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Sample records for catalytic redox-active cysteine

  1. Methylene Blue Inhibits Caspases by Oxidation of the Catalytic Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakavathkumar, Prateep; Sharma, Gyanesh; Kaushal, Vikas; Foveau, Bénédicte; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Methylene blue, currently in phase 3 clinical trials against Alzheimer Disease, disaggregates the Tau protein of neurofibrillary tangles by oxidizing specific cysteine residues. Here, we investigated if methylene blue can inhibit caspases via the oxidation of their active site cysteine. Methylene blue, and derivatives, azure A and azure B competitively inhibited recombinant Caspase-6 (Casp6), and inhibited Casp6 activity in transfected human colon carcinoma cells and in serum-deprived primary human neuron cultures. Methylene blue also inhibited recombinant Casp1 and Casp3. Furthermore, methylene blue inhibited Casp3 activity in an acute mouse model of liver toxicity. Mass spectrometry confirmed methylene blue and azure B oxidation of the catalytic Cys163 cysteine of Casp6. Together, these results show a novel inhibitory mechanism of caspases via sulfenation of the active site cysteine. These results indicate that methylene blue or its derivatives could (1) have an additional effect against Alzheimer Disease by inhibiting brain caspase activity, (2) be used as a drug to prevent caspase activation in other conditions, and (3) predispose chronically treated individuals to cancer via the inhibition of caspases. PMID:26400108

  2. Cysteine functionalized copper organosol: synthesis, characterization and catalytic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We herein report a facile one-pot synthesis, stabilization, redispersion and Cu-S interaction of L-cysteine and dodecanethiol (DDT) protected copper organosol in toluene from precursor copper stearate using sodium borohydride in toluene under a nitrogen atmosphere. Surface modification of the synthesized copper organosol with an amino acid L-cysteine and an alkanethiol (dodecanethiol, DDT) is accomplished by a thiolate bond between the used ligands and nanoparticle surface. The cysteine molecule binds the copper surface via a thiolate and amine linkage but not through electrostatic interaction with the carboxylate group due to the solvent polarity and dielectric medium. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis was performed to confirm the surface functionalization of the amino acid and DDT to the copper surface. Copper organosol has been characterized by optical spectroscopy (UV/vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The as-synthesized particles are spherical in shape and exhibit a Mie scattering profile with an absorption maxima in the visible range. Copper nanoparticles capped by cysteine and/or DDT in non-aqueous media are found to represent an interesting catalytic approach for the synthesis of octylphenyl ether

  3. An atypical catalytic mechanism involving three cysteines of thioredoxin

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Cha San; Navrot, Nicolas; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Knaff, David B.; WINGSLE, GUNNAR; Samian, Razip; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Corbier, Catherine; Gelhaye, Éric

    2008-01-01

    Unlike other thioredoxins h characterized so far, a poplar thioredoxin of the h type, PtTrxh4, is reduced by glutathione and glutaredoxin (Grx) but not NADPH:thioredoxin reductase (NTR). PtTrxh4 contains three cysteines: one localized in an N-terminal extension (Cys4) and two (Cys58 and Cys61) in the classical thioredoxin active site (57WCGPC61). The property of a mutant in which Cys58 was replaced by serine demonstrates that it is responsible for the initial nucleophilic attack during the ca...

  4. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saisawang, Chonticha; Saitornuang, Sawanan; Sillapee, Pornpan; Ubol, Sukathida; Smith, Duncan R; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzyme reaction proceeding through a cysteine/histidine catalytic dyad. We performed structure-function studies on the chikungunya nsP2 protease and show that the enzyme is not papain-like. Characterization of the catalytic dyad cysteine residue enabled us to identify a nearby serine that is catalytically interchangeable with the dyad cysteine residue. The enzyme retains activity upon alanine replacement of either residue but a replacement of both cysteine and serine residues results in no detectable activity. Protein dynamics appears to allow the use of either the cysteine or the serine residue in catalysis. This switchable dyad residue has not been previously reported for alphavirus nsP2 proteases and would have a major impact on the nsP2 protease as an anti-viral target. PMID:26597768

  5. Mechanism of catalytic electroreduction of In(3) ions in the presence of thiourea, cysteine, thiosemicarbazide, and finding stability constants of corresponding indium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical reduction of In(3) ions at a dropping mercury electrode is studied. The reduction is catalyzed by thiourea, cysteine, and thiosemicarbazide. The catalytic effect is caused by the surface chemical reaction of formation and reduction of a polarographically active complex [In(L)sub(ads)sup(3+)] (thiourea and thiosemicarbazide) and complexes [In(Lsup(+-))sub(ads)sup(3+)], In(Lsup(+-))sub(ads)sup(2+) (cysteine). For the thiourea and thiosemicarbazide, this is a reaction with the sulphur atom, for cysteine - with the thiol group anion. The catalytic activity of ligands grows in the series thiourea < cysteine < thiosemicarbazide. The process rate is decreased with growing hydrogen ion concentration. Effective constants of complex stability are determined and kinetic reaction parameters are obtained

  6. Redox-active media for permeable reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, three classes of redox-active media are described and evaluated in terms of their long-term effectiveness in treating TCE-contaminated groundwater in permeable reactive zones. Zero-valent iron, in the form of recycled cast iron filings, the first class, has received considerable attention as a reactive media and has been used in about a dozen pilot- and full-scale subsurface wall installations. Criteria used in selecting commercial sources of granular iron, will be discussed. Two other classes of redox-active media that have not yet seen wide use in pilot- or full-scale installations will also be described: Fe(II) minerals and bimetallic systems. Fe(II) minerals, including magnetite (Fe3O4), and ferrous sulfide (troilite, FeS), are redox-active and afford TCE reduction rates and product distributions that suggest that they react via a reductive mechanism similar to that which operates in the FeO system. Fe(II) species within the passive oxide layer coating the iron metal may act as electron transfer mediators, with FeO serving as the bulk reductant. Bimetallic systems, the third class of redox-active media, are commonly prepared by plating a second metal onto zero-valent iron (e.g., Ni/Fe and Pd/Fe) and have been shown to accelerate solvent degradation rates relative to untreated iron metal. The long-term effectiveness of this approach, however, has not yet been determined in groundwater treatability tests. The results of a Ni-plated iron column study using site groundwater indicate that a change in reduction mechanism (to catalytic dehydrohalogenation/hydrogenation) accounts for the observed rate enhancement. A significant loss in media reactivity was observed over time, attributable to Ni catalyst deactivation or poisoning. Zero-valent iron systems have not shown similar losses in reactivity in long-term laboratory, pilot or field investigations

  7. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-04-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  8. Redox activity of naphthalene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. McWhinney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. Similar attempts to predict redox behaviour of oxidised two-stroke engine exhaust particles by measuring 1,2-naphthoquinone, 1,4-naphthoquinone and 9,10-phenanthrenequinone predicted DTT decay rates only 4.9 ± 2.5% of those observed. Together, these results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5 × 10−4 m3 μg−1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. As well, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  9. Design Strategies for Redox Active Metalloenzymes: Applications in Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcala-Torano, R; Sommer, D J; Bahrami Dizicheh, Z; Ghirlanda, G

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen an increased interest in finding alternative means to produce renewable fuels in order to satisfy the growing energy demands and to minimize environmental impact. Nature can serve as an inspiration for development of these methodologies, as enzymes are able to carry out a wide variety of redox processes at high efficiency, employing a wide array of earth-abundant transition metals to do so. While it is well recognized that the protein environment plays an important role in tuning the properties of the different metal centers, the structure/function relationships between amino acids and catalytic centers are not well resolved. One specific approach to study the role of proteins in both electron and proton transfer is the biomimetic design of redox active peptides, binding organometallic clusters in well-understood protein environments. Here we discuss different strategies for the design of peptides incorporating redox active FeS clusters, [FeFe]-hydrogenase organometallic mimics, and porphyrin centers into different peptide and protein environments in order to understand natural redox enzymes. PMID:27586342

  10. Kinetics of ABTS derived radical cation scavenging by bucillamine, cysteine, and glutathione. Catalytic effect of Cu(2+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Ivan; Topoľská, Dominika; Valachová, Katarína; Bujdák, Juraj; Šoltés, Ladislav

    2016-05-01

    Kinetics of reduction of the stable radical cation derived from 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) in reaction with the anti-rheumatic drug bucillamine (BUC) and two reference thiols - cysteine (Cys) and glutathione (GSH) was followed spectrophotometrically in acidic medium with 10-fold molar excess of the reductant. Decay of the radical is governed by pseudo-first order kinetics with small deviation in the case of GSH. H(+) ions displayed second order inhibition of the reaction with all the studied compounds. The reaction of BUC exhibits zero order kinetics to the radical at lower acidities with a moderate acceleration of the reaction rate by H(+) ions. A significant catalytic effect of Cu(2+) ions on the reactions with all the reductants was observed. The most sensitive to Cu(2+)-catalysis was the reaction of BUC with the radical cation, while Cu(2+) ions showed much lower effect on the reaction with GSH. The presence of EDTA strongly inhibited the reactions and equalized the reaction rates for all the reductants. A Cu(I) selective chelator bathocuproine disulfonate reduced the reaction rate with Cys, but accelerated the reaction with BUC at the lower acidities. The experimental results were rationalized in the framework of the mechanism of reductive chelation. The conclusions may have important consequences for interpretation of antioxidant capacity assays, such as TEAC, utilizing the ABTS derived radical cation. PMID:26978549

  11. Relationship between redox activity and chemical speciation of size-fractionated particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Arthur K

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanisms of airborne particulate matter (PM related health effects remain incompletely understood, one emerging hypothesis is that these adverse effects derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS within affected cells. Typically, ROS are formed in cells through the reduction of oxygen by biological reducing agents, with the catalytic assistance of electron transfer enzymes and redox active chemical species such as redox active organic chemicals and metals. The purpose of this study was to relate the electron transfer ability, or redox activity, of the PM samples to their content in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and various inorganic species. The redox activity of the samples has been shown to correlate with the induction of the stress protein, hemeoxygenase-1. Results Size-fractionated (i.e. Conclusion The results of this work demonstrate the utility of the dithiothreitol assay for quantitatively assessing the redox potential of airborne particulate matter from a wide range of sources. Studies to characterize the redox activity of PM from various sources throughout the Los Angeles basin are currently underway.

  12. Chiral Redox-Active Isosceles Triangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Siva Krishna Mohan; Liu, Zhichang; Wu, Yilei; Hermann, Keith R; Samanta, Avik; Kim, Dong Jun; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-05-11

    Designing small-molecule organic redox-active materials, with potential applications in energy storage, has received considerable interest of late. Herein, we report on the synthesis, characterization, and application of two rigid chiral triangles, each of which consist of non-identical pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and naphthalene diimide (NDI)-based redox-active units. (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopic investigations in solution confirm the lower symmetry (C2 point group) associated with these two isosceles triangles. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal their rigid triangular prism-like geometries. Unlike previously investigated equilateral triangle containing three identical NDI subunits, both isosceles triangles do not choose to form one-dimensional supramolecular nanotubes by dint of [C-H···O] interaction-driven columnar stacking. The rigid isosceles triangle, composed of one NDI and two PMDI subunits, forms-in the presence of N,N-dimethylformamide-two different types of intermolecular NDI-NDI and NDI-PMDI π-π stacked dimers with opposite helicities in the solid state. Cyclic voltammetry reveals that both isosceles triangles can accept reversibly up to six electrons. Continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance and electron-nuclear double-resonance spectroscopic investigations, supported by density functional theory calculations, on the single-electron reduced radical anions of the isosceles triangles confirm the selective sharing of unpaired electrons among adjacent redox-active NDI subunit(s) within both molecules. The isosceles triangles have been employed as electrode-active materials in organic rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The evaluation of the structure-performance relationships of this series of diimide-based triangles reveals that the increase in the number of NDI subunits, replacing PMDI ones, within the molecules improves the electrochemical cell performance of the batteries. PMID:27070768

  13. Cloning, expression, and purification of human cyclophilin in Escherichia coli and assessment of the catalytic role of cysteines by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cDNA encoding human cyclophilin from the Jurkat T-cell lymphoma line has been cloned by the expression cassette polymerase chain reaction and sequenced, and an expression vector has been constructed under control of the tac promoter for efficient expression in Escherichia coli. Active cyclophilin is produced at up to 40% of soluble cell protein, facilitating a one-column purification to homogeneity. Wild-type cyclophilin was characterized for binding of the potent immunosuppressant agent cyclosporin A by tryptophan fluorescence enhancement and for inhibition of cyclophilin's peptidyl-proly cis-trans isomerase (rotamase) activity. With N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as the substrate, recombinant human cyclophilin has a high catalytic efficiency. To test the prior suggestion that a cysteine residue may be essential for catalysis and immunosuppressant binding, the four cysteines at positions 52, 62, 115, and 161 were mutated individually to alanine and the purified mutant proteins were shown to retain full affinity for cyclosporin A and equivalent catalytic efficiency as a rotamase. Clearly the cysteines play no essential role in catalysis or cyclosporin A binding. These results rule out the recently proposed mechanism. Involving the formation of tetrahedral hemithioorthoamide. Whereas mechanisms that embody other tetrahedral intermediates may be operative, an alternative mechanism is considered that involves distortion of bound substrate with a twisted (90 degree) peptidyl-prolyl amide bond

  14. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1-14C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  15. Naphthalene SOA: redox activity and naphthoquinone gas-particle partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhinney, R. D.; Zhou, S.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2013-10-01

    Chamber secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from low-NOx photooxidation of naphthalene by hydroxyl radical was examined with respect to its redox cycling behaviour using the dithiothreitol (DTT) assay. Naphthalene SOA was highly redox-active, consuming DTT at an average rate of 118 ± 14 pmol per minute per μg of SOA material. Measured particle-phase masses of the major previously identified redox active products, 1,2- and 1,4-naphthoquinone, accounted for only 21 ± 3% of the observed redox cycling activity. The redox-active 5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone was identified as a new minor product of naphthalene oxidation, and including this species in redox activity predictions increased the predicted DTT reactivity to 30 ± 5% of observations. These results suggest that there are substantial unidentified redox-active SOA constituents beyond the small quinones that may be important toxic components of these particles. A gas-to-SOA particle partitioning coefficient was calculated to be (7.0 ± 2.5) × 10-4 m3 μg-1 for 1,4-naphthoquinone at 25 °C. This value suggests that under typical warm conditions, 1,4-naphthoquinone is unlikely to contribute strongly to redox behaviour of ambient particles, although further work is needed to determine the potential impact under conditions such as low temperatures where partitioning to the particle is more favourable. Also, higher order oxidation products that likely account for a substantial fraction of the redox cycling capability of the naphthalene SOA are likely to partition much more strongly to the particle phase.

  16. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  17. Whence flavins? Redox-active ribonucleotides link metabolism and genome repair to the RNA world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khiem Van; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2012-12-18

    Present-day organisms are under constant environmental stress that damages bases in DNA, leading to mutations. Without DNA repair processes to correct these errors, such damage would be catastrophic. Organisms in all kingdoms have repair processes ranging from direct reversal to base excision and nucleotide excision repair, and the recently characterized giant viruses also include these mechanisms. At what point in the evolution of genomes did active repair mechanisms become critical? In particular, how did early RNA genomes protect themselves from UV photodamage that would have hampered nonenzymatic replication and led to a mutation rate too high to pass on accurate sequence information from one generation to the next? Photolyase is a widespread and phylogenetically ancient enzyme that utilizes longer wavelength light to cleave thymine dimers in DNA produced via photodamage. The protein serves as a binding scaffold but does not contribute to the catalytic chemistry; the action of the dinucleotide cofactor FADH(2) breaks the chemical bonds. This small bit of RNA, hailed as a "fossil of the RNA World," contains the flavin heterocycle, whose redox activity has been harnessed for myriad functions of life from metabolism to DNA repair. In present-day biochemistry, flavin biosynthesis begins with guanosine and proceeds through seven steps catalyzed by protein-based enzymes. This leads to the question of how flavins originally evolved. Did the RNA world include ancestral RNA bases with greater redox activity than G, A, C, and U that were capable of photorepair of uracil dimers? Could those ancestral bases have chemically evolved to the current flavin structure? Or did flavins already exist from prebiotic chemical synthesis? And were they then co-opted as catalysts for repair sometime after metabolism was established? In this Account, we analyze simple derivatives of guanosine and other bases that show two prerequisites for flavin-like photolyase activity: a significantly

  18. Capacitance enhancement of polyaniline coated curved-graphene supercapacitors in a redox-active electrolyte

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We show, for the first time, a redox-active electrolyte in combination with a polyaniline-coated curved graphene active material to achieve significant enhancement in the capacitance (36-92% increase) compared to supercapacitors that lack the redox-active contribution from the electrolyte. The supercapacitors based on the redox-active electrolyte also exhibit excellent rate capability and very long cycling performance (>50 000 cycles). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  20. Substitution of cysteine for a conserved alanine residue in the catalytic center of type II iodothyronine deiodinase alters interaction with reducing cofactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Klootwijk (Willem); T.J. Visser (Ton); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractHuman type II iodothyronine deiodinase (D2) catalyzes the activation of T(4) to T(3). The D2 enzyme, like the type I (D1) and type III (D3) deiodinases, contains a selenocysteine (SeC) residue (residue 133 in D2) in the highly conserved catalytic center. Remarkably, all

  1. Crystal Structure of Mammalian Cysteine dioxygenase: A Novel Mononuclear Iron Center for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Liu, Q.; Huang, Q.; Hao, Q.; Begley, T.; Karplus, P.; Stipanuk, M.

    2006-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase is a mononuclear iron-dependent enzyme responsible for the oxidation of cysteine with molecular oxygen to form cysteinesulfinate. This reaction commits cysteine to either catabolism to sulfate and pyruvate or to the taurine biosynthetic pathway. Cysteine dioxygenase is a member of the cupin superfamily of proteins. The crystal structure of recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase has been determined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution, and these results confirm the canonical cupin {beta}-sandwich fold and the rare cysteinyl-tyrosine intramolecular crosslink (between Cys93 and Tyr157) seen in the recently reported murine cysteine dioxygenase structure. In contrast to the catalytically inactive mononuclear Ni(II) metallocenter present in the murine structure, crystallization of a catalytically competent preparation of rat cysteine dioxygenase revealed a novel tetrahedrally coordinated mononuclear iron center involving three histidines (His86, His88, and His140) and a water molecule. Attempts to acquire a structure with bound ligand using either co-crystallization or soaks with cysteine revealed the formation of a mixed disulfide involving Cys164 near the active site, which may explain previously observed substrate inhibition. This work provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in thiol dioxygenation and sets the stage for exploring the chemistry of both the novel mononuclear iron center and the catalytic role of the cysteinyl-tyrosine linkage.

  2. Novel Molecular Non-Volatile Memory: Application of Redox-Active Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Zhu; Qiliang Li

    2015-01-01

    This review briefly describes the development of molecular electronics in the application of non-volatile memory. Molecules, especially redox-active molecules, have become interesting due to their intrinsic redox behavior, which provides an excellent basis for low-power, high-density and high-reliability non-volatile memory applications. Recently, solid-state non-volatile memory devices based on redox-active molecules have been reported, exhibiting fast speed, low operation voltage, excellent...

  3. In situ-generated metal oxide catalyst during CO oxidation reaction transformed from redox-active metal-organic framework-supported palladium nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jin Yeong; Jin, Mingshi; Lee, Kyung Joo; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ji Man; Moon, Hoi Ri

    2012-01-01

    The preparation of redox-active metal-organic framework (ra-MOF)-supported Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via the redox couple-driven method is reported, which can yield unprotected metallic NPs at room temperature within 10 min without the use of reducing agents. The Pd@ra-MOF has been exploited as a precursor of an active catalyst for CO oxidation. Under the CO oxidation reaction condition, Pd@ra-MOF is transformed into a PdO x -NiO y /C nanocomposite to generate catalytically active species in sit...

  4. A general approach toward enhancement of pseudocapacitive performance of conducting polymers by redox-active electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A general approach is demonstrated where the pseudocapacitive performance of different conducting polymers is enhanced in redox-active electrolytes. The concept is demonstrated using several electroactive conducting polymers, including polyaniline, polypyrrole, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). As compared to conventional electrolytes, the redox-active electrolytes, prepared by simply adding a redox mediator to the conventional electrolyte, can significantly improve the energy storage capacity of pseudocapacitors with different conducting polymers. The results show that the specific capacitance of conducting polymer based pseudocapacitors can be increased by a factor of two by utilization of the redox-active electrolytes. In fact, this approach gives some of the highest reported specific capacitance values for electroactive conducting polymers. Moreover, our findings present a general and effective approach for the enhancement of energy storage performance of pseudocapacitors using a variety of polymeric electrode materials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Redox activity of airborne particulate matter at different sites in the Los Angeles Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies have shown associations between ambient particulate matter (PM) and adverse health outcomes including increased mortality, emergency room visits, and time lost from school and work. The mechanisms of PM-related health effects are still incompletely understood, but a hypothesis under investigation is that many of the adverse health effects may derive from oxidative stress, initiated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. While the adverse effects from PM have historically been associated with the airborne concentration of PM and more recently fine-particle PM, we considered it relevant to develop an assay to quantitatively measure the ability of PM to catalyze ROS generation as the initial step in the induction of oxidative stress. This ability of PM could then be related to different sources, chemical composition, and physical and spatial/temporal characteristics in the ambient environment. The measurement of ROS-forming ability in relation to sources and other factors will have potential relevance to control of redox-active PM. If oxidative stress represents a relevant mechanism of toxicity from PM, the measurement of redox activity represents a first step in the elucidation of the subsequent downstream processes. We have developed an assay for PM redox activity, utilizing the reduction of oxygen by dithiothreitol which serves as an electron source. We have found that PM will catalyze the reduction of oxygen and have examined the distribution and chemical characteristics of the redox activity of PM fractions collected in different sites in the Los Angeles Basin. Samples of concentrated coarse, fine, and ultrafine PM, obtained with aerosol concentrators, were studied with regard to their chemical properties and redox activity. Redox activity was highest in the ultrafine fraction, in agreement with results indicating ultrafines were the most potent toward inducing that heme oxygenase expression and depleting

  6. Aminotroponiminates as tunable, redox-active ligands: reversible single electron transfer and reductive dimerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, C; Krummenacher, I

    2016-08-21

    Aminotroponiminates (atis) are shown to be redox-active ligands. Under strongly reducing conditions, the result of electron transfer can be controlled by the choice of the metal bound to the ati ligand. Either reversible electron transfer or a reductively induced dimerisation is observed. The latter reaction is (regio- and diastereo-) selective and chemically reversible. PMID:27452905

  7. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Banerjee, Debasis; Liu, Jian; Schaef, Herbert T; Crum, Jarrod V; Fernandez, Carlos A; Kukkadapu, Ravi K; Nie, Zimin; Nune, Satish K; Motkuri, Radha K; Chapman, Karena W; Engelhard, Mark H; Hayes, James C; Silvers, Kurt L; Krishna, Rajamani; McGrail, B Peter; Liu, Jun; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-05-01

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O2 adsorption over N2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material. PMID:26953336

  8. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Banerjee, Debasis [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jian [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Schaef, Herbert T. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Fernandez, Carlos A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nie, Zimin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nune, Satish K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Motkuri, Radha K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hayes, James C. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Silvers, Kurt L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Krishna, Rajamani [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam The Netherlands; McGrail, B. Peter [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Liu, Jun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-03-08

    Incorporating, a redox active organometallic molIncorporating, a redox active organometallic molecule within a porous matrix is a useful strategy to form redox active composite materials for emerging applications such as energy storage, electro-catalysis and electro-magnetic separation. Herein we report a new class of stable, redox active metal organic composites for oxygen/air separation with exceptional efficiency. In particular, Ferrocene impregnated in a thermally stable hierarchical porous framework showed a saturation uptake capacity of >51 mg/g for oxygen at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.06. The material shows excellent O2 selectivity from air as evident from experimental and simulated breakthrough experiments. In detail structural analysis using 57Fe-Mössbauer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis show that of O2 adsorption affinity and selectivity originates by the formation Fe3+-O oxide due to the highly reactive nature of the organometallics imbedded in the porous matrix.

  9. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Composites for Highly Selective Oxygen Separation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wen [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Banerjee, Debasis [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Liu, Jian [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Schaef, Herbert T. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Crum, Jarrod V. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Fernandez, Carlos A. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nie, Zimin [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Nune, Satish K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Motkuri, Radha K. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chapman, Karena W. [X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Hayes, James C. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Silvers, Kurt L. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Krishna, Rajamani [Van' t Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904 1098 XH Amsterdam The Netherlands; McGrail, B. Peter [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Liu, Jun [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Thallapally, Praveen K. [Physical & Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA

    2016-03-08

    A redox-active metal-organic composite material shows improved and selective O-2 adsorption over N-2 with respect to individual components (MIL-101 and ferrocene). The O-2 sensitivity of the composite material arises due to the formation of maghemite nanoparticles with the pore of the metal-organic framework material.

  10. Electron transfer across the polarized interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Trojánek, Antonín; Samec, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 10 (2010), s. 1333-1335. ISSN 1388-2481 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08098; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.282, year: 2010

  11. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568. ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.853, year: 2014

  12. Redox activity of urban quasi-ultrafine particles from primary and secondary sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vishal; Ning, Zhi; Cho, Arthur K.; Schauer, James J.; Shafer, Martin M.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2009-12-01

    To characterize the redox activity profiles of atmospheric aerosols from primary (traffic) and secondary photochemical sources, ambient quasi-ultrafine particles were collected near downtown Los Angeles in two different time periods - morning (6:00-9:00 PDT) and afternoon (11:00-14:00 PDT) in the summer of 2008. Detailed chemical analysis of the collected samples, including water-soluble elements, inorganic ions, organic species and water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) was conducted and redox activity of the samples was measured by two different assays: the dithiothreitol (DTT) and the macrophage reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays. Tracers of secondary photochemical reactions, such as sulfate and organic acids were higher (2.1 ± 0.6 times for sulfate, and up to 3 times for the organic acids) in the afternoon period. WSOC was also elevated by 2.5 ± 0.9 times in the afternoon period due to photo-oxidation of primary particles during atmospheric aging. Redox activity measured by the DTT assay was considerably higher for the samples collected during the afternoon; on the other hand, diurnal trends in the ROS-based activity were not consistent between the morning and afternoon periods. A linear regression between redox activity and various PM chemical constituents showed that the DTT assay was highly correlated with WSOC ( R2 = 0.80), while ROS activity was associated mostly with water soluble transition metals (Vanadium, Nickel and Cadmium; R2 > 0.70). The DTT and ROS assays, which are based on the generation of different oxidizing species by chemical PM constituents, provide important information for elucidating the health risks related to PM exposure from different sources. Thus, both primary and secondary particles possess high redox activity; however, photochemical transformations of primary emissions with atmospheric aging enhance the toxicological potency of primary particles in terms of generating oxidative stress and leading to subsequent damage in cells.

  13. The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: Dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadehvakili, B; McNeill, S M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-03-15

    Redox active molecules containing organoselenium or organotellurium groups catalyse the oxidation of cellular thiols by hydrogen peroxide and are currently being developed as therapeutic agents. Potentially these synthetic thiol peroxidase (TPx) mimics can protect cells from oxidative stress by catalysing the reduction of reactive oxygen species by the cellular thiol glutathione, an activity which mimics the function of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Alternatively they can act as prooxidants by catalysing the oxidation of essential thiol species within the cell. However the structure-activity relationships which determine the choice of thiol substrate, and hence the overall antioxidant or prooxidant outcome of drug administration, remain unknown. We report the first study that relates the pharmacological properties of TPx mimics with their solubility and catalytic activity using different thiol substrates. We used a series of structurally related compounds PhMCnH2n+1 (M=Se, Te; n=4-7) and investigated their ability to catalyse the oxidation of the cellular thiols glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid by hydrogen peroxide. The resulting rate constants (kobs) were then related to compound cytotoxicity and antioxidant versus prooxidant action in A549 cancer cells. The results show that the dihydrolipoic acid kobs values correlate with both cytotoxicity and prooxidant function. This enabled us to define a relationship, IC50=10+280e(-5(DHLA)(kobs)()), which allows the prediction of TPx mimic cytotoxicity. In contrast, hydrophobicity and glutathione kobs were unrelated to the compounds' redox pharmacology. PMID:26801688

  14. Selective modification of phosphoribulokinase cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krieger, T.J.; Mende-Mueller, L.M.; Miziorko, H.M.

    1987-05-01

    The most reactive sulfhydryl in native phosphoribulokinase can be selectively alkylated with iodoacetate; complete loss of activity results. Composition and N-terminal analyses of the peptide bearing this -SH show that cys-16 is the modification site. In the presence of Mg and ATP, a nonessential -SH is modified; catalytic activity is unchanged. The peptide bearing this cysteine has been characterized by amino acid composition and N-terminal analyses (Phe-Phe-Asn-Pro-Val-Tyr-(Ile/Leu)...). Enzyme alkylated at this site is subject to reversible oxidative inactivation, showing that this cysteine is not involved in regulation of activity. A cysteine distinct from this nonessential residue is suggested by crosslinking studies to be close (5a) to cys-16. The site-directed inhibitor fluorosulfonylbenzoyladenosine (FSBA) inactivates enzyme by modifying cys-16. Carboxymethylation of enzyme after FSBA incorporation, followed by DTT treatment, unmasks the initial modification site and allows (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate labeling. The tryptic peptide bearing this residue co-chromatographs with and is identical in composition to the cys-16 containing peptide.

  15. Crystal Structures of the Reduced, Sulfenic Acid, and Mixed Disulfide Forms of SarZ, a Redox Active Global Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poor, Catherine B.; Chen, Peng R.; Duguid, Erica; Rice, Phoebe A.; He, Chuan; (UC)

    2010-01-20

    SarZ is a global transcriptional regulator that uses a single cysteine residue, Cys{sup 13}, to sense peroxide stress and control metabolic switching and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus. SarZ belongs to the single-cysteine class of OhrR-MgrA proteins that play key roles in oxidative resistance and virulence regulation in various bacteria. We present the crystal structures of the reduced form, sulfenic acid form, and mixed disulfide form of SarZ. Both the sulfenic acid and mixed disulfide forms are structurally characterized for the first time for this class of proteins. The Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid modification is stabilized through two hydrogen bonds with surrounding residues, and the overall DNA-binding conformation is retained. A further reaction of the Cys{sup 13} sulfenic acid with an external thiol leads to formation of a mixed disulfide bond, which results in an allosteric change in the DNA-binding domains, disrupting DNA binding. Thus, the crystal structures of SarZ in three different states provide molecular level pictures delineating the mechanism by which this class of redox active regulators undergoes activation. These structures help to understand redox-mediated virulence regulation in S. aureus and activation of the MarR family proteins in general.

  16. Functionalized Nanostructures: Redox-Active Porphyrin Anchors for Supramolecular DNA Assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Börjesson, Karl

    2010-09-28

    We have synthesized and studied a supramolecular system comprising a 39-mer DNA with porphyrin-modified thymidine nucleosides anchored to the surface of large unilamellar vesicles (liposomes). Liposome porphyrin binding characteristics, such as orientation, strength, homogeneity, and binding site size, was determined, suggesting that the porphyrin is well suited as a photophysical and redox-active lipid anchor, in comparison to the inert cholesterol anchor commonly used today. Furthermore, the binding characteristics and hybridization capabilities were studied as a function of anchor size and number of anchoring points, properties that are of importance for our future plans to use the addressability of these redox-active nodes in larger DNA-based nanoconstructs. Electron transfer from photoexcited porphyrin to a lipophilic benzoquinone residing in the lipid membrane was characterized by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and verified by femtosecond transient absorption. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. Nanoscale charge transport in cytochrome c3/DNA network: Comparative studies between redox-active molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Harumasa; Che, Dock-Chil; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Masayuki; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2015-09-01

    The redox-active molecule of a cytochrome c3/DNA network exhibits nonlinear current-voltage (I-V) characteristics with a threshold bias voltage at low temperature and zero-bias conductance at room temperature. I-V curves for the cytochrome c3/DNA network are well matched with the Coulomb blockade network model. Comparative studies of the Mn12 cluster, cytochrome c, and cytochrome c3, which have a wide variety of redox potentials, indicate no difference in charge transport, which suggests that the conduction mechanism is not directly related to the redox states. The charge transport mechanism has been discussed in terms of the newly-formed electronic energy states near the Fermi level, induced by the ionic interaction between redox-active molecules with the DNA network.

  18. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: Different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Biao; Rotenberg, Susan A.; Mirkin, Michael V.

    2000-01-01

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransform...

  19. Improvement of Human Keratinocyte Migration by a Redox Active Bioelectric Dressing

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Jaideep; Das Ghatak, Piya; Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Emily K. Sequin; Bellman, Karen; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Suri, Prerna; Subramaniam, Vish V.; Chang, Christopher J.; Chandan K Sen

    2014-01-01

    Exogenous application of an electric field can direct cell migration and improve wound healing; however clinical application of the therapy remains elusive due to lack of a suitable device and hence, limitations in understanding the molecular mechanisms. Here we report on a novel FDA approved redox-active Ag/Zn bioelectric dressing (BED) which generates electric fields. To develop a mechanistic understanding of how the BED may potentially influence wound re-epithelialization, we direct emphas...

  20. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia von Montfort; Lirija Alili; Sarah Teuber-Hanselmann; Peter Brenneisen

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce) oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria) are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and red...

  1. Practical Ni-Catalyzed Aryl-Alkyl Cross-Coupling of Secondary Redox-Active Esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornella, Josep; Edwards, Jacob T; Qin, Tian; Kawamura, Shuhei; Wang, Jie; Pan, Chung-Mao; Gianatassio, Ryan; Schmidt, Michael; Eastgate, Martin D; Baran, Phil S

    2016-02-24

    A new transformation is presented that enables chemists to couple simple alkyl carboxylic acids with aryl zinc reagents under Ni-catalysis. The success of this reaction hinges on the unique use of redox-active esters that allow one to employ such derivatives as alkyl halides surrogates. The chemistry exhibits broad substrate scope and features a high degree of practicality. The simple procedure and extremely inexpensive nature of both the substrates and pre-catalyst (NiCl2·6H2O, ca. $9.5/mol) bode well for the immediate widespread adoption of this method. PMID:26835704

  2. Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Redox-Active Esters with Boronic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Qin, Tian; Chen, Tie-Gen; Wimmer, Laurin; Edwards, Jacob T; Cornella, Josep; Vokits, Benjamin; Shaw, Scott A; Baran, Phil S

    2016-08-01

    A transformation analogous in simplicity and functional group tolerance to the venerable Suzuki cross-coupling between alkyl-carboxylic acids and boronic acids is described. This Ni-catalyzed reaction relies upon the activation of alkyl carboxylic acids as their redox-active ester derivatives, specifically N-hydroxy-tetrachlorophthalimide (TCNHPI), and proceeds in a practical and scalable fashion. The inexpensive nature of the reaction components (NiCl2 ⋅6 H2 O-$9.5 mol(-1) , Et3 N) coupled to the virtually unlimited commercial catalog of available starting materials bodes well for its rapid adoption. PMID:27380912

  3. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices. (paper)

  4. Non-volatile memory devices with redox-active diruthenium molecular compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pookpanratana, S.; Zhu, H.; Bittle, E. G.; Natoli, S. N.; Ren, T.; Richter, C. A.; Li, Q.; Hacker, C. A.

    2016-03-01

    Reduction-oxidation (redox) active molecules hold potential for memory devices due to their many unique properties. We report the use of a novel diruthenium-based redox molecule incorporated into a non-volatile Flash-based memory device architecture. The memory capacitor device structure consists of a Pd/Al2O3/molecule/SiO2/Si structure. The bulky ruthenium redox molecule is attached to the surface by using a ‘click’ reaction and the monolayer structure is characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to verify the Ru attachment and molecular density. The ‘click’ reaction is particularly advantageous for memory applications because of (1) ease of chemical design and synthesis, and (2) provides an additional spatial barrier between the oxide/silicon to the diruthenium molecule. Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data identified the energy of the electronic levels of the surface before and after surface modification. The molecular memory devices display an unsaturated charge storage window attributed to the intrinsic properties of the redox-active molecule. Our findings demonstrate the strengths and challenges with integrating molecular layers within solid-state devices, which will influence the future design of molecular memory devices.

  5. Peptidyl cyclopropenones: Reversible inhibitors, irreversible inhibitors, or substrates of cysteine proteases?

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Meital; Bretler, Uriel; Albeck, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Peptidyl cyclopropenones were previously introduced as selective cysteine protease reversible inhibitors. In the present study we synthesized one such peptidyl cyclopropenone and investigated its interaction with papain, a prototype cysteine protease. A set of kinetics, biochemical, HPLC, MS, and 13C-NMR experiments revealed that the peptidyl cyclopropenone was an irreversible inhibitor of the enzyme, alkylating the catalytic cysteine. In parallel, this cyclopropenone also behaved as an alter...

  6. A new autocatalytic activation mechanism for cysteine proteases revealed by Prevotella intermedia interpain A

    OpenAIRE

    Mallorquí-Fernández, Noemí; Manandhar, Surya P.; Mallorquí-Fernández, Goretti; Usón, Isabel; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Kantyka, Tomasz; Solà, Maria; Thøgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a major periodontopathogen contributing to human gingivitis and periodontitis. Such pathogens release proteases as virulence factors that cause deterrence of host defences and tissue destruction. A new cysteine protease from the cysteine-histidine-dyad class, interpain A, was studied in its zymogenic and its self-processed mature form. The latter consists of a bivalved moiety made up by two subdomains. In the structure of a catalytic cysteine-to-alanine zymogen varian...

  7. Nitric oxide-generating l-cysteine-grafted graphene film as a blood-contacting biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhen; Dou, Ruixia; Zu, Mian; Liu, Xueying; Yin, Wenyan; Zhao, Yuliang; Chen, Jingbo; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun

    2016-06-24

    By using polyethylenimine molecules as the linker, l-cysteine was immobilized onto graphene nanosheets, endowing the biocompatible l-cysteine-functionalized graphene film with the ability for catalytic decomposition of exogenous or endogenous donors to generate nitric oxide, and thus inhibiting the platelet activation and aggregation and reducing platelet adhesion. PMID:27111404

  8. Electroanalysis of NADH Using Conducting and Redox Active Polymer/Carbon Nanotubes Modified Electrodes-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Ming Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Past few decades, conducting and redox active polymers play a critical role in the development of transducers for biosensing. It has been evidenced by increasing numerous reports on conducting and redox active polymers incorporated electrodes for assay of biomolcules. This review highlights the potential uses of electrogenerated polymer modified electrodes and polymer/carbon nanotubes composite modified electrodes for electroanalysis of reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinuceltoide (NADH. In addition, carbon electrodes modified with organic and inorganic materials as modifier have been discussed in detail for the quantification of NADH based on mediator or mediator-less methods.

  9. A Heterobimetallic W-Ni Complex Containing a Redox-Active W[SNS]2 Metalloligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkoetter, Kyle E; Ziller, Joseph W; Heyduk, Alan F

    2016-07-01

    The tungsten complex W[SNS]2 ([SNS]H3 = bis(2-mercapto-4-methylphenyl)amine) was bound to a Ni(dppe) [dppe = 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane] fragment to form the new heterobimetallic complex W[SNS]2Ni(dppe). Characterization of the complex by single-crystal X-ray diffraction revealed the presence of a short W-Ni bond, which renders the complex diamagnetic despite formal tungsten(V) and nickel(I) oxidation states. The W[SNS]2 unit acts as a redox-active metalloligand in the bimetallic complex, which displays four one-electron redox processes by cyclic voltammetry. In the presence of the organic acid 4-cyanoanilinium tetrafluoroborate, W[SNS]2Ni(dppe) catalyzes the electrochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen coincident with the first reduction of the complex. PMID:27300501

  10. Redox-Active Selenium Compounds—From Toxicity and Cell Death to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sougat Misra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is generally known as an antioxidant due to its presence in selenoproteins as selenocysteine, but it is also toxic. The toxic effects of selenium are, however, strictly concentration and chemical species dependent. One class of selenium compounds is a potent inhibitor of cell growth with remarkable tumor specificity. These redox active compounds are pro-oxidative and highly cytotoxic to tumor cells and are promising candidates to be used in chemotherapy against cancer. Herein we elaborate upon the major forms of dietary selenium compounds, their metabolic pathways, and their antioxidant and pro-oxidant potentials with emphasis on cytotoxic mechanisms. Relative cytotoxicity of inorganic selenite and organic selenocystine compounds to different cancer cells are presented as evidence to our perspective. Furthermore, new novel classes of selenium compounds specifically designed to target tumor cells are presented and the potential of selenium in modern oncology is extensively discussed.

  11. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of living cells: different redox activities of nonmetastatic and metastatic human breast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Rotenberg, S A; Mirkin, M V

    2000-08-29

    Electrochemical methods have been widely used to monitor physiologically important molecules in biological systems. This report describes the first application of the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) to probe the redox activity of individual living cells. The possibilities of measuring the rate and investigating the pathway of transmembrane charge transfer are demonstrated. By this approach, significant differences are detected in the redox responses given by nonmotile, nontransformed human breast epithelial cells, breast cells with a high level of motility (engendered by overexpression of protein kinase Calpha), and highly metastatic breast cancer cells. SECM analysis of the three cell lines reveals reproducible differences with respect to the kinetics of charge transfer by several redox mediators. PMID:10963658

  12. Redox-active cerium oxide nanoparticles protect human dermal fibroblasts from PQ-induced damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia von Montfort

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been published that cerium (Ce oxide nanoparticles (CNP; nanoceria are able to downregulate tumor invasion in cancer cell lines. Redox-active CNP exhibit both selective pro-oxidative and antioxidative properties, the first being responsible for impairment of tumor growth and invasion. A non-toxic and even protective effect of CNP in human dermal fibroblasts (HDF has already been observed. However, the effect on important parameters such as cell death, proliferation and redox state of the cells needs further clarification. Here, we present that nanoceria prevent HDF from reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced cell death and stimulate proliferation due to the antioxidative property of these particles.

  13. Computational screening study towards redox-active metal-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metal-organic framework (MOF) MFU-4 l containing Co(II) centers and Cl− ligands has recently shown promising redox activity. Aiming for further improved MOF catalysts for oxidation processes employing molecular oxygen we present a density-functional theory (DFT) based computational screening approach to identify promising metal center and ligand combinations within the MFU-4 l structural family. Using the O2 binding energy as a descriptor for the redox property, we show that relative energetic trends in this descriptor can reliably be obtained at the hybrid functional DFT level and using small cluster (scorpionate-type complex) models. Within this efficient computational protocol we screen a range of metal center/ligand combinations and identify several candidate systems that offer more exothermic O2 binding than the original Co/Cl-based MFU-4 l framework. (paper)

  14. Progress in conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janošević Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in synthesis, characterization and application of the selected conducting/semiconducting and redox-active oligomers and polymers of arylamines are reviewed. A brief historical background of the selected topics is given. The overview of the preparation, structure and properties of polyaniline, substituted polyanilines, especially those obtained by the oxidative polymerization of p-substituted anilines, poly(1-aminonaphthalene and its derivatives, carbocyclic and heterocyclic polyaryldiamines such as poly(p-phenylenediamine and polydiaminoacridines, is presented. The mechanism of formation of polyaniline nanostructures is discussed. Recent approaches to the preparation of one-dimensional polyaniline nanostructures are concisely reviewed, with special attention paid to the template-free falling-pH method. Current and potential future applications of oligo/polyarylamines are briefly discussed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI 172043

  15. Electronic Structure and Multicatalytic Features of Redox-Active Bis(arylimino)acenaphthene (BIAN)-Derived Ruthenium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha Hazari, Arijit; Ray, Ritwika; Hoque, Md Asmaul; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2016-08-15

    The article examines the newly designed and structurally characterized redox-active BIAN-derived [Ru(trpy)(R-BIAN)Cl]ClO4 ([1a]ClO4-[1c]ClO4), [Ru(trpy)(R-BIAN)(H2O)](ClO4)2 ([3a](ClO4)2-[3c](ClO4)2), and BIAO-derived [Ru(trpy)(BIAO)Cl]ClO4 ([2a]ClO4) (trpy = 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine, R-BIAN = bis(arylimino)acenaphthene (R = H (1a(+), 3a(2+)), 4-OMe (1b(+), 3b(2+)), 4-NO2 (1c(+), 3c(2+)), BIAO = [N-(phenyl)imino]acenapthenone). The experimental (X-ray, (1)H NMR, spectroelectrochemistry, EPR) and DFT/TD-DFT calculations of 1a(n)-1c(n) or 2a(n) collectively establish {Ru(II)-BIAN(0)} or {Ru(II)-BIAO(0)} configuration in the native state, metal-based oxidation to {Ru(III)-BIAN(0)} or {Ru(III)-BIAO(0)}, and successive electron uptake processes by the α-diimine fragment, followed by trpy and naphthalene π-system of BIAN or BIAO, respectively. The impact of the electron-withdrawing NO2 function in the BIAN moiety in 1c(+) has been reflected in the five nearby reduction steps within the accessible potential limit of -2 V versus SCE, leading to a fully reduced BIAN(4-) state in [1c](4-). The aqua derivatives ({Ru(II)-OH2}, 3a(2+)-3c(2+)) undergo simultaneous 2e(-)/2H(+) transfer to the corresponding {Ru(IV)═O} state and the catalytic current associated with the Ru(IV)/Ru(V) response probably implies its involvement in the electrocatalytic water oxidation. The aqua derivatives (3a(2+)-3c(2+)) are efficient and selective precatalysts in transforming a wide variety of alkenes to corresponding epoxides in the presence of PhI(OAc)2 as an oxidant in CH2Cl2 at 298 K as well as oxidation of primary, secondary, and heterocyclic alcohols with a large substrate scope with H2O2 as the stoichiometric oxidant in CH3CN at 343 K. The involvement of the {Ru(IV)═O} intermediate as the active catalyst in both the oxidation processes has been ascertained via a sequence of experimental evidence. PMID:27482834

  16. Thermodynamic aspects of the electron transfer across the interface between water and a hydrophobic redox-active ionic liquid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Langmaier, Jan; Samec, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, - (2011), s. 606-613. ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/0707; GA ČR GAP206/10/1231 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : redox-active ionic liquid * membrane * cyclic voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  17. Regulation of human ADAM 12 protease by the prodomain. Evidence for a functional cysteine switch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loechel, F; Overgaard, M T; Oxvig, C;

    1999-01-01

    prodomain maintaining the protease in a latent form. We now provide evidence that the latency mechanism of ADAM 12 can be explained by the cysteine switch model, in which coordination of Zn2+ in the active site of the catalytic domain by a cysteine residue in the prodomain is critical for inhibition of the...... protease. Replacing Cys179 with other amino acids results in an ADAM 12 proform that is proteolytically active, but latency can be restored by placing cysteine at other positions in the propeptide. None of the amino acids adjacent to the crucial cysteine residue is essential for blocking activity of the...

  18. Electron Propagation within Redox-Active Microdomains in Thin Films of Ferrocene-Containing Diblock Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, Govinda; Yi, Yi; Derylo, Maksymilian A; Baker, Lane A; Ito, Takashi

    2015-11-10

    This paper reports the electrochemical behavior of redox-active microdomains in thin films of ferrocene-containing diblock copolymers, polystyrene-block-poly(2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl ferrocenecarboxylate) (PS-b-PAEFc). PS-b-PAEFc with different PAEFc volume fractions (PS154-b-PAEFc51, PS154-b-PAEFc26, and PS154-b-PAEFc12, where the subscripts represent the polymerization degree of each block; f(PAEFc) = 0.47, 0.30, and 0.17, respectively) was synthesized by sequential atom transfer radical polymerization. PS-b-PAEFc films of controlled thicknesses (20-160 nm) were prepared on gold substrates via spin-coating and characterized by ellipsometry. Microdomains were observed via atomic force microscopy on the surfaces of PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26 thin films but not on the surfaces of PS154-b-PAEFc12 thin films. Electrochemical behavior of films was assessed by cyclic voltammetry and chronocoulometry in acetonitrile solution. The redox potential of ferrocene moieties was similar (ca. + 0.29 V vs Fc(+)/Fc) regardless of fPAEFc and film thickness. For PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26, thicker films afforded larger faradaic peak currents and exhibited diffusion-controlled voltammograms at faster sweep rates. PS154-b-PAEFc26 produced voltammograms less influenced by solvent-induced swelling than PS154-b-PAEFc51, reflecting the improved morphological stability of PAEFc microdomains by redox-inert PS frameworks. In contrast, PS154-b-PAEFc12 films yielded similar faradaic peak currents regardless of film thickness and exhibited voltammograms indicative of surface-confined species. These observations suggest that PS154-b-PAEFc51 and PS154-b-PAEFc26 films contain continuous PAEFc microdomains extending from the electrode to the surface, in contrast to the PS154-b-PAEFc12 films which contain isolated PAEFc microdomains buried within the PS matrix. Electron propagation took place only through PAEFc microdomains that could electrically communicate with the underlying

  19. Innocent or guilty? Redox activity in and magnetic and optical behaviour of dinuclear molydenum complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jon A McCleverty; Michael D Ward

    2002-08-01

    The phenomenon of `non-innocence’, first articulated by Jørgensen in 1966, is briefly reviewed. Spectroelectrochemical studies of a range of dinuclear complexes of the type [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = dipyridyls) and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = diphenolates) which are redox active, show that oxidised or reduced forms of these species exhibit `non-innocence’. The spectral behaviour is associated with metal-to-ligand or ligand-to-metal charge transfer phenomena, probably the first time that monodentate bridging ligands have been implicated in `non-innocent’ behaviour. These bridging ligands also determine the nature and extent of magnetic interaction between the unpaired spins in [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)], the dominant mechanism of spin-exchange relying on the extent of $\\eth$-delocalisation within the bridging ligands. The unusual optical behaviour of these dinuclear complexes when oxidised (oxomolybdenum diphenolates) or reduced (nitrosyl molybdenum dipyridyls) has led to the exploration of electrochromism as a means to develop variable optical attenuators operating in the near-infrared region.

  20. Portable Enzyme-Paper Biosensors Based on Redox-Active CeO2 Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, A; Othman, A; Andreescu, S

    2016-01-01

    Portable, nanoparticle (NP)-enhanced enzyme sensors have emerged as powerful devices for qualitative and quantitative analysis of a variety of analytes for biomedicine, environmental applications, and pharmaceutical fields. This chapter describes a method for the fabrication of a portable, paper-based, inexpensive, robust enzyme biosensor for the detection of substrates of oxidase enzymes. The method utilizes redox-active NPs of cerium oxide (CeO2) as a sensing platform which produces color in response to H2O2 generated by the action of oxidase enzymes on their corresponding substrates. This avoids the use of peroxidases which are routinely used in conjunction with glucose oxidase. The CeO2 particles serve dual roles, as high surface area supports to anchor high loadings of the enzyme as well as a color generation reagent, and the particles are recycled multiple times for the reuse of the biosensor. These sensors are small, light, disposable, inexpensive, and they can be mass produced by standard, low-cost printing methods. All reagents needed for the analysis are embedded within the paper matrix, and sensors stored over extended periods of time without performance loss. This novel sensor is a general platform for the in-field detection of analytes that are substrates for oxidase enzymes in clinical, food, and environmental samples. PMID:27112400

  1. Extraction and recovery of nuclear fission products using hydrophobic, redox-active organometallic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are investigating a new strategy for liquid-liquid extraction and recovery of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from aqueous nuclear waste and contaminated groundwater. The extractants are hydrophobic, redox-active derivatives of Ni(C2B9H11) and FeCp(C2B9H11). They are activated for extraction by reduction to the corresponding monoanions. The cesium and strontium cations are recovered from the organic phase by reoxidation (deactivation) of the anionic extractants back to the neutral species, which also allows for recovery and reuse (i.e., recycling) of the extractants. The reduction potentials of the parent compounds are 0.18 V and -0.08V respectively (acetonitrile, SCE). Therefore, the derivatives can be easily reduced and re-oxidized by many common substances. The redox potentials, relative solubilities in organic solvents and aqueous solution, and D values for extraction and recovery, which vary as a function of substituent groups on the ligands, will be discussed

  2. Electrochemical properties and diffusion of a redox active surfactant incorporated in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to investigate the electrochemical behaviour of the divalent redox active surfactant, N-cetyl-N'-methylviologen (CMV), in bicontinuous cubic and lamellar phases. The liquid crystalline phases were prepared from the system glycerolmonooleate (GMO)-water (and brine)-cationic surfactant. A comparison of the phase behaviour of GMO with the monovalent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and the divalent CMV surfactant showed that the surfactants gave about the same effect at the same surface charge density. The electrochemical measurements were made with a mixture of CTAB and CMV as the surfactant. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the electrochemistry of CMV incorporated in the cubic and lamellar phases that were spread on a gold electrode. The E 0-values in the cubic samples were more negative (-0.55 V versus SCE) than in the lamellar samples (-0.53 V versus SCE). This can be explained by the higher charge density in the lamellar phase. The diffusion coefficients were also measured in the cubic phase. The mass transport is slowed down about fifty times in the cubic phase compared to in the pure electrolyte. The concentration dependence on the diffusion coefficient was also investigated. No electron hopping could be observed, which suggest that diffusional movement of the redox probe is the main source of charge transport. By placing the samples on a conducting glass slide, spectroelectrochemical investigations were performed. In the lamellar phase strong dimerization was detected at high concentration of viologen, but much less in the cubic phase

  3. ssDNA-Functionalized Nanoceria: A Redox-Active Aptaswitch for Biomolecular Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of biomolecular binding events is a critical step for the development of biorecognition assays for diagnostics and therapeutic applications. This paper reports the design of redox-active switches based on aptamer conjugated nanoceria for detection and quantification of biomolecular recognition. It is shown that the conformational transition state of the aptamer on nanoceria, combined with the redox properties of these particles can be used to create surface based structure switchable aptasensing platforms. Changes in the redox properties at the nanoceria surface upon binding of the ssDNA and its target analyte enables rapid and highly sensitive measurement of biomolecular interactions. This concept is demonstrated as a general applicable method to the colorimetric detection of DNA binding events. An example of a nanoceria aptaswitch for the colorimetric sensing of Ochratoxin A (OTA) and applicability to other targets is provided. The system can sensitively and selectivity detect as low as 0.15 × 10(-9) m OTA. This novel assay is simple in design and does not involve oligonucleotide labeling or elaborate nanoparticle modification steps. The proposed mechanism discovered here opens up a new way of designing optical sensing methods based on aptamer recognition. This approach can be broadly applicable to many bimolecular recognition processes and related applications. PMID:26844813

  4. Cannabidiol Exposure During Neuronal Differentiation Sensitizes Cells Against Redox-Active Neurotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönhofen, Patrícia; de Medeiros, Liana M; Bristot, Ivi Juliana; Lopes, Fernanda M; De Bastiani, Marco A; Kapczinski, Flávio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Castro, Mauro Antônio A; Parsons, Richard B; Klamt, Fábio

    2015-08-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD), one of the most abundant Cannabis sativa-derived compounds, has been implicated with neuroprotective effect in several human pathologies. Until now, no undesired side effects have been associated with CBD. In this study, we evaluated CBD's neuroprotective effect in terminal differentiation (mature) and during neuronal differentiation (neuronal developmental toxicity model) of the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. A dose-response curve was performed to establish a sublethal dose of CBD with antioxidant activity (2.5 μM). In terminally differentiated SH-SY5Y cells, incubation with 2.5 μM CBD was unable to protect cells against the neurotoxic effect of glycolaldehyde, methylglyoxal, 6-hydroxydopamine, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Moreover, no difference in antioxidant potential and neurite density was observed. When SH-SY5Y cells undergoing neuronal differentiation were exposed to CBD, no differences in antioxidant potential and neurite density were observed. However, CBD potentiated the neurotoxicity induced by all redox-active drugs tested. Our data indicate that 2.5 μM of CBD, the higher dose tolerated by differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal cells, does not provide neuroprotection for terminally differentiated cells and shows, for the first time, that exposure of CBD during neuronal differentiation could sensitize immature cells to future challenges with neurotoxins. PMID:25108670

  5. Unravelling ``off-target'' effects of redox-active polymers and polymer multilayered capsules in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Giovanni L.; Folini, Marco; Cavalieri, Francesca; Yan, Yan; Fresch, Enrico; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Hasenöhrl, Christoph; Richardson, Joseph J.; Tinelli, Stella; Fery, Andreas; Caruso, Frank; Zaffaroni, Nadia

    2015-03-01

    Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell lines. This suggests that the simultaneous action of carboxyl and disulfide groups in PMASH polymer or capsules may play a role in mediating the intracellular off-target effects. Our work provides evidence that the rational design of redox-active carriers for therapeutic-related application should be guided by a careful investigation on potential disturbance of the cellular machineries related to the carrier association.Redox-active polymers and carriers are oxidizing nanoagents that can potentially trigger intracellular off-target effects. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of off-target effects in prostate cancer cells following exposure to redox-active polymer and thin multilayer capsules with different chemical properties. We show that, depending on the intracellular antioxidant capacity, thiol-functionalized poly(methacrylic acid), PMASH triggers cell defense responses/perturbations that result in off-target effects (i.e., induction of autophagy and down-regulation of survivin). Importantly, the conversion of the carboxyl groups of PMASH into the neutral amides of poly(hydroxypropylmetacrylamide) (pHPMASH) nullified the off-target effects and cytotoxicity in tested cell

  6. Impedance aspect of charge storage at graphite and glassy carbon electrodes in potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) redox active electrolyte

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Magdić; Višnja Horvat-Radošević; Krešimir Kvastek

    2016-01-01

    Different types of charge storage mechanisms at unmodified graphite vs. glassy carbon electrodes in acid sulphate supporting solution containing potassium hexacyanoferrate (II) redox active electrolyte, have been revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and supported by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Reversible charge transfer of Fe(CN)63-/4- redox reaction detected by assessment of CVs of glassy carbon electrode, is in impedance spectra indicated by presence of bulk diffusion impe...

  7. Mechanism of electrochemical lithiation of a metal-organic framework without redox-active nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bohejin; Huang, Shuping; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Jinbo; Malonzo, Camille; Truhlar, Donald G; Stein, Andreas

    2016-05-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many potential uses for separations, storage, and catalysis, but their use as intercalation hosts for batteries has been scarce. In this article, we examine the mechanism of Li insertion in a MOF to provide guidance to future design efforts in this area. As a model system, we choose UiO-66, a MOF with the formula (Zr6O4(OH)4)4(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)6, as an electrode material for lithium-ion batteries; this MOF is of special interest because the zirconium is not redox active. We report both quantum mechanical characterization of the mechanism and experimental studies in which the material is synthesized as nanoparticles to reduce diffusion lengths for lithium ions and increase the contact area with a conductive carbon phase. The calculated changes in the IR spectra of UiO-66 and lithiated UiO-66 are consistent with the experimental FTIR results. We found experimentally that this MOF can maintain a specific discharge capacity of at least 118 mAh/g for 30 lithiation and delithiation cycles at a rate of C/5, exhibiting good cyclability. Density functional electronic structure calculations show that the charge transfer during lithiation is mainly from Li to node oxygens and carboxylate oxygens, that is, it involves anions rather than cations or aromatic rings, and they provide a mechanistic understanding of the potential for increased Li capacity because the theoretical capacity of UiO-66 with Li at the oxygens in the metal oxide nodes and the carboxylate linkers is more than 400 mAh/g. The lithiation process greatly decreases the bandgap of UiO-66, which is expected to increase its electronic conductivity. The electrode material was also characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which were consistent in confirming that smaller particle sizes were obtained in lower-temperature syntheses. PMID:27208960

  8. Mechanism of electrochemical lithiation of a metal-organic framework without redox-active nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bohejin; Huang, Shuping; Fang, Yuan; Hu, Jinbo; Malonzo, Camille; Truhlar, Donald G.; Stein, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have many potential uses for separations, storage, and catalysis, but their use as intercalation hosts for batteries has been scarce. In this article, we examine the mechanism of Li insertion in a MOF to provide guidance to future design efforts in this area. As a model system, we choose UiO-66, a MOF with the formula (Zr6O4(OH)4)4(1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)6, as an electrode material for lithium-ion batteries; this MOF is of special interest because the zirconium is not redox active. We report both quantum mechanical characterization of the mechanism and experimental studies in which the material is synthesized as nanoparticles to reduce diffusion lengths for lithium ions and increase the contact area with a conductive carbon phase. The calculated changes in the IR spectra of UiO-66 and lithiated UiO-66 are consistent with the experimental FTIR results. We found experimentally that this MOF can maintain a specific discharge capacity of at least 118 mAh/g for 30 lithiation and delithiation cycles at a rate of C/5, exhibiting good cyclability. Density functional electronic structure calculations show that the charge transfer during lithiation is mainly from Li to node oxygens and carboxylate oxygens, that is, it involves anions rather than cations or aromatic rings, and they provide a mechanistic understanding of the potential for increased Li capacity because the theoretical capacity of UiO-66 with Li at the oxygens in the metal oxide nodes and the carboxylate linkers is more than 400 mAh/g. The lithiation process greatly decreases the bandgap of UiO-66, which is expected to increase its electronic conductivity. The electrode material was also characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, which were consistent in confirming that smaller particle sizes were obtained in lower-temperature syntheses.

  9. 1,5-Diamido-9,10-anthraquinone, a Centrosymmetric Redox-Active Bridge with Two Coupled β-Ketiminato Chelate Functions: Symmetric and Asymmetric Diruthenium Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ansari, M. A.; Mandal, A.; Paretzki, A.; Beyer, K.; Fiedler, Jan; Kaim, W.

    (2016). ISSN 0020-1669 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : 1,5-diamido-9,10-anthraquinone bridge * Centrosymmetric Redox-Active Bridge * Diruthenium Complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.762, year: 2014

  10. Adsorption behavior of redox-active suppressor additives: Combined electrochemical and STM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Janus Green B and safranine are prototypical redox-active leveler additives for copper electroplating. → Their redox-transitions lie within the copper potential window. → Reduced additives are identified as active species for the leveling effect. → Electro-reduction affects in particular the central aromatic cores of the additives. - Abstract: The redox chemistry and the related surface phase behavior of Safranine (SAF) and Janus Green B (JGB) have been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry in combination with in situ Scanning Tunneling Microscopy using HOPG (Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite) and single crystalline Cu(1 0 0) as model substrates, both revealing different widths of the accessible potential windows. JGB and SAF serve as prototypical heterocyclic suppressor/leveler additives that are used for the metallization of 3D-TSVs (3D Through Silicon Vias) following a classical 'leveling' concept. SAF can be considered as the reductive decomposition product of JGB that is formed at the copper/electrolyte interface upon electroplating. Both additives reveal a pronounced pH-dependent redox-chemistry with redox-transitions lying close to or even beyond the anodic limit of the copper potential window. Affected by these redox-processes are in particular the aromatic cores of those heterocycles that can be (quasi)reversibly reduced by a two electron transfer process within the potential window of copper. Therefore we identify the reduced form of those dyes as the active components for the suppressing/leveling effect in copper plating. STM data clearly shows a dye surface phase behavior that is crucially determined by its potential-dependent redox-chemistry. This will be exemplarily discussed for the SAF dye. On chloride-modified Cu(1 0 0) mono-reduced SAF forms a structurally well-defined monolayer of cationic stacking polymers. However, this coupled anion/cation layer reveals only minor suppressing capabilities with respect to the copper

  11. Characterization, sources and redox activity of fine and coarse particulate matter in Milan, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Nancy; Ruprecht, Ario; Invernizzi, Giovanni; De Marco, Cinzia; Miller-Schulze, Justin; Heo, Jong Bae; Shafer, Martin M.; Shelton, Brandon R.; Schauer, James J.; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2012-03-01

    The correlation between health effects and exposure to particulate matter (PM) has been of primary concern to public health organizations. An emerging hypothesis is that many of the biological effects derive from the ability of PM to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) within affected cells. Milan, one of the largest and most polluted urban areas in Europe, is afflicted with high particle levels. To characterize its ambient PM, fine and coarse PM (PM2.5 and PM2.5-10, respectively) samples were collected on a weekly basis for a year-long period. Samples were analyzed for their chemical properties and ROS-activity. A molecular marker chemical mass balance (MM-CMB) model was also applied to apportion primary and secondary sources to fine organic carbon (OC) and PM. Findings revealed that PM2.5 is a major contributor to ambient particle levels in Milan, averaging 34.5 ± 19.4 μg m-3 throughout the year. Specifically, secondary inorganic ions and organic matter were the most dominant fine PM species contributing to 36 ± 7.1% and 34 ± 6.3% of its mass on a yearly-based average, respectively. Highest PM2.5 concentrations occurred during December-February and were mainly attributed to poor atmospheric dispersion. On the other hand, PM2.5-10 exhibited an annual average of 6.79 ± 1.67 μg m-3, with crustal elements prevailing. Source apportionment results showed that wood-smoke and secondary organic aerosol sources contribute to 4.6 ± 2.6% and 9.8 ± 11% of fine OC on a yearly-based average, respectively. The remaining OC is likely associated with petroleum-derived material that is not adequately represented by existing source profiles used in this study. Lastly, ROS-activity measurements indicated that PM2.5-induced redox activity expressed per m3 of air volume is greatest during January (837 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3) and February (920 μg Zymosan equivalents m-3). Conversely, intrinsic (per PM mass) ROS-activity peaked in July (22,587 μg Zymosan equivalents mg

  12. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  13. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    OpenAIRE

    Jurss, JW; Khnayzer, RS; Panetier, JA; El Roz, KA; Nichols, EM; Head-Gordon, M.; Long, JR; Castellano, FN; Chang, CJ

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry. Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within ...

  14. Interaction between pyrite and cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jian-she; WANG Zhao-hui; LI Bang-mei; ZHANG Yan-hua

    2006-01-01

    The adsorption mechanism of cysteine on pyrite was studied by amounts adsorbed, FTIR and XRD measurements. The results obtained by adsorption experiment suggest that as the mass ratio of mineral to cysteine mp/mc is greater than 5, the amounts adsorbed on mineral is stable after adsorption for 15 min and cysteine adsorbing with mp/mc shows the same tendency. It can be inferred by its Langmuir-type adsorption isotherm that chemical interaction governs the entire adsorption process. The results from FTIR and XRD prove that the functional groups of cysteine appear with blue shift of their characteristic adsorption peak in FTIR spectrum; meanwhile, the lattice constant obviously decreases and the widening of crystal planes such as (210), (220) and (211) is found after cysteine adsorbing on mineral.

  15. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain fam...

  16. Cysteine proteinases and cystatins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeliana S. Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describeds the definition, localization, functions and examples of cysteine proteinases and their protein inhibitors in vertebrate, non-vertebrate animals and plants. These inhibitors are related with defense mechanisms of plant against pests. It also describes the factors involved in the specific cysteine proteinase-cystatin interaction and high degree of affinity and large specificity in this interaction which are not only represented by the compatibility between amino acid residues of the active site involved in catalysis, but also of all amino acid residues that participante in the enzyme-inhibitor interaction.Nesta revisão foram descritas definições, localizações, funções e exemplos de proteinases cisteínicas e suas proteinas inibidoras em animais vertebrados e invertebrados e plantas. Tratamos principalmente com aqueles inibidores que são relatados com o mecanismo de defesa da planta contra pestes. Em adição, comentamos sobre recentes trabalhos que contribuíram para uma melhor compreenção dos fatores envolvidos na interação específica proteinase cisteínica-cistatina. Por outro lado, chamamos atenção para o alto grau de afinidade e grande especificidade na interação que não são apenas representadas pela compatibilidade entre os residuos de aminoácidos do sítio ativo envolvidos na catalise, mas também de todos os resíduos de aminoácidos que participam da interação enzima-inibidor.

  17. Cellular Interaction and Toxicity Depends on Physiochemical Properties and Surface Modification of Redox Active Nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Dowding, Janet M.; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X. T.; Sayle, Dean C.; von Kalm, Laurence; SEAL, SUDIPTA; Self, William T.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 NPs (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exists regarding the toxicity of CNP. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CeO2 NPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physiochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs us...

  18. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe2NiO(Piv)6 (Piv=O2CC(CH3)3) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N2 and H2 adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe2NiO(Piv)6(L)(H2O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics

  19. Challenging a Paradigm: Theoretical Calculations of the Protonation State of the Cys25-His159 Catalytic Diad in Free Papain

    OpenAIRE

    Shokhen, Michael; Khazanov, Netaly; Albeck, Amnon

    2009-01-01

    A central mechanistic paradigm of cysteine proteases is that the His – Cys catalytic diad forms an ion-pair NH(+)/S(−) already in the catalytically active free enzyme. Most molecular modeling studies of cysteine proteases refer to this paradigm as their starting point. Nevertheless, several recent kinetics and X-ray crystallography studies of viral and bacterial cysteine proteases depart from the ion-pair mechanism, suggesting general base catalysis. We challenge the postulate of the ion-pair...

  20. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Lyanna O. L.; Chorna V. I.

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic anal...

  1. Inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanna O. L.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the inhibitors of cysteine proteinases which are believed to be very important in many biochemical processes of living organisms. They participate in the development and progression of numerous diseases that involve abnormal protein turnover. One of the main regulators of these proteinases is their specific inhibitors: cystatins. The aim of this review was to present current knowledge about endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine proteases and their synthetic analogs.

  2. Cellular interaction and toxicity depend on physicochemical properties and surface modification of redox-active nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Janet M; Das, Soumen; Kumar, Amit; Dosani, Talib; McCormack, Rameech; Gupta, Ankur; Sayle, Thi X T; Sayle, Dean C; von Kalm, Laurence; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2013-06-25

    The study of the chemical and biological properties of CeO2 nanoparticles (CNPs) has expanded recently due to its therapeutic potential, and the methods used to synthesize these materials are diverse. Moreover, conflicting reports exist regarding the toxicity of CNPs. To help resolve these discrepancies, we must first determine whether CNPs made by different methods are similar or different in their physicochemical and catalytic properties. In this paper, we have synthesized several forms of CNPs using identical precursors through a wet chemical process but using different oxidizer/reducer; H2O2 (CNP1), NH4OH (CNP2), or hexamethylenetetramine (HMT-CNP1). Physicochemical properties of these CNPs were extensively studied and found to be different depending on the preparation methods. Unlike CNP1 and CNP2, HMT-CNP1 was readily taken into endothelial cells and the aggregation can be visualized using light microscopy. Exposure to HMT-CNP1 also reduced cell viability at a 10-fold lower concentration than CNP1 or CNP2. Surprisingly, exposure to HMT-CNP1 led to substantial decreases in ATP levels. Mechanistic studies revealed that HMT-CNP1 exhibited substantial ATPase (phosphatase) activity. Though CNP2 also exhibits ATPase activity, CNP1 lacked ATPase activity. The difference in catalytic (ATPase) activity of different CNPs preparation may be due to differences in their morphology and oxygen extraction energy. These results suggest that the combination of increased uptake and ATPase activity of HMT-CNP1 may underlie the biomechanism of the toxicity of this preparation of CNPs and may suggest that ATPase activity should be considered when synthesizing CNPs for use in biomedical applications. PMID:23668322

  3. Role of cysteine-58 and cysteine-95 residues in the thiol di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Nikhil; Hoti, S L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) is the first human cytokine reported and was thought to have a central role in the regulation of inflammatory responses. Homologs of this molecule have been reported in bacteria, invertebrates and plants. Apart from cytokine activity, it also has two catalytic activities viz., tautomerase and di-sulfide oxidoreductase, which appear to be involved in immunological functions. The CXXC catalytic site is responsible for di-sulfide oxidoreductase activity of MIF. We have recently reported thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor-2 of Wuchereria bancrofti (Wba-MIF-2), although it lacks the CXXC motif. We hypothesized that three conserved cysteine residues might be involved in the formation of di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic site. Homology modeling of Wba-MIF-2 showed that among the three cysteine residues, Cys58 and Cys95 residues came in close proximity (3.23Å) in the tertiary structure with pKa value 9, indicating that these residues might play a role in the di-sulfide oxidoreductase catalytic activity. We carried out site directed mutagenesis of these residues (Cys58Ser & Cys95Ser) and expressed mutant proteins in Escherichia coli. The mutant proteins did not show any oxidoreductase activity in the insulin reduction assay, thus indicating that these two cysteine residues are vital for the catalytic activity of Wba-MIF-2. PMID:26432350

  4. Electrochemical Oxidation of L-Cysteine in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Admicelles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李中春; 刘天晴; 郭荣

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of L-cysteine can be catalyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) admicelles. The catalytic efficiency increases hardly when SDS concentration is lower than the critical admicelle concentration (CAC) and increases rapidly when SDS concentration is between CAC and the critical micelle concentration (CMC), but decreases when SDS concentration is higher than CMC. Both results of rate constant k0 and Gibbs free energy ΔGck accord with that of catalytic efficiency.

  5. Redox activity and chemical speciation of size fractioned PM in the communities of the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S.; Polidori, A.; Arhami, M.; Shafer, M. M.; Schauer, J. J.; Cho, A.; Sioutas, C.

    2008-11-01

    In this study, two different types of assays were used to quantitatively measure the redox activity of PM and to examine its intrinsic toxicity: 1) in vitro exposure to rat alveolar macrophage (AM) cells using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) as the fluorescent probe (macrophage ROS assay), and: 2) consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT) in a cell-free system (DTT assay). Coarse (PM10-2.5), accumulation (PM2.5-0.25), and quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UF, PM0.25) mode particles were collected weekly at five sampling sites in the Los Angeles-Long Beach harbor and at one site near the University of Southern California campus (urban site). All PM samples were analyzed for organic (total and water-soluble) and elemental carbon, organic species, inorganic ions, and total and water-soluble elements. Quasi-UF mode particles showed the highest redox activity at all Long Beach sites (on both a per-mass and per-air volume basis). A significant association (R2=0.61) was observed between the two assays, indicating that macrophage ROS and DTT levels are affected at least partially by similar PM species. Relatively small variation was observed for the DTT measurements across all size fractions and sites, whereas macrophage ROS levels showed more significant ranges across the three different particle size modes and throughout the sites (coefficients of variation, or CVs, were 0.35, 0.24 and 0.53 for quasi-UF, accumulation, and coarse mode particles, respectively). Association between the PM constituents and the redox activity was further investigated using multiple linear regression models. The results showed that OC was the most important component influencing the DTT activity of PM samples. The variability of macrophage ROS was explained by changes in OC concentrations and water-soluble vanadium (probably originating from ship emissions bunker oil combustion). The multiple regression models were used to predict the average diurnal DTT levels as a function of the OC concentration at

  6. Redox activity and chemical speciation of size fractioned PM in the communities of the Los Angeles – Long Beach Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cho

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different types of assays were used to quantitatively measure the redox activity of PM and to examine its intrinsic toxicity: 1 in vitro exposure to rat alveolar macrophage (AM cells using dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA as the fluorescent probe (macrophage ROS assay, and: 2 consumption of dithiothreitol (DTT in a cell-free system (DTT assay. Coarse (PM10–2.5, accumulation (PM2.5–0.25, and quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UF, PM0.25 mode particles were collected weekly at five sampling sites in the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor and at one site near the University of Southern California campus (urban site. All PM samples were analyzed for organic (total and water-soluble and elemental carbon, organic species, inorganic ions, and total and water-soluble elements. Quasi-UF mode particles showed the highest redox activity at all Long Beach sites (on both a per-mass and per-air volume basis. A significant association (R2=0.61 was observed between the two assays, indicating that macrophage ROS and DTT levels are affected at least partially by similar PM species. Relatively small variation was observed for the DTT measurements across all size fractions and sites, whereas macrophage ROS levels showed more significant ranges across the three different particle size modes and throughout the sites (coefficients of variation, or CVs, were 0.35, 0.24 and 0.53 for quasi-UF, accumulation, and coarse mode particles, respectively. Association between the PM constituents and the redox activity was further investigated using multiple linear regression models. The results showed that OC was the most important component influencing the DTT activity of PM samples. The variability of macrophage ROS was explained by changes in OC concentrations and water-soluble vanadium (probably originating from ship emissions – bunker oil combustion. The multiple regression models were used to predict the average diurnal macrophage ROS and DTT levels as a

  7. Redox-active porous coordination polymer based on trinuclear pivalate: Temperature-dependent crystal rearrangement and redox-behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Kiskin, Mikhail A., E-mail: mkiskin@igic.ras.ru [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Dorofeeva, Victoria N.; Mishura, Andrey M.; Titov, Vladimir E.; Kolotilov, Sergey V. [L.V. Pisarzhevskii Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospekt Nauki 31, Kiev 03028 (Ukraine); Eremenko, Igor L.; Novotortsev, Vladimir M. [N.S. Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 31, GSP-1, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    Linking of trinuclear pivalate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6} (Piv=O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}) by 2,6-bis(4-pyridyl)-4-(1-naphthyl)pyridine (L) resulted in formation of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)·Solv, which was characterized in two forms: DMSO solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(DMSO)·2.5DMSO (1) or water solvate Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) (2). X-ray structure of 1 was determined. Crystal lattice of 1 at 160 K contained open channels, filled by captured solvent, while temperature growth to 296 K led to the crystal lattice rearrangement and formation of closed voids. Redox-behavior of 2 was studied by cyclic voltammetry for a solid compound, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. The presence of pores in desolvated sample Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L) was confirmed by the measurements of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} adsorption at 77 K. Potential barriers of the different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Graphical abstract: Redox-behavior of 1D-porous coordination polymer Fe{sub 2}NiO(Piv){sub 6}(L)(H{sub 2}O) was studied by cyclic voltammetry in thin film, deposited on glassy-carbon electrode. Redox-activity of L preserved upon incorporation in the coordination polymer. Potential barriers of different molecules diffusion through pores were estimated by the means of molecular mechanics. - Highlights: • Porous 1D coordination polymer was synthesized. • Temperature growth led to pores closing due to crystal lattice rearrangement. • Redox-activity of ligand preserved upon incorporation into coordination polymer. • Redox-properties of solid coordination polymer were studied in thin film. • Diffusion barriers were evaluated by molecular mechanics.

  8. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  9. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  10. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jason Z. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Ke, Yuebin [Shenzhen Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Misra, Hara P. [Virginia Tech CRC, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Trush, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Y. Robert [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Virginia Tech-Wake Forest University SBES, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States); Zhu, Hong, E-mail: zhu@campbell.edu [Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Buies Creek, NC (United States); Jia, Zhenquan, E-mail: z_jia@uncg.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, NC (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  11. Impedance aspect of charge storage at graphite and glassy carbon electrodes in potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Magdić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different types of charge storage mechanisms at unmodified graphite vs. glassy carbon electrodes in acid sulphate supporting solution containing potassium hexacyanoferrate (II redox active electrolyte, have been revealed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and supported by cyclic voltammetry experiments. Reversible charge transfer of Fe(CN63-/4- redox reaction detected by assessment of CVs of glassy carbon electrode, is in impedance spectra indicated by presence of bulk diffusion impedance and constant double-layer/pseudocapacitive electrode impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. Some surface retention of redox species detected by assessment of CVs of graphite electrode is in impedance spectra indicated by diffusion impedance coupled in this case by diminishing of double-layer/pseudo­capacitive impedance compared to that measured in the pure supporting electrolyte. This phenomenon is ascribed to contribution of additional pseudocapacitive impedance generated by redox reaction of species confined at the electrode surface.

  12. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes: expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.L.J. Broere; R. Plessius; J.I. van der Vlugt

    2015-01-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This r

  13. New avenues for ligand-mediated processes--expanding metal reactivity by the use of redox-active catechol, o-aminophenol and o-phenylenediamine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broere, Daniël L J; Plessius, Raoul; van der Vlugt, Jarl Ivar

    2015-10-01

    Redox-active ligands have evolved from being considered spectroscopic curiosities - creating ambiguity about formal oxidation states in metal complexes - to versatile and useful tools to expand on the reactivity of (transition) metals or to even go beyond what is generally perceived possible. This review focusses on metal complexes containing either catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine type ligands. These ligands have opened up a new area of chemistry for metals across the periodic table. The portfolio of ligand-based reactivity invoked by these redox-active entities will be discussed. This ranges from facilitating oxidative additions upon d(0) metals or cross coupling reactions with cobalt(iii) without metal oxidation state changes - by functioning as an electron reservoir - to intramolecular ligand-to-substrate single-electron transfer to create a reactive substrate-centered radical on a Pd(ii) platform. Although the current state-of-art research primarily consists of stoichiometric and exploratory reactions, several notable reports of catalysis facilitated by the redox-activity of the ligand will also be discussed. In conclusion, redox-active ligands containing catechol, o-aminophenol or o-phenylenediamine moieties show great potential to be exploited as reversible electron reservoirs, donating or accepting electrons to activate substrates and metal centers and to enable new reactivity with both early and late transition as well as main group metals. PMID:26148803

  14. Cysteine proteases: Modes of activation and future prospects as pharmacological targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eVerma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria and parasite to the higher organisms (mammals. Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases and metallo-proteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a pro-domain (regulatory and a mature domain (catalytic. The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases.

  15. Cysteine Proteases: Modes of Activation and Future Prospects as Pharmacological Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sonia; Dixit, Rajnikant; Pandey, Kailash C

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes are crucial for a variety of biological processes in organisms ranging from lower (virus, bacteria, and parasite) to the higher organisms (mammals). Proteases cleave proteins into smaller fragments by catalyzing peptide bonds hydrolysis. Proteases are classified according to their catalytic site, and distributed into four major classes: cysteine proteases, serine proteases, aspartic proteases, and metalloproteases. This review will cover only cysteine proteases, papain family enzymes which are involved in multiple functions such as extracellular matrix turnover, antigen presentation, processing events, digestion, immune invasion, hemoglobin hydrolysis, parasite invasion, parasite egress, and processing surface proteins. Therefore, they are promising drug targets for various diseases. For preventing unwanted digestion, cysteine proteases are synthesized as zymogens, and contain a prodomain (regulatory) and a mature domain (catalytic). The prodomain acts as an endogenous inhibitor of the mature enzyme. For activation of the mature enzyme, removal of the prodomain is necessary and achieved by different modes. The pro-mature domain interaction can be categorized as protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and may be targeted in a range of diseases. Cysteine protease inhibitors are available that can block the active site but no such inhibitor available yet that can be targeted to block the pro-mature domain interactions and prevent it activation. This review specifically highlights the modes of activation (processing) of papain family enzymes, which involve auto-activation, trans-activation and also clarifies the future aspects of targeting PPIs to prevent the activation of cysteine proteases. PMID:27199750

  16. Self-assembled monolayer and multilayer formation using redox-active Ru complex with phosphonic acids on silicon oxide surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of self-assembled monolayer and multilayer using redox-active Ru complex molecules with phosphonic acids on SiO2 surface has been examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, and time of flight secondary mass-ion spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS). We found that an introduction of a Zr adlayer leads to higher surface molecular density of Ru complex SAMs on the SiO2 surface, compared to that of obtained from the direct adsorption of Ru complex monolayer on the SiO2 surface. We further tried to fabricate a multilayer film using this molecule with Zr(IV) ion acting as a chemical glue by a successive immersion process. The XPS data revealed that the molecular densities of the multilayers were also higher for the immobilization with Zr adlayer between Ru complex and SiO2 surface than those without the Zr adlayer, suggesting that Zr adlayer is effective in forming highly packed molecular layer of phosphonic acids on SiO2 surface. We found the film growth reached a saturation point after 6 layers on the SiO2 surface. The film growth saturation can be explained by a molecular domain boundary effect encountered due to the large tilt angle of the molecular layer.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Response and Resistance to Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Is Linked to the Redox-Active Molecule Phenazine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Mai-Prochnow

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen displaying high antibiotic resistance. Its resistance is in part due to its outstanding ability to form biofilms on a range of biotic and abiotic surfaces leading to difficult-to-treat, often long-term infections. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is a new, promising antibacterial treatment to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Plasma is ionized gas that has antibacterial properties through the generation of a mix of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS, excited molecules, charged particles and UV photons. Our results show the efficient removal of P. aeruginosa biofilms using a plasma jet (kINPen med, with no viable cells detected after 5 min treatment and no attached biofilm cells visible with confocal microscopy after 10 min plasma treatment. Because of its multi-factorial action, it is widely presumed that the development of bacterial resistance to plasma is unlikely. However, our results indicate that a short plasma treatment (3 min may lead to the emergence of a small number of surviving cells exhibiting enhanced resistance to subsequent plasma exposure. Interestingly, these cells also exhibited a higher degree of resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Whole genome comparison between surviving cells and control cells revealed 10 distinct polymorphic regions, including four belonging to the redox active, antibiotic pigment phenazine. Subsequently, the interaction between phenazine production and CAP resistance was demonstrated in biofilms of transposon mutants disrupted in different phenazine pathway genes which exhibited significantly altered sensitivity to CAP.

  18. Synthesis of poly(aniline-co-3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid) and its enhanced redox activity under highly basic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Poly(aniline-co-3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid) (PAAHBA) was prepared. • Morphology and electrochemical activity of PAAHBA were studied. • PAAHBA film shows a nanostructured network of mass interwoven fibers. • PAAHBA film exhibits improved electrochemical properties under highly basic conditions. -- Abstract: Poly(aniline-co-3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid) was synthesized using cyclic voltammetry. The monomer concentration ratio and applied potential strongly affect the copolymerization rate and electrochemical properties of the copolymer. The results from the infrared spectrum (IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of the copolymer demonstrate that 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid units are incorporated into the copolymer chain and that SO42− ions can be doped into the copolymer film during the electrochemical copolymerization. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrograph proves that the copolymer film has a nanostructured network of mass interwoven fibers with a diameter of 10–50 nm. The copolymer obtained at the optimum conditions exhibits excellent redox activity in a 0.30 M Na2SO4 aqueous solution (pH 11.0), which is superior to that of polyaniline itself. The improvement can be attributed to the synergistic effect of the -COOH and -OH functional groups in the copolymer chain

  19. Redox-active on-surface polymerization of single-site divalent cations from pure metals by a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic iron, chromium, or platinum mixing with a ketone-functionalized phenanthroline ligand on a single crystal gold surface demonstrates redox activity to a well-defined oxidation state and assembly into thermally stable, one dimensional, polymeric chains. The diverging ligand geometry incorporates redox-active sub-units and bi-dentate binding sites. The gold surface provides a stable adsorption environment and directs growth of the polymeric chains, but is inert with regard to the redox chemistry. These systems are characterized by scanning tunnelling microscopy, non-contact atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The relative propensity of the metals to interact with the ketone group is examined, and it is found that Fe and Cr more readily complex the ligand than Pt. The formation and stabilization of well-defined transition metal single-sites at surfaces may open new routes to achieve higher selectivity in heterogeneous catalysts

  20. Redox Activation of Dicarbonyl(.eta.5-Cyclopentadienyl)Methyl Iron within the Cavity of .beta.-Cyclodextrin: Carbon Monoxide Insertion in Iron-Methyl Bond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Lubomír; Hromadová, Magdaléna; Fiedler, Jan; Amatore, C.; Verpeaux, J. N.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 668, 1/2 (2003), s. 9-16. ISSN 0022-328X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/02/P082; GA MŠk OC D15.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : redox activation * beta-cyclodextrin * CO insertion Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2003

  1. Redox-active tetrathiafulvalene and dithiolene compounds derived from allylic 1,4-diol rearrangement products of disubstituted 1,3-dithiole derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Filipe Vilela; Skabara, Peter J; Mason, Christopher R.; Thomas D. J. Westgate; Asun Luquin; Coles, Simon J.; Hursthouse, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    We present a series of compounds by exploiting the unusual 1,4-aryl shift observed for electron-rich 1,3-dithiole-2-thione and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivatives in the presence of perchloric acid. The mechanistic features of this rearrangement are discussed since this synthetic strategy provides an alternative route for the synthesis and functionalisation of sulfur rich compounds including redox active compounds of TTFs, and a Ni dithiolene.

  2. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J; Bakker, Bert H; Buma, Wybren J; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules. PMID:23556803

  3. An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical cell for the study of vibrational circular dichroism of chiral redox-active molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingos, Sérgio R.; Luyten, Henk; van Anrooij, Fred; Sanders, Hans J.; Bakker, Bert H.; Buma, Wybren J.; Hartl, František; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-03-01

    An optically transparent thin-layer electrochemical (OTTLE) cell with a locally extended optical path has been developed in order to perform vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy on chiral molecules prepared in specific oxidation states by means of electrochemical reduction or oxidation. The new design of the electrochemical cell successfully addresses the technical challenges involved in achieving sufficient infrared absorption. The VCD-OTTLE cell proves to be a valuable tool for the investigation of chiral redox-active molecules.

  4. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy of electrically conductive metal-organic frameworks doped with redox active species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberding, Brian G.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2015-09-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs) are three-dimensional coordination polymers that are well known for large pore surface area and their ability to adsorb molecules from both the gaseous and solution phases. In general, MOFs are electrically insulating, but promising opportunities for tuning the electronic structure exist because MOFs possess synthetic versatility; the metal and organic ligand subunits can be exchanged or dopant molecules can be introduced into the pore space. Two such MOFs with demonstrated electrical conductivity are Cu3(1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate)2, a.k.a HKUST-1, and Cu[Ni(pyrazine-2,3-dithiolate)2]. Herein, these two MOFs have been infiltrated with the redox active species 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) and iodine under solution phase conditions and shown to produce redox products within the MOF pore space. Vibrational bands assignable to TCNQ anion and triiodide anion have been observed in the Mid-IR and Terahertz ranges using FTIR Spectroscopy. The MOF samples have been further investigated by Time-Resolved Terehertz Spectroscopy (TRTS). Using this technique, the charge mobility, separation, and recombination dynamics have been followed on the picosecond time scale following photoexcitation with visible radiation. The preliminary results show that the MOF samples have small inherent photoconductivity with charge separation lifetimes on the order of a few picoseconds. In the case of HKUST-1, the MOF can also be supported by a TiO2 film and initial results show that charge injection into the TiO2 layer occurs with a comparable efficiency to the dye sensitizer N3, [cis-Bis(isothiocyanato)-bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylato ruthenium(II)], and therefore this MOF has potential as a new light absorbing and charge conducting material in photovoltaic devices.

  5. Diverse redox-active molecules bearing O-, S-, or Se-terminated tethers for attachment to silicon in studies of molecular information storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, Arumugham; Lysenko, Andrey B; Carcel, Carole; Malinovskii, Vladimir L; Gryko, Daniel T; Schweikart, Karl-Heinz; Loewe, Robert S; Yasseri, Amir A; Liu, Zhiming; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2004-03-01

    A molecular approach to information storage employs redox-active molecules tethered to an electroactive surface. Attachment of the molecules to electroactive surfaces requires control over the nature of the tether (linker and surface attachment group). We have synthesized a collection of redox-active molecules bearing different linkers and surface anchor groups in free or protected form (hydroxy, mercapto, S-acetylthio, and Se-acetylseleno) for attachment to surfaces such as silicon, germanium, and gold. The molecules exhibit a number of cationic oxidation states, including one (ferrocene), two [zinc(II)porphyrin], three [cobalt(II)porphyrin], or four (lanthanide triple-decker sandwich compound). Electrochemical studies of monolayers of a variety of the redox-active molecules attached to Si(100) electrodes indicate that molecules exhibit a regular mode of attachment (via a Si-X bond, X = O, S, or Se), relatively homogeneous surface organization, and robust reversible electrochemical behavior. The acetyl protecting group undergoes cleavage during the surface deposition process, enabling attachment to silicon via thio or seleno groups without handling free thiols or selenols. PMID:14986994

  6. Novel electrochemical redox-active species: one-step synthesis of polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd and its application for multiplexed immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Feng, Feng; Ma, Zhanfang

    2015-11-01

    Electrochemical redox-active species play crucial role in electrochemically multiplexed immunoassays. A one-pot method for synthesizing four kinds of new electrochemical redox-active species was reported using HAuCl4 and Na2PdCl4 as dual oxidating agents and aniline derivatives as monomers. The synthesized polyaniline derivative-Au/Pd composites, namely poly(N-methyl-o-benzenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-o-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd, poly(N-phenyl-p-phenylenediamine)-Au/Pd and poly(3,3’,5,5’-tetramethylbenzidine)-Au/Pd, exhibited electrochemical redox activity at -0.65 V, -0.3 V, 0.12 V, and 0.5 V, respectively. Meanwhile, these composites showed high H2O2 electrocatalytic activity because of the presence of Au/Pd. The as-prepared composites were used as electrochemical immunoprobes in simultaneous detection of four tumor biomarkers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA199), carbohydrate antigen 72-4 (CA724), and alpha fetoprotein (AFP)). This immunoassay shed light on potential applications in simultaneous gastric cancer (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, CA724) and liver cancer diagnosis (related biomarkers: CEA, CA199, AFP). The present strategy to the synthesize redox species could be easily extended to other polymers such as polypyrrole derivatives and polythiophene derivatives. This would be of great significance in the electrochemical detection of more analytes.

  7. Functional properties of the two redox-active sites in yeast protein disulphide isomerase in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Darby, N J; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    Protein folding catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI) has been studied both in vivo and in vitro using different assays. PDI contains a CGHC active site in each of its two catalytic domains (a and a'). The relative importance of each active site in PDI from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y...

  8. Redox-active labile iron in fortified flours from the Brazilian market Ferro lábil redox-ativo em farinhas fortificadas do mercado brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Pannia Espósito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantify the fraction of redox-active labile iron in iron-fortified flours acquired on the Brazilian market. METHODS: Samples of wheat flour, maize flour and breadcrumbs were extracted with buffers that mimic gastric juice, saliva and intestinal juice. Redox-active labile iron levels were assessed through the reaction of autoxidation of ascorbic acid catalyzed by iron in the presence of a fluorescence probe. RESULTS: Redox-active labile iron represents 1% to 9% of the total iron in the flour and breadcrumb samples, with the lowest values found under gastric juice conditions and the highest in the more alkaline media. Redox-active labile iron possibly arises from the decomposition of an iron-phytic acid complex. A positive correlation between redox-active labile iron and total iron was found in saline biomimetic fluids. CONCLUSION: Redox-active labile iron may be a risk factor for people with impaired antioxidant defenses, such as those who are atransferrinemic or iron overloaded (e.g. thalassemic. Total iron can be used to predict redox-active labile iron absorption at each stage of the gastrointestinal tract after ingestion of iron-fortified flours.OBJETIVO: Quantificar a porcentagem de ferro lábil redox ativo em farinhas fortificadas adquiridas no comércio popular. MÉTODOS: Amostras de farinha de trigo, fubá e rosca foram extraídas com tampões miméticos de suco gástrico, saliva e suco intestinal. Os níveis de ferro lábil redox ativo foram determinados por meio da reação de auto-oxidação do ácido ascórbico catalisada pelo ferro, em presença de uma sonda fluorimétrica. RESULTADOS: A fração de ferro lábil redox ativo representa entre 1% e 9% do ferro total nas farinhas estudadas, sendo os menores valores encontrados em condições miméticas do suco gástrico e os maiores nos meios mais alcalinos. Há indícios de que o ferro lábil redox ativo origina-se da decomposição de um complexo entre ferro e ácido f

  9. Serum albumin as a probe for testing the selectivity of irreversible cysteine protease inhibitors: The case of vinyl sulfones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzoni, Luca; Colombo, Simone; Mazzolari, Angelica; Vistoli, Giulio; Carini, Marina

    2016-05-30

    Vinyl sulfones are used for drug design of irreversible inhibitors of cysteine proteases since they are able to alkylate cysteine thiols inside the catalytic pocket of this class of enzymes. Some authors have reported the lack of reactivity towards glutathione as sufficient evidence of the selectivity of such a mechanism. Herein, we demonstrate that some simple molecules containing a vinyl sulfone moiety are not thiol-specific alkylants since they react with some albumin nucleophiles including side chains of Cys34 and His146. Such side-reactions are not desirable for any drug candidate since they limit serum stability, bioavailability and they possibly trigger toxicity mechanisms. In silico predictions, indicate that the compounds tested share similar structural features with reported inhibitors of cysteine proteases, as well as similar poses around the main albumin nucleophiles. Altogether, the data suggest that albumin is better than glutathione for the setup of early in vitro tests probing the selectivity of cysteine protease inhibitors. PMID:26970985

  10. Plasma cysteine, cystine, and glutathione in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, R K; Lewis, F W; Kutner, M H; Bate, D M; Roy, R G; Rudman, D

    1984-10-01

    Plasma contains three forms of cyst(e)ine: cysteine, cystine, and protein-bound cysteine. The former is a thiol and the latter two are disulfides. The levels of all three types of cyst(e)ine, as well as the cysteinyl tripeptide glutathione, were measured in the plasma of 14 normal and 10 cirrhotic individuals. All subjects ate mixed foods. Some cirrhotic patients were studied during nasogastric hyperalimentation with Vivonex (Norwich Eaton Pharmaceuticals, Norwich, N.Y.) as well as during total parenteral nutrition with FreAmine III (American McGaw, Irvine, Calif.); neither formula contains cyst(e)ine. Regardless of the nature of the diet, cirrhotic patients had significantly subnormal values for cysteine, glutathione, and albumin. In addition, the following significant changes were found to be diet-dependent: (a) elevated methionine during Vivonex, (b) subnormal taurine during mixed foods and total parenteral nutrition, (c) depressed protein-bound cysteine during total parenteral nutrition, (d) depressed cyst(e)ine thiol/disulfide ratio during mixed foods, and (e) depressed total thiol during Vivonex and total parenteral nutrition. The data indicate multiple abnormalities in sulfur metabolism in cirrhosis. PMID:6468868

  11. Mutagenesis of the N- and C-terminal cysteine pairs of Tn501 mercuric ion reductase: Consequences for bacterial detoxification of mercurials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercuric ion reductase (the mer A gene product) is a unique member of the class of FAD and redox-active disulfide-containing oxidoreductases by virtue of its ability to reduce Hg(II) to Hg(0) as the last step in bacterial detoxification of mercurials. In addition to the active site redox-active disulfide, formed between Cys135 and Cys140 in Tn501 MerA, the protein products of the three mer A gene sequences published to data have two additional conserved pairs of cysteines, one near the N-terminus (Cys10Cys13 in Tn501 MerA) and another near the C-terminus (Cys588Cys559 in Tn501 MerA). Neither of these pairs is found in other members of this enzyme family. To assess the possible roles of these peripheral cysteines in the Hg(II) detoxification pathway, the authors have constructed and characterized one single mutant, Cys10Ala13, and two double mutants, Ala10Ala13 and Ala558Ala559. The N-terminal mutants are fully functional in vivo as determined by HgCl2 resistance studies, showing the N-terminal cysteine pair to be dispensable. In contrast, the Ala558Ala559 mutant is defective for HgCl2 resistance in vivo and Hg(SR)2 reduction in vitro, thereby implicating Cys558 and/or Cys559 in Hg(II) reduction by the wild-type enzyme. Other activities, such as NADPH/thio-NADP+ transhydrogenation, NADPH oxidation, and DTNB reduction, are unimpaired in this mutant

  12. Covalent targeting of acquired cysteines in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Marieke; Arkin, Michelle R; Dansen, Tobias B

    2016-02-01

    The thiolate side chain of cysteine has a unique functionality that drug hunters and chemical biologists have begun to exploit. For example, targeting cysteine residues in the ATP-binding pockets of kinases with thiol-reactive molecules has afforded increased selectivity and potency to drugs like imbrutinib, which inhibits the oncogene BTK, and CO-1686 and AZD9291 that target oncogenic mutant EGFR. Recently, disulfide libraries and targeted GDP-mimetics have been used to selectively label the G12C oncogenic mutation in KRAS. We reasoned that other oncogenes contain mutations to cysteine, and thus screened the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer for frequently acquired cysteines. Here, we describe the most common mutations and discuss how these mutations could be potential targets for cysteine-directed personalized therapeutics. PMID:26629855

  13. Getting a Knack for NAC: N-Acetyl-Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Sansone, Randy A.; Sansone, Lori A.

    2011-01-01

    N-acetyl-cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, N-acetyl cysteine, and N-acetyl-L-cysteine are all designations for the same compound, which is abbreviated as NAC. NAC is a precursor to the amino acid cysteine, which ultimately plays two key metabolic roles. Through its metabolic contribution to glutathione production, cysteine participates in the general antioxidant activities of the body. Through its role as a modulator of the glutamatergic system, cysteine influences the reward-reinforcement pathway....

  14. Understanding the Adsorption Interface of Polyelectrolyte Coating on Redox Active Nanoparticles Using Soft Particle Electrokinetics and Its Biological Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The application of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) for therapeutic purposes requires a stable dispersion of nanoparticles in a biological environment. The objective of this study is to tailor the properties of polyelectrolyte coated CNPs as a function of molecular weight to achieve a stable and catalytic active dispersion. The coating of CNPs with polyacrylic acid (PAA) has increased the dispersion stability of CNPs and enhanced the catalytic ability. The stability of PAA coating was analyzed using the change in the Gibbs free energy computed by the Langmuir adsorption model. The adsorption isotherms were determined using soft particle electrokinetics which overcomes the challenges presented by other techniques. The change in Gibbs free energy was highest for CNPs coated with PAA of 250 kg/mol indicating the most stable coating. The change in free energy for PAA of 100 kg/mol coated CNPs was 85% lower than the PAA of 250 kg/mol coated CNPs. This significant difference is caused by the strong adsorption of PAA of 100 kg/mol on CNPs. Catalytic activity of PAA-CNPs is assessed by the catalase enzymatic mimetic activity of nanoparticles. The catalase activity was higher for PAA coated CNPs as compared to bare CNPs which indicated preferential adsorption of hydrogen peroxide induced by coating. This indicates that the catalase activity is also affected by the structure of the coating layer. PMID:24673655

  15. Cysteine proteases: mode of action and role in epidermal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Keith; Philpott, Mike P

    2013-02-01

    Desquamation or cell shedding in mammalian skin is known to involve serine proteases, aspartic proteases and glycosidases. In addition, evidence continues to accumulate that papain-like cysteine proteases and an inhibitor cystatin M/E largely confined to the cutaneous epithelia also play key roles in the process. This involves the complete proteolysis of cell adhesive structures of the stratum corneum, the corneodesmosomes and notably of the desmogleins. Continual cell replacement in the epidermis is the result of the balance between the loss of the outer squames and mitosis of the cells in the basal cell layer. This article provides a brief account of the salient features of the characteristics and catalytic mechanism of cysteine proteases, followed by a discussion of the relevant epidermal biology. The proteases include the asparaginyl endopeptidase legumain, which exerts a strict specificity for the hydrolysis of asparaginyl bonds, cathepsin-V and cathepsin-L. The control of these enzymes by cystatin M/E regulates the processing of transglutaminases and is crucial in the biochemical pathway responsible for regulating the cross-linking and desquamation of the stratum corneum. In addition, caspase-14 has now been shown to play a major part in epidermal maturation. Uncontrolled proteolytic activity leads to abnormal hair follicle formation and deleterious effects on the skin barrier function. PMID:23344364

  16. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  17. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Mercury and other highly-toxic heavy metals such as cadmium and lead are present in many aquatic environments, and the remediation of such environments or the avoidance of heavy-metal contamination in the first place is an area of active interest. In recent years tougher environmental regulations and the high initial cost of new, more effective, and more selective extractants has made the reuse of extractant materials and the minimization of secondary waste volume a focus of their scientific effort. The authors research has involved the investigation of redox-active layered metal chalcogenides as selective, effective, and redox-recyclable extractants for heavy metals from aqueous solution.'

  18. The study of redox-active inorganic substituents of cellulase enzymes. Quarterly report, 25 February--25 May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    In order to characterize the attachment site of Ru-complex of the Cellobiohydroloase I (CBHI) protein the catalytic core of the enzyme was isolated. A 30-minute light papain digest resulted in complete cleavage of the native CBHI into the core and tail domain. The core protein was easily modified by pentaammineruthenium reagent in two hours time. Upon modification, the difference-vis spectrum showed a max. absorption between 300nm and 310 nm which is not a characteristic of the native CBH I core.

  19. Mass spectrometric analysis and mutagenesis predict involvement of multiple cysteines in redox regulation of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V Petrotchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Evgeniy V Petrotchenko1,2,4, Naohiro Yamaguchi1,3,4, Daniel A Pasek1, Christoph H Borchers1,2, Gerhard Meissner11Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 2University of Victoria, Genome BC Proteomics Centre, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; 3Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA 4Contributed equally to the workAbstract: The tetrameric skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ion channel complex (RyR1 contains a large number of free cysteines that are potential targets for redox-active molecules. Here, we report the mass spectrometric analysis of free thiols in RyR1 using the lipophilic, thiol-specific probe monobromobimane (MBB. In the presence of reduced glutathione, MBB labeled 14 cysteines per RyR1 subunit in tryptic peptides in five of five experiments. Forty-six additional MBB-labeled cysteines per RyR1 subunit were detected with lower frequency in tryptic peptides, bringing the total number of MBB-labeled cysteines to 60 per RyR1 subunit. A combination of fluorescence detection and mass spectrometry of RyR1, labeled in the presence of reduced and oxidized glutathione, identified two redox-sensitive cysteines (C1040 and C1303. Regulation of RyR activity by reduced and oxidized glutathione was investigated in skeletal muscle mutant RyR1s in which 18 cysteines were substituted with serine or alanine, using a [3H]ryanodine ligand binding assay. Three single-site RyR1 mutants (C1781S, C2436S, and C2606S and two multisite mutants with five and seven substituted cysteines exhibited a reduced redox response compared with wild-type RyR1. The results suggest that multiple cysteines determine the redox state and activity of RyR1.Keywords: mass spectrometry, mutagenesis, ryanodine receptor, redox modification of cysteines

  20. Long-term cysteine fortification impacts cysteine/glutathione homeostasis and food intake in ageing rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal, Karine; Breuille, Denis; Serrant, Patrick; Denis, Philippe; Glomot, Francoise; Bechereau, Fabienne; PAPET, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Healthy ageing is associated with higher levels of glutathione. The study aimed to determine whether long-term dietary fortification with cysteine increases cysteine and glutathione pools, thus alleviating age-associated low-grade inflammation and resulting in global physiological benefits. The effect of a 14-week dietary fortification with cysteine was studied in non-inflamed (NI, healthy at baseline) and in spontaneously age-related low-grade inflamed (LGI, prefrail at baseline) 21-month-ol...

  1. Impact of electrolyte composition on the reactivity of a redox active polymer studied through surface interrogation and ion-sensitive scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Mark; Hernández-Burgos, Kenneth; Cheng, Kevin J; Moore, Jeffrey S; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2016-06-21

    Elucidating the impact of interactions between the electrolyte and electroactive species in redox active polymers is key to designing better-performing electrodes for electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Here, we present on the improvement of the electrochemical activity of poly(para-nitrostyrene) (PNS) in solution and as a film by exploiting the ionic interactions between reduced PNS and K(+), which showed increased reactivity when compared to tetrabutylammonium (TBA(+))- and Li(+)-containing electrolytes. While cyclic voltammetry enabled the study of the effects of cations on the electrochemical reversibility and the reduction potential of PNS, scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provided new tools to probe the ionic and redox reactivity of this system. Using an ion-sensitive Hg SECM tip allowed to probe the ingress of ions into PNS redox active films, while surface interrogation SECM (SI-SECM) measured the specific kinetics of PNS and a solution phase mediator in the presence of the tested electrolytes. SI-SECM measurements illustrated that the interrogation kinetics of PNS in the presence of K(+) compared to TBA(+) and Li(+) are greatly enhanced under the same surface concentration of adsorbed radical anion, exhibiting up to a 40-fold change in redox kinetics. We foresee using this new application of SECM methods for elucidating optimal interactions that enhance polymer reactivity for applications in redox flow batteries. PMID:27064026

  2. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF6, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E0'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period

  3. A stability comparison of redox-active layers produced by chemical coupling of an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, Susan; Foster, Kevin [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Leech, Donal [School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.leech@nuigalway.ie

    2009-02-28

    The production of stable redox active layers on electrode surfaces is a key factor for the development of practical electronic and electrochemical devices. Here, we report on a comparison of the stability of redox layers formed by covalently coupling an osmium redox complex to pre-functionalized gold and graphite electrode surfaces. Pre-treatment of gold and graphite electrodes to provide surface carboxylic acid groups is achieved via classical thiolate self-assembled monolayer formation on gold surfaces and the electro-reduction of an in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from 4-aminobenzoic acid on gold, glassy carbon and graphite surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by AFM and electrochemical blocking studies. The surface carboxylate is then used to tether an osmium complex, [Os(2,2'-bipyridyl){sub 2}(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl]PF{sub 6}, to provide a covalently bound redox active layer, E{sup 0}'' of 0.29 V (vs. Ag/AgCl in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4), on the pre-treated electrodes. The aryldiazonium salt-treated carbon-based surfaces showed the greatest stability, represented by a decrease of <5% in the peak current for the Os(II/III) redox transition of the immobilized complex over a 3-day period, compared to a decrease of 19% and 14% for the aryldiazonium salt treated and thiolate treated gold surfaces, respectively, over the same period.

  4. Synthesis of macrocyclic trypanosomal cysteine protease inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yen Ting; Lira, Ricardo; Hansell, Elizabeth; McKerrow, James H.; Roush, William R.

    2008-01-01

    The importance of cysteine proteases in parasites, compounded with the lack of redundancy compared to their mammalian hosts makes proteases attractive targets for the development of new therapeutic agents. The binding mode of K11002 to cruzain, the major cysteine protease of Trypanosoma cruzi was used in the design of conformationally constrained inhibitors. Vinyl sulfone-containing macrocycles were synthesized via olefin ring-closing metathesis and evaluated against cruzain and the closely r...

  5. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    OpenAIRE

    Sojka, Daniel; FRANCISCHETTI, IVO M. B.; Calvo, Eric; KOTSYFAKIS, MICHALIS

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model...

  6. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kailash C.; Rajnikant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. ...

  7. S-Nitrosation of Conserved Cysteines Modulates Activity and Stability of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase (GSNOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Damian; Ballard, Keith; Truebridge, Ian; Vierling, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    The free radical nitric oxide (NO(•)) regulates diverse physiological processes from vasodilation in humans to gas exchange in plants. S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is considered a principal nitroso reservoir due to its chemical stability. GSNO accumulation is attenuated by GSNO reductase (GSNOR), a cysteine-rich cytosolic enzyme. Regulation of protein nitrosation is not well understood since NO(•)-dependent events proceed without discernible changes in GSNOR expression. Because GSNORs contain evolutionarily conserved cysteines that could serve as nitrosation sites, we examined the effects of treating plant (Arabidopsis thaliana), mammalian (human), and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) GSNORs with nitrosating agents in vitro. Enzyme activity was sensitive to nitroso donors, whereas the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) restored activity, suggesting that catalytic impairment was due to S-nitrosation. Protein nitrosation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, by which mono-, di-, and trinitrosation were observed, and these signals were sensitive to DTT. GSNOR mutants in specific non-zinc-coordinating cysteines were less sensitive to catalytic inhibition by nitroso donors and exhibited reduced nitrosation signals by mass spectrometry. Nitrosation also coincided with decreased tryptophan fluorescence, increased thermal aggregation propensity, and increased polydispersity-properties reflected by differential solvent accessibility of amino acids important for dimerization and the shape of the substrate and coenzyme binding pockets as assessed by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Collectively, these data suggest a mechanism for NO(•) signal transduction in which GSNOR nitrosation and inhibition transiently permit GSNO accumulation. PMID:27064847

  8. Electrochemical determination of cysteine based on conducting polymers/gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Ya-Ping; Su, Wan-Yu; Cheng, Jin-Ru [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou Hsien 545, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Shu-Hua, E-mail: shcheng@ncnu.edu.t [Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chi Nan University, Puli, Nantou Hsien 545, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of a conducting polymer and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is fabricated onto a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). A thin layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is coated electrochemically on a bare SPCE; then, the nano-sized AuNPs are embedded by electrochemical deposition. The resultant SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode is characterized by electrochemical methods, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode possesses great catalytic activity for the oxidation of cysteine in various pH buffer solutions (pH 2.0-8.0). The selectivity of the method is demonstrated by the separation of the oxidation peaks at up to 240 mV for cysteine and glutathione in pH 6.0 buffer solutions. The effects of the oxidizable interferences are also investigated. Flow-injection amperometry is performed for 0.5-200 {mu}M of cysteine in pH 4.0 buffer solutions, and a linear calibration plot with a slope of 0.115 {mu}A/{mu}M is obtained. The detection limit (S/N = 3) is 0.05 {mu}M. Additionally, the proposed methods obtain satisfactory results in the detection of cysteine-containing medicine samples.

  9. Electrochemical determination of cysteine based on conducting polymers/gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of a conducting polymer and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is fabricated onto a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE). A thin layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is coated electrochemically on a bare SPCE; then, the nano-sized AuNPs are embedded by electrochemical deposition. The resultant SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode is characterized by electrochemical methods, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The SPCE/PEDOT/AuNPs-modified electrode possesses great catalytic activity for the oxidation of cysteine in various pH buffer solutions (pH 2.0-8.0). The selectivity of the method is demonstrated by the separation of the oxidation peaks at up to 240 mV for cysteine and glutathione in pH 6.0 buffer solutions. The effects of the oxidizable interferences are also investigated. Flow-injection amperometry is performed for 0.5-200 μM of cysteine in pH 4.0 buffer solutions, and a linear calibration plot with a slope of 0.115 μA/μM is obtained. The detection limit (S/N = 3) is 0.05 μM. Additionally, the proposed methods obtain satisfactory results in the detection of cysteine-containing medicine samples.

  10. Nonfouling property of zwitterionic cysteine surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peter; Ding, Ling; Lin, Chii-Wann; Gu, Frank

    2014-06-10

    Applications of implantable bioelectronics for analytical and curative purposes are currently limited by their poor long-term biofunctionality in physiological media and nonspecific interactions with biomolecules. In an attempt to prolong in vivo functionality, recent advances in surface modifications have demonstrated that zwitterionic coatings can rival the performance of conventional poly(ethylene glycol) polymers in reducing nonspecific protein fouling. Herein, we report the fabrication of a very thin layer of nonfouling zwitterionic cysteine surface capable of protecting implantable bioelectronics from nonspecific adsorption of plasma proteins. This work is the first of its kind to fabricate, through solution chemistry, a cysteine surface exhibiting zwitterionic state as high as 88% and to demonstrate antibiofouling under the exposure of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum. The fabricated surface utilized a minimal amount of gold substrate, approximately 10 nm, and an extremely thin antifouling layer at 1.14 nm verified by ellipsometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy assessment of the nitrogen (N1s) and carbon (C1s) spectra conclude that 87.8% of the fabricated cysteine surface is zwitterionic, 2.5% is positively charged, and 9.6% is noncharged. Antibiofouling performance of the cysteine surface is quantitatively determined by bicinchoninic acid (BCA) protein assay as well as qualitatively confirmed using scanning electron spectroscopy. Cysteine surfaces demonstrated a BSA fouling of 3.9 ± 4.84% μg/cm(2), which is 93.6% and 98.5% lower than stainless steel and gold surfaces, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis returned similar results and suggest that a thinner cysteine coating will enhance performance. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed the results of BCA assay and suggested that the cysteine surface demonstrated a 69% reduction to serum fouling. The results reported in this paper demonstrate that it is possible to achieve

  11. The Cysteine Protease–Cysteine Protease Inhibitor System Explored in Soybean Nodule Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Dorcas Quain

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Almost all protease families have been associated with plant development, particularly senescence, which is the final developmental stage of every organ before cell death. Proteolysis remobilizes and recycles nitrogen from senescent organs that is required, for example, seed development. Senescence-associated expression of proteases has recently been characterized using large-scale gene expression analysis seeking to identify and characterize senescence-related genes. Increasing activities of proteolytic enzymes, particularly cysteine proteases, are observed during the senescence of legume nodules, in which a symbiotic relationship between the host plant and bacteria (Rhizobia facilitate the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. It is generally considered that cysteine proteases are compartmentalized to prevent uncontrolled proteolysis in nitrogen-fixing nodules. In addition, the activities of cysteine proteases are regulated by endogenous cysteine protease inhibitors called cystatins. These small proteins form reversible complexes with cysteine proteases, leading to inactivation. However, very little is currently known about how the cysteine protease-cysteine protease inhibitor (cystatin system is regulated during nodule development. Moreover, our current understanding of the expression and functions of proteases and protease inhibitors in nodules is fragmented. To address this issue, we have summarized the current knowledge and techniques used for studying proteases and their inhibitors including the application of “omics” tools, with a particular focus on changes in the cysteine protease-cystatin system during nodule development.

  12. Reduction of Guanosyl Radical by Cysteine and Cysteine-Glycine Studied by Time-Resolved CIDNP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morozova, O.B.; Kaptein, R.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    As a model for chemical DNA repair, reduction of guanosyl radicals in the reaction with cysteine or the dipeptide cysteine-glycine has been studied by time-resolved chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP). Radicals were generated photochemically by pulsed laser irradiation of a solut

  13. π-Clamp-mediated cysteine conjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Welborn, Matthew; Zhu, Tianyu; Yang, Nicole J.; Santos, Michael S.; van Voorhis, Troy; Pentelute, Bradley L.

    2016-02-01

    Site-selective functionalization of complex molecules is one of the most significant challenges in chemistry. Typically, protecting groups or catalysts must be used to enable the selective modification of one site among many that are similarly reactive, and general strategies that selectively tune the local chemical environment around a target site are rare. Here, we show a four-amino-acid sequence (Phe-Cys-Pro-Phe), which we call the ‘π-clamp’, that tunes the reactivity of its cysteine thiol for site-selective conjugation with perfluoroaromatic reagents. We use the π-clamp to selectively modify one cysteine site in proteins containing multiple endogenous cysteine residues. These examples include antibodies and cysteine-based enzymes that would be difficult to modify selectively using standard cysteine-based methods. Antibodies modified using the π-clamp retained binding affinity to their targets, enabling the synthesis of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates for selective killing of HER2-positive breast cancer cells. The π-clamp is an unexpected approach to mediate site-selective chemistry and provides new avenues to modify biomolecules for research and therapeutics.

  14. Mediated Electron Transfer at Redox Active Monolayers. Part 4: Kinetics of Redox Enzymes Coupled With Electron Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E.G. Lyons

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A detailed kinetic analysis of the pertinent physical processes underlying the operation of enzyme electrodes immobilized within alkane thiol self assembled monolayers is developed. These electrodes utilize a soluble mediator, which partitions into the monolayer, regenerates the active catalytic form of the enzyme and is re-oxidized at the underlying support electrode surface giving rise to a current which reflects kinetic events at the enzyme surface. Both the enzyme/substrate and enzyme mediator kinetics have been quantified fully in terms of a ping-pong mechanism for the former and Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the latter. The effect of substrate and mediator diffusion in solution have also been specifically considered and the latter processes have been shown to result in a complex expression for the reaction flux. Four limiting kinetic cases have been enumerated and simple expressions for the reaction flux in each of these rate limiting situations have been developed. Kinetic case diagrams have been presented as an aid to mechanistic diagnosis. The complicating effects of diffusive loss of reduced mediator from the enzyme layer have also been examined and the relation between the observed flux corresponding to reduced mediator oxidation at the support electrode and the substrate reaction flux in the enzyme layer have been quantified in terms of an efficiency factor. Results extracted from recently published practical realizations of immobilized monolayer enzyme systems have been discussed in the context of the proposed model analysis.

  15. Electrocatalytic oxidation of thiocyanate, L -cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol by self-assembled monolayer of cobalt tetraethoxy thiophene phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic activity of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of cobalt tetra ethoxythiophene phthalocyanine (CoTEThPc-SAM) complex towards oxidation of thiocyanate (SCN-), L -cysteine (CYS) and 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) is reported. The oxidation of thiocyanate occurs via a two electron transfer, whereas L-cysteine and 2-ME require 1 electron. The oxidation of thiocyanate is catalysed by ring based processes, while L-cysteine is catalysed by both CoIII/CoII process and by ring based processes. 2-ME is catalysed by CoIII/CoII process. The oxidation of thiocyanate on CoTEThPc was performed in acid media instead of basic media commonly employed. The reaction order was found to be unity for all the analytes, showing that only one molecule of analyte interacts with one molecule of the catalyst during the rate determining step

  16. Redox-active quinones induces genome-wide DNA methylation changes by an iron-mediated and Tet-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Bailin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoli; Chong, Zechen; Yin, Ruichuan; Song, Shu-Hui; Zhao, Chao; Li, Cuiping; Huang, Hua; Sun, Bao-Fa; Wu, Danni; Jin, Kang-Xuan; Song, Maoyong; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Jiang, Guibin; Danielsen, Jannie Michaela Rendtlew; Xu, Guo-Liang; Yang, Yun-Gui; Wang, Hailin

    2014-01-01

    , and increase 5 hmC in 5751 genes in cells. 5 hmC increase is associated with significantly altered gene expression of 3414 genes. Interestingly, in quinone-treated cells, labile iron-sensitive protein ferritin light chain showed a significant increase at both mRNA and protein levels indicating a role...... of iron regulation in stimulating Tet-mediated 5 mC oxidation. Consistently, the deprivation of cellular labile iron using specific chelator blocked the 5 hmC increase, and a delivery of labile iron increased the 5 hmC level. Moreover, both Tet1/Tet2 knockout and dimethyloxalylglycine-induced Tet...... inhibition diminished the 5 hmC increase. These results suggest an iron-regulated Tet-dependent DNA demethylation mechanism mediated by redox-active biomolecules....

  17. Molecular Bases for the Recognition of Short Peptide Substrates and Cysteine-Directed Modifications of Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen (UC)

    2009-12-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid {beta} (A{beta}). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located 30 {angstrom} away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high K{sub m} values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all 13 cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitrosoglutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing toward an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis.

  18. Molecular bases for the recognition of short peptide substrates and cysteine-directed modifications of human insulin-degrading enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malito, Enrico; Ralat, Luis A.; Manolopoulou, Marika; Tsay, Julie L.; Wadlington, Natasha L.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) utilizes a large catalytic chamber to selectively bind and degrade peptide substrates such as insulin and amyloid β (Aβ). Tight interactions with substrates occur at an exosite located ~30Å away from the catalytic center that anchors the N-terminus of substrates to facilitate binding and subsequent cleavages at the catalytic site. However, IDE also degrades peptide substrates that are too short to occupy both the catalytic site and the exosite simultaneously. Here, we use kinins as a model system to address the kinetics and regulation of human IDE with short peptides. IDE specifically degrades bradykinin and kallidin at the Pro/Phe site. A 1.9Å crystal structure of bradykinin-bound IDE reveals the binding of bradykinin to the exosite, and not to the catalytic site. In agreement with observed high Km values, this suggests low affinity of bradykinin for IDE. This structure also provides the molecular basis on how the binding of short peptides at the exosite could regulate substrate recognition. We also found that human IDE is potently inhibited by physiologically relevant concentrations of S-nitrosylation and oxidation agents. Cysteine-directed modifications play a key role, since an IDE mutant devoid of all thirteen cysteines is insensitive to the inhibition by S-nitroso-glutathione, hydrogen peroxide, or N-ethylmaleimide. Specifically, cysteine 819 of human IDE is located inside the catalytic chamber pointing towards an extended hydrophobic pocket and is critical for the inactivation. Thiol-directed modification of this residue likely causes local structural perturbation to reduce substrate binding and catalysis. PMID:18986166

  19. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. PMID:2327970

  20. Highly Catalytic Nanodots with Renal Clearance for Radiation Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Jinxuan; Wang, Junying; Yang, Jiang; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiu; Deng, Jiao; Deng, Dehui; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Changlong; Li, Meixian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (gamma and x-ray) is widely used in industry and medicine, but it can also pose a significant hazardous effect on health and induce cancer, physical deformity and even death, due to DNA damages and invasion of free radicals. There is therefore an urgent unmet demand in designing highly efficient radioprotectants with synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and low toxicity. In this study, we designed ultrasmall (sub-5 nm) highly catalytically active and cysteine...

  1. Iron- and Cobalt-Catalyzed Alkene Hydrogenation: Catalysis with Both Redox-Active and Strong Field Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirik, Paul J

    2015-06-16

    The hydrogenation of alkenes is one of the most impactful reactions catalyzed by homogeneous transition metal complexes finding application in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and commodity chemical industries. For decades, catalyst technology has relied on precious metal catalysts supported by strong field ligands to enable highly predictable two-electron redox chemistry that constitutes key bond breaking and forming steps during turnover. Alternative catalysts based on earth abundant transition metals such as iron and cobalt not only offer potential environmental and economic advantages but also provide an opportunity to explore catalysis in a new chemical space. The kinetically and thermodynamically accessible oxidation and spin states may enable new mechanistic pathways, unique substrate scope, or altogether new reactivity. This Account describes my group's efforts over the past decade to develop iron and cobalt catalysts for alkene hydrogenation. Particular emphasis is devoted to the interplay of the electronic structure of the base metal compounds and their catalytic performance. First generation, aryl-substituted pyridine(diimine) iron dinitrogen catalysts exhibited high turnover frequencies at low catalyst loadings and hydrogen pressures for the hydrogenation of unactivated terminal and disubstituted alkenes. Exploration of structure-reactivity relationships established smaller aryl substituents and more electron donating ligands resulted in improved performance. Second generation iron and cobalt catalysts where the imine donors were replaced by N-heterocyclic carbenes resulted in dramatically improved activity and enabled hydrogenation of more challenging unactivated, tri- and tetrasubstituted alkenes. Optimized cobalt catalysts have been discovered that are among the most active homogeneous hydrogenation catalysts known. Synthesis of enantiopure, C1 symmetric pyridine(diimine) cobalt complexes have enabled rare examples of highly enantioselective

  2. Self-assembly, redox activity, and charge transport of functional surface nano-architectures by molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, Daniel

    Surface-assisted molecular self-assembly is a promising strategy to program the structure and chemical state of atoms and molecules in nano-architectures to achieve a specific function. The experiments described in this thesis demonstrate that the design and programming of basic organic components leads to desired characteristics by self-assembly. The fabrication of uniform single-site metal centers at surfaces, important for high selectivity in next-generation catalysts, was accomplished by coordination to redox non-innocent phenanthroline and tetrazine-based ligands. These examples were the first demonstrating tuning of the metal oxidation state in surface coordination architectures through rational ligand design. The molecular-scale coordination architectures were the first formed from chromium and vanadium, and the first from platinum in a non-porphyrin system. The first mixed valence metal-ligand surface structure was fabricated that attained the same ligand coordination number for all metal sites. A new surface reaction method was demonstrated between an inexpensive sodium chloride reagent and carboxylate ligands. High-temperature, molecular-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy of the ordered metal-organic structures demonstrated thermal stability up to 300 °C, the highest molecular-level thermal stability in organic surface nanostructures yet achieved, making such systems potential candidates for moderate-temperature catalytic reactions. Molecular self-assembly was expanded into organic semiconductor thin films. In a two-component, bi-layered system, hydrogen bonding between carboxylates and carboxylic acid-substituted thiophenes was utilized, yielding the first real-space images of phenyl-thiophene stacking. In a one-component system, multiple donor-acceptor pi-pi contacts between phenyltriazole building blocks accomplished assembly of flat-lying molecules from a surface with molecular-scale precision through more than twenty molecular layers. Sufficient

  3. Cysteine proteases as potential antigens in antiparasitic DNA vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise von Gersdorff; Buchmann, Kurt

    2011-01-01

    En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner.......En litteraturgennemgang af muligheder for at bruge cystein proteaser som antigener i antiparasitære vacciner....

  4. Cysteine Prevents Menopausal Syndromes in Ovariectomized Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Na-Ra; Kim, Na-Rae; Kim, Hyung-Min; Jeong, Hyun-Ja

    2016-05-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is well known to be involved in oxidation-reduction reactions, serving as a source of sulfides in the body. Amino acids are known to improve menopausal symptoms and significantly reduce morbidity. This study aims to find an unrevealed effect of Cys with estrogenic and osteogenic actions. Ovariectomized (OVX) mice were treated with Cys daily for 8 weeks. Estrogen-related and osteoporosis-related factors were analyzed in the vagina, serum, and tibia. Cys was treated in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells and ER-positive human breast cancer Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) cells. Cysteine administration ameliorated overweightness of the body and vaginal atrophy in the OVX mice. Cysteine increased the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 17β-estradiol in the serum of the OVX mice and improved the bone mineral density in the OVX mice. In MG-63 cells, Cys increased the proliferation, ERβ messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, and estrogen response element (ERE) activity. Cysteine increased the ALP activity and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In MCF-7 cells, Cys also increased the proliferation, ERβ mRNA expression, and ERE activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Cys has estrogenic and osteogenic activities in OVX mice, MG-63 cells, and MCF-7 cells. The novel insights gained here strongly imply the potential use of Cys as a new agent for postmenopausal women. PMID:26494699

  5. Characterization of the Cysteine Content in Proteins Utilizing Cysteine Selenylation with 266 nm Ultraviolet Photodissociation (UVPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W. Ryan; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization of the cysteine content of proteins is a key aspect of proteomics. By defining both the total number of cysteines and their bound/unbound state, the number of candidate proteins considered in database searches is significantly constrained. Herein we present a methodology that utilizes 266 nm UVPD to count the number of free and bound cysteines in intact proteins. In order to attain this goal, proteins were derivatized with N-(phenylseleno)phthalimide (NPSP) to install a selectively cleavable Se-S bond upon 266 UVPD. The number of Se-S bonds cleaved upon UVPD, a process that releases SePh moieties, corresponds to the number of cysteine residues per protein.

  6. Centenary celebrations article: Cysteine proteases of human malaria parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Kailash C.

    2011-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new drugs against malaria, which takes millions of lives annually. Cysteine proteases are potential new drug targets, especially when current drugs are showing resistance. Falcipains and vivapains are well characterized cysteine proteases of P. falciparum and P. vivax, respectively. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases specific genes have suggested their roles in hemoglobin hydrolysis. In P. falciparum, falcipain-2 and falci...

  7. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  8. Selectively colorimetric detection of cysteine with triangular silver nanoprisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong Wu; Yuan Fang Li; Cheng Zhi Huang

    2009-01-01

    Triangular silver nanoprisms were prepared and applied to make colorimetric detection of cysteine based on our findings that cysteine could lead to the blue shift of the dipole plasmon resonance absorption,but other 19 kinds of natural amino acids could not.Cysteine with a concentration 160 nmol/L can result in a color change that can be discerned with naked eyes.

  9. Cysteine and Cysteine-Related SignalingPathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine occupies a central position in plant metabolism because it is a reduced sulfur donor moleculeinvolved in the synthesis of essential biomolecules and defense compounds. Moreover, cysteine per se and its deriva-tive molecules play roles in the redox signaling of processes occurring in various cellular compartments. Cysteine issynthesized during the sulfate assimilation pathway via the incorporation of sulfide to O-acetylserine, catalyzed byO-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL). Plant cells contain OASTLs in the mitochondria, chloroplasts, and cytosol, resultingin a complex array of isoforms and subcellular cysteine pools, in recent years, significant progress has been made inArabidopsis, in determining the specific roles of the OASTLs and the metabolites produced by them. Thus, the dis-covery of novel enzymatic activities of the less-abundant, like DES1 with L-cysteine desulfhydrase activity and SCSwith S-sulfocysteine synthase activity, has provided new perspectives on their roles, besides their metabolic functions.Thereby, the research has been demonstrated that cytosolic sulfide and chloroplastic S-sulfocysteine act as signalingmolecules regulating autophagy and protecting the photosystems, respectively. In the cytosol, cysteine plays an essentialrole in plant immunity; in the mitochondria, this molecule plays a central role in the detoxification of cyanide, which isessential for root hair development and plant responses to pathogens.

  10. Hierarchical networks of redox-active reduced crumpled graphene oxide and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes for rapid electrochemical energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongyong; Lee, Chongmin; Liu, Tianyuan; Eom, Kwangsup; Chen, Zhongming; Noda, Suguru; Fuller, Thomas F.; Jang, Hee Dong; Lee, Seung Woo

    2016-06-01

    Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes consisting of conventional 2D reduced graphene oxide and f-FWNTs. These results highlight the importance of microstructure design coupled with oxygen chemistry control, to maximize the surface redox reactions on functionalized graphene based electrodes.Crumpled graphene is known to have a strong aggregation-resistive property due to its unique 3D morphology, providing a promising solution to prevent the restacking issue of graphene based electrode materials. Here, we demonstrate the utilization of redox-active oxygen functional groups on the partially reduced crumpled graphene oxide (r-CGO) for electrochemical energy storage applications. To effectively utilize the surface redox reactions of the functional groups, hierarchical networks of electrodes including r-CGO and functionalized few-walled carbon nanotubes (f-FWNTs) are assembled via a vacuum-filtration process, resulting in a 3D porous structure. These composite electrodes are employed as positive electrodes in Li-cells, delivering high gravimetric capacities of up to ~170 mA h g-1 with significantly enhanced rate-capability compared to the electrodes

  11. Application of 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid as a suitable mediator and multiwall carbon nanotubes as a sensor for the electrocatalytic determination of L-cysteine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohsen Keyvanfard; Rasoul Salmani-mobarakeh; Hassan Karimi-Maleh; Khadijeh Alizad

    2014-01-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor was prepared for the determination of L-cysteine using a modified multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode in the presence of 3,4-dihydroxycinnamic acid (3,4-DHCA) as a mediator, based on an electrocatalytic process. The results indicate that the elec-trode is electrocatalytically efficient for the oxidation of L-cysteine in the presence of 3,4-DHCA. The interaction between the mediator and L-cysteine can be used for its sensitive and selective deter-mination. Using chronoamperometry, the catalytic reaction rate constant was calculated to be 2.37 × 102 mol-1 L s-1. The catalytic peak current was linearly dependent on the L-cysteine concentration in the range of 0.4-115 μmol/L. The detection limit obtained by linear sweep voltammetry was 0.25 μmol/L. Finally, the modified electrode was examined as a selective, simple, and precise new elec-trochemical sensor for the determination of L-cysteine in real samples.

  12. Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease heterologous expressed in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    During germination of barley seeds, the mobilization of protein is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...... active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. One of the key cysteine proteases in Barley...

  13. Formation of redox-active self-assembled polyelectrolyte-surfactant complexes integrating glucose oxidase on electrodes: Influence of the self-assembly solvent on the signal generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, M Lorena; Ceolín, Marcelo; Azzaroni, Omar; Battaglini, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    In this work the effects of the self-assembly solvent on the structure and electrochemical behavior of redox-active polyelectrolyte–surfactant complexes cast on electrode supports from aqueous and DMF solutions are presented. The complex studied is formed by complexation of osmium complex-modified polyallylamine (OsPA) with dodecyl sulfate (DS) surfactants. The structure of the films was characterized by GISAXS, showing that films present a lamellar mesostructure. However, when they are exposed to humid environments, films cast from aqueous solutions (OsPA–DSaq) undergo a structural transition that ultimately leads to the disappearance of the mesostructural order. On the other hand, OsPA–DS films cast from DMF solutions (OsPA–DSorg) revealed no significant changes upon exposure to humid environments. Both types of films were exposed to glucose oxidase (GOx), showing similar adsorption characteristics. Notwithstanding these similarities in GOx and content, OsPA–DSaq films revealed a more sensitive bioelectrocatalytical response to glucose as compared to OsPA–DSorg films. PMID:26094060

  14. Supramolecular Photoinduced Electron Transfer between a Redox-Active Hexanuclear Metal-Organic Cylinder and an Encapsulated Ruthenium(II) Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; He, Cheng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Hui; Guo, Huimin

    2016-04-01

    By using redox-active nickel(II) ions as the connect nodes, a hexanuclear metal-organic cylinder (Ni-YL) was achieved through self-assembly with a large cavity and an opening windows capable to accommodate guest molecules. The suitable cavity of Ni-YL provides an opportunity to encapsulate the anionic ruthenium bipyridine derivative [Ru(dcbpy)3 ] (dcbpy=2,2'-bipyridine-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid) as the photosensitizer for light-driven reactions. The host-guest behavior between Ni-YL and [Ru(dcbpy)3 ] was investigated by mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and computational studies, revealing an effective binding of the guest [Ru(dcbpy)3 ] within the cavity of Ni-YL. Optical experiments suggested a pseudo-intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between the [Ru(dcbpy)3 ] and the host Ni-YL, leading to an efficient light-driven hydrogen production based on this system. Control experiments with a mononuclear Ni complex as a reference photocatalyst and the inactive [Fe(dcbpy)3 ] as an inhibitor for comparison were also performed to confirm such a supramolecular photocatalysis process. PMID:26923780

  15. Chronic Glutathione Depletion Confers Protection against Alcohol-induced Steatosis: Implication for Redox Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Singh, Surendra; Matsumoto, Akiko; Manna, Soumen K.; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Golla, Srujana; Murphy, Robert C.; Dong, Hongbin; Song, Byoung-Joon; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is not well established. However, oxidative stress and associated decreases in levels of glutathione (GSH) are known to play a central role in ALD. The present study examines the effect of GSH deficiency on alcohol-induced liver steatosis in Gclm knockout (KO) mice that constitutively have ≈15% normal hepatic levels of GSH. Following chronic (6 week) feeding with an ethanol-containing liquid diet, the Gclm KO mice were unexpectedly found to be protected against steatosis despite showing increased oxidative stress (as reflected in elevated levels of CYP2E1 and protein carbonyls). Gclm KO mice also exhibit constitutive activation of liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway and nuclear factor-erythroid 2–related factor 2 target genes, and show enhanced ethanol clearance, altered hepatic lipid profiles in favor of increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and concordant changes in expression of genes associated with lipogenesis and fatty acid oxidation. In summary, our data implicate a novel mechanism protecting against liver steatosis via an oxidative stress adaptive response that activates the AMPK pathway. We propose redox activation of the AMPK may represent a new therapeutic strategy for preventing ALD. PMID:27403993

  16. Development of a long-acting, protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel formed by a polyion complex for local protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shiro; Kaneko, Junya; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer immunotherapies are attracting much attention, it is difficult to develop bioactive proteins owing to the severe systemic toxicity. To overcome the issue, we designed new local protein delivery system by using a protein-loaded, redox-active, injectable gel (RIG), which is formed by a polyion complex (PIC) comprising three components, viz., cationic polyamine-poly(ethylene glycol)-polyamine triblock copolymer possessing ROS-scavenging moieties as side chains; anionic poly(acrylic acid); and a protein. The mixture formed the protein-loaded PIC flower micelles at room temperature, which immediately converted to a gel with high mechanical strength upon exposure to physiological conditions. Because the protein electrostatically interacts with the PIC gel network, RIG provided a sustained release of the protein without a significant initial burst, regardless of the types of proteins in vitro, and much longer retention of the protein at the local injection site in mice than that of the naked protein. Subcutaneous injections of IL-12@RIG in the vicinity of tumor tissue showed remarkable tumor growth inhibition in tumor-bearing mice, compared to that observed with injection of IL-12 alone, suppressing adverse events caused by IL-12-induced ROS. Our results indicate that RIG has potential as a platform technology for an injectable sustained-release carrier for proteins. PMID:26828685

  17. 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl as a model organic redox active compound for nonaqueous flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Jarrod D.; Barton, John L.; Darling, Robert M.; Brushett, Fikile R.

    2016-09-01

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NAqRFBs) that utilize redox active organic molecules are an emerging energy storage concept with the possibility of meeting grid storage requirements. Sporadic and uneven advances in molecular discovery and development, however, have stymied efforts to quantify the performance characteristics of nonaqueous redox electrolytes and flow cells. A need exists for archetypal redox couples, with well-defined electrochemical properties, high solubility in relevant electrolytes, and broad availability, to serve as probe molecules. This work investigates the 4-acetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (AcNH-TEMPO) redox pair for such an application. We report the physicochemical and electrochemical properties of the reduced and oxidized compounds at dilute concentrations for electroanalysis, as well as moderate-to-high concentrations for RFB applications. Changes in conductivity, viscosity, and UV-vis absorbance as a function of state-of-charge are quantified. Cyclic voltammetry investigates the redox potential, reversibility, and diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions, while symmetric flow cell cycling determines the stability of the AcNH-TEMPO redox pair over long experiment times. Finally, single electrolyte flow cell studies demonstrate the utility of this redox couple as a platform chemistry for benchmarking NAqRFB performance.

  18. Coordination polymers of Fe(iii) and Al(iii) ions with TCA ligand: distinctive fluorescence, CO2 uptake, redox-activity and oxygen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Barun; Sappati, Subrahmanyam; Singh, Santosh K; Kurungot, Sreekumar; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2016-04-19

    Fe and Al belong to different groups in the periodic table, one from the p-block and the other from the d-block. In spite of their different groups, they have the similarity of exhibiting a stable 3+ oxidation state. Here we have prepared Fe(iii) and Al(iii) based coordination polymers in the form of metal-organic gels with the 4,4',4''-tricarboxyltriphenylamine (TCA) ligand, namely Fe-TCA and Al-TCA, and evaluated some important physicochemical properties. Specifically, the electrical conductivity, redox-activity, porosity, and electrocatalytic activity (oxygen evolution reaction) of the Fe-TCA system were noted to be remarkably higher than those of the Al-TCA system. As for the photophysical properties, almost complete quenching of the fluorescence originating from TCA was observed in case of the Fe-TCA system, whereas for the Al-TCA system a significant retention of fluorescence with red-shifted emission was observed. Quantum mechanical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to unravel the origin of such discriminative behaviour of these coordination polymer systems. PMID:26961352

  19. Redox-Active Profile Characterization of Remirea maritima Extracts and It Cytotoxic Effect in Mouse Fibroblasts (L929 and Melanoma (B16F10 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Anne A. Dória

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Remirea maritima is a tropical plant with a reticulated root system belonging to the family Cyperaceae, also known to have biologically active secondary metabolites. However, very few data on R. maritima’s biological actions are available and there are no reports regarding the redox-active profile of this plant. In this study, we examined the total phenolic content of Remirea maritima hydroalcoholic (RMHA extracts, redox properties against different reactive species generated in vitro and their cytotoxic effect against fibroblasts (L929 and melanoma (B16F10 cells. Total reactive antioxidant potential index (TRAP and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR results revealed that RMHA at all concentrations tested showed significant antioxidant capacity. RMHA was also effective against hydroxyl radical formation, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in scavenging nitric oxide (NO radicals. In vitro, the level of lipid peroxidation was reduced by RMHA extract and the data showed significant oxidative damage protection. The RMHA cytotoxicity was evaluated by a neutral red assay in fibroblast (L929 and melanome (B16F10 cells. The obtained results showed that the RMHA (40 and 80 µg/mL, respectively reduced 70% of the viable cells. In conclusion, this study represents the first report regarding the antioxidant and anti-proliferative potential of R. maritima against B16F10 melanoma cells.

  20. Redox active molecules cytochrome c and vitamin C enhance heme-enzyme peroxidations by serving as non-specific agents for redox relay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► At low concentrations, cytochrome c/vitamin C do not catalyze peroxidations. ► But low levels of cytochrome c/vitamin C enhance diverse heme peroxidase activities. ► Enhancement positively correlates to the concentration of peroxide in reaction. ► Reducible additives serve as non-specific agents for redox relay in the system. ► Insight into electron transfer processes in routine and oxidative-stress states. -- Abstract: We report that incorporation of very low concentrations of redox protein cytochrome c and redox active small molecule vitamin C impacted the outcome of one-electron oxidations mediated by structurally distinct plant/fungal heme peroxidases. Evidence suggests that cytochrome c and vitamin C function as a redox relay for diffusible reduced oxygen species in the reaction system, without invoking specific or affinity-based molecular interactions for electron transfers. The findings provide novel perspectives to understanding – (1) the promiscuous role of cytochrome b5 in the metabolism mediated by liver microsomal xenobiotic metabolizing systems and (2) the roles of antioxidant molecules in affording relief from oxidative stress.

  1. Redox-Active Metal-Organic Frameworks: Highly Stable Charge-Separated States through Strut/Guest-to-Strut Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Nivedita; Jayaramulu, Kolleboyina; Kiran, Venkayala; Rao, K Venkata; Sampath, Srinivasan; George, Subi J; Maji, Tapas Kumar

    2015-08-10

    Molecular organization of donor and acceptor chromophores in self-assembled materials is of paramount interest in the field of photovoltaics or mimicry of natural light-harvesting systems. With this in mind, a redox-active porous interpenetrated metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Cd(bpdc)(bpNDI)]⋅4.5 H2 O⋅DMF}n (1) has been constructed from a mixed chromophoric system. The μ-oxo-bridged secondary building unit, {Cd2 (μ-OCO)2 }, guides the parallel alignment of bpNDI (N,N'-di(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide) acceptor linkers, which are tethered with bpdc (bpdcH2 =4,4'-biphenyldicarboxylic acid) linkers of another entangled net in the framework, resulting in photochromic behaviour through inter-net electron transfer. Encapsulation of electron-donating aromatic molecules in the electron-deficient channels of 1 leads to a perfect donor-acceptor co-facial organization, resulting in long-lived charge-separated states of bpNDI. Furthermore, 1 and guest encapsulated species are characterised through electrochemical studies for understanding of their redox properties. PMID:26206156

  2. Structure-function analysis of the endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductase TMX3 reveals interdomain stabilization of the n-terminal redox-active domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugstetter, J.; Maurer, M.A.; Blicher, Thomas; Pagac, M.; Wider, G.; Ellgaard, L.

    2007-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by enzymes of the protein disulfide-isomerase family that harbor one or more thioredoxin-like domains. We recently discovered the transmembrane protein TMX3, a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the protein disulfide-isomerase fami...... enzyme. Overall, the data indicate that in addition to their role as substrate and co-factor binding domains, redox-inactive thioredoxin-like domains also function in stabilizing neighboring redox-active domains.......Disulfide bond formation in the endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by enzymes of the protein disulfide-isomerase family that harbor one or more thioredoxin-like domains. We recently discovered the transmembrane protein TMX3, a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the protein disulfide-isomerase family...... more resistant toward chemical denaturation and proteolysis in both the oxidized and reduced form. In combination with molecular modeling studies of TMX3 abb', the experimental results provide a new understanding of the relationship between the multidomain structure of TMX3 and its function as a redox...

  3. Redox-Active Profile Characterization of Remirea maritima Extracts and Its Cytotoxic Effect in Mouse Fibroblasts (L929) and Melanoma (B16F10) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dória, Grace Anne A; Santos, Anderson R; Bittencourt, Leonardo S; Bortolin, Rafael C; Menezes, Paula P; Vasconcelos, Bruno S; Souza, Rebeca O; Fonseca, Maria José V; Santos, Alan Diego C; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Silva, Francilene A; Gelain, Daniel P; Moreira, José Cláudio F; Prata, Ana Paula N; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Araújo, Adriano A S

    2015-01-01

    Remirea maritima is a tropical plant with a reticulated root system belonging to the family Cyperaceae, also known to have biologically active secondary metabolites. However, very few data on R. maritima's biological actions are available and there are no reports regarding the redox-active profile of this plant. In this study, we examined the total phenolic content of Remirea maritima hydroalcoholic (RMHA) extracts, redox properties against different reactive species generated in vitro and their cytotoxic effect against fibroblasts (L929) and melanoma (B16F10) cells. Total reactive antioxidant potential index (TRAP) and total antioxidant reactivity (TAR) results revealed that RMHA at all concentrations tested showed significant antioxidant capacity. RMHA was also effective against hydroxyl radical formation, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2+ and in scavenging nitric oxide (NO) radicals. In vitro, the level of lipid peroxidation was reduced by RMHA extract and the data showed significant oxidative damage protection. The RMHA cytotoxicity was evaluated by a neutral red assay in fibroblast (L929) and melanome (B16F10) cells. The obtained results showed that the RMHA (40 and 80 µg/mL, respectively) reduced 70% of the viable cells. In conclusion, this study represents the first report regarding the antioxidant and anti-proliferative potential of R. maritima against B16F10 melanoma cells. PMID:26121396

  4. [Plant signaling peptides. Cysteine-rich peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Recent bioinformatic and genetic analyses of several model plant genomes have revealed the existence of a highly abundant group of signaling peptides that are defined as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs). CRPs are usually in size between 50 and 90 amino acid residues, they are positively charged, and they contain 4-16 cysteine residues that are important for the correct conformational folding. Despite the structural differences among CRP classes, members from each class have striking similarities in their molecular properties and function. The present review presents the recent progress in research on signaling peptides from several families including: EPF/EPFL, SP11/SCR, PrsS, RALF, LURE, and some other peptides belonging to CRP group. There is convincing evidence indicating multiple roles for these CRPs as signaling molecules during the plant life cycle, ranging from stomata development and patterning, self-incompatibility, pollen tube growth and guidance, reproductive processes, and nodule formation. PMID:26281357

  5. The concerted action of a positive charge and hydrogen bonds dynamically regulates the pKa of the nucleophilic cysteine in the NrdH-redoxin family

    OpenAIRE

    Van Laer, Koen; Oliveira, Margarida; Wahni, Khadija; Messens, Joris

    2013-01-01

    NrdH-redoxins shuffle electrons from the NADPH pool in the cell to Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases, which in turn provide the precursors for DNA replication and repair. NrdH-redoxins have a CVQC active site motif and belong to the thioredoxin-fold protein family. As for other thioredoxin-fold proteins, the pKa of the nucleophilic cysteine of NrdH-redoxins is of particular interest since it affects the catalytic reaction rate of the enzymes. Recently, the pKa value of this cysteine in Coryn...

  6. Long-time treatment by low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine enhances proinflammatory cytokine expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohnishi

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-cysteine is known to act as a reactive oxygen species scavenger and used in clinical applications. Previous reports have shown that high-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment inhibits the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in activated macrophages. Here, we have found that long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low-concentration increases phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT, which are essential for the induction of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin 1β and interleukin 6 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, long-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment decreases expressions of protein phosphatases, catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-2A and dual specificity phosphatase 1. On the other hand, we have found that short-time N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment at low dose increases p53 expression, which inhibits expressions of proinflammatory cytokines. These observations suggest that long-time low-dose N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment increases expressions of proinflammatory cytokines through enhancement of kinase phosphorylation.

  7. The reactions of nitrosyl complexes with cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaroli, Federico; Olabe, José A

    2005-06-27

    The reaction kinetics of a set of ruthenium nitrosyl complexes, {(X)5MNO}n, containing different coligands X (polypyridines, NH3, EDTA, pz, and py) with cysteine (excess conditions), were studied by UV-vis spectrophotometry, using stopped-flow techniques, at an appropriate pH, in the range 3-10, and T = 25 degrees C. The selection of coligands afforded a redox-potential range from -0.3 to +0.5 V (vs Ag/AgCl) for the NO+/NO bound couples. Two intermediates were detected. The first one, I1, appears in the range 410-470 nm for the different complexes and is proposed to be a 1:1 adduct, with the S atom of the cysteinate nucleophile bound to the N atom of nitrosyl. The adduct formation step of I1 is an equilibrium, and the kinetic rate constants for the formation and dissociation of the corresponding adducts were determined by studying the cysteine-concentration dependence of the formation rates. The second intermediate, I2, was detected through the decay of I1, with a maximum absorbance at ca. 380 nm. From similar kinetic results and analyses, we propose that a second cysteinate adds to I1 to form I2. By plotting ln k1(RS-) and ln k2(RS-) for the first and second adduct formation steps, respectively, against the redox potentials of the NO+/NO couples, linear free energy plots are obtained, as previously observed with OH- as a nucleophile. The addition rates for both processes increase with the nitrosyl redox potentials, and this reflects a more positive charge at the electrophilic N atom. In a third step, the I2 adducts decay to form the corresponding Ru-aqua complexes, with the release of N2O and formation of cystine, implying a two-electron process for the overall nitrosyl reduction. This is in contrast with the behavior of nitroprusside ([Fe(CN)5NO]2-; NP), which always yields the one-electron reduction product, [Fe(CN)5NO]3-, either under substoichiometric or in excess-cysteine conditions. PMID:15962980

  8. Natural cysteine protease inhibitors in protozoa: Fifteen years of the chagasin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tatiana F R; Lima, Ana Paula C A

    2016-03-01

    Chagasin-type inhibitors comprise natural inhibitors of papain-like cysteine proteases that are distributed among Protist, Bacteria and Archaea. Chagasin was identified in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi as an approximately 11 kDa protein that is a tight-binding and highly thermostable inhibitor of papain, cysteine cathepsins and endogenous parasite cysteine proteases. It displays an Imunoglobulin-like fold with three exposed loops to one side of the molecule, where amino acid residues present in conserved motifs at the tips of each loop contact target proteases. Differently from cystatins, the loop 2 of chagasin enters the active-site cleft, making direct contact with the catalytic residues, while loops 4 and 6 embrace the enzyme from the sides. Orthologues of chagasin are named Inhibitors of Cysteine Peptidases (ICP), and share conserved overall tri-dimensional structure and mode of binding to proteases. ICPs are tentatively distributed in three families: in family I42 are grouped chagasin-type inhibitors that share conserved residues at the exposed loops; family I71 contains Plasmodium ICPs, which are large proteins having a chagasin-like domain at the C-terminus, with lower similarity to chagasin in the conserved motif at loop 2; family I81 contains Toxoplasma ICP. Recombinant ICPs tested so far can inactivate protozoa cathepsin-like proteases and their mammalian counterparts. Studies on their biological roles were carried out in a few species, mainly using transgenic protozoa, and the conclusions vary. However, in all cases, alterations in the levels of expression of chagasin/ICPs led to substantial changes in one or more steps of parasite biology, with higher incidence in influencing their interaction with the hosts. We will cover most of the findings on chagasin/ICP structural and functional properties and overview the current knowledge on their roles in protozoa. PMID:26546840

  9. Synthesis and characterisation of iron, cobalt and gallium complexes wit the redox-active amide ligand systems pyridinocarboxiamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide; Synthese und Charakterisierung von Eisen-, Cobalt- und Galliumkomplexen mit den redoxaktiven Amidligandsystemen Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, U.

    2001-07-01

    The interactions of the redox-active ligand systems piridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide with the metals iron, cobalt and gallium were investigated. It was found that metal complexes with ligands of the pyridinocarboxamidobenzene and hydroxy phenyl oxamide type can be redox-active in the sense of a ligand-centered reaction. This may provide a better understanding of natural catalysis mechanisms and redox processes. [German] In dieser Arbeit wurde die Wechselwirkung der redoxaktiven Ligandsysteme Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid mit den Metallen Eisen, Cobalt und Gallium untersucht. Es konnte gezeigt werden, dass Metallkomplexe mit Liganden vom Typ Pyridincarboxamidobenzol und Hydroxyphenyloxamid auch im Sinne einer ligandzentrierten Reaktion redoxaktiv sein koennen. Dies kann dazu beitragen, Katalysemechanismen und Redoxprozesse in der Natur besser zu verstehen. (orig.)

  10. The concerted action of a positive charge and hydrogen bonds dynamically regulates the pKa of the nucleophilic cysteine in the NrdH-redoxin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laer, Koen; Oliveira, Margarida; Wahni, Khadija; Messens, Joris

    2014-02-01

    NrdH-redoxins shuffle electrons from the NADPH pool in the cell to Class Ib ribonucleotide reductases, which in turn provide the precursors for DNA replication and repair. NrdH-redoxins have a CVQC active site motif and belong to the thioredoxin-fold protein family. As for other thioredoxin-fold proteins, the pK(a) of the nucleophilic cysteine of NrdH-redoxins is of particular interest since it affects the catalytic reaction rate of the enzymes. Recently, the pK(a) value of this cysteine in Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis NrdH-redoxins were determined, but structural insights explaining the relatively low pK(a) remained elusive. We subjected C. glutamicum NrdH-redoxin to an extensive molecular dynamics simulation to expose the factors regulating the pK(a) of the nucleophilic cysteine. We found that the nucleophilic cysteine receives three hydrogen bonds from residues within the CVQC active site motif. Additionally, a fourth hydrogen bond with a lysine located N-terminal of the active site further lowers the cysteine pK(a). However, site-directed mutagenesis data show that the major contribution to the lowering of the cysteine pK(a) comes from the positive charge of the lysine and not from the additional Lys-Cys hydrogen bond. In 12% of the NrdH-redoxin family, this lysine is replaced by an arginine that also lowers the cysteine pK(a). All together, the four hydrogen bonds and the electrostatic effect of a lysine or an arginine located N-terminally of the active site dynamically regulate the pK(a) of the nucleophilic cysteine in NrdH-redoxins. PMID:24243781

  11. Redox activation of Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and Fe(III)-bleomycin by thioredoxin reductase: specificity of enzymatic redox centers and analysis of reactive species formation by ESR spin trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Judith M.; Cheng, Qing; Antholine, William E.; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Arnér, ArnerElias S.J.; Myers, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Thiosemicarbazones such as triapine (Tp) and Dp44mT are tridentate iron (Fe) chelators that have well-documented anti-neoplastic activity. While Fe-thiosemicarbazones can undergo redox-cycling to generate reactive species that may have important roles in their cytotoxicity, there is only limited insight into specific cellular agents that can rapidly reduce Fe(III)-thiosemicarbazones and thereby promote their redox activity. Here we report that thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione r...

  12. Synthesis, molecular and electronic structures of six-coordinate transition metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) complexes with redox-active 9-hydroxyphenoxazin-1-one ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivakhnenko, Eugeny P; Starikov, Andrey G; Minkin, Vladimir I; Lyssenko, Konstantin A; Antipin, Mikhail Yu; Simakov, Vladimir I; Korobov, Mikhail S; Borodkin, Gennady S; Knyazev, Pavel A

    2011-08-01

    A series of pseudo-octahedral metal (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) complexes 4 of a new redox-active ligand, 2,4,6,8-tetra(tert-butyl)-9-hydroxyphenoxazin-1-one 3, have been synthesized, and their molecular structures determined with help of X-ray crystallography. The effective magnetic moments of complexes 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni) measured in the solid state and toluene solution point to the stabilization of their high-spin electronic ground states. Detailed information on the electronic structure of the complexes and their redox-isomeric forms has been obtained using density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP*/6-311++G(d,p) calculations. The energy disfavored low-spin structures of manganese, iron, and cobalt complexes have been located, and based on the computed geometries and distribution of spin densities identified as Mn(IV)[(Cat-N-SQ)](2), Fe(II)[Cat-N-BQ)](2), and Co(II)[Cat-N-BQ)](2) compounds, respectively. It has been shown that stabilization of the high-spin structures of complexes 4 (M = Mn, Fe, Co) is caused by the rigidity of the molecular framework of ligands 3 that sterically inhibits interconversions between the redox-isomeric forms of the complexes. The calculations performed on complex 4 (M = Co) predict that a suitable structural modification that might provide for stabilization of the low-spin electromeric forms and create conditions for the valence tautomeric rearrangement via stabilization of the low-spin electromer and narrowing energy gap between the low-spin ground state tautomer and the minimal energy crossing point on the intersection of the potential energy surfaces of the interconverting structures consists in the replacement of an oxygen in the oxazine ring by a bulkier sulfur atom. PMID:21718042

  13. Extraction and recovery of mercury and lead from aqueous waste streams using redox-active layered metal chalcogenides. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The authors have begun to examine the extraction and recovery of heavy elements from aqueous waste streams using redox-active metal chalcogenides. They have been able to prepare extractants from known chalcogenide starting materials, studied the efficacy of the extractants for selective removal of soft metal ions from aqueous phases, studied the deactivation of extractants and the concomitant recovery of soft metal ions from the extractants, and characterized all of the solids and solutions thus far in the study. The study was proposed as two parallel tasks: Part 1 and Part 2 emphasize the study and development of known metal chalcogenide extractants and the synthesis and development of new metal chalcogenide extractants, respectively. The two tasks were divided into sub-sections that study the extractants and their chemistry as detailed below: Preparation and reactivity of metal chalcogenide host solids Extraction of target waste (guest) ions from simulated waste streams Examination of the guest-host solids recovery of the guest metal and reuse of extractant Each section of the two tasks was divided into focused subsections that detail the specific problems and solutions to those problems that were proposed. The extent to which those tasks have been accomplished and the continued efforts of the team are described in detail below. (b) Progress and Results. The DOE-supported research has proceeded largely as proposed and has been productive in its first 12 months. Two full-paper manuscripts were submitted and are currently under peer review. A third paper is in preparation and will be submitted shortly. In addition, 5 submitted or invited presentations have been made.'

  14. Differential expression of cysteine desulfurases in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heis Marta D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron-sulfur [Fe-S] clusters are prosthetic groups required to sustain fundamental life processes including electron transfer, metabolic reactions, sensing, signaling, gene regulation and stabilization of protein structures. In plants, the biogenesis of Fe-S protein is compartmentalized and adapted to specific needs of the cell. Many environmental factors affect plant development and limit productivity and geographical distribution. The impact of these limiting factors is particularly relevant for major crops, such as soybean, which has worldwide economic importance. Results Here we analyze the transcriptional profile of the soybean cysteine desulfurases NFS1, NFS2 and ISD11 genes, involved in the biogenesis of [Fe-S] clusters, by quantitative RT-PCR. NFS1, ISD11 and NFS2 encoding two mitochondrial and one plastid located proteins, respectively, are duplicated and showed distinct transcript levels considering tissue and stress response. NFS1 and ISD11 are highly expressed in roots, whereas NFS2 showed no differential expression in tissues. Cold-treated plants showed a decrease in NFS2 and ISD11 transcript levels in roots, and an increased expression of NFS1 and ISD11 genes in leaves. Plants treated with salicylic acid exhibited increased NFS1 transcript levels in roots but lower levels in leaves. In silico analysis of promoter regions indicated the presence of different cis-elements in cysteine desulfurase genes, in good agreement with differential expression of each locus. Our data also showed that increasing of transcript levels of mitochondrial genes, NFS1/ISD11, are associated with higher activities of aldehyde oxidase and xanthine dehydrogenase, two cytosolic Fe-S proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest a relationship between gene expression pattern, biochemical effects, and transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of cysteine desulfurase genes. Moreover, data show proportionality between NFS1 and ISD11

  15. Quantifying tetrahedral adduct formation and stabilization in the cysteine and the serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Jennifer A; Doherty, William; Evans, Paul; Malthouse, J Paul G

    2015-10-01

    Two new papain inhibitors have been synthesized where the terminal α-carboxyl groups of Z-Phe-Ala-COOH and Ac-Phe-Gly-COOH have been replaced by a proton to give Z-Phe-Ala-H and Ac-Phe-Gly-H. We show that for papain, replacing the terminal carboxylate group of a peptide inhibitor with a hydrogen atom decreases binding 3-4 fold while replacing an aldehyde or glyoxal group with a hydrogen atom decreases binding by 300,000-1,000,000 fold. Thiohemiacetal formation by papain with aldehyde or glyoxal inhibitors is shown to be ~10,000 times more effective than hemiacetal or hemiketal formation with chymotrypsin. It is shown using effective molarities, that for papain, thiohemiacetal stabilization is more effective with aldehyde inhibitors than with glyoxal inhibitors. The effective molarity obtained when papain is inhibited by an aldehyde inhibitor is similar to the effective molarity obtained when chymotrypsin is inhibited by glyoxal inhibitors showing that both enzymes can stabilize tetrahedral adducts by similar amounts. Therefore the greater potency of aldehyde and glyoxal inhibitors with papain is not due to greater thiohemiacetal stabilization by papain compared to the hemiketal and hemiacetal stabilization by chymotrypsin, instead it reflects the greater intrinsic reactivity of the catalytic thiol group of papain compared to the catalytic hydroxyl group of chymotrypsin. It is argued that while the hemiacetals and thiohemiacetals formed with the serine and cysteine proteases respectively can mimic the catalytic tetrahedral intermediate they are also analogues of the productive and non-productive acyl intermediates that can be formed with the cysteine and serine proteases. PMID:26169698

  16. Antimalarial Synergy of Cysteine and Aspartic Protease Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Semenov, Andrey; Olson, Jed E.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that the Plasmodium falciparum cysteine protease falcipain and aspartic proteases plasmepsin I and plasmepsin II act cooperatively to hydrolyze hemoglobin as a source of amino acids for erythrocytic parasites. Inhibitors of each of these proteases have potent antimalarial effects. We have now evaluated the antimalarial effects of combinations of cysteine and aspartic protease inhibitors. When incubated with cultured P. falciparum parasites, cysteine and aspartic protease ...

  17. Two pathways for cysteine biosynthesis in Leishmania major

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Roderick A. M.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Genome mining and biochemical analyses have shown that L. major possesses two pathways for cysteine synthesis - the de novo biosynthesis pathway comprising serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and cysteine synthase (CS) and the reverse transsulfuration (RTS) pathway comprising cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine gamma-lyase (CGL). The L. major CS (LmjCS) is similar to the type A CSs of bacteria and catalyses the synthesis of cysteine using O-acetyserine and sulfide...

  18. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2009-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to iden...

  19. Modulation of ion transport across rat distal colon by cysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MartinDiener

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the actions of stimulation of endogenous production of H2S by cysteine, the substrate for the two H2S-producing enzymes, cystathionin-beta-synthase and cystathionin-gamma-lyase, on ion transport across rat distal colon. Changes in short-circuit current (Isc induced by cysteine were measured in Ussing chambers. Free cysteine caused a concentration-dependent, transient fall in Isc, which was sensitive to amino-oxyacetate and beta-cyano-L-alanine, i.e. inhibitors of H2S-producing enzymes. In contrast, Na cysteinate evoked a biphasic change in Isc, i.e. an initial fall followed by a secondary increase, which was also reduced by these enzyme inhibitors. All responses were dependent on the presence of Cl- and inhibited by bumetanide, suggesting that free cysteine induces an inhibition of transcellular Cl- secretion, whereas Na cysteinate – after a transient inhibitory phase – activates anion secretion. The assumed reason for this discrepancy is a fall in the cytosolic pH induced by free cysteine, but not by Na cysteinate, as observed in isolated colonic crypts loaded with the pH-sensitive dye, BCECF. Intracellular acidification is known to inhibit epithelial K+ channels. Indeed, after preinhibition of basolateral K+ channels with tetrapentylammonium or Ba2+, the negative Isc induced by free cysteine was reduced significantly. In consequence, stimulation of endogenous H2S production by Na cysteinate causes, after a short inhibitory response, a delayed activation of anion secretion, which is missing in the case of free cysteine, probably due to the cytosolic acidification. In contrast, diallyl trisulfide, which is intracellularly converted to H2S, only evoked a monophasic increase in Isc without the initial fall observed with Na cysteinate. Consequently, time course and amount of produced H2S seem to strongly influence the functional response of the colonic epithelium evoked by this gasotransmitter.

  20. Cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags for enrichment of cysteine-containing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giron, Priscille; Dayon, Loïc; Mihala, Nikolett; Sanchez, Jean-Charles; Rose, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Considering the tremendous complexity and the wide dynamic range of protein samples from biological origin and their proteolytic peptide mixtures, proteomics largely requires simplification strategies. One common approach to reduce sample complexity is to target a particular amino acid in proteins or peptides, such as cysteine (Cys), with chemical tags in order to reduce the analysis to a subset of the whole proteome. The present work describes the synthesis and the use of two new cysteinyl tags, so-called cysteine-reactive covalent capture tags (C3T), for the isolation of Cys-containing peptides. These bifunctional molecules were specifically designed to react with cysteines through iodoacetyl and acryloyl moieties and permit efficient selection of the tagged peptides. To do so, a thioproline was chosen as the isolating group to form, after a deprotection/activation step, a thiazolidine with an aldehyde resin by the covalent capture (CC) method. The applicability of the enrichment strategy was demonstrated on small synthetic peptides as well as on peptides derived from digested proteins. Mass spectrometric (MS) analysis and tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) sequencing confirmed the efficient and straightforward selection of the cysteine-containing peptides. The combination of C3T and CC methods provides an effective alternative to reduce sample complexity and access low abundance proteins. PMID:19813279

  1. The role of cysteine residues in redox regulation and protein stability of Arabidopsis thaliana starch synthase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M;

    2015-01-01

    its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the...... reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis......-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98-99%). In addition of being part of...

  2. Bipolar mass spectrometry of labile coordination complexes, redox active inorganic compounds, and proteins using a glass nebulizer for sonic-spray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonakis, Manolis M; Tsirigotaki, Alexandra; Kanaki, Katerina; Milios, Constantinos J; Pergantis, Spiros A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a novel nebulizer configuration for sonic-spray ionization (SSI) mass spectrometry (MS), more specifically for a version of SSI that is referred to as Venturi easy ambient sonic-spray ionization (V-EASI) MS. The developed nebulizer configuration is based on a commercially available pneumatic glass nebulizer that has been used extensively for aerosol formation in atomic spectrometry. In the present study, the nebulizer was modified in order to achieve efficient V-EASI-MS operation. Upon evaluating this system, it has been demonstrated that V-EASI-MS offers some distinct advantages for the analysis of coordination compounds and redox active inorganic compounds over the predominantly used electrospray ionization (ESI) technique. Such advantages, for this type of compounds, are demonstrated here for the first time. More specifically, a series of labile heptanuclear heterometallic [Cu(II) 6Ln(III)] clusters held together with artificial amino acid ligands, in addition to easily oxidized inorganic oxyanions of selenium and arsenic, were analyzed. The observed advantages pertain to V-EASI appearing to be a "milder" ionization source than ESI, not requiring electrical potentials for gas phase ion formation, thus eliminating the possibility of unwanted redox transformations, allowing for the "simultaneous" detection of negative and positive ions (bipolar analysis) without the need to change source ionization conditions, and also not requiring the use of syringes and delivery pumps. Because of such features, especially because of the absence of ionization potentials, EASI can be operated with minimal requirements for source parameter optimization. We observed that source temperature and accelerating voltage do not seem to affect labile compounds to the extent they do in ESI-MS. In addition, bipolar analysis of proteins was demonstrated here by acquiring both positive and negative ion mass spectra from the same protein solutions

  3. Catalytic cracking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  4. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  5. Heterologous expression of Hordeum vulgare cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben B;

    Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins during germination. Several Cysteine proteases have been identified in barley. One of the key enzymes, Hordeum vulgare endoprotease B2 (HvEPB2) was cloned with and...

  6. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  7. Colorimetric Strategy for Highly Sensitive and Selective Simultaneous Detection of Histidine and Cysteine Based on G-Quadruplex-Cu(II) Metalloenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changtong; Fan, Daoqing; Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2016-03-01

    In this present work, we proposed a colorimetric strategy for simultaneous detection of histidine and cysteine based on G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme for the first time. Because of the adding of histidine or cysteine, the formation of G-quadruplex-Cu(II) metalloenzyme will be disturbed, thus the catalytic activity to TMB-H2O2 reaction is inversely proportional to the concentration of histidine or cysteine. With this strategy, the limit of detection in experimental measurement for histidine and cysteine is 10 nM and 5 nM, respectively, which are both lower than previous colorimetric arrays. With the help of NEM, cysteine is alkylated and the reaction between Cu(2+) is inhibited, so the selectivity can also be guaranteed. The cost is quite low since the developed array is label free and enzyme free by using low-cost DNA and Cu(2+). More importantly, the colorimetric detection operation is very simple without any further modification process. PMID:26832965

  8. Structure-Function of Falcipains: Malarial Cysteine Proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that cysteine proteases play essential role in malaria parasites; therefore an obvious area of investigation is the inhibition of these enzymes to treat malaria. Studies with cysteine protease inhibitors and manipulating cysteine proteases genes have suggested a role for cysteine proteases in hemoglobin hydrolysis. The best characterized Plasmodium cysteine proteases are falcipains, which are papain family enzymes. Falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 are major hemoglobinases of P. falciparum. Structural and functional analysis of falcipains showed that they have unique domains including a refolding domain and a hemoglobin binding domain. Overall, the complexes of falcipain-2 and falcipain-3 with small and macromolecular inhibitors provide structural insight to facilitate the design or modification of effective drug treatment against malaria. Drug development targeting falcipains should be aided by a strong foundation of biochemical and structural studies.

  9. Nanoscaled redox active protein adsorption on Au-dot arrays: An electrochemical scanning probe microscopic investigation for application in nano-biodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Jung, Mi; Kim, Sang-Uk [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [College of Bionanotechnology, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Seongnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.k [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Highly dense and uniform protein dot arrays on Au-nanodots using size controllable method were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate in order to develop an electrochemical nanobiochip. Cysteine modified azurin was directly immobilized on the fabricated Au-nanodots without any linker materials. Atomic force microscopy was used for characterizing Au-dots formed on ITO substrate. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) revealed the monolayer formation with an in situ cyclic voltammetry to observe redox behaviour of both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots. I-V characteristics were obtained on both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots structured on ITO conductive electrodes.

  10. Viral cysteine proteases are homologous to the trypsin-like family of serine proteases: structural and functional implications.

    OpenAIRE

    Bazan, J F; Fletterick, R J

    1988-01-01

    Proteases that are encoded by animal picornaviruses and plant como- and potyviruses form a related group of cysteine-active-center enzymes that are essential for virus maturation. We show that these proteins are homologous to the family of trypsin-like serine proteases. In our model, the active-site nucleophile of the trypsin catalytic triad, Ser-195, is changed to a Cys residue in these viral proteases. The other two residues of the triad, His-57 and Asp-102, are otherwise absolutely conserv...

  11. Reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Shankar; P Kolandaivel

    2007-09-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism of -acylhydroxamate with cysteine proteases has been investigated using ab initio and density functional theory. On the irreversible process, after breakdown of tetrahedral intermediate (INT1), small 1-2 anionotropic has been formed and rearranged to give stable by-products sulfenamide (P1) and thiocarbamate (P2) with considerable energy loss. While, on the reversible part of this reaction mechanism, intermediate (INT2) breaks down on oxidation, to form a stable product (P3). Topological and AIM analyses have been performed for hydrogen bonded complex in this reaction profile. Intrinsic reaction coordinates [IRC, minimum-energy path (MEP)] calculation connects the transition state between R-INT1, INT1-P1 and INT1-P2. The products P1, P2 and P3 are energetically more stable than the reactant and hence the reaction enthalpy is found to be exothermic.

  12. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding cysteine proteases from senescent leaves of Gossypium hirsutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Fafu; YU Shuxun; HAN Xiulan; FAN Shuli

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding a cysteine proteinase was isolated from senescent leave of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cv liaomian No. 9 by utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), and a set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal the conserved sequences of plant cysteine protease genes. The cDNA, which designated Ghcysp gene, contained 1368 bp terminating in a poly(A)+ trail, and included a putative 5′(98 bp) and a 3′(235 bp) non-coding region. The opening reading frame (ORF) encodes polypeptide 344 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.88 kD and theoretical pI of 4.80. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence in the GenBank database has shown considerable sequence similarity to a novel family of plant cysteine proteases. This putative cotton Ghcysp protein shows from 67% to 82% identity to the other plants. All of them share catalytic triad of residues, which are highly conserved in three regions. Hydropaths analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that the Ghcysp is a potential membrane protein and localizes to the vacuole, which has a transmembrane helix between resides 7-25. A characteristic feature of Ghcysp is the presence of a putative vacuole-targeting signal peptide of 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal region. The expression of Ghcysp gene was determined using northern blot analysis. The Ghcysp mRNA levels are high in development senescent leaf but below the limit of detection in senescent root, hypocotyl, faded flower, 6 d post anthesis ovule, and young leaf.

  13. Purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Elucidating the role of a conserved cysteine in adenine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle V; Brown, Anne M; Xu, Huimin; Bevan, David R; White, Robert H

    2016-06-01

    Adenine deaminases (Ade) and hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferases (Hpt) are widely distributed enzymes involved in purine salvage. Characterization of the previously uncharacterized Ade (MJ1459 gene product) and Hpt (MJ1655 gene product) are discussed here and provide insight into purine salvage in Methanocaldococcus jannaschii. Ade was demonstrated to use either Fe(II) and/or Mn(II) as the catalytic metal. Hpt demonstrated no detectable activity with adenine, but was equally specific for hypoxanthine and guanine with a kcat /KM of 3.2 × 10(7) and 3.0 × 10(7) s(- 1) M(- 1) , respectively. These results demonstrate that hypoxanthine and IMP are the central metabolites in purine salvage in M. jannaschii for AMP and GMP production. A conserved cysteine (C127, M. jannaschii numbering) was examined due to its high conservation in bacterial and archaeal homologues. To assess the role of this highly conserved cysteine in M. jannaschii Ade, site-directed mutagenesis was performed. It was determined that mutation to serine (C127S) completely abolished Ade activity and mutation to alanine (C127A) exhibited 10-fold decrease in kcat over the wild type Ade. To further investigate the role of C127, detailed molecular docking and dynamics studies were performed and revealed adenine was unable to properly orient in the active site in the C127A and C127S Ade model structures due to distinct differences in active site conformation and rotation of D261. Together this work illuminates purine salvage in M. jannaschii and the critical role of a cysteine residue in maintaining active site conformation of Ade. Proteins 2016; 84:828-840. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990095

  14. Structural and Functional Studies of the Mitochondrial Cysteine Desulfurase from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valeria R; Turowski; Maria V.Busi; Diego F.Gomez-Casati

    2012-01-01

    AtNfs1 is the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial homolog of the bacterial cysteine desulfurases NifS and lscS,having an essential role in cellular Fe-S cluster assembly.Homology modeling of AtNfs1m predicts a high global similarity with E.coli IscS showing a full conservation of residues involved in the catalytic site,whereas the chloroplastic AtNfs2 is more similar to the Synechocystis sp.SufS.Pull-down assays showed that the recombinant mature form,AtNfs1m,specifically binds to Arabidopsis frataxin (AtFH).A hysteretic behavior,with a lag phase of several minutes,was observed and hysteretic parameters were affected by pre-incubation with AtFH.Moreover,AtFH modulates AtNfs1m kinetics,increasing Vmax and decreasing the S0.5 value for cysteine.Results suggest that AtFH plays an important role in the early steps of Fe-S cluster formation by regulating AtNfs1 activity in olant mitochondria.

  15. Cysteine peptidases from Phytomonas serpens: biochemical and immunological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Camila G R; Aor, Ana Carolina; Valle, Roberta S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Branquinha, Marta H; Santos, André L S

    2009-12-01

    Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate trypanosomatid, shares common antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi. In the present work, we compared the hydrolytic capability of cysteine peptidases in both trypanosomatids. Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes presented a 10-fold higher efficiency in hydrolyzing the cysteine peptidase substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC than P. serpens promastigotes. Moreover, two weak cysteine-type gelatinolytic activities were detected in P. serpens, while a strong 50-kDa cysteine peptidase was observed in T. cruzi. Cysteine peptidase activities were detected at twofold higher levels in the cytoplasmic fraction when compared with the membrane-rich or the content released from P. serpens. The cysteine peptidase secreted by P. serpens cleaved several proteinaceous substrates. Corroborating these findings, the cellular distribution of the cruzipain-like molecules in P. serpens was attested through immunocytochemistry analysis. Gold particles were observed in all cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, flagellum, flagellar membrane and flagellar pocket. Interestingly, some gold particles were visualized free in the flagellar pocket, suggesting the release of the cruzipain-like molecule. The antigenic properties of the cruzipain-like molecules of P. serpens were also analyzed. Interestingly, sera from chagasic patients recognized both cellular and extracellular antigens of P. serpens, including the cruzipain-like molecule. These results point to the use of P. serpens antigens, especially the cruzipain-like cysteine-peptidases, as an alternative vaccination approach to T. cruzi infection. PMID:19780820

  16. Purification and characterization of cysteine aminotransferase from rat liver cytosol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Reiko

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine aminotransferase (L-cysteine: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.3 was purified over 400-fold from the high-speed supernatant fraction of rat liver. The purified enzyme was homogeneous as judged by gel filtration, isoelectric focusing and disc electrophoresis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was about 74,000 by gel filtration and the isoelectric point was 6.2 (4 degrees C. The enzyme catalyzed transamination between L-cysteine and 2-oxoglutarate and the reverse reaction. The optimum pH was 9.7. The Km value for L-cysteine was 22.2 mM, and that for 2-oxoglutaric acid was 0.06 mM. L-Aspartate was a potent inhibitor of the cysteine aminotransferase reaction. The enzyme was very active toward L-alanine 3-sulfinic acid at pH 8.0, and was also very active toward L-aspartic acid (Km = 1.6 mM. Ratios of activities for L-aspartic acid and L-cysteine were essentially constant during the purification of the enzyme. Evidence based on substrate specificity, enzyme inhibition, and physicochemical properties indicates that cytosolic cysteine aminotransferase is identical with cytosolic aspartate aminotransferase (L-aspartate: 2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.1.

  17. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  18. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  19. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  20. Catalytic Coanda combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.D.; Smith, A.G.; Kopmels, M.

    1992-09-16

    A catalytic reaction is enhanced by the use of the Coanda effect to maximise contact between reactant and catalyst. A device utilising this principle comprises a Coanda surface which directs the flow of fuel from a slot to form a primary jet which entrains the surrounding ambient air and forms a combustible mixture for reaction on a catalytic surface. The Coanda surface may have an internal or external nozzle which may be axi-symmetric or two-dimensional. (author)

  1. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  2. Molecular cloning and analysis of Ancylostoma ceylanicum glutamate-cysteine ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewski, Marcin; Lapiński, Maciej; Zdziarska, Anna; Długosz, Ewa; Bąska, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL) is a heterodimer enzyme composed of a catalytic subunit (GCLC) and a modifier subunit (GCLM). This enzyme catalyses the synthesis of γ-glutamylcysteine, a precursor of glutathione. cDNAs of the putative glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic (Ace-GCLC) and modifier subunits (Ace-GCLM) of Ancylostoma ceylanicum were cloned using the RACE-PCR amplification method. The Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm cDNAs encode proteins with 655 and 254 amino acids and calculated molecular masses of 74.76 and 28.51kDa, respectively. The Ace-GCLC amino acid sequence shares about 70% identity and 80% sequence similarity with orthologs in Loa loa, Onchocerca volvulus, Brugia malayi, and Ascaris suum, whereas the Ace-GCLM amino acid sequence has only about 30% sequence identity and 50% similarity to homologous proteins in those species. Real-time PCR analysis of mRNA expression in L3, serum stimulated L3 and adult stages of A. ceylanicum showed the highest level of Ace-GCLC and Ace-GCLM expression occurred in adult worms. No differences were detected among adult hookworms harvested 21 and 35dpi indicating expression of Ace-gclc and Ace-gclm in adult worms is constant during the course of infection. Positive interaction between two subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was detected using the yeast two-hybrid system, and by specific enzymatic reaction. Ace-GCL is an intracellular enzyme and is not exposed to the host immune system. Thus, as expected, we did not detect IgG antibodies against Ace-GCLC or Ace-GCLM on days 21, 60 and 120 of A. ceylanicum infection in hamsters. Furthermore, vaccination with one or both antigens did not reduce worm burdens, and resulted in no improvement of clinical parameters (hematocrit and hemoglobin) of infected hamsters. Therefore, due to the significant role of the enzyme in parasite metabolism, our analyses raises hope for the development of a successful new drug against ancylostomiasis based on the specific GCL inhibitor. PMID

  3. Organometallic palladium reagents for cysteine bioconjugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Ekaterina V.; Zhang, Chi; Spokoyny, Alexander M.; Pentelute, Bradley L.; Buchwald, Stephen L.

    2015-10-01

    Reactions based on transition metals have found wide use in organic synthesis, in particular for the functionalization of small molecules. However, there are very few reports of using transition-metal-based reactions to modify complex biomolecules, which is due to the need for stringent reaction conditions (for example, aqueous media, low temperature and mild pH) and the existence of multiple reactive functional groups found in biomolecules. Here we report that palladium(II) complexes can be used for efficient and highly selective cysteine conjugation (bioconjugation) reactions that are rapid and robust under a range of bio-compatible reaction conditions. The straightforward synthesis of the palladium reagents from diverse and easily accessible aryl halide and trifluoromethanesulfonate precursors makes the method highly practical, providing access to a large structural space for protein modification. The resulting aryl bioconjugates are stable towards acids, bases, oxidants and external thiol nucleophiles. The broad utility of the bioconjugation platform was further corroborated by the synthesis of new classes of stapled peptides and antibody-drug conjugates. These palladium complexes show potential as benchtop reagents for diverse bioconjugation applications.

  4. Cathepsin K: a unique collagenolytic cysteine peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novinec, Marko; Lenarčič, Brigita

    2013-09-01

    Cathepsin K has emerged as a promising target for the treatment of osteoporosis in recent years. Initially identified as a papain-like cysteine peptidase expressed in high levels in osteoclasts, the important role of this enzyme in bone metabolism was highlighted by the finding that mutations in the CTSK gene cause the rare recessive disorder pycnodysostosis, which is characterized by severe bone anomalies. At the molecular level, the physiological role of cathepsin K is reflected by its unique cleavage pattern of type I collagen molecules, which is fundamentally different from that of other endogenous collagenases. Several cathepsin K inhibitors have been developed to reduce the excessive bone matrix degradation associated with osteoporosis, with the frontrunner odanacatib about to successfully conclude Phase 3 clinical trials. Apart from osteoclasts, cathepsin K is expressed in different cell types throughout the body and is involved in processes of adipogenesis, thyroxine liberation and peptide hormone regulation. Elevated activity of cathepsin K has been associated with arthritis, atherosclerosis, obesity, schizophrenia, and tumor metastasis. Accordingly, its activity is tightly regulated via multiple mechanisms, including competitive inhibition by endogenous macromolecular inhibitors and allosteric regulation by glycosaminoglycans. This review provides a state-of-the-art description of the activity of cathepsin K at the molecular level, its biological functions and the mechanisms involved in its regulation. PMID:23629523

  5. A Series of Diamagnetic Pyridine Monoimine Rhenium Complexes with Different Degrees of Metal-to-Ligand Charge Transfer: Correlating (13) C NMR Chemical Shifts with Bond Lengths in Redox-Active Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieh, Daniel; Kubiak, Clifford P

    2016-07-18

    A set of pyridine monoimine (PMI) rhenium(I) tricarbonyl chlorido complexes with substituents of different steric and electronic properties was synthesized and fully characterized. Spectroscopic (NMR and IR) and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses of these complexes showed that the redox-active PMI ligands are neutral and that the overall electronic structure is little affected by the choices of the substituent at the ligand backbone. One- and two-electron reduction products were prepared from selected starting compounds and could also be characterized by multiple spectroscopic methods and X-ray diffraction. The final product of a one-electron reduction in THF is a diamagnetic metal-metal-bonded dimer after loss of the chlorido ligand. Bond lengths in and NMR chemical shifts of the PMI ligand backbone indicate partial electron transfer to the ligand. Two-electron reduction in THF also leads to the loss of the chlorido ligand and a pentacoordinate complex is obtained. The comparison with reported bond lengths and (13) C NMR chemical shifts of doubly reduced free pyridine monoaldimine ligands indicates that both redox equivalents in the doubly reduced rhenium complex investigated here are located in the PMI ligand. With diamagnetic complexes varying over three formal reduction stages at the PMI ligand we were, for the first time, able to establish correlations of the (13) C NMR chemical shifts with the relevant bond lengths in redox-active ligands over a full redox series. PMID:27319753

  6. Reversible targeting of noncatalytic cysteines with chemically tuned electrophiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafimova, Iana M; Pufall, Miles A; Krishnan, Shyam;

    2012-01-01

    Targeting noncatalytic cysteine residues with irreversible acrylamide-based inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity. Nevertheless, concerns about off-target modification motivate the development of reversible cysteine-targeting strategies. Here we...... show that electron-deficient olefins, including acrylamides, can be tuned to react with cysteine thiols in a rapidly reversible manner. Installation of a nitrile group increased the olefins' intrinsic reactivity, but, paradoxically, eliminated the formation of irreversible adducts. Incorporation of...... targeted cysteine. Disruption of these interactions by protein unfolding or proteolysis promoted instantaneous cleavage of the covalent bond. Our results establish a chemistry-based framework for engineering sustained covalent inhibition without accumulating permanently modified proteins and peptides....

  7. Designing Novel Synthetic Enzyme-Like Structures with Inducible Dynamic Catalytic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michelle Lillian

    Over the past three decades considerable efforts have been made to create synthetic versions of enzymes, sometimes called synzymes. Most have failed, and the few so-called successes are at best only marginal exhibiting properties that can barely be described as catalytic. While these synthetic nano-structures look similar to the enzyme active site, they do not have the unique mechanical or dynamic catalytic properties to transform a substrate molecule into the desired product molecule with turnover capability. In our study, a series of synzymes that mimics the active catalytic site of proteases which utilizes serine/hydroxyl, cysteine/sulfhydryl, histidine/imidazole and aspartate/carboxyl groups were designed and fabricated. The acetylation and the deacylation kinetics of the synzyme peptides were studied through molecular modeling and UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The intramolecular interactions of synzyme residues were measured with proton NMR. These synzymes were shown to be able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate esters and acetic anhydride. Synzymes with phenylalanines between the cysteine and histidine yield a significantly higher deacylation rate, suggesting that the large bulky R-groups of phenylalanine bends the backbone of the synzyme, thus bringing the cysteine thiol group and the histidine imidazole group closer for acetyl exchange. When oscillating pulse electric field was applied to the synzymes, an increase in acetylation rate is observed, suggesting the possibility that PEF treatment aids the electroconformation change of the synzyme during the catalysis process, which in turn increased its deacylation ability and turnover rate.

  8. Temporal dependence of cysteine protease activation following excitotoxic hippocampal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jennifer N.; Sharrett-Field, Lynda; Butler, Tracy R.; Prendergast, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Excitotoxic insults can lead to intracellular signaling cascades that contribute to cell death, in part by activation of proteases, phospholipases, and endonucleases. Cysteine proteases, such as calpains, are calcium-activated enzymes which degrade cytoskeletal proteins, including microtubule-associated proteins, tubulin, and spectrin, among others. The current study used the organotypic hippocampal slice culture model to examine whether pharmacologic inhibition of cysteine protease activity ...

  9. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  10. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  11. Partial Purification and Characterization of a Cysteine Protease Inhibitor from the Plerocercoid of Spirometra erinacei

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Young-Bae; Yang, Hyun-Jong

    2008-01-01

    Helminthic cysteine proteases are well known to play critical roles in tissue invasion, nutrient uptake, and immune evasion of the parasites. In the same manner, the sparganum, the plerocercoid of Spirometra mansoni, is also known to secrete a large amount of cysteine proteases. However, cysteine protease inhibitors regulating the proteolytic activities of the cysteine protease are poorly illustrated. In this regard, we partially purified an endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor from spargan...

  12. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  13. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  14. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  15. THE ROLE OF CYSTEINE PROTEASE IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbasic, Samra; Jahic, Alma; Karahmet, Emina; Sejranic, Asja; Prnjavorac, Besim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cysteine protease are biological catalysts which play a pivotal role in numerous biological reactions in organism. Much of the literature is inscribed to their biochemical significance, distribution and mechanism of action. Many diseases, e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, develop due to enzyme balance disruption. Understanding of cysteine protease’s disbalance is therefor a key to unravel the new possibilities of treatment. Cysteine protease are one of the most important enzymes for protein disruption during programmed cell death. Whether protein disruption is part of cell deaths is not enough clear in any cases. Thereafter, any tissue disruption, including proteolysis, generate more or less inflammation appearance. Review: This review briefly summarizes the current knowledge about pathological mechanism’s that results in AD, with significant reference to the role of cysteine protease in it. Based on the summary, new pharmacological approach and development of novel potent drugs with selective toxicity targeting cysteine protease will be a major challenge in years to come.

  16. L-Cysteine-assisted Synthesis of Copper Gallium Sulfide Microspheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xiao-juan; ZHONG Jia-song; CAI Qian; HUANG Hai-yu; LIU Hai-tao; XIANG Wei-dong; SUN Jun-cai

    2012-01-01

    An effective L-cysteine-assisted synthetic route has been successfully developed to prepare copper gallium sulfide(CuGaS2) microspheres under solvothermal conditions with CuCI2-2H2O,GaCl3 and L-cysteine as source materials,in which L-cysteine was used as the sulfide source and eomplexing molecule.The experiments revealed that the synthesized sample was of a typical CuGaS2 tetragonal structure.Moreover,the prepared CuGaS2 crystals consisting of microspheres made up of nanoflakes,and the diameter of the nanoflakes was about 20 nm.Raman spectrum of the obtained CuGaS2 exhibits a high-intensity peak of the A1 mode at 306 cm-1.Meanwhile,a possible growth mechanism was proposed based on the investigations.

  17. Development of nitrile-based peptidic inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizler, Maxim; Stirnberg, Marit; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that several papain-like cysteine cathepsins are involved in the pathophysiology of diseases such as osteoporosis, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Therefore, the development of potent and selective cathepsin inhibitors is an attractive subject for medicinal chemists. New advances have been made for nitrile-based inhibitors, leading to the identification of the cathepsin K inhibitor odanacatib and other candidates with potential for therapeutic use. This review summarizes the development of peptidic and peptidomimetic compounds with an electrophilic nitrile 'warhead' as inhibitors of the cysteine cathepsins B, S, L, C, and K. Peptide nitriles have been shown to reversibly react with the active site cysteine under formation of a covalent thioimidate adduct. The structural optimization with respect to the positions P3, P2, P1, P1', and P2' resulted in the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of the corresponding cathepsins. The underlying structure-activity relationships are discussed herein. PMID:20166952

  18. Biochemical Properties of Cysteine Desulfurase and Its Mechanism for the Desulfuration of L-Cysteine%半胱氨酸脱硫酶的生化特性及其脱硫作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭加平; 韦平和; 周锡樑

    2011-01-01

    半胱氨酸脱硫酶是一类依赖磷酸吡哆醛的酶,为同质二聚体,能催化L-半胱氨酸脱硫生成L-丙氨酸和硫.NifS首先在棕色固氮菌中发现,并被认为在固氮酶铁硫簇的形成中起重要作用.NifS同系物也存在于许多非固氮的原核及真核生物中,它们在分子质量、分光光度特性、底物选择性、氨基酸序列和生物学功能等方面非常相似.根据氨基酸序列的相似性,将NifS同系物分成二组,Ⅰ组包括NifS和IscS等,Ⅱ组包括CSD和CsdB等.半胱氨酸脱硫酶均具有保守的赖氨酸和半胱氨酸残基,前者与PLP形成Schiff碱,后者参与半胱氨酸过硫化物中间物形成.半胱氨酸脱硫酶的作用机理涉及半胱氨酸残基亲核攻击底物L-半胱氨酸上的巯基,形成与酶结合的半胱氨酸过硫化物中间物,该过硫化物中间物作为供硫体,参与生物素、硫胺素、钼碟呤以及铁硫簇、硫代核苷等含硫分子的生物合成.%Cysteine desulfurases are pyridoxal phosphate dependent homodimeric enzymes that catalyze the desulfuration of L-cyste-ine to yield L-alanine and free sulfur. The enzyme NifS was first identified in Azotobacter vinelandii, indicating that it might serve a general role in the formation of Fe-S clusters in nitrogenase. NifS homologs also occur in many nondiazotrophic prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and they are very similar in molecular weight, spectrophotometric property, substrate specificity, amino acid sequence, and function to the A. Vinelandii NifS. On the basis of sequence similarity relationships, the NifS homologs are divided into groups I and II. NifS and IscS are group I enzymes, whereas CSD and CsdB are members of group II. All cysteine desulfurases contain a conserved lysine that forms a Schiff base with the PLP cofactor in the resting state and a conserved catalytic cysteine involved in transient persulfide formation. The mechanism for desulfuration of L-cysteine catalyzed by cysteine

  19. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. 75Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher Km than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue

  20. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  1. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  2. Catalytic combustion of methane by perovskite-type oxide nanoparticles as pollution prevention strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, F.; Luisetto, I.; Serra, E.; Tuti, S.; Pasquali, M.

    2016-06-01

    The transition from the existing brown economy towards the desired green economy drives the research efforts to the development of advanced technologies promoting the efficient utilization of energy sources. Catalysis science offers to combustion technology significant opportunity to increase the fuel efficiency by lowering the internal temperature gradients and reduce the environmental impact by lowering local peak temperature and, consequently, thermodynamically inhibiting the nitrogen oxides formation. Alternative catalytic materials are transition metals oxide, including complex oxides with perovskite crystalline structure. The aim of this work is to synthetize lanthanum ferrite perovskites with lanthanum ions partially substituted by strontium ions in order to study the substitution effects on structural properties and redox activity of the original oxide. Lanthanum ferrite oxides partially substituted with different Strontium amount were synthesized by solution combustion method. The perovskite nanopowders obtained were characterized by XRD, SEM, TPR analyses for defining crystalline structure, morphology and redox properties. Finally, the catalytic activity for methane combustion was tested. The most performing catalysts was La0.6Sr0.4FeO3 having the highest oxygen vacancy concentration as revealed by TPR analysis.

  3. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J.; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon–carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts—this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity.

  4. Asymmetric catalytic formation of quaternary carbons by iminium ion trapping of radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John J; Bastida, David; Paria, Suva; Fagnoni, Maurizio; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-04-14

    An important goal of modern organic chemistry is to develop new catalytic strategies for enantioselective carbon-carbon bond formation that can be used to generate quaternary stereogenic centres. Whereas considerable advances have been achieved by exploiting polar reactivity, radical transformations have been far less successful. This is despite the fact that open-shell intermediates are intrinsically primed for connecting structurally congested carbons, as their reactivity is only marginally affected by steric factors. Here we show how the combination of photoredox and asymmetric organic catalysis enables enantioselective radical conjugate additions to β,β-disubstituted cyclic enones to obtain quaternary carbon stereocentres with high fidelity. Critical to our success was the design of a chiral organic catalyst, containing a redox-active carbazole moiety, that drives the formation of iminium ions and the stereoselective trapping of photochemically generated carbon-centred radicals by means of an electron-relay mechanism. We demonstrate the generality of this organocatalytic radical-trapping strategy with two sets of open-shell intermediates, formed through unrelated light-triggered pathways from readily available substrates and photoredox catalysts--this method represents the application of iminium ion activation (a successful catalytic strategy for enantioselective polar chemistry) within the realm of radical reactivity. PMID:27075098

  5. Cloning and expression of the cathepsin F-like cysteine protease gene in Escherichia coli and its characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Han Seung; Koo, Kwang Bon; Park, Kyung In; Bae, Song Hwan; Yun, Jong Won; Chang, Chung Soon; Choi, Jang Won

    2007-04-01

    In this study, we have cloned a novel cDNA encoding for a papain-family cysteine protease from the Uni-ZAP XR cDNA library of the polychaete, Periserrula leucophryna. This gene was expressed in Escherichia coli using the T7 promoter system, and the protease was characterized after partial purification. First, the partial DNA fragment (498 bp) was amplified from the total RNA via RT-PCR using degenerated primers derived from the conserved region of cysteine protease. The full-length cDNA of cysteine protease (PLCP) was prepared via the screening of the Uni-ZAP XR cDNA library using the 32P-labeled partial DNA fragment. As a result, the PLCP gene was determined to consist of a 2591 bp nucleotide sequence (CDS: 173-1024 bp) which encodes for a 283-amino acid polypeptide, which is itself composed of an 59-residue signal sequence, a 6-residue propeptide, a 218-residue mature protein, and a long 3'-noncoding region encompassing 1564 bp. The predicted molecular weights of the preproprotein and the mature protein were calculated as 31.8 kDa and 25 kDa, respectively. The results of sequence analysis and alignment revealed a significant degree of sequence similarity with other eukaryotic cysteine proteases, including the conserved catalytic triad of the Cys90, His226, and Asn250 residues which characterize the C1 family of papain-like cysteine protease. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the novel gene were deposited into the GenBank database under the accession numbers, AY390282 and AAR27011, respectively. The results of Northern blot analysis revealed the 2.5 kb size of the transcript and ubiquitous expression throughout the entirety of the body, head, gut, and skin, which suggested that the PLCP may be grouped within the cathepsin F-like proteases. The region encoding for the mature form of the protease was then subcloned into the pT7-7 expression vector following PCR amplification using the designed primers, including the initiation and termination codons. The

  6. Chikungunya nsP2 protease is not a papain-like cysteine protease and the catalytic dyad cysteine is interchangeable with a proximal serine

    OpenAIRE

    Chonticha Saisawang; Sawanan Saitornuang; Pornpan Sillapee; Sukathida Ubol; Smith, Duncan R.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus is the pathogenic alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever in humans. In the last decade millions of cases have been reported around the world from Africa to Asia to the Americas. The alphavirus nsP2 protein is multifunctional and is considered to be pivotal to viral replication, as the nsP2 protease activity is critical for proteolytic processing of the viral polyprotein during replication. Classically the alphavirus nsP2 protease is thought to be papain-like with the enzym...

  7. Crystal structure and catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal kinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meong Il; Hong, Minsun

    2016-09-01

    Pyridoxal kinase is a ubiquitous enzyme essential for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) homeostasis since PLP is required for the catalytic activity of a variety of PLP-dependent enzymes involved in amino acid, lipid, and sugar metabolism as well as neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Previously, two catalytic mechanisms were proposed with regard to Pdx kinases, in which either the aspartate or the cysteine residue is involved as a catalytic residue. Because the Pdx kinase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaPdxK) contains both residues, the catalytic mechanism of PaPdxK remains elusive. To elucidate the substrate-recognition and catalytic mechanisms of PaPdxK, the crystal structure of PaPdxK was determined at a 2.0 Å resolution. The PaPdxK structure possesses a channel that can accommodate substrates and a metallic cofactor. Our structure-based biochemical and mutational analyses in combination with modeling studies suggest that PaPdxK catalysis is mediated by an acid-base mechanism through the catalytic acid Asp225 and a helical dipole moment. PMID:27425248

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  9. Chloro(triphenylphosphole)gold(I) - A selective Chemosensor for Cysteine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Photophysical studies of luminescent gold complex of triphenylphosphole has been described. Addition of biologically relevant thio compounds was found to quench its fluorescence in methanol solution. Based on this, a simple and selective luminescence sensing method for cysteine detection has been developed.

  10. Isolation of recombinant cysteine dioxygenase protein from Trichophyton mentagrophytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašperová, A.; Kunert, J.; Horynová, M.; Weigl, E.; Sebela, M.; Lenobel, René; Raška, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2011), E456-E462. ISSN 0933-7407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cysteine dioxygenase * dermatophytes * recombinant protein * keratinolytic fungi * cDNA Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.247, year: 2011

  11. DISULFIND: A DISULFIDE BONDING STATE AND CYSTEINE CONNECTIVITY PREDICTION SERVER

    OpenAIRE

    Ceroni, A; Passerini, A.; Vullo,A; Frasconi, P.

    2006-01-01

    DISULFIND is a server for predicting the disulfide bonding state of cysteines and their disulfide connectivity starting from sequence alone. Optionally, disulfide connectivity can be predicted from sequence and a bonding state assignment given as input. The output is a simple visualization of the assigned bonding state (with confidence degrees) and the most likely connectivity patterns. The server is available at .

  12. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    sequential C-terminal degradation pattern characteristic of this dipeptylpeptidase. The substrate primary structure was not found to be essential for regulation of the proteolytic activity of the cysteine peptidases studied. However, the degradation patterns obtained imply that calpains are involved in...

  13. Synthesis of Protein Bioconjugates via Cysteine-maleimide Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alexander F; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-01-01

    The chemical linking or bioconjugation of proteins to fluorescent dyes, drugs, polymers and other proteins has a broad range of applications, such as the development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) and nanomedicine, fluorescent microscopy and systems chemistry. For many of these applications, specificity of the bioconjugation method used is of prime concern. The Michael addition of maleimides with cysteine(s) on the target proteins is highly selective and proceeds rapidly under mild conditions, making it one of the most popular methods for protein bioconjugation. We demonstrate here the modification of the only surface-accessible cysteine residue on yeast cytochrome c with a ruthenium(II) bisterpyridine maleimide. The protein bioconjugation is verified by gel electrophoresis and purified by aqueous-based fast protein liquid chromatography in 27% yield of isolated protein material. Structural characterization with MALDI-TOF MS and UV-Vis is then used to verify that the bioconjugation is successful. The protocol shown here is easily applicable to other cysteine - maleimide coupling of proteins to other proteins, dyes, drugs or polymers. PMID:27501061

  14. 21 CFR 184.1271 - L-Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 92-93, which is incorporated by reference. Copies may... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine. 184.1271 Section 184.1271 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1272 - L-Cysteine monohydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...). (b) The ingredient meets the specifications of the “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 92-93... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true L-Cysteine monohydrochloride. 184.1272 Section 184.1272 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  16. Development and Characterization of an Electroless Plated Silver/Cysteine Sensor Platform for the Electrochemical Determination of Aflatoxin B1

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Paul Wacoo; Mathew Ocheng; Deborah Wendiro; Peter California Vuzi; Joseph F. Hawumba

    2016-01-01

    An electroless plated silver/cysteine sensor platform [Glass|silver|cysteine|aflatoxin B1|horseradish peroxidase] for the Electrochemical detection of aflatoxin B1 was developed and characterized. This involved four major steps: (1) an electroless deposition of silver (plating) onto a glass slide, (2) immobilization of cysteine; (3) conjugation of aflatoxin B1 to cysteine groups; and (4) blocking of free cysteine groups with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The binding of cysteine to the silver...

  17. Functional significance of conserved cysteines in the human organic cation transporter 2

    OpenAIRE

    Pelis, Ryan M.; Dangprapai, Yodying; Cheng, Yaofeng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Terpstra, Jennifer; Wright, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    The significance of conserved cysteines in the human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2), namely the six cysteines in the long extracellular loop (loop cysteines) and C474 in transmembrane helix 11, was examined. Uptake of tetraethylammonium (TEA) and 1-methyl-4-phenypyridinium (MPP) into Chinese hamster ovary cells was stimulated >20-fold by hOCT2 expression. Both cell surface expression and transport activity were reduced considerably following mutation of individual loop cysteines (C51, C...

  18. Schistosomiasis mansoni: novel chemotherapy using a cysteine protease inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis is a chronic, debilitating parasitic disease infecting more than 200 million people and is second only to malaria in terms of public health importance. Due to the lack of a vaccine, patient therapy is heavily reliant on chemotherapy with praziquantel as the World Health Organization-recommended drug, but concerns over drug resistance encourage the search for new drug leads. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The efficacy of the vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor K11777 was tested in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni. Disease parameters measured were worm and egg burdens, and organ pathology including hepato- and splenomegaly, presence of parasite egg-induced granulomas in the liver, and levels of circulating alanine aminotransferase activity as a marker of hepatocellular function. K11777 (25 mg/kg twice daily [BID], administered intraperitoneally at the time of parasite migration through the skin and lungs (days 1-14 postinfection [p.i.], resulted in parasitologic cure (elimination of parasite eggs in five of seven cases and a resolution of other disease parameters. K11777 (50 mg/kg BID, administered at the commencement of egg-laying by mature parasites (days 30-37 p.i., reduced worm and egg burdens, and ameliorated organ pathology. Using protease class-specific substrates and active-site labeling, one molecular target of K11777 was identified as the gut-associated cathepsin B1 cysteine protease, although other cysteine protease targets are not excluded. In rodents, dogs, and primates, K11777 is nonmutagenic with satisfactory safety and pharmacokinetic profiles. CONCLUSIONS: The significant reduction in parasite burden and pathology by this vinyl sulfone cysteine protease inhibitor validates schistosome cysteine proteases as drug targets and offers the potential of a new direction for chemotherapy of human schistosomiasis.

  19. Assay of Cysteine in Human Serum with Quinine-Ce4+ Chemiluminescence System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A sensitive and selective chemiluminescence (CL) method was developed for the determination of cysteine. This method is based on that the weak CL of cysteine oxidized with cerium (IV) can be greatly enhanced by quinine, and the total cysteine in human serum can be detected through simply diluting with water, showing a simpler analytical characteristic.

  20. Effects of cysteine on growth, protease production, and catalase activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Himelbloom, B H; Hassan, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Cysteine inhibits growth of and protease production by Pseudomonas fluorescens NC3. Catalase activity in P. fluorescens NC3 was increased by cysteine. The addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide did not increase catalase activity, thus suggesting a role for the endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide via the autoxidation of cysteine.

  1. Catalytic reforming process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  2. Site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modelling studies show the role of Asp82 and cysteines in rat acylase 1, a member of the M20 family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acylase 1 from rat kidney catalyzes the hydrolysis of acyl-amino acids. Sequence alignment has shown that this enzyme belongs to the metalloprotein family M20. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments led to the identification of one functionally important amino acid residue located near one of the zinc coordinating residues, which play a critical role in the enzymatic activity. The D82N- and D82E-substituted forms showed no significant activity and very low activity, respectively, along with a loss of zinc coordination. Molecular modelling investigations indicated a putative role of D82 in ensuring a proper protonation of catalytic histidine. In addition, none of the five cysteine residues present in the rat kidney acylase 1 sequence seemed involved in the catalytic process: the loss of activity induced by the C294A substitution was probably due to a conformational change in the 3D structure

  3. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of l-Cysteine Metabolism: Physiological Role and Fate of l-Cysteine in the Enteric Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    OpenAIRE

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Sato, Dan; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Watanabe, Haruo; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT l-Cysteine is essential for virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to higher eukaryotes. Besides having a role in the synthesis of virtually all proteins and of taurine, cysteamine, glutathione, and other redox-regulating proteins, l-cysteine has important functions under anaerobic/microaerophilic conditions. In anaerobic or microaerophilic protozoan parasites, such as Entamoeba histolytica, l-cysteine has been implicated in growth, attachment, survival, and protection from ox...

  4. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  5. Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine proteases: heterologous expression, purification and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    During germination of barley seeds, mobilization of protein is essential and cysteine proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme and is activated through reduction of the active...... site cysteines and by removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. A cDNA clone of the barley key cysteine endoprotease...

  6. Identification of essential residues in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase. Chemical modification and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the role of cysteine and histidine residues in enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J; Gravel, M; Gao, E; O'Neill, R C; Braun, P E

    2001-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP; EC ) catalyzes in vitro hydrolysis of 3'-phosphodiester bonds in 2',3'-cyclic nucleotides to produce 2'-nucleotides exclusively. N-terminal deletion mapping of the C-terminal two-thirds of recombinant rat CNP1 identified a region that possesses the catalytic domain, with further truncations abolishing activity. Proteolysis and kinetic analysis indicated that this domain forms a compact globular structure and contains all of the catalytically essential features. Subsequently, this catalytic fragment of CNP1 (CNP-CF) was used for chemical modification studies to identify amino acid residues essential for activity. 5,5'-Dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) modification studies and kinetic analysis of cysteine CNP-CF mutants revealed the nonessential role of cysteines for enzymatic activity. On the other hand, modification studies with diethyl pyrocarbonate indicated that two histidines are essential for CNPase activity. Consequently, the only two conserved histidines, His-230 and His-309, were mutated to phenylalanine and leucine. All four histidine mutants had k(cat) values 1000-fold lower than wild-type CNP-CF, but K(m) values were similar. Circular dichroism studies demonstrated that the low catalytic activities of the histidine mutants were not due to gross changes in secondary structure. Taken together, these results demonstrate that both histidines assume critical roles for catalysis. PMID:11278504

  7. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  8. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  9. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  10. Importance of lysosomal cysteine proteases in lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman Harold A; Wolters Paul J

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The human lysosomal cysteine proteases are a family of 11 proteases whose members include cathepsins B, C, H, L, and S. The biology of these proteases was largely ignored for decades because of their lysosomal location and the belief that their function was limited to the terminal degradation of proteins. In the past 10 years, this view has changed as these proteases have been found to have specific functions within cells. This review highlights some of these functions, specifically ...

  11. The maize cystatin CC9 interacts with apoplastic cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    van der Linde, Karina; Mueller, André N.; Hemetsberger, Christoph; Kashani, Farnusch; Van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    In a recent study we identified corn cystain9 (CC9) as a novel compatibility factor for the interaction of the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis with its host plant maize. CC9 is transcriptionally induced during the compatible interaction with U. maydis and localizes in the maize apoplast where it inhibits apoplastic papain-like cysteine proteases. The proteases are activated during incompatible interaction and salicylic acid (SA) treatment and, in turn, are sufficient to induce SA signa...

  12. Hypothiocyanous acid oxidation of tubulin cysteines inhibits microtubule polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Hillary M; Hagedorn, Tara D.; Landino, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. In addition, protein thiol redox reactions are increasingly identified as a mechanism to regulate protein structure and function. We assessed the effect of hypothiocyanous acid on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by hypothiocyanous and hypochlorous acids was monitored by labeling tubulin with 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein and by detecting higher molecula...

  13. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  14. Human lamin B contains a farnesylated cysteine residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently showed that HeLa cell lamin B is modified by a mevalonic acid derivative. Here we identified the modified amino acid, determined its mode of linkage to the mevalonic acid derivative, and established the derivative's structure. A cysteine residue is modified because experiments with lamin B that had been biosynthetically labeled with [3H]mevalonic acid or [35S]cysteine and then extensively digested with proteases yielded 3H- or 35S-labeled products that co-chromatographed in five successive systems. A thioether linkage rather than a thioester linkage is involved because the mevalonic acid derivative could be released from the 3H-labeled products in a pentane-extractable form by treatment with Raney nickel but not with methanolic KOH. The derivative is a farnesyl moiety because the Raney nickel-released material was identified as 2,6,10-trimethyl-2,6,10-dodecatriene by a combination of gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The thioether-modified cysteine residue appears to be located near the carboxyl end of lamin B because treatment of 3H-labeled lamin B with cyanogen bromide yielded a single labeled polypeptide that mapped toward this end of the cDNA-inferred sequence of human lamin B

  15. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  16. Coordination behavior of ligand based on NNS and NNO donors with ruthenium(III) complexes and their catalytic and DNA interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, R.; Viswnathamurthi, P.

    2012-11-01

    Reactions of 2-acetylpyridine-thiosemicarbazone HL1, 2-acetylpyridine-4-methyl-thiosemicarbazone HL2, 2-acetylpyridine-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone HL3 and 2-acetylpyridine-semicarbazone HL4 with ruthenium(III) precursor complexes were studied and the products were characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, EPR and EI-MS) methods. The ligands coordinated with the ruthenium(III) ion via pyridine nitrogen, azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur/enolate oxygen. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the complexes based on the studies. All the complexes are redox active and display an irreversible and quasireversible metal centered redox processes. Further, the catalytic activity of the new complexes has been investigated for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones in the presence of isopropanol/KOH and the Kumada-Corriu coupling of aryl halides with aryl Grignard reagents. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  17. Copper Inhibits the Protease from Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 by Both Cysteine-Dependent and Cysteine-Independent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlstrom, Anders R.; Levine, Rodney L.

    1991-07-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic protease lacking cysteine residues was not inhibited by exposure to copper. However, addition of dithiothreitol as an exogenous thiol rendered even the synthetic protease susceptible to inactivation by copper. Oxygen was not required for inactivation of either the wild-type or the synthetic protease. These results provide the basis for the design of novel types of protease inhibitors.

  18. Copper inhibits the protease from human immunodeficiency virus 1 by both cysteine-dependent and cysteine-independent mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    Karlström, A R; Levine, R L

    1991-01-01

    The protease of the human immunodeficiency virus is essential for replication of the virus, and the enzyme is therefore an attractive target for antiviral action. We have found that the viral protease is inhibited by approximately stoichiometric concentrations of copper or mercury ions. Inactivation by Cu2+ was rapid and not reversed by subsequent exposure to EDTA or dithiothreitol. Direct inhibition by Cu2+ required the presence of cysteine residue(s) in the protease. Thus, a synthetic prote...

  19. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  20. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn 175 in plant thiol protease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tapas K Nandi; Hridoy R Bairagya; Bishnu P Mukhopadhyay; K Sekar; Dipankar Sukul; Asim K Bera

    2009-03-01

    The role of invariant water molecules in the activity of plant cysteine protease is ubiquitous in nature. On analysing the 11 different Protein DataBank (PDB) structures of plant thiol proteases, the two invariant water molecules W1 and W2 (W220 and W222 in the template 1PPN structure) were observed to form H-bonds with the Ob atom of Asn 175. Extensive energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation studies up to 2 ns on all the PDB and solvated structures clearly revealed the involvement of the H-bonding association of the two water molecules in fixing the orientation of the asparagine residue of the catalytic triad. From this study, it is suggested that H-bonding of the water molecule at the W1 invariant site better stabilizes the Asn residue at the active site of the catalytic triad.

  1. Structure and function of C-terminal catalytic region of pasteurella multocida toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is one of virulence factors responsible for the pathogenesis in some Pasteurellosis. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of PMT (C-PMT), which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-PMT displays three different domains designated C1, C2 and C3. We found in the C3 domain the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying the Cys-His-Asp triad. Our results demonstrate that PMT is an enzymatic toxin carrying the cysteine-protease like catalytic triad, which is organized only under reducing conditions. (author)

  2. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  3. Catalytic DNA with phosphatase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekar, Jagadeeswaran; Silverman, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic DNA sequences (deoxyribozymes, DNA enzymes, or DNAzymes) have been identified by in vitro selection for various catalytic activities. Expanding the limits of DNA catalysis is an important fundamental objective and may facilitate practical utility of catalysts that can be obtained from entirely unbiased (random) sequence populations. In this study, we show that DNA can catalyze Zn2+-dependent phosphomonoester hydrolysis of tyrosine and serine side chains (i.e., exhibit phosphatase ac...

  4. Cadmium(II) complex formation with cysteine and penicillamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilehvand, Farideh; Leung, Bonnie O; Mah, Vicky

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation between cadmium(II) and the ligands cysteine (H(2)Cys) and penicillamine (H(2)Pen = 3,3'-dimethylcysteine) in aqueous solutions, having C(Cd(II)) approximately 0.1 mol dm(-3) and C(H(2)L) = 0.2-2 mol dm(-3), was studied at pH = 7.5 and 11.0 by means of (113)Cd NMR and Cd K- and L(3)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For all cadmium(II)-cysteine molar ratios, the mean Cd-S and Cd-(N/O) bond distances were found in the ranges 2.52-2.54 and 2.27-2.35 A, respectively. The corresponding cadmium(II)-penicillamine complexes showed slightly shorter Cd-S bonds, 2.50-2.53 A, but with the Cd-(N/O) bond distances in a similar wide range, 2.28-2.33 A. For the molar ratio C(H(2)L)/C(Cd(II)) = 2, the (113)Cd chemical shifts, in the range 509-527 ppm at both pH values, indicated complexes with distorted tetrahedral CdS(2)N(N/O) coordination geometry. With a large excess of cysteine (molar ratios C(H(2)Cys)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10), complexes with CdS(4) coordination geometry dominate, consistent with the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 680 ppm at pH 7.5 and 636-658 ppm at pH 11.0, and their mean Cd-S distances were 2.53 +/- 0.02 A. At pH 7.5, the complexes are almost exclusively sulfur-coordinated as [Cd(S-cysteinate)(4)](n-), while at higher pH, the deprotonation of the amine groups promotes chelate formation. At pH 11.0, a minor amount of the [Cd(Cys)(3)](4-) complex with CdS(3)N coordination is formed. For the corresponding penicillamine solutions with molar ratios C(H(2)Pen)/C(Cd(II)) >or= 10, the (113)Cd NMR chemical shifts, delta approximately 600 ppm at pH 7.5 and 578 ppm at pH 11.0, together with the average bond distances, Cd-S 2.53 +/- 0.02 A and Cd-(N/O) 2.30-2.33 A, indicate that [Cd(penicillaminate)(3)](n-) complexes with chelating CdS(3)(N/O) coordination dominate already at pH 7.5 and become mixed with CdS(2)N(N/O) complexes at pH 11.0. The present study reveals differences between cysteine and penicillamine as ligands to the

  5. Activated human CD4 T cells express transporters for both cysteine and cystine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levring, Trine Bøegh; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Nielsen, Bodil Lisbeth;

    2012-01-01

    Because naïve T cells are unable to import cystine due to the absence of cystine transporters, it has been suggested that T cell activation is dependent on cysteine generated by antigen presenting cells. The aim of this study was to determine at which phases during T cell activation exogenous...... cystine/cysteine is required and how T cells meet this requirement. We found that early activation of T cells is independent of exogenous cystine/cysteine, whereas T cell proliferation is strictly dependent of uptake of exogenous cystine/cysteine. Naïve T cells express no or very low levels of both...... cystine and cysteine transporters. However, we found that these transporters become strongly up-regulated during T cell activation and provide activated T cells with the required amount of cystine/cysteine needed for T cell proliferation. Thus, T cells are equipped with mechanisms that allow T cell...

  6. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  7. Biosynthesis and Reactivity of Cysteine Persulfides in Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pramod K; Martinov, Michael; Vitvitsky, Victor; Seravalli, Javier; Wedmann, Rudolf; Filipovic, Milos R; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-13

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) elicits pleiotropic physiological effects ranging from modulation of cardiovascular to CNS functions. A dominant method for transmission of sulfide-based signals is via posttranslational modification of reactive cysteine thiols to persulfides. However, the source of the persulfide donor and whether its relationship to H2S is as a product or precursor is controversial. The transsulfuration pathway enzymes can synthesize cysteine persulfide (Cys-SSH) from cystine and H2S from cysteine and/or homocysteine. Recently, Cys-SSH was proposed as the primary product of the transsulfuration pathway with H2S representing a decomposition product of Cys-SSH. Our detailed kinetic analyses demonstrate a robust capacity for Cys-SSH production by the human transsulfuration pathway enzymes, cystathionine beta-synthase and γ-cystathionase (CSE) and for homocysteine persulfide synthesis from homocystine by CSE only. However, in the reducing cytoplasmic milieu where the concentration of reduced thiols is significantly higher than of disulfides, substrate level regulation favors the synthesis of H2S over persulfides. Mathematical modeling at physiologically relevant hepatic substrate concentrations predicts that H2S rather than Cys-SSH is the primary product of the transsulfuration enzymes with CSE being the dominant producer. The half-life of the metastable Cys-SSH product is short and decomposition leads to a mixture of polysulfides (Cys-S-(S)n-S-Cys). These in vitro data, together with the intrinsic reactivity of Cys-SSH for cysteinyl versus sulfur transfer, are consistent with the absence of an observable increase in protein persulfidation in cells in response to exogenous cystine and evidence for the formation of polysulfides under these conditions. PMID:26667407

  8. Characterization of Cysteine Coated Magnetite Nanoparticles as MRI Contrast Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza Ahmadi; Ning Gu; Hamid Reza Madaah Hosseini

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a kind of stabilized ferrofluid based on magnetite nanoparticles (mean core and its coating size about 21.9 and 1.6 nm, respectively) was synthesized via coprecipitation method. Cysteine was used as surfactant due to its proper conjunction to the surface of magnetite nanoparticles. Coating density and synthesized ferrofluids were characterized by using transmission electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, dynamic light scattering and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. Magnetic resonance imaging studies show that the synthesized ferrofluid can be used as a potential contrast enhancement agent especially for imaging lymphatic system.

  9. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate e...

  10. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Judge Bryan S; James Laura P; Green Jody L; Heard Kennon J; Zolot Liza; Rhyee Sean; Dart Richard C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS) are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from ...

  11. Irreversible effect of cysteine protease inhibitors on the release of malaria parasites from infected erythrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Glushakova, Svetlana; Mazar, Julia; Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F; Hama, Erinn; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2008-01-01

    By studying the inactivation of malaria parasite culture by cysteine protease inhibition using confocal microscopy of living cells, and electron microscopy of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted cells, we report the precise step in the release of malaria parasites from erythrocytes that is likely regulated by cysteine proteases: the opening of the erythrocyte membrane, liberating parasites for the next round of infection. Inhibition of cysteine proteases within the last few minutes of...

  12. Excretory bladder: the source of cysteine proteases in Paragonimus westermani metacercariae

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun-Jong; Chung, Young-Bae; Kang, Shin-Yong; Kong, Yoon; Cho, Seung-Yull

    2002-01-01

    The cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani metacercariae are involved in metacercarial excystment, host immune modulation, and possibly in tissue penetration. In order to clarify the origin of the enzymes, 28 and 27 kDa cysteine proteases in metacercarial excretory-secretory products were purified through the FPLC system using Mono Q column chromatography. The polyclonal antibodies to the enzymes were produced in BALB/c mice. Immunolocalization studies revealed that both cysteine protea...

  13. α-Ketoheterocycles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    OpenAIRE

    Steert, Koen; Berg, Maya; Mottram, Jeremy C.; Westrop, Gareth D.; Coombs, Graham H; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Joossens, Jurgen; Van der Veken, Pieter; Haemers, Achiel; Augustyns, Koen

    2010-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes and also play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites. Inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Inspired by the in vivo antiparasitic activity of the vinyl sulfone based cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs), a series of α-ketoheterocycles 1-15 has been developed as reversible inhibitors of a r...

  14. Cysteine proteases as therapeutic targets: does selectivity matter? A systematic review of calpain and cathepsin inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Marton Siklos; Manel BenAissa; Thatcher, Gregory R.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases continue to provide validated targets for treatment of human diseases. In neurodegenerative disorders, multiple cysteine proteases provide targets for enzyme inhibitors, notably caspases, calpains, and cathepsins. The reactive, active-site cysteine provides specificity for many inhibitor designs over other families of proteases, such as aspartate and serine; however, a) inhibitor strategies often use covalent enzyme modification, and b) obtaining selectivity within families...

  15. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB

    OpenAIRE

    Schroder, J.; S. Noack; Marhofer, R.J.; Mottram, J. C.; Coombs, G.H.; Selzer, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas’ disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput sc...

  16. Quantitative Mapping of Reversible Mitochondrial Complex I Cysteine Oxidation in a Parkinson Disease Mouse Model*

    OpenAIRE

    Danielson, Steven R.; Held, Jason M.; Oo, May; Riley, Rebeccah; Bradford W Gibson; Julie K. Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Differential cysteine oxidation within mitochondrial Complex I has been quantified in an in vivo oxidative stress model of Parkinson disease. We developed a strategy that incorporates rapid and efficient immunoaffinity purification of Complex I followed by differential alkylation and quantitative detection using sensitive mass spectrometry techniques. This method allowed us to quantify the reversible cysteine oxidation status of 34 distinct cysteine residues out of a total 130 present in muri...

  17. Cysteine-associated distribution of aromatic residues in disulfide-stabilized extracellular protein families

    OpenAIRE

    H. Tina Guraya; Melissa A. Sealie; Stephen R. Campion; Jeffrey D. Longenberger

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine-dependent protein sequences were downloaded from annotated database resources to generate comprehensive EGF, Sushi, Laminin and Immu- noglobulin (IgC) motif-specific sequence files. Each dataset was vertically registered and the cumulative distribution of amino acid functional group chemistry determined relative to the respective complement of cysteine residues providing critical disulfide stabilization of these four well-known modular motif families. The cysteine-aligned amino acid...

  18. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is ...

  19. Functional contribution of cysteine residues to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope.

    OpenAIRE

    Tschachler, E; Buchow, H; Gallo, R C; Reitz, M S

    1990-01-01

    Although the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 shows considerable strain variability, cysteine residues of the envelope protein are strongly conserved, suggesting that they are important to the envelope structure. We constructed and analyzed mutants of a biologically active molecular clone of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in which different cysteines were replaced by other amino acids in order to determine their functional importance. Substitution of cysteines 296 and...

  20. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling sys...

  1. Convergent evolution of cysteine-rich proteins in feathers and hair

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, Bettina; Mlitz, Veronika; Hermann, Marcela; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Background Feathers and hair consist of cornified epidermal keratinocytes in which proteins are crosslinked via disulfide bonds between cysteine residues of structural proteins to establish mechanical resilience. Cysteine-rich keratin-associated proteins (KRTAPs) are important components of hair whereas the molecular components of feathers have remained incompletely known. Recently, we have identified a chicken gene, named epidermal differentiation cysteine-rich protein (EDCRP), that encodes ...

  2. Selective metal binding to Cys-78 within endonuclease V causes an inhibition of catalytic activities without altering nontarget and target DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T4 endonuclease V is a pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA repair enzyme which has been previously shown not to require metal ions for either of its two catalytic activities or its DNA binding function. However, we have investigated whether the single cysteine within the enzyme was able to bind metal salts and influence the various activities of this repair enzyme. A series of metals (Hg2+, Ag+, Cu+) were shown to inactivate both endonuclease Vs pyrimidine dimer-specific DNA glycosylase activity and the subsequent apurinic nicking activity. The binding of metal to endonuclease V did not interfere with nontarget DNA scanning or pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. The Cys-78 codon within the endonuclease V gene was changed by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to Thr-78 and Ser-78 in order to determine whether the native cysteine was directly involved in the enzyme's DNA catalytic activities and whether the cysteine was primarily responsible for the metal binding. The mutant enzymes were able to confer enhanced ultraviolet light (UV) resistance to DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli at levels equal to that conferred by the wild type enzyme. The C78T mutant enzyme was purified to homogeneity and shown to be catalytically active on pyrimidine dimer-containing DNA. The catalytic activities of the C78T mutant enzyme were demonstrated to be unaffected by the addition of Hg2+ or Ag+ at concentrations 1000-fold greater than that required to inhibit the wild type enzyme. These data suggest that the cysteine is not required for enzyme activity but that the binding of certain metals to that amino acid block DNA incision by either preventing a conformational change in the enzyme after it has bound to a pyrimidine dimer or sterically interfering with the active site residue's accessibility to the pyrimidine dimer

  3. Cysteine Prevents the Reduction in Keratin Synthesis Induced by Iron Deficiency in Human Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Irace, Carlo; Capuozzo, Antonella; Piccolo, Marialuisa; Di Pascale, Antonio; Russo, Annapina; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Lepre, Fabio; Russo, Giulia; Santamaria, Rita

    2016-02-01

    L-cysteine is currently recognized as a conditionally essential sulphur amino acid. Besides contributing to many biological pathways, cysteine is a key component of the keratin protein by its ability to form disulfide bridges that confer strength and rigidity to the protein. In addition to cysteine, iron represents another critical factor in regulating keratins expression in epidermal tissues, as well as in hair follicle growth and maturation. By focusing on human keratinocytes, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cysteine supplementation as nutraceutical on keratin biosynthesis, as well as to get an insight on the interplay of cysteine availability and cellular iron status in regulating keratins expression in vitro. Herein we demonstrate that cysteine promotes a significant up-regulation of keratins expression as a result of de novo protein synthesis, while the lack of iron impairs keratin expression. Interestingly, cysteine supplementation counteracts the adverse effect of iron deficiency on cellular keratin expression. This effect was likely mediated by the up-regulation of transferrin receptor and ferritin, the main cellular proteins involved in iron homeostasis, at last affecting the labile iron pool. In this manner, cysteine may also enhance the metabolic iron availability for DNA synthesis without creating a detrimental condition of iron overload. To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the first study in an in vitro keratinocyte model providing evidence that cysteine and iron cooperate for keratins expression, indicative of their central role in maintaining healthy epithelia. PMID:26212225

  4. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Jaspreet S; McLuskey, Karen; Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K; Burchmore, Richard J; Coombs, Graham H; Schnaufer, Achim; Mottram, Jeremy C

    2016-04-29

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His(99) and Cys(136)), and an Asp (Asp(134)) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  5. PNT1 Is a C11 Cysteine Peptidase Essential for Replication of the Trypanosome Kinetoplast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Myburgh, Elmarie; Wilkes, Jonathan; Brown, Elaine; Lemgruber, Leandro; Gould, Matthew K.; Burchmore, Richard J.; Coombs, Graham H.; Schnaufer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a C11 peptidase PmC11 from the gut bacterium, Parabacteroides merdae, has recently been determined, enabling the identification and characterization of a C11 orthologue, PNT1, in the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma brucei. A phylogenetic analysis identified PmC11 orthologues in bacteria, archaea, Chromerids, Coccidia, and Kinetoplastida, the latter being the most divergent. A primary sequence alignment of PNT1 with clostripain and PmC11 revealed the position of the characteristic His-Cys catalytic dyad (His99 and Cys136), and an Asp (Asp134) in the potential S1 binding site. Immunofluorescence and cryoelectron microscopy revealed that PNT1 localizes to the kinetoplast, an organelle containing the mitochondrial genome of the parasite (kDNA), with an accumulation of the protein at or near the antipodal sites. Depletion of PNT1 by RNAi in the T. brucei bloodstream form was lethal both in in vitro culture and in vivo in mice and the induced population accumulated cells lacking a kinetoplast. In contrast, overexpression of PNT1 led to cells having mislocated kinetoplasts. RNAi depletion of PNT1 in a kDNA independent cell line resulted in kinetoplast loss but was viable, indicating that PNT1 is required exclusively for kinetoplast maintenance. Expression of a recoded wild-type PNT1 allele, but not of an active site mutant restored parasite viability after induction in vitro and in vivo confirming that the peptidase activity of PNT1 is essential for parasite survival. These data provide evidence that PNT1 is a cysteine peptidase that is required exclusively for maintenance of the trypanosome kinetoplast. PMID:26940875

  6. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify. PMID:27172378

  7. Copper oxide assisted cysteine hierarchical structures for immunosensor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Chandra Mouli [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Sumana, Gajjala, E-mail: sumanagajjala@gmail.com [Biomedical Instrumentation Section, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Tiwari, Ida [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-09-08

    The present work describes the promising electrochemical immunosensing strategy based on copper (II) assisted hierarchical cysteine structures (CuCys) varying from star to flower like morphology. The CuCys having average size of 10 μm have been synthesised using L-Cysteine as initial precursor in presence of copper oxide under environmentally friendly conditions in aqueous medium. To delineate the synthesis mechanism, detailed structural investigations have been carried out using characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behaviour of self-assembled CuCys on gold electrode shows surface controlled electrode reaction with an apparent electron transfer rate constant of 3.38 × 10{sup −4 }cm s{sup −1}. This innovative platform has been utilized to fabricate an immunosensor by covalently immobilizing monoclonal antibodies specific for Escherichia coli O157:H7 (E. coli). Under the optimal conditions, the fabricated immunosensor is found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of E. coli with a detection limit of 10 cfu/ml.

  8. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  9. Density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of cysteine protease inhibition by nitrile-based inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visser, Sam; Quesne, Matthew; Ward, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Cysteine protease enzymes are important for human physiology and catalyze key protein degradation pathways. These enzymes react via a nucleophilic reaction mechanism that involves a cysteine residue and the proton of a proximal histidine. Particularly efficient inhibitors of these enzymes are nitrile-based, however, the details of the catalytic reaction mechanism currently are poorly understood. To gain further insight into the inhibition of these molecules, we have performed a combined density functional theory and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study on the reaction of a nitrile-based inhibitor with the enzyme active site amino acids. We show here that small perturbations to the inhibitor structure can have dramatic effects on the catalysis and inhibition processes. Thus, we investigated a range of inhibitor templates and show that specific structural changes reduce the inhibitory efficiency by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, as the reaction takes place on a polar surface, we find strong differences between the DFT and QM/MM calculated energetics. In particular, the DFT model led to dramatic distortions from the starting structure and the convergence to a structure that would not fit the enzyme active site. In the subsequent QM/MM study we investigated the use of mechanical versus electronic embedding on the kinetics, thermodynamics and geometries along the reaction mechanism. We find minor effects on the kinetics of the reaction but large geometric and thermodynamics differences as a result of inclusion of electronic embedding corrections. The work here highlights the importance of model choice in the investigation of this biochemical reaction mechanism.

  10. Hydrogen bonding to the cysteine ligand of superoxide reductase: acid-base control of the reaction intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremey, Emilie; Bonnot, Florence; Moreau, Yohann; Berthomieu, Catherine; Desbois, Alain; Favaudon, Vincent; Blondin, Geneviève; Houée-Levin, Chantal; Nivière, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron metalloenzyme that detoxifies superoxide radical in microorganisms. Its active site consists of an unusual non-heme Fe(2+) center in a [His4Cys1] square pyramidal pentacoordination, with the axial cysteine ligand proposed to be an essential feature in catalysis. Two NH peptide groups from isoleucine 118 and histidine 119 establish hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand (Desulfoarculus baarsii SOR numbering). To investigate the catalytic role of these hydrogen bonds, the isoleucine 118 residue of the SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii was mutated into alanine, aspartate, or serine residues. Resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the mutations specifically induced an increase of the strength of the Fe(3+)-S(Cys) and S-Cβ(Cys) bonds as well as a change in conformation of the cysteinyl side chain, which was associated with the alteration of the NH hydrogen bonding involving the sulfur ligand. The effects of the isoleucine mutations on the reactivity of SOR with O2 (•-) were investigated by pulse radiolysis. These studies showed that the mutations induced a specific increase of the pK a of the first reaction intermediate, recently proposed to be an Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) species. These data were supported by density functional theory calculations conducted on three models of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) intermediate, with one, two, or no hydrogen bonds involving the sulfur ligand. Our results demonstrated that the hydrogen bonds between the NH (peptide) and the cysteine ligand tightly control the rate of protonation of the Fe(2+)-O2 (•-) reaction intermediate to form an Fe(3+)-OOH species. PMID:23917995

  11. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  12. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  13. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  14. Distinct and stage specific nuclear factors regulate the expression of falcipains, Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra Pawan; Chauhan Virander S; Sunil Sujatha

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum cysteine proteases (falcipains) play indispensable roles in parasite infection and development, especially in the process of host erythrocyte rupture/invasion and hemoglobin degradation. No detailed molecular analysis of transcriptional regulation of parasite proteases especially cysteine proteases has yet been reported. In this study, using a combination of transient transfection assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA), we demonstrate...

  15. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  16. Identification of Covalent Binding Sites Targeting Cysteines Based on Computational Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Zhang, Danfeng; Tian, Haozhong; Jiao, Yu; Shi, Zhihao; Ran, Ting; Liu, Haichun; Lu, Shuai; Xu, Anyang; Qiao, Xin; Pan, Jing; Yin, Lingfeng; Zhou, Weineng; Lu, Tao; Chen, Yadong

    2016-09-01

    Covalent drugs have attracted increasing attention in recent years due to good inhibitory activity and selectivity. Targeting noncatalytic cysteines with irreversible inhibitors is a powerful approach for enhancing pharmacological potency and selectivity because cysteines can form covalent bonds with inhibitors through their nucleophilic thiol groups. However, most human kinases have multiple noncatalytic cysteines within the active site; to accurately predict which cysteine is most likely to form covalent bonds is of great importance but remains a challenge when designing irreversible inhibitors. In this work, FTMap was first applied to check its ability in predicting covalent binding site defined as the region where covalent bonds are formed between cysteines and irreversible inhibitors. Results show that it has excellent performance in detecting the hot spots within the binding pocket, and its hydrogen bond interaction frequency analysis could give us some interesting instructions for identification of covalent binding cysteines. Furthermore, we proposed a simple but useful covalent fragment probing approach and showed that it successfully predicted the covalent binding site of seven targets. By adopting a distance-based method, we observed that the closer the nucleophiles of covalent warheads are to the thiol group of a cysteine, the higher the possibility that a cysteine is prone to form a covalent bond. We believe that the combination of FTMap and our distance-based covalent fragment probing method can become a useful tool in detecting the covalent binding site of these targets. PMID:27483186

  17. Sulfur amino acid metabolism in children with severe childhood undernutrition: cysteine kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children with edematous but not nonedematous severe childhood undernutrition (SCU) have lower plasma and erythrocyte-free concentrations of cysteine, the rate-limiting precursor of glutathione synthesis. We propose that these lower cysteine concentrations are due to reduced production secondary to s...

  18. Binuclear ruthenium(III) bis(thiosemicarbazone) complexes: Synthesis, spectral, electrochemical studies and catalytic oxidation of alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Subarkhan, M.; Ramesh, R.

    2015-03-01

    A new series of binuclear ruthenium(III) thiosemicarbazone complexes of general formula [(EPh3)2(X)2Ru-L-Ru(X)2(EPh3)2] (where E = P or As; X = Cl or Br; L = NS chelating bis(thiosemicarbazone ligands) has been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, UV-Vis and EPR). IR spectra show that the thiosemicarbazones behave as monoanionic bidentate ligands coordinating through the azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulphur. The electronic spectra of the complexes indicate that the presence of d-d and intense LMCT transitions in the visible region. The complexes are paramagnetic (low spin d5) in nature and all the complexes show rhombic distortion around the ruthenium ion with three different 'g' values (gx ≠ gy ≠ gz) at 77 K. All the complexes are redox active and exhibit an irreversible metal centered redox processes (RuIII-RuIII/RuIV-RuIV; RuIII-RuIII/RuII-RuII) within the potential range of 0.38-0.86 V and -0.39 to -0.66 V respectively, versus Ag/AgCl. Further, the catalytic efficiency of one of the complexes [Ru2Cl2(AsPh3)4(L1)] (4) has been investigated in the case of oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols into their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide(NMO) as co-oxidant. The formation of high valent RuVdbnd O species is proposed as catalytic intermediate for the catalytic cycle.

  19. Replication of murine coronavirus requires multiple cysteines in the endodomain of spike protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinhua; Lv, Jun; Wang, Yuyan; Gao, Shuang; Yao, Qianqian; Qu, Di; Ye, Rong, E-mail: yerong24@fudan.edu.cn

    2012-06-05

    A conserved cysteine-rich motif located between the transmembrane domain and the endodomain is essential for membrane fusion and assembly of coronavirus spike (S) protein. Here, we proved that three cysteines within the motif, but not dependent on position, are minimally required for the survival of the recombinant mouse hepatitis virus. When the carboxy termini with these mutated motifs of S proteins were respectively introduced into a heterogeneous protein, both incorporation into lipid rafts and S-palmitoylation of these recombinant proteins showed a similar quantity requirement to cysteine residues. Meanwhile, the redistribution of these proteins on cellular surface indicated that the absence of the positively charged rather than cysteine residues in the motif might lead the dramatic reduction in syncytial formation of some mutants with the deleted motifs. These results suggest that multiple cysteine as well as charged residues concurrently improves the membrane-associated functions of S protein in viral replication and cytopathogenesis.

  20. A fluorescence enhancement probe based on BODIPY for the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Deyan; Tian, Yuejun; Yang, Chengduan; Iqbal, Anam; Wang, Zhiping; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Zhu, Xiangtao; Guo, Huichen

    2016-11-15

    Herein, a fluorescent probe BODIPY-based glyoxal hydrazone (BODIPY-GH) (1) for cysteine based on inhibiting of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) quenching process upon reaction with the unsaturated aldehyde has been synthesized, which exhibits longer excitation wavelength, selective and sensitive colorimetric and fluorimetric response toward cysteine in natural media. The probe shows highly selectivity towards cysteine over homocysteine and glutathione as well as other amino acids with a significant fluorescence enhancement response within 15min In the presence of 50 equiv. of homocysteine, the emission increased slightly within 15min and completed in 2.5h to reach its maximum intensity. Therefore, the discrimination of cysteine from homocysteine and glutathione can be achieved through detection of probe 1. It shows low cytotoxicity and excellent membrane permeability toward living cells, which was successfully applied to detect and image intracellular cysteine effectively by confocal fluorescence imaging. PMID:27176916

  1. Production of hydrogen sulfide from D-cysteine and its therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NorihiroShibuya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that H2S has physiological functions in various tissues and organs. It includes regulation of neuronal activity, vascular tension, a release of insulin, and protection of the heart, kidney and brain from ischemic insult. H2S is produced by enzymes from L-cysteine; cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST along with cysteine aminotransferase (CAT. We recently discovered an additional pathway for the production of H2S from D-cysteine. D-Amino acid oxidase (DAO provides 3-mercaptopyruvate (3MP for 3MST to produce H2S. D-Cysteine protects cerebellar neurons from oxidative stress and attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury caused in the kidney more effectively than L-cysteine. This review focuses on a novel pathway for the production of H2S and its therapeutic application especially to the renal diseases.

  2. Investigation of redox activities of soil humic acids using 3D excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy%基于三维荧光光谱特征研究土壤腐殖质氧化还原特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜杰; 李黎; 孙国新

    2012-01-01

    Humic substances serve as electron shuttles in the soil environment. They not only stimulate the element migration, but also accelerate containment degradation and environment remediation. In this study, a standard humic acid and two extracted humic acids from soil samples were reduced by H2, and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM) was employed to characterize these humic acids. The results of 3DEEMs revealed the differences between native and reduced humic acids. Fluorescence peak intensity of humic acids in the reduced state was lower than those in the natural state, which can be explained by the changes of chemical structures of humic acids, such as the loss of π-π bonds. As a model compound of quinone groups in humic acids, benzoquinone reduction and 3DEEM analysis were carried out under the same conditions. It was observed that there was a decrease of fluorescence with benzoquinone reduction. Potassium ferricyanide method was used to measure the reducing capacity of native extracted humic acids, which was found to be 0. 998 and 0. 465 meq. g-1 C for Yingtan and Taoyuan soils, respectively. Electron accepting capacities of humic acids were 3. 384 and 1.187 meq-g 1 C for Yingtan and Taoyuan soils, respectively. Determination of electron accepting capacities, quantification of redox-active functional groups and prediction of redox reaction processes in soil are all important applications of 3 DEEM in the investigation of humic acid redox-activities.%以国际腐殖质协会腐殖酸和实验室提纯腐殖酸为研究对象,发现被H2还原前后腐殖酸的三维荧光光谱明显不同,但有共同的变化趋势:还原态腐殖酸的三维荧光光谱图的波峰荧光强度均明显低于还原前,说明腐殖酸还原过程有类似π-π化学键断开的结构变化.对苯醌是腐殖酸氧化还原醌基官能团的代表化合物,将其还原前后与腐殖酸还原前后的荧光光

  3. The role of lysosomal cysteine proteases in crustacean immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FL Garcia-Carreño

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the long course of evolution and under the selective pressure exerted by pathogens and parasites, animals have selectively fixed a number of defense mechanisms against the constant attack of intruders. The immune response represents a key component to optimize the biological fitness of individuals. Two decades ago, prevention and control of diseases in crustacean aquaculture systems were considered priorities in most shrimp-producing countries, but knowledge was scarce and various pathogens have severely affected aquaculture development around the world. Scientific contributions have improved our understanding of the crustacean immune response. Several studies confirm the central role played by proteases in the immune response of animals, and the cooperative interaction of these enzymes in a wide variety of organisms is well known. This review summarizes the current information regarding the role of cysteine proteases in the immune system of Crustacea and points to aspects that are needed to provide a better integration of our knowledge.

  4. Development of 68Ga ethyl cysteinate dimer for PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work development of 68Ga-ethyl cysteinate dimer (68Ga-ECD) a 68Ga tracer for possible cerebral blood flow based on 99mTc ECD homolog is reported. 68Ga-ECD was prepared using generator-based 68GaCl3 and ECD at optimized conditions. Quality control, stability, partition co-efficient and the biodistribution of the tracer (by tissue counting and PET/CT in rats) was studied. Significant metabolism of the lipophilic tracer into water soluble metabolite(s) led to urinary excretion of the tracer, un-comparable to that of homologous 99mTc-compound. Cardiac uptake of the complex suggests formation of a possible lipophil cationic complex and/or metabolite. (author)

  5. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines

  6. Cysteine modified polyaniline films improve biocompatibility for two cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yslas, Edith I., E-mail: eyslas@exa.unrc.edu.ar [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Cavallo, Pablo; Acevedo, Diego F.; Barbero, César A. [Departamento de Química, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina); Rivarola, Viviana A. [Departamento de Biología Molecular, Universidad Nacional de Río Cuarto, Agencia Postal Nro3, X580BYA Río Cuarto (Argentina)

    2015-06-01

    This work focuses on one of the most exciting application areas of conjugated conducting polymers, which is cell culture and tissue engineering. To improve the biocompatibility of conducting polymers we present an easy method that involves the modification of the polymer backbone using L-cysteine. In this publication, we show the synthesis of polyaniline (PANI) films supported onto Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films, and modified using cysteine (PANI-Cys) in order to generate a biocompatible substrate for cell culture. The PANI-Cys films are characterized by Fourier Transform infrared and UV–visible spectroscopy. The changes in the hydrophilicity of the polymer films after and before the modification were tested using contact angle measurements. After modification the contact angle changes from 86° ± 1 to 90° ± 1, suggesting a more hydrophylic surface. The adhesion properties of LM2 and HaCaT cell lines on the surface of PANI-Cys films in comparison with tissue culture plastic (TCP) are studied. The PANI-Cys film shows better biocompatibility than PANI film for both cell lines. The cell morphologies on the TCP and PANI-Cys film were examined by florescence and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Microscopic observations show normal cellular behavior when PANI-Cys is used as a substrate of both cell lines (HaCaT and LM2) as when they are cultured on TCP. The ability of these PANI-Cys films to support cell attachment and growth indicates their potential use as biocompatible surfaces and in tissue engineering. - Highlights: • A new surface PANI-Cys was produced on films of polyethylene terephthalate. • The relationship between surface characteristics and biocompatibility is analyzed. • The PANI-Cys film presents good biocompatibility for two cell lines.

  7. Characterization of cysteine proteases in Malian medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bah, Sékou; Paulsen, Berit S; Diallo, Drissa; Johansen, Harald T

    2006-09-19

    Extracts form 10 different Malian medicinal plants with a traditional use against schistosomiasis were investigated for their possible content of proteolytic activity. The proteolytic activity was studied by measuring the hydrolysis of two synthetic peptide substrates Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec and Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec. Legumain- and papain-like activities were found in all tested crude extracts except those from Entada africana, with the papain-like activity being the strongest. Cissus quadrangularis, Securidaca longepedunculata and Stylosanthes erecta extracts showed high proteolytic activities towards both substrates. After gel filtration the proteolytic activity towards the substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Asn-NHMec in root extract of Securidaca longepedunculata appeared to have Mr of 30 and 97kDa, while the activity in extracts from Cissus quadrangularis was at 39kDa. Enzymatic activity cleaving the substrate Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec showed apparent Mr of 97 and 26kDa in extracts from roots and leaves of Securidaca longepedunculata, while in Cissus quadrangularis extracts the activity eluted at 39 and 20kDa, with the highest activity in the latter. All Z-Phe-Arg-NHMec activities were inhibited by E-64 but unaffected by PMSF. The legumain activity was unaffected by E-64 and PMSF. The SDS-PAGE analysis exhibited five distinct gelatinolytic bands for Cissus quadrangularis extracts (115, 59, 31, 22 and 20kDa), while two bands (59 and 30kDa) were detected in Securidaca longepedunculata extracts. The inhibition profile of the gelatinolytic bands and that of the hydrolysis of the synthetic substrates indicate the cysteine protease class of the proteolytic activities. Several cysteine protease activities with different molecular weights along with a strong variability of these activities between species as well as between plant parts from the same species were observed. PMID:16621376

  8. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  9. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sáez, Laura; Molina, Jorge; Florea, Daniela I.; Planells, Elena M. [Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology and Department of Physiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Campus Cartuja, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Cabeza, M. Carmen [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Quintero, Bartolomé, E-mail: bqosso@ugr.es [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2013-06-27

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis.

  10. Characterization of L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots and application to test Cu(II) deficiency in biological samples from critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •We examinate stability of L-cysteine capped CdTe QD. •Factors influence QD fluorescence response are controlled. •Application in copper deficiency analysis is made. •We report comparison with other techniques. -- Abstract: The catalytic activity of copper ion gives, from the physiological point of view, a central role in many biological processes. Variations in the composition and location of cellular copper have been addressed given their physiological and pathological consequences. In this paper L-cysteine capped CdTe quantum dots is used for the fluorimetric determination of Cu(II) in biological samples from healthy individuals and patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units (ICU). An acceptable homogeneity in the CdTe QDs size has been obtained with an average value of 3 nm. No significant alterations in the spectral properties were observed for 2 months when stored in vacutainers at 6 °C and a concentration of approximately 2 μM. Data from oxidative stress markers such superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and DNA damage can be correlated with a Cu(II) deficiency for the ICU patients as measured by flame-atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) and inductively coupled plasma source mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Aqueous solutions 0.3 μM of L-cysteine capped CdTe QDs in MOPS buffer (6 mM, pH 7.4) used at 21 °C in the range 15–60 min after preparation of the sample for the measurements of fluorescence gives contents in Cu(II) for erythrocytes in good agreement with those obtained in FAAS and ICP-MS but the comparative ease of use makes the fluorimetric technique more suitable than the other two techniques for routine analysis

  11. Electrocatalytic determination of L-cysteine using a modified carbon nanotube paste electrode: Application to the analysis of some real samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malihe Ahmadipour; Mohammad Ali Taher; Hadi Beitollahi; Rahman Hosseinzadeh

    2012-01-01

    The electrooxidation of L-cysteine (L-Cys) was studied using a benzoylferrocene (BF) modified multi-wall carbon nanotube paste electrode (BFCNPE) using cyclic voltammetry (CV),square wave voltammetry (SWV) and chronoamperometry (CHA).Under optimum pH in CV the oxidation of L-Cys occurs at a potential about 215 mV less positive than that at the surface of unmodified carbon paste electrode.The catalytic oxidation peak currents were dependent on the L-Cys concentration and a linearcalibration curve was obtained in the range 0.7-350.0 μmol/L of L-Cys with SWV method.The detection limit (3σ) was determined as 0.1 μmolL.This method was also used for the determination of L-Cys in some real samples.

  12. Copper inorganic-organic hybrid coordination compound as a novel L-cysteine electrochemical sensor: Synthesis, characterization, spectroscopy and crystal structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zohreh Derikvand; Azadeh Azadbakht

    2015-11-01

    Dinuclear coordination compound of Cu(II), namely, [Cu2(pydc)2(pz)(H2O)2]·2H2O, where pydc = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (dipicolinic acid) and pz = pyrazine has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, spectra (IR, UV-Vis), thermal (TG/DTG) analysis, magnetic measurements and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the dimeric structure, the planar tridentate pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid dianion coordinates to a Cu(II) ion in a meridional fashion and defines the basal plane of the complex. The fourth equatorial coordination site is then occupied by a pyrazine molecule that functions as a linear bidentate ligand bridging two Cu(II) complexes to form a dimer. The axial positions of each Cu(II) complex are occupied by one water molecule to form a distorted square pyramidal geometry. The complicated hydrogen bonding network accompanied with C–O· · · and C–H· · · stacking interactions assemble the crystal structure of 1 into a fascinating supramolecular architecture. Electrochemical behavior of [Cu2(pydc)2(pz)(H2O)2] (Cu-PDAP) on the surface of carbon nanotube (CNTs) glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is described. Oxidation of cysteine on the surface of modified electrode was investigated with cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the Cu-PDAP/CNTs film displays excellent electrochemical catalytic activities towards L-cysteine oxidation.

  13. Molecular Biology, Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology of Cysteine Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Rüdiger; Wirtz, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine is one of the most versatile molecules in biology, taking over such different functions as catalysis, structure, regulation and electron transport during evolution. Research on Arabidopsis has contributed decisively to the understanding of cysteine synthesis and its role in the assimilatory pathways of S, N and C in plants. The multimeric cysteine synthase complex is present in the cytosol, plastids and mitochondria and forms the centre of a unique metabolic sensing and signaling system. Its association is reversible, rendering the first enzyme of cysteine synthesis active and the second one inactive, and vice-versa. Complex formation is triggered by the reaction intermediates of cysteine synthesis in response to supply and demand and gives rise to regulation of genes of sulfur metabolism to adjust cellular sulfur homeostasis. Combinations of biochemistry, forward and reverse genetics, structural- and cell-biology approaches using Arabidopsis have revealed new enzyme functions and the unique pattern of spatial distribution of cysteine metabolism in plant cells. These findings place the synthesis of cysteine in the centre of the network of primary metabolism. PMID:22303278

  14. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV–Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the μM range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation–reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V2O5 form.

  15. The mechanism of cysteine detection in biological media by means of vanadium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra, A. G. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Departamento Academico de Fisica (Brazil); Barison, A. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Quimica (Brazil); Oliveira, V. S. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Foti, L.; Krieger, M. A. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto de Biologia Molecular do Parana (Brazil); Dhalia, R.; Viana, I. F. T. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes (Brazil); Schreiner, W. H., E-mail: wido@fisica.ufpr.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    We report on the interaction of vanadate nanoparticles, produced using the laser ablation in liquids synthesis, with cysteine in biological molecules. Cysteine is a very important amino acid present in most proteins, but also because cysteine and the tripeptide glutathione are the main antioxidant molecules in our body system. Detailed UV-Vis absorption spectra and dynamic light scattering measurements were done to investigate the detection of cysteine in large biological molecules. The intervalence band of the optical absorption spectra shows capability for quantitative cysteine sensing in the {mu}M range in biological macromolecules. Tests included cytoplasmic repetitive antigen and flagellar repetitive antigen proteins of the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoa, as well as the capsid p24 proteins from Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 and type 2. Detailed NMR measurements for hydrogen, carbon, and vanadium nuclei show that cysteine in contact with the vanadate looses hydrogen of the sulphydryl side chain, while the vanadate is reduced. The subsequent detachment of two deprotonated molecules to form cystine and the slow return to the vanadate complete the oxidation-reduction cycle. Therefore, the vanadate acts as a charge exchanging catalyst on cysteine to form cystine. The NMR results also indicate that the nanoparticles are not formed by the common orthorhombic V{sub 2}O{sub 5} form.

  16. Molecular Structures and Dynamics of the Stepwise Activation Mechanism of a Matrix Metalloproteinase Zymogen: Challenging the Cysteine Switch Dogma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation of matrix metalloproteinase zymogen (pro-MMP) is a vital homeostatic process, yet its molecular basis remains unresolved. Using stopped-flow X-ray spectroscopy of the active site zinc ion, we determined the temporal sequence of pro-MMP-9 activation catalyzed by tissue kallikrein protease in milliseconds to several minutes. The identity of three intermediates seen by X-ray spectroscopy was corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The cysteine-zinc interaction that maintains enzyme latency is disrupted via active-site proton transfers that mediate transient metal-protein coordination events and eventual binding of water. Unexpectedly, these events ensue as a direct result of complexation of pro-MMP-9 and kallikrein and occur before proteolysis and eventual dissociation of the pro-peptide from the catalytic site. Here we demonstrate the synergism among long-range protein conformational transitions, local structural rearrangements, and fine atomic events in the process of zymogen activation.

  17. Molecular Structures and Dynamics of the Stepwise Activation Mechanism of a Matrix Metalloproteinase Zymogen: Challenging the Cysteine Switch Dogma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenblum,G.; Meroueh, S.; Toth, M.; Fisher, J.; Fridman, R.; Mobashery, S.; Sagi, I.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of matrix metalloproteinase zymogen (pro-MMP) is a vital homeostatic process, yet its molecular basis remains unresolved. Using stopped-flow X-ray spectroscopy of the active site zinc ion, we determined the temporal sequence of pro-MMP-9 activation catalyzed by tissue kallikrein protease in milliseconds to several minutes. The identity of three intermediates seen by X-ray spectroscopy was corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The cysteine-zinc interaction that maintains enzyme latency is disrupted via active-site proton transfers that mediate transient metal-protein coordination events and eventual binding of water. Unexpectedly, these events ensue as a direct result of complexation of pro-MMP-9 and kallikrein and occur before proteolysis and eventual dissociation of the pro-peptide from the catalytic site. Here we demonstrate the synergism among long-range protein conformational transitions, local structural rearrangements, and fine atomic events in the process of zymogen activation.

  18. Preparation, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis to 1.5 Å resolution of rat cysteine dioxygenase, a mononuclear iron enzyme responsible for cysteine thiol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Chad R. [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Hao, Quan [MacCHESS at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States); Stipanuk, Martha H., E-mail: mhs6@cornell.edu [Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-8001 (United States)

    2005-11-01

    Recombinant rat cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) has been expressed, purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data have been collected to 1.5 Å resolution. Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an ∼23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O{sub 2}, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  19. Highly Catalytic Nanodots with Renal Clearance for Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Junying; Yang, Jiang; Chen, Jie; Shen, Xiu; Deng, Jiao; Deng, Dehui; Long, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Ming; Liu, Changlong; Li, Meixian

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (gamma and x-ray) is widely used in industry and medicine, but it can also pose a significant hazardous effect on health and induce cancer, physical deformity and even death, due to DNA damages and invasion of free radicals. There is therefore an urgent unmet demand in designing highly efficient radioprotectants with synergetic integration of effective renal clearance and low toxicity. In this study, we designed ultrasmall (sub-5 nm) highly catalytically active and cysteine-protected MoS2 dots as radioprotectants and investigated their application in protection against ionizing radiation. In vivo preclinical studies showed that the surviving fraction of MoS2-treated mice can appreciably increase to up to 79 % when they were exposed to high-energy ionizing radiation. Furthermore, MoS2 dots can contribute in cleaning up the accumulated free radicals within the body, repairing DNA damages and recovering all vital chemical and biochemical indicators, suggesting their unique role as free radical...

  20. Possible involvement of radical intermediates in the inhibition of cysteine proteases by allenyl esters and amides

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Yoshio; Fujiwara, Tomoya; Shimone, Yoshihito; Miyataka, Hideki; Satoh, Toshio; Kirk, Kenneth L.; Hori, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate crystallographically the mechanism of inhibition of cysteine protease by α-methyl-γ,γ-diphenylallenecarboxylic acid ethyl ester 3, a cysteine protease inhibitor having in vivo stability, we synthesized N-(α-methyl-γ,γ-diphenylallenecarbonyl)-l-phenylalanine ethyl ester 4. Reaction of 4 with thiophenol, the SH group of which has similar pKa value to that of cysteine protease, produced oxygen-mediated radical adducts 6 and 7 in ambient air but did not proceed under oxyge...

  1. Serine substitution for cysteine residues in levansucrase selectively abolishes levan forming activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthilkumar, Velusamy; Busby, Stephen J W; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Senthikumar, Velusamy; Bushby, Stephen J W

    2003-10-01

    Levansucrase is responsible for levan formation during sucrose fermentation of Zymomonas mobilis, and this decreases the efficiency of ethanol production. As thiol modifying agents decrease levan formation, a role for cysteine residues in levansucrase activity has been examined using derivatives of Z. mobilis levansucrase that carry serine substitutions of cysteine at positions 121, 151 or 244. These substitutions abolished the levan forming activity of levansucrase whilst only halving its activity in sucrose hydrolysis. Thus, polymerase and hydrolase activities of Z. mobilis levansucrase are separate and have different requirements for the enzyme's cysteine residues. PMID:14584923

  2. Adsorption Dynamics and Self-Assembled L-cysteine on Au(100)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Yan, Jiawei;

    As the only amino acid with a functional thiol group, L - cysteine offers a strong perspective both for binding to gold and other metals, and for gentle immobilization of biomolecules. Binding to single - crystal, atomically planar surfaces offers the additional perspective that bound L - cysteine...... can be structurally mapped at the single - molecule level . In this work, we have followed the adsorption of L - cysteine on single - crystal Au(100) by measuring the electrode potential dynamics during the adsorption process. In situ STM revealed the structure of the self - assembled ordered layers...

  3. Cysteine as a non toxic corrosion inhibitor for copper alloys in conservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravgaard, Mari; van Lanschot, Jettie

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine cysteine as an alternative to benzotriazole (BTA) for the conservation of archaeological objects with bronze disease. Investigation of the two inhibitors involved the use of electrochemical techniques, measurements of weight change in high humidity and comparative...... studies of colour changes in the corrosion products. The results obtained in this article demonstrate that cysteine could be a non-toxic alternative to BTA. Cysteine performed as well as BTA on pre-corroded coupons with bronze disease in high humidity and showed acceptable results during testing for...

  4. Heterologous expression and purification of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cysteine protease in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Anne Lind; Dionisio, Giuseppe; Holm, Preben Bach;

    2011-01-01

    The mobilization of protein during germination of barley seeds is essential and Cysteine Proteases accounts for more than 90 % of the total proteolytic activity in the degradation of barley seed storage proteins [1]. Cysteine proteases exist as pro-enzyme until activated through reduction of the...... active site cysteines and via removal of the pro-domain. The complement of cysteine proteases is comprehensive and for detailed studies of the individual components of this complement, a fast and efficient eukaryotic expression platform is highly desirable. The barley key cysteine protease, endoprotease...

  5. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  6. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power. PMID:1283938

  7. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  8. Investigations for designing catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of a severe accident in pressurised water reactors (PWR) a high amount of hydrogen up to about 20,000 m3 might be generated and released into the containments. The mixture consisting of hydrogen and oxygen may either burn or detonate, if ignited. In case of detonation the generated shock wave may endanger the components of the plant or the plant itself. Consequently, effective removal of hydrogen is required. The fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exo-thermally on catalytically acting surfaces already at low temperatures generating steam and heat is made use of in catalytic recombiners. They consist of substrates coated with catalyst (mainly platinum or palladium) which are arranged inside a casing. Being passively acting measures, recombiners do not need any additional energy supply. Experimental investigations on catalytic hydrogen recombination are conducted at FZJ (Forschungszentrum Juelich) using three test facilities. The results yield insight in the development potential of contemporary recombiner systems as well as of innovative systems. Detailed investigations on a recombiner section show strong temperature gradients over the surface of a catalytically coated sample. Dependent on the flow velocity, ignition temperature may be reached at the leading edge already at an inlet hydrogen concentration of about 5 vol.-%. The thermal strain of the substrate leads to considerable detachment of catalyst particles probably causing unintended ignition of the flammable mixture. Temperature peaks can be prevented effectively by leaving the first part of the plate uncoated. In order to avoid overheating of the catalyst elements of a recombiner even at high hydrogen concentrations a modular system of porous substrates is proposed. The metallic substrates are coated with platinum at low catalyst densities thus limiting the activity of the single specimen. A modular arrangement of these elements provides high recombination rates over a large hydrogen concentration

  9. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. PMID:27451206

  10. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Studies of the Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 2 Cysteine Protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Compton, Jaimee R; Leary, Dagmar H; Olson, Mark A; Lee, Michael S; Cheung, Jonah; Ye, Wenjuan; Ferrer, Mark; Southall, Noel; Jadhav, Ajit; Morazzani, Elaine M; Glass, Pamela J; Marugan, Juan; Legler, Patricia M

    2016-05-31

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.-) is essential for viral replication and is involved in the cytopathic effects (CPE) of the virus. The VEEV nsP2 protease is a member of MEROPS Clan CN and characteristically contains a papain-like protease linked to an S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase (SAM MTase) domain. The protease contains an alternative active site motif, (475)NVCWAK(480), which differs from papain's (CGS(25)CWAFS), and the enzyme lacks a transition state-stabilizing residue homologous to Gln-19 in papain. To understand the roles of conserved residues in catalysis, we determined the structure of the free enzyme and the first structure of an inhibitor-bound alphaviral protease. The peptide-like E64d inhibitor was found to bind beneath a β-hairpin at the interface of the SAM MTase and protease domains. His-546 adopted a conformation that differed from that found in the free enzyme; one or both of the conformers may assist in leaving group departure of either the amine or Cys thiolate during the catalytic cycle. Interestingly, E64c (200 μM), the carboxylic acid form of the E64d ester, did not inhibit the nsP2 protease. To identify key residues involved in substrate binding, a number of mutants were analyzed. Mutation of the motif residue, N475A, led to a 24-fold reduction in kcat/Km, and the conformation of this residue did not change after inhibition. N475 forms a hydrogen bond with R662 in the SAM MTase domain, and the R662A and R662K mutations both led to 16-fold decreases in kcat/Km. N475 forms the base of the P1 binding site and likely orients the substrate for nucleophilic attack or plays a role in product release. An Asn homologous to N475 is similarly found in coronaviral papain-like proteases (PLpro) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus. Mutation of another motif residue, K480A, led to a 9

  11. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme. PMID:22543019

  12. Mechanistic studies of the spore photoproduct lyase via a single cysteine mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Linlin; Lin, Gengjie; Nelson, Renae S; Jian, Yajun; Telser, Joshua; Li, Lei

    2012-09-11

    5-Thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine (also called spore photoproduct or SP) is the exclusive DNA photodamage product in bacterial endospores. It is repaired by a radical SAM (S-adenosylmethionine) enzyme, the spore photoproduct lyase (SPL), at the bacterial early germination phase. Our previous studies proved that SPL utilizes the 5'-dA• generated by the SAM cleavage reaction to abstract the H(6proR) atom to initiate the SP repair process. The resulting thymine allylic radical was suggested to take an H atom from an unknown protein source, most likely cysteine 141. Here we show that C141 can be readily alkylated in the native SPL by an iodoacetamide treatment, suggesting that it is accessible to the TpT radical. SP repair by the SPL C141A mutant yields TpTSO(2)(-) and TpT simultaneously from the very beginning of the reaction; no lag phase is observed for TpTSO(2)(-) formation. Should any other protein residue serve as the H donor, its presence would result in TpT being the major product at least for the first enzyme turnover. These observations provide strong evidence to support C141 as the direct H atom donor. Moreover, because of the lack of this intrinsic H donor, the C141A mutant produces TpT via an unprecedented thymine cation radical reduction (proton-coupled electron transfer) process, contrasting to the H atom transfer mechanism in the wild-type (WT) SPL reaction. The C141A mutant repairs SP at a rate that is ~3-fold slower than that of the WT enzyme. Formation of TpTSO(2)(-) and TpT exhibits a V(max) deuterium kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of 1.7 ± 0.2, which is smaller than the (D)V(max) KIE of 2.8 ± 0.3 determined for the WT SPL reaction. These findings suggest that removing the intrinsic H atom donor disturbs the rate-limiting process during enzyme catalysis. As expected, the prereduced C141A mutant supports only ~0.4 turnover, which is in sharp contrast to the >5 turnovers exhibited by the WT SPL reaction, suggesting that the enzyme catalytic cycle (SAM

  13. Cysteine and arginine-rich peptides as molecular carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Amir Nasrolahi; El-Sayed, Naglaa Salem; Mandal, Dindayal; Tiwari, Rakesh K; Tavakoli, Kathy; Etesham, Matthew; Parang, Keykavous

    2016-01-15

    A number of linear and cyclic peptides containing alternative arginine and cysteine residues, namely linear (CR)3, linear (CR)4, linear (CR)5, cyclic [CR]4, and cyclic [CR]5, were synthesized. The peptides were evaluated for their ability to deliver two molecular cargos, fluorescence-labeled cell-impermeable negatively charged phosphopeptide (F'-GpYEEI) and fluorescence-labeled lamivudine (F'-3TC), intracellularly in human leukemia cancer (CCRF-CEM) cells. We investigated the role of cyclization and the number of amino acids in improving the transporting ability of the peptides. The flow cytometry studies suggested that the synthesized peptides were able to work efficiently as transporters for both cargos. Among all compounds, cyclic [CR]4 was found to be the most efficient peptide in transporting the cargo into cells. For instance, the cellular uptake of F'-3TC (5μM) and F'-GpYEEI (5μM) was enhanced by 16- and 20-fold, respectively, in the presence of cyclic [CR]4 compared to that of the parent compound alone. The mechanism of F'-GpYEEI uptake by cells was found to be energy-independent. The results showed that the number of amino acids and their cyclic nature can impact the efficiency of the peptide in transporting the molecular cargos. PMID:26631317

  14. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  15. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  16. The unique cysteine knot regulates the pleotropic hormone leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellinor Haglund

    Full Text Available Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake/expenditure, metabolism and hypertension. It folds into a four-helix bundle that binds to the extracellular receptor to initiate signaling. Our work on leptin revealed a hidden complexity in the formation of a previously un-described, cysteine-knotted topology in leptin. We hypothesized that this unique topology could offer new mechanisms in regulating the protein activity. A combination of in silico simulation and in vitro experiments was used to probe the role of the knotted topology introduced by the disulphide-bridge on leptin folding and function. Our results surprisingly show that the free energy landscape is conserved between knotted and unknotted protein, however the additional complexity added by the knot formation is structurally important. Native state analyses led to the discovery that the disulphide-bond plays an important role in receptor binding and thus mediate biological activity by local motions on distal receptor-binding sites, far removed from the disulphide-bridge. Thus, the disulphide-bridge appears to function as a point of tension that allows dissipation of stress at a distance in leptin.

  17. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  18. Ratiometric fluorescent nanosensors for selective detecting cysteine with upconversion luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yunlong; Qu, Songnan; Li, Bin; Zhang, Liming; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Ligong

    2016-03-15

    Fluorescent sensors based on upconversion (UC) luminescence have been considered as a promising strategy to detect bio-analyte due to their advantages in deep penetration, minimum autofluorescence, and ratiometric fluorescent output. A prototype of nanosensors combined with mesoporous silica coated upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) and a fluorescein-based fluorescent probe loaded in pores was therefore designed to detect cysteine (Cys). The silica shell provided loading space for the probe and enabled the nanosensors to disperse in water. In the presence of Cys, the fluorescent probe was transformed into 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein with an emission band centering at 518 nm which was secondarily excited by the light at around 475 nm from NaYF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+) UCNPs driven by 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser. The intensity ratio between green and blue luminescence (I518/I475) grew exponentially with increasing concentrations of Cys over a range of 20-200 μmolL(-1). The response of the nanosensors towards Cys was recognizable with naked eyes by luminescence color change. Evidences suggest that these nanosensors are capable of sensing Cys in aqueous solution and distinguishing Cys from homocysteine (Hcy) with kinetically-controlled selectivity. The system was further employed to detect Cys in human serum and the result was in agreement with it tested by high performance liquid chromatography with acceptable recovery. PMID:26402589

  19. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  20. Extracellular Cysteine in Connexins: Role as Redox Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamal, Mauricio A.; García, Isaac E.; Pinto, Bernardo I.; Pupo, Amaury; Báez, David; Stehberg, Jimmy; Del Rio, Rodrigo; González, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Connexin-based channels comprise hemichannels and gap junction channels. The opening of hemichannels allow for the flux of ions and molecules from the extracellular space into the cell and vice versa. Similarly, the opening of gap junction channels permits the diffusional exchange of ions and molecules between the cytoplasm and contacting cells. The controlled opening of hemichannels has been associated with several physiological cellular processes; thereby unregulated hemichannel activity may induce loss of cellular homeostasis and cell death. Hemichannel activity can be regulated through several mechanisms, such as phosphorylation, divalent cations and changes in membrane potential. Additionally, it was recently postulated that redox molecules could modify hemichannels properties in vitro. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox molecules interact with hemichannels is poorly understood. In this work, we discuss the current knowledge on connexin redox regulation and we propose the hypothesis that extracellular cysteines could be important for sensing changes in redox potential. Future studies on this topic will offer new insight into hemichannel function, thereby expanding the understanding of the contribution of hemichannels to disease progression. PMID:26858649

  1. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  2. Controllable synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials by assisting with l-cysteine and ethylenediamine

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yugui

    2013-11-21

    This paper reports a facile l-cysteine-assisted solvothermal synthesis of TiO2 nanomaterials using ethylenediamine (En) and distilled water as solvent. The influence of reaction time, temperature, l-cysteine and solvent was initially investigated. Results demonstrated the reaction temperature, l-cysteine and En significantly imposed impact on the phase and morphology of the particles. Amorphous nanosheets, mixed-crystal nanorods and pure anatase nanoparticles were controllably synthesized by varying reaction temperature. The formation of the amorphous nanosheets and mixed-crystal nanorods were directly affected by the presence of l-cysteine and En. And the presence of En distinctly affected the crystal phase of the products, which was rarely mentioned in other studies. Moreover, the photocatalytic activities of three typical samples were excellent. The possible formation mechanism of the sample was also discussed. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  3. Cysteine-Free Proteins in the Immunobiology of Arthropod-Borne Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Santiago Mejia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identify epitopes that could be used in the design of vaccines to control several arthropod-borne diseases simultaneously is to look for common structural features in the secretome of the pathogens that cause them. Using a novel bioinformatics technique, cysteine-abundance and distribution analysis, we found that many different proteins secreted by several arthropod-borne pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum, Borrelia burgdorferi, and eight species of Proteobacteria, are devoid of cysteine residues. The identification of three cysteine-abundance and distribution patterns in several families of proteins secreted by pathogenic and nonpathogenic Proteobacteria, and not found when the amino acid analyzed was tryptophan, provides evidence of forces restricting the content of cysteine residues in microbial proteins during evolution. We discuss these findings in the context of protein structure and function, antigenicity and immunogenicity, and host-parasite relationships.

  4. Formation scheme and antioxidant activity of a novel Maillard pigment, pyrrolothiazolate, formed from cysteine and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Kyoko; Terasawa, Naoko; Murata, Masatsune

    2016-06-15

    We recently identified 6-hydroxy-3[R],7a[S]-dimethyl-7-oxo-2,3-dihydropyrrolo[2,1-b]thiazole-3-calboxylic acid, a novel pyrrolothiazole derivative carrying a carboxy group and named pyrrolothiazolate, as a Mallard pigment formed from l-cysteine and d-glucose. Here we described the formation of its enantiomer, the plausible formation scheme of pyrrolothiazolate, and its antioxidant activity. When d-cysteine was used instead of l-cysteine in the reaction mixture, the enantiomer of pyrrolothiazolate was obtained. The carbon at position 1 of glucose was incorporated into two methyl groups of pyrrolothiazolate. The pigment was considered to be formed through 1-deoxyglucosone (1-DG). The dehydrated isomer of 1-DG would be condensed with the thiol and amino groups of cysteine. This condensate was dehydrated and cyclized to form pyrrolothiazolate. This compound was an antioxidant showing radical scavenging activity. PMID:26987433

  5. The SNO/SOH TMT strategy for combinatorial analysis of reversible cysteine oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wojdyla, Katarzyna; Williamson, James; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Redox homeostasis is essential for normal function of cells and redox imbalance has been recognised as a pathogenic factor of numerous human diseases. Oxidative modifications of cysteine thiols modulate function of many proteins, mediate signalling, and fine-tune transcriptional and...... metabolic processes. In this study we present the SNO/SOH TMT strategy, which enables simultaneous analysis of two different types of cysteine modification: S-nitrosylation (SNO) and S-sulfenylation (SOH). The method facilitates quantitation of modification changes corrected by changes in protein abundance...... strategy is a viable alternative to existing methods for cysteine oxidation analysis and provides new features that will facilitate our understanding of the interplay between SNO and SOH. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: SNO/SOH TMT strategy outperforms other available strategies for cysteine oxidation analysis...

  6. Cysteine Mutagenesis and Computer Modeling of the S6 Region of an Intermediate Conductance IKCa Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Simoes, Manuel; Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Banderali, Umberto; Hobeila, Fadi; Roux, Benoit; Parent, Lucie; Sauvé, Rémy

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine-scanning mutagenesis (SCAM) and computer-based modeling were used to investigate key structural features of the S6 transmembrane segment of the calcium-activated K+ channel of intermediate conductance IKCa. Our SCAM results show that the interaction of [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] methanethiosulfonate bromide (MTSET) with cysteines engineered at positions 275, 278, and 282 leads to current inhibition. This effect was state dependent as MTSET appeared less effective at inhibiting IKCa...

  7. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing O-acylhydroxamates that form stable covalent adducts with target proteases. This allows them to be used as ABPs for papain family cysteine proteases. A second class of related analogues containing ...

  8. Cysteine Protease Inhibitor (AcStefin) Is Required for Complete Cyst Formation of Acanthamoeba

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung-Yub; Song, Su-Min; Moon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Yu-Ran; Jha, Bijay Kumar; Danne, Dinzouna-Boutamba Sylvatrie; Cha, Hee-Jae; Yu, Hak Sun; Kong, Hyun-Hee; Chung, Dong-Il; Hong, Yeonchul

    2013-01-01

    The encystation of Acanthamoeba leads to the formation of resilient cysts from vegetative trophozoites. This process is essential for parasite survival under unfavorable conditions, such as those associated with starvation, low temperatures, and biocides. Furthermore, cysteine proteases have been implicated in the massive turnover of intracellular components required for encystation. Thus, strict modulation of the activities of cysteine proteases is required to protect Acanthamoeba from intra...

  9. A malarial cysteine protease is necessary for Plasmodium sporozoite egress from oocysts

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Ahmed S.I.; Matuschewski, Kai

    2005-01-01

    The Plasmodium life cycle is a sequence of alternating invasive and replicative stages within the vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. How malarial parasites exit their host cells after completion of reproduction remains largely unsolved. Inhibitor studies indicated a role of Plasmodium cysteine proteases in merozoite release from host erythrocytes. To validate a vital function of malarial cysteine proteases in active parasite egress, we searched for target genes that can be analyzed functional...

  10. Identification and Optimization of Inhibitors of Trypanosomal Cysteine Proteases: Cruzain, Rhodesain, and TbCatB

    OpenAIRE

    Mott, Bryan T.; Ferreira, Rafaela S.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Ang, Kenny Kean-Hooi; Leister, William; Shen, Min; Silveira, Julia T.; Doyle, Patricia S; Michelle R. Arkin; McKerrow, James H.; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P; Thomas, Craig J.; Shoichet, Brian K.

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei are parasites that cause Chagas’ disease and African sleeping sickness, respectively. Both parasites rely on essential cysteine proteases for survival, cruzain for T. cruzi and TbCatB/rhodesain for T. brucei. A recent quantitative high-throughput screen of cruzain identified triazine nitriles, which are known inhibitors of other cysteine proteases, as reversible inhibitors of the enzyme. Structural modifications detailed herein, including core scaffold...

  11. Cysteine Protease Secreted by Paragonimus westermani Attenuates Effector Functions of Human Eosinophils Stimulated with Immunoglobulin G

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Myeong Heon; Kita, Hirohito; Park, Hae Young; Seoh, Ju Young

    2001-01-01

    An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-coated surface, such as that found on helminth parasites, is one of the most effective physiologic stimuli for eosinophil activation. The cysteine proteases secreted by tissue-invasive helminth larvae play an important role in evasion of the immune response by degrading the host immunoglobulins. In this study, we investigated whether cysteine proteases in the excretory-secretory product (ESP) produced by Paragonimus westermani newly excysted metacercariae (PwNEM), wh...

  12. Identification, characterization and localization of chagasin, a tight-binding cysteine protease inhibitor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Ana C. S.; Abrahamson, Magnus; Lima, Ana P. C. A.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Scharfstein, Julio

    2001-01-01

    Lysosomal cysteine proteases from mammalian cells and plants are regulated by endogenous tight-binding inhibitors from the cystatin superfamily. The presence of cystatin-like inhibitors in lower eukaryotes such as protozoan parasites has not yet been demonstrated, although these cells express large quantities of cysteine proteases and may also count on endogenous inhibitors to regulate cellular proteolysis. Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas heart disease, is a relevant model to...

  13. Two distinct gene subfamilies within the family of cysteine protease genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Karrer, K M; Peiffer, S L; DiTomas, M E

    1993-01-01

    A cDNA clone for a physiologically regulated Tetrahymena cysteine protease gene was sequenced. The nucleotide sequence predicts that the clone encodes a 336-amino acid protein composed of a 19-residue N-terminal signal sequence followed by a 107-residue propeptide and a 210-residue mature protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the protein with those of other cysteine proteases revealed a highly conserved interspersed amino acid motif in the propeptide region of the protein,...

  14. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Piñeiro Galvin, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1...

  15. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasanth, S.; Raj, D. Rithesh; Kumar, T. V. Vineesh; Sudarsanakumar, C. [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University Kottayam, Kerala (India)

    2015-06-24

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles.

  16. Micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics and prebiotics, a review of effectiveness in reducing HIV progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics...

  17. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, a Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Ruben Hummelen; Jaimie Hemsworth; Gregor Reid

    2010-01-01

    Low serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebio...

  18. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hummelen, Ruben; Hemsworth, Jaimie; Reid, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical trials of these interventions on the progression of HIV. Vitamin B, C, E, and folic acid have been shown to delay the progression of HIV. Supplementation with selenium, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics...

  19. Sulphation by cultured cells. Cysteine, cysteinesulphinic acid and sulphite as sources for proteoglycan sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, D E; Silbert, C K; Silbert, J E

    1988-01-01

    Bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, bovine aortic endothelial cells, and IMR-90 human embryonic lung fibroblasts were tested to determine their ability to use cysteine or cysteine metabolites as a source of sulphate (SO4). Cells were incubated in SO4-depleted medium containing [3H]glucosamine plus 0.2 mM-cystine, 0.3 mM-cysteinesulphinic acid or 0.3 mM-sulphite (SO3). The [3H]chondroitin sulphate produced by the different cells was found to vary considerably in degree of sulphation under these conditions. One line of smooth-muscle cells utilized cysteine effectively as a SO4 source and thus produced chondroitin sulphate which was highly sulphated. IMR-90 fibroblasts produced partly sulphated chondroitin sulphate under these conditions, while another smooth-muscle cell line could not utilize cysteine, but could utilize cysteinesulphinic acid as a partial SO4 source. In contrast with the above cells, endothelial cells could not use cysteine or cysteinesulphinic acid as a source of SO4 and produced chondroitin with almost no SO4. All of the cells were able to utilize SO3. Incubation of the cells in the SO4-depleted medium containing [35S]cysteine confirmed that only the first line of smooth-muscle cells could convert significant amounts of [35S]cysteine to 35SO4. Furthermore, the addition of 0.4 mM inorganic SO4 did not inhibit the production of SO4 from cysteine by these cells. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3138971

  20. Techniques for the Analysis of Cysteine Sulfhydryls and Oxidative Protein Folding

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Chad R.; Sherma, Nisha D.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Modification of cysteine thiols dramatically affects protein function and stability. Hence, the abilities to quantify specific protein sulfhydryl groups within complex biological samples and map disulfide bond structures are crucial to gaining greater insights into how proteins operate in human health and disease. Recent Advances: Many different molecular probes are now commercially available to label and track cysteine residues at great sensitivity. Coupled with mass spectromet...

  1. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...

  2. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles with tyrosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatible cysteine coated CuS nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple aqueous solution method. Hexagonal phase of the samples were confirmed from X-ray diffraction and particle size found to be 9 nm. The possible interaction between the bioactive cysteine capped CuS nanoparticles and tyrosine were investigated using spectroscopic techniques such as UV-Visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. It is observed that the luminescence intensity of tyrosine molecule enhanced by the addition CuS nanoparticles

  3. The cysteine releasing pattern of some antioxidant thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Önen Bayram, F Esra; Sipahi, Hande; Acar, Ebru Türköz; Kahveci Ulugöl, Reyhan; Buran, Kerem; Akgün, Hülya

    2016-05-23

    Oxidative stress that corresponds to a significant increase in free radical concentration in cells can cause considerable damage to crucial biological macromolecules if not prevented by cellular defense mechanisms. The low-molecular-weight thiol glutathione (GSH) constitutes one of the main intracellular antioxidants. It is synthesized via cysteine, an amino acid found only in limited amounts in cells because of its neurotoxicity. Thus, to ensure an efficient GSH synthesis in case of an oxidative stress, cysteine should be provided extracellularly. Yet, given its nucleophilic properties and its rapid conversion into cystine, its corresponding disulfide, cysteine presents some toxicity and therefore is usually supplemented in a prodrug approach. Here, some thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids were synthesized and evaluated for their antioxidant properties via the DDPH and CUPRAC assays. Then, the cysteine releasing capacity of the obtained compounds was investigated in aqueous and organic medium in order to correlate the relevant antioxidant properties of the molecules with their cysteine releasing pattern. As a result, the structures' antioxidative properties were not only attributed to cysteine release but also to the thiazolidine cycle itself. PMID:27017266

  4. Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao-Lin, E-mail: liu_x_l@sina.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000 (China); Zhu, Ying-Jie [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Qian; Li, Zhi-Feng; Yang, Bin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Cadmium sulfide polycrystalline nanotubes have been successfully synthesized by microwave-assisted transformation method using Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires as the source material and template in ethylene glycol at 160 °C or ethanol at 60 °C. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires were successfully synthesized in alkaline solution. ► CdS nanotubes were prepared by templated microwave-assisted transformation method. ► CdS nanotubes can well duplicate the size and morphology of precursor nanowires. ► This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost. -- Abstract: We report the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowire templated microwave-assisted transformation route to CdS nanotubes. In this method, the Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are synthesized using CdCl{sub 2}·2.5H{sub 2}O, L-cysteine and ethanolamine in water at room temperature. The Cd–cysteine precursor nanowires are used as the source material and template for the subsequent preparation of CdS nanotubes by a microwave-assisted transformation method using ethylene glycol or ethanol as the solvent. This method has the advantages of the simplicity and low cost, and may be extended to the synthesis of nanotubes of other compounds. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  5. l-cysteine induced manganese porphyrin electrocatalytic amplification with 3D DNA-Au@Pt nanoparticles as nanocarriers for sensitive electrochemical aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yingning; Yuan, Yali; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-05-15

    We successfully applied the novel l-cysteine (RSH) induced manganese porphyrin (MnTPP) electrocatalytic amplification in electrochemical aptasensor for detection of thrombin (TB) with the 3D DNA-Au@Pt nanoparticles (DNA-Au@Pt NPs) as nanocarrier. A further discussion for the suggested mechanism of the reaction involved the MnTPP-catalyzed oxidation of thiols (RSH) to disulfides l-cystine (RSSR) was also discussed in detail in this work. In comparison with traditional H2O2 mediated MnTPP electrocatalytic amplification, the novel reaction with more stable catalytic substrate RSH possessed high catalytic amplification efficiency. In addition, the 3D DNA-Au@Pt NPs could provide abundant binding sites for immobilizing signal tags and enzymes. As a result, the electrochemical signal can be greatly enhanced by the RSH mediated MnTPP electrocatalytic reaction and 3D DNA-Au@Pt NPs. Under optimal conditions, the proposed aptasensor exhibited a wider linear range of 0.1pM-100nM with a more sensitive detection limit of 29fM for TB detection. PMID:26700580

  6. Metabolism of cysteine and cysteinesulfinate in rat kidney tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In studies with rat hepatocytes, hypotaurine plus taurine production accounted for less than 5% of the total amount of cysteine (CYS) catabolized, whereas more than 90% of the metabolized cysteinesulfinate (CSA) was converted to taurine plus hypotaurine. Similar studies have been carried out with kidney tubules isolated from fed rats and incubated with 2 mM [1-14C]CYS or 25 mM [1-14C]CSA at 370C for up to 40 min. The production of 14CO2 from CSA (3.1 +/- 1.3 nmol/sup ./ min-1/sup ./ mg dry wt-1) was equivalent to the accumulation of N in NH4+ plus glutamate. Substantial oxidation of CYS was observed (16 +/- 11 nmol CO2 x min-1 x mg dry wt-1), but only 12% of the expected amount of N was recovered as NH4+ plus glutamate. Accumulation of hypotaurine plus taurine was equivalent to 20% of the observed rate of 14CO2 production from CSA but accounted for only 2% of the observed rate of 14CO2 production from CYS. Addition of unlabeled CSA to incubations with varying levels of CYS had no effect on production of 14CO2. Addition of 2 mM α-ketoglutarate to the incubation mixtures resulted in an increased in 14CO2 production from CSA to 290% of the control level but had no effect on CYS oxidation. In agreement with the authors findings for rat hepatocytes, these data suggest that most metabolism of CYS by the rat kidney tubule occurs by a CSA-independent pathway. However, in contrast to the metabolism of CSA almost entirely to taurine in the hepatocyte, kidney tubules appeared to metabolize CSA primarily by the transamination pathway

  7. The effect of N-acetyl cysteine on laryngopharyngeal reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payman Dabirmoghaddam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR is a variant of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in which the stomach contents go up into the pharynx and then down into the larynx. LPR causes a wide spectrum of manifestations mainly related to the upper and the lower respiratory system such as laryngitis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cough, hoarseness, postnasal drip disease, sinusitis, otitis media, recurrent pneumonia, laryngeal cancer and etc. The object of this study was to examine the effect of N-acetyl Cysteine (NAC with and without Omeprazole on laryngitis and LPR. Ninety patients with laryngitis or its symptoms were referred and randomly assigned into three groups. The first group was treated by Omeprazole and NAC. The second group was treated by Omeprazole and placebo and the last group was treated by NAC and placebo. Duration of treatment was 3 months and all patients were evaluated at the beginning of study, one month and three month after treatment of sign and symptoms, based on reflux symptom index (RSI and reflex finding score (RFS. Based on the results of this study, despite therapeutic efficacy of all treatment protocols, the RSI before and after 3 months treatment had significant difference in (NAS+ Omeprazole and (Omeprazole+ placebo group (P<0.001 in the first group, P<0.001 in the second group and P=0.35 in the third group. Whereas RFS before and after 3 month treatment had significant difference in all groups. (P<0.001 in each group in comparison with itself but this results had not significant difference after 1 month treatment. Our results showed that the combination therapy with Omeprazole and NAC treatment had the most effect on both subjective and objective questionnaire at least after 3 months treatment. Based on the results of the present study, it seems that the use objective tools are more accurate than subjective tools in evaluation of therapeutic effects in patients with GERD-related laryngitis.

  8. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  9. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  10. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ...... observed by XPS as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  11. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  12. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  13. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method is described for estimating the temperature in a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. Pressure sensors monitor the flow resistance across the catalytic converter to provide an indication of the temperature inside. This feedback system allows heating devices to be switched off and thus avoid overheating, while maintaining the catalytic converter's efficiency by assuring that it does not operate below its light off temperature. (UK)

  14. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method of estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine is described. Heated exhaust gas oxygen (HEGO) sensors are placed upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. The temperature of the catalytic converter shortly after start-up is measured by monitoring the resistance of the HEGO sensor's heating element. The downstream sensor is used for mixture control and to double check results of the upstream sensor. (UK)

  15. Preparation, Crystallization and X-ray Diffraction Analysis to 1.5 A Resolution of Rat Cysteine Dioxygenase, a Mononuclear Iron Enzyme Responsible for Cysteine Thiol Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons,C.; Hao, Q.; Stipanuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO; EC 1.13.11.20) is an {approx}23 kDa non-heme iron metalloenzyme that is responsible for the oxidation of cysteine by O2, yielding cysteinesulfinate. CDO catalyzes the first step in the conversion of cysteine to taurine, as well as the first step in the catabolism of cysteine to pyruvate plus sulfate. Recombinant rat CDO was heterologously expressed, purified and crystallized. The protein was expressed as a fusion protein bearing a polyhistidine tag to facilitate purification, a thioredoxin tag to improve solubility and a factor Xa cleavage site to permit removal of the entire N-terminus, leaving only the 200 amino acids inherent to the native protein. A multi-step purification scheme was used to achieve >95% purity of CDO. The optimal CDO crystals diffracted to 1.5 Angstroms resolution and belonged to space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 57.55, c = 123.06 Angstrom, {alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90. CDO shows little homology to any other proteins; therefore, the structure of the enzyme will be determined by ab initio phasing using a selenomethionyl derivative.

  16. Global regulation of gene expression in response to cysteine availability in Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Gaelle

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine has a crucial role in cellular physiology and its synthesis is tightly controlled due to its reactivity. However, little is known about the sulfur metabolism and its regulation in clostridia compared with other firmicutes. In Clostridium perfringens, the two-component system, VirR/VirS, controls the expression of the ubiG operon involved in methionine to cysteine conversion in addition to the expression of several toxin genes. The existence of links between the C. perfringens virulence regulon and sulfur metabolism prompted us to analyze this metabolism in more detail. Results We first performed a tentative reconstruction of sulfur metabolism in C. perfringens and correlated these data with the growth of strain 13 in the presence of various sulfur sources. Surprisingly, C. perfringens can convert cysteine to methionine by an atypical still uncharacterized pathway. We further compared the expression profiles of strain 13 after growth in the presence of cystine or homocysteine that corresponds to conditions of cysteine depletion. Among the 177 genes differentially expressed, we found genes involved in sulfur metabolism and controlled by premature termination of transcription via a cysteine specific T-box system (cysK-cysE, cysP1 and cysP2 or an S-box riboswitch (metK and metT. We also showed that the ubiG operon was submitted to a triple regulation by cysteine availability via a T-box system, by the VirR/VirS system via the VR-RNA and by the VirX regulatory RNA. In addition, we found that expression of pfoA (theta-toxin, nagL (one of the five genes encoding hyaluronidases and genes involved in the maintenance of cell redox status was differentially expressed in response to cysteine availability. Finally, we showed that the expression of genes involved in [Fe-S] clusters biogenesis and of the ldh gene encoding the lactate dehydrogenase was induced during cysteine limitation. Conclusion Several key functions for the

  17. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  18. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  19. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  20. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  1. Catalytic reforming feed characterisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Univ. of La Laguna, Chemical Engineering Dept., La Laguna (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The catalytic reforming of naphtha is one of the major refinery processes, designed to increase the octane number of naphtha or to produce aromatics. The naphtha used as catalytic reformer feedstock usually contains a mixture of paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics in the carbon number range C{sub 6} to C{sub 10}. The detailed chemical composition of the feed is necessary to predict the aromatics and hydrogen production as well as the operation severity. The analysis of feed naphtha is usually reported in terms of its ASTM distillation curve and API or specific gravity. Since reforming reactions are described in terms of lumped chemical species (paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics), a feed characterisation technique should be useful in order to predict reforming operating conditions and detect feed quality changes. Unfortunately online analyzer applications as cromatography or recently introduced naphtha NMR [1] are scarce in most of refineries. This work proposes an algorithmic characterisation method focusing on its main steps description. The method could help on the subjects previously described, finally a calculation example is shown. (orig.)

  2. Kinetic and Mechanistic Characterization and Versatile Catalytic Properties of Mammalian Glutaredoxin 2: Implications for Intracellular Roles†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallogly, Molly M.; Starke, David W.; Leonberg, Amanda K.; Ospina, Susan M. English; Mieyal, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Glutaredoxin (Grx)-catalyzed deglutathionylation of protein–glutathione mixed disulfides (protein-SSG) serves important roles in redox homeostasis and signal transduction, regulating diverse physiological and pathophysiological events. Mammalian cells have two Grx isoforms: Grx1, localized to the cytosol and mitochondrial intermembrane space, and Grx2, localized primarily to the mitochondrial matrix [Pai, H. V., et al. (2007) Antioxid. Redox Signaling 9, 2027–2033]. The catalytic behavior of Grx1 has been characterized extensively, whereas Grx2 catalysis is less well understood. We observed that human Grx1 and Grx2 exhibit key catalytic similarities, including selectivity for protein-SSG substrates and a nucleophilic, double-displacement, monothiol mechanism exhibiting a strong commitment to catalysis. A key distinction between Grx1- and Grx2-mediated deglutathionylation is decreased catalytic efficiency (kcat/KM) of Grx2 for protein deglutathionylation (due primarily to a decreased kcat), reflecting a higher pKa of its catalytic cysteine, as well as a decreased enhancement of nucleophilicity of the second substrate, GSH. As documented previously for hGrx1 [Starke, D. W., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 14607–14613], hGrx2 catalyzes glutathione-thiyl radical (GS•) scavenging, and it also mediates GS transfer (protein S-glutathionylation) reactions, where GS• serves as a superior glutathionyl donor substrate for formation of GAPDH-SSG, compared to GSNO and GSSG. In contrast to its lower kcat for deglutathionylation reactions, Grx2 promotes GS-transfer to the model protein substrate GAPDH at rates equivalent to those of Grx1. Estimation of Grx1 and Grx2 concentrations within mitochondria predicts comparable deglutathionylation activities within the mitochondrial subcompartments, suggesting localized regulatory functions for both isozymes. PMID:18816065

  3. Selective loss of cysteine residues and disulphide bonds in a potato proteinase inhibitor II family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Qing Li

    Full Text Available Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C, and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution.

  4. Cure of hookworm infection with a cysteine protease inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon J Vermeire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hookworm disease is a major global health problem and principal among a number of soil-transmitted helminthiases (STHs for the chronic disability inflicted that impacts both personal and societal productivity. Mass drug administration most often employs single-dose therapy with just two drugs of the same chemical class to which resistance is a growing concern. New chemical entities with the appropriate single-dose efficacy are needed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using various life-cycle stages of the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum in vitro and a hamster model of infection, we report the potent, dose-dependent cidal activities of the peptidyl cysteine protease inhibitors (CPIs K11002 (4-mopholino-carbonyl-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl- vinyl sulfone phenyl and K11777 (N-methylpiperazine-phenylalanyl-homophenylalanyl-vinylsulfone phenyl. The latter is in late pre-clinical testing for submission as an Investigational New Drug (IND with the US Federal Drug Administration as an anti-chagasic. In vitro, K11002 killed hookworm eggs but was without activity against first-stage larvae. The reverse was true for K11777 with a larvicidal potency equal to that of the current anti-hookworm drug, albendazole (ABZ. Both CPIs produced morbidity in ex vivo adult hookworms with the activity of K11777 again being at least the equivalent of ABZ. Combinations of either CPI with ABZ enhanced morbidity compared to single compounds. Strikingly, oral treatment of infected hamsters with 100 mg/kg K11777 b.i.d. (i.e., a total daily dose of 200 mg/kg for one day cured infection: a single 100 mg/kg treatment removed >90% of worms. Treatment also reversed the otherwise fatal decrease in blood hemoglobin levels and body weights of hosts. Consistent with its mechanism of action, K11777 decreased by >95% the resident CP activity in parasites harvested from hamsters 8 h post-treatment with a single 100 mg/kg oral dose. CONCLUSION: A new, oral single-dose anthelmintic that

  5. Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts during therapeutic dosing and following overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judge Bryan S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen-cysteine adducts (APAP-CYS are a specific biomarker of acetaminophen exposure. APAP-CYS concentrations have been described in the setting of acute overdose, and a concentration >1.1 nmol/ml has been suggested as a marker of hepatic injury from acetaminophen overdose in patients with an ALT >1000 IU/L. However, the concentrations of APAP-CYS during therapeutic dosing, in cases of acetaminophen toxicity from repeated dosing and in cases of hepatic injury from non-acetaminophen hepatotoxins have not been well characterized. The objective of this study is to describe APAP-CYS concentrations in these clinical settings as well as to further characterize the concentrations observed following acetaminophen overdose. Methods Samples were collected during three clinical trials in which subjects received 4 g/day of acetaminophen and during an observational study of acetaminophen overdose patients. Trial 1 consisted of non-drinkers who received APAP for 10 days, Trial 2 consisted of moderate drinkers dosed for 10 days and Trial 3 included subjects who chronically abuse alcohol dosed for 5 days. Patients in the observational study were categorized by type of acetaminophen exposure (single or repeated. Serum APAP-CYS was measured using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Results Trial 1 included 144 samples from 24 subjects; Trial 2 included 182 samples from 91 subjects and Trial 3 included 200 samples from 40 subjects. In addition, we collected samples from 19 subjects with acute acetaminophen ingestion, 7 subjects with repeated acetaminophen exposure and 4 subjects who ingested another hepatotoxin. The mean (SD peak APAP-CYS concentrations for the Trials were: Trial 1- 0.4 (0.20 nmol/ml, Trial 2- 0.1 (0.09 nmol/ml and Trial 3- 0.3 (0.12 nmol/ml. APAP-CYS concentrations varied substantially among the patients with acetaminophen toxicity (0.10 to 27.3 nmol/ml. No subject had detectable APAP

  6. Cross-Talk between Malarial Cysteine Proteases and Falstatin: The BC Loop as a Hot-Spot Target

    OpenAIRE

    Sundararaj, Srinivasan; Saxena, Ajay K.; Sharma, Ruby; Vashisht, Kapil; Sharma, Supriya; Anvikar, Anup; Dixit, Rajnikant; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Pandey, Kailash C.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteases play a crucial role in the development of the human malaria parasites Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Our earlier studies demonstrated that these enzymes are equipped with specific domains for defined functions and further suggested the mechanism of activation of cysteine proteases. The activities of these proteases are regulated by a new class of endogenous inhibitors of cysteine proteases (ICPs). Structural studies of the ICPs of Trypanosoma cruzi (chagasin) a...

  7. Inactivation of Streptococcus pyogenes extracellular cysteine protease significantly decreases mouse lethality of serotype M3 and M49 strains.

    OpenAIRE

    Lukomski, S; Sreevatsan, S; Amberg, C; Reichardt, W.; Woischnik, M.; Podbielski, A; Musser, J M

    1997-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been implicated as important virulence factors in a wide range of prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathogens, but little direct evidence has been presented to support this notion. Virtually all strains of the human bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes express a highly conserved extracellular cysteine protease known as streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB). Two sets of isogenic strains deficient in SpeB cysteine protease activity were constructed by integrational mut...

  8. High-resolution complex of papain with remnants of a cysteine protease inhibitor derived from Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Alphey, Magnus S.; Hunter, William N.

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to cocrystallize the cysteine protease papain derived from the latex of Carica papaya with an inhibitor of cysteine proteases (ICP) from Trypanosoma brucei were unsuccessful. However, crystals of papain that diffracted to higher resolution, 1.5 Å, than other crystals of this archetypal cysteine protease were obtained, so the analysis was continued. Surprisingly, the substrate-binding cleft was occupied by two short peptide fragments which have been assigned as remnants of ICP. Compar...

  9. 2,2′-Dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) as an Effective and Gentle Deprotectant for Common Cysteine Protecting Groups†

    OpenAIRE

    Alayne L. Schroll; Hondal, Robert J.; Flemer, Stevenson

    2011-01-01

    Of all the commercially-available amino acid derivatives for solid phase peptide synthesis, none has a greater abundance of sidechain protection diversity than cysteine. The high reactivity of the cysteine thiol necessitates its attenuation during peptide construction. Moreover, the propensity of cysteine residues within a peptide or protein sequence to form disulfide connectivity allows the opportunity for the peptide chemist to install these disulfides iteratively as a post-synthetic manipu...

  10. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Katja E. Menger; Andrew M. James; Helena M. Cochemé; Harbour, Michael E.; Edward T. Chouchani; Shujing Ding; Ian M. Fearnley; Linda Partridge; Michael P. Murphy

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox...

  11. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  12. Understanding catalytic biomass conversion through data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Ras; B. McKay; G. Rothenberg

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of biomass is a key challenge that we chemists face in the twenty-first century. Worldwide, research is conducted into obtaining bulk chemicals, polymers and fuels. Our project centres on glucose valorisation via furfural derivatives using catalytic hydrogenation. We present her

  13. Novel residues lining the CFTR chloride channel pore identified by functional modification of introduced cysteines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis (SCAM) has been used widely to identify pore-lining amino acid side chains in ion channel proteins. However, functional effects on permeation and gating can be difficult to separate, leading to uncertainty concerning the location of reactive cysteine side chains. We have combined SCAM with investigation of the charge-dependent effects of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents on the functional permeation properties of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channels. We find that cysteines substituted for seven out of 21 continuous amino acids in the eleventh and twelfth transmembrane (TM) regions can be modified by external application of positively charged [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS bromide (MTSET) and negatively charged sodium [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS (MTSES). Modification of these cysteines leads to changes in the open channel current-voltage relationship at both the macroscopic and single-channel current levels that reflect specific, charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation through the channel from the external solution. This approach therefore identifies amino acid side chains that lie within the permeation pathway. Cysteine mutagenesis of pore-lining residues also affects intrapore anion binding and anion selectivity, giving more information regarding the roles of these residues. Our results demonstrate a straightforward method of screening for pore-lining amino acids in ion channels. We suggest that TM11 contributes to the CFTR pore and that the extracellular loop between TMs 11 and 12 lies close to the outer mouth of the pore. PMID:19381710

  14. Identification of semicarbazones, thiosemicarbazones and triazine nitriles as inhibitors of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schröder

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases of the papain superfamily are present in nearly all eukaryotes. They play pivotal roles in the biology of parasites and inhibition of cysteine proteases is emerging as an important strategy to combat parasitic diseases such as sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease and leishmaniasis. Homology modeling of the mature Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8 suggested that it differs significantly from bovine cathepsin B and thus could be a good drug target. High throughput screening of a compound library against this enzyme and bovine cathepsin B in a counter assay identified four novel inhibitors, containing the warhead-types semicarbazone, thiosemicarbazone and triazine nitrile, that can be used as leads for antiparasite drug design. Covalent docking experiments confirmed the SARs of these lead compounds in an effort to understand the structural elements required for specific inhibition of CPB2.8. This study has provided starting points for the design of selective and highly potent inhibitors of L. mexicana cysteine protease CPB that may also have useful efficacy against other important cysteine proteases.

  15. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, K., E-mail: e7141@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Tsujibayashi, T. [Department of Physics, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Takahashi, K.; Azuma, J. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Kakimoto, K. [Department of Geriatric Dentistry, Osaka Dental University, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Kamada, M. [Synchrotron Light Application Center, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. {yields} The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. {yields} The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. {yields} The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. {yields} The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  16. Electrocatalytic oxidation behavior of L-cysteine at Pt microparticles modified nanofibrous polyaniline film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Song-jiang; LUO Sheng-lian; ZHOU Hai-hui; KUANG Ya-fei; NING Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    Platinum(Pt)/nanofibrous polyaniline(PANI) electrode was prepared by pulse galvanostatic method and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical behavior of L-cysteine at the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The results indicate that the pH value of the solution and the Pt loading of the electrode have great effect on the electrocatalytic property of the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode; the suitable Pt loading of the electrode is 600 μg/cm2 and the suitable pH value of the solution is 4.5 for investigating L-cysteine oxidation. The L-cysteine sensor based on the Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode has a good selectivity, reproducibility and stability. The Pt/nanofibrous PANI electrode is highly sensitive to L-cysteine, and the linear calibration curve for the oxidation of L-cysteine can be observed in the range of 0.2-5.0 mmol/L.

  17. Development of a cysteine-deprived and C-terminally truncated GLP-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Garibay, Patrick W.;

    2013-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to family B of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and has become a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the development and characterization of a fully functional cysteine-deprived and C-terminally trun......The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) belongs to family B of the G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), and has become a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Here we describe the development and characterization of a fully functional cysteine-deprived and C......-terminally truncated GLP-1R. Single cysteines were initially substituted with alanine, and functionally redundant cysteines were subsequently changed simultaneously. Our results indicate that Cys174, Cys226, Cys296 and Cys403 are important for the GLP-1-mediated response, whereas Cys236, Cys329, Cys341, Cys347, Cys438...... membrane proximal part of the C-terminal is involved in receptor expression at the cell surface. The results show that seven cysteines and more than half of the C-terminal tail can be removed from GLP-1R without compromising GLP-1 binding or function....

  18. Electronic structures of the L-cysteine film on dental alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The electronic structures of dental alloys and L-cysteine film were studied by PES. → The density of states in the dental alloy originates from Au and Cu as constituents. → The Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. → The electronic structure of L-cysteine thin film is different from the thick film. → The bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states are formed at the interface. - Abstract: Metal-organic interfaces have been attracting continuous attention in many fields including basic biosciences. The surface of dental alloys could be one of such interfaces since they are used in a circumstance full of organic compounds such as proteins and bacteria. In this work, electronic structures of Au-dominant dental alloys, which have Ag and Cu besides Au, and those of L-cysteine on the dental alloys have been studied by photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the density of states in the dental alloy originate from gold and copper as constituents, and the Cu-3d states contribute dominantly to the occupied states near the Fermi level. It was also found that the electronic structure of the L-cysteine thin film on the dental alloy is different from that of the L-cysteine thick film. The result indicates the formation of the orbital bonding between Cu-3d and S-3sp states in the thin film on the dental alloy.

  19. Effect of cysteine on methionine production by a regulatory mutant of Corynebacterium lilium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Subramanian, Kartik; Bisaria, Virendra S.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.; Gomes, James [Indian Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Biochemical Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi (India)

    2005-02-01

    The production of methionine by submerged fermentation using a mutant strain of Corynebacterium lilium was studied to determine suitable conditions for obtaining high productivity. The mutant strain resistant to the methionine analogues ethionine, norleucine, methionine sulfoxide and methionine methylsulfonium chloride produced 2.34 g l{sup -1} of methionine in minimal medium containing glucose as carbon source. The effect of cysteine on methionine production in a 15 l bioreactor was studied by supplementing cysteine intermittently during the course of fermentation. The addition of cysteine (0.75 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}) every 2 h to the production medium increased the production of methionine to 3.39 g l{sup -1}. A metabolic flux analysis showed that during cysteine supplementation the ATP consumption reduced by 20%. It also showed that the increase in flux from phosphoenol pyruvate to oxaloacetate leads to higher methionine production. Results indicate that controlling the respiratory quotient close to 0.75 will produce the highest amount of methionine and that regulatory mutants also resistant to analogues of cysteine would be better methionine over producers. (Author)

  20. Accumulation and reactions of H2O2 during the copper ion catalysed autoxidation of cysteine in alkaline medium

    OpenAIRE

    Koningsberger, D.C.; De Zwart, J.; Wolput, J.H.M.C. van; Cammen, J.C.J.M. van der

    1981-01-01

    The stoichiometry of the copper catalysed alkaline autoxidation of cysteine has been investigated. Products of this oxidation reaction are cystine, H{2}O{2} and H{2}O. No oxygen containing sulfur acids are produced as long as cysteine is present in the reaction liquid.The H{2}O{2} generated reacts with cysteine selectively to form cystine and H{2}O with r{H}{2}{O}{2} = k{H}{2}{O}{2} [CyS][H{2}O{2}] (k{H}{2}{O}{2} = 0.17 1 mol}-{}1{ s}-{}1{).The reaction between H{2}O{2} and cysteine is not ca...

  1. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja E. Menger

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT, to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster.

  2. Fasting, but Not Aging, Dramatically Alters the Redox Status of Cysteine Residues on Proteins in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Katja E.; James, Andrew M.; Cochemé, Helena M.; Harbour, Michael E.; Chouchani, Edward T.; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Partridge, Linda; Murphy, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Altering the redox state of cysteine residues on protein surfaces is an important response to environmental challenges. Although aging and fasting alter many redox processes, the role of cysteine residues is uncertain. To address this, we used a redox proteomic technique, oxidative isotope-coded affinity tags (OxICAT), to assess cysteine-residue redox changes in Drosophila melanogaster during aging and fasting. This approach enabled us to simultaneously identify and quantify the redox state of several hundred cysteine residues in vivo. Cysteine residues within young flies had a bimodal distribution with peaks at ∼10% and ∼85% reversibly oxidized. Surprisingly, these cysteine residues did not become more oxidized with age. In contrast, 24 hr of fasting dramatically oxidized cysteine residues that were reduced under fed conditions while also reducing cysteine residues that were initially oxidized. We conclude that fasting, but not aging, dramatically alters cysteine-residue redox status in D. melanogaster. PMID:26095360

  3. Nuclear quadrupole interaction of 99Mo(β -) 99Tc in Mo(V; VI)-cysteine complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guida; Ni, Xinbo; Butz, T.; Lerf, A.

    1988-10-01

    The nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) of 99Mo(β -) 99Tc in Mo(V)-cysteine and Mo(VI)-cysteine complexes was measured by time differential perturbed angular correlation (TDPAC) in ammonium salts between 77 and 300 K. The NQI is about a factor of two larger in Mo(V)-cysteine than in Mo(VI)-cysteine. The NQI for both complexes is considerably larger than in their EDTA analogues (17% and 45% for Mo(V) and Mo(VI), respectively).

  4. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  5. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  6. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  7. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  8. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  9. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  10. Fluctuations in catalytic surface reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Imbihl, R

    2003-01-01

    The internal reaction-induced fluctuations which occur in catalytic CO oxidation on a Pt field emitter tip have been studied using field electron microscopy (FEM) as a spatially resolving method. The structurally heterogeneous Pt tip consists of facets of different orientations with nanoscale dimensions. The FEM resolution of roughly 2 nm corresponds to a few hundred reacting adsorbed particles whose variations in the density are imaged as brightness fluctuations. In the bistable range of the reaction one finds fluctuation-induced transitions between the two stable branches of the reaction kinetics. The fluctuations exhibit a behaviour similar to that of an equilibrium phase transition, i.e. the amplitude diverges upon approaching the bifurcation point terminating the bistable range of the reaction. Simulations with a hybrid Monte Carlo/mean-field model reproduce the experimental observations. Fluctuations on different facets are typically uncorrelated but within a single facet a high degree of spatial cohere...

  11. Catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R; Beutner, Gregory L

    2005-07-25

    In 1935, R. C. Fuson formulated the principle of vinylogy to explain how the influence of a functional group may be felt at a distant point in the molecule when this position is connected by conjugated double-bond linkages to the group. In polar reactions, this concept allows the extension of the electrophilic or nucleophilic character of a functional group through the pi system of a carbon-carbon double bond. This vinylogous extension has been applied to the aldol reaction by employing "extended" dienol ethers derived from gamma-enolizable alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Since 1994, several methods for the catalytic, enantioselective, vinylogous aldol reaction have appeared, with which varying degrees of regio- (site), enantio-, and diastereoselectivity can be attained. In this Review, the current scope and limitations of this transformation, as well as its application in natural product synthesis, are discussed. PMID:15940727

  12. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  13. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  14. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  15. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-07-14

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. PMID:27305447

  16. Leishmania aethiopica: identification and characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Teklu; Jirata, Dagim; Genetu, Abebe; Barr, Stephen; Mengistu, Yohannes; Aseffa, Abraham; Gedamu, Lashitew

    2007-03-01

    There is limited information on the biology and pathogenesis of Leishmania aethiopica, causative agent of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Ethiopia. In this study we have identified and characterized two cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes, Laecpa and Laecpb, from L. aethiopica. The predicted amino acid sequence of Laecpa and Laecpb is more than 75% identical with homologous cathepsin L-like cysteine protease genes of other Leishmania species and less than 50% identical with human cathepsin L. Laecpa is expressed predominantly in the stationary, and to a lower level, during the amastigote stage while Laecpb is specifically expressed in the stationary stage of L. aethiopica development. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the two genes are grouped into separate clades which are the result of gene duplication. The isolation of these genes will be useful in developing Leishmania species specific diagnostics for molecular epidemiological studies and serves as a first step to study the role of cysteine proteases in L. aethiopica pathogenesis. PMID:17083936

  17. Usefulness of scintigraphy with 99mTc-L-cysteine for the detection of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the usefulness of scintigraphic studies with 99mTc-L-cysteine in the detection of breast cancer, 100 female patients were studied by ultrasound, mammography and scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images were acquired at 15 minutes and one hour after injection of the radiopharmaceutical. Histopathologic results were the confirmation test: 64 patients were completed as having breast carcinoma and 36 benign lesions. The scintigraphic studies obtained value of sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of: 98.4%, 94.4% and 97% respectively. The positive predictive value was 96.9% and the negative predictive value was 97.1%. There was infiltration of axillary lymph nodes in 20 of the patients studied, 70% were detected by 99mTc-L-cysteine. Conclusion: 99mTc-L-cysteine was useful for the detection of breast cancer

  18. The roles of cysteines in the heme domain of human soluble guanylate cyclase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Fang Zhong; Xiao Xiao Liu; Jie Pan; Zhong Xian Huang; Xiang Shi Tan

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a critical heme-containing enzyme involved in NO signaling.The dimerization of sGC subunits is necessary for its bioactivity and its mechanism is a striiking and an indistinct issue.The roles of heme domain cysteines of the sGC on the dimerization and heme binding were investigated herein.The site-directed mutations of three conserved cysteines (C78A,C 122A and C 174S) were studied systematically and the three mutants were characterized by gel filtration analysis,UV-vis spectroscopy and heime transfer examination.Cys78 was involved in heme binding but not referred to the dimerization,while Cys174 was demonstrated to be involved in the homodimerization.These results provide new insights into the cysteine-related dimerization regulation of sGC.

  19. The anthelmintic efficacy of natural plant cysteine proteinases against Hymenolepis microstoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, F; Luoga, W; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Lowe, A; Behnke, J M

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the efficacy of cysteine proteinases (CP) as anthelmintics for cestode infections in vivo. Hymenolepis microstoma is a natural parasite of house mice, and provides a convenient model system for the assessment of novel drugs for anthelmintic activity against cestodes. The experiments described in this paper indicate that treatment of H. microstoma infections in mice with the supernatant of papaya latex (PLS), containing active cysteine proteinases, is only minimally efficacious. The statistically significant effects seen on worm burden and biomass showed little evidence of dose dependency, were temporary and the role of cysteine proteinases as the active principles in PLS was not confirmed by specific inhibition with E-64. Worm fecundity was not affected by treatment at the doses used. We conclude also that this in vivo host-parasite system is not sensitive enough to be used reliably for the detection of cestocidal activity of compounds being screened as potential, novel anthelmintics. PMID:25226116

  20. Cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) supports tumor cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, K; Albrechtsen, R; Gilpin, B J;

    1999-01-01

    tumor cell adhesion. We found that the disintegrin-like domain of human ADAM 15 supported adhesion of alphavbeta3-expressing A375 melanoma cells. In the case of human ADAM 12, however, recombinant polypeptides of the cysteine-rich domain but not the disintegrin-like domain supported cell adhesion of a...... panel of carcinoma cell lines. On attachment to recombinant polypeptides from the cysteine-rich domain of human ADAM 12, most tumor cell lines, such as MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, were rounded and associated with numerous actin-containing filopodia and used a cell surface heparan sulfate...... proteoglycan to attach. Finally, we demonstrated that authentic full-length human ADAM 12 could bind to heparin Sepharose. Together these results suggest a novel role of the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM 12 -- that of supporting tumor cell adhesion....

  1. Surface functionalization of silica nanoparticles with cysteine: a low-fouling zwitterionic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joshua E; Gu, Frank X

    2011-09-01

    Herein, we report on the functionalization of silica nanoparticles with a small molecule, the amino acid cysteine, in order to create a low-fouling zwitterionic surface for nanomedicine applications. The cysteine functionalization was shown to impart the particles with excellent stability in both salt and single-protein solutions of lysozyme (positively charged) and bovine serum albumin (negatively charged). Bare silica particles precipitated immediately in a lysozyme solution, while cysteine-functionalized particles were stable for 20 h. Furthermore, the particles displayed excellent long-term stability in solutions of human serum showing no aggregation over a period of 14 days. The functionalized particles also possess multiple reactive surface groups for further coupling reactions. We believe that the surface functionalization schemes described in this report represent a versatile and effective method of stabilizing nanoparticle systems in biological media for their use in a variety of therapeutic and diagnostic applications. PMID:21761888

  2. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure

  3. Phytomonas serpens: cysteine peptidase inhibitors interfere with growth, ultrastructure and host adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, André L S; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia M; Dias, Felipe A; Ribeiro, Rachel O; Pereira, Fernanda M; Elias, Camila G R; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Lopes, Angela H C S; Alviano, Celuta S; Branquinha, Marta H; Soares, Rosangela M A

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we report the ultrastructural and growth alterations caused by cysteine peptidase inhibitors on the plant trypanosomatid Phytomonas serpens. We showed that the cysteine peptidase inhibitors at 10 microM were able to arrest cellular growth as well as promote alterations in the cell morphology, including the parasites becoming short and round. Additionally, iodoacetamide induced ultrastructural alterations, such as disintegration of cytoplasmic organelles, swelling of the nucleus and kinetoplast-mitochondrion complex, which culminated in parasite death. Leupeptin and antipain induced the appearance of microvillar extensions and blebs on the cytoplasmic membrane, resembling a shedding process. A 40 kDa cysteine peptidase was detected in hydrophobic and hydrophilic phases of P. serpens cells after Triton X-114 extraction. Additionally, we have shown through immunoblotting that anti-cruzipain polyclonal antibodies recognised two major polypeptides in P. serpens, including a 40 kDa component. Flow cytometry analysis confirmed that this cruzipain-like protein has a location on the cell surface. Ultrastructural immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the cruzipain-like protein on the surface and in small membrane fragments released from leupeptin-treated parasites. Furthermore, the involvement of cysteine peptidases of P. serpens in the interaction with explanted salivary glands of the phytophagous insect Oncopeltus fasciatus was also investigated. When P. serpens cells were pre-treated with either cysteine peptidase inhibitors or anti-cruzipain antibody, a significant reduction of the interaction process was observed. Collectively, these results suggest that cysteine peptidases participate in several biological processes in P. serpens including cell growth and interaction with the invertebrate vector. PMID:16310789

  4. Decoration of gold nanoparticles with cysteine in solution: reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Susanna; Carravetta, Vincenzo; Ågren, Hans

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption.The dynamics of gold nanoparticle functionalization by means of adsorption of cysteine molecules in water solution is simulated through classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations based on an accurately parametrized force field. The adsorption modes of the molecules are characterized in detail disclosing the nature of the cysteine-gold interactions and the stability of the final material. The simulation results agree satisfactorily with recent experimental and theoretical data and confirm previous findings for a similar system. The covalent attachments of the molecules to the gold support are all slow physisorptions followed by fast chemisorptions. However, a great variety of binding arrangements can be observed. Interactions with the adsorbate caused surface modulations in terms of adatoms and dislocations which contributed to strengthen the cysteine adsorption. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Different views of the AuNP surface coverage. Distance map describing the position of each molecule in relation to the others on the AuNP (alpha carbon distances). See DOI: 10.1039/C

  5. Gastrointestinal absorption and biological activities of serine and cysteine proteases of animal and plant origin: review on absorption of serine and cysteine proteases

    OpenAIRE

    Lorkowski, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Research has confirmed that peptides and larger protein molecules pass through the mucosal barrier of the gastrointestinal tract. Orally administered serine and cysteine proteases of plant and animal origin also reach blood and lymph as intact, high molecular weight and physiologically active protein molecules. Their absorption may be supported by a self-enhanced paracellular transport mechanism resulting in sub-nanomolar concentration of transiently free protease molecules or, in a complex w...

  6. Partial Purification and Properties of a Cysteine Protease from Citrus Red Mite Panonychus citri

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Seong Chul; Her, Kyu-Hee; Kim, Heung-Up; Lee, Jaechun; Lee, Sang Pyo; Chung, Young-Bae

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have reported that the citrus red mites Panonychus citri were an important allergen of citrus-cultivating farmers in Jeju Island. The aim of the present study was to purify and assess properties of a cysteine protease from the mites acting as a potentially pathogenic factor to citrus-cultivating farmers. A cysteine protease was purified using column chromatography of Mono Q anion exchanger and Superdex 200 HR gel filtration. It was estimated to be 46 kDa by gel filtration colu...

  7. An Assay Study of Molecular Recognition of Amino Acids in Water: Covalent Imprinting of Cysteine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Yu, Donghong

    2015-01-01

    A novel synthetic N-(9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SH)-OH) receptor was pre- pared by co-polymerizing (9-fluorenyl methoxy carbonyl)-S-(1-propene-2-thiol)-L-Cysteine (Fmoc-Cys(SCH2CHCH2)-OH) and a non-imprinted polymer prepared from 1-propene-1-thiol photo-chemically 15 h at ...... reproducible and contain constant binding strengths and recognition properties. Furthermore, we proved that short incubation periods resulted in fast and efficient thiol-disulfide interchange reactions....

  8. Metabolism of the cysteine S-conjugate of busulfan involves a β-lyase reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Arthur J.L.; Younis, Islam R.; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Pinto, John T.; Petros, William P.; Callery, Patrick S.

    2008-01-01

    The present work documents the first example of an enzyme-catalyzed β-elimination of a thioether from a sulfonium cysteine S-conjugate. β-(S-Tetrahydrothiophenium)-L-alanine (THT-A) is the cysteine S-conjugate of busulfan. THT-A slowly undergoes a non-enzymatic β-elimination reaction at pH 7.4 and 37°C to yield tetrahydrothiophene, pyruvate and ammonia. This reaction is accelerated by a) rat liver, kidney and brain homogenates, b) isolated rat liver mitochondria, and c) pyridoxal 5′-phosphate...

  9. DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8) Is a Double-cysteine-ligated Heme Protein*

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Ian; Smith, Aaron T.; Senturia, Rachel; Chen, Yanqiu; Scheidemantle, Brooke D.; Burstyn, Judith N.; Guo, Feng

    2011-01-01

    All known heme-thiolate proteins ligate the heme iron using one cysteine side chain. We previously found that DiGeorge Critical Region 8 (DGCR8), an essential microRNA processing factor, associates with heme of unknown redox state when overexpressed in Escherichia coli. On the basis of the similarity of the 450-nm Soret absorption peak of the DGCR8-heme complex to that of cytochrome P450 containing ferrous heme with CO bound, we identified cysteine 352 as a probable axial ligand in DGCR8. Her...

  10. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M;

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  11. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H;

    2006-01-01

    explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans...... vivo in CK null mice. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of MMP activity reduced both proteoglycan loss and type II collagen degradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered...

  12. Hg(2+) mediated quinazoline ensemble for highly selective recognition of Cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Thangaraj; Sivaraman, Gandhi; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2014-04-01

    A fluorimetric sensor for Hg(2+) ion and Cysteine based on quinazoline platform was designed and synthesized by one step reaction and characterized by using common spectroscopic methods. Time Dependent Density Functional Theory calculations shows that probe behaves as "ON-OFF" fluorescent quenching sensor via electron transfer/heavy atom effect. Receptor was found to exhibit selective fluorescence quenching behavior over the other competitive metal ions, and also the receptor-Hg(2+) ensemble act as an efficient "OFF-ON" sensor for Cysteine. Moreover this sensor has also been successfully applied to detection of Hg(2+) in natural water samples with good recovery. PMID:24384358

  13. Two Japanese CADASIL families exhibiting Notch3 mutation R75P not involving cysteine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Toshiki; Muranishi, Manabu; Torugun, Torusunjian; Tango, Hiromi; Nagakane, Yoshinari; Kudeken, Tukasa; Kawase, Yuji; Kawabe, Kiyokazu; Oshima, Fumiko; Yaoi, Takeshi; Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2008-01-01

    Most previously reported mutations in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) result in an odd number of cysteine residues within the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats in Notch3. We report here R75P mutation in two Japanese CADASIL families not directly involving cysteine residues located within the first EGF-like repeats. Probands in both families had repeated episodes of stroke, depression, dementia as well as T2 high-intensity lesions in the basal ganglia and periventricular white matter, but fewer white matter lesions in the temporal pole on MRI. These families provide new insights into the diagnosis and pathomechanisms of CADASIL. PMID:19043263

  14. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  15. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  16. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  17. Development of Catalytic Cooking Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden); Tena, Emmanuel; Berger, Marc [Gaz de France (France)

    2004-04-01

    Gas catalytic combustion for gas stoves or cooking plates (closed catalytic burner system with ceramic plates) is a very promising technique in terms of ease of cleaning, power modulation and emissions. Previous investigations show that wire mesh catalysts, prepared and supplied by Catator AB (CAT), seem to be very well suited for such applications. Beside significantly reducing the NOx-emissions, these catalysts offer important advantages such as good design flexibility, low pressure drop and high heat transfer capacity, where the latter leads to a quick thermal response. Prior to this project, Gaz de France (GdF) made a series of measurements with CAT's wire mesh catalysts in their gas cooking plates and compared the measured performance with similar results obtained with theirs cordierite monolith catalysts. Compared to the monolith catalyst, the wire mesh catalyst was found to enable very promising results with respect to both emission levels (<10 mg NO{sub x} /kWh, <5 mg CO/kWh) and life-time (>8000 h vs. 700 h at 200 kW/m{sup 2}). It was however established that the radiation and hence, the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate, was significantly less than is usually measured in combination with the monolith (15 % vs. 32 %). It was believed that the latter could be improved by developing new burner designs based on CAT's wire mesh concept. As a consequence, a collaboration project between GdF, CAT and the Swedish Gas Technology AB was created. This study reports on the design, the construction and the evaluation of new catalytic burners, based on CAT's wire mesh catalysts, used for the combustion of natural gas in gas cooking stoves. The evaluation of the burners was performed with respect to key factors such as thermal efficiency, emission quality and pressure drop, etc, by the use of theoretical simulations and experimental tests. Impacts of parameters such as the the wire mesh number, the wire mesh structure (planar or folded), the

  18. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  19. L-Cysteine inhibits root elongation through auxin/PLETHORA and SCR/SHR pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Wang; Jie-Li Mao; Ying-Jun Zhao; Chuan-You Li; Cheng-Bin Xiang

    2015-01-01

    L‐Cysteine plays a prominent role in sulfur metabo-lism of plants. However, its role in root development is largely unknown. Here, we report that L‐cysteine reduces primary root growth in a dosage‐dependent manner. Elevating cel ular L‐cysteine level by exposing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings to high L‐cysteine, buthionine sulphoximine, or O‐acetylserine leads to altered auxin maximum in root tips, the expression of quiescent center cel marker as wel as the decrease of the auxin carriers PIN1, PIN2, PIN3, and PIN7 of primary roots. We also show that high L‐cysteine significantly reduces the protein level of two sets of stem cel specific transcription factors PLETHORA1/2 and SCR/SHR. However, L‐cysteine does not downregulate the transcript level of PINs, PLTs, or SCR/SHR, suggesting that an uncharacterized post‐transcriptional mech-anism may regulate the accumulation of PIN, PLT, and SCR/SHR proteins and auxin transport in the root tips. These results suggest that endogenous L‐cysteine level acts to maintain root stem cel niche by regulating basal‐and auxin‐induced expression of PLT1/2 and SCR/SHR. L‐Cysteine may serve as a link between sulfate assimilation and auxin in regulating root growth.

  20. Accumulation and Reactions of H2O2 during the copper ion Catalyzed Autoxidation of Cysteine in Alkaline Medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Zwart, J.; Wolput, J.H.M.C. van; Cammen, J.C.J.M. van der

    1981-01-01

    The stoichiometry of the copper catalysed alkaline autoxidation of cysteine has been investigated. Products of this oxidation reaction are cystine, H{2}O{2} and H{2}O. No oxygen containing sulfur acids are produced as long as cysteine is present in the reaction liquid.The H{2}O{2} generated reacts w

  1. 2,2'-Dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) as an effective and gentle deprotectant for common cysteine protecting groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroll, Alayne L; Hondal, Robert J; Flemer, Stevenson

    2012-01-01

    Of all the commercially available amino acid derivatives for solid phase peptide synthesis, none has a greater abundance of side-chain protection diversity than cysteine. The high reactivity of the cysteine thiol necessitates its attenuation during peptide construction. Moreover, the propensity of cysteine residues within a peptide or protein sequence to form disulfide connectivity allows the opportunity for the peptide chemist to install these disulfides iteratively as a post-synthetic manipulation through the judicious placement of orthogonal pairs of cysteine S-protection within the peptide's architecture. It is important to continuously discover new vectors of deprotection for these different blocking protocols in order to achieve the highest degree of orthogonality between the removal of one species in the presence of another. We report here a complete investigation of the scope and limitations of the deprotective potential of 2,2'-dithiobis(5-nitropyridine) (DTNP) on a selection of commercially available Cys S-protecting groups. The gentle conditions of DTNP in a TFA solvent system show a remarkable ability to deprotect some cysteine blocking functionality traditionally removable only by more harsh or forcing conditions. Beyond illustrating the deprotective ability of this reagent cocktail within a cysteine-containing peptide sequence, the utility of this method was further demonstrated through iterative disulfide formation in oxytocin and apamin test peptides. It is shown that this methodology has high potential as a stand-alone cysteine deprotection technique or in further manipulation of disulfide architecture within a more complex cysteine-containing peptide template. PMID:22083608

  2. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  3. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  4. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  5. Key Role of Cysteine Residues in Catalysis and Subcellular Localization of Sulfur Oxygenase-Reductase of Acidianus tengchongensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z. W.; Jiang, C. Y.; She, Qunxin;

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of known sulfur oxygenase-reductases (SORs) and the SOR-like sequences identified from public databases indicated that they all possess three cysteine residues within two conserved motifs (V-G-P-K-V-C31 and C101-X-X-C104; numbering according to the Acidianus tengchongensis numbering system......). The thio-modifying reagent N-ethylmaleimide and Zn2+ strongly inhibited the activities of the SORs of A. tengchongensis, suggesting that cysteine residues are important. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to construct four mutant SORs with cysteines replaced by serine or alanine. The purified mutant...... proteins were investigated in parallel with the wild-type SOR. Replacement of any cysteine reduced SOR activity by 98.4 to 100%, indicating that all the cysteine residues are crucial to SOR activities. Circular-dichroism and fluorescence spectrum analyses revealed that the wild-type and mutant SORs have...

  6. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment of...... adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...... work with new possibilities of development of the work, but also suggestions for development of the concept of catalytic processes....

  7. Catalytic converters as a source of platinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornalczyk

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase of Platinum Group Metals demand in automotive industry is connected with growing amount of cars equipped with the catalytic converters. The paper presents the review of available technologies during recycling process. The possibility of removing platinum from the used catalytic converters applying pyrometallurgical and hyrdometallurgical methods were also investigated. Metals such as Cu, Pb, Ca, Mg, Cd were used in the pyrometallurgical research (catalytic converter was melted with Cu, Pb and Ca or Mg and Cd vapours were blown through the whole carrier. In hydrometallurgical research catalytic converters was dissolved in aqua regia. Analysis of Pt contents in the carrier before and after the process was performed by means of atomic absorption spectroscopy. Obtained result were discussed.

  8. Lifespan extension and increased resistance to environmental stressors by N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Il Oh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a modified sulfur-containing amino acid that acts as a strong cellular antioxidant, on the response to environmental stressors and on aging in C. elegans. METHOD: The survival of worms under oxidative stress conditions induced by paraquat was evaluated with and without in vivo N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the response to other environmental stressors, including heat stress and ultraviolet irradiation (UV, was also monitored. To investigate the effect on aging, we examined changes in lifespan, fertility, and expression of age-related biomarkers in C. elegans after N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. RESULTS: Dietary N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly increased resistance to oxidative stress, heat stress, and UV irradiation in C. elegans. In addition, N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation significantly extended both the mean and maximum lifespan of C. elegans. The mean lifespan was extended by up to 30.5% with 5 mM N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment, and the maximum lifespan was increased by 8 days. N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation also increased the total number of progeny produced and extended the gravid period of C. elegans. The green fluorescent protein reporter assay revealed that expression of the stress-responsive genes, sod-3 and hsp-16.2, increased significantly following N-acetyl-L-cysteine treatment. CONCLUSION: N-acetyl-L-cysteine supplementation confers a longevity phenotype in C. elegans, possibly through increased resistance to environmental stressors.

  9. NEW EMBO MEMBER’S REVIEW: Lysosomal cysteine proteases: facts and opportunities

    OpenAIRE

    Turk, Vito; Turk, Boris; Turk, Dušan

    2001-01-01

    From their discovery in the first half of the 20th century, lysosomal cysteine proteases have come a long way: from being the enzymes non-selectively degrading proteins in lysosomes to being those responsible for a number of important cellular processes. Some of the features and roles of their structures, specificity, regulation and physiology are discussed.

  10. The effect of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on the viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Lichtendonk, W.J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) proved to be an effective mucolytic in pulmonary secretions. Our goal was to investigate the in vitro effect of NAC on viscosity of ileal neobladder mucus. The urine of a patient with an ileal neobladder was collected during the first 7 days postoperatively and stored in a

  11. Partial purification and properties of a cysteine protease from citrus red mite Panonychus citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seong Chul; Her, Kyu-Hee; Kim, Heung-Up; Lee, Jaechun; Lee, Sang Pyo; Chung, Young-Bae

    2014-02-01

    Several studies have reported that the citrus red mites Panonychus citri were an important allergen of citrus-cultivating farmers in Jeju Island. The aim of the present study was to purify and assess properties of a cysteine protease from the mites acting as a potentially pathogenic factor to citrus-cultivating farmers. A cysteine protease was purified using column chromatography of Mono Q anion exchanger and Superdex 200 HR gel filtration. It was estimated to be 46 kDa by gel filtration column chromatography and consisted of 2 polypeptides, at least. Cysteine protease inhibitors, such as trans poxy-succinyl-L-leucyl-amido (4-guanidino) butane (E-64) and iodoacetic acid (IAA) totally inhibited the enzyme activities, whereas serine or metalloprotease inhibitors did not affect the activities. In addition, the purified enzyme degraded human IgG, collagen, and fibronectin, but not egg albumin. From these results, the cysteine protease of the mites might be involved in the pathogenesis such as tissue destruction and penetration instead of nutrient digestion. PMID:24623894

  12. Immobilization of Cysteine-Tagged Proteins on Electrode Surfaces by Thiol-Ene Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Vilà, Neus; Klein, Tobias; Kohring, Gert-Wieland; Mazurenko, Ievgen; Walcarius, Alain; Etienne, Mathieu

    2016-07-13

    Thiol-ene click chemistry can be exploited for the immobilization of cysteine-tagged dehydrogenases in an active form onto carbon electrodes (glassy carbon and carbon felt). The electrode surfaces have been first modified with vinylphenyl groups by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding diazonium salts generated in situ from 4-vinylaniline. The grafting process has been optimized in order to not hinder the electrochemical regeneration of NAD(+)/NADH cofactor and soluble mediators such as ferrocenedimethanol and [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+). Having demonstrated the feasibility of thiol-ene click chemistry for attaching ferrocene moieties onto those carbon surfaces, the same approach was then applied to the immobilization of d-sorbitol dehydrogenases with cysteine tag. These proteins can be effectively immobilized (as pointed out by XPS), and the cysteine tag (either 1 or 2 cysteine moieties at the N terminus of the polypeptide chain) was proven to maintain the enzymatic activity of the dehydrogenase upon grafting. The bioelectrode was applied to electroenzymatic enantioselective reduction of d-fructose to d-sorbitol, as a case study. PMID:27299176

  13. Allicin from garlic strongly inhibits cysteine proteinases and cytopathic effects of Entamoeba histolytica.

    OpenAIRE

    Ankri, S; Miron, T; Rabinkov, A; Wilchek, M; Mirelman, D

    1997-01-01

    The ability of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites to destroy monolayers of baby hamster kidney cells is inhibited by allicin, one of the active principles of garlic. Cysteine proteinases, an important contributor to amebic virulence, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase, are strongly inhibited by allicin.

  14. Assembly of the Cysteine Synthase Complex and the Regulatory Role of Protein-Protein Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macromolecular assemblies play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The cysteine synthase complex (CSC), which is formed by association of serine O-acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), functions as a multienzyme complex that responds to changes in intracellul...

  15. Role of conserved cysteine residues in Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Baura, Valter A; Aquino, Bruno; Huergo, Luciano F; Kadowaki, Marco A S; Chubatsu, Leda S; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Wassem, Roseli; Monteiro, Rose A

    2009-01-01

    Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium that associates with economically important crops. NifA protein, the transcriptional activator of nif genes in H. seropedicae, binds to nif promoters and, together with RNA polymerase-sigma(54) holoenzyme, catalyzes the formation of open complexes to allow transcription initiation. The activity of H. seropedicae NifA is controlled by ammonium and oxygen levels, but the mechanisms of such control are unknown. Oxygen sensitivity is attributed to a conserved motif of cysteine residues in NifA that spans the central AAA+ domain and the interdomain linker that connects the AAA+ domain to the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Here we mutagenized this conserved motif of cysteines and assayed the activity of mutant proteins in vivo. We also purified the mutant variants of NifA and tested their capacity to bind to the nifB promoter region. Chimeric proteins between H. seropedicae NifA, an oxygen-sensitive protein, and Azotobacter vinelandii NifA, an oxygen-tolerant protein, were constructed and showed that the oxygen response is conferred by the central AAA+ and C-terminal DNA binding domains of H. seropedicae NifA. We conclude that the conserved cysteine motif is essential for NifA activity, although single cysteine-to-serine mutants are still competent at binding DNA. PMID:19573596

  16. Detection of cysteine protease in Taenia solium-induced brain granulomas in naturally infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mkupasi, Ernatus Martin; Sikasunge, Chummy Sikalizyo; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel;

    2013-01-01

    In order to further characterize the immune response around the viable or degenerating Taenia solium cysts in the pig brain, the involvement of cysteine protease in the immune evasion was assessed. Brain tissues from 30 adult pigs naturally infected with T. solium cysticercosis were subjected...... protease may play a role in inducing immune evasion through apoptosis around viable T. solium cysts....

  17. Structural basis for specificity of papain-like cysteine protease proregions toward their cognate enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groves, M R; Coulombe, R; Jenkins, J; Cygler, M

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to the proregions of papain-like cysteine proteases have been shown to be good and selective inhibitors of their parental enzymes. The molecular basis for their selectivity, quite remarkable in some cases, is not fully understood. The recent determination of the crys

  18. Cysteine cathepsin activity suppresses osteoclastogenesis of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Rautela, J.; Duivenvoorden, H.M.; Jayatilleke, K.M.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.; Parker, B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsin proteases contribute to many normal cellular functions, and their aberrant activity within various cell types can contribute to many diseases, including breast cancer. It is now well accepted that cathepsin proteases have numerous cell-specific functions within the tumor microenvi

  19. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise H; Petersson, Stine J; Sellathurai, Jeeva;

    2009-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)/osteonectin is expressed in different tissues during remodeling and repair, suggesting a function in regeneration. Several gene expression studies indicated that SPARC was expressed in response to muscle damage. Studies on myoblasts further...

  20. Micronutrients, N-Acetyl Cysteine, Probiotics and Prebiotics, A Review of Effectiveness in Reducing HIV Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.B.S. Hummelen (Ruben); J. Hemsworth (Jaimie); G.K. Reid (Gregor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLow serum concentrations of micronutrients, intestinal abnormalities, and an inflammatory state have been associated with HIV progression. These may be ameliorated by micronutrients, N-acetyl cysteine, probiotics, and prebiotics. This review aims to integrate the evidence from clinical t

  1. Novel Aza Peptide Inhibitors and Active-Site Probes of Papain-Family Cysteine Proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhelst, Steven H.L.; Witte, Martin D.; Arastu-Kapur, Shirin; Fonovic, Marko; Bogyo, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Recent characterization of multiple classes of functionalized azapeptides as effective covalent inhibitors of cysteine proteases prompted us to investigate O-acyl hydroxamates and their azapeptide analogues for use as activity-based probes (ABPs). We report here a new class of azaglycine-containing

  2. Facile synthesis of gold nanoribbons by L-cysteine at room temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lan; ZHANG Yu; GUO ZhiRui; GU Ning

    2009-01-01

    Highly crystalline gold nanoribbons have been synthesized via a simple method by L-cysteine reduc-tion of aqueous chloroaurate ions at room temperature, without additional capping agent or surfactant. Based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis absorption studies for the intermediate products, the formation of gold nanoribbons is regarded as a kind of oriented attachment growth.

  3. Serum cysteine proteases and their inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis: relation to disease activity and radiographic progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kos, Janko; Krašovec, Marta; Troelsen, Lone;

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the serum levels of cysteine proteases cathepsins B and H and their inhibitors stefin A, stefin B, and cystatin C, as well as traditional inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and to correlate these markers with scores...

  4. A sensitive chemiluminescence method for the determination of cysteine based on silver nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a sensitive chemiluminescent (CL) assay for cysteine. It is based on the use of water-soluble and fluorescent silver nanoclusters (Ag NCs) which are found to be able to strongly enhance the weak CL signal resulting from the redox reaction between Ce(IV) ion and sulfite ion. This enhancement is inhibited by cysteine under appropriate conditions. Taking advantage of this specific CL inhibition, a novel CL method for the sensitive and selective detection of cysteine was developed. This effect is interpreted in terms of an electronic energy transfer from excited state intermediate sulfur dioxide (originating from the CL reaction between Ce(IV) and sulfite ions) to the Ag-NCs. The latter become electronically excited and thus can act as a new source of emission. The method was applied to the determination of cysteine in the range from 5.0 nM to 1.0 μM, with a detection limit at 2.5 nM (S/N=3). (author)

  5. Recombinant Cysteine Proteinase from Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi Implicated in Human and Dog T-Cell Responses

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa Pinheiro, Paulo Henrique; de Souza Dias, Suzana; EULÁLIO, Kelsen Dantas; Mendonça, Ivete L.; Katz, Simone; Barbiéri, Clara Lúcia

    2005-01-01

    High in vitro lymphoproliferative responses were induced in humans and dogs by a recombinant Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi cysteine proteinase, with secretion of IFN-γ in asymptomatic subjects or of IFN-γ, interleukin 4 (IL-4), and IL-10 in oligosymptomatic subjects. In contrast, responses of symptomatic patients and dogs were lower, with production of IL-4 and IL-10.

  6. Vibrational spectra and the structure of coordination center complexes of cadmium with cysteine in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a number of coordination compounds of cadmium with cysteine, we observe the effects of coordination in Raman and IR-transmission spectra in the frequency range 300-600 cm-1. The assignment of observed internal vibrations of the coordination center is done, and their frequencies are determined (cm-1): 500, 575, 578 (Cd-O) and 345, 406, 429 (Cd-S)

  7. Ultrasonic-assisted synthesis of magnetite based MRI contrast agent using cysteine as the biocapping coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Reza [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Malek, Mahrooz [Medical Image Centre, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran Medical University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Hamid Reza Madaah [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali [National Cell Bank of Iran, Pasteur Institute of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oghabian, Mohammad Ali [Research Centre for Sciences and Technology in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Masoudi, Afshin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11155-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gu Ning; Zhang Yu [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biomaterials and Devices, Nanjing (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We used cysteine as surfactant to synthesize stable magnetite-based ferrofluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer pH increase from 11 to 12 led to particle size decrease from 19.58 to 10.02 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cytotoxicity assay showed that synthesized particles were biocompatible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MRI results showed that magnetite particles were accumulated in lymph nodes. - Abstract: Magnetite nanoparticles (mean particle size ranging from 10 to 20 nm) were prepared by a biomolecule-assisted solution-phase approach under ultrasonic irradiation. Cysteine was used as the capping agent in the solution. The results show that cysteine could be an efficient biocapping agent in producing Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. The crystal structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were characterized by XRD and VSM techniques, respectively. FT-IR was used to investigate the presence of cysteine on the nanoparticles surface. The influence of pH value of the solution on the size distribution and hydrodynamic size of nanoparticles were studied by TEM and DLS methods, respectively. The MTT assay performed by incubation of L929 cells, showed the good biocompability of synthesized ferrofluids. In vitro T1 and T2 relaxivity measurements along with in vivo studies, which were conducted on rats, demonstrate that synthesized nanoparticles are applicable as the contrast agents, especially for imaging of the lymphatic system.

  8. Schizophrenia and oxidative stress: glutamate cysteine ligase modifier as a susceptibility gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosic, Mirjana; Ott, Jurg; Barral, Sandra;

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress could be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder. Glutathione (GSH), a redox regulator, is decreased in patients' cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex. The gene of the key GSH-synthesizing enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM...

  9. SULFUR ASSIMILATION IN SOYBEAN: MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF O-ACETYLSERINE (THIOL) LYASE (CYSTEINE SYNTHASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is a good protein source for both humans and livestock. However, soybean seed proteins are deficient in the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine. This deficiency has stimulated efforts to improve the amino acid composition of soybean seed proteins. ...

  10. Proteome-Wide Profiling of Targets of Cysteine reactive Small Molecules by Using Ethynyl Benziodoxolone Reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegg, Daniel; Frei, Reto; Cerato, Luca; Prasad Hari, Durga; Wang, Chao; Waser, Jerome; Adibekian, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present a highly efficient method for proteomic profiling of cysteine residues in complex proteomes and in living cells. Our method is based on alkynylation of cysteines in complex proteomes using a "clickable" alkynyl benziodoxolone bearing an azide group. This reaction proceeds fast, under mild physiological conditions, and with a very high degree of chemoselectivity. The formed azide-capped alkynyl-cysteine adducts are readily detectable by LC-MS/MS, and can be further functionalized with TAMRA or biotin alkyne via CuAAC. We demonstrate the utility of alkynyl benziodoxolones for chemical proteomics applications by identifying the proteomic targets of curcumin, a diarylheptanoid natural product that was and still is part of multiple human clinical trials as anticancer agent. Our results demonstrate that curcumin covalently modifies several key players of cellular signaling and metabolism, most notably the enzyme casein kinase I gamma. We anticipate that this new method for cysteine profiling will find broad application in chemical proteomics and drug discovery. PMID:26211368

  11. Inhibitory selectivity of canecystatin: a recombinant cysteine peptidase inhibitor from sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cDNA of a cystein peptidase inhibitor was isolated from sugarcane and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, named canecystatin, has previously been shown to exert antifungal activity on the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Herein, the inhibitory specificity of canecystatin was further characterized. It inhibits the cysteine peptidases from plant source papain (Ki=3.3 nM) and baupain (Ki=2.1x10-8 M), but no inhibitory effect was observed on ficin or bromelain. Canecystatin also inhibits lysosomal cysteine peptidases such as human cathepsin B (Ki=125 nM), cathepsin K (Ki=0.76 nM), cathepsin L (Ki=0.6 nM), and cathepsin V (Ki=1.0 nM), but not the aspartyl peptidase cathepsin D. The activity of serine peptidases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic, and neutrophil elastases, and human plasma kallikrein is not affected by the inhibitor, nor is the activity of the metallopeptidases angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of a sugarcane cystatin on cysteine peptidases

  12. Electronic structure of the L-cysteine films on dental alloys studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The valence electronic structures of the dental alloys, type 1, type 3, K14, and MC12 and their interaction with L-cysteine have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. It was found that the electronic structures of the type-1 and type-3 dental alloys are similar to that of polycrystalline Au, while that of the K14 dental alloy is much affected by Cu. The electronic states of the MC12 dental alloy originate dominantly from Cu 3d states and Pd 4d states around the top of the valence bands, while the 4∼7-eV electronic structure of MC12 originates from the Ag 4d states. The peak shift and the change in shape due to alloying are observed in all the dental alloys. For the L-cysteine thin films, new peak or structure observed around 2 eV on all the dental alloys is suggested to be due to the bonding of S 3sp orbitals with the dental alloy surfaces. The Cu-S bond as well as the Au-S and Au-O bonds may cause the change in the electronic structure of the L-cysteine on type 1, type 3 and K14. For MC12, the interaction with L-cysteine may be dominantly due to the Pd-S, Cu-S, and Ag-O bonds, while the contribution of the Ag-S bond is small.

  13. Palladium-Catalyzed Chemoselective and Biocompatible Functionalization of Cysteine-Containing Molecules at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shuaeeb, Riyadh Ahmed Atto; Kolodych, Sergii; Koniev, Oleksandr; Delacroix, Sébastien; Erb, Stéphane; Nicolaÿ, Stéphanie; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Brion, Jean-Daniel; Cianférani, Sarah; Alami, Mouâd; Wagner, Alain; Messaoudi, Samir

    2016-08-01

    The third generation of aminobiphenyl palladacycle pre-catalyst "G3-Xantphos" enables functionalization of peptides containing cysteine in high yields. The conjugation (bioconjugation) occurs chemoselectively at room temperature under biocompatible conditions. Extension of the method to protein functionalization allows selective bioconjugation of the trastuzumab antibody. PMID:27362372

  14. Early recognition of atypical Francisella tularensis strains lacking a cysteine requirement.

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, K; Tessier, S; Winstanley, J; D. Chang; Borczyk, A

    1994-01-01

    Seven cultures referred to in our laboratories as unidentified gram-negative bacilli or Haemophilus species were identified as atypical strains of Francisella tularensis lacking a requirement for cysteine or enriched medium for growth. The use of cellular fatty acid composition analysis facilitated early recognition of this pathogen and prompt implementation of appropriate biosafety measures.

  15. Chemical introduction of the green fluorescence: imaging of cysteine cathepsins by an irreversibly locked GFP fluorophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizler, Maxim; Yampolsky, Ilia V; Baranov, Mikhail S; Stirnberg, Marit; Gütschow, Michael

    2013-09-21

    An activity-based probe, containing an irreversibly locked GFP-like fluorophore, was synthesized and evaluated as an inhibitor of human cathepsins and, as exemplified with cathepsin K, it proved to be suitable for ex vivo imaging and quantification of cysteine cathepsins by SDS-PAGE. PMID:23912233

  16. Cysteine: A Novel Neural Inducer for Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Soleimani Mehranjani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can differentiate into various cell types. Since cysteine has structural similarities to neuronal inducers β-mercaptoethanol and glutathione, we examined its effect on neural induction of rat bone marrow MSCs. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, cells were treated in a medium containing 1mM cysteine for 24 hours prior to treatment with neuron inducing medium containing 10 mM cysteine for 1, 2 and 3 hours. Cell viability and morphology were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and, Hoechst, propidium iodide and acridine orange staining respectively. Expression of nestin and β-Tubulin III genes, as neural cell-specific markers, was studied reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The data was statistically analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and Tukey’s test and p<0.05 was considered significant. Results: After 3 hours of treatment, neuron like morphology with a considerable expression of nestin and β-Tubulin III genes was apparent. The mean cell viability was not significantly different at 1, 2 and 3 hours following induction, compared with the control cells. Conclusion: Cysteine can induce neural features in rat bone marrow MSCs without reducing cell viability. Therefore, it can be considered as a safer alternative to toxic neural inducer agents such as β-mercaptoethanol.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of arsenic-doped cysteine-capped thoria-based nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoria materials have been largely used in the nuclear industry. Nonetheless, fluorescent thoria-based nanoparticles provide additional properties to be applied in other fields. Thoria-based nanoparticles, with and without arsenic and cysteine, were prepared in 1,2-ethanediol aqueous solutions by a simple precipitation procedure. The synthesized thoria-based nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (ED-XRS), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. The presence of arsenic and cysteine, as well as the use of a thermal treatment facilitated fluorescence emission of the thoria-based nanoparticles. Arsenic-doped and cysteine-capped thoria-based nanoparticles prepared in 2.5 M 1,2-ethanediol solutions and treated at 348 K showed small crystallite sizes and strong fluorescence. However, thoria nanoparticles subjected to a thermal treatment at 873 K also produced strong fluorescence with a very narrow size distribution and much smaller crystallite sizes, 5 nm being the average size as shown by XRD and TEM. The XRD data indicated that, even after doping of arsenic in the crystal lattice of ThO2, the samples treated at 873 K were phase pure with the fluorite cubic structure. The Raman and FT-IR spectra shown the most characteristics vibrational peaks of cysteine together with other peaks related to the bonds of this molecule to thoria and arsenic when present

  18. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 107 mol-1.l.s-1

  19. Characterization of Aqueous Peroxomolybdates with Catalytic Applicability

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, Fabian

    2003-01-01

    Abstract This thesis is a summary of five papers, containing equilibrium and structure studies of aqueous molybdate and peroxomolybdate species. Some of the peroxomolybdate species have also been studied in terms of their dynamic and catalytic properties. The primary objective was to characterize species with potential catalytic activity, with emphasis on thebleach process of kraft pulp. For this, potentiometry, EXAFS and 17O, 31P, 1H and 95 Mo NMR have been used. The molybdate speciation in ...

  20. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vedi V.E.; Rovenskii A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  1. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  2. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  3. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  4. Preparation and Catalytic Oxidation Activity on 2-mercaptoethanol of a Novel Catalytic Cellulose Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yu-yuan; LI Ying-jie; CHEN Wen-xing; Lü Wang-yang; Lü Su-fang; XU Min-hong; LIU Fan

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt tetra(N-carbonylacylic) aminophthalocyanine was supported on cellulose fibres by graft reaction to obtain a novel polymer catalyst, catalytic cellulose fibres (CCF),and the optimal supporting conditions were pH = 6, 80℃,t = 120 min. The catalytic oxidation activity of CCF towards oxidation of 2-mereaptoethanol (MEA) in aqueous solution was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that CCF had good catalytic oxidation activity on MEA at room temperature, causing no secondary pollution and remaining efficient for the repetitive tests with no obvious decrease of catalytic activity.

  5. Hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets with high MoS2 loading with enhanced electro-catalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Xiao, Han; Zhou, Bowen; Huang, Feifan; Zhou, Shoubin; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Dihua

    2015-12-01

    Incorporation of high-loading redox-active materials with small amounts of graphene is a general protocol to achieve high-performance catalysts. Herein, hierarchical MoS2-reduced graphene oxide nanosheet (denoted as MoS2-rGO nanosheets) hybrids with a loading of MoS2 as high as 94 wt% are synthesized. The obtained hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets simultaneously integrate the structural and compositional design rationales for high-efficiency and durable electrocatalysts based on high weight ratio of MoS2 in hybrid composite, highly stable/conducting rGO, well-dispersed two-dimensional ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, more exposed edge sites and micro/nano hierarchical structure. When evaluated as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution and oxygen reduction reactions, the hierarchical MoS2-rGO nanosheets demonstrates enhanced activity and excellent stability, promising their applications in MoS2 based electrochemical, photo-catalytic and photo-elecrocatalytic cells.

  6. Low efficiency deasphalting and catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for converting an asphaltene and metals containing heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter, more valuable products the metals comprising Ni and V. It comprises: demetallizing the feed by deasphalting the feed in a solvent deasphalting means operating at solvent deasphalting conditions including a solvent: feed volume ratio of about 1:1 to 4:1, using a solvent selected from the group of C4 to 400 degrees F. hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof; recovering from the solvent rich fraction a demetallized oil intermediate product, having a boiling range and containing at least 10 wt.% of the asphaltenes, and 5 to 30% of the Ni and V, and at least 10 wt.% of the solvent present in the solvent rich phase produced in the deasphalting means; catalytically cracking the demetallized oil intermediate product in a catalytic cracking means operating at catalytic cracking conditions to produce a catalytically cracked product vapor fraction having a lower boiling range than the boiling range of the demetallized oil intermediate product; and fractionating the catalytically cracked product in a fractionation means to produce catalytically cracked product fractions

  7. Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase from Trypanosoma brucei: Catalytic Activity and Mechanism of a QSOX Family Member with a Single Thioredoxin Domain†

    OpenAIRE

    Kodali, Vamsi K.; Thorpe, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Quiescin-sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX) flavoenzymes catalyze the direct, facile, insertion of disulfide bonds into reduced unfolded proteins with the reduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide. To date, only QSOXs from vertebrates have been characterized enzymatically. These metazoan sulfhydryl oxidases have 4 recognizable domains: a redox-active thioredoxin (Trx) domain containing the first of three CxxC motifs (CI-CII), a second Trx domain with no obvious redox-active disulfide, a helix-rich doma...

  8. Isotope-coded, iodoacetamide-based reagent to determine individual cysteine pKa values by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Kimberly J.; Day, Amanda E.; Zeng, Bubing B.; King, S. Bruce; Poole, Leslie B.

    2007-01-01

    Cysteine reactivity in enzymes is imparted to a large extent by the stabilization of the deprotonated form of the reduced cysteine (i.e. the thiolate) within the active site. While this is likely to be an important chemical attribute of many thiol-based enzymes including cysteine-dependent peroxidases (peroxiredoxins) and proteases, only relatively few pKa values have been determined experimentally. Presented here is a new technique for determining the pKa value of cysteine residues through q...

  9. Single Residue Mutation in Active Site of Serine Acetyltransferase Isoform 3 from Entamoeba histolytica Assists in Partial Regaining of Feedback Inhibition by Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Sudhir; Mazumder, Mohit; Dharavath, Sudhaker; Gourinath, S.

    2013-01-01

    The cysteine biosynthetic pathway is essential for survival of the protist pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, and functions by producing cysteine for countering oxidative attack during infection in human hosts. Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS) are involved in cysteine biosynthesis and are present in three isoforms each. While EhSAT1 and EhSAT2 are feedback inhibited by end product cysteine, EhSAT3 is nearly insensitive to such inhibition. The active site res...

  10. Cysteine could change the transport mechanism of PVP-coated silver nanoparticles in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Lin, S.; Wiesner, M.

    2012-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) can hardly be removed by wastewater treatment plant and have big potential to enter groundwater, jeopardizing the water quality & aquatic ecosystem. Most AgNPs have surface coatings such as polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) which dominate their transport in porous media. Our previous study shows that PVP may promote the deposition of AgNPs on silica surface by a bridging mechanism. This study further explored how cysteine, a natural organic matter type, may influence the role of the PVP coating on AgNP translocation. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurement (Figure 1A) shows that the PVP coating rendered the AgNP dispersion high stability during the measuring period (3hrs). Addition of 100 ppm cysteine to the dispersion resulted in a rapid decrease in particle size from 100nm to 52nm within one hour, following which no further decline in particle size occurred. Column experiment results (Figure 1B) show that corresponding to the particle size change was a substantial decrease in particle deposition rates: introduction of 100 ppm cysteine into the particle dispersion resulted in a decrease in AgNP attenuation by the porous medium from 67% to 26%. The decline in particle size suggested that cysteine may have displaced the macromolecular PVP from the particle surface. Desorption of PVP resulted in a weakening or vanish of polymer bridging effect which in turn lowered the deposition rates substantially. This study demonstrated an implication of environmental transformation of coated AgNPs to their mobility in saturated sand aquifers. Acknowledgment Xinyao Yang appreciates the Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.:41101475) for covering the registration fee and traveling costs.igure 1 Particle size measurement (A) and breakthrough curves (B) of PVP-coated silver nanoparticle in the absence and presence of cysteine: pH=7.0, ionic strength=1mM, flow rate=1ml/min.

  11. Catalytic and surface oxidation processes on transition metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Jaatinen, Sampsa

    2007-01-01

    Transition metals are technologically important catalytic materials. The transition metal catalysts are used for example in petroleum and fertilizer industry. In the car industry the catalytic materials are used in the catalytic converters. Because of the industrial importance the catalytic metals have been widely studied throughout the past decades. Nonetheless, the oxidation mechanisms of small molecules and the effect of alloying to catalytic properties of metals are not fully understood. ...

  12. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  13. Global analysis of gene expression in response to L-Cysteine deprivation in the anaerobic protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeelani Ghulam

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric protozoan parasite, causes amebic colitis and extra intestinal abscesses in millions of inhabitants of endemic areas. E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione metabolism but possesses L-cysteine as the principle low molecular weight thiol. L-Cysteine is essential for the structure, stability, and various protein functions, including catalysis, electron transfer, redox regulation, nitrogen fixation, and sensing for regulatory processes. Recently, we demonstrated that in E. histolytica, L-cysteine regulates various metabolic pathways including energy, amino acid, and phospholipid metabolism. Results In this study, employing custom-made Affymetrix microarrays, we performed time course (3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h gene expression analysis upon L-cysteine deprivation. We identified that out of 9,327 genes represented on the array, 290 genes encoding proteins with functions in metabolism, signalling, DNA/RNA regulation, electron transport, stress response, membrane transport, vesicular trafficking/secretion, and cytoskeleton were differentially expressed (≥3 fold at one or more time points upon L-cysteine deprivation. Approximately 60% of these modulated genes encoded proteins of no known function and annotated as hypothetical proteins. We also attempted further functional analysis of some of the most highly modulated genes by L-cysteine depletion. Conclusions To our surprise, L-cysteine depletion caused only limited changes in the expression of genes involved in sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism and oxidative stress defense. In contrast, we observed significant changes in the expression of several genes encoding iron sulfur flavoproteins, a major facilitator super-family transporter, regulator of nonsense transcripts, NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase, short chain dehydrogenase, acetyltransferases, and various other genes involved in diverse cellular functions. This study represents the first

  14. Carbon paste electrode incorporating multi-walled carbon nanotube/ferrocene as a sensor for the electroanalytical determination of -acetyl--cysteine in the presence of tryptophan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jahan Bakhsh Raoof; Fereshteh Chekin; Reza Ojani; Saeideh Barari

    2013-03-01

    The preparation and electrochemical performance of the carbon nanotube paste electrode modified with ferrocene (FCMCNPE) was investigated for electrocatalytic behaviour toward oxidation of -acetyl--cysteine (NAC) in the presence of tryptophan (Trp) using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The results showed an efficient electrocatalytic activity of FCMCNPE toward oxidation of NAC and Trp, as the electrooxidation of NAC and Trp together gave two well-defined anodic peaks, revealing the applicability of this modified electrode for simultaneous voltammetric detection of mentioned compounds in the same solution. The values of catalytic rate constant () and the apparent diffusion coefficient (Dapp) were also calculated using chronoamperometry. The DPV method was applied as a sensitive method for the quantitative detection of trace amounts of NAC and Trp. A linear dynamic range from 1.0 to 18.0 M for NAC and 2.0 to 150.0 M for Trp was obtained using DPV method in pH 7.00 buffered solution and the detection limit (3) was determined as 0.49 M and 0.54 M for NAC and Trp, respectively. The proposed method was also applied for analysis of NAC tablet, investigating the applicability of the proposed voltammetric method for determination of NAC in real sample.

  15. The substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of N-carbamyl- D-amino acid amidohydrolase: A theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Wei; Zhan, Dong Ling; Luo, Quan; Zhou, Yi-Han; Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng; Feng, Yan

    2009-04-01

    N-carbamyl- D-amino acid amidohydrolasecatalyzes the hydrolysis of N-carbamyl- D-amino acids to D-amino acids, ammonia and the carbon dioxide. The docking studies validate that D-NCAase possesses of preference for D-enantiomers, predict that Gly194 and Arg174 may take part in the catalytic mechanism, and Glu136 is essential to maintain the stable conformation for catalysis. The initial step of the acylation reaction catalyzed by D-NCAase has been studied by density functional calculations. It was furthermore demonstrated that Lys126, His143, and Asn196 decrease the reaction barrier, while Asn172 raise the barrier. The structural and mechanistic insights obtained from computational study should be valuable for the mechanisms of cysteine proteases.

  16. The significance of cysteine synthesis for acclimation to high light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Anna; Haberland, Stefan; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Wirtz, Markus; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Saito, Kazuki; Hell, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Situations of excess light intensity are known to result in the emergence of reactive oxygen species that originate from the electron transport chain in chloroplasts. The redox state of glutathione and its biosynthesis contribute importantly to the plant's response to this stress. In this study we analyzed the significance of cysteine synthesis for long-term acclimation to high light conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. Emphasis was put on the rate-limiting step of cysteine synthesis, the formation of the precursor O-acetylserine (OAS) that is catalyzed by serine acetyltransferase (SERAT). Wild type Arabidopsis plants responded to the high light condition (800 μmol m(-2) s(-1) for 10 days) with synthesis of photo-protective anthocyanins, induction of total SERAT activity and elevated glutathione levels when compared to the control condition (100 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). The role of cysteine synthesis in chloroplasts was probed in mutant plants lacking the chloroplast isoform SERAT2;1 (serat2;1) and two knock-out alleles of CYP20-3, a positive interactor of SERAT in the chloroplast. Acclimation to high light resulted in a smaller growth enhancement than wild type in the serat2;1 and cyp20-3 mutants, less induction of total SERAT activity and OAS levels but similar cysteine and glutathione concentrations. Expression analysis revealed no increase in mRNA of the chloroplast SERAT2;1 encoding SERAT2;1 gene but up to 4.4-fold elevated SERAT2;2 mRNA levels for the mitochondrial SERAT isoform. Thus, lack of chloroplast SERAT2;1 activity or its activation by CYP20-3 prevents the full growth response to high light conditions, but the enhanced demand for glutathione is likely mediated by synthesis of OAS in the mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine synthesis in the chloroplast is important for performance but is dispensable for survival under long-term exposure to high light and can be partially complemented by cysteine synthesis in mitochondria. PMID:25653656

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of peroxiredoxin Qbeta from Xylella fastidiosa: catalytic mechanism and high reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Bruno Brasil; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Discola, Karen Fulan; Cussiol, José Renato Rosa; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares

    2010-05-21

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the etiological agent of various plant diseases. To survive under oxidative stress imposed by the host, microorganisms express antioxidant proteins, including cysteine-based peroxidases named peroxiredoxins. This work is a comprehensive analysis of the catalysis performed by PrxQ from X. fastidiosa (XfPrxQ) that belongs to a peroxiredoxin class still poorly characterized and previously considered as moderately reactive toward hydroperoxides. Contrary to these assumptions, our competitive kinetics studies have shown that the second-order rate constants of the peroxidase reactions of XfPrxQ with hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite are in the order of 10(7) and 10(6) M(-1) S(-1), respectively, which are as fast as the most efficient peroxidases. The XfPrxQ disulfides were only slightly reducible by dithiothreitol; therefore, the identification of a thioredoxin system as the probable biological reductant of XfPrxQ was a relevant finding. We also showed by site-specific mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that an intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys-47 and Cys-83 is generated during the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, we elucidated the crystal structure of XfPrxQ C47S in which Ser-47 and Cys-83 lie approximately 12.3 A apart. Therefore, significant conformational changes are required for disulfide bond formation. In fact, circular dichroism data indicated that there was a significant redox-dependent unfolding of alpha-helices, which is probably triggered by the peroxidatic cysteine oxidation. Finally, we proposed a model that takes data from this work as well data as from the literature into account. PMID:20335172

  18. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; XiaoNian; XIANG; YiZhi

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  19. Recombinant toluene-4-monooxygenase: catalytic and Mössbauer studies of the purified diiron and rieske components of a four-protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikus, J D; Studts, J M; Achim, C; Kauffmann, K E; Münck, E; Steffan, R J; McClay, K; Fox, B G

    1996-07-16

    Expression of the tmoA-F gene cluster from Pseudomonas mendocina KRI in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) produces a catalytically active form of the toluene-4-monooxygenase (T4MO) complex. Here we report the purification and characterization of four soluble proteins required for the in vitro reconstitution of T4MO catalytic activity. These proteins are a diiron hydroxylase (T4MOH), a Riesketype ferredoxin (T4MOC), an effector protein (T4MOD), and an NADH oxidoreductase (T4MOF). The T4MOH component is composed of the tmoA, tmoB, and tmoE gene products [quaternary structure (alpha beta epsilon)2, Mr approximately 220 kDa]. The T4MOA polypeptide contains two copies of the amino acid sequence motif (D/E)X(28-37)DEXRH; the same motif provides all of the protein-derived ligands to the diiron centers of ribonucleotide reductase, the soluble methane monooxygenase, and the stearoyl-ACP delta 9 desaturase. Mössbauer, optical, and EPR measurements show that the T4MOH contains diiron centers and suggest that the diiron center contains hydroxo bridge(s) in the diferric state, as observed for methane monooxygenase. Mössbauer and EPR measurements also show that the T4MOC contains a Rieske-type iron-sulfur center. This assignment is in accord with the presence of the amino acid sequence motif CPHX(15-17)CX2H, which has also been found in the bacterial, chloroplastic, and mitochondrial Rieske proteins as well as the bacterial NADH-dependent cis-dihydrodiol-forming aromatic dioxygenases. While single-turnover catalytic studies confirm the function of the T4MOH as the hydroxylase, the NADH-dependent multiple-turnover hydroxylation activity is increased by more than 100-fold in the presence of the T4MOC, which mediates highly specific electron transfer between the T4MOF and the T4MOH. The T4MOD can be purified as an 11.6 kDa monomeric protein devoid of cofactors or redox-active metal ions; this component is also detected as a substoichiometric consitutent of the purified T4MOH. The rate

  20. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei; Hu, Pingping; Chen, Jianmin; Liu, Xi; Tang, Xingfu

    2015-01-01

    Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X......-ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation...