [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate, as a result of intramolecular electron transfer between Trp-179 and the porphyrin. Also, the EPR characterization crucially showed that [Fe(IV)=O Trp-179(*)] was the reactive intermediate with veratryl alcohol. Accordingly, our work shows that it is necessary to take into account the physicochemical properties of the radical, fine-tuned by the microenvironment, as well as those of the preceding [Fe(IV)=O Por(*+)] intermediate to engineer a catalytically competent Trp site for a given substrate. Manipulation of the microenvironment of the Trp-171 site in LiP allowed the detection by EPR spectroscopy of the Trp-171(*), for which direct evidence has been missing so far. Our work also highlights the role of Trp residues as tunable redox-active cofactors for enzyme catalysis in the context of peroxidases with a unique reactivity toward recalcitrant substrates that require oxidation potentials not realized at the heme site.

  18. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  19. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  20. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  1. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method is described for estimating the temperature in a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. Pressure sensors monitor the flow resistance across the catalytic converter to provide an indication of the temperature inside. This feedback system allows heating devices to be switched off and thus avoid overheating, while maintaining the catalytic converter's efficiency by assuring that it does not operate below its light off temperature. (UK)

  2. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method of estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine is described. Heated exhaust gas oxygen (HEGO) sensors are placed upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. The temperature of the catalytic converter shortly after start-up is measured by monitoring the resistance of the HEGO sensor's heating element. The downstream sensor is used for mixture control and to double check results of the upstream sensor. (UK)

  3. Some Aspects of the Catalytic Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; K.Saikia

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Catalytic reactions are gaining importance due to its low cost, operational simplicity, high efficiency and selectivity. It is also getting much attention in green synthesis. Many useful organic reactions, including the acylation of alcohols and aldehydes, carbon-carbon, carbon-nitrogen, carbon-sulfur bond forming and oxidation reactions are carried out by catalyst. We are exploring the catalytic acylation of alcohols and aldehydes in a simple and efficient manner. Catalytic activation of unr...

  4. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  5. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  6. An Entamoeba cysteine peptidase specifically expressed during encystation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Frank; Bachmann, Anna; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Hennings, Ina; Drescher, Babette; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Tannich, Egbert; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2008-12-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Entamoeba possess a considerable number of cysteine peptidases (CPs), the function of most of these molecules for amoeba biology needs to be established. In order to determine whether CPs may play a role during Entamoeba stage conversion from trophozoites into cysts and vice versa, expression of cp genes was analysed in the reptilian parasite Entamoeba invadens, a model organism for studying Entamoeba cyst development. By homology search, 28 papain-like cp genes were identified in public E. invadens genome databases. For eight of these genes the expression profiles during stage conversion was determined. By Northern blot analysis, transcripts for eicp-a9, -b7, -b8 and -c2, respectively, were detected neither in trophozoites or cysts nor at any of the point of times analysed during stage conversion. On the other hand, eicp-a5 is constitutively expressed during all developmental stages, whereas eicp-a3 and eicp-a11, respectively, are trophozoite-specific. Only eicp-b9 was found to be cyst-specific as it is expressed exclusively 18 to 28 h after cyst induction. Cyst-specific expression was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy of the corresponding protein EiCP-B9. In immature cysts, the molecule is located in structures that accumulate near the cyst wall, but which are uniformly distributed in mature cysts. The precise function of EiCP-B9 during Entamoeba encystation remains to be determined. However, colocalisation studies with an Entamoeba marker for autophagosomes suggest that EiCP-B9 is not associated with Entamoeba autophagy.

  7. The effect of N-acetyl cysteine on laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Dabirmoghaddam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a variant of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in which the stomach contents go up into the pharynx and then down into the larynx. LPR causes a wide spectrum of manifestations mainly related to the upper and the lower respiratory system such as laryngitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cough, hoarseness, postnasal drip disease, sinusitis, otitis media, recurrent pneumonia, laryngeal cancer and etc. The object of this study was to examine the effect of N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC with and without Omeprazole on laryngitis and LPR. Ninety patients with laryngitis or its symptoms were referred and randomly assigned into three groups. The first group was treated by Omeprazole and NAC. The second group was treated by Omeprazole and placebo and the last group was treated by NAC and placebo. Duration of treatment was 3 months and all patients were evaluated at the beginning of study, one month and three month after treatment of sign and symptoms, based on reflux symptom index (RSI and reflex finding score (RFS. Based on the results of this study, despite therapeutic efficacy of all treatment protocols, the RSI before and after 3 months treatment had significant difference in (NAS+ Omeprazole and (Omeprazole+ placebo group (P<0.001 in the first group, P<0.001 in the second group and P=0.35 in the third group. Whereas RFS before and after 3 month treatment had significant difference in all groups. (P<0.001 in each group in comparison with itself but this results had not significant difference after 1 month treatment. Our results showed that the combination therapy with Omeprazole and NAC treatment had the most effect on both subjective and objective questionnaire at least after 3 months treatment. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that the use objective tools are more accurate than subjective tools in evaluation of therapeutic effects in patients with GERD-related laryngitis.

  8. A critical life-supporting role for cystathionine γ-lyase in the absence of dietary cysteine supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sarathi; Yang, Guangdong; Wang, Rui

    2011-05-15

    This study examined the important relationship between cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) functionality and cysteine supply for normal growth and life span. Mice with a targeted deletion of the CSE gene (CSE-KO) were fed a cysteine-limited diet and their growth and survival patterns as well as levels of cysteine, homocysteine, glutathione, and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) were measured. CSE-KO mice fed a cysteine-limited diet exhibited growth retardation; decreased levels of cysteine, glutathione, and H2S; and increased plasma homocysteine level. However, histological examinations of liver did not reveal any abnormality and plasma levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and albumin were normal in these animals. No CSE-KO mice survived after 12 weeks of feeding with the cysteine-limited diet. Supplementation of H2S to the CSE-KO mice failed to reverse the aforementioned abnormalities. On the other hand, supplementation of cysteine in the drinking water of the CSE-KO mice significantly increased plasma cysteine and glutathione levels. This eventually led to an increase in body weight and rescued the animals from death. In conclusion, CSE is critical for cysteine biosynthesis through the transsulfuration pathway and the combination of CSE deficiency and lack of dietary cysteine supply would threaten life sustainability.

  9. Catalytic reforming feed characterisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Univ. of La Laguna, Chemical Engineering Dept., La Laguna (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The catalytic reforming of naphtha is one of the major refinery processes, designed to increase the octane number of naphtha or to produce aromatics. The naphtha used as catalytic reformer feedstock usually contains a mixture of paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics in the carbon number range C{sub 6} to C{sub 10}. The detailed chemical composition of the feed is necessary to predict the aromatics and hydrogen production as well as the operation severity. The analysis of feed naphtha is usually reported in terms of its ASTM distillation curve and API or specific gravity. Since reforming reactions are described in terms of lumped chemical species (paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics), a feed characterisation technique should be useful in order to predict reforming operating conditions and detect feed quality changes. Unfortunately online analyzer applications as cromatography or recently introduced naphtha NMR [1] are scarce in most of refineries. This work proposes an algorithmic characterisation method focusing on its main steps description. The method could help on the subjects previously described, finally a calculation example is shown. (orig.)

  10. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  11. Cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase genes of the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum: possible involvement in hypotaurine synthesis and adaptation to hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaki, Toshihiro; Hongo, Yuki; Koito, Tomoko; Nakamura-Kusakabe, Ikumi; Shimamura, Shigeru; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Takao; Maruyama, Tadashi; Inoue, Koji

    2015-03-01

    It has been suggested that invertebrates inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vent areas use the sulfinic acid hypotaurine, a precursor of taurine, to protect against the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide contained in the seawater from the vent. In this protective system, hypotaurine is accumulated in the gill, the primary site of sulfide exposure. However, the pathway for hypotaurine synthesis in mollusks has not been identified. In this study, we screened for the mRNAs of enzymes involved in hypotaurine synthesis in the deep-sea mussel Bathymodiolus septemdierum and cloned cDNAs encoding cysteine dioxygenase and cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase. As mRNAs encoding cysteamine dioxygenase and cysteine lyase were not detected, the cysteine sulfinate pathway is suggested to be the major pathway of hypotaurine and taurine synthesis. The two genes were found to be expressed in all the tissues examined, but the gill exhibited the highest expression. The mRNA level in the gill was not significantly changed by exposure to sulfides or thiosulfate. These results suggests that the gill of B. septemdierum maintains high levels of expression of the two genes regardless of ambient sulfide level and accumulates hypotaurine continuously to protect against sudden exposure to high level of sulfide.

  12. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  13. N-acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol augment selenium-glutathione peroxidase activity in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicigüzel, Y; Aslan, M

    2004-09-01

    In glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient erythrocytes, failure to maintain normal levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) due to decreased NADPH regeneration in the hexose monophosphate pathway results in acute hemolytic anemia following exposure to oxidative insults, such as ingestion of Vicia fava beans or use of certain drugs. GSH is a source of protection against oxidative attack, used by the selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px)/reductase (GR) system to detoxify hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxides, provided that sufficient GSH is made available. In this study, Se-GSH-Px activity was analyzed in G6PD-deficient patients in the presence of reducing agents such as N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol. Se-GSH-Px activity was decreased in G6PD-deficient red blood cells (RBCs). N-Acetyl cysteine, L-cysteine, and beta-mercaptoethanol increased Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD-deficient human erythrocytes, indicating that other reducing agents can be utilized to complement Se-GSH-Px activity in G6PD deficiency. Based on the increased susceptibility of G6PD-deficient patients to oxidative stress, the reported increase in Se-GSH-Px activity can facilitate the detoxification of reactive oxygen species. PMID:15598086

  14. Activation of human acid sphingomyelinase through modification or deletion of C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Edmunds, Tim; Baker-Malcolm, Jennifer; Karey, Kenneth P; Estes, Scott; Schwarz, Cordula; Hughes, Heather; Van Patten, Scott M

    2003-08-29

    One form of Niemann-Pick disease is caused by a deficiency in the enzymatic activity of acid sphingomyelinase. During efforts to develop an enzyme replacement therapy based on a recombinant form of human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), purified preparations of the recombinant enzyme were found to have substantially increased specific activity if cell harvest media were stored for several weeks at -20 degrees C prior to purification. This increase in activity was found to correlate with the loss of the single free thiol on rhASM, suggesting the involvement of a cysteine residue. It was demonstrated that a variety of chemical modifications of the free cysteine on rhASM all result in substantial activation of the enzyme, and the modified cysteine responsible for this activation was shown to be the C-terminal residue (Cys629). Activation was also achieved by copper-promoted dimerization of rhASM (via cysteine) and by C-terminal truncation using carboxypeptidase Y. The role of the C-terminal cysteine in activation was confirmed by creating mutant forms of rhASM in which this residue was either deleted or replaced by a serine, with both forms having substantially higher specific activity than wild-type rhASM. These results indicate that purified rhASM can be activated in vitro by loss of the free thiol on the C-terminal cysteine via chemical modification, dimerization, or deletion of this amino acid residue. This method of activation is similar to the cysteine switch mechanism described previously for matrix metalloproteinases and could represent a means of posttranslational regulation of ASM activity in vivo.

  15. Effect of Copper on l-Cysteine/l-Cystine Influx in Normal Human Erythrocytes and Erythrocytes of Wilson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Nabarun; Bhattacharjee, Debojyoti; Rout, Jayanta Kumar; Dasgupta, Anindya; Bhattacharya, Gorachand; Sarkar, Chandan; Gangopadhyaya, Prasanta Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a disease of abnormal copper metabolism in which free serum copper level is raised. The objective of the study was to determine, whether in Wilson disease, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx into RBC was decreased or not and the specific amino acid transporter affected by copper in normal human RBC. For l-cysteine/l-cystine influx, ten untreated cases, ten treated cases and ten age and sex matched healthy controls were recruited. To study the effect of copper on l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in RBC, 15 healthy subjects were selected. RBC GSH and l-cysteine/l-cystine influx were estimated by Beautler's and Yildiz's method respectively. In untreated cases, l-cysteine/l-cystine influx and erythrocyte GSH level were decreased showing that elevated level of free copper in serum or media decreased l-cysteine/l-cystine influx in human RBC. Copper treatment inhibited L amino acid transporter in normal RBC specifically.

  16. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  17. Understanding catalytic biomass conversion through data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Ras; B. McKay; G. Rothenberg

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of biomass is a key challenge that we chemists face in the twenty-first century. Worldwide, research is conducted into obtaining bulk chemicals, polymers and fuels. Our project centres on glucose valorisation via furfural derivatives using catalytic hydrogenation. We present her

  18. Cure of hookworm infection with a cysteine protease inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon J Vermeire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hookworm disease is a major global health problem and principal among a number of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs for the chronic disability inflicted that impacts both personal and societal productivity. Mass drug administration most often employs single-dose therapy with just two drugs of the same chemical class to which resistance is a growing concern. New chemical entities with the appropriate single-dose efficacy are needed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using various life-cycle stages of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum in vitro and a hamster model of infection, we report the potent, dose-dependent cidal activities of the peptidyl cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs K11002 (4-mopholino-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl- vinyl sulfone phenyl and K11777 (N-methylpiperazine-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl-vinylsulfone phenyl. The latter is in late pre-clinical testing for submission as an Investigational New Drug (IND with the US Federal Drug Administration as an anti-chagasic. In vitro, K11002 killed hookworm eggs but was without activity against first-stage larvae. The reverse was true for K11777 with a larvicidal potency equal to that of the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole (ABZ. Both CPIs produced morbidity in ex vivo adult hookworms with the activity of K11777 again being at least the equivalent of ABZ. Combinations of either CPI with ABZ enhanced morbidity compared to single compounds. Strikingly, oral treatment of infected hamsters with 100 mg/kg K11777 b.i.d. (i.e., a total daily dose of 200 mg/kg for one day cured infection: a single 100 mg/kg treatment removed >90% of worms. Treatment also reversed the otherwise fatal decrease in blood hemoglobin levels and body weights of hosts. Consistent with its mechanism of action, K11777 decreased by >95% the resident CP activity in parasites harvested from hamsters 8 h post-treatment with a single 100 mg/kg oral dose. CONCLUSION: A new, oral single-dose anthelmintic that

  19. Cure of Hookworm Infection with a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Jon J.; Lantz, Lorine D.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Hookworm disease is a major global health problem and principal among a number of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs) for the chronic disability inflicted that impacts both personal and societal productivity. Mass drug administration most often employs single-dose therapy with just two drugs of the same chemical class to which resistance is a growing concern. New chemical entities with the appropriate single-dose efficacy are needed. Methods and Findings Using various life-cycle stages of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum in vitro and a hamster model of infection, we report the potent, dose-dependent cidal activities of the peptidyl cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs) K11002 (4-mopholino-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl- vinyl sulfone phenyl) and K11777 (N-methylpiperazine-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl-vinylsulfone phenyl). The latter is in late pre-clinical testing for submission as an Investigational New Drug (IND) with the US Federal Drug Administration as an anti-chagasic. In vitro, K11002 killed hookworm eggs but was without activity against first-stage larvae. The reverse was true for K11777 with a larvicidal potency equal to that of the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole (ABZ). Both CPIs produced morbidity in ex vivo adult hookworms with the activity of K11777 again being at least the equivalent of ABZ. Combinations of either CPI with ABZ enhanced morbidity compared to single compounds. Strikingly, oral treatment of infected hamsters with 100 mg/kg K11777 b.i.d. (i.e., a total daily dose of 200 mg/kg) for one day cured infection: a single 100 mg/kg treatment removed >90% of worms. Treatment also reversed the otherwise fatal decrease in blood hemoglobin levels and body weights of hosts. Consistent with its mechanism of action, K11777 decreased by >95% the resident CP activity in parasites harvested from hamsters 8 h post-treatment with a single 100 mg/kg oral dose. Conclusion A new, oral single-dose anthelmintic that is active in an

  20. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judge Bryan S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from non-acetaminophen hepatotoxins have not been well characterized. The objective of this study is to describe APAP-CYS concentrations in these clinical settings as well as to further characterize the concentrations observed following acetaminophen overdose. Methods Samples were collected during three clinical trials in which subjects received 4 g/day of acetaminophen and during an observational study of acetaminophen overdose patients. Trial 1 consisted of non-drinkers who received APAP for 10 days, Trial 2 consisted of moderate drinkers dosed for 10 days and Trial 3 included subjects who chronically abuse alcohol dosed for 5 days. Patients in the observational study were categorized by type of acetaminophen exposure (single or repeated. Serum APAP-CYS was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Trial 1 included 144 samples from 24 subjects; Trial 2 included 182 samples from 91 subjects and Trial 3 included 200 samples from 40 subjects. In addition, we collected samples from 19 subjects with acute acetaminophen ingestion, 7 subjects with repeated acetaminophen exposure and 4 subjects who ingested another hepatotoxin. The mean (SD peak APAP-CYS concentrations for the Trials were: Trial 1- 0.4 (0.20 nmol/ml, Trial 2- 0.1 (0.09 nmol/ml and Trial 3- 0.3 (0.12 nmol/ml. APAP-CYS concentrations varied substantially among the patients with acetaminophen toxicity (0.10 to 27.3 nmol/ml. No subject had detectable APAP

  1. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  2. 2,2′-Dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) as an Effective and Gentle Deprotectant for Common Cysteine Protecting Groups†

    OpenAIRE

    Alayne L. Schroll; Hondal, Robert J.; Flemer, Stevenson

    2011-01-01

    Of all the commercially-available amino acid derivatives for solid phase peptide synthesis, none has a greater abundance of sidechain protection diversity than cysteine. The high reactivity of the cysteine thiol necessitates its attenuation during peptide construction. Moreover, the propensity of cysteine residues within a peptide or protein sequence to form disulfide connectivity allows the opportunity for the peptide chemist to install these disulfides iteratively as a post-synthetic manipu...

  3. High-resolution complex of papain with remnants of a cysteine protease inhibitor derived from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to cocrystallize the cysteine protease papain derived from the latex of Carica papaya with an inhibitor of cysteine proteases (ICP) from Trypanosoma brucei were unsuccessful. However, crystals of papain that diffracted to higher resolution, 1.5 Å, than other crystals of this archetypal cysteine protease were obtained, so the analysis was continued. Surprisingly, the substrate-binding cleft was occupied by two short peptide fragments which have been assigned as remnants of ICP. Compar...

  4. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  5. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  6. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  7. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  8. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  9. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lepelley Maud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is

  10. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore. PMID:19381710

  11. Effect of cysteine on the inactivation of cystathionine gamma-lyase by D,L-propargylglycine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awata,Shiro

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available In vivo inactivation of cystathionine gamma-lyase by D,L-propargylglycine, a suicide inhibitor, was found to be less profound in rat kidney than in the liver. We investigated the cause of this difference using rat tissues. We fractionated kidney extract to characterize the substance which protected enzyme, and found that cysteine exhibits protecting action. Addition of 0.3 mM L-cysteine to the incubation mixture containing dialyzed kidney supernatant and 0.5 mM D,L-propargylglycine resulted in the protection of cystathionine gamma-lyase from the inactivation by the inhibitor. The content of cysteine in the kidney was six-fold higher than that in the liver. Thus, we have concluded that one of the reasons why the in vivo inactivation of cystathionine gamma-lyase in rat kidney was less than that in the liver is the presence of a higher concentration of cysteine in the kidney. S-Carboxymethylcysteine, a cysteine derivative, exhibited a similar, but weaker, protective effect.

  12. Genes involved in cysteine metabolism of Chironomus tepperi are regulated differently by copper and by cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppe, Katherine J; Carew, Melissa E; Long, Sara M; Lee, Siu F; Pettigrove, Vincent; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2014-05-01

    Freshwater invertebrates are often exposed to metal contamination, and changes in gene expression patterns can help understand mechanisms underlying toxicity and act as pollutant-specific biomarkers. In this study the expressions of genes involved in cysteine metabolism are characterized in the midge Chironomus tepperi during exposures to sublethal concentrations of cadmium and copper. These metals altered gene expression of the cysteine metabolism differently. Both metals decreased S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase expression and did not change the expression of S-adenosylmethionine synthetase. Cadmium exposure likely increased cystathionine production by up-regulating cystathionine-β-synthase (CβS) expression, while maintaining control level cysteine production via cystathionine-γ-lyase (CγL) expression. Conversely, copper down-regulated CβS expression and up-regulated CγL expression, which in turn could diminish cystathionine to favor cysteine production. Both metals up-regulated glutathione related expression (γ-glutamylcysteine synthase and glutathione synthetase). Only cadmium up-regulated metallothionein expression and glutathione S-transferase d1 expression was up-regulated only by copper exposure. These different transcription responses of genes involved in cysteine metabolism in C. tepperi point to metal-specific detoxification pathways and suggest that the transsulfuration pathway could provide biomarkers for identifying specific metals.

  13. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schröder

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases.

  14. Electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of L-cysteine at Pt microparticles modified nanofibrous polyaniline film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Song-jiang; LUO Sheng-lian; ZHOU Hai-hui; KUANG Ya-fei; NING Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Platinum(Pt)/nanofibrous polyaniline(PANI) electrode was prepared by pulse galvanostatic method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of L-cysteine at the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results indicate that the pH value of the solution and the Pt loading of the electrode have great effect on the electrocatalytic property of the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode; the suitable Pt loading of the electrode is 600 μg/cm2 and the suitable pH value of the solution is 4.5 for investigating L-cysteine oxidation. The L-cysteine sensor based on the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode has a good selectivity, reproducibility and stability. The Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode is highly sensitive to L-cysteine, and the linear calibration curve for the oxidation of L-cysteine can be observed in the range of 0.2-5.0 mmol/L.

  15. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K., E-mail: e7141@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Tsujibayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Azuma, J. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Kakimoto, K. [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kamada, M. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. {yields} The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. {yields} The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. {yields} The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. {yields} The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  16. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. → The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. → The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. → The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. → The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  17. Effect of cysteine on methionine production by a regulatory mutant of Corynebacterium lilium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Subramanian, Kartik; Bisaria, Virendra S.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.; Gomes, James [Indian Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi (India)

    2005-02-01

    The production of methionine by submerged fermentation using a mutant strain of Corynebacterium lilium was studied to determine suitable conditions for obtaining high productivity. The mutant strain resistant to the methionine analogues ethionine, norleucine, methionine sulfoxide and methionine methylsulfonium chloride produced 2.34 g l{sup -1} of methionine in minimal medium containing glucose as carbon source. The effect of cysteine on methionine production in a 15 l bioreactor was studied by supplementing cysteine intermittently during the course of fermentation. The addition of cysteine (0.75 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}) every 2 h to the production medium increased the production of methionine to 3.39 g l{sup -1}. A metabolic flux analysis showed that during cysteine supplementation the ATP consumption reduced by 20%. It also showed that the increase in flux from phosphoenol pyruvate to oxaloacetate leads to higher methionine production. Results indicate that controlling the respiratory quotient close to 0.75 will produce the highest amount of methionine and that regulatory mutants also resistant to analogues of cysteine would be better methionine over producers. (Author)

  18. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  19. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  20. Accumulation and reactions of H2O2 during the copper ion catalysed autoxidation of cysteine in alkaline medium

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; De Zwart, J.; Wolput, J.H.M.C. van; Cammen, J.C.J.M. van der

    1981-01-01

    The stoichiometry of the copper catalysed alkaline autoxidation of cysteine has been investigated. Products of this oxidation reaction are cystine, H{2}O{2} and H{2}O. No oxygen containing sulfur acids are produced as long as cysteine is present in the reaction liquid.The H{2}O{2} generated reacts with cysteine selectively to form cystine and H{2}O with r{H}{2}{O}{2} = k{H}{2}{O}{2} [CyS][H{2}O{2}] (k{H}{2}{O}{2} = 0.17 1 mol}-{}1{ s}-{}1{).The reaction between H{2}O{2} and cysteine is not ca...

  1. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure

  2. An Unprecedented Combination of Serine and Cysteine Nucleophiles in a Split Intein with an Atypical Split Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Anne-Lena; Mootz, Henning D

    2015-11-27

    Protein splicing mediated by inteins is a self-processive reaction leading to the excision of the internal intein domain from a precursor protein and the concomitant ligation of the flanking sequences, the extein-N and extein-C parts, thereby reconstituting the host protein. Most inteins employ a splicing pathway in which the upstream scissile peptide bond is consecutively rearranged into two thioester or oxoester intermediates before intein excision and rearrangement into the new peptide bond occurs. The catalytically critical amino acids involved at the two splice junctions are cysteine, serine, or threonine. Notably, the only potential combination not observed so far in any of the known or engineered inteins corresponds to the transesterification from an oxoester to a thioester, which suggested that this formal uphill reaction with regard to the thermodynamic stability might be incompatible with intein-mediated catalysis. We show that corresponding mutations also led to inactive gp41-1 and AceL-TerL inteins. We report the novel GOS-TerL split intein identified from metagenomic databases as the first intein harboring the combination of Ser1 and Cys+1 residues. Mutational analysis showed that its efficient splicing reaction indeed follows the shift from oxoester to thioester and thus represents a rare diversion from the canonical pathway. Furthermore, the GOS-TerL intein has an atypical split site close to the N terminus. The Int(N) fragment could be shortened from 37 to 28 amino acids and exchanged with the 25-amino acid Int(N) fragment from the AceL-TerL intein, indicating a high degree of promiscuity of the Int(C) fragment of the GOS-TerL intein.

  3. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on oviposition rate of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annadana, S; Peters, J; Gruden, K; Schipper, A; Outchkourov, N S; Beekwilder, M J.; Udayakumar, M; Jongsma, M A.

    2002-07-01

    Proteolytic activity in whole insect extracts of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was found to belong predominantly to the class of cysteine proteases. The pH optimum of the general proteolytic activity was determined to be 3.5, which is low when compared to other insects using cysteine proteases for protein digestion. The proteinaceous cysteine protease inhibitors chicken cystatin, potato cystatin and sea anemone equistatin inhibited in vitro more than 90% of the protease activity. To test in vivo the biological effect of such inhibitors on the oviposition rate of western flower thrips, recombinant potato cystatin and equistatin were fed to adult females. A gradual reduction in oviposition rate to about 45% of control was observed when reared on these PIs for a period of 5 days, with no increase in mortality. These results are discussed in the light of the application of protease inhibitors in transgenic plants to control this insect pest.

  4. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-14

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. PMID:27305447

  5. Restoration of proper trafficking to the cell surface for membrane proteins harboring cysteine mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Angelica; Holmgren, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    A common phenotype for many genetic diseases is that the cell is unable to deliver full-length membrane proteins to the cell surface. For some forms of autism, hereditary spherocytosis and color blindness, the culprits are single point mutations to cysteine. We have studied two inheritable cysteine mutants of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels that produce achromatopsia, a common form of severe color blindness. By taking advantage of the reactivity of cysteine's sulfhydryl group, we modified these mutants with chemical reagents that attach moieties with similar chemistries to the wild-type amino acids' side chains. We show that these modifications restored proper delivery to the cell membrane. Once there, the channels exhibited normal functional properties. This strategy might provide a unique opportunity to assess the chemical nature of membrane protein traffic problems. PMID:23082193

  6. Biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hilda M; Marcet, Ricardo; Sarracent, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Human trichomonosis, infection with Trichomonas vaginalis, is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The host-parasite interaction and pathophysiological processes of trichomonosis remain incompletely understood. This review focuses on the advancements reached in the area of the pathogenesis of T. vaginalis, especially in the role of the cysteine proteinases. It highlights various approaches made in this field and lists a group of trichomonad cysteine proteinases involved in diverse processes such as invasion of the mucous layer, cytoadherence, cytotoxicity, cytoskeleton disruption of red blood cells, hemolysis, and evasion of the host immune response. A better understanding of the biological roles of cysteine proteinases in the pathogenesis of this parasite could be used in the identification of new chemotherapeutic targets. An additional advantage could be the development of a vaccine in order to reduce transmission of T. vaginalis.

  7. Hieronymain I, a new cysteine peptidase isolated from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mariela A; Pardo, Marcelo F; Caffini, Néstor O; López, Laura M I

    2003-02-01

    A new peptidase, named hieronymain I, was purified to homogeneity from unripe fruits of Bromelia hieronymi Mez (Bromeliaceae) by acetone fractionation followed by cation exchange chromatography (FPLC) on CM-Sepharose FF. Homogeneity of the enzyme was confirmed by mass spectroscopy (MALDI-TOF), isoelectric focusing, and SDS-PAGE. Hieronymain is a basic peptidase (pI > 9.3) and its molecular mass was 24,066 Da. Maximum proteolytic activity on casein (>90% of maximum activity) was achieved at pH 8.5-9.5. The enzyme was completely inhibited by E-64 and iodoacetic acid and activated by the addition of cysteine; these results strongly suggest that the isolated protease should be included within the cysteine group. The N-terminal sequence of hieronymain (ALPESIDWRAKGAVTEVKRQDG) was compared with 25 plant cysteine proteases that showed more than 50% of identity.

  8. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  9. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel; Leifsson, Pall S; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2013-10-18

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected to histopathology using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and immunohistochemistry using caspase-3 antibodies. Histopathological evaluation revealed lesions of stage I which was characterized by presence of viable parasite surrounded with minimal to moderate inflammatory cells and stage III characterized by the presence of a disintegrating parasite surrounded with high inflammatory cells. The results of immunohistochemistry indicated caspase-3 positive cells interspaced between inflammatory infiltrate mainly in stage I lesions, indicating the presence of cysteine protease. This result confirms the earlier hypothesis that cysteine protease may play a role in inducing immune evasion through apoptosis around viable T. solium cysts.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of cystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor, from bufo melanostictus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wa; Ji, Senlin; Zhang, A-Mei; Han, Qinqin; Feng, Yue; Song, Yuzhu

    2013-01-01

    Cystatins are efficient inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteinases, and they serve various important physiological functions. In this study, a novel cystatin, Cystatin-X, was cloned from a cDNA library of the skin of Bufo melanostictus. The single nonglycosylated polypeptide chain of Cystatin-X consisted of 102 amino acid residues, including seven cysteines. Evolutionary analysis indicated that Cystatin-X can be grouped with family 1 cystatins. It contains cystatin-conserved motifs known to interact with the active site of cysteine proteinases. Recombinant Cystatin-X expressed and purified from Escherichia coli exhibited obvious inhibitory activity against cathepsin B. rCystatin-X at a concentration of 8 µM inhibited nearly 80% of cathepsin B activity within 15 s, and about 90% of cathepsin B activity within 15 min. The Cystatin-X identified in this study can play an important role in host immunity and in the medical effect of B. melanostictus.

  11. Development of Catalytic Cooking Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden); Tena, Emmanuel; Berger, Marc [Gaz de France (France)

    2004-04-01

    Gas catalytic combustion for gas stoves or cooking plates (closed catalytic burner system with ceramic plates) is a very promising technique in terms of ease of cleaning, power modulation and emissions. Previous investigations show that wire mesh catalysts, prepared and supplied by Catator AB (CAT), seem to be very well suited for such applications. Beside significantly reducing the NOx-emissions, these catalysts offer important advantages such as good design flexibility, low pressure drop and high heat transfer capacity, where the latter leads to a quick thermal response. Prior to this project, Gaz de France (GdF) made a series of measurements with CAT's wire mesh catalysts in their gas cooking plates and compared the measured performance with similar results obtained with theirs cordierite monolith catalysts. Compared to the monolith catalyst, the wire mesh catalyst was found to enable very promising results with respect to both emission levels (<10 mg NO{sub x} /kWh, <5 mg CO/kWh) and life-time (>8000 h vs. 700 h at 200 kW/m{sup 2}). It was however established that the radiation and hence, the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate, was significantly less than is usually measured in combination with the monolith (15 % vs. 32 %). It was believed that the latter could be improved by developing new burner designs based on CAT's wire mesh concept. As a consequence, a collaboration project between GdF, CAT and the Swedish Gas Technology AB was created. This study reports on the design, the construction and the evaluation of new catalytic burners, based on CAT's wire mesh catalysts, used for the combustion of natural gas in gas cooking stoves. The evaluation of the burners was performed with respect to key factors such as thermal efficiency, emission quality and pressure drop, etc, by the use of theoretical simulations and experimental tests. Impacts of parameters such as the the wire mesh number, the wire mesh structure (planar or folded), the

  12. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  13. A Redox 2-Cys Mechanism Regulates the Catalytic Activity of Divergent Cyclophilins1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Bruna Medéia; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Ambrosio, Andre Luis Berteli; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Brasil de Souza, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalvez; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Whittaker, Sara Britt-Marie; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Matos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    The citrus (Citrus sinensis) cyclophilin CsCyp is a target of the Xanthomonas citri transcription activator-like effector PthA, required to elicit cankers on citrus. CsCyp binds the citrus thioredoxin CsTdx and the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and is a divergent cyclophilin that carries the additional loop KSGKPLH, invariable cysteine (Cys) residues Cys-40 and Cys-168, and the conserved glutamate (Glu) Glu-83. Despite the suggested roles in ATP and metal binding, the functions of these unique structural elements remain unknown. Here, we show that the conserved Cys residues form a disulfide bond that inactivates the enzyme, whereas Glu-83, which belongs to the catalytic loop and is also critical for enzyme activity, is anchored to the divergent loop to maintain the active site open. In addition, we demonstrate that Cys-40 and Cys-168 are required for the interaction with CsTdx and that CsCyp binds the citrus carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II YSPSAP repeat. Our data support a model where formation of the Cys-40-Cys-168 disulfide bond induces a conformational change that disrupts the interaction of the divergent and catalytic loops, via Glu-83, causing the active site to close. This suggests a new type of allosteric regulation in divergent cyclophilins, involving disulfide bond formation and a loop-displacement mechanism. PMID:23709667

  14. Mutagenicity of the cysteine S-conjugate sulfoxides of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Roy M; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2013-04-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain.

  15. Pectin-cysteine conjugate: synthesis and in-vitro evaluation of its potential for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoob, Sayeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Dorkoosh, Farid; Kafedjiiski, Krum; Loretz, Brigitta; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2006-12-01

    This study was aimed at improving certain properties of pectin by introduction of thiol moieties on the polymer. Thiolated pectin was synthesized by covalent attachment of cysteine. Pectin-cysteine conjugate was evaluated for its ability to be degraded by pectinolytic enzyme. The toxicity profile of the thiolated polymer in Caco-2-cells, its permeation enhancing effect and its mucoadhesive and swelling properties were studied. Moreover insulin-loaded hydrogel beads of the new polymer were examined for their stability in simulated gastrointestinal conditions and their drug release profile. The new polymer displayed 892.27 +/- 68.68 micromol thiol groups immobilized per g polymer, and proved to have retained its biodegradability, upon addition of Pectinex Ultra SPL in-vitro, determined by viscosity measurements and titration method. Pectin-cysteine showed no severe toxicity in Caco-2 cells, as tested by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Moreover, the synthesized polymer exhibited a relative permeation enhancement ratio of 1.61 for sodium fluorescein, compared to unmodified pectin. Pectin-cysteine conjugate exhibited approximately 5-fold increased in in-vitro adhesion duration and significantly improved cohesive properties. Zinc pectin-cysteine beads showed improved stability in simulated gastrointestinal media; however, insulin release from these beads followed the same profile as unmodified zinc pectinate beads. Due to favourable safety and biodegradability profile, and improved cohesive and permeation-enhancing properties, pectin-cysteine might be a promising excipient in various transmucosal drug delivery systems.

  16. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption.The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Different views of the AuNP surface coverage. Distance map describing the position of each molecule in relation to the others on the AuNP (alpha carbon distances). See DOI: 10.1039/C

  17. Ethylene-regulated expression of a carnation cysteine proteinase during flower petal senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, M L; Larsen, P B; Woodson, W R

    1995-06-01

    The senescence of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower petals is regulated by the phytohormone ethylene and is associated with considerable catabolic activity including the loss of protein. In this paper we present the molecular cloning of a cysteine proteinase and show that its expression is regulated by ethylene and associated with petal senescence. A 1600 bp cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using a 5'-specific primer and 3'-nonspecific primer designed to amplify a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase cDNA from reverse-transcribed stylar RNA. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned product (pDCCP1) was found to share significant homology to several cysteine proteinases rather than ACC synthase. A single open reading frame of 428 amino acids was shown to share significant homology with other plant cysteine proteinases including greater than 70% identity with a cysteine proteinase from Arabidopsis thaliana. Amino acids in the active site of cysteine proteinases were conserved in the pDCCP1 peptide. RNA gel blot analysis revealed that the expression of pDCCP1 increased substantially with the onset of ethylene production and senescence of petals. Increased pDCCP1 expression was also associated with ethylene production in other senescing floral organs including ovaries and styles. The pDCCP1 transcript accumulated in petals treated with exogenous ethylene within 3 h and treatment of flowers with 2,5-norbornadiene, an inhibitor of ethylene action, prevented the increase in pDCCP1 expression in petals. The temporal and spatial patterns of pDCCP1 expression suggests a role for cysteine proteinase in the loss of protein during floral senescence.

  18. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  19. Effect of cysteine on the inactivation of cystathionine gamma-lyase by D,L-propargylglycine.

    OpenAIRE

    Awata,Shiro; Nakayama,Kazuko; SUZUKI, Isao; Kodama, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    In vivo inactivation of cystathionine gamma-lyase by D,L-propargylglycine, a suicide inhibitor, was found to be less profound in rat kidney than in the liver. We investigated the cause of this difference using rat tissues. We fractionated kidney extract to characterize the substance which protected enzyme, and found that cysteine exhibits protecting action. Addition of 0.3 mM L-cysteine to the incubation mixture containing dialyzed kidney supernatant and 0.5 mM D,L-propargylglycine resulted i...

  20. An Assay Study of Molecular Recognition of Amino Acids in Water: Covalent Imprinting of Cysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Yu, Donghong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic N-(9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH) receptor was pre- pared by co-polymerizing (9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-S-(1-propene-2-thiol)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SCH2CHCH2)-OH) and a non-imprinted polymer prepared from 1-propene-1-thiol photo-chemically 15 h at ...... reproducible and contain constant binding strengths and recognition properties. Furthermore, we proved that short incubation periods resulted in fast and efficient thiol-disulfide interchange reactions....

  1. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M;

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  2. Hg(2+) mediated quinazoline ensemble for highly selective recognition of Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2014-04-01

    A fluorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) ion and Cysteine based on quinazoline platform was designed and synthesized by one step reaction and characterized by using common spectroscopic methods. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations shows that probe behaves as "ON-OFF" fluorescent quenching sensor via electron transfer/heavy atom effect. Receptor was found to exhibit selective fluorescence quenching behavior over the other competitive metal ions, and also the receptor-Hg(2+) ensemble act as an efficient "OFF-ON" sensor for Cysteine. Moreover this sensor has also been successfully applied to detection of Hg(2+) in natural water samples with good recovery. PMID:24384358

  3. DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8) Is a Double-cysteine-ligated Heme Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Ian; Smith, Aaron T.; Senturia, Rachel; Chen, Yanqiu; Scheidemantle, Brooke D.; Burstyn, Judith N.; Guo, Feng

    2011-01-01

    All known heme-thiolate proteins ligate the heme iron using one cysteine side chain. We previously found that DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8), an essential microRNA processing factor, associates with heme of unknown redox state when overexpressed in Escherichia coli. On the basis of the similarity of the 450-nm Soret absorption peak of the DGCR8-heme complex to that of cytochrome P450 containing ferrous heme with CO bound, we identified cysteine 352 as a probable axial ligand in DGCR8. Her...

  4. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  5. Two Japanese CADASIL families exhibiting Notch3 mutation R75P not involving cysteine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Toshiki; Muranishi, Manabu; Torugun, Torusunjian; Tango, Hiromi; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kudeken, Tukasa; Kawase, Yuji; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Oshima, Fumiko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Most previously reported mutations in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) result in an odd number of cysteine residues within the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in Notch3. We report here R75P mutation in two Japanese CADASIL families not directly involving cysteine residues located within the first EGF-like repeats. Probands in both families had repeated episodes of stroke, depression, dementia as well as T2 high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter, but fewer white matter lesions in the temporal pole on MRI. These families provide new insights into the diagnosis and pathomechanisms of CADASIL. PMID:19043263

  6. Partial Purification and Properties of a Cysteine Protease from Citrus Red Mite Panonychus citri

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Seong Chul; Her, Kyu-Hee; Kim, Heung-Up; Lee, Jaechun; Lee, Sang Pyo; Chung, Young-Bae

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported that the citrus red mites Panonychus citri were an important allergen of citrus-cultivating farmers in Jeju Island. The aim of the present study was to purify and assess properties of a cysteine protease from the mites acting as a potentially pathogenic factor to citrus-cultivating farmers. A cysteine protease was purified using column chromatography of Mono Q anion exchanger and Superdex 200 HR gel filtration. It was estimated to be 46 kDa by gel filtration colu...

  7. Preparation of Cystein from Cysteine Cuprous Mercaptide%由半胱氨酸亚铜制取半胱氨酸

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勋; 胡敏; 姚小平

    2015-01-01

    In this paper ,a new preparation method of cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate from cysteine cu‐prous mcercaptide ,which is prepared by the reduction and precipitation of cystine with cuprous oxide has been introduced ,including re‐precipitation of cysteine cuprous mercaptide ,removal of copper using H2 S , decoloration ,crystallization and recrystalization .The yield of the product is up to 12 .4% ,with the quality according with the Japanese AJI standards .%研究了一种用氧化亚铜将胱氨酸还原沉淀为半胱氨酸亚铜,再由此制备半胱氨酸盐酸盐一水物的新方法.该方法包含半胱氨酸亚铜再沉淀,H2 S法脱铜,脱色,产品结晶,重结晶等步骤,半胱氨酸盐酸盐一水物收率达12.4%,产品质量符合日本味之素标准.

  8. Dealing with the sulfur part of cysteine: four enzymatic steps degrade l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate in Arabidopsis mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfler, Saskia; Lorenz, Christin; Busch, Tjorven; Brinkkötter, Mascha; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Braun, Hans-Peter; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M

    2016-07-01

    Amino acid catabolism is essential for adjusting pool sizes of free amino acids and takes part in energy production as well as nutrient remobilization. The carbon skeletons are generally converted to precursors or intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In the case of cysteine, the reduced sulfur derived from the thiol group also has to be oxidized in order to prevent accumulation to toxic concentrations. Here we present a mitochondrial sulfur catabolic pathway catalyzing the complete oxidation of l-cysteine to pyruvate and thiosulfate. After transamination to 3-mercaptopyruvate, the sulfhydryl group from l-cysteine is transferred to glutathione by sulfurtransferase 1 and oxidized to sulfite by the sulfur dioxygenase ETHE1. Sulfite is then converted to thiosulfate by addition of a second persulfide group by sulfurtransferase 1. This pathway is most relevant during early embryo development and for vegetative growth under light-limiting conditions. Characterization of a double mutant produced from Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertion lines for ETHE1 and sulfurtransferase 1 revealed that an intermediate of the ETHE1 dependent pathway, most likely a persulfide, interferes with amino acid catabolism and induces early senescence. PMID:27105581

  9. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  10. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  11. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  12. 2,2'-Dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) as an effective and gentle deprotectant for common cysteine protecting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroll, Alayne L; Hondal, Robert J; Flemer, Stevenson

    2012-01-01

    Of all the commercially available amino acid derivatives for solid phase peptide synthesis, none has a greater abundance of side-chain protection diversity than cysteine. The high reactivity of the cysteine thiol necessitates its attenuation during peptide construction. Moreover, the propensity of cysteine residues within a peptide or protein sequence to form disulfide connectivity allows the opportunity for the peptide chemist to install these disulfides iteratively as a post-synthetic manipulation through the judicious placement of orthogonal pairs of cysteine S-protection within the peptide's architecture. It is important to continuously discover new vectors of deprotection for these different blocking protocols in order to achieve the highest degree of orthogonality between the removal of one species in the presence of another. We report here a complete investigation of the scope and limitations of the deprotective potential of 2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) on a selection of commercially available Cys S-protecting groups. The gentle conditions of DTNP in a TFA solvent system show a remarkable ability to deprotect some cysteine blocking functionality traditionally removable only by more harsh or forcing conditions. Beyond illustrating the deprotective ability of this reagent cocktail within a cysteine-containing peptide sequence, the utility of this method was further demonstrated through iterative disulfide formation in oxytocin and apamin test peptides. It is shown that this methodology has high potential as a stand-alone cysteine deprotection technique or in further manipulation of disulfide architecture within a more complex cysteine-containing peptide template. PMID:22083608

  13. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; Jie-Li Mao; Ying-Jun Zhao; Chuan-You Li; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2015-01-01

    L‐Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabo-lism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L‐cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage‐dependent manner. Elevating cel ular L‐cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L‐cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O‐acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cel marker as wel as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L‐cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cel specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L‐cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post‐transcriptional mech-anism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L‐cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cel niche by regulating basal‐and auxin‐induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L‐Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth.

  14. Accumulation and Reactions of H2O2 during the copper ion Catalyzed Autoxidation of Cysteine in Alkaline Medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Zwart, J.; Wolput, J.H.M.C. van; Cammen, J.C.J.M. van der

    1981-01-01

    The stoichiometry of the copper catalysed alkaline autoxidation of cysteine has been investigated. Products of this oxidation reaction are cystine, H{2}O{2} and H{2}O. No oxygen containing sulfur acids are produced as long as cysteine is present in the reaction liquid.The H{2}O{2} generated reacts w

  15. Isolation and molecular characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease cDNAs from Western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, A.G.J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are predominant in thrips guts (TGs) and, therefore, a suitable target for selecting effective protease inhibitors against western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis). We report the isolation of four full-length cysteine protease cDNA clones from thrips in a two-step PCR ap

  16. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Mao, Jie-Li; Zhao, Ying-Jun; Li, Chuan-You; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2015-02-01

    L-Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabolism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L-cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage-dependent manner. Elevating cellular L-cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L-cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O-acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cell marker as well as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L-cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cell specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L-cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post-transcriptional mechanism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L-cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cell niche by regulating basal- and auxin-induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L-Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth.

  17. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...... of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...... work with new possibilities of development of the work, but also suggestions for development of the concept of catalytic processes....

  18. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  19. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vedi V.E.; Rovenskii A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  20. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  1. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  2. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  3. Preparation and Catalytic Oxidation Activity on 2-mercaptoethanol of a Novel Catalytic Cellulose Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yu-yuan; LI Ying-jie; CHEN Wen-xing; Lü Wang-yang; Lü Su-fang; XU Min-hong; LIU Fan

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt tetra(N-carbonylacylic) aminophthalocyanine was supported on cellulose fibres by graft reaction to obtain a novel polymer catalyst, catalytic cellulose fibres (CCF),and the optimal supporting conditions were pH = 6, 80℃,t = 120 min. The catalytic oxidation activity of CCF towards oxidation of 2-mereaptoethanol (MEA) in aqueous solution was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that CCF had good catalytic oxidation activity on MEA at room temperature, causing no secondary pollution and remaining efficient for the repetitive tests with no obvious decrease of catalytic activity.

  4. Key Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis and Subcellular Localization of Sulfur Oxygenase-Reductase of Acidianus tengchongensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; She, Qunxin;

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of known sulfur oxygenase-reductases (SORs) and the SOR-like sequences identified from public databases indicated that they all possess three cysteine residues within two conserved motifs (V-G-P-K-V-C31 and C101-X-X-C104; numbering according to the Acidianus tengchongensis numbering system......). The thio-modifying reagent N-ethylmaleimide and Zn2+ strongly inhibited the activities of the SORs of A. tengchongensis, suggesting that cysteine residues are important. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct four mutant SORs with cysteines replaced by serine or alanine. The purified mutant...... proteins were investigated in parallel with the wild-type SOR. Replacement of any cysteine reduced SOR activity by 98.4 to 100%, indicating that all the cysteine residues are crucial to SOR activities. Circular-dichroism and fluorescence spectrum analyses revealed that the wild-type and mutant SORs have...

  5. Low efficiency deasphalting and catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for converting an asphaltene and metals containing heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter, more valuable products the metals comprising Ni and V. It comprises: demetallizing the feed by deasphalting the feed in a solvent deasphalting means operating at solvent deasphalting conditions including a solvent: feed volume ratio of about 1:1 to 4:1, using a solvent selected from the group of C4 to 400 degrees F. hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof; recovering from the solvent rich fraction a demetallized oil intermediate product, having a boiling range and containing at least 10 wt.% of the asphaltenes, and 5 to 30% of the Ni and V, and at least 10 wt.% of the solvent present in the solvent rich phase produced in the deasphalting means; catalytically cracking the demetallized oil intermediate product in a catalytic cracking means operating at catalytic cracking conditions to produce a catalytically cracked product vapor fraction having a lower boiling range than the boiling range of the demetallized oil intermediate product; and fractionating the catalytically cracked product in a fractionation means to produce catalytically cracked product fractions

  6. Hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets with high MoS2 loading with enhanced electro-catalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Xiao, Han; Zhou, Bowen; Huang, Feifan; Zhou, Shoubin; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Incorporation of high-loading redox-active materials with small amounts of graphene is a general protocol to achieve high-performance catalysts. Herein, hierarchical MoS2-reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (denoted as MoS2-rGO nanosheets) hybrids with a loading of MoS2 as high as 94 wt% are synthesized. The obtained hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets simultaneously integrate the structural and compositional design rationales for high-efficiency and durable electrocatalysts based on high weight ratio of MoS2 in hybrid composite, highly stable/conducting rGO, well-dispersed two-dimensional ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, more exposed edge sites and micro/nano hierarchical structure. When evaluated as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions, the hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets demonstrates enhanced activity and excellent stability, promising their applications in MoS2 based electrochemical, photo-catalytic and photo-elecrocatalytic cells.

  7. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  8. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on oviposition rate of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annadana, S.; Peters, J.; Jongsma, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Proteolytic activity in whole insect extracts of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, was found to belong predominantly to the class of cysteine proteases. The pH optimum of the general proteolytic activity was determined to be 3.5, which is low when compared to other insects using

  9. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  10. Evolutionary Acquisition of Cysteines determines FOXO Paralog-Specific Redox Signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, Harmjan; van Dorenmalen, Kim; de Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn Marius; Vermeulen, Michiel; Dansen, T B

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein functi

  11. Evolutionary acquisition of cysteines determines FOXO paralog-specific redox signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putker, Marrit; Vos, HR; Van Dorenmalen, Kim; De Ruiter, Hesther; Duran, Ana G.; Snel, Berend; Burgering, Boudewijn M T; Vermeulen, M; Dansen, TB

    2015-01-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) signaling, the translation of an oxidative intracellular environment into a cellular response, is mediated by the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine thiols. The latter can result in disulfide formation between protein hetero- or homodimers that alter protein functi

  12. Micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics and prebiotics, a review of effectiveness in reducing HIV progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical t

  13. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G.K. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical t

  14. Improved stability of halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 by replacement of cysteine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Lixia; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E.T.; Lutje Spelberg, Jeffrey H.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, DB

    2002-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenase from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 is a homo-tetrameric protein containing three cysteines per 28 kDa subunit. Under oxidizing conditions the enzyme was found to be susceptible to inactivation which could be prevented by the addition of beta-mercaptoethanol or glycerol. Gel f

  15. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, Steven H.L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing

  16. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  17. Cysteine: A Novel Neural Inducer for Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Soleimani Mehranjani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into various cell types. Since cysteine has structural similarities to neuronal inducers β-mercaptoethanol and glutathione, we examined its effect on neural induction of rat bone marrow MSCs. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cells were treated in a medium containing 1mM cysteine for 24 hours prior to treatment with neuron inducing medium containing 10 mM cysteine for 1, 2 and 3 hours. Cell viability and morphology were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and, Hoechst, propidium iodide and acridine orange staining respectively. Expression of nestin and β-Tubulin III genes, as neural cell-specific markers, was studied reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The data was statistically analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and Tukey’s test and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: After 3 hours of treatment, neuron like morphology with a considerable expression of nestin and β-Tubulin III genes was apparent. The mean cell viability was not significantly different at 1, 2 and 3 hours following induction, compared with the control cells. Conclusion: Cysteine can induce neural features in rat bone marrow MSCs without reducing cell viability. Therefore, it can be considered as a safer alternative to toxic neural inducer agents such as β-mercaptoethanol.

  18. Glutathione provides a source of cysteine essential for intracellular multiplication of Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Alkhuder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterium causing the zoonotic disease tularemia. Its ability to multiply and survive in macrophages is critical for its virulence. By screening a bank of HimarFT transposon mutants of the F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS to isolate intracellular growth-deficient mutants, we selected one mutant in a gene encoding a putative gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT. This gene (FTL_0766 was hence designated ggt. The mutant strain showed impaired intracellular multiplication and was strongly attenuated for virulence in mice. Here we present evidence that the GGT activity of F. tularensis allows utilization of glutathione (GSH, gamma-glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine dipeptide as cysteine sources to ensure intracellular growth. This is the first demonstration of the essential role of a nutrient acquisition system in the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. GSH is the most abundant source of cysteine in the host cytosol. Thus, the capacity this intracellular bacterial pathogen has evolved to utilize the available GSH, as a source of cysteine in the host cytosol, constitutes a paradigm of bacteria-host adaptation.

  19. Submolecular Electronic Mapping of Single Cysteine Molecules by in Situ Scanning Tunneling Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin; Nazmutdinov, R. R.;

    2009-01-01

    We have used L-Cysteine (Cys) as a model system to study the surface electronic structures of single molecules at the submolecular level in aqueous buffer solution by a combination of electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (in situ STM), electrochemistry including voltammetry and chronocou...

  20. Structural basis for specificity of papain-like cysteine protease proregions toward their cognate enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Coulombe, R; Jenkins, J; Cygler, M

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to the proregions of papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to be good and selective inhibitors of their parental enzymes. The molecular basis for their selectivity, quite remarkable in some cases, is not fully understood. The recent determination of the crys

  1. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Rautela, J.; Duivenvoorden, H.M.; Jayatilleke, K.M.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.; Parker, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvi

  2. Facile synthesis of gold nanoribbons by L-cysteine at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lan; ZHANG Yu; GUO ZhiRui; GU Ning

    2009-01-01

    Highly crystalline gold nanoribbons have been synthesized via a simple method by L-cysteine reduc-tion of aqueous chloroaurate ions at room temperature, without additional capping agent or surfactant. Based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption studies for the intermediate products, the formation of gold nanoribbons is regarded as a kind of oriented attachment growth.

  3. Inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum oocyst production by membrane-permeant cysteine protease inhibitor E64d.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eksi, S.; Czesny, B.; Gemert, G.J.A. van; Sauerwein, R.W.; Eling, W.M.C.; Williamson, K.C.

    2007-01-01

    During asexual intraerythrocytic growth, Plasmodium falciparum utilizes hemoglobin obtained from the host red blood cell (RBC) as a nutrient source. Papain-like cysteine proteases, falcipains 2 and 3, have been reported to be involved in hemoglobin digestion and are targets of current antimalarial d

  4. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel;

    2013-01-01

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected...... protease may play a role in inducing immune evasion through apoptosis around viable T. solium cysts....

  5. Recombinant Cysteine Proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi Implicated in Human and Dog T-Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa Pinheiro, Paulo Henrique; de Souza Dias, Suzana; EULÁLIO, Kelsen Dantas; Mendonça, Ivete L.; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2005-01-01

    High in vitro lymphoproliferative responses were induced in humans and dogs by a recombinant Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi cysteine proteinase, with secretion of IFN-γ in asymptomatic subjects or of IFN-γ, interleukin 4 (IL-4), and IL-10 in oligosymptomatic subjects. In contrast, responses of symptomatic patients and dogs were lower, with production of IL-4 and IL-10.

  6. Immobilization of Cysteine-Tagged Proteins on Electrode Surfaces by Thiol-Ene Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Vilà, Neus; Klein, Tobias; Kohring, Gert-Wieland; Mazurenko, Ievgen; Walcarius, Alain; Etienne, Mathieu

    2016-07-13

    Thiol-ene click chemistry can be exploited for the immobilization of cysteine-tagged dehydrogenases in an active form onto carbon electrodes (glassy carbon and carbon felt). The electrode surfaces have been first modified with vinylphenyl groups by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding diazonium salts generated in situ from 4-vinylaniline. The grafting process has been optimized in order to not hinder the electrochemical regeneration of NAD(+)/NADH cofactor and soluble mediators such as ferrocenedimethanol and [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+). Having demonstrated the feasibility of thiol-ene click chemistry for attaching ferrocene moieties onto those carbon surfaces, the same approach was then applied to the immobilization of d-sorbitol dehydrogenases with cysteine tag. These proteins can be effectively immobilized (as pointed out by XPS), and the cysteine tag (either 1 or 2 cysteine moieties at the N terminus of the polypeptide chain) was proven to maintain the enzymatic activity of the dehydrogenase upon grafting. The bioelectrode was applied to electroenzymatic enantioselective reduction of d-fructose to d-sorbitol, as a case study. PMID:27299176

  7. Role of conserved cysteine residues in Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Baura, Valter A; Aquino, Bruno; Huergo, Luciano F; Kadowaki, Marco A S; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Wassem, Roseli; Monteiro, Rose A

    2009-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium that associates with economically important crops. NifA protein, the transcriptional activator of nif genes in H. seropedicae, binds to nif promoters and, together with RNA polymerase-sigma(54) holoenzyme, catalyzes the formation of open complexes to allow transcription initiation. The activity of H. seropedicae NifA is controlled by ammonium and oxygen levels, but the mechanisms of such control are unknown. Oxygen sensitivity is attributed to a conserved motif of cysteine residues in NifA that spans the central AAA+ domain and the interdomain linker that connects the AAA+ domain to the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Here we mutagenized this conserved motif of cysteines and assayed the activity of mutant proteins in vivo. We also purified the mutant variants of NifA and tested their capacity to bind to the nifB promoter region. Chimeric proteins between H. seropedicae NifA, an oxygen-sensitive protein, and Azotobacter vinelandii NifA, an oxygen-tolerant protein, were constructed and showed that the oxygen response is conferred by the central AAA+ and C-terminal DNA binding domains of H. seropedicae NifA. We conclude that the conserved cysteine motif is essential for NifA activity, although single cysteine-to-serine mutants are still competent at binding DNA. PMID:19573596

  8. Partial purification and properties of a cysteine protease from citrus red mite Panonychus citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Chul; Her, Kyu-Hee; Kim, Heung-Up; Lee, Jaechun; Lee, Sang Pyo; Chung, Young-Bae

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have reported that the citrus red mites Panonychus citri were an important allergen of citrus-cultivating farmers in Jeju Island. The aim of the present study was to purify and assess properties of a cysteine protease from the mites acting as a potentially pathogenic factor to citrus-cultivating farmers. A cysteine protease was purified using column chromatography of Mono Q anion exchanger and Superdex 200 HR gel filtration. It was estimated to be 46 kDa by gel filtration column chromatography and consisted of 2 polypeptides, at least. Cysteine protease inhibitors, such as trans poxy-succinyl-L-leucyl-amido (4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and iodoacetic acid (IAA) totally inhibited the enzyme activities, whereas serine or metalloprotease inhibitors did not affect the activities. In addition, the purified enzyme degraded human IgG, collagen, and fibronectin, but not egg albumin. From these results, the cysteine protease of the mites might be involved in the pathogenesis such as tissue destruction and penetration instead of nutrient digestion. PMID:24623894

  9. Schizophrenia and oxidative stress: glutamate cysteine ligase modifier as a susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosic, Mirjana; Ott, Jurg; Barral, Sandra;

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder. Glutathione (GSH), a redox regulator, is decreased in patients' cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex. The gene of the key GSH-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM...

  10. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malek, Mahrooz [Medical Image Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oghabian, Mohammad Ali [Research Centre for Sciences and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoudi, Afshin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gu Ning; Zhang Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biomaterials and Devices, Nanjing (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  11. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  12. Cysteine could change the transport mechanism of PVP-coated silver nanoparticles in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Lin, S.; Wiesner, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can hardly be removed by wastewater treatment plant and have big potential to enter groundwater, jeopardizing the water quality & aquatic ecosystem. Most AgNPs have surface coatings such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which dominate their transport in porous media. Our previous study shows that PVP may promote the deposition of AgNPs on silica surface by a bridging mechanism. This study further explored how cysteine, a natural organic matter type, may influence the role of the PVP coating on AgNP translocation. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurement (Figure 1A) shows that the PVP coating rendered the AgNP dispersion high stability during the measuring period (3hrs). Addition of 100 ppm cysteine to the dispersion resulted in a rapid decrease in particle size from 100nm to 52nm within one hour, following which no further decline in particle size occurred. Column experiment results (Figure 1B) show that corresponding to the particle size change was a substantial decrease in particle deposition rates: introduction of 100 ppm cysteine into the particle dispersion resulted in a decrease in AgNP attenuation by the porous medium from 67% to 26%. The decline in particle size suggested that cysteine may have displaced the macromolecular PVP from the particle surface. Desorption of PVP resulted in a weakening or vanish of polymer bridging effect which in turn lowered the deposition rates substantially. This study demonstrated an implication of environmental transformation of coated AgNPs to their mobility in saturated sand aquifers. Acknowledgment Xinyao Yang appreciates the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.:41101475) for covering the registration fee and traveling costs.igure 1 Particle size measurement (A) and breakthrough curves (B) of PVP-coated silver nanoparticle in the absence and presence of cysteine: pH=7.0, ionic strength=1mM, flow rate=1ml/min.

  13. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  14. N-Acetyl cysteine restores viability and function of rat odontoblast-like cells impaired by polymethylmethacrylate dental resin extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahiro; Kojima, Norinaga; Att, Wael; Hori, Norio; Suzuki, Takeo; Ogawa, Takahiro

    2009-01-01

    There is concern that dental-resin materials directly loaded on a prepared tooth adversely affect dental pulp tissue by releasing the resin chemicals through dentinal tubes. This study determined whether self-curing polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-based dental resin extract adversely affected the viability and function of odontoblast-like cells and whether the cytotoxicity of this resin, if any, could be eliminated by N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant amino acid derivative. Odontoblast-like cells isolated from rat maxillary incisor dental pulp tissue were exposed to a PMMA resin extract with or without N-acetyl cysteine for 1 h and then cultured in osteoblastic media. The percentage of viable cells 24 h after seeding was 20% in cells exposed to the resin extract without N-acetyl cysteine, whereas 45% of cells were viable after exposure to the N-acetyl cysteine-supplemented extract. The cells that had been exposed to the extract showed a strong tendency for apoptosis associated with the increased reactive oxygen species production and decreased intracellular glutathione level, which was improved by the addition of N-acetyl cysteine. N-Acetyl cysteine supplementation almost completely restored the significantly reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and matrix mineralization by the resin extract. These results conclusively demonstrated that exposure of odontoblast-like cells to the resin extract impaired the cell viability and function and, more intriguingly, N-acetyl cysteine supplementation to the extract significantly prevented these toxic effects.

  15. A Cu@Au nanoparticle-based colorimetric competition assay for the detection of sulfide anion and cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia; Xu, Xiaowen; Yuan, Yue; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Xiurong

    2011-08-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which described the unique ability of the core/shell Cu@Au nanoparticle (NP) to selectively recognize iodide, (1) herein, we wish to report the development of an alternatively sensitive and selective colorimetric detection for sulfide anion and cysteine based upon the Cu@Au NP by a competition avenue. In the absence of sulfide anion or cysteine, iodide can induce an appreciable color change of the Cu@Au NP solution from purple to red by transforming the clusters of NP to single, nearly spherical, and larger ones. However, the transformation is severely interfered by the presence of sulfide or cysteine because of a higher binding strength of the S-Au bond than the I-Au one. As a result, the clear purple-to-red color change induced by iodide is affected as a correlation with the concentration of sulfide or cysteine. By taking advantage of this fact, we can detect a concentration of 3 μM for sulfide and 0.4 μM for cysteine with the naked eye or 0.3 μM (10 ppb) for sulfide and 50 nM (6 ppb) for cysteine aided by a UV/vis spectrometer. Given the detrimental effect of hydrogen sulfide and the biological importance of cysteine, the assay may become useful in the environment monitoring, water quality inspection and biomedical diagnosis as well.

  16. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of peroxiredoxin Qbeta from Xylella fastidiosa: catalytic mechanism and high reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Bruno Brasil; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Discola, Karen Fulan; Cussiol, José Renato Rosa; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares

    2010-05-21

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the etiological agent of various plant diseases. To survive under oxidative stress imposed by the host, microorganisms express antioxidant proteins, including cysteine-based peroxidases named peroxiredoxins. This work is a comprehensive analysis of the catalysis performed by PrxQ from X. fastidiosa (XfPrxQ) that belongs to a peroxiredoxin class still poorly characterized and previously considered as moderately reactive toward hydroperoxides. Contrary to these assumptions, our competitive kinetics studies have shown that the second-order rate constants of the peroxidase reactions of XfPrxQ with hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite are in the order of 10(7) and 10(6) M(-1) S(-1), respectively, which are as fast as the most efficient peroxidases. The XfPrxQ disulfides were only slightly reducible by dithiothreitol; therefore, the identification of a thioredoxin system as the probable biological reductant of XfPrxQ was a relevant finding. We also showed by site-specific mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that an intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys-47 and Cys-83 is generated during the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, we elucidated the crystal structure of XfPrxQ C47S in which Ser-47 and Cys-83 lie approximately 12.3 A apart. Therefore, significant conformational changes are required for disulfide bond formation. In fact, circular dichroism data indicated that there was a significant redox-dependent unfolding of alpha-helices, which is probably triggered by the peroxidatic cysteine oxidation. Finally, we proposed a model that takes data from this work as well data as from the literature into account. PMID:20335172

  18. Carbon paste electrode incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotube/ferrocene as a sensor for the electroanalytical determination of -acetyl--cysteine in the presence of tryptophan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jahan Bakhsh Raoof; Fereshteh Chekin; Reza Ojani; Saeideh Barari

    2013-03-01

    The preparation and electrochemical performance of the carbon nanotube paste electrode modified with ferrocene (FCMCNPE) was investigated for electrocatalytic behaviour toward oxidation of -acetyl--cysteine (NAC) in the presence of tryptophan (Trp) using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The results showed an efficient electrocatalytic activity of FCMCNPE toward oxidation of NAC and Trp, as the electrooxidation of NAC and Trp together gave two well-defined anodic peaks, revealing the applicability of this modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric detection of mentioned compounds in the same solution. The values of catalytic rate constant () and the apparent diffusion coefficient (Dapp) were also calculated using chronoamperometry. The DPV method was applied as a sensitive method for the quantitative detection of trace amounts of NAC and Trp. A linear dynamic range from 1.0 to 18.0 M for NAC and 2.0 to 150.0 M for Trp was obtained using DPV method in pH 7.00 buffered solution and the detection limit (3) was determined as 0.49 M and 0.54 M for NAC and Trp, respectively. The proposed method was also applied for analysis of NAC tablet, investigating the applicability of the proposed voltammetric method for determination of NAC in real sample.

  19. Optimization of the dispersion of gold and platinum nanoparticles on indium tin oxide for the electrocatalytic oxidation of cysteine and arsenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diep Vu Ca [Miami University Center for Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Miami University, Hughes Laboratories, Room 112, Oxford, OH 45056-1465 (United States); Sun Laisheng [Miami University Center for Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Miami University, Hughes Laboratories, Room 112, Oxford, OH 45056-1465 (United States); Cox, James A. [Miami University Center for Nanotechnology, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Miami University, Hughes Laboratories, Room 112, Oxford, OH 45056-1465 (United States)]. E-mail: coxja@muohio.edu

    2006-02-15

    Gold and platinum nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by chemical reduction of the corresponding metal complex bound by ion-exchange to generation-4 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (PAMAM). Arrays of the NPs on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes were formed by adsorbing a monolayer comprising a controlled ratio of NP-PAMAM to PAMAM on ITO that was modified with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane; subsequently, the organic components were thermally destroyed. Varying the above-defined ratio resulted in a commensurate change of the density of the NPs on the surface. Using an electrode modified in a solution with a mole fraction of Au-PAMAM (relative to total of Au-PAMAM and PAMAM) of 0.06, which gave NPs separated by 200 nm, the current for the catalytic oxidation of cysteine reached a value that did not increase when more nanoparticles were present. The analogous experiment on the oxidation of As{sup III} with PtNPs as the catalyst was optimized at a mole fraction of 0.2. Calculations assuming hemispherical diffusion suggested that the diffusion domains during cyclic voltammetry at 5 mV s{sup -1} were less than the distance between the NPs.

  20. Electrocatalytic simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, uric acid and L-Cysteine in real samples using quercetin silver nanoparticles-graphene nanosheets modified glassy carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Jahangiri-Dehaghani, Fahime; Shekari, Zahra; Benvidi, Ali

    2016-07-01

    By immobilizing of quercetin at the surface of a glassy carbon electrode modified with silver nanoparticles and graphene nanosheets (Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE) a new sensor has been fabricated. The cyclic voltammogram of Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shows a stable redox couple with surface confined characteristics. Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE demonstrated a high catalytic activity for L-Cysteine (L-Cys) oxidation. Results indicated that L-Cys peak potential at Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE shifted to less positive values compared to GNs-GCE or AgNPs-GCE. Also, the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient,, and the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant, k‧, for the oxidation of L-Cys at the Q-AgNPs-GNs-GCE surface were estimated. In differential pulse voltammetric determination, the detection limit of L-Cys was obtained 0.28 μM, and the calibration plots were linear within two ranges of 0.9-12.4 μM and 12.4-538.5 μM of L-Cys. Also, the proposed modified electrode is used for the simultaneous determinations of ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), and L-Cys. Finally, this study has demonstrated the practical analytical utility of the sensor for determination of AA in vitamin C tablet, L-Cys in a milk sample and UA in a human urine sample.

  1. Global analysis of gene expression in response to L-Cysteine deprivation in the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeelani Ghulam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric protozoan parasite, causes amebic colitis and extra intestinal abscesses in millions of inhabitants of endemic areas. E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione metabolism but possesses L-cysteine as the principle low molecular weight thiol. L-Cysteine is essential for the structure, stability, and various protein functions, including catalysis, electron transfer, redox regulation, nitrogen fixation, and sensing for regulatory processes. Recently, we demonstrated that in E. histolytica, L-cysteine regulates various metabolic pathways including energy, amino acid, and phospholipid metabolism. Results In this study, employing custom-made Affymetrix microarrays, we performed time course (3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h gene expression analysis upon L-cysteine deprivation. We identified that out of 9,327 genes represented on the array, 290 genes encoding proteins with functions in metabolism, signalling, DNA/RNA regulation, electron transport, stress response, membrane transport, vesicular trafficking/secretion, and cytoskeleton were differentially expressed (≥3 fold at one or more time points upon L-cysteine deprivation. Approximately 60% of these modulated genes encoded proteins of no known function and annotated as hypothetical proteins. We also attempted further functional analysis of some of the most highly modulated genes by L-cysteine depletion. Conclusions To our surprise, L-cysteine depletion caused only limited changes in the expression of genes involved in sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress defense. In contrast, we observed significant changes in the expression of several genes encoding iron sulfur flavoproteins, a major facilitator super-family transporter, regulator of nonsense transcripts, NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase, short chain dehydrogenase, acetyltransferases, and various other genes involved in diverse cellular functions. This study represents the first

  2. Structure of the Mature Streptococcal Cysteine Protease Exotoxin mSpeB in Its Active Dimeric Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Johan G; Dagil, Robert; Niclasen, Louise Meinert;

    2009-01-01

    Invasive infections of Streptococcus pyogenes are dependent on the cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B. Previous structures of the enzyme have not disclosed the proper active-site configuration. Here, the crystal structure of the mature enzyme is presented to 1.55 A, disclosing....... Based on the present structure, the active site of clan CA cysteine proteases is expanded and a detailed mechanism of the deacylation mechanism is proposed. The results may have applications for the development of protease inhibitors specific to bacterial cysteine proteases....

  3. Catalytic nanoarchitectonics for environmentally compatible energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally compatible energy management is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Low-temperature conversion of chemical to electrical energy is of particular importance to minimize the impact to the environment while sustaining the consumptive economy. In this review, we shed light on one of the most versatile energy-conversion technologies: heterogeneous catalysts. We establish the integrity of structural tailoring in heterogeneous catalysts at different scales in the context of an emerging paradigm in materials science: catalytic nanoarchitectonics. Fundamental backgrounds of energy-conversion catalysis are first provided together with a perspective through state-of-the-art energy-conversion catalysis including catalytic exhaust remediation, fuel-cell electrocatalysis and photosynthesis of solar fuels. Finally, the future evolution of catalytic nanoarchitectonics is overviewed: possible combinations of heterogeneous catalysts, organic molecules and even enzymes to realize reaction-selective, highly efficient and long-life energy conversion technologies which will meet the challenge we face.

  4. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  5. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  6. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei;

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  7. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh.M.; Bragin, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  8. Catalytic microreactors for portable power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiannidis, Symeon [Paul Scherer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    ''Catalytic Microreactors for Portable Power Generation'' addresses a problem of high relevance and increased complexity in energy technology. This thesis outlines an investigation into catalytic and gas-phase combustion characteristics in channel-flow, platinum-coated microreactors. The emphasis of the study is on microreactor/microturbine concepts for portable power generation and the fuels of interest are methane and propane. The author carefully describes numerical and experimental techniques, providing a new insight into the complex interactions between chemical kinetics and molecular transport processes, as well as giving the first detailed report of hetero-/homogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms for catalytic propane combustion. The outcome of this work will be widely applied to the industrial design of micro- and mesoscale combustors. (orig.)

  9. Use catalytic combustion for LHV gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, E.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper shows how low heating value (LHV) waste gases can be combusted to recover energy even when the gases won't burn in a normal manner. Significant energy and economic savings can result by adopting this process. Catalytic combustion is a heterogeneous surface-catalyzed air oxidation of fuel, gaseous or liquid, to generate thermal energy in a flameless mode. The catalytic combustion process is quite complex since it involves numerous catalytic surface and gas-phase chemical reactions. During low temperature surface-catalyzed combustion, as in start-up, the combustion stage is under kinetically controlled conditions. The discussion covers the following topics - combustor substrates; combustor washcoating and catalyzing; combustor operational modes (turbine or tabular modes); applications in coal gasification and in-situ gasification; waste process gases. 16 refs.

  10. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  11. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  12. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F;

    1986-01-01

    We used linker insertion-deletion mutagenesis to study the catalytic domain of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus v-rasH transforming protein, which is closely related to the cellular rasH protein. The mutants displayed a wide range of in vitro biological activity, from those that induced focal...... transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic...

  13. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  14. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  15. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  16. Heterogeneous Catalytic Ozonization of Sulfosalicylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of heterogeneous catalytic ozonization of sulfo-salicylic acid (SSal). It was found that catalytic ozonization in the presence of Mn-Zr-O (a modified manganese dioxide supported on silica gel) had significantly enhanced the removal rate (72%) of total organic carbon (TOC) compared with that of ozonization alone (19%). The efficient removal rate of TOC was probably due to increasing the adsorption ability of catalyst and accelerating decomposition of ozone to produce more powerful oxidants than ozone.

  17. Post-Intake of S-Ethyl Cysteine and S-Methyl Cysteine Improved LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-chun Hsia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of S-ethyl cysteine (SEC and S-methyl cysteine (SMC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice were examined. Eight hours after LPS challenge, SEC or SMC was supplied in drinking water at 0.5% or 1% for 3 days. LPS increased lung myeloperoxidase activity, neutrophil counts and edema. SEC or SMC post-intake attenuated these events. SEC or SMC suppressed LPS-induced lung expression of cyclooxygenase-2, nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and lowered the generation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prostaglandin E2. LPS enhanced the expression of p47phox, gp91phox, Bax and cleaved caspase-3, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the lung. SEC or SMC post-intake reversed these alterations. These findings suggest that these agents could protect the lung through their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities.

  18. The importance of pH in regulating the function of the Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 cysteine protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lowther

    Full Text Available The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cathepsin L cysteine proteases to invade its host, migrate through tissues and digest haemoglobin, its main source of amino acids. Here we investigated the importance of pH in regulating the activity and functions of the major cathepsin L protease FheCL1. The slightly acidic pH of the parasite gut facilitates the auto-catalytic activation of FheCL1 from its inactive proFheCL1 zymogen; this process was approximately 40-fold faster at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.0. Active mature FheCL1 is very stable at acidic and neutral conditions (the enzyme retained approximately 45% activity when incubated at 37 degrees C and pH 4.5 for 10 days and displayed a broad pH range for activity peptide substrates and the protein ovalbumin, peaking between pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. This pH profile likely reflects the need for FheCL1 to function both in the parasite gut and in the host tissues. FheCL1, however, could not cleave its natural substrate Hb in the pH range pH 5.5 and pH 7.0; digestion occurred only at pH

  19. A functional fragment of Tau forms fibers without the need for an intermolecular cysteine bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huvent, Isabelle; Kamah, Amina; Cantrelle, François-Xavier [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Barois, Nicolas [Plate-forme BICeL-IFR142, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille (France); Slomianny, Christian [Inserm U1003, Laboratoire de physiologie cellulaire, Université Lille 1, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Landrieu, Isabelle [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Lippens, Guy, E-mail: Guy.Lippens@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • A functional fragment of Tau forms bundled ribbon-like fibrils. • Nucleation of its fibril formation is faster than for full-length Tau. • In contrast to full-length Tau, without cysteines, the fragment still forms fibers. - Abstract: We study the aggregation of a fragment of the neuronal protein Tau that contains part of the proline rich domain and of the microtubule binding repeats. When incubated at 37 °C with heparin, the fragment readily forms fibers as witnessed by Thioflavin T fluorescence. Electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy show bundled ribbon like structures with most residues rigidly incorporated in the fibril. Without its cysteines, this fragment still forms fibers of a similar morphology, but with lesser Thioflavin T binding sites and more mobility for the C-terminal residues.

  20. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Oligo(L-cysteine) for Use as a Thermostable Bio-Based Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yinan; Sato, Ryota; Li, Zhibo; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of thiol-unprotected L-cysteine ethyl ester (Cys-OEt) catalyzed by proteinase K in aqueous solution has been used to synthesize oligo(L-cysteine) (OligoCys) with a well-defined chemical structure and relatively large degree of polymerization (DP) up to 16-17 (average 8.8). By using a high concentration of Cys-OEt, 78.0% free thiol content was achieved. The thermal properties of OligoCys are stable, with no glass transition until 200 °C, and the decomposition temperature could be increased by oxidation. Chemoenzymatically synthesized OligoCys has great potential for use as a thermostable bio-based material with resistance to oxidation. PMID:26388290

  1. Do cysteine residues regulate transient receptor potential canonical type 6 (TRPC6) channel protein expression?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Liu, Ying; Krueger, Katharina;

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed that patie......The regulation of calcium influx through transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channel is mandatory for the activity of human monocytes. We submit the first evidence that cysteine residues of homocysteine or acetylcysteine affect TRPC6 expression in human monocytes. We observed...... that patients with chronic renal failure had significantly elevated homocysteine levels and TRPC6 mRNA expression levels in monocytes compared to control subjects. We further observed that administration of homocysteine or acetylcysteine significantly increased TRPC6 channel protein expression compared...

  2. Synthesis and structural elucidation of glutathione and N-aceyl-cysteine conjugates of 5-aminosalicylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Cornett, Claus; Olsen, C. E.;

    1993-01-01

    The ability of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) to be oxidized to a quinone monoimine compound capable of conjugating with nucleophilic compounds such as N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH) has been investigated in vitro. Three isomeric conjugates of 5-ASA and NAC as well as three isomeric...... conjugates of 5-ASA and GSH were found to be formed. 5-ASA was initially oxidized by PbO2 in a solution of TRIS-HCl buffer pH 9.3 followed by the in situ addition of N-acetyl-cysteine or glutathione to the oxidized 5-ASA at pH 7.5. The resulting conjugates were N-acetylated at the aromatic amino group in...

  3. Half-sandwich complexes of rhodium containing cysteine-derived ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, María; Rodríguez, Ricardo; Lahoz, Fernando J; García-Orduña, Pilar; Osante, Iñaki; Cativiela, Carlos; López, José A; Carmona, Daniel

    2016-09-28

    The modified cysteine ligand, S-benzyl-α-methyl-l-cysteine (HL2), was prepared from l-cysteine hydrochloride methyl ester. The reaction of commercial S-benzyl-l-cysteine (HL1) or HL2 with the dimer, [{(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl}2(μ-Cl)2], gives rise to the cationic complexes, [(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl(HL)]Cl (HL = HL1 (1), HL2 (2)), in which the cysteine ligand exhibits a κ(2)N,S coordination mode. In a basic medium, HL1 or HL2 reacts with [{(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl}2(μ-Cl)2] to afford mixtures of two epimers at the metal centre of the neutral complexes, [(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl(κ(2)N,O-L)] (HL = HL1 (3), HL2 (4)), in which amino carboxylate adopts a κ(2)N,O mode of coordination along with variable amounts of the cationic compounds, [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L)]Cl (HL = HL1 (6Cl), HL2 (7Cl)), which contain κ(3)N,O,S coordinated cysteine-derived ligands. However, in a basic medium, the N-Boc substituted cysteine S-benzyl-N-Boc-l-cysteine (HL3) only yields the κ(2)O,S coordinated derivative, [(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl(κ(2)O,S-L3)] (5), as a mixture of two diastereomers depending on the configuration of the metal centre. The bidentate chelate complexes 3-5 react with AgSbF6 to give the hexafluoroantimonates [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L)][SbF6] (HL = HL1 (6Sb), HL2 (7Sb), HL3 (8Sb)) with tridentate coordination. Compound 8Sb reacts with NaHCO3 to give the neutral complex [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L3-H)] (9), which can also be prepared by reacting the dimer [{(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl}2(μ-Cl)2] with HL3 in the presence of two equivalents of NaHCO3. The new compounds contain up to four stereogenic centres, namely, Rh, S, N, and C. The absolute configuration of the complexes has been established by spectroscopic and diffractometric investigations, including the crystal structure determination of [(η(5)-C5Me5)RhCl(κ(2)O,S-L3)] (5), [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L1)][SbF6] (6Sb), [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L2)][SbF6] (7Sb) and [(η(5)-C5Me5)Rh(κ(3)N,O,S-L3-H)] (9). Variable temperature (1)H NMR

  4. Primary structure of a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from the fruit of avocado (Persea americana Mill).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M; Ikeda, T; Fukumoto, D; Yamasaki, N; Yonekura, M

    1995-12-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of a proteinaceous cysteine proteinase inhibitor from the fruit of avocado (avocado cystatin) is presented. The protein consists of 100 amino acid residues and has a molecular mass of 11,300 Da. Comparison of this sequence with sequences of plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors (phytocystatins), including oryzacystatins I and II from rice seeds, cowpea cystatin, and corn cystatin, showed that the avocado cystatin molecule has 60% and 54% residues identical with the two forms of the rice seed proteins, oryzacystatins I and II, respectively, and 64% and 63% with the cowpea and corn proteins, respectively. The totally conserved sequence, Gln-Val-Val-Ala-Gly, among several of the animal cystatins as well as phytocystatins, is at positions 47-51 in the avocado cystatin molecule.

  5. Cysteine 138 mutation in HIV-1 Nef from patients with delayed disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Martin; Laursen, Alex Lund; Gerstoft, J.;

    2006-01-01

    The nef gene from HIV-1 has been shown to be an important pathogenic factor when considering development of AIDS. Detection of nef variants with an effect on immune modulation is important to understand HIV-1 pathogenesis and has possible impact on treatment strategies. METHODS: The nef gene of HIV...... an insight into the LTNP disease profile and allowing for the stratification of patients based on their CD4 cell decline. RESULTS: In sequences from nine patients, most of the functional domains of HIV-1 Nef appeared intact, and no major deletions were observed to possibly account for an effect on...... the delayed disease status. However, the results demonstrate a high incidence of a single amino acid polymorphism (cysteine 138) in HIV-1 Nef. The allelic frequency of cysteine 138 between the delayed disease progression group and the progressor group was found to be statistically significant (P = 0...

  6. C1A cysteine protease-cystatin interactions in leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Velasco-Arroyo, Blanca; González-Melendi, Pablo; Martínez, Manuel; Díaz, Isabel

    2014-07-01

    Senescence-associated proteolysis in plants is a crucial process to relocalize nutrients from leaves to growing or storage tissues. The massive net degradation of proteins involves broad metabolic networks, different subcellular compartments, and several types of proteases and regulators. C1A cysteine proteases, grouped as cathepsin L-, B-, H-, and F-like according to their gene structures and phylogenetic relationships, are the most abundant enzymes responsible for the proteolytic activity during leaf senescence. Besides, cystatins as specific modulators of C1A peptidase activities exert a complex regulatory role in this physiological process. This overview article covers the most recent information on C1A proteases in leaf senescence in different plant species. Particularly, it is focussed on barley, as the unique species where the whole gene family members of C1A cysteine proteases and cystatins have been analysed.

  7. Electronic conductivity of Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95-δ) and Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ): Hebb-Wagner polarisation in the case of redox active dopants and interference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2011-01-01

    The electronic conductivity of Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95-δ) and Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ) under suppressed ionic flow was measured as a function of pO(2) in the range from 10(3) atm to 10(-17) atm for temperatures between 600 °C and 900 °C by means of Hebb-Wagner polarisation. The steady state I-V curve...... of Ce(0.9)Gd(0.1)O(1.95-δ) could be well described by the standard Hebb-Wagner equation [M. H. Hebb, J. Chem. Phys., 1952, 20, 185; C. Wagner, Z. Elektrochem., 1956, 60, 4], yielding expressions for the n- and p-type conductivity as a function of pO(2). On the other hand, significant deviation...... of the steady state I-V curve from the standard Hebb-Wagner equation was observed for the case of Ce(0.8)Pr(0.2)O(2-δ). It is shown that the I-V curve can be successfully reproduced when the presence of the redox active dopant, Pr(3+)/Pr(4+), is taken into account, whereas even better agreement can be reached...

  8. The association of plasma cysteine and gamma-glutamyltransferase with BMI and obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Elshorbagy, Amany K

    2009-07-01

    We recently reported a strong positive association of plasma total cysteine (tCys) with fat mass in over 5,000 subjects. As gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) enzyme increases cysteine availability by catalyzing glutathione breakdown and is positively associated with BMI and adiposity, we hypothesized that GGT might explain the association of tCys with adiposity. To study whether the associations of tCys and serum GGT with BMI and obesity were interrelated we conducted a cross-sectional study using data from 1,550 subjects recruited from nine European countries in the COMAC project. Multiple linear and logistic regression models and concentration-response curves were used. In age and sex-adjusted analyses, tCys showed strong positive associations with BMI (partial r = 0.19, P < 0.001), and obesity (odds ratio (OR) for 4th vs. 1st tCys quartile: 2.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.6-5.0, P < 0.001), both of which remained robust after adjustment for GGT and other metabolic and lifestyle confounders. Serum GGT was also a positive predictor of BMI (partial r = 0.17, P < 0.001) and obesity (OR for 4th vs. 1st GGT quartile: 4.8; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-9.2, P < 0.001), independent of tCys. However, the associations of GGT with BMI and obesity were weakened by adjustment for obesity-related factors such as serum lipids and blood pressure. These results indicate that tCys is a strong positive predictor of BMI and obesity, independent of GGT and other obesity-related factors. We also suggest that the association of serum GGT with BMI and obesity is unrelated to the role of GGT in cysteine turnover. The potential link between cysteine and fat metabolism should be further evaluated.

  9. The nematicidal effect of cysteine proteinases on the root knot nematode Meloidogne incognita

    OpenAIRE

    Gorny, Samuel Victor

    2013-01-01

    Despite current control measures, plant parasitic nematodes are estimated to be responsible for > $100 billion of damage to worldwide crop production per annum. Current nematicides are highly toxic, and due to health and environmental safety concerns, many are being withdrawn from the market under directive 914/414/EEC. Alternative control strategies are urgently required. The cysteine proteinases papain, actinidain and recombinant endoproteinase B isoform 2 (R.EP-B2) have been demonstrate...

  10. Impaired sperm fertilizing ability in mice lacking Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein 1 (CRISP1)

    OpenAIRE

    Da Ros, Vanina G; Maldera, Julieta A; Willis, William D; Cohen, Débora J.; Goulding, Eugenia H.; Gelman, Diego M.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Eddy, Edward M.; Cuasnicu, Patricia S.

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is a complex multi-step process mediated by different molecules present on both gametes. Epididymal protein CRISP1, a member of the Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP) family, was identified by our laboratory and postulated to participate in both sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) interaction and gamete fusion by binding to egg-complementary sites. To elucidate the functional role of CRISP1 in vivo, we disrupted the Crisp1 gene and evaluated the effect on animal fertility a...

  11. Potential involvement of Brugia malayi cysteine proteases in the maintenance of the endosymbiotic relationship with Wolbachia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Lustigman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode that causes lymphatic filariasis, harbors endosymbiotic intracellular bacteria, Wolbachia, that are required for the development and reproduction of the worm. The essential nature of this endosymbiosis led to the development of anti-Wolbachia chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of human filarial infections. Our study is aimed at identifying specific proteins that play a critical role in this endosymbiotic relationship leading to the identification of potential targets in the adult worms. Filarial cysteine proteases are known to be involved in molting and embryogenesis, processes shown to also be Wolbachia dependent. Based on the observation that cysteine protease transcripts are differentially regulated in response to tetracycline treatment, we focused on defining their role in symbiosis. We observe a bimodal regulation pattern of transcripts encoding cysteine proteases when in vitro tetracycline treated worms were examined. Using tetracycline-treated infertile female worms and purified embryos we established that the first peak of the bimodal pattern corresponds to embryonic transcripts while the second takes place within the hypodermis of the adult worms. Localization studies of the native proteins corresponding to Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 indicate that they are present in the area surrounding Wolbachia, and, in some cases, the proteins appear localized within the bacteria. Both proteins were also found in the inner bodies of microfilariae. The possible role of these cysteine proteases during development and endosymbiosis was further characterized using RNAi. Reduction in Bm-cpl-3 and Bm-cpl-6 transcript levels was accompanied by hindered microfilarial development and release, and reduced Wolbachia DNA levels, making these enzymes strong drug target candidates.

  12. Gene Targeting of the Cysteine Peptidase Cathepsin H Impairs Lung Surfactant in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Bühling, Frank; Kouadio, Martin; Caroline E Chwieralski; Kern, Ursula; Hohlfeld, Jens M.; Klemm, Nicole; Friedrichs, Nicole; Roth, Wera; Deussing, Jan M.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background The 11 human cysteine cathepsins are proteases mainly located in the endolysosomal compartment of all cells and within the exocytosis pathways of some secretory cell types. Cathepsin H (Ctsh) has amino- and endopeptidase activities. In vitro studies have demonstrated Ctsh involvement in the processing and secretion of the pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B). Furthermore, Ctsh is highly expressed in the secretory organelles of alveolar type II pneumocytes where the surfactant prot...

  13. Schizophrenia and oxidative stress: glutamate cysteine ligase modifier as a susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosic, Mirjana; Ott, Jurg; Barral, Sandra;

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder. Glutathione (GSH), a redox regulator, is decreased in patients' cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex. The gene of the key GSH-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM......) subunit, is strongly associated with schizophrenia in two case-control studies and in one family study. GCLM gene expression is decreased in patients' fibroblasts. Thus, GSH metabolism dysfunction is proposed as one of the vulnerability factors for schizophrenia....

  14. Sweet potato cysteine proteases SPAE and SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsien-Jung; Liang, Shu-Hao; Huang, Guan-Jhong; Lin, Yaw-Huei

    2015-08-15

    Sweet potato sporamins are trypsin inhibitors and exhibit strong resistance to digestion by pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin. In addition, they constitute the major storage proteins in the sweet potato and, after degradation, provide nitrogen as a nutrient for seedling regrowth in sprouting storage roots. In this report, four cysteine proteases-one asparaginyl endopeptidase (SPAE), two papain-like cysteine proteases (SPCP1 and SPCP2), and one granulin-containing cysteine protease (SPCP3)-were studied to determine their association with sporamin degradation in sprouting storage roots. Sporamin degradation became significant in the flesh of storage roots starting from week 4 after sprouting and this correlated with expression levels of SPAE and SPCP2, but not of SPCP1 and SPCP3. In the outer flesh near the skin, sporamin degradation was more evident and occurred earlier than in the inner flesh of storage roots. Degradation of sporamins in the outer flesh was inversely correlated with the distance of the storage root from the sprout. Exogenous application of SPAE and SPCP2, but not SPCP3, fusion proteins to crude extracts of the outer flesh (i.e., extracted from a depth of 0.3cm and within 2cm of one-week-old sprouts) promoted in vitro sporamin degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of SPAE and SPCP2 fusion proteins at 95°C for 5min prior to their application to the crude extracts reduced sporamin degradation. These data show that sweet potato asparaginyl endopeptidase SPAE and papain-like cysteine protease SPCP2 participate in sporamin degradation during storage root sprouting. PMID:26363719

  15. Inhibition of cysteine peptidase activity in ascitic fluid in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Skalski

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The work's objective is to answer the question whether there is any possibility of activity inhibition of cysteine peptidases inhibitors playing an important role in key processes accompanying cancer formation, including pancreas. There is a justified speculation that specific inhibitors of these enzymes may inhibit development of cancer processes by inhibiting their activity. In vitro studies confirmed that these enzymes in ascitic fluid were inhibited with egg whites inhibitors even to 90% of their original activity.

  16. A Cysteine Zipper Stabilizes a Pre-Fusion F Glycoprotein Vaccine for Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume B E Stewart-Jones

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines should contain minimal non-pathogen motifs to reduce potential off-target reactivity. We recently developed a vaccine antigen against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, which comprised the fusion (F glycoprotein stabilized in its pre-fusion trimeric conformation by "DS-Cav1" mutations and by an appended C-terminal trimerization motif or "foldon" from T4-bacteriophage fibritin. Here we investigate the creation of a cysteine zipper to allow for the removal of the phage foldon, while maintaining the immunogenicity of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen. Constructs without foldon yielded RSV F monomers, and enzymatic removal of the phage foldon from pre-fusion F trimers resulted in their dissociation into monomers. Because the native C terminus of the pre-fusion RSV F ectodomain encompasses a viral trimeric coiled-coil, we explored whether introduction of cysteine residues capable of forming inter-protomer disulfides might allow for stable trimers. Structural modeling indicated the introduced cysteines to form disulfide "rings", with each ring comprising a different set of inward facing residues of the coiled-coil. Three sets of rings could be placed within the native RSV F coiled-coil, and additional rings could be added by duplicating portions of the coiled-coil. High levels of neutralizing activity in mice, equivalent to that of the parent DS-Cav1+foldon antigen, were elicited by a 4-ring stabilized RSV F trimer with no foldon. Structure-based alteration of a viral coiled-coil to create a cysteine zipper thus allows a phage trimerization motif to be removed from a candidate vaccine antigen.

  17. A key role for mitochondria in endothelial signaling by plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential

    OpenAIRE

    Go, Young-Mi; Park, Heonyong; Koval, Michael; Orr, Michael; Reed, Matthew; Liang, Yongliang; Smith, Debra; Pohl, Jan; Jones, Dean P.

    2009-01-01

    The redox potential of the plasma cysteine/cystine couple (EhCySS) is oxidized in association with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including age, smoking, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and alcohol abuse. Previous in vitro findings support a cause–effect relationship for extracellular EhCySS in cell signaling pathways associated with CVD, including those controlling monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In this study, we provide evidence that mitochondria are a major source of rea...

  18. First report on fish cysteine as a biomarker of contamination in the River Chenab, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Bilal; Sultana, Tayyaba; Sultana, Salma; Mahboob, Shahid; Farooq, Muhammad; Al-Ghanim, Khalid; Nadeem, Shahid

    2016-08-01

    The eastern and southern parts of the Faisalabad city produce considerable quantities of industrial and municipal pollutants, much of which is drained into the River Chenab, reducing the productivity of fauna and flora in the river. This study was aimed to determine whether cysteine is useful as a biomarker of exposure to polluted fresh water. The amino acid profile of fish muscle was analyzed by paper chromatography in Cirrhinus mrigala and Labeo rohita from the River Chenab to determine habitat related variations due to the pollution from industrial and domestic sources. C. mrigala showed higher level of metal contamination in muscle tissues for Sn, Cr, Pb, Zn, Mn, Cu, and Cd when compared to L. rohita. Both fish species collected from polluted areas of the river Chenab showed significantly (P polluted section of the river, and further increased to 83 ± 2 mg/g dry weight in more heavily polluted sections. Cysteine concentration in farmed L. rohita was detected as 28 ± 2 and 25 ± 4 mg/g dry weight, respectively for farmed fish and fish from a mildly polluted section of the river, and then increased to 94 ± 3 mg/g dry weight for fish from highly polluted water. C. mrigala from a mildly polluted area of the river also had higher levels of cysteine in the muscle, along with increases in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and alanine. Elevated concentrations of cysteine seem to be associated with a threat to these fish species in polluted sections of the river, and thus may be used as a biomarker. PMID:27117257

  19. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-l-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S.; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L.

    2013-01-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-l-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H2O2. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabi...

  20. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Michael N.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.