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Sample records for catalytic domain directed

  1. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F;

    1986-01-01

    We used linker insertion-deletion mutagenesis to study the catalytic domain of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus v-rasH transforming protein, which is closely related to the cellular rasH protein. The mutants displayed a wide range of in vitro biological activity, from those that induced focal...... transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic...

  2. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  3. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of alkenyllithium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornillos, Valentin; Giannerini, Massimo; Vila, Carlos; Fananas-Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic method for the direct cross-coupling of alkenyllithium reagents with aryl and alkenyl halides is described. The use of a catalyst comprising Pd-2(dba)(3)/XPhos allows for the stereoselective preparation of a wide variety of substituted alkenes in high yields under mild conditions. In add

  4. Improving the catalytic activity of semiconductor nanocrystals through selective domain etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khon, Elena; Lambright, Kelly; Khnayzer, Rony S; Moroz, Pavel; Perera, Dimuthu; Butaeva, Evgeniia; Lambright, Scott; Castellano, Felix N; Zamkov, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    Colloidal chemistry offers an assortment of synthetic tools for tuning the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals. While many nanocrystal architectures can be obtained directly via colloidal growth, other nanoparticle morphologies require alternative processing strategies. Here, we show that chemical etching of colloidal nanoparticles can facilitate the realization of nanocrystal shapes that are topologically inaccessible by hot-injection techniques alone. The present methodology is demonstrated by synthesizing a two-component CdSe/CdS nanoparticle dimer, constructed in a way that both CdSe and CdS semiconductor domains are exposed to the external environment. This structural morphology is highly desirable for catalytic applications as it enables both reductive and oxidative reactions to occur simultaneously on dissimilar nanoparticle surfaces. Hydrogen production tests confirmed the improved catalytic activity of CdSe/CdS dimers, which was enhanced 3-4 times upon etching treatment. We expect that the demonstrated application of etching to shaping of colloidal heteronanocrystals can become a common methodology in the synthesis of charge-separating nanocrystals, leading to advanced nanoparticles architectures for applications in areas of photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and light detection.

  5. Time domain computational modeling of viscothermal acoustic propagation in catalytic converter substrates with porous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, N. S.; Selamet, A.; Miazgowicz, K. D.; Tallio, K. V.; Parks, S. J.

    2005-08-01

    Models for viscothermal effects in catalytic converter substrates are developed for time domain computational methods. The models are suitable for use in one-dimensional approaches for the prediction of exhaust system performance (engine tuning characteristics) and radiated sound levels. Starting with the ``low reduced frequency'' equations for viscothermal acoustic propagation in capillary tubes, time domain submodels are developed for the frequency-dependent wall friction, frequency-dependent wall heat transfer, and porous wall effects exhibited by catalytic converter substrates. Results from a time domain computational approach employing these submodels are compared to available analytical solutions for the low reduced frequency equations. The computational results are shown to agree well with the analytical solutions for capillary geometries representative of automotive catalytic converter substrates.

  6. Autoantibodies against the catalytic domain of BRAF are not specific serum markers for rheumatoid arthritis.

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    Wenli Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autoantibodies to the catalytic domain of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF have been recently identified as a new family of autoantibodies involved in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The objective of this study was to determine antibody responses to the catalytic domain of BRAF in RA and other autoimmune diseases. The association between RA-related clinical indices and these antibodies was also assessed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The presence of autoantibodies to the catalytic domain of BRAF (anti-BRAF or to peptide P25 (amino acids 656-675 of the catalytic domain of BRAF; anti-P25 was determined in serum samples from patients with RA, primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, and healthy controls by using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs based on the recombinant catalytic domain of BRAF or a synthesized peptide, respectively. Associations of anti-BRAF or anti-P25 with disease variables of RA patients were also evaluated. Our results show that the BRAF-specific antibodies anti-BRAF and anti-P25 are equally present in RA, pSS, and SLE patients. However, the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR used to detect inflammation was significantly different between patients with and without BRAF-specific antibodies. The anti-BRAF-positive patients were found to have prolonged disease, and active disease occurred more frequently in anti-P25-positive patients than in anti-P25-negative patients. A weak but significant correlation between anti-P25 levels and ESRs was observed (r = 0.319, p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The antibody response against the catalytic domain of BRAF is not specific for RA, but the higher titers of BRAF-specific antibodies may be associated with increased inflammation in RA.

  7. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-08-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern synthetic chemistry. However, the high reactivity and poor selectivity of common organolithium reagents have largely prohibited their use as a viable partner in direct catalytic cross-coupling. Here we report that in the presence of a Pd-phosphine catalyst, a wide range of alkyl-, aryl- and heteroaryl-lithium reagents undergo selective cross-coupling with aryl- and alkenyl-bromides. The process proceeds quickly under mild conditions (room temperature) and avoids the notorious lithium halogen exchange and homocoupling. The preparation of key alkyl-, aryl- and heterobiaryl intermediates reported here highlights the potential of these cross-coupling reactions for medicinal chemistry and material science.

  8. Expression, purification and enzymatic characterization of the catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Boesen, Jane; Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach;

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase exists in two isoforms: Isoform 1 catalyses the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral parts of the body while isoform 2 catalyses this step in the brain. The catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2 have been expressed...

  9. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

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    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  10. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  11. Different in vivo functions of the two catalytic domains of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Kenneth E.; Shen, Xiao Z.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Billet, Sandrine; Okwan-Duodu, Derick; Ong, Frank S.; Fuchs, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) can cleave angiotensin I, bradykinin, neurotensin and many other peptide substrates in vitro. In part, this is due to the structure of ACE, a protein composed of two independent catalytic domains. Until very recently, little was known regarding the specific in vivo role of each ACE domain, and they were commonly regarded as equivalent. This is not true, as shown by mouse models with a genetic inactivation of either the ACE N- or C-domains. In vivo, most ang...

  12. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity.

  13. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  14. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  15. Complete determination of the Pin1 catalytic domain thermodynamic cycle by NMR lineshape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Rogals, Monique J.; De, Soumya [Cornell University, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (United States); Lu, Kun Ping [Cancer Biology Program and Biology of Aging Program, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School (United States); Kovrigin, Evgenii L. [Marquette University, Chemistry Department (United States); Nicholson, Linda K., E-mail: lkn2@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (United States)

    2011-09-15

    The phosphorylation-specific peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 catalyzes the isomerization of the peptide bond preceding a proline residue between cis and trans isomers. To best understand the mechanisms of Pin1 regulation, rigorous enzymatic assays of isomerization are required. However, most measures of isomerase activity require significant constraints on substrate sequence and only yield rate constants for the cis isomer, k{sub cat}{sup cis} and apparent Michaelis constants, K{sub M}{sup App}. By contrast, NMR lineshape analysis is a powerful tool for determining microscopic rates and populations of each state in a complex binding scheme. The isolated catalytic domain of Pin1 was employed as a first step towards elucidating the reaction scheme of the full-length enzyme. A 24-residue phosphopeptide derived from the amyloid precurser protein intracellular domain (AICD) phosphorylated at Thr668 served as a biologically-relevant Pin1 substrate. Specific {sup 13}C labeling at the Pin1-targeted proline residue provided multiple reporters sensitive to individual isomer binding and on-enzyme catalysis. We have performed titration experiments and employed lineshape analysis of phosphopeptide {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H constant time HSQC spectra to determine k{sub cat}{sup cis}, k{sub cat}{sup trans}, K{sub D}{sup cis}, and K{sub D}{sup trans} for the catalytic domain of Pin1 acting on this AICD substrate. The on-enzyme equilibrium value of [E{center_dot}trans]/[E{center_dot}cis] = 3.9 suggests that the catalytic domain of Pin1 is optimized to operate on this substrate near equilibrium in the cellular context. This highlights the power of lineshape analysis for determining the microscopic parameters of enzyme catalysis, and demonstrates the feasibility of future studies of Pin1-PPIase mutants to gain insights on the catalytic mechanism of this important enzyme.

  16. Complete determination of the Pin1 catalytic domain thermodynamic cycle by NMR lineshape analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phosphorylation-specific peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 catalyzes the isomerization of the peptide bond preceding a proline residue between cis and trans isomers. To best understand the mechanisms of Pin1 regulation, rigorous enzymatic assays of isomerization are required. However, most measures of isomerase activity require significant constraints on substrate sequence and only yield rate constants for the cis isomer, kcatcis and apparent Michaelis constants, KMApp. By contrast, NMR lineshape analysis is a powerful tool for determining microscopic rates and populations of each state in a complex binding scheme. The isolated catalytic domain of Pin1 was employed as a first step towards elucidating the reaction scheme of the full-length enzyme. A 24-residue phosphopeptide derived from the amyloid precurser protein intracellular domain (AICD) phosphorylated at Thr668 served as a biologically-relevant Pin1 substrate. Specific 13C labeling at the Pin1-targeted proline residue provided multiple reporters sensitive to individual isomer binding and on-enzyme catalysis. We have performed titration experiments and employed lineshape analysis of phosphopeptide 13C–1H constant time HSQC spectra to determine kcatcis, kcattrans, KDcis, and KDtrans for the catalytic domain of Pin1 acting on this AICD substrate. The on-enzyme equilibrium value of [E·trans]/[E·cis] = 3.9 suggests that the catalytic domain of Pin1 is optimized to operate on this substrate near equilibrium in the cellular context. This highlights the power of lineshape analysis for determining the microscopic parameters of enzyme catalysis, and demonstrates the feasibility of future studies of Pin1-PPIase mutants to gain insights on the catalytic mechanism of this important enzyme.

  17. Comparison of Properties of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Converting Enzyme (TACE) and Some Matrix Metalloproteases (MMPs) in Catalytic Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structural data of TACE, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9 were obtained from PDB database, and then their catalytic domains' properties including conformation, molecular surface hydrophobicity and electrostatic potential were analyzed and compared by using Insight Ⅱ molecular modeling software. It was found that the conformation and molecular surface hydrophobicity of catalytic domains of TACE and MMPs were not obviously different, but the molecular surface electrostatic potential of catalytic domain of TACE and MMPs had obvious differences.The findings are helpful in the Rational Drug Design of TACE selective inhibitor.

  18. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ Helicase Catalytic Core Domain: The Interdomain Flexibility

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    Sheng-Chia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RecQ DNA helicases are key enzymes in the maintenance of genome integrity, and they have functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to most RecQs, RecQ from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecQ possesses an unusual domain architecture that is crucial for its remarkable ability to repair DNA. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the DrRecQ helicase catalytic core and its ADP-bound form, revealing interdomain flexibility in its first RecA-like and winged-helix (WH domains. Additionally, the WH domain of DrRecQ is positioned in a different orientation from that of the E. coli RecQ (EcRecQ. These results suggest that the orientation of the protein during DNA-binding is significantly different when comparing DrRecQ and EcRecQ.

  19. Direct time-domain techniques for transient radiation and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tutorial introduction to transient electromagnetics, focusing on direct time-domain techniques, is presented. Physical, mathematical, numerical, and experimental aspects of time-domain methods, with emphasis on wire objects excited as antennas or scatters are examined. Numerous computed examples illustrate the characteristics of direct time-domain procedures, especially where they may offer advantages over procedures in the more familiar frequency domain. These advantages include greater solution efficiency for many types of problems, the ability to handle nonlinearities, improved physical insight and interpretability, availability of wide-band information from a single calculation, and the possibility of isolating interactions among various parts of an object using time-range gating

  20. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  1. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a eukaryotic guanylate cyclase

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    Marletta Michael A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble guanylate cyclases generate cyclic GMP when bound to nitric oxide, thereby linking nitric oxide levels to the control of processes such as vascular homeostasis and neurotransmission. The guanylate cyclase catalytic module, for which no structure has been determined at present, is a class III nucleotide cyclase domain that is also found in mammalian membrane-bound guanylate and adenylate cyclases. Results We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a soluble guanylate cyclase from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at 2.55 Å resolution, and show that it is a dimeric molecule. Conclusion Comparison of the structure of the guanylate cyclase domain with the known structures of adenylate cyclases confirms the close similarity in architecture between these two enzymes, as expected from their sequence similarity. The comparison also suggests that the crystallized guanylate cyclase is in an inactive conformation, and the structure provides indications as to how activation might occur. We demonstrate that the two active sites in the dimer exhibit positive cooperativity, with a Hill coefficient of ~1.5. Positive cooperativity has also been observed in the homodimeric mammalian membrane-bound guanylate cyclases. The structure described here provides a reliable model for functional analysis of mammalian guanylate cyclases, which are closely related in sequence.

  2. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

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    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  3. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fananas Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern sy

  4. Visualizing Dealumination of a Single Zeolite Domain in a Real-Life Catalytic Cracking Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Sam; Paalanen, Pasi P; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts play a central role in the chemical conversion of crude oil fractions. Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) we investigate the chemistry of one fresh and two industrially deactivated (ECAT) FCC catalysts at the single zeolite domain level. Spectro-microscopic data at the Fe L3 , La M5 , and Al K X-ray absorption edges reveal differing levels of deposited Fe on the ECAT catalysts corresponding with an overall loss in tetrahedral Al within the zeolite domains. Using La as a localization marker, we have developed a novel methodology to map the changing Al distribution of single zeolite domains within real-life FCC catalysts. It was found that significant changes in the zeolite domain size distributions as well as the loss of Al from the zeolite framework occur. Furthermore, inter- and intraparticle heterogeneities in the dealumination process were observed, revealing the complex interplay between metal-mediated pore accessibility loss and zeolite dealumination.

  5. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  6. The N-terminal cysteine-rich domain of tobacco class I chitinase is essential for chitin binding but not for catalytic or antifungal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, B; Boller, T; Neuhaus, J M

    1993-09-01

    The vacuolar chitinases of class I possess an N-terminal cysteine-rich domain homologous to hevein and chitin-binding lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin and Urtica dioica lectin. To investigate the significance of this domain for the biochemical and functional characteristics of chitinase, chimeric genes encoding the basic chitinase A of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with and without this domain were constructed and constitutively expressed in transgenic Nicotiana sylvestris. The chitinases were subsequently isolated and purified to homogeneity from the transgenic plants. Chromatography on colloidal chitin revealed that only the form with the N-terminal domain, and not the one without it, had chitin-binding properties, demonstrating directly that the domain is a chitin-binding domain (CBD). Under standard assay conditions with radioactive colloidal chitin, both forms of chitinase had approximately the same catalytic activity. However, kinetic analysis demonstrated that the enzyme without CBD had a considerably lower apparent affinity for its substrate. The pH and temperature optima of the two chitinases were similar, but the form with the CBD had an approximately 3-fold higher activation energy and retained a higher activity at low pH values. Both chitinases were capable of inhibiting growth of Trichoderma viride, although the form with the CBD was about three times more effective than the one without it. Thus, the CBD is not necessary for catalytic or antifungal activity of chitinase. PMID:8208848

  7. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunita, S; Zhenxing, H; Swaathi, J; Cygler, Miroslaw; Matte, Allan; Sivaraman, J

    2006-06-16

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine (Psi) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF at 2.6A resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of Psi-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  8. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  9. Direct observation of closure domain wall mediated spin waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozooni, Babak, E-mail: bamo@tf.uni-kiel.de; McCord, Jeffrey, E-mail: jmc@tf.uni-kiel.de [Institute for Materials Science, University of Kiel, Kaiserstraße 2, 24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-07-27

    The generation and guiding of spin waves from and by magnetic domain walls are demonstrated. The spin waves radiate from pinned and oscillating magnetic closure domain walls and propagate linearly along a narrow path formed by the surrounding 180° asymmetric Bloch domain walls. The propagating spin wave modes are directly visualized by time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr microscopy with picosecond temporal resolution. A linear relationship between excitation frequency, wavelength, and number of spin waves per domain exists. Independent of the field excitation frequency, a constant phase velocity of spin waves propagation is obtained. Spin waves characteristics can be tuned by varying the magnetic domain dynamics, allowing for variable spin wave characteristics with magnetic field characteristics and histories.

  10. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Clostridium thermocellum cellulase CelT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavulu, Muppuru M; Tsai, Jia Yin; Lee, Hsiao Lin; Liang, Po Huang; Hsiao, Chwan Deng

    2012-03-01

    Cellulases hydrolyze cellulose, a major component of plant cell walls, to oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. Several Clostridium species secrete multi-enzyme complexes (cellulosomes) containing cellulases. C. thermocellum CelT, a family 9 cellulase, lacks the accessory module(s) necessary for activity, unlike most other family 9 cellulases. Therefore, characterization of the CelT structure is essential in order to understand its catalytic mechanism. Here, the crystal structure of free CelTΔdoc, the catalytic domain of CelT, is reported at 2.1 Å resolution. Its structure differs in several aspects from those of other family 9 cellulases. CelTΔdoc contains an additional α-helix, α-helices of increased length and two additional surface-exposed β-strands. It also contains three calcium ions instead of one as found in C. cellulolyticum Cel9M. CelTΔdoc also has two flexible loops at the open end of its active-site cleft. Movement of these loops probably allows the substrate to access the active site. CelT is stable over a wide range of pH and temperature conditions, suggesting that CelT could be used to convert cellulose biomass into biofuel.

  11. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maione

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a "conformational editing" through a disulfide bond formation.

  12. Direct formulation of the supersonic acoustic intensity in space domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Leclre, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes and examines a direct formulation in space domain of the so-called supersonic acoustic intensity. This quantity differs from the usual (active) intensity by excluding the circulating energy in the near-field of the source, providing a map of the acoustic energy that is radiated...... into the far field. To date, its calculation has been formulated in the wave number domain, filtering out the evanescent waves outside the radiation circle and reconstructing the acoustic field with only the propagating waves. In this study, the supersonic intensity is calculated directly in space...

  13. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael;

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present...... the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy...... and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity...

  14. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of the Glucuronoyl Esterase Catalytic Domain from Hypocrea jecorina

    Science.gov (United States)

    The catalytic domain of the glucuronoyl esterase from Hypocrea jecorina (anamorph Trichoderma reesei) was over-expressed, purified, and crystallized by sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method using 1.4 M sodium/potassium phosphate pH 6.9. Crystals had space group P212121 and X-ray diffraction data were...

  15. Direct conversion of wood to methane by catalytic hydrothermal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohler, C.; Schneebeli, J.; Binkert, P.; Biollaz, S.; Stucki, S

    2003-03-01

    Green production of substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood by a catalytic hydrothermal process was studied in a laboratory batch reactor suitable for high feed concentrations (10-30 wt%) at 350-460{sup o}C and 27-33 MPa. Raney Nickel was much more active than Ni/a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the conditions studied. A maximum methane yield of 0.24 g CH{sub 4}/g wood was obtained, corresponding to 67% of the theoretical maximum of 0.36 g CH{sub 4}/g wood. The carbon gasification was limited to 80% in our equipment due to accumulation of phenols and other aromatics in the condenser. At supercritical conditions the remaining liquid phase was always tar-free, colorless and contained less than 1 wt% of the feed carbon. An economic analysis for a 20 MWth SNG plant (calculated thermal process efficiency 85%) located in Switzerland yielded SNG production costs of 10 USD/GJ. Almost half of the SNG cost is made up by the feedstock cost. (author)

  16. Catalytic domain of plasmid pAD1 relaxase TraX defines a group of relaxases related to restriction endonucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, María Victoria; Clewell, Don B; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2013-08-13

    Plasmid pAD1 is a 60-kb conjugative element commonly found in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis. The relaxase TraX and the primary origin of transfer oriT2 are located close to each other and have been shown to be essential for conjugation. The oriT2 site contains a large inverted repeat (where the nic site is located) adjacent to a series of short direct repeats. TraX does not show any of the typical relaxase sequence motifs but is the prototype of a unique family of relaxases (MOBC). The present study focuses on the genetic, biochemical, and structural analysis of TraX, whose 3D structure could be predicted by protein threading. The structure consists of two domains: (i) an N-terminal domain sharing the topology of the DNA binding domain of the MarR family of transcriptional regulators and (ii) a C-terminal catalytic domain related to the PD-(D/E)XK family of restriction endonucleases. Alignment of MOBC relaxase amino acid sequences pointed to several conserved polar amino acid residues (E28, D152, E170, E172, K176, R180, Y181, and Y203) that were mutated to alanine. Functional analysis of these mutants (in vivo DNA transfer and cleavage assays) revealed the importance of these residues for relaxase activity and suggests Y181 as a potential catalytic residue similarly to His-hydrophobe-His relaxases. We also show that TraX binds specifically to dsDNA containing the oriT2 direct repeat sequences, confirming their role in transfer specificity. The results provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of MOBC relaxases, which differs radically from that of His-hydrophobe-His relaxases.

  17. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  19. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-05-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans.

  20. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Tucker

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG. Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethylpyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  1. Directed Evolution of L-Aspartase by Mobility of Domains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Xiao-jun; LI Shuang; KONG Xiang-duo; LIU Wei; SUN Yan-hong; ZHANG Jin

    2004-01-01

    To enhance the relative movement of domains, we inserted a random sequence of fifteen-peptide into the three domains of L-aspartase. By means of directed screening, the three isoforms of monomeric, dimmeric and tetrameric enzymes were obtained. Compared to the wild-type tetrameric L-asparease, these mutants remained 19.7%, 42.3%, and 92% of the enzyme activity, respectively. Moreover, the examination of enzyme properties revealed that their kcat and KM changed in varying degrees, and the optimum pH shifted towards acidic pH, while the dependence of the activity of enzyme on Mg2+ concentration and thermostability increased. Therefore this strategy provides a novel approach to directed evolution of enzymes.

  2. Cloning and expression of catalytic domain of Abl protein tyrosine kinase gene in E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and are involved in signal transduction. Uncontrolled signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases to intracellular tyrosine kinases can lead to inflamma tory responses and diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. Thus, inhibitors that block the activity of tyrosine kinases or the signaling pathways of PTKs activation could be assumed as the potential candidate for drug development. On this assumption, we cloned and expressed the Abl PTK gene in E. coli, and purified the PTK, which was used to screen the PTK inhibitors from the extracts of Chinese herbs. The catalytic domain sequence of PTK gene was amplified by PCR us ing the cDNA of abl from Abelson murine leukemia virus as template. The amplified fragment was then cloned into the GST-tagged expression vector pGEX2T. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into host cell E. coli DH5α and was induced to express PTK protein. The expression of the protein was detected using SDS-PAGE. The result showed that a specific protein was induced to express after 12 min induction, and reached peak level about 40% of the host total pro tein after 4 h induction. The molecular weight of the fusion protein was about 58 kD. The purified GST-PTK fusion pro tein presented higher activity for tyrosine phosphorylation.

  3. Biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of the catalytic domain of MMP16 (cdMMP16).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Hao; Aitha, Mahesh; George, Sam; Tierney, David L; Crowder, Michael W

    2016-07-01

    Membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase 16 (MMP16/MT3-MMP) is considered a drug target due to its role(s) in disease processes such as cancer and inflammation. Biochemical characterization of MMP16 is critical for developing new generation MMP inhibitors (MMPi), which exhibit high efficacies and selectivities. Herein, a modified over-expression and purification protocol was used to prepare the catalytic domain of MMP16 (cdMMP16). The resulting recombinant enzyme exhibited steady-state kinetic constants of K m = 10.6 ± 0.7 μM and k cat = 1.14 ± 0.02 s(-1), when using FS-6 as substrate, and the enzyme bound 1.8 ± 0.1 eq of Zn(II). The enzymatic activity of cdMMP16 is salt concentration-dependent, and cdMMP16 exhibits autoproteolytic activity under certain conditions, which may be related to an in vivo regulatory mechanism of MMP16 and of other membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs). Co(II)-substituted analogs (Co2- and ZnCo) of cdMMP16 were prepared and characterized using several spectroscopic techniques, such as UV-Vis, (1)H NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies. A well-characterized cdMMP16 is now available for future inhibitor screening efforts. PMID:27229514

  4. Cloning, expression, purification, and characterization of the catalytic domain of sika deer MMP-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Jiawen; Liu, Meichen; Wang, Siming; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase 13 is one of three mammalian collagenases that are capable of initiating the degradation of interstitial collagens during wound healing. Herein, we report for the first time the molecular cloning of the catalytic domain (CD) of sika deer MMP-13, followed by protein expression in Escherichia coli and purification by affinity chromatography. The final yield was approximately 90.4 mg per liter of growth culture with a purity of 91.6%. The mass recovery during the purification and renaturation were 70.2% and 81.5%, respectively. Using gelatin zymography and a degradation assay, we found that the refolded sika deer MMP-13 (CD) could digest gelatin. The optimal pH and temperature for the enzyme bioactivity was 8.0 and 37 °C, respectively. The Km value for the enzyme-catalyzed digestion of gelatin was 136+/-8 μg/mL, and the Vmax was 4.12 × 10(3) U/μg. sdMMP13 (CD) was able to completely degrade collagen II and gelatin, and partially degrade fibronectin. The sdMMP-13 (CD) activity was significantly inhibited by several chemicals including 1, 10-phenanthroline, EDTA, Fe(2+), Cu(2+), and Mn(2+). PMID:27338011

  5. The Role of Catalytic Substrate Morphology on the Shape and Domain Size of Two-Dimensional Boron Nitride Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Mark; Tay, Roland; Tumlin, Travis; Teo, Edwin; Mallick, Govind; Karna, Shashi

    2014-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, including graphene and boron nitride (BN), has been of intense interest in recent years due to their exceptional electronic, thermal, and mechanical properties. Tailoring these novel properties to their maximum potential requires precise control of the atomic layer growth process. In recent years, catalytic growth of 2-D nanomaterials using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process has emerged as an attractive approach due to their low-cost, scalalibility, and ability totransfer the grown materials on various substrates. In this approach, The the morphology and purity of the catalytic surface plays a critical role on the shape, size, and growth kintectics of the 2D nanomaterial. In this work, we present the results of our systematic studies of the role of catalytic surface morphology on the shape and domain size of CVD grown hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) films. The present work clearly demonstrates that that the presence of surface roghness in the form of ridges leads to a preferential growth of small-domain triangular BN sheets. A 10 to 100-fold reduction in the surfcae roughness leads to increased domain BN triangles, eventually transitioning to large-domain hexagonal shaped hBN sheets.

  6. Catalytic polymeric electrodes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Peters, Alice; Talemi, Pejman

    2016-08-01

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a new class of fuel cells that produces non-toxic by-products and has a potential for a high voltage and high energy density. A major challenge in developing efficient DBFCs is the development of an efficient, stable, and economic catalyst for the oxidation of borohydride. In this paper, we report the use of conducting polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as electrocatalysts in DBFC. PEDOT electrodes prepared by vacuum phase polymerization exhibited electrocatalytic behavior towards oxidation of borohydride and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic analysis of samples showed that PEDOT can act as an interface for electron transfer from borohydride ions. Comparing the polarization curves of DBFCs with PEDOT coated on graphite electrodes and cells with bare graphite electrodes, demonstrated higher voltage, maximum power density, and stability.

  7. The Type II Pullulanase of Thermococcus hydrothermalis: Molecular Characterization of the Gene and Expression of the Catalytic Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Erra-Pujada, Marta; Debeire, Philippe; Duchiron, Francis; O’Donohue, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The gene encoding a hyperthermostable type II pullulanase produced by Thermococcus hydrothermalis (Th-Apu) has been isolated. Analysis of a total of 5.2 kb of genomic DNA has revealed the presence of three open reading frames, one of which (apuA) encodes the pullulanase. This enzyme is composed of 1,339 amino acid residues and exhibits a multidomain structure. In addition to a typical N-terminal signal peptide, Th-Apu possesses a catalytic domain, a domain bearing S-layer homology-like motifs...

  8. Evolutionary divergence in the catalytic activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W Bainbridge

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases.

  9. Study on Application of Bi-directional Combination Technology Integrating Residue Hydrotreating with Catalytic Cracking RICP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Chuanfeng; Gao Yongcan; Dai Lishun; Li Dadong

    2008-01-01

    After analysing the disadvantages of the traditional residue hydrotreating-catalytic cracking combination process, RIPP has proposed a bi-directional combination technology integrating residue hydrotreating with catalytic cracking called RICP which does not further recycles the FCC heavy cycle oil (HCO) inside the FCC unit and delivers HCO to the residue hydrotreating unit as a diluting oil for the residue that is concurrently subjected to hydrotreating prior to being used as the FCC feed oil. The RICP technology can stimulate residue hydrotreating reactions through utilization of HCO along with an increased yield of FCC light distillate, resulting in enhanced petroleum utilization and economic benefits of the refinery.

  10. Over-expression and refolding of isotopically labeled recombinant catalytic domain of human macrophage elastase (MMP-12) for NMR studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xunhai; Ou, Li; Tong, Xiaotian; Zhu, Jing; Wu, Houming

    2007-12-01

    Human macrophage elastase (MMP-12) plays an important role in inflammatory processes and is involved in a number of physiological or pathological situations, such as conversion of plasminogen into angiostatin, allergic airway inflammation, vascular remodeling or alteration, as well as emphysema, and has been justified as a novel drug target. Here, we report the over-expression in Escherichia coil, purification and refolding of MMP-12 catalytic domain for NMR studies. The primary sequence of expressed protein was identified by means of MALDI-TOF MS, and was confirmed by the MALDI-TOF MS data of trypsin-digested peptides. A significantly optimized protocol has been worked out to prepare 15N and/or 13C-labeled MMP-12 catalytic domain, and the yield of the purified protein is estimated to 10-12 mg from 0.5L of M9 minimal media. Finally, the 15N-1H HSQC spectrum of uniformly 15N-labeled MMP-12 catalytic domain indicates the presence of well-ordered and properly folded protein in a monomeric form. PMID:17601747

  11. Improved catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, anti-salt and detergent tolerance of keratinase KerSMD by partially truncation of PPC domain

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Fang; Juan Zhang; Guocheng Du; Jian Chen

    2016-01-01

    The keratinase from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (KerSMD) is known for its high activity and pH stability in keratin degradation. However, catalytic efficiency and detergent tolerability need to be improved in order to be used for industrial application. In this work, we obtained several keratinase variants with enhanced catalytic efficiency, thermophilicity, and anti-salt and detergent tolerability by partially truncating the PPC domain of KerSMD. The variants all showed improved catalytic e...

  12. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael;

    2016-01-01

    and their lipolytic processing. The current work conceptualizes a model for the GPIHBP1•LPL interaction based on biophysical measurements with hydrogen-deuterium exchange/mass spectrometry, surface plasmon resonance, and zero-length cross-linking. According to this model, GPIHBP1 comprises two functionally distinct...... stabilizes LPL catalytic activity by mitigating the global unfolding of LPL's catalytic domain. This study provides a conceptual framework for understanding intravascular lipolysis and GPIHBP1 and LPL mutations causing familial chylomicronemia.......GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries...

  13. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  14. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  15. The Ste5 scaffold directs mating signaling by catalytically unlocking the Fus3 MAP kinase for activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Matthew; Tang, Grace; Singleton, Julie; Reményi, Attila; Lim, Wendell A

    2009-03-20

    The scaffold protein Ste5 is required to properly direct signaling through the yeast mating pathway to the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Fus3. Scaffolds are thought to function by tethering kinase and substrate in proximity. We find, however, that the previously identified Fus3-binding site on Ste5 is not required for signaling, suggesting an alternative mechanism controls Fus3's activation by the MAPKK Ste7. Reconstituting MAPK signaling in vitro, we find that Fus3 is an intrinsically poor substrate for Ste7, although the related filamentation MAPK, Kss1, is an excellent substrate. We identify and structurally characterize a domain in Ste5 that catalytically unlocks Fus3 for phosphorylation by Ste7. This domain selectively increases the k(cat) of Ste7-->Fus3 phosphorylation but has no effect on Ste7-->Kss1 phosphorylation. The dual requirement for both Ste7 and this Ste5 domain in Fus3 activation explains why Fus3 is selectively activated by the mating pathway and not by other pathways that also utilize Ste7. PMID:19303851

  16. Direct data domain approach to space-time adaptive processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Xiaoqin; Han Chongzhao

    2006-01-01

    In non-homogeneous environment, traditional space-time adaptive processing doesn' t effectively suppress interference and detect target, because the secondary data don' t exactly reflect the statistical characteristic of the range cell under test. A novel methodology utilizing the direct data domain approach to space- time adaptive processing (STAP) in airborne radar non-homogeneous environments is presented. The deterministic least squares adaptive signal processing technique operates on a "snapshot-by-snapshot" basis to determine the adaptive weights for nulling interferences and estimating signal of interest (SOI). Furthermore, this approach eliminates the requirement for estimating the covariance through the data of neighboring range rell,which eliminates calculating the inverse of covariance, and can be implemented to operate in resl-time. Simulation results illustrate the efficiency of interference suppression in non-homogeneous environment.

  17. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, Lindsay R; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Flemming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefan

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the "holy grails" is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFT+U calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  18. Direct Visualization of Catalytically Active Sites at the FeO-Pt(111) Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudernatsch, Wilhelmine; Peng, Guowen; Zeuthen, Helene; Bai, Yunhai; Merte, L. R.; Lammich, Lutz; Besenbacher, Fleming; Mavrikakis, Manos; Wendt, Stefen

    2015-08-25

    Within the area of surface science, one of the “holy grails” is to directly visualize a chemical reaction at the atomic scale. Whereas this goal has been reached by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in a number of cases for reactions occurring at flat surfaces, such a direct view is often inhibited for reaction occurring at steps and interfaces. Here we have studied the CO oxidation reaction at the interface between ultrathin FeO islands and a Pt(111) support by in situ STM and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Time-lapsed STM imaging on this inverse model catalyst in O2 and CO environments revealed catalytic activity occurring at the FeO-Pt(111) interface and directly showed that the Fe-edges host the catalytically most active sites for the CO oxidation reaction. This is an important result since previous evidence for the catalytic activity of the FeO-Pt(111) interface is essentially based on averaging techniques in conjunction with DFT calculations. The presented STM results are in accord with DFTþU calculations, in which we compare possible CO oxidation pathways on oxidized Fe-edges and O-edges. We found that the CO oxidation reaction is more favorable on the oxidized Fe-edges, both thermodynamically and kinetically.

  19. Exploring the origin of the catalytic power and product specificity of SET domain protein methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, A H; Alves, C N; Prasad, R; Lameira, J

    2016-10-20

    Herein, we used computer simulation to evaluate the free energy activation barriers of the first and second methyl transfer for native SET8 PKMT and its Y334F mutant. The results suggest that the origin of SET8 catalytic power is mainly due to electrostatic preorganization.

  20. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC); (Scripps)

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  1. Direct Formation of Oxocarbenium Ions under Weakly Acidic Conditions: Catalytic Enantioselective Oxa-Pictet-Spengler Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenfei; Chen, Shawn B; Seidel, Daniel

    2016-07-27

    Two catalysts, an amine HCl salt and a bisthiourea, work in concert to enable the generation of oxocarbenium ions under mild conditions. The amine catalyst generates an iminium ion of sufficient electrophilicity to enable 1,2-attack by an alcohol. Catalyst turnover is achieved by amine elimination with concomitant formation of an oxocarbenium intermediate. The bisthiourea catalyst accelerates all of the steps of the reaction and controls the stereoselectivity via anion binding/ion pair formation. This new concept was applied to direct catalytic enantioselective oxa-Pictet-Spengler reactions of tryptophol with aldehydes. PMID:27396413

  2. Domain III function of Mu transposase analysed by directed placement of subunits within the transpososome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susana Mariconda; Soon-Young Namgoong; Ki-Hoon Yoon; Hong Jiang; Rasika M Harshey

    2000-12-01

    Assembly of the functional tetrameric form of Mu transposase (MuA protein) at the two att ends of Mu depends on interaction of MuA with multiple att and enhancer sites on supercoiled DNA, and is stimulated by MuB protein. The N-terminal domain I of MuA harbours distinct regions for interaction with the att ends and enhancer; the C-terminal domain III contains separate regions essential for tetramer assembly and interaction with MuB protein (III and III, respectively). Although the central domain II (the ‘DDE’ domain) of MuA harbours the known catalytic DDE residues, a 26 amino acid peptide within III also has a non-specific DNA binding and nuclease activity which has been implicated in catalysis. One model proposes that active sites for Mu transposition are assembled by sharing structural/catalytic residues between domains II and III present on separate MuA monomers within the MuA tetramer. We have used substrates with altered att sites and mixtures of MuA proteins with either wild-type or altered att DNA binding specificities, to create tetrameric arrangements wherein specific MuA subunits are nonfunctional in II, III or III domains. From the ability of these oriented tetramers to carry out DNA cleavage and strand transfer we conclude that domain III or III function is not unique to a specific subunit within the tetramer, indicative of a structural rather than a catalytic function for domain III in Mu transposition.

  3. Goal Directed Model Inversion: Learning Within Domain Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombano, Silvano P.; Compton, Michael; Raghavan, Bharathi; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Goal Directed Model Inversion (GDMI) is an algorithm designed to generalize supervised learning to the case where target outputs are not available to the learning system. The output of the learning system becomes the input to some external device or transformation, and only the output of this device or transformation can be compared to a desired target. The fundamental driving mechanism of GDMI is to learn from success. Given that a wrong outcome is achieved, one notes that the action that produced that outcome "would have been right if the outcome had been the desired one." The algorithm makes use of these intermediate "successes" to achieve the final goal. A unique and potentially very important feature of this algorithm is the ability to modify the output of the learning module to force upon it a desired syntactic structure. This differs from ordinary supervised learning in the following way: in supervised learning the exact desired output pattern must be provided. In GDMI instead, it is possible to require simply that the output obey certain rules, i.e., that it "make sense" in some way determined by the knowledge domain. The exact pattern that will achieve the desired outcome is then found by the system. The ability to impose rules while allowing the system to search for its own answers in the context of neural networks is potentially a major breakthrough in two ways: 1) it may allow the construction of networks that can incorporate immediately some important knowledge, i.e. would not need to learn everything from scratch as normally required at present, and 2) learning and searching would be limited to the areas where it is necessary, thus facilitating and speeding up the process. These points are illustrated with examples from robotic path planning and parametric design.

  4. The properties of catalytically-inactivated Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I: Role of the cellulose binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Donner, T.R.; Affholter, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) was purified from a crude cellulase by preparative isoelectric focusing. Treatment of CBH I with 1-ethyl-3-3(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide (EDC) resulted in its catalytic inactivation but did not abolish its ability to be absorbed to microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel). CBH I thus modified possessed a pI of between 8.5 and 9.3 and decreased tryptophan fluorescence compared to native CBH I. A comparison of the effect of native and modified CBH I on the morphology of crystalline cotton cellulose fibers was made using scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Crystal structures of the catalytic domains of pseudouridine synthases RluC and RluD from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kenji; Machida, Yoshitaka; Unzai, Satoru; Park, Sam-Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2004-04-20

    The most frequent modification of RNA, the conversion of uridine bases to pseudouridines, is found in all living organisms and often in highly conserved locations in ribosomal and transfer RNA. RluC and RluD are homologous enzymes which each convert three specific uridine bases in Escherichia coli ribosomal 23S RNA to pseudouridine: bases 955, 2504, and 2580 in the case of RluC and 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the case of RluD. Both have an N-terminal S4 RNA binding domain. While the loss of RluC has little phenotypic effect, loss of RluD results in a much reduced growth rate. We have determined the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of RluC, and full-length RluD. The S4 domain of RluD appears to be highly flexible or unfolded and is completely invisible in the electron density map. Despite the conserved topology shared by the two proteins, the surface shape and charge distribution are very different. The models suggest significant differences in substrate binding by different pseudouridine synthases.

  6. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  7. Direct Catalytic Asymmetric Mannich-Type Reaction of α- and β-Fluorinated Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewitz, Lennart; Arteaga, Fernando Arteaga; Yin, Liang; Alagiri, Kaliyamoorthy; Kumagai, Naoya; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-12-23

    The last two decades have witnessed the emergence of direct enolization protocols providing atom-economical and operationally simple methods to use enolates for stereoselective C-C bond-forming reactions, eliminating the inherent drawback of the preformation of enolates using stoichiometric amounts of reagents. In its infancy, direct enolization relied heavily on the intrinsic acidity of the latent enolates, and the reaction scope was limited to readily enolizable ketones and aldehydes. Recent advances in this field enabled the exploitation of carboxylic acid derivatives for direct enolization, offering expeditious access to synthetically versatile chiral building blocks. Despite the growing demand for enantioenriched fluorine-containing small molecules, α- and β-fluorinated carbonyl compounds have been neglected in direct enolization chemistry because of the competing and dominating defluorination pathway. Herein we present a comprehensive study on direct and highly stereoselective Mannich-type reactions of α- and β-fluorine-functionalized 7-azaindoline amides that rely on a soft Lewis acid/hard Brønsted base cooperative catalytic system to guarantee an efficient enolization while suppressing undesired defluorination. This protocol contributes to provide a series of fluorinated analogs of enantioenriched β-amino acids for medicinal chemistry. PMID:26652911

  8. Solar reforming of methane in a direct absorption catalytic reactor on a parabolic dish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muir, J.F.; Hogan, R.E. Jr.; Skocypec, R.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Buck, R. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Thermodynamik)

    1990-01-01

    The concept of solar driven chemical reactions in a commercial-scale volumetric receiver/reactor on a parabolic concentrator was successfully demonstrated in the CAtalytically Enhanced Solar Absorption Receiver (CAESAR) test. Solar reforming of methane (CH{sub 4}) with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) was achieved in a 64-cm diameter direct absorption reactor on a parabolic dish capable of 150 kW solar power. The reactor was a catalytic volumetric absorber consisting of a multi-layered, porous alumina foam disk coated with rhodium (Rh) catalyst. The system was operated during both steady-state and solar transient (cloud passage) conditions. The total solar power absorbed reached values up to 97 kW and the maximum methane conversion was 70%. Receiver thermal efficiencies ranged up to 85% and chemical efficiencies peaked at 54%. The absorber performed satisfactorily in promoting the reforming reaction during the tests without carbon formation. However, problems of cracking and degradation of the porous matrix, nonuniform dispersion of the Rh through the absorber, and catalyst deactivation due to sintering and possible encapsulation, must be resolved to achieve long-term operation and eventual commercialization. 17 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Directly coupled vs conventional time domain reflectometry in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR), a technique for estimation of soil water, measures the travel time of an electromagnetic pulse on electrodes embedded in the soil, but has limited application in commercial agriculture due to costs, labor, and sensing depth. Conventional TDR systems have employed ana...

  10. Direct Comparison of Electrochemical and Spectrochemical Kinetics for Catalytic Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasylenko, Derek J.; Rodriguez, Carlos; Pegis, Michael L.; Mayer, James M.

    2014-09-10

    We describe here a direct comparison of electrochemical and spectrochemical experiments to determine rates and selectivity of oxygen reduction catalyzed by iron 5,10,15,20-meso-tetraphenylporphyrin chloride. Strong agreement was found between the two methods suggesting the same mechanism is occurring under both conditions, with the same overall third order rate constant kcat = (1.1 ± 0.1) × 106 M-2 s-1. This report provides a rare example of characterization of a redox catalytic process by two common but very different methods. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences.

  11. Advances in the development of catalytic tethering directing groups for C-H functionalization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huan; Guimond, Nicolas; Huang, Yong

    2016-09-28

    Transition metal-catalyzed C-H bond insertion is one of the most straightforward strategies to introduce functionalities within a hydrocarbon microenvironment. For the past two decades, selective activation and functionalization of certain inert C-H bonds have been made possible with the help of directing groups (DGs). Despite the enormous advances in the field, an overwhelming majority of systems require two extra steps from their simple precursors: installation and removal of the DGs. Recently, traceless and multitasking groups were invented as a partial solution to DG release. However, installation remains largely unsolved. Ideally, a transient, catalytic DG would circumvent this problem and increase the step- and atom-economy of C-H functionalization processes. In this review, we summarize the recent development of the transient tethering strategy for C-H activation reactions. PMID:27506568

  12. Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Human APOBEC3B and the Critical Structural Role for a Conserved Methionine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardena, Sachini U; Guruge, Thisari A; Bhagwat, Ashok S

    2015-09-25

    Human APOBEC3B deaminates cytosines in DNA and belongs to the AID/APOBEC family of enzymes. These proteins are involved in innate and adaptive immunity and may cause mutations in a variety of cancers. To characterize its ability to convert cytosines into uracils, we tested several derivatives of APOBEC3B gene for their ability to cause mutations in Escherichia coli. Through this analysis, a methionine residue at the junction of the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) was found to be essential for high mutagenicity. Properties of mutants with substitutions at this position, examination of existing molecular structures of APOBEC3 family members and molecular modeling suggest that this residue is essential for the structural stability of this family of proteins. The APOBEC3B CTD with the highest mutational activity was purified to homogeneity and its kinetic parameters were determined. Size-exclusion chromatography of the CTD monomer showed that it is in equilibrium with its dimeric form and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis of the protein suggested that the dimer may be quite stable. The partially purified NTD did not show intrinsic deamination activity and did not enhance the activity of the CTD in biochemical assays. Finally, APOBEC3B was at least 10-fold less efficient at mutating 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to thymine than APOBEC3A in a genetic assay and was at least 10-fold less efficient at deaminating 5mC compared to C in biochemical assays. These results shed light on the structural organization of APOBEC3B catalytic domain, its substrate specificity and its possible role in causing genome-wide mutations.

  13. MPN+, a putative catalytic motif found in a subset of MPN domain proteins from eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is critical for Rpn11 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Kay

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three macromolecular assemblages, the lid complex of the proteasome, the COP9-Signalosome (CSN and the eIF3 complex, all consist of multiple proteins harboring MPN and PCI domains. Up to now, no specific function for any of these proteins has been defined, nor has the importance of these motifs been elucidated. In particular Rpn11, a lid subunit, serves as the paradigm for MPN-containing proteins as it is highly conserved and important for proteasome function. Results We have identified a sequence motif, termed the MPN+ motif, which is highly conserved in a subset of MPN domain proteins such as Rpn11 and Csn5/Jab1, but is not present outside of this subfamily. The MPN+ motif consists of five polar residues that resemble the active site residues of hydrolytic enzyme classes, particularly that of metalloproteases. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the MPN+ residues are important for the function of Rpn11, while a highly conserved Cys residue outside of the MPN+ motif is not essential. Single amino acid substitutions in MPN+ residues all show similar phenotypes, including slow growth, sensitivity to temperature and amino acid analogs, and general proteasome-dependent proteolysis defects. Conclusions The MPN+ motif is abundant in certain MPN-domain proteins, including newly identified proteins of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea thought to act outside of the traditional large PCI/MPN complexes. The putative catalytic nature of the MPN+ motif makes it a good candidate for a pivotal enzymatic function, possibly a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating activity and a CSN-associated Nedd8/Rub1-removing activity.

  14. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand; Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Trillo-Muyo, Sergio; de Diego, Iñaki; Riise, Erik; Potempa, Jan; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to matrix metalloproteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low-micromolar binding affinities. Subsequent refinement revealed that inhibition comparable to that of longer peptides could be achieved using the tetrapeptide SWFP. To analyze its binding, the high-resolution crystal structure of the complex between Kly18 and SWFP was determined and it was found that the peptide binds to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc-binding histidines from the protein scaffold, to an octahedral-minus-one metal-coordination sphere. The tryptophan side chain penetrates the deep partially water-filled specificity pocket of Kly18. Together with previous serendipitous product complexes of Kly18, the present results provide the structural determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule.

  15. Expression in E. coli and characterization of the catalytic domain of Botrytis cinerea chitin synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piffeteau Annie

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chitin synthase 3a (CHS3a from Botrytis cinerea (Bc catalyses the multiple transfer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc residues to the growing chitin chain. Chitin, a β-1,4 linked GlcNAc homopolymer, is an essential cell wall component of filamentous fungi. Chitin synthase, processive membranous protein, has been recognized as a promising target for new antifungicides. Enzymatic characterizations of chitin synthases have been limited, mainly because purity and amounts of integral enzyme obtained after purification procedures have not been sufficient. Findings We undertook the preparation of two BcCHS3a fragment proteins, containing only the central domain and devoid of the N-terminal and transmembrane C-terminal regions. The central domain of CHS3a, named SGC (Spsa GntI Core, is conserved in all UDP-glycosyltransferases and it is believed to contain the active site of the enzyme. CHS3a-SGC protein was totally expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli. We performed recombinant CHS3a-SGC purification in denaturing conditions, followed by a refolding step. Although circular dichroism spectra clearly exhibited secondary structures of renatured CHS3a-SGC, no chitin synthase activity was detected. Nevertheless CHS3a-SGC proteins show specific binding for the substrate UDP-GlcNAc with a dissociation constant similar to the Michaelis constant and a major contribution of the uracil moiety for recognition was confirmed. Conclusions Milligram-scale quantities of CHS3a-SGC protein with native-like properties such as specific substrate UDP-GlcNAc binding could be easily obtained. These results are encouraging for subsequent heterologous expression of full-length CHS3a.

  16. Formation of domain reversal by direct irradiation with femtosecond laser in lithium niobate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haisheng Zhu; Xianfeng Chen; Hongyun Chen; Xuewei Deng

    2009-01-01

    We propose that domain inversion can be directly induced by femtceecond laser both theoretically and experimentally, which opens a path to achieve three-dimensional (3D) nonlinear crystal with a period in sub-micron-scale. A simulation of domain inversion is modeled by considering the temporal distribution of femtosecond pulses. The calculation results clarify that the domain inversions can happen within or after the interaction with the laser pulse, and the response time of domain inversion is in the picosecond level depending on the intensity and the materials. The domain reversal windows of lithium niobate by femtosecond laser are observed which agrees with theoretical predictions qualitatively.

  17. Motile properties of the bi-directional kinesin-5 Cin8 are affected by phosphorylation in its motor domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Ofer; Gheber, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 performs essential mitotic functions in spindle assembly and anaphase B spindle elongation. Recent work has shown that Cin8 is a bi-directional motor which moves towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs) under high ionic strength (IS) conditions and changes directionality in low IS conditions and when bound between anti-parallel microtubules. Previous work from our laboratory has also indicated that Cin8 is differentially phosphorylated during late anaphase at cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-specific sites located in its motor domain. In vivo, such phosphorylation causes Cin8 detachment from spindles and reduces the spindle elongation rate, while maintaining proper spindle morphology. To study the effect of phosphorylation on Cin8 motor function, we examined in vitro motile properties of wild type Cin8, as well as its phosphorylation using phospho-deficient and phospho-mimic variants, in a single molecule fluorescence motility assay. Analysis was performed on whole cell extracts and on purified Cin8 samples. We found that addition of negative charges in the phospho-mimic mutant weakened the MT-motor interaction, increased motor velocity and promoted minus-end-directed motility. These results indicate that phosphorylation in the catalytic domain of Cin8 regulates its motor function. PMID:27216310

  18. Structure of catalytic domain of Matriptase in complex with Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Mingdong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Matriptase is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is found on the surfaces of epithelial cells and certain cancer cells. Matriptase has been implicated in the degradation of certain extracellular matrix components as well as the activation of various cellular proteins and proteases, including hepatocyte growth factor and urokinase. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1, a cyclic peptide inhibitor originally isolated from sunflower seeds, exhibits potent inhibitory activity toward matriptase. Results We have engineered and produced recombinant proteins of the matriptase protease domain, and have determined the crystal structures of the protease:SFTI-1 complex at 2.0 Å as well as the protease:benzamidine complex at 1.2 Å. These structures elaborate the structural basis of substrate selectivity of matriptase, and show that the matriptase S1 substrate specificity pocket is larger enough to allow movement of benzamidine inside the S1 pocket. Our study also reveals that SFTI-1 binds to matriptase in a way similar to its binding to trypsin despite the significantly different isoelectric points of the two proteins (5.6 vs. 8.2. Conclusions This work helps to define the structural basis of substrate specificity of matriptase and the interactions between the inhibitor and protease. The complex structure also provides a structural template for designing new SFTI-1 derivatives with better potency and selectivity against matriptase and other proteases.

  19. Dynamically-driven inactivation of the catalytic machinery of the SARS 3C-like protease by the N214A mutation on the extra domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiahai; Han, Nanyu; Lim, Liangzhong; Lua, Shixiong; Sivaraman, J; Wang, Lushan; Mu, Yuguang; Song, Jianxing

    2011-02-01

    Despite utilizing the same chymotrypsin fold to host the catalytic machinery, coronavirus 3C-like proteases (3CLpro) noticeably differ from picornavirus 3C proteases in acquiring an extra helical domain in evolution. Previously, the extra domain was demonstrated to regulate the catalysis of the SARS-CoV 3CLpro by controlling its dimerization. Here, we studied N214A, another mutant with only a doubled dissociation constant but significantly abolished activity. Unexpectedly, N214A still adopts the dimeric structure almost identical to that of the wild-type (WT) enzyme. Thus, we conducted 30-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for N214A, WT, and R298A which we previously characterized to be a monomer with the collapsed catalytic machinery. Remarkably, three proteases display distinctive dynamical behaviors. While in WT, the catalytic machinery stably retains in the activated state; in R298A it remains largely collapsed in the inactivated state, thus implying that two states are not only structurally very distinguishable but also dynamically well separated. Surprisingly, in N214A the catalytic dyad becomes dynamically unstable and many residues constituting the catalytic machinery jump to sample the conformations highly resembling those of R298A. Therefore, the N214A mutation appears to trigger the dramatic change of the enzyme dynamics in the context of the dimeric form which ultimately inactivates the catalytic machinery. The present MD simulations represent the longest reported so far for the SARS-CoV 3CLpro, unveiling that its catalysis is critically dependent on the dynamics, which can be amazingly modulated by the extra domain. Consequently, mediating the dynamics may offer a potential avenue to inhibit the SARS-CoV 3CLpro.

  20. Rescue of HIV-1 release by targeting widely divergent NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases and isolated catalytic HECT domains to Gag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Weiss

    Full Text Available Retroviruses engage the ESCRT pathway through late assembly (L domains in Gag to promote virus release. HIV-1 uses a PTAP motif as its primary L domain, which interacts with the ESCRT-I component Tsg101. In contrast, certain other retroviruses primarily use PPxY-type L domains, which constitute ligands for NEDD4-type ubiquitin ligases. Surprisingly, although HIV-1 Gag lacks PPxY motifs, the release of HIV-1 L domain mutants is potently enhanced by ectopic NEDD4-2s, a native isoform with a naturally truncated C2 domain that appears to account for the residual titer of L domain-defective HIV-1. The reason for the unique potency of the NEDD4-2s isoform has remained unclear. We now show that the naturally truncated C2 domain of NEDD4-2s functions as an autonomous Gag-targeting module that can be functionally replaced by the unrelated Gag-binding protein cyclophilin A (CypA. The residual C2 domain of NEDD4-2s was sufficient to transfer the ability to stimulate HIV-1 budding to other NEDD4 family members, including the yeast homologue Rsp5, and even to isolated catalytic HECT domains. The isolated catalytic domain of NEDD4-2s also efficiently promoted HIV-1 budding when targeted to Gag via CypA. We conclude that the regions typically required for substrate recognition by HECT ubiquitin ligases are all dispensable to stimulate HIV-1 release, implying that the relevant target for ubiquitination is Gag itself or can be recognized by divergent isolated HECT domains. However, the mere ability to ubiquitinate Gag was not sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Rather, our results indicate that the synthesis of K63-linked ubiquitin chains is critical for ubiquitin ligase-mediated virus release.

  1. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Trompouki

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD, which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human CYLD inactivation and characterize the biological role of CYLD in vivo, we generated mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Cyld exon 9 (CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice using a conditional approach. Deletion of exon 9 would cause a carboxyl-terminal truncation of CYLD and inactivation of its deubiquitinating activity. In accordance with previous studies, fibroblasts from CyldΔ9/Δ9 embryos had hyperactive nuclear factor κB and c-Jun kinase pathways compared with control fibroblasts. CyldΔ9/Δ9 newborn mice were smaller than wild-type littermates with a short and kinky tail and nomajor developmental defects. However, CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice died shortly after birth from apparent respiratory dysfunction. Histological examination of E18.5 CyldΔ9/Δ9 lungs demonstrated an immature phenotype characterized by hyperplasic mesenchyme but apparently normal epithelial, smooth muscle. and endothelial structures. Our study identifies an important role of CYLD in lung maturation, which may underlie the development of many cases of lung cancer.

  2. Fusion proteins comprising the catalytic domain of mutansucrase and a starch-binding domain can after the morphology of amylose-free potato starch granules during biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Nazarian, F.; Kok-Jacon, G.A.; Vincken, J.P.; Q. JI; Suurs, L.C.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown previously that mutan can be co-synthesized with starch when a truncated mutansucrase (GtfICAT) is directed to potato tuber amyloplasts. The mutan seemed to adhere to the isolated starch granules, but it was not incorporated in the starch granules. In this study, GtfICAT was fused to the N- or C-terminus of a starch-binding domain (SBD). These constructs were introduced into two genetically different potato backgrounds (cv. Kardal and amf), in order to bring GtfICAT in more ...

  3. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of RluD, the only rRNA pseudouridine synthase required for normal growth of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Mark; Ofengand, James; Malhotra, Arun

    2004-02-01

    Escherichia coli pseudouridine synthase RluD makes pseudouridines 1911, 1915, and 1917 in the loop of helix 69 in 23S RNA. These are the most highly conserved ribosomal pseudouridines known. Of 11 pseudouridine synthases in E. coli, only cells lacking RluD have severe growth defects and abnormal ribosomes. We have determined the 2.0 A structure of the catalytic domain of RluD (residues 77-326), the first structure of an RluA family member. The catalytic domain folds into a mainly antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by several loops and helices. A positively charged cleft that presumably binds RNA leads to the conserved Asp 139. The RluD N-terminal S4 domain, connected by a flexible linker, is disordered in our structure. RluD is very similar in both catalytic domain structure and active site arrangement to the pseudouridine synthases RsuA, TruB, and TruA. We identify five sequence motifs, two of which are novel, in the RluA, RsuA, TruB, and TruA families, uniting them as one superfamily. These results strongly suggest that four of the five families of pseudouridine synthases arose by divergent evolution. The RluD structure also provides insight into its multisite specificity.

  4. Direct observation of lipid domains in free standing bilayers: from simple to complex lipid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis A

    2003-01-01

    The direct observation of temperature-dependent lipid phase equilibria, using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of different lipid mixtures, provides novel information about the physical characteristics of lipid domain coexistence. Physica...

  5. Catalytic Enhancement of Carbon Black and Coal-Fueled Hybrid Direct Carbon Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Ippolito, Davide; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    , Ce1-xREExO2-δ (REE = Pr, Sm)) and metal oxides (LiMn2O4, Ag2O). Materials showing the highest activity in carbon black (Mn2O3, CeO2, Ce0.6Pr0.4O2-δ, Ag2O) were subsequently tested for catalytic activity toward bituminous coal, as revealed by both I-V-P curves and electrochemical impedance......Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells (HDCFCs) consisting of a solid carbon (carbon black)-molten carbonate ((62–38 wt% Li-K)2CO3) mixtures in the anode chamber of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell type full-cell are tested for their electrochemical performance between 700 and 800°C. Performance...... was investigated using current-voltage-power density curves. In the anode chamber, catalysts are mixed with the carbon-carbonate mixture. These catalysts include various manganese oxides (MnO2, Mn2O3, Mn3O4, MnO), metal carbonates (Ag2CO3, MnCO3, Ce2(CO3)3), metals (Ag, Ce, Ni), doped-ceria (CeO2, Ce1-xGdxO2-x/2...

  6. Direct Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural Using Ionic Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanan Eminov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose is the single largest component of lignocellulosic biomass and is an attractive feedstock for a wide variety of renewable platform chemicals and biofuels, providing an alternative to petrochemicals and petrofuels. This potential is currently limited by the existing methods of transforming this poorly soluble polymer into useful chemical building blocks, such as 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF. Ionic liquids have been used successfully to separate cellulose from the other components of lignocellulosic biomass and so the use of the same medium for the challenging transformation of cellulose into HMF would be highly attractive for the development of the biorefinery concept. In this report, ionic liquids based on 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cations [C4C1im]+ with Lewis basic (X = Cl− and Brønsted acidic (X = HSO4− anions were used to investigate the direct catalytic transformation of cellulose to HMF. Variables probed included the composition of the ionic liquid medium, the metal catalyst, and the reaction conditions (temperature, substrate concentration. Lowering the cellulose loading and optimising the temperature achieved a 58% HMF yield after only one hour at 150 °C using a 7 mol % loading of the CrCl3 catalyst. This compares favourably with current literature procedures requiring much longer reactions times or approaches that are difficult to scale such as microwave irradiation.

  7. Direct observation of electron dynamics in the attosecond domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föhlisch, A; Feulner, P; Hennies, F; Fink, A; Menzel, D; Sanchez-Portal, D; Echenique, P M; Wurth, W

    2005-07-21

    Dynamical processes are commonly investigated using laser pump-probe experiments, with a pump pulse exciting the system of interest and a second probe pulse tracking its temporal evolution as a function of the delay between the pulses. Because the time resolution attainable in such experiments depends on the temporal definition of the laser pulses, pulse compression to 200 attoseconds (1 as = 10(-18) s) is a promising recent development. These ultrafast pulses have been fully characterized, and used to directly measure light waves and electronic relaxation in free atoms. But attosecond pulses can only be realized in the extreme ultraviolet and X-ray regime; in contrast, the optical laser pulses typically used for experiments on complex systems last several femtoseconds (1 fs = 10(-15) s). Here we monitor the dynamics of ultrafast electron transfer--a process important in photo- and electrochemistry and used in solid-state solar cells, molecular electronics and single-electron devices--on attosecond timescales using core-hole spectroscopy. We push the method, which uses the lifetime of a core electron hole as an internal reference clock for following dynamic processes, into the attosecond regime by focusing on short-lived holes with initial and final states in the same electronic shell. This allows us to show that electron transfer from an adsorbed sulphur atom to a ruthenium surface proceeds in about 320 as. PMID:16034414

  8. Direct Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Performance of Iron-Containing SBA-15 for Phenol Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Huan-ling; XU Wen-guo

    2008-01-01

    An iron-containing SBA-15(Fe-SBA-15) has been synthesized via one-pot hydrothermal method under weak acidic conditions. A series of characterizations show nanocomposite materials of iron particles supported over mesostructured materials. The catalytic activity of these iron-containing SBA-15 materials has been tested for the heterogeneous Fenton degradation of phenolic aqueous solutions. The catalytic performance has been monitored in terms of phenol conversion, whereas the catalytic stability was evaluated by catalyst recycle. The influence of concentration of hydrogen peroxide, catalyst loading, catalyst prepared with different Fe/Si molar ratios in the gel and pH values of the solution on phenol conversion has been studied. Achieving a good catalytic performance accompanied with a noteworthy stability, Fe-SBA-15 materials prepared by this method are shown as the successful catalyst for degradation of phenolic aqueous solutions by Fenton process.

  9. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  10. Changes in Protein Domains outside the Catalytic Site of the Bacteriophage Qβ Replicase Reduce the Mutagenic Effect of 5-Azacytidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Laura; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The high genetic heterogeneity and great adaptability of RNA viruses are ultimately caused by the low replication fidelity of their polymerases. However, single amino acid substitutions that modify replication fidelity can evolve in response to mutagenic treatments with nucleoside analogues. Here, we investigated how two independent mutants of the bacteriophage Qβ replicase (Thr210Ala and Tyr410His) reduce sensitivity to the nucleoside analogue 5-azacytidine (AZC). Despite being located outside the catalytic site, both mutants reduced the mutation frequency in the presence of the drug. However, they did not modify the type of AZC-induced substitutions, which was mediated mainly by ambiguous base pairing of the analogue with purines. Furthermore, the Thr210Ala and Tyr410His substitutions had little or no effect on replication fidelity in untreated viruses. Also, both substitutions were costly in the absence of AZC or when the action of the drug was suppressed by adding an excess of natural pyrimidines (uridine or cytosine). Overall, the phenotypic properties of these two mutants were highly convergent, despite the mutations being located in different domains of the Qβ replicase. This suggests that treatment with a given nucleoside analogue tends to select for a unique functional response in the viral replicase. IMPORTANCE In the last years, artificial increase of the replication error rate has been proposed as an antiviral therapy. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which two substitutions in the Qβ replicase confer partial resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue AZC. As opposed to previous work with animal viruses, where different mutations selected sequentially conferred nucleoside analogue resistance through different mechanisms, our results suggest that there are few or no alternative AZC resistance phenotypes in Qβ. Also, despite resistance mutations being highly costly in the absence of the drug, there was no sequential

  11. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-05-01

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing

  12. Direct observation of doping incorporation pathways in self-catalytic GaMnAs nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, Takeshi; Thuvander, M.; Siusys, A.;

    2015-01-01

    Doping mechanisms of Mn in GaAs nanowires (NWs) that have been grown self-catalytically at 600 degrees C by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated using advanced electron microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography, Mn is found to be incorporated primarily in the form of non-magnetic t...

  13. Catalytic modification of conventional SOFC anodes with a view to reducing their activity for direct internal reforming of natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boder, M.; Dittmeyer, R. [Research Group Technical Chemistry, Karl-Winnacker-Institut, DECHEMA e.V., Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, D-60486 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-04-18

    When using natural gas as fuel for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), direct internal reforming lowers the requirement for cell cooling and, theoretically, offers advantages with respect to capital cost and efficiency. The high metal content of a nickel/zirconia anode and the high temperature, however, cause the endothermic reforming reaction to take place very fast. The resulting drop of temperature at the inlet produces thermal stresses, which may lower the system efficiency and limit the stack lifetime. To reduce the reforming rate without lowering the electrochemical activity of the cell, a wet impregnation procedure for modifying conventional cermets by coverage with a less active metal was developed. As the coating material copper was chosen. Copper is affordable, catalytically inert for the reforming reaction and exhibits excellent electronic conductivity. The current density-voltage characteristics of the modified units showed that it is possible to maintain a good electrochemical performance of the cells despite the catalytic modification. A copper to nickel ratio of 1:3 resulted in a strong diminution of the catalytic reaction rate. This indicates that the modification could be a promising method to improve the performance of solid oxide fuel cells with direct internal reforming of hydrocarbons. (author)

  14. Theoretical models of catalytic domains of protein phosphatases 1 and 2A with Zn2+ and Mn2+ metal dications and putative bioligands in their catalytic centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak-Celmer, E; Ołdziej, S; Ciarkowski, J

    2001-01-01

    The oligomeric metalloenzymes protein phosphatases dephosphorylate OH groups of Ser/Thr or Tyr residues of proteins whose actions depend on the phosphorus signal. The catalytic units of Ser/Thr protein phosphatases 1, 2A and 2B (PP1c, PP2Ac and PP2Bc, respectively), which exhibit about 45% sequence similarity, have their active centers practically identical. This feature strongly suggests that the unknown structure of PP2Ac could be successfully homology-modeled from the known structures of PP1c and/or PP2Bc. Initially, a theoretical model of PP1c was built, including a phosphate and a metal dication in its catalytic site. The latter was modeled, together with a structural hydroxyl anion, as a triangular pseudo-molecule (Zno or Mno), composed of two metal cations (double Zn2+ or Mn2+, respectively) and the OH- group. To the free PP1c two inhibitor sequences R29RRRPpTPAMLFR40 of DARPP-32 and R30RRRPpTPATLVLT42 of Inhibitor-1, and two putative substrate sequences LRRApSVA and QRRQRKpRRTI were subsequently docked. In the next step, a free PP2Ac model was built via homology re-modeling of the PP1c template and the same four sequences were docked to it. Thus, together, 20 starting model complexes were built, allowing for combination of the Zno and Mno pseudo-molecules, free enzymes and the peptide ligands docked in the catalytic sites of PP1c and PP2Ac. All models were subsequently subjected to 250-300 ps molecular dynamics using the AMBER 5.0 program. The equilibrated trajectories of the final 50 ps were taken for further analyses. The theoretical models of PP1c complexes, irrespective of the dication type, exhibited increased mobilities in the following residue ranges: 195-200, 273-278, 287-209 for the inhibitor sequences and 21-25, 194-200, 222-227, 261, 299-302 for the substrate sequences. Paradoxically, the analogous PP2Ac models appeared much more stable in similar simulations, since only their "prosegment" residues 6-10 and 14-18 exhibited an increased mobility

  15. Direct observation of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tan, Guotai; Gu, Lin; Yao, Yuan; Jin, Changqing; Wang, Yanguo; Duan, Xiaofeng; Yu, Richeng

    2013-01-01

    Topological vortices with swirling ferroelectric, magnetic and structural anti-phase relationship in hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Ho to Lu, Y, and Sc) have attracted much attention because of their intriguing behaviors. Herein, we report the structure of multiferroic vortex domains in YMnO3 at atomic scale using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Two types of displacements were identified among six domain walls (DWs); six translation-ferroelectric domains denoted by α+, γ-, β+, α-, γ+ and β-, respectively, were recognized, demonstrating the interlocking nature of the anti-vortex domain. We found that the anti-vortex core is about four unit cells wide. In addition, we reconstructed the vortex model with three swirling pairs of DWs along the [001] direction. These results are very critical for the understanding of topological behaviors and unusual properties of the multiferroic vortex.

  16. Direct observation of stochastic domain-wall depinning in magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Mi-Young; Bocklage, Lars; Fischer, Peter; Meier, Guido

    2008-11-01

    The stochastic field-driven depinning of a domain wall pinned at a notch in a magnetic nanowire is directly observed using magnetic X-ray microscopy with high lateral resolution down to 15 nm. The depinning-field distribution in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires considerably depends on the wire width and the notch depth. The difference in the multiplicity of domain-wall types generated in the vicinity of a notch is responsible for the observed dependence of the stochastic nature of the domain wall depinning field on the wire width and the notch depth. Thus the random nature of the domain wall depinning process is controllable by an appropriate design of the nanowire.

  17. Direct imaging of topological edge states at a bilayer graphene domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Long-Jing; Jiang, Hua; Qiao, Jia-Bin; He, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The AB-BA domain wall in gapped graphene bilayers is a rare naked structure hosting topological electronic states. Although it has been extensively studied in theory, a direct imaging of its topological edge states is still missing. Here we image the topological edge states at the graphene bilayer domain wall by using scanning tunnelling microscope. The simultaneously obtained atomic-resolution images of the domain wall provide us unprecedented opportunities to measure the spatially varying edge states within it. The one-dimensional conducting channels are observed to be mainly located around the two edges of the domain wall, which is reproduced quite well by our theoretical calculations. Our experiment further demonstrates that the one-dimensional topological states are quite robust even in the presence of high magnetic fields. The result reported here may raise hopes of graphene-based electronics with ultra-low dissipation.

  18. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2014-11-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp(2) carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations.

  19. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  20. On the Direct Cauchy Theorem in Widom Domains: Positive and Negative Examples

    CERN Document Server

    Yuditskii, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We discuss several questions which remained open in our joint work with M. Sodin "Almost periodic Jacobi matrices with homogeneous spectrum, infinite-dimensional Jacobi inversion, and Hardy spaces of character--automorphic functions". In particular, we show that there exists a non-homogeneous set $E$ such that the Direct Cauchy Theorem (DCT) holds in the Widom domain $\\bbC\\setminus E$. On the other hand we demonstrate that the weak homogeneity condition on $E$ (introduced recently by Poltoratski and Remling) does not ensure that DCT holds in the corresponding Widom domain.

  1. A simple two step procedure for purification of the catalytic domain of chicken tryptophan hydroxylase 1 in a form suitable for crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte R.; Munch, Astrid;

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1 in Escheri......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1...... in Escherichia coli in high yield. The enzyme was highly purified using only one anion exchange and one gel filtration, with a yield of 11 mg/L culture and a specific activity of 0.60 μmol/min/mg. The Km values were determined to Km,tryptophan = 7.7 ± 0.7 μM, Km,BH4=324±10 μM and Km,O2=39±2 μM. Substrate...... inhibition by tryptophan was observed at concentrations above 15 μM. Furthermore, the purified enzyme has been crystallized without 7,8-dihydro-l-biopterin and a data set to 3 Å resolution has been collected....

  2. Direction of arrival estimation using array model in time-frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yun; LI Zhishun

    2004-01-01

    Time-frequency analysis is combined with array processing to develop a direction of arrival (DOA) estimation method. The array data model is constructed in time-frequency domain by cross time-frequency distribution between the output of a reference sensor and those of two symmetric sub-arrays. Accordingly a subspace method is presented based on the average of two sub-arrays' time-frequency data vector model instead of the conventional array model, to estimate DOAs of multiple signals. Because the array data is processed both in spatial domain and 2-D time-frequency domain, the proposed method has an ability to select the signal of interesting, and is suitable for non-stationary signal. Additionally, the method is robust to noise and holds an advantage of low computational load. Simulations are conducted to verify the efficiency of the method and comparision is made with other methods.

  3. Direct catalytic transformation of carbohydrates into 5-ethoxymethylfurfural with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates into HMF and EMF in ethanol/DMSO with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres prepared from self-assembly of corresponding basic amino acids and HPA. - Highlights: • Acid–base bifunctional nanospheres were efficient for production of EMF from sugars. • Synthesis of EMF in a high yield of 76.6% was realized from fructose. • Fructose based biopolymers could also be converted into EMF with good yields. • Ethyl glucopyranoside was produced in good yields from glucose in ethanol. - Abstract: A series of acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres prepared from the self-assembly of basic amino acids and phosphotungstic acid (HPA) with different molar ratios were employed as efficient and recyclable catalysts for synthesis of liquid biofuel 5-ethoxymethylfurfural (EMF) from various carbohydrates. A high EMF yield of 76.6%, 58.5%, 42.4%, and 36.5% could be achieved, when fructose, inulin, sorbose, and sucrose were used as starting materials, respectively. Although, the acid–base bifunctional nanocatalysts were inert for synthesis of EMF from glucose based carbohydrates, ethyl glucopyranoside in good yields could be obtained from glucose in ethanol. Moreover, the nanocatalyst functionalized with acid and basic sites was able to be reused several times with no significant loss in catalytic activity

  4. Catalysis looks to the future. Panel on new directions in catalytic science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    Catalysts play a vital role in providing society with fuels, commodity and fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and means for protecting the environment. To be useful, a good catalyst must have a high turnover frequency (activity), produce the right kind of product (selectivity), and have a long life (durability), all at an acceptable cost. Research in the field of catalysis provides the tools and understanding required to facilitate and accelerate the development of improved catalysts and to open opportunities for the discovery of new catalytic processes. The aim of this report is to identify the research opportunities and challenges for catalysis in the coming decades and to detail the resources necessary to ensure steady progress. Chapter 2 discusses opportunities for developing new catalysts to meet the demands of the chemical and fuel industries, and the increasing role of catalysis in environmental protection. The intellectual challenges for advancing the frontiers of catalytic science are outlined in Chapter 3. The human and institutional resources available in the US for carrying out research on catalysis are summarized in Chapter 4. The findings and recommendations of the panel for industry, academe, the national laboratories, and the federal government are presented in Chapter 5.

  5. Solution structure of the parvulin-type PPIase domain of Staphylococcus aureus PrsA – Implications for the catalytic mechanism of parvulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koskela Harri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogenic bacterium causing many kinds of infections from mild respiratory tract infections to life-threatening states as sepsis. Recent emergence of S. aureus strains resistant to numerous antibiotics has created a need for new antimicrobial agents and novel drug targets. S. aureus PrsA is a membrane associated extra-cytoplasmic lipoprotein which contains a parvulin-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain. PrsA is known to act as an essential folding factor for secreted proteins in Gram-positive bacteria and thus it is a potential target for antimicrobial drugs against S. aureus. Results We have solved a high-resolution solution structure of the parvulin-type peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase domain of S. aureus PrsA (PrsA-PPIase. The results of substrate peptide titrations pinpoint the active site and demonstrate the substrate preference of the enzyme. With detailed NMR spectroscopic investigation of the orientation and tautomeric state of the active site histidines we are able to give further insight into the structure of the catalytic site. NMR relaxation analysis gives information on the dynamic behaviour of PrsA-PPIase. Conclusion Detailed structural description of the S. aureus PrsA-PPIase lays the foundation for structure-based design of enzyme inhibitors. The structure resembles hPin1-type parvulins both structurally and regarding substrate preference. Even though a wealth of structural data is available on parvulins, the catalytic mechanism has yet to be resolved. The structure of S. aureus PrsA-PPIase and our findings on the role of the conserved active site histidines help in designing further experiments to solve the detailed catalytic mechanism.

  6. The SH3 domain, but not the catalytic domain, is required for phospholipase C-γ1 to mediate epidermal growth factor-induced mitogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhongjian; Chen, Ying; Pennypacker, Sally D.; Zhou, Zhiguang; PENG, DAN

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) is a multiple-domain protein and plays an important role in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced cell mitogenesis, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have previously demonstrated that PLC-γ1 is required for EGF-induced mitogenesis of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells, but the mitogenic function of PLC-γ1 is independent of its lipase activity. Earlier studies suggest that the Src homology 3 (SH3) domain of PLC-γ1 possesses mitogenic activity. In the pres...

  7. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  8. MMP-12 Catalytic Domain Recognizes Triple Helical Peptide Models of Collagen V with Exosites and High Activity*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskaran, Rajagopalan; Palmier, Mark O.; Lauer-Fields, Janelle L.; Fields, Gregg B.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 (or metalloelastase) efficiently hydrolyzed the gelatinase-selective α1(V)436-447 fluorescent triple helical peptide (THP) when the substrate was submicromolar. The sequence of this THP was derived from collagen V, a component of collagen I fibrils. The hemopexin domains of MMP-12 and -9 each increased kcat/Km toward this substrate by decreasing Km, just as the hemopexin domain of MMP-1 enhances its triple helical peptidase activit...

  9. WD40 domain of Apc1 is critical for the coactivator-induced allosteric transition that stimulates APC/C catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuhong; Chang, Leifu; Aibara, Shintaro; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Ziguo; Barford, David

    2016-09-20

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is a large multimeric cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that orchestrates cell-cycle progression by targeting cell-cycle regulatory proteins for destruction via the ubiquitin proteasome system. The APC/C assembly comprises two scaffolding subcomplexes: the platform and the TPR lobe that together coordinate the juxtaposition of the catalytic and substrate-recognition modules. The platform comprises APC/C subunits Apc1, Apc4, Apc5, and Apc15. Although the role of Apc1 as an APC/C scaffolding subunit has been characterized, its specific functions in contributing toward APC/C catalytic activity are not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human Apc1 (Apc1N) determined at 2.2-Å resolution and provide an atomic-resolution description of the architecture of its WD40 (WD40 repeat) domain (Apc1(WD40)). To understand how Apc1(WD40) contributes to APC/C activity, a mutant form of the APC/C with Apc1(WD40) deleted was generated and evaluated biochemically and structurally. We found that the deletion of Apc1(WD40) abolished the UbcH10-dependent ubiquitination of APC/C substrates without impairing the Ube2S-dependent ubiquitin chain elongation activity. A cryo-EM structure of an APC/C-Cdh1 complex with Apc1(WD40) deleted showed that the mutant APC/C is locked into an inactive conformation in which the UbcH10-binding site of the catalytic module is inaccessible. Additionally, an EM density for Apc15 is not visible. Our data show that Apc1(WD40) is required to mediate the coactivator-induced conformational change of the APC/C that is responsible for stimulating APC/C catalytic activity by promoting UbcH10 binding. In contrast, Ube2S activity toward APC/C substrates is not dependent on the initiation-competent conformation of the APC/C.

  10. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-01

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes.

  12. Invoking Direct Exciton-Plasmon Interactions by Catalytic Ag Deposition on Au Nanoparticles: Photoelectrochemical Bioanalysis with High Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zheng-Yuan; Xu, Fei; Qin, Yu; Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2016-04-19

    In this work, direct exciton-plasmon interactions (EPI) between CdS quantum dots (QDs) and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) were invoked ingeniously by catalytic Ag deposition on Au NPs for the stimulation of high efficient damping effect toward the excitonic responses in CdS QDs, on the basis of which a novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalytical format was achieved for sensitive microRNA detection. Specifically, upon the configurational change from the hairpin probe DNA to the "Y"-shaped ternary conjugate consisting of the original probe DNA, assistant DNA, and the target microRNA, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) catalytic chemistry would then trigger the transition of the interparticle interplay from the CdS QDs-Au NPs to the CdS QDs-Ag NPs systems for the microRNA detection due to the dependence of the photocurrent quenching on the target concentration. This work not only provided a unique method for EPI generation among the PEC nanosystems but also offered a versatile and general protocol for future PEC bioanalysis development. PMID:27023112

  13. Direct observation of doping incorporation pathways in self-catalytic GaMnAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama, T., E-mail: tk@cen.dtu.dk; Yazdi, S. [Center for Electron Nanoscopy, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Thuvander, M. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Siusys, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotników 32/46, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); Gontard, L. C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), C/Américo Vespucio 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Kovács, A.; Duchamp, M.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gustafsson, A. [Solid State Physics and the Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Sadowski, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotników 32/46, PL-02-668 Warszawa (Poland); MAX-IV Laboratory, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-08-07

    Doping mechanisms of Mn in GaAs nanowires (NWs) that have been grown self-catalytically at 600 °C by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) are investigated using advanced electron microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography. Mn is found to be incorporated primarily in the form of non-magnetic tetragonal Ga{sub 0.82}Mn{sub 0.18} nanocrystals in Ga catalyst droplets at the ends of the NWs, while trace amounts of Mn (22 ± 4 at. ppm) are also distributed randomly in the NW bodies without forming clusters or precipitates. The nanocrystals are likely to form after switching off the reaction in the MBE chamber, since they are partially embedded in neck regions of the NWs. The Ga{sub 0.82}Mn{sub 0.18} nanocrystals and the low Mn concentration in the NW bodies are insufficient to induce a ferromagnetic phase transition, suggesting that it is difficult to have high Mn contents in GaAs even in 1-D NW growth via the vapor-liquid-solid process.

  14. The catalytic activity of the CD45 membrane-proximal phosphatase domain is required for TCR signaling and regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desai, D M; Sap, J; Silvennoinen, O;

    1994-01-01

    Cell surface expression of CD45, a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPase), is required for T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-mediated signal transduction. Like the majority of transmembrane PTPases, CD45 contains two cytoplasmic phosphatase domains, whose relative in vivo function is not...

  15. Fine tuning of the catalytic activity of colicin e7 nuclease domain by systematic n-terminal mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Németh, Eszter; Körtvélyesi, Tamás; Thulstrup, Peter W.;

    2014-01-01

    The nuclease domain of colicin E7 (NColE7) promotes the nonspecific cleavage of nucleic acids at its C-terminal HNH motif. Interestingly, the deletion of four N-terminal residues (446–449NColE75KRNK) resulted in complete loss of the enzyme activity. R447A mutation was reported to decrease the nuc...

  16. MOLECULAR CLONING OF hTRT CATALYTIC DOMAIN FROM HeLa CELLS AND ITS EXPRESSION IN E. Coli AND PURIFICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the expression of telomerase gene hTRT mRNA in HeLa cells and to obtain hTRT pro-tein for futher study. Methods. The gene for encoding hTRT catalytic domain was cloned based on RT-PCR amplification from HeLa cells and sequenced. The cloned hTRTcDNA was in-frame inserted into His-tag fusion expression vector pEK318. The His-tag hTRT fusion proteins were purified by Ni-NTA chromatography and stained by westerm blotting. Results. An approximately 620bp fragment was generated and cloned into pBluescript SK + between Sail and BamHI sites. DNA sequencing showed the isolated fragment was consistem to those reported. SDS-PAGE present that a 17kDa protein was expressed stably in E. coli JM109 harboring pEKTRTM4 containing 6 × His-tag and hTRT 150aa, and the expression level of the protein was about 26% of the total bacterial proteins, while the expression of pEKTRT containing 6 × His-tag and hTRT 243aa was only detectable as 27 kDa band in western blotting. Both of fu-sion proteins were purified by Ni-NTA chromatography and showed single band( > 95% purifity) in Coomassie Bril-liant staining. Westem-blotting confirmed that two proteins could be recognized by the Ni-NTA AP conjugate. Conclusions. The hTRT catalytic domain was highly conserved. The expressed hTRT protein contained recogniz-able His-tag, telomerase-specific and strong antigenic epitops, which may be convenient for further investigation.

  17. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in a fluid-porous domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turbulent heat transfer in a channel partially filled by a porous medium is investigated using a direct numerical simulation of an incompressible flow. The porous medium consists of a three-dimensional Cartesian grid of cubes, which has a relatively high permeability. The energy equation is not solved in the cubes. Three different heating configurations are studied. The simulation is performed for a bulk Reynolds number Reb = 5500 and a Prandtl number Pr = 0.1. The turbulent flow quantities are compared with the results of Breugem and Boersma ['Direct numerical simulations of turbulent flow over a permeable wall using a direct and a continuum approach,' Phys. Fluids 17, 025103 (2005)] to validate the numerical approach and macroscopic turbulent quantities are analyzed. Regarding the temperature fields, original results are obtained. The temperature fields show an enhanced turbulent heat transfer just above the porous region compared to the solid top wall, which can be related to the large vortical structures that develop in this region. Furthermore, these large structures induce pressure waves inside the porous domain which are responsible of large temperature fluctuations deep inside the porous region where the flow is laminar. Finally, macroscopic turbulent quantities are computed to get reference results for the development of macroscopic turbulent heat transfer models in fluid-porous domain. (authors)

  18. Combination of direct-forcing fictitious domain method and sharp interface method for dielectrophoresis of particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Shi; Zhaosheng Yu; Xueming Shao

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we combine the direct-forcing fictitious domain(DF/FD)method and the sharp interface method to resolve the problem of particle dielectrophoresis in two dimensions,The flow field and the motion of particles are solved with the DF/FD method,the electric field is solved with the sharp interface method,and the electrostatic force on the particles is computed using the Maxwell stress tensor method.The proposed method is validated via three problems: effective conductivity of particle composite between two planar plates,cell trapping in a channel,and motion of particles due to both conventional and traveling wave dielectrophoretic forces.

  19. THE DIMINISHING OF THE CONTENT OF TEXTILE DIRECT DYES AND AUXILIARY COMPOUNDS DURING THEIR CATALYTIC OXIDATION

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Gonta; Gheorghe Duca; Vera Matveevici; Larisa Mocanu

    2014-01-01

    Advanced oxidation methods of organic compounds lead to their partial mineralization and increase of the adsorption process efficiency on the surface of oxidized activated carbon. We have studied the oxidation process using model solutions containing mixture of dye direct brown (DB), ethylene glycol (EGL) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) under the action of Fenton reagent, in the presence and absence of UV irradiation or under the action of electric current (in the electrochemical cell). The s...

  20. New Reactions to Obtain Aromatics and Hydrogen through Methane's Direct Catalytic Dehydroaromatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yide; XIE Maosong; BAO Xinhe; LIN Liwu; WANG Linsheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Methane is the main component of natural gas and coal-bed gas. Structurally, its molecule is highly symmetric and hence, it becomes one of the most stable hydrocarbon compounds in nature. For a long time in the past, the research of methane transformation is a permanent "hot spot" and disciplinary frontier for chemists as it can be catalyzed directly into top-quality fuel and chemicals.

  1. Easy moment direction and antiferromagnetic domain wall motion in Mn2Au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthem, Vitoria M. T. S.; Colin, Claire V.; Haettel, Richard; Dufeu, Didier; Givord, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The interest of giving active functions to antiferromagnetic (AFM) materials in spintronics devices has been realized recently. Mn2Au is a high-Néel temperature antiferromagnet with large Mn moment, lying in plane of the tetragonal structure. To determine the direction of the moments in Mn2Au, an original approach is demonstrated, which should be generic to planar AFM materials. It involves the rotation of the granular sample around an axis perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The family of easy moment directions is . For grains prevented from rotating, the dominant magnetization process is AFM domain wall motion. Textured Mn2Au nanoelements could be introduced in spintronics devices, in which the Mn moments would be switched under modest external excitation.

  2. Isolation of an Active Catalytic Core of Streptococcus downei MFe28 GTF-I Glucosyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Monchois, Vincent; Arguello-Morales, Martha; Russell, Roy R. B.

    1999-01-01

    Truncated variants of GTF-I from Streptococcus downei MFe28 were purified by means of a histidine tag. Sequential deletions showed that the C-terminal domain was not directly involved in the catalytic process but was required for primer activation. A fully active catalytic core of only 100 kDa was isolated.

  3. Domains of quality of life of people with profound multiple disabilities : The perspective of parents and direct support staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petry, K; Maes, B; Vlaskamp, C

    2005-01-01

    Background This study considered the general validity of the basic domains of quality of life that appear in theoretical models, in relation to people with profound multiple disabilities. The authors examined how parents and direct support staff operationalized these basic domains for people with pr

  4. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Terminalia cuneata and its catalytic action in reduction of direct yellow-12 dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Lee, Yong Rok; Sethuraman, Mathur Gopalakrishnan

    2016-05-01

    Facile green synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous bark extract of Terminalia cuneata has been reported in this article. The effects of concentration of the extract, reaction time and pH were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Appearance of yellow color with λmax around ~ 420 nm suggested the formation of AgNPs. The stable AgNPs were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) with zeta potential and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The synthesized AgNPs were in the size range of 25-50 nm with a distorted spherical shape identified from HR-TEM analysis. The catalytic activity of AgNPs on the reduction of direct yellow-12 using NaBH4 was analyzed using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. This study showed the efficacy of biogenic AgNPs in catalyzing the reduction of direct yellow-12.

  5. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-01

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability. PMID:27493179

  6. Direct conversion of methane to aromatics in a catalytic co-ionic membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morejudo, S H; Zanón, R; Escolástico, S; Yuste-Tirados, I; Malerød-Fjeld, H; Vestre, P K; Coors, W G; Martínez, A; Norby, T; Serra, J M; Kjølseth, C

    2016-08-01

    Nonoxidative methane dehydroaromatization (MDA: 6CH4 ↔ C6H6 + 9H2) using shape-selective Mo/zeolite catalysts is a key technology for exploitation of stranded natural gas reserves by direct conversion into transportable liquids. However, this reaction faces two major issues: The one-pass conversion is limited by thermodynamics, and the catalyst deactivates quickly through kinetically favored formation of coke. We show that integration of an electrochemical BaZrO3-based membrane exhibiting both proton and oxide ion conductivity into an MDA reactor gives rise to high aromatic yields and improved catalyst stability. These effects originate from the simultaneous extraction of hydrogen and distributed injection of oxide ions along the reactor length. Further, we demonstrate that the electrochemical co-ionic membrane reactor enables high carbon efficiencies (up to 80%) that improve the technoeconomic process viability.

  7. Evaluation of anode (electro)catalytic materials for the direct borohydride fuel cell: Methods and benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olu, Pierre-Yves; Job, Nathalie; Chatenet, Marian

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, different methods are discussed for the evaluation of the potential of a given catalyst, in view of an application as a direct borohydride fuel cell DBFC anode material. Characterizations results in DBFC configuration are notably analyzed at the light of important experimental variables which influence the performances of the DBFC. However, in many practical DBFC-oriented studies, these various experimental variables prevent one to isolate the influence of the anode catalyst on the cell performances. Thus, the electrochemical three-electrode cell is a widely-employed and useful tool to isolate the DBFC anode catalyst and to investigate its electrocatalytic activity towards the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR) in the absence of other limitations. This article reviews selected results for different types of catalysts in electrochemical cell containing a sodium borohydride alkaline electrolyte. In particular, propositions of common experimental conditions and benchmarks are given for practical evaluation of the electrocatalytic activity towards the BOR in three-electrode cell configuration. The major issue of gaseous hydrogen generation and escape upon DBFC operation is also addressed through a comprehensive review of various results depending on the anode composition. At last, preliminary concerns are raised about the stability of potential anode catalysts upon DBFC operation.

  8. The Myc Transactivation Domain Promotes Global Phosphorylation of the RNA Polymerase II Carboxy-Terminal Domain Independently of Direct DNA Binding▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Myc is a transcription factor which is dependent on its DNA binding domain for transcriptional regulation of target genes. Here, we report the surprising finding that Myc mutants devoid of direct DNA binding activity and Myc target gene regulation can rescue a substantial fraction of the growth defect in myc−/− fibroblasts. Expression of the Myc transactivation domain alone induces a transcription-independent elevation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) and CDK9 and a global increase in CTD phosphorylation. The Myc transactivation domain binds to the transcription initiation sites of these promoters and stimulates TFIIH binding in an MBII-dependent manner. Expression of the Myc transactivation domain increases CDK mRNA cap methylation, polysome loading, and the rate of translation. We find that some traditional Myc transcriptional target genes are also regulated by this Myc-driven translation mechanism. We propose that Myc transactivation domain-driven RNA Pol II CTD phosphorylation has broad effects on both transcription and mRNA metabolism. PMID:17242204

  9. Copper directs ATP7B to the apical domain of hepatic cells via basolateral endosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyasae, Lydia K; Schell, Michael J; Hubbard, Ann L

    2014-12-01

    Physiologic Cu levels regulate the intracellular location of the Cu ATPase ATP7B. Here, we determined the routes of Cu-directed trafficking of endogenous ATP7B in the polarized hepatic cell line WIF-B and in the liver in vivo. Copper (10 µm) caused ATP7B to exit the trans-Golgi network (TGN) in vesicles, which trafficked via large basolateral endosomes to the apical domain within 1 h. Although perturbants of luminal acidification had little effect on the TGN localization of ATP7B in low Cu, they blocked delivery to the apical membrane in elevated Cu. If the vesicular proton-pump inhibitor bafilomycin-A1 (Baf) was present with Cu, ATP7B still exited the TGN, but accumulated in large endosomes located near the coverslip, in the basolateral region. Baf washout restored ATP7B trafficking to the apical domain. If ATP7B was staged apically in high Cu, Baf addition promoted the accumulation of ATP7B in subapical endosomes, indicating a blockade of apical recycling, with concomitant loss of ATP7B at the apical membrane. The retrograde pathway to the TGN, induced by Cu removal, was far less affected by Baf than the anterograde (Cu-stimulated) case. Overall, loss of acidification-impaired Cu-regulated trafficking of ATP7B at two main sites: (i) sorting and exit from large basolateral endosomes and (ii) recycling via endosomes near the apical membrane. PMID:25243755

  10. Direct imaging of the structural domains in the iron pnictides AFe2As2 (A=Ca, Sr, Ba)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parent compounds of recently discovered iron-arsenide superconductors, AFe2As2 with alkaline earth A=Ca,Sr,Ba, undergo simultaneous structural and magnetic phase transitions at a temperature TSM. Using a combination of polarized light microscopy and spatially resolved high-energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction we show that the orthorhombic distortion leads to the formation of 45o-type structural domains in all parent compounds. Domains penetrate through the sample thickness in the c direction and are not affected by crystal imperfections such as growth terraces. The domains form regular stripe patterns in the plane with a characteristic dimension of 10--50 μm. The direction of the stripes is fixed with respect to the tetragonal (100) and (010) directions but can change by 90o on thermal cycling through the transition. This domain pattern may have profound implications for intrinsic disorder and anisotropy of iron arsenides.

  11. Direct visualization of lipid domains in human skin stratum corneum's lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Norlen, Lars; Bagatolli, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The main function of skin is to serve as a physical barrier between the body and the environment. This barrier capacity is in turn a function of the physical state and structural organization of the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix. This lipid matrix is essentially composed of very long...... chain saturated ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. Three unsolved key questions are i), whether the stratum corneum extracellular lipid matrix is constituted by a single gel phase or by coexisting crystalline (solid) domains; ii), whether a separate liquid crystalline phase is present......; and iii), whether pH has a direct effect on the lipid matrix phase behavior. In this work the lateral structure of membranes composed of lipids extracted from human skin stratum corneum was studied in a broad temperature range (10 degrees C-90 degrees C) using different techniques such as differential...

  12. Direct Production of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural via Catalytic Conversion of Simple and Complex Sugars over Phosphated TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanda, Luqman; Shrotri, Abhijit; Mukundan, Swathi; Ma, Qing; Konarova, Muxina; Beltramini, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    A water-THF biphasic system containing N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was found to enable the efficient synthesis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) from a variety of sugars (simple to complex) using phosphated TiO2 as a catalyst. Fructose and glucose were selectively converted to HMF resulting in 98 % and 90 % yield, respectively, at 175 °C. Cellobiose and sucrose also gave rise to high HMF yields of 94 % and 98 %, respectively, at 180 °C. Other sugar variants such as starch (potato and rice) and cellulose were also investigated. The yields of HMF from starch (80-85 %) were high, whereas cellulose resulted in a modest yield of 33 %. Direct transformation of cellulose to HMF in significant yield (86 %) was assisted by mechanocatalytic depolymerization-ball milling of acid-impregnated cellulose. This effectively reduced cellulose crystallinity and particle size, forming soluble cello-oligomers; this is responsible for the enhanced substrate-catalytic sites contact and subsequent rate of HMF formation. During catalyst recyclability, P-TiO2 was observed to be reusable for four cycles without any loss in activity. We also investigated the conversion of the cello-oligomers to HMF in a continuous flow reactor. Good HMF yield (53 %) was achieved using a water-methyl isobutyl ketone+NMP biphasic system.

  13. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  14. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  15. A rigid surface boundary element for soil-structure interaction analysis in the direct time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizos, D. C.

    Many soil-structure interaction problems involve studies of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape and soil media. The commonly used boundary element methods implement the equations of the rigid body in a form that depends on the particulars of the geometry and requires partitioning and condensation of the associated algebraic system of equations. The present work employs the direct time domain B-Spline BEM for 3D elastodynamic analysis and presents an efficient implementation of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in contact with, or embedded in, elastic media. The formulation of a rigid surface boundary element introduced herein is suitable for direct superposition in the BEM system of algebraic equations. Consequently, solutions are computed in a single analysis step, eliminating, thus, the need for partitioning of the system of equations. Computational efficiency is also achieved due to the extremely sparse form of the associated coefficient matrices. The proposed element can be used for the modeling of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape within the framework of the BEM method. The efficiency and general nature of the proposed element is demonstrated through applications related to the dynamic analysis of rigid surface and embedded foundations and their interaction with embedded rigid bodies of arbitrary shape.

  16. Directed evolution of human heavy chain variable domain (VH) using in vivo protein fitness filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Sik; Song, Hyung-Nam; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kim, Sung-Geun; Park, Young-Seoub; Park, Jae-Chan; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Lim, Hyung-Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin heavy chain variable domains (VH) are promising scaffolds for antigen binding. However, VH is an unstable and aggregation-prone protein, hindering its use for therapeutic purposes. To evolve the VH domain, we performed in vivo protein solubility selection that linked antibiotic resistance to the protein folding quality control mechanism of the twin-arginine translocation pathway of E. coli. After screening a human germ-line VH library, 95% of the VH proteins obtained were identified as VH3 family members; one VH protein, MG2x1, stood out among separate clones expressing individual VH variants. With further screening of combinatorial framework mutation library of MG2x1, we found a consistent bias toward substitution with tryptophan at the position of 50 and 58 in VH. Comparison of the crystal structures of the VH variants revealed that those substitutions with bulky side chain amino acids filled the cavity in the VH interface between heavy and light chains of the Fab arrangement along with the increased number of hydrogen bonds, decreased solvation energy, and increased negative charge. Accordingly, the engineered VH acquires an increased level of thermodynamic stability, reversible folding, and soluble expression. The library built with the VH variant as a scaffold was qualified as most of VH clones selected randomly were expressed as soluble form in E. coli regardless length of the combinatorial CDR. Furthermore, a non-aggregation feature of the selected VH conferred a free of humoral response in mice, even when administered together with adjuvant. As a result, this selection provides an alternative directed evolution pathway for unstable proteins, which are distinct from conventional methods based on the phage display.

  17. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  18. Accurate Detection of Adenylation Domain Functions in Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases by an Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay System Using Active Site-directed Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Miyamoto, Kengo; Konno, Sho; Kasai, Shota; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-18

    A significant gap exists between protein engineering and enzymes used for the biosynthesis of natural products, largely because there is a paucity of strategies that rapidly detect active-site phenotypes of the enzymes with desired activities. Herein, we describe a proof-of-concept study of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system for the adenylation (A) domains in nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) using a combination of active site-directed probes coupled to a 5'-O-N-(aminoacyl)sulfamoyladenosine scaffold with a biotin functionality that immobilizes probe molecules onto a streptavidin-coated solid support. The recombinant NRPSs have a C-terminal His-tag motif that is targeted by an anti-6×His mouse antibody as the primary antibody and a horseradish peroxidase-linked goat antimouse antibody as the secondary antibody. These probes can selectively capture the cognate A domains by ligand-directed targeting. In addition, the ELISA technique detected A domains in the crude cell-free homogenates from the Escherichia coli expression systems. When coupled with a chromogenic substrate, the antibody-based ELISA technique can visualize probe-protein binding interactions, which provides accurate readouts of the A-domain functions in NRPS enzymes. To assess the ELISA-based engineering of the A domains of NRPSs, we reprogramed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB)-activating enzyme EntE toward salicylic acid (Sal)-activating enzymes and investigated a correlation between binding properties for probe molecules and enzyme catalysts. We generated a mutant of EntE that displayed negligible loss in the kcat/Km value with the noncognate substrate Sal and a corresponding 48-fold decrease in the kcat/Km value with the cognate substrate DHB. The resulting 26-fold switch in substrate specificity was achieved by the replacement of a Ser residue in the active site of EntE with a Cys toward the nonribosomal codes of Sal-activating enzymes. Bringing a laboratory ELISA technique

  19. Dissecting the Catalytic Mechanism of Betaine-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase Using Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence and Site-Directed Mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.; Gratson, A.A.; Evans, J.C.; Jiracek, J.; Collinsova, M.; Ludwig, M.L.; Garrow, T.A. (ASCR); (UIUC); (Michigan)

    2010-03-05

    Betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (BHMT) is a zinc-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from glycine betaine (Bet) to homocysteine (Hcy) to form dimethylglycine (DMG) and methionine (Met). Previous studies in other laboratories have indicated that catalysis proceeds through the formation of a ternary complex, with a transition state mimicked by the inhibitor S-({delta}-carboxybutyl)-l-homocysteine (CBHcy). Using changes in intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to determine the affinity of human BHMT for substrates, products, or CBHcy, we now demonstrate that the enzyme-substrate complex reaches its transition state through an ordered bi-bi mechanism in which Hcy is the first substrate to bind and Met is the last product released. Hcy, Met, and CBHcy bind to the enzyme to form binary complexes with K{sub d} values of 7.9, 6.9, and 0.28 {micro}M, respectively. Binary complexes with Bet and DMG cannot be detected with fluorescence as a probe, but Bet and DMG bind tightly to BHMT-Hcy to form ternary complexes with K{sub d} values of 1.1 and 0.73 {micro}M, respectively. Mutation of each of the seven tryptophan residues in human BHMT provides evidence that the enzyme undergoes two distinct conformational changes that are reflected in the fluorescence of the enzyme. The first is induced when Hcy binds, and the second, when Bet binds. As predicted by the crystal structure of BHMT, the amino acids Trp44 and Tyr160 are involved in binding Bet, and Glu159 in binding Hcy. Replacing these residues by site-directed mutagenesis significantly reduces the catalytic efficiency (V{sub max}/K{sub m}) of the enzyme. Replacing Tyr77 with Phe abolishes enzyme activity.

  20. Direct Data Domain Sparsity-Based STAP Utilizing Subaperture Smoothing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaocheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel direct data domain (D3 sparsity-based space-time adaptive processing (STAP algorithm utilizing subaperture smoothing techniques for airborne radar applications. Different from either normal sparsity-based STAP or D3 sparsity-based STAP, the proposed algorithm firstly uses only the snapshot in the cell under test (CUT to generate multiple subsnapshots by exploiting the space-time structure of the steering vector and the uncorrelated nature of the components of the interference covariance matrix. Since the interference spectrum is sparse in the whole angle-Doppler plane, by employing a sparse regularization, the generated multiple subsnapshots are jointly used to recover the interference spectrum. The interference covariance matrix is then estimated from the interference spectrum, followed by the space-time filtering and the target detection. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms the generalized forward/backward method, the conventional D3 least squares STAP algorithm, and the existing D3 sparsity-based STAP algorithm. Furthermore, compared with the normal sparsity-based STAP algorithm using multiple snapshots, the proposed algorithm can also avoid the performance degradation caused by discrete interferers merely appearing in the CUT.

  1. The c-Myc Transactivation Domain Is a Direct Modulator of Apoptotic versus Proliferative Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, David W.; Claassen, Gisela F.; Hann, Stephen R.; Cole, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    We have assayed the oncogenic, proliferative, and apoptotic activities of the frequent mutations that occur in the c-myc gene in Burkitt's lymphomas. Some alleles have a modest (50 to 60%) increase in transforming activity; however, the most frequent Burkitt's lymphoma allele (T58I) had an unexpected substantial decrease in transforming activity (85%). All alleles restored the proliferation function of c-Myc in cells that grow slowly due to a c-myc knockout. There was discordance for some alleles between apoptotic and oncogenic activities, but only the T58A allele had elevated transforming activity with a concomitant reduced apoptotic potential. We discovered a novel missense mutation, MycS71F, that had a very low apoptotic activity compared to wild-type Myc, yet this mutation has never been found in lymphomas, suggesting that there is no strong selection for antiapoptotic c-Myc alleles. MycS71F also induced very low levels of cytochrome c release from mitochondria, suggesting a mechanism of action for this mutation. Phosphopeptide mapping provided a biochemical basis for the dramatically different biological activities of the transformation-defective T58I and transformation-enhanced T58A c-Myc alleles. Furthermore, the antiapoptotic survival factor insulin-like growth factor 1 was found to suppress phosphorylation of T58, suggesting that the c-Myc transactivation domain is a direct target of survival signals. PMID:10825194

  2. Direct writing of ferroelectric domains on strontium barium niobate crystals using focused ultraviolet laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boes, Andreas; Crasto, Tristan; Steigerwald, Hendrik; Mitchell, Arnan [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and ARC Center for Ultra-High Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia); Wade, Scott [Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Frohnhaus, Jakob; Soergel, Elisabeth [Institute of Physics, University of Bonn, Wegelerstr. 8, 53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-09-30

    We report ferroelectric domain inversion in strontium barium niobate (SBN) single crystals by irradiating the surface locally with a strongly focused ultraviolet (UV) laser beam. The generated domains are investigated using piezoresponse force microscopy. We propose a simple model that allows predicting the domain width as a function of the irradiation intensity, which indeed applies for both SBN and LiNbO{sub 3}. Evidently, though fundamentally different, the domain structure of both SBN and LiNbO{sub 3} can be engineered through similar UV irradiation.

  3. Photo-activated psoralen binds the ErbB2 catalytic kinase domain, blocking ErbB2 signaling and triggering tumor cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenle Xia

    Full Text Available Photo-activation of psoralen with UVA irradiation, referred to as PUVA, is used in the treatment of proliferative skin disorders. The anti-proliferative effects of PUVA have been largely attributed to psoralen intercalation of DNA, which upon UV treatment, triggers the formation of interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICL that inhibit transcription and DNA replication. Here, we show that PUVA exerts antitumor effects in models of human breast cancer that overexpress the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase oncogene, through a new mechanism. Independent of ICL formation, the antitumor effects of PUVA in ErbB2+ breast cancer models can instead be mediated through inhibition of ErbB2 activation and signaling. Using a mass spectroscopy-based approach, we show for the first time that photo-activated 8MOP (8-methoxypsoralen interacts with the ErbB2 catalytic autokinase domain. Furthermore, PUVA can reverse therapeutic resistance to lapatinib and other ErbB2 targeted therapies, including resistance mediated via expression of a phosphorylated, truncated form of ErbB2 (p85(ErbB2 that is preferentially expressed in tumor cell nuclei. Current ErbB2 targeted therapies, small molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies, do not block the phosphorylated, activated state of p85(ErbB2. Here we show that PUVA reduced p85(ErbB2 phosphorylation leading to tumor cell apoptosis. Thus, in addition to its effects on DNA and the formation of ICL, PUVA represents a novel ErbB2 targeted therapy for the treatment of ErbB2+ breast cancers, including those that have developed resistance to other ErbB2 targeted therapies.

  4. Assignments and structure determination of the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase using 3D double and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the backbone 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO, and 1Hα NMR assignments for the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). Three independent assignment pathways (matching 1H, 13Cα, and 13CO resonances) were used to establish sequential connections. The connections using 13Cα resonances were obtained from HNCOCA and HNCA experiments; 13CO connections were obtained from HNCO and HNCACO experiments. The sequential proton assignment pathway was established from a 3D(1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC experiment. Amino acid typing was accomplished using 13C and 15N chemical shifts, specific labeling of 15N-Leu, and spin pattern recognition from DQF-COSY. The secondary structure was determined by analyzing the 3D (1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC. A preliminary NMR structure calculation of HFC was found to be in agreement with recent X-ray structures of human fibroblast collagenase and human neutrophil collagenase as well as similar to recent NMR structures of a highly homologous protein, stromelysin. All three helices were located; a five-stranded β-sheet (four parallel strands, one antiparallel strand) was also determined. β-Sheet regions were identified by cross-strand dαN and dNN connections and by strong intraresidue dαN correlations, and were corroborated by observing slow amide proton exchange. Chemical shift changes in a selectively 15N-labeled sample suggest that substantial structural changes occur in the active site cleft on the binding of an inhibitor

  5. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA. PMID:21857987

  6. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ballandras

    Full Text Available Integrase (IN is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1. These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1 IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T. Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3. A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  7. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  8. Properties and catalytic activities of MICAL1, the flavoenzyme involved in cytoskeleton dynamics, and modulation by its CH, LIM and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Teresa; Maffioli, Elisa; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Vanoni, Maria A

    2016-03-01

    MICAL1 is a cytoplasmic 119 kDa protein participating in cytoskeleton dynamics through the NADPH-dependent oxidase and F-actin depolymerizing activities of its N-terminal flavoprotein domain, which is followed by calponin homology (CH), LIM domains and a C-terminal region with Pro-, Glu-rich and coiled-coil motifs. MICAL1 and truncated forms lacking the C-terminal, LIM and/or CH regions have been produced and characterized. The CH, LIM and C-terminal regions cause an increase of Km,NADPH exhibited by the NADPH oxidase activity of the flavoprotein domain, paralleling changes in the overall protein charge. The C-terminus also determines a ∼ 10-fold decrease of kcat, revealing its role in establishing an inactive/active conformational equilibrium, which is at the heart of the regulation of MICAL1 in cells. F-actin lowers Km,NADPH (10-50 μM) and increases kcat (10-25 s(-1)) to similar values for all MICAL forms. The apparent Km,actin of MICAL1 is ∼ 10-fold higher than that of the other forms (3-5 μM), reflecting the fact that F-actin binds to the flavoprotein domain in the MICAL's active conformation and stabilizes it. Analyses of the reaction in the presence of F-actin indicate that actin depolymerization is mediated by H2O2 produced by the NADPH oxidase reaction, rather than due to direct hydroxylation of actin methionine residues. PMID:26845023

  9. Activation of p115-RhoGEF requires direct association of Gα13 and the Dbl homology domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R; Sternweis, Paul C

    2012-07-20

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G(12) class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated α subunits of G(12) and G(13). Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by Gα(13), the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated Gα(13) in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of Gα(13) docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the α3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated Gα(13) and ablates the stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the αB-αC loop of the helical domain of Gα(13) also affect stimulation of p115 by Gα(13). Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by Gα(13), two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of Gα(13) to the RH domain facilitates direct association of Gα(13) to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  10. The Effect of a Three-Way Catalytic Converter on Particulate Matter from a Gasoline Direct-Injection Engine During Cold-Start

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Ian; Timoney, David; Smith, William; et al

    2013-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of a three-way catalytic converter and sampling dilution ratio on nano-scale exhaust particulate matter emissions from a gasoline direct-injection engine during cold-start and warm-up transients. Experimental results are presented from a four cylinder in-line, four stroke, wall-guided direct-injection, turbo-charged and inter-cooled 1.6 litre gasoline engine. A fast-response particulate spectrometer for exhaust nano-particle measurement up to 1000 nm was util...

  11. A novel 3D Ag(I)-MOF: Surfactant-directed syntheses and catalytic degradation of o/m/p-Nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Qian; Wen, Guo-Xuan; Wu, Ya-Pan; Dong, Wen-Wen; Zhao, Jun; Li, Dong-Sheng

    2016-10-01

    For the first time, sodium caprylate has been investigated to direct the crystal growth of 3D Ag-MOF, [Ag2(ddcba)(4,4‧-bipy)2] (1), constructing from 3,5-(di(2‧,5‧-dicarboxylphenyl)benozoic acid and 4,4‧-bipy. The single crystal diffraction analyses shows that complex 1 possess 3D neutral framework with a three-connected ThSi2 (103-b) topology. Compound 1 exhibits predominant catalytic activity towards the degradation of o-Nitrophenol (ONP), m-Nitrophenol (MNP) and p-Nitrophenol (PNP) in aqueous solution. The kinetics of such catalytic degradation reactions was also studied.

  12. Direct Evidence for a Phenylalanine Site in the Regulatory Domain of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jun; Ilangovan, Udayar; Daubner, S. Colette; Hinck, Andrew P.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    The hydroxylation of phenylalanine to tyrosine by the liver enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase is regulated by the level of phenylalanine. Whether there is a distinct allosteric binding site for phenylalanine outside of the active site has been unclear. The enzyme contains an N-terminal regulatory domain that extends through Thr117. The regulatory domain of rat phenylalanine hydroxylase was expressed in E. coli. The purified protein behaves as a dimer on a gel filtration column. In the presence...

  13. Directed evolution of the TALE N-terminal domain for recognition of all 5' bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Brian M; Mercer, Andrew C; Barbas, Carlos F

    2013-11-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can be designed to bind virtually any DNA sequence. General guidelines for design of TALE DNA-binding domains suggest that the 5'-most base of the DNA sequence bound by the TALE (the N0 base) should be a thymine. We quantified the N0 requirement by analysis of the activities of TALE transcription factors (TALE-TF), TALE recombinases (TALE-R) and TALE nucleases (TALENs) with each DNA base at this position. In the absence of a 5' T, we observed decreases in TALE activity up to >1000-fold in TALE-TF activity, up to 100-fold in TALE-R activity and up to 10-fold reduction in TALEN activity compared with target sequences containing a 5' T. To develop TALE architectures that recognize all possible N0 bases, we used structure-guided library design coupled with TALE-R activity selections to evolve novel TALE N-terminal domains to accommodate any N0 base. A G-selective domain and broadly reactive domains were isolated and characterized. The engineered TALE domains selected in the TALE-R format demonstrated modularity and were active in TALE-TF and TALEN architectures. Evolved N-terminal domains provide effective and unconstrained TALE-based targeting of any DNA sequence as TALE binding proteins and designer enzymes.

  14. Direct observation of low frequency confined acoustic phonons in silver nanoparticles: Terahertz time domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Kamaraju, N; Karthikeyan, B; Tondusson, M; Freysz, E; Sood, A K

    2010-07-01

    Terahertz time domain spectroscopy has been used to study low frequency confined acoustic phonons of silver nanoparticles embedded in poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix in the spectral range of 0.1-2.5 THz. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function show two bands at 0.60 and 2.12 THz attributed to the spheroidal and toroidal modes of silver nanoparticles, thus demonstrating the usefulness of terahertz time domain spectroscopy as a complementary technique to Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the nanoparticles.

  15. Directly catalytic upgrading bio-oil vapor produced by prairie cordgrass pyrolysis over Ni/HZSM-5 using a two stage reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyun Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic cracking is one of the most promising processes for thermochemical conversion of biomass to advanced biofuels in recent years. However, current effectiveness of catalysts and conversion efficiency still remain challenges. An investigation of directly catalytic upgrading bio-oil vapors produced in prairie cordgrass (PCG pyrolysis over Ni/HZSM-5 and HZSM-5 in a two stage packed-bed reactor was carried out. The Ni/HZSM-5 catalyst was synthesized using an impregnation method. Fresh and used catalysts were characterized by BET and XRD. The effects of catalysts on pyrolysis products yields and quality were examined. Both catalysts improved bio-oil product distribution compared to non-catalytic treatment. When PCG pyrolysis vapor was treated with absence of catalyst, the produced bio-oils contained higher alcohols (10.97% and furans (10.14%. In contrast, the bio-oils contained the second highest hydrocarbons (34.97%)and the highest phenols (46.97% when PCG pyrolysis vapor was treated with Ni/HZSM-5. Bio-oils containing less ketones and aldehydes were produced by both Ni/HZSM-5 and HZSM-5, but no ketones were found in Ni/HZSM-5 treatment compared to HZSM-5 (2.94%. The pyrolysis gas compositions were also affected by the presenting of HZSM-5 or Ni/HZSM-5 during the catalytic upgrading process. However, higher heating values and elemental compositions (C, H and N of bio-chars produced in all treatments had no significant difference.

  16. DIRECT DETERMINATION OF THE LIPID CONTENT IN STARCH-LIPID COMPOSITES BY TIME-DOMAIN NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starch-lipid composites, prepared by excess steam jet-cooking aqueous mixtures of starch and lipid, are used in various applications for which their performance can depend upon accurate quantitation of lipid contained within these composites. A rapid and non-destructive method based on time-domain ...

  17. Large-scale production and purification of recombinant protein from an insect cell/baculovirus system in Erlenmeyer flasks: application to the chicken poly(ADP-ribose polymerase catalytic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive shaker/Erlenmeyer flask system for large-scale cultivation of insect cells is described and compared to a commercial spinner system. On the basis of maximum cell density, average population doubling time and overproduction of recombinant protein, a better result was obtained with a simpler and less expensive bioreactor consisting of Erlenmeyer flasks and an ordinary shaker waterbath. Routinely, about 90 mg of pure poly(ADP-ribose polymerase catalytic domain was obtained for a total of 3 x 109 infected cells in three liters of culture

  18. The metavinculin tail domain directs constitutive interactions with raver1 and vinculin RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Vonrhein, Clemens; Bricogne, Gerard; Izard, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Vinculin is a key regulator of the attachment of the actin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane at cellular adhesion sites that is crucial for processes like cell motility and migration, development, survival, and wound healing. Vinculin loss results in embryonic lethality, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Its tail domain, Vt, is crucial for vinculin activation and focal adhesion turnover and binds to the actin cytoskeleton and acidic phospholipids upon which it unfurls. The RNA binding prot...

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of the regulatory domain of Escherichia coli carbamoyl phosphate synthetase identifies crucial residues for allosteric regulation and for transduction of the regulatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresquet, V; Mora, P; Rochera, L; Ramón-Maiques, S; Rubio, V; Cervera, J

    2000-06-16

    Carbamoyl phosphate (CP), the essential precursor of pyrimidines and arginine, is made in Escherichia coli by a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase (CPS) consisting of 41.4 and 117.7 kDa subunits, which is feed-back inhibited by UMP and activated by IMP and ornithine. The large subunit catalyzes CP synthesis from ammonia in three steps, and binds the effectors in its 15 kDa C-terminal domain. Fifteen site-directed mutations were introduced in 13 residues of this domain to investigate the mechanism of allosteric modulation by UMP and IMP. Two mutations, K993A and V994A, decreased significantly or abolished enzyme activity, apparently by interfering with the step of carbamate synthesis, and one mutation, T974A, negatively affected ornithine activation. S948A, K954A, T974A, K993A and K993W/H995A abolished or greatly hampered IMP activation and UMP inhibition as well as the binding of both effectors, monitored using photoaffinity labeling and ultracentrifugation binding assays. V994A also decreased significantly IMP and UMP binding. L990A, V991A, H995A, G997A and G1008A had more modest effects or affected more the modulation by and the binding of one than of the other nucleotide. K993W, R1020A, R1021A and K1061A were without substantial effects. The results confirm the independence of the regulatory and catalytic centers, and also confirm functional predictions based on the X-ray structure of an IMP-CPS complex. They prove that the inhibitor UMP and the activator IMP bind in the same site, and exclude that the previously observed binding of ornithine and glutamine in this site were relevant for enzyme activation. K993 and V994 appear to be involved in the transmission of the regulatory signals triggered by UMP and IMP binding. These effectors possibly change the position of K993 and V994, and alter the intermolecular contacts mediated by the regulatory domain. PMID:10843852

  20. Directional effects consideration to improve out-doors emissivity retrieval in the 3-13 mum domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, Keyvan; Poutier, Laurent; Nerry, Françoise; Stoll, Marc-Philippe

    2007-09-17

    This work analyses and solves for issues encountered when retrieving surface emissivity in LWIR (750 to 1250 cm(-1)) and MWIR (2000 to 3500 cm(-1)) bands under outdoor conditions. The Spectral Smoothness method, which takes advantage of high spectral resolution measurements to solve for temperature emissivity separation, and which has already proven its efficiency in the LWIR domain, was applied in an experimental campaign to assess its ability to operate both in the LWIR and MWIR domains. In the MWIR band, directional behaviour of surface emissivity is shown to be a source of systematic errors in the retrieved emissivity and a new method, called SmaC (SMoothness And Continuity), corrects for this error by providing quantitative estimates on the deviation of the surface from Lambertian behavior.

  1. Directional effects consideration to improve out-doors emissivity retrieval in the 3-13 mum domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, Keyvan; Poutier, Laurent; Nerry, Françoise; Stoll, Marc-Philippe

    2007-09-17

    This work analyses and solves for issues encountered when retrieving surface emissivity in LWIR (750 to 1250 cm(-1)) and MWIR (2000 to 3500 cm(-1)) bands under outdoor conditions. The Spectral Smoothness method, which takes advantage of high spectral resolution measurements to solve for temperature emissivity separation, and which has already proven its efficiency in the LWIR domain, was applied in an experimental campaign to assess its ability to operate both in the LWIR and MWIR domains. In the MWIR band, directional behaviour of surface emissivity is shown to be a source of systematic errors in the retrieved emissivity and a new method, called SmaC (SMoothness And Continuity), corrects for this error by providing quantitative estimates on the deviation of the surface from Lambertian behavior. PMID:19547618

  2. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  3. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-11-01

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The images of XRD, UV-vis, EDX and soot-TPR. The table providing information on Co/Ti-NA catalysts. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03757f

  4. Direct Time-domain Observation of Conformational Relaxation in Gas-phase Cold Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Drayna, Garrett K.; Hallas, Christian; Wang, Kenneth; Domingos, Sérgio R.; Eibenberger, Sandra; Doyle, John M.; Patterson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cooling molecules in the gas phase is important for precision spectroscopy, cold molecule physics, and physical chemistry. Measurements of conformational relaxation cross sections shed important light on potential energy surfaces and energy flow within a molecule. However, gas-phase conformational cooling has not been previously observed directly. In this work, we directly observe conformational dynamics of 1,2-propanediol in cold (6K) collisions with atomic helium using microwave spectroscop...

  5. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  6. Directed self-assembled crystalline oligomer domains on graphene and graphite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Klarskov, Mikkel Buster;

    2014-01-01

    We observe the formation of thin films of fibre-like aggregates from the prototypical organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenylene (p-6P) on graphite thin flakes and on monolayer graphene. Using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, polarized fluorescence...... microscopy, and bireflectance microscopy, the molecular orientations on the surface are deduced and correlated to both the morphology as well as to the high-symmetry directions of the graphitic surface: the molecules align with their long axis at ±11° with respect to a high-symmetry direction. The results...

  7. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  8. Directed Evolution of a Highly Specific FN3 Monobody to the SH3 Domain of Human Lyn Tyrosine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhua Huang

    Full Text Available Affinity reagents of high affinity and specificity are very useful for studying the subcellular locations and quantities of individual proteins. To generate high-quality affinity reagents for human Lyn tyrosine kinase, a phage display library of fibronectin type III (FN3 monobodies was affinity selected with a recombinant form of the Lyn SH3 domain. While a highly specific monobody, TA8, was initially isolated, we chose to improve its affinity through directed evolution. A secondary library of 1.2 × 109 variants was constructed and screened by affinity selection, yielding three variants, two of which have affinities of ~ 40 nM, a 130-fold increase over the original TA8 monobody. One of the variants, 2H7, displayed high specificity to the Lyn SH3 domain, as shown by ELISA and probing arrays of 150 SH3 domains. Furthermore, the 2H7 monobody was able to pull down endogenous Lyn from a lysate of Burkitt's lymphoma cells, thereby demonstrating its utility as an affinity reagent for detecting Lyn in a complex biological mixture.

  9. LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN transcription factors direct callus formation in Arabidopsis regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingzhu Fan; Chongyi Xu; Ke Xu; Yuxin Hu

    2012-01-01

    The remarkable regeneration capability of plant tissues or organs under culture conditions has underlain an extensive practice for decades.The initial step in plant in vitro regeneration often involves the induction of a pluripotent cell mass termed callus,which is driven by the phytohormone auxin and occurs via a root development pathway.However,the key molecules governing callus formation remain unknown.Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD)/ASYMMETRIC LEAVES2-LIKE (ASL) transcription factors are involved in the control of callus formation program.The four LBD genes downstream of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORs (ARFs),LBD16,LBD17,LBD18 and LBD29,are rapidly and dramatically induced by callus-inducing medium (CIM) in multiple organs.Ectopic expression of each of the four LBD genes in Arabidopsis is sufficient to trigger spontaneous callus formation without exogenous phytohormones,whereas suppression of LBD function inhibits the callus formation induced by CIM.Moreover,the callus triggered by LBD resembles that induced by CIM by characteristics of ectopically activated root meristem genes and efficient regeneration capacity.These findings define LBD transcription factors as key regulators in the callus induction process,thereby establishing a molecular link between auxin signaling and the plant regeneration program.

  10. The Lectin Domain of the Polypeptide GalNAc Transferase Family of Glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) Acts as a Switch Directing Glycopeptide Substrate Glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal Direction, Further Controlling Mucin Type O-Glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C;

    2013-01-01

    Mucin type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc Ts) that add α-GalNAc to the Ser and Thr residues of peptides. Of the 20 human isoforms, all but one are composed of two globular domains linked by a short flexible linker: a catalytic domain...... and a ricin-like lectin carbohydrate binding domain. Presently, the roles of the catalytic and lectin domains in peptide and glycopeptide recognition and specificity remain unclear. To systematically study the role of the lectin domain in ppGalNAc T glycopeptide substrate utilization, we have developed...... a series of novel random glycopeptide substrates containing a single GalNAc-O-Thr residue placed near either the N or C terminus of the glycopeptide substrate. Our results reveal that the presence and N- or C-terminal placement of the GalNAc-O-Thr can be important determinants of overall catalytic activity...

  11. A Multiple-Labeling Strategy for Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetases Using Active-Site-Directed Proteomic Probes for Adenylation Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Kakeya, Hideaki

    2015-12-01

    Genetic approaches have greatly contributed to our understanding of nonribosomal peptide biosynthetic machinery; however, proteomic investigations are limited. Here, we developed a highly sensitive detection strategy for multidomain nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) by using a multiple-labeling technique with active-site-directed probes for adenylation domains. When applied to gramicidin S-producing and -nonproducing strains of Aneurinibacillus migulanus (DSM 5759 and DSM 2895, respectively), the multiple technique sensitively detected an active multidomain NRPS (GrsB) in lysates obtained from the organisms. This functional proteomics method revealed an unknown inactive precursor (or other inactive form) of GrsB in the nonproducing strain. This method provides a new option for the direct detection, functional analysis, and high-resolution identification of low-abundance active NRPS enzymes in native proteomic environments. PMID:26467472

  12. 1-D Directional Filter Based Texture Descriptor in Fractional Fourier Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kai Tian; Hongzhang Jin; Liying Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Texture analysis is a fundamental field in computer vision. However, it is also a particularly difficult problem for no universal mathematical model of real world textures. By extending a new application of the fractional Fourier transform ( FrFT) in the field of texture analysis, this paper proposes an FrFT⁃based method for describing textures. Firstly, based on the Radon⁃Wigner transform, 1⁃D directional FrFT filters are designed to two types of texture features, i.e., the coarseness and directionality. Then, the frequencies with maximum and median amplitudes of the FrFT of the input signal are regarded as the output of the 1⁃D directional FrFT filter. Finally, the mean and the standard deviation are used to compose of the feature vector. Compared to the WD⁃based method, three benefits can be achieved with the proposed FrFT⁃based method, i. e., less memory size, lower computational load, and less disturbed by the cross⁃terms. The proposed method has been tested on 16 standard texture images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to the popular Gabor filtering⁃based method.

  13. Directed evolution of Tau class glutathione transferases reveals a site that regulates catalytic efficiency and masks co-operativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axarli, Irine; Muleta, Abdi W; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Kossida, Sophia; Kotzia, Georgia; Maltezos, Anastasios; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2016-03-01

    A library of Tau class GSTs (glutathione transferases) was constructed by DNA shuffling using the DNA encoding the Glycine max GSTs GmGSTU2-2, GmGSTU4-4 and GmGSTU10-10. The parental GSTs are >88% identical at the sequence level; however, their specificity varies towards different substrates. The DNA library contained chimaeric structures of alternated segments of the parental sequences and point mutations. Chimaeric GST sequences were expressed in Escherichia coli and their enzymatic activities towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and the herbicide fluorodifen (4-nitrophenyl α,α,α-trifluoro-2-nitro-p-tolyl ether) were determined. A chimaeric clone (Sh14) with enhanced CDNB- and fluorodifen-detoxifying activities, and unusual co-operative kinetics towards CDNB and fluorodifen, but not towards GSH, was identified. The structure of Sh14 was determined at 1.75 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution in complex with S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione. Analysis of the Sh14 structure showed that a W114C point mutation is responsible for the altered kinetic properties. This was confirmed by the kinetic properties of the Sh14 C114W mutant. It is suggested that the replacement of the bulky tryptophan residue by a smaller amino acid (cysteine) results in conformational changes of the active-site cavity, leading to enhanced catalytic activity of Sh14. Moreover, the structural changes allow the strengthening of the two salt bridges between Glu(66) and Lys(104) at the dimer interface that triggers an allosteric effect and the communication between the hydrophobic sites.

  14. Measurements of the Domain Magnetization Direction and its Effects on the Sensitivity of Magneto-optic Field Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Mannix; Garzarella, Anthony; Wu, Dong Ho; Tao, Rongjia

    Bismuth doped, rare earth iron garnet (Bi:RIG) thick films exhibit a large magneto-optic response to external magnetic fields while exhibiting low optical insertion loss, making them ideal candidates for polarimetric magnetic field sensors. It was generally found that the Faraday rotation and overall sensitivity of the sensors depends on the orientation of the local domain magnetization relative to the direction of laser propagation. In arrayed Bi:RIG sensors, it is critical that the optical path of the laser is perpendicular to the easy-axis of each film of the array, in order to avoid magnetically-induced optical incoherence (MIOI). Therefore a precise, localized measurement of the magnetization vector within the films is necessary. Since traditional magnetization measurement techniques do not provide adequate resolution, several new approaches to precisely measure the easy axis were developed and will be described in this presentation. These approaches involve measurements of the directionality of the Faraday response, incoherence in the Malus curves, and damping in the domain wall motion. Such measurements have been instrumental in constructing and optimizing arrayed Bi:RIG sensors, which currently have a sensitivity of 6 pT/Hz1/2.

  15. Domain of oscillatory growth in directional solidification of dilute binary alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushkina, Evgenia; Bessonov, Nicholas M; Korzhenevskii, Alexander L; Bausch, Richard; Schmitz, Rudi

    2013-04-01

    The oscillatory growth of a dilute binary alloy has recently been described by a nonlinear oscillator equation that applies to small temperature gradients and large growth velocities in the setup of directional solidification. Based on a one-dimensional stability analysis of stationary solutions of this equation, we explore in the present paper the complete region where the solidification front propagates in an oscillatory way. The boundary of this region is calculated exactly, and the nature of the oscillations is evaluated numerically in several segments of the region.

  16. Direct Time-Domain Observation of Conformational Relaxation in Gas-Phase Cold Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayna, Garrett K; Hallas, Christian; Wang, Kenneth; Domingos, Sergio R; Eibenberger, Sandra; Doyle, John M; Patterson, David

    2016-04-11

    Cooling molecules in the gas phase is important for precision spectroscopy, cold molecule physics, and physical chemistry. Measurements of conformational relaxation cross sections shed important light on potential energy surfaces and energy flow within a molecule. However, gas-phase conformational cooling has not been previously observed directly. In this work, we directly observe conformational dynamics of 1,2-propanediol in cold (6 K) collisions with atomic helium using microwave spectroscopy and buffer-gas cooling. Precise knowledge and control of the collisional environment in the buffer-gas allows us to measure the absolute collision cross-section for conformational relaxation. Several conformers of 1,2-propanediol are investigated and found to have relaxation cross-sections with He ranging from σ=4.7(3.0)×10(-18)  cm(2) to σ>5×10(-16)  cm(2) . Our method is applicable to a broad class of molecules and could be used to provide information about the potential energy surfaces of previously uninvestigated molecules. PMID:26992036

  17. Direct Time-domain Observation of Conformational Relaxation in Gas-phase Cold Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Drayna, Garrett K; Wang, Kenneth; Domingos, Sergio R; Eibengerber, Sandra; Doyle, John M; Patterson, David

    2016-01-01

    Cooling molecules in the gas phase is important for precision spectroscopy, cold molecule physics, and physical chemistry. Measurements of conformational relaxation cross sections shed important light on potential energy surfaces and energy flow within a molecule. However, gas-phase conformational cooling has not been previously observed directly. In this work, we directly observe conformational dynamics of 1,2-propanediol in cold (6K) collisions with atomic helium using microwave spectroscopy and buffer-gas cooling. Precise knowledge and control of the collisional environment in the buffer-gas allows us to measure the absolute collision cross-section for conformational relaxation. Several conformers of 1,2-propanediol are investigated and found to have relaxation cross-sections with He ranging from $\\sigma=4.7(3.0)\\times10^{-18}\\:\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ to $\\sigma>5\\times10^{-16}\\:\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$. Our method is applicable to a broad class of molecules and could be used to provide information about the potential en...

  18. Ligation of cancer cell surface GRP78 with antibodies directed against its COOH-terminal domain up-regulates p53 activity and promotes apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Uma Kant; Mowery, Yvonne; Kaczowka, Steven; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2009-05-01

    Binding of activated α(2)-macroglobulin to GRP78 on the surface of human prostate cancer cells promotes proliferation by activating signaling cascades. Autoantibodies directed against the activated α(2)-macroglobulin binding site in the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 are receptor agonists, and their presence in the sera of cancer patients is a poor prognostic indicator. We now show that antibodies directed against the GRP78 COOH-terminal domain inhibit [(3)H]thymidine uptake and cellular proliferation while promoting apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation, Annexin V assay, and clonogenic assay. These antibodies are receptor antagonists blocking autophosphorylation and activation of GRP78. Using 1-LN and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines and A375 melanoma cells, which express GRP78 on their cell surface, we show that antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain of GRP78 up-regulate the tumor suppressor protein p53. By contrast, antibody directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 shows negligible effects on p53 expression. PC-3 prostate cancer cells, which do not express GRP78 on their cell surface, are refractory to the effects of anti-GRP78 antibodies directed against either the COOH- or NH(2)-terminal domains. However, overexpression of GRP78 in PC-3 cells causes translocation of GRP78 to the cell surface and promotes apoptosis when these cells are treated with antibody directed against its COOH-terminal domain. Silencing GRP78 or p53 expression by RNA interference significantly blocked the increase in p53 induced by antibodies. Antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain may play a therapeutic role in cancer patients whose tumors trigger the production of autoantibodies directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78.

  19. PNA-mediated modulation and redirection of Her-2 pre-mRNA splicing: specific skipping of erbB-2 exon 19 coding for the ATP catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Birgit N; Shiraishi, Takehiko;

    2010-01-01

    The Her-2 receptor coded for by the proto-oncogenic erbB-2 gene is a clinically validated target for treatment of a significant genetic subclass of breast cancers, and Her-2 is also overexpressed or mutated in a range of other cancers. In an approach to exploit antisense mediated splicing...... oligomers that specifically induce skipping of exon 19 as this exon is coding for the ATP catalytic domain of Her-2, and if expressed such truncated version of the Her-2 protein should be functionally inactive in a dominant negative fashion. Therefore, antisense compounds having efficient erbB-2 exon 19...... skipping activity could be very interesting in terms of drug discovery. In the present study we identified PNA oligomers having such activity in SK-BR-3 and HeLa cancer cells in culture....

  20. Directed Self-assembly of Block Copolymer with Sub-15 nm Domain Spacing Using Nanoimprinted Photoresist Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Chen, Zhenbin; Zhang, Wenxu; Coughlin, E. Bryan; Xiao, Shuaigang; Russell, Thomas

    There has been increasing interest in preparing block copolymer thin films with ultra-small domain spacings for use as etching masks for ultra-high resolution nanolithography. One method to prepare block copolymer materials with small feature sizes is salt doping, increasing the Flory-Huggins interaction and allowing microphase separation to be maintained at lower molecular weights. Lamellae-forming P2VP- b-PS- b-P2VP block copolymer with various molecular weight was synthesized using RAFT polymerization with a dual functional chain transfer agent. Copper (II) Chloride or Gold (III) chloride was found to be selectively associated with P2VP block and increase the unfavorable interactions between PS and P2VP blocks, driving the disordered block copolymer into the ordered state. A 14 nm lamellar spacing of P2VP- b-PS- b-P2VP thin film was prepared using copper (II) Chloride doping after acetone vapor annealing on neutral brushes. Metallic nano-wire arrays were prepared after selective infiltration of platinum salt into the P2VP domain and oxygen plasma treatment. The directed self-assembly of salt doped P2VP- b-PS- b-P2VP triblock copolymer having long-rang lateral order on nanoimprinted photoresist templates with shallow trenches was also studied.

  1. Encapsulation of metal clusters within MFI via interzeolite transformations and direct hydrothermal syntheses and catalytic consequences of their confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sarika; Zones, Stacey I; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-10-29

    The encapsulation of metal clusters (Pt, Ru, Rh) within MFI was achieved by exchanging cationic metal precursors into a parent zeolite (BEA, FAU), reducing them with H2 to form metal clusters, and transforming these zeolites into daughter structures of higher framework density (MFI) under hydrothermal conditions. These transformations required MFI seeds or organic templates for FAU parent zeolites, but not for BEA, and occurred with the retention of encapsulated clusters. Clusters uniform in size (1.3-1.7 nm) and exposing clean and accessible surfaces formed in BEA and FAU zeolites; their size remained essentially unchanged upon transformation into MFI. Encapsulation selectivities, determined from the relative hydrogenation rates of small (toluene) and large (alkyl arenes) molecules and defined as the ratio of the surface areas of all the clusters in the sample to that of external clusters, were very high (8.1-40.9) for both parent and daughter zeolites. Encapsulation into MFI via direct hydrothermal syntheses was unsuccessful because metal precursors precipitated prematurely at the pH and temperatures required for MFI synthesis. Delayed introduction of metal precursors and F(-) (instead of OH(-)) as the mineralizing agent in hydrothermal syntheses increased encapsulation selectivities, but they remained lower than those achieved via interzeolite transformations. These interconversions provide a general and robust strategy for encapsulation of metals when precursors can be introduced via exchange into a zeolite that can be transformed into target daughter zeolites with higher framework densities, whether spontaneously or by using seeds or structure-directing agents (SDA).

  2. Cystatins as calpain inhibitors: engineered chicken cystatin- and stefin B-kininogen domain 2 hybrids support a cystatin-like mode of interaction with the catalytic subunit of mu-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, B G; Gross, S; Assfalg-Machleidt, I; Pfeiler, D; Gollmitzer, N; Gabrijelcic-Geiger, D; Stubbs, M T; Fritz, H; Auerswald, E A; Machleidt, W

    2001-01-01

    Within the cystatin superfamily, only kininogen domain 2 (KD2) is able to inhibit mu- and m-calpain. In an attempt to elucidate the structural requirements of cystatins for calpain inhibition, we constructed recombinant hybrids of human stefin B (an intracellular family 1 cystatin) with KD2 and deltaL110 deletion mutants of chicken cystatin-KD2 hybrids. Substitution of the N-terminal contact region of stefin B by the corresponding KD2 sequence resulted in a calpain inhibitor of Ki = 188 nM. Deletion of L110, which forms a beta-bulge in family 1 and 2 cystatins but is lacking in KD2, improved inhibition of mu-calpain 4- to 8-fold. All engineered cystatins were temporary inhibitors of calpain due to slow substrate-like cleavage of a single peptide bond corresponding to Gly9-Ala10 in chicken cystatin. Biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that, unlike calpastatin, the cystatin-type inhibitors do not bind to the calmodulin-like domain of the small subunit of calpain, and their interaction with the mu-calpain heterodimer is completely prevented by a synthetic peptide comprising subdomain B of calpastatin domain 1. Based on these results we propose that (i) cystatin-type calpain inhibitors interact with the active site of the catalytic domain of calpain in a similar cystatin-like mode as with papain and (ii) the potential for calpain inhibition is due to specific subsites within the papain-binding regions of the general cystatin fold.

  3. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  4. Direct visualization of tear film on soft contact lens using ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhua; Jiao, Shuliang; Ruggeri, Marco; Wehbe, Hassan M.

    2008-02-01

    The integrity of the tear film on the surface of contact lenses is essential to maintaining visual clarity and the overall health of the superficial structures of the eye (cornea and conjunctiva) for contact lens wearers. It is very critical to evaluate pre- and post-lens tear films in contact lens practice to make sure the lens is properly fitted. Improper lens fitting may cause ocular discomfort, visual distortion and ocular infection. It is very often for soft contact lens wearers to experience dry eye, especially in the afternoon after wearing the lens for a period of time. Dry eye has been a common cause of contact lens drop-off. There is currently no method available to directly visualize the tears on and underneath the contact lens in situ on human eye, mainly due to the extremely difficulty in imaging the micrometer-thin tear layer. An ultra-high resolution spectral domain optical coherence tomography has been developed with a telecentric light delivery system mounted with a slit-lamp. The system has a 3 micrometer depth resolution with a scan width up to 15 mm. The system was used to image soft contact lenses on the human eye. For the first time to our knowledge, tear films on the center and edge of the soft contact lens were directly visualized in vivo.

  5. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Biehl, R.; Hoffmann, B.; Monkenbusch, M.; Falus, P.; Préost, S.; Merkel, R.; Richter, D.

    2008-01-01

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spinecho spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffenin...

  6. Effect of ethanol-diesel blend fuels on emission and particle size distribution in a common-rail direct injection diesel engine with warm-up catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hwanam [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea); Choi, Byungchul [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    In this study, the exhaust gas from a common-rail direct injection diesel engine was investigated both upstream and downstream warm-up catalytic converters (WCC). Three different types of ultra-low sulfur fuels (ethanol-diesel blend, ethanol-diesel blend with cetane improver and pure diesel) were tested in this study. The objective of the work was to study the engine performance and the formation of THC (total hydro carbon), CO (carbon monoxide), NO{sub x} (nitrogen oxides), smoke and PM (particulate matters) when using these fuels. THC and CO emissions of the ethanol-diesel blend fuels were slightly increased, and about 50-80% mean conversion efficiencies of THC and CO on catalysts were achieved in the ECE R49 13-mode cycle. Smoke was decreased by more than 42% in the entire ECE 13-mode cycles. From the measurement of scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) for the particle size range of 10-385 nm, the total number and total mass of the PM of the ethanol-diesel blend fuels were decreased by about 11.7-15% and 19.2-26.9%, respectively. (author)

  7. Identification of amino acids related to catalytic function of Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Ho; Lee, Ye-Na; Park, Young-Jun; Yoon, Sung-Jin; Lee, Hee-Bong

    2016-01-01

    The archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus P1 carboxylesterase is a thermostable enzyme with a molecular mass of 33.5 kDa belonging to the mammalian hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) family. In our previous study, we purified the enzyme and suggested the expected amino acids related to its catalysis by chemical modification and a sequence homology search. For further validating these amino acids in this study, we modified them using site-directed mutagenesis and examined the activity of the mutant enzymes using spectrophotometric analysis and then estimated by homology modeling and fluorescence analysis. As a result, it was identified that Ser151, Asp244, and His274 consist of a catalytic triad, and Gly80, Gly81, and Ala152 compose an oxyanion hole of the enzyme. In addition, it was also determined that the cysteine residues are located near the active site or at the positions inducing any conformational changes of the enzyme by their replacement with serine residues. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(6): 349-354] PMID:27222124

  8. Expression and Characterization of Catalytic Domain of T Cell Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase(ΔTC-PTP)——Immunohistochemical Study of ΔTC-PTP Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Zhi-cheng; SUN Mei; ZHANG Xing-yi; LIU Ke-xiang; SHI Dong-lei; LI Jin-dong; SU Ji-quan; XU Yue-chi; FU Xue-qi

    2007-01-01

    This study objective was to express and characterize the catalytic domain of the human T cell protein tyrosine phosphatase(ΔTC-PTP) and to study immunohistochemically the expression of ΔTC-PTP in human non-small cell lung cancers. ΔTC-PTP gene was PCR amplified with the cDNA of human TC-PTP as template, and cloned into the pT7 expression vector. The recombinant pT7-ΔTC-PTP was expressed in E.coli Rosetta(DE3) host cells and purified. The enzymatic characteristics of ΔTC-PTP including enzyme activity and kinetics assay were measured. The antiserum was prepared by immunizing rabbit with the purified recombinant ΔTC-PTP. Rabbit polyclonal antibody against ΔTC-PTP was purified by PVDF immobilized antigen affinity chromatography. Immunohistochemical staining of lung cancer tissues was performed with antibody against ΔTC-PTP protein. ΔTC-PTP gene was correctly cloned, expressed, and purified. The recombinant ΔTC-PTP had a highly catalytic activity of PTPase. Squamous cell lung carcinoma showed a significantly higher expression rate of ΔTC-PTP(76.92%, 10/13) than adenocarcinoma(57.14%, 4/7) and normal lung tissue(20%, 1/5). This study represents the first demonstration that ΔTC-PTP is highly expressed in human squamous cell lung carcinomas. In addition, this study provides an important basis for further studying the biological function of TC-PTP and its relationship with lung carcinomas and other diseases.

  9. A ROBUST PHASE-ONLY DIRECT DATA DOMAIN ALGORITHM BASED ON GENERALIZED RAYLEIGH QUOTIENT OPTIMIZATION USING HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Wei; Qian Zuping; Yuan Feng

    2007-01-01

    A robust phase-only Direct Data Domain Least Squares (D3LS) algorithm based on generalized Rayleigh quotient optimization using hybrid Genetic Algorithm (GA) is presented in this letter. The optimization efficiency and computational speed are improved via the hybrid GA composed of standard GA and Nelder-Mead simplex algorithms. First, the objective function, with a form of generalized Rayleigh quotient, is derived via the standard D3LS algorithm. It is then taken as a fitness function and the unknown phases of all adaptive weights are taken as decision variables.Then, the nonlinear optimization is performed via the hybrid GA to obtain the optimized solution of phase-only adaptive weights. As a phase-only adaptive algorithm, the proposed algorithm is simpler than conventional algorithms when it comes to hardware implementation. Moreover, it processes only a single snapshot data as opposed to forming sample covariance matrix and operating matrix inversion. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a good signal recovery and interferences nulling performance, which are superior to that of the phase-only D3LS algorithm based on standard GA.

  10. Generalized focusing of time-lapse changes with applications to direct current and time-domain induced polarization inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Doetsch, Joseph; Vignoli, Giulio; Auken, Esben

    2015-11-01

    Often in geophysical monitoring experiments time-lapse inversion models vary too smoothly with time, owing to the strong imprint of regularization. Several methods have been proposed for focusing the spatiotemporal changes of the model parameters. In this study, we present two generalizations of the minimum support norm, which favour compact time-lapse changes and can be adapted to the specific problem requirements. Inversion results from synthetic direct current resistivity models that mimic developing plumes show that the focusing scheme significantly improves size, shape and magnitude estimates of the time-lapse changes. Inversions of the synthetic data also illustrate that the focused inversion gives robust results and that the focusing settings are easily chosen. Inversions of full-decay time-domain induced polarization (IP) field data from a CO2 monitoring injection experiment show that the focusing scheme performs well for field data and inversions for all four Cole-Cole polarization parameters. Our tests show that the generalized minimum support norms react in an intuitive and predictable way to the norm settings, implying that they can be used in time-lapse experiments for obtaining reliable and robust results.

  11. Nonstationary Interference Excision in Time-Frequency Domain Using Adaptive Hierarchical Lapped Orthogonal Transform for Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yi-Sheng

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive hierarchical lapped orthogonal transform (HLOT exciser is proposed for tracking, localizing, and rejecting the nonstationary interference in direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS communications. The method is based on HLOT. It utilizes a fast dynamic programming algorithm to search for the best basis, which matches the interference structure best, in a library of lapped orthogonal bases. The adaptive HLOT differs from conventional block transform and the more advanced modulated lapped transform (MLT in that the former produces arbitrary time-frequency tiling, which can be adapted to the signal structure, while the latter yields fixed tilings. The time-frequency tiling of the adaptive HLOT can be time varying, so it is also able to track the variations of the signal time-frequency structure. Simulation results show that the proposed exciser brings significant performance improvement in the presence of nonstationary time-localized interference with or without instantaneous frequency (IF information compared with the existing block transform domain excisers. Also, the proposed exciser is effective in suppressing narrowband interference and combined narrowband and time-localized impulsive interference.

  12. Purification and Characterization of the Catalytic Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase SHP-1 and the Preparation of Anti-△SHP-1 Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wan-nan; ZHUANG Yan; LI He; SUN Ying; FU Yao; WU Xiao-xia; ZHAO Zhi-zhuang; FU Xue-qi

    2008-01-01

    This study is focused on the expression of an SH2 domain-truncated form of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1(designated △SHP-1) and the preparation of its polyelonal antibodies.A cDNA fragment encoding △SHP-1 was amplified by PCR and then cloned into the pT7 expression vector.The recombinant pT7-△SHP-1 plasmid was used to transform Rosetta(DE3) E.coll cells.△SHP-1 was distributed in the exclusion body of E.coll cell extracts and was purified through a two-column chromatographic procedure.The purified enzyme exhibited an expected molecular weight on SDS-gels and HPLC gel filtration columns.It possesses robust tyrosine phosphatase activity and shows typical enzymatic characteristics of classic tyrosine phosphatases.To generate polyclonal anti-△SHP-1 antibodies,purified recombinant △SHP-1 was used to immunize a rabbit.The resultant anti-serum was subjected to purification on △SHP-1 antigen affinity chromatography.The purified polyclonal antibody displayed a high sensitivity and specificity toward △SHP-1.This study thus provides the essential materials for further investigating the biological function and pathological implication of SHP-1 and screening the inhibitors and activators of the enzyme for therapeutic drug development.

  13. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor–regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences......Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several...... glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  14. Cyclin H binding to the RARα activation function (AF)-2 domain directs phosphorylation of the AF-1 domain by cyclin-dependent kinase 7

    OpenAIRE

    Bour, Gaétan; Gaillard, Emilie; Bruck, Nathalie; Lalevée, Sébastien; Plassat, Jean-Luc; Busso, Didier; Samama, Jean-Pierre; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2005-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs), which act as RAR/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimers, depends on two activation functions, AF-1 and AF-2, which are targets for phosphorylations and synergize for the activation of retinoic acid target genes. The N-terminal AF-1 domain of RARα is phosphorylated at S77 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-activating kinase (CAK) subcomplex (cdk7/cyclin H/MAT1) of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Here, we show tha...

  15. The E2-25K ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain aids in polyubiquitin chain synthesis and linkage specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We examine the role of a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain in an E2 enzyme. → The E2-25K UBA domain directs polyubiquitin chain linkage specificity. → The E2-25K UBA domain regulates length of polyubiquitin chains synthesized. -- Abstract: E2-25K is an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme with the ability to synthesize Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chains. E2-25K and its homologs represent the only known E2 enzymes which contain a C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain as well as the conserved catalytic ubiquitin-conjugating (UBC) domain. As an additional non-covalent binding surface for ubiquitin, the UBA domain must provide some functional specialization. We mapped the protein-protein interface involved in the E2-25K UBA/ubiquitin complex by solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and subsequently modeled the structure of the complex. Domain-domain interactions between the E2-25K catalytic UBC domain and the UBA domain do not induce significant structural changes in the UBA domain or alter the affinity of the UBA domain for ubiquitin. We determined that one of the roles of the C-terminal UBA domain, in the context of E2-25K, is to increase processivity in Lys48-linked polyubiquitin chain synthesis, possibly through increased binding to the ubiquitinated substrate. Additionally, we see evidence that the UBA domain directs specificity in polyubiquitin chain linkage.

  16. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  17. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  18. Metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc molecule adsorbed on the Au(111 surface: formation of a wide domain along a single lattice direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Komeda, Hironari Isshiki and Jie Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, we observed the bonding configuration of the metal-free phthalocyanine (H2Pc molecule adsorbed on the Au(111 surface. A local lattice formation started from a quasi-square lattice aligned to the close-packed directions of the Au(111 surface. Although we expected the lattice alignment to be equally distributed along the three crystallographically equivalent directions, the domain aligned normal to the ridge of the herringbone structure was missing in the STM images. We attribute this effect to the uniaxial contraction of the reconstructed Au(111 surface that can account for the formation of a large lattice domain along a single crystallographical direction.

  19. Charge-Domain Signal Processing of Direct RF Sampling Mixer with Discrete-Time Filters in Bluetooth and GSM Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Yo-Chuol

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RF circuits for multi-GHz frequencies have recently migrated to low-cost digital deep-submicron CMOS processes. Unfortunately, this process environment, which is optimized only for digital logic and SRAM memory, is extremely unfriendly for conventional analog and RF designs. We present fundamental techniques recently developed that transform the RF and analog circuit design complexity to digitally intensive domain for a wireless RF transceiver, so that it enjoys benefits of digital and switched-capacitor approaches. Direct RF sampling techniques allow great flexibility in reconfigurable radio design. Digital signal processing concepts are used to help relieve analog design complexity, allowing one to reduce cost and power consumption in a reconfigurable design environment. The ideas presented have been used in Texas Instruments to develop two generations of commercial digital RF processors: a single-chip Bluetooth radio and a single-chip GSM radio. We further present details of the RF receiver front end for a GSM radio realized in a 90-nm digital CMOS technology. The circuit consisting of low-noise amplifier, transconductance amplifier, and switching mixer offers dB dynamic range with digitally configurable voltage gain of 40 dB down to dB. A series of decimation and discrete-time filtering follows the mixer and performs a highly linear second-order lowpass filtering to reject close-in interferers. The front-end gains can be configured with an automatic gain control to select an optimal setting to form a trade-off between noise figure and linearity and to compensate the process and temperature variations. Even under the digital switching activity, noise figure at the 40 dB maximum gain is 1.8 dB and dBm IIP2 at the 34 dB gain. The variation of the input matching versus multiple gains is less than 1 dB. The circuit in total occupies 3.1 . The LNA, TA, and mixer consume less than mA at a supply voltage of 1.4 V.

  20. Charge-Domain Signal Processing of Direct RF Sampling Mixer with Discrete-Time Filters in Bluetooth and GSM Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RF circuits for multi-GHz frequencies have recently migrated to low-cost digital deep-submicron CMOS processes. Unfortunately, this process environment, which is optimized only for digital logic and SRAM memory, is extremely unfriendly for conventional analog and RF designs. We present fundamental techniques recently developed that transform the RF and analog circuit design complexity to digitally intensive domain for a wireless RF transceiver, so that it enjoys benefits of digital and switched-capacitor approaches. Direct RF sampling techniques allow great flexibility in reconfigurable radio design. Digital signal processing concepts are used to help relieve analog design complexity, allowing one to reduce cost and power consumption in a reconfigurable design environment. The ideas presented have been used in Texas Instruments to develop two generations of commercial digital RF processors: a single-chip Bluetooth radio and a single-chip GSM radio. We further present details of the RF receiver front end for a GSM radio realized in a 90-nm digital CMOS technology. The circuit consisting of low-noise amplifier, transconductance amplifier, and switching mixer offers 32.5 dB dynamic range with digitally configurable voltage gain of 40 dB down to 7.5 dB. A series of decimation and discrete-time filtering follows the mixer and performs a highly linear second-order lowpass filtering to reject close-in interferers. The front-end gains can be configured with an automatic gain control to select an optimal setting to form a trade-off between noise figure and linearity and to compensate the process and temperature variations. Even under the digital switching activity, noise figure at the 40 dB maximum gain is 1.8 dB and +50 dBm IIP2 at the 34 dB gain. The variation of the input matching versus multiple gains is less than 1 dB. The circuit in total occupies 3.1 mm 2 . The LNA, TA, and mixer consume less than 15.3 mA at a supply voltage of 1.4 V.

  1. APPL proteins FRET at the BAR: direct observation of APPL1 and APPL2 BAR domain-mediated interactions on cell membranes using FRET microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi J Chial

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human APPL1 and APPL2 are homologous RAB5 effectors whose binding partners include a diverse set of transmembrane receptors, signaling proteins, and phosphoinositides. APPL proteins associate dynamically with endosomal membranes and are proposed to function in endosome-mediated signaling pathways linking the cell surface to the cell nucleus. APPL proteins contain an N-terminal Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR domain, a central pleckstrin homology (PH domain, and a C-terminal phosphotyrosine binding (PTB domain. Previous structural and biochemical studies have shown that the APPL BAR domains mediate homotypic and heterotypic APPL-APPL interactions and that the APPL1 BAR domain forms crescent-shaped dimers. Although previous studies have shown that APPL minimal BAR domains associate with curved cell membranes, direct interaction between APPL BAR domains on cell membranes in vivo has not been reported. METHODOLOGY: Herein, we used a laser-scanning confocal microscope equipped with a spectral detector to carry out fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET experiments with cyan fluorescent protein/yellow fluorescent protein (CFP/YFP FRET donor/acceptor pairs to examine interactions between APPL minimal BAR domains at the subcellular level. This comprehensive approach enabled us to evaluate FRET levels in a single cell using three methods: sensitized emission, standard acceptor photobleaching, and sequential acceptor photobleaching. We also analyzed emission spectra to address an outstanding controversy regarding the use of CFP donor/YFP acceptor pairs in FRET acceptor photobleaching experiments, based on reports that photobleaching of YFP converts it into a CFP-like species. CONCLUSIONS: All three methods consistently showed significant FRET between APPL minimal BAR domain FRET pairs, indicating that they interact directly in a homotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL1 and APPL2-APPL2 and heterotypic (i.e., APPL1-APPL2 manner on curved cell membranes

  2. The lectin domain of the polypeptide GalNAc transferase family of glycosyltransferases (ppGalNAc Ts) acts as a switch directing glycopeptide substrate glycosylation in an N- or C-terminal direction, further controlling mucin type O-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Thomas A; Revoredo, Leslie; Thome, Joseph J C; Tabak, Lawrence A; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Clausen, Henrik; Gahlay, Gagandeep K; Jarvis, Donald L; Johnson, Roy W; Moniz, Heather A; Moremen, Kelley

    2013-07-01

    Mucin type O-glycosylation is initiated by a large family of polypeptide GalNAc transferases (ppGalNAc Ts) that add α-GalNAc to the Ser and Thr residues of peptides. Of the 20 human isoforms, all but one are composed of two globular domains linked by a short flexible linker: a catalytic domain and a ricin-like lectin carbohydrate binding domain. Presently, the roles of the catalytic and lectin domains in peptide and glycopeptide recognition and specificity remain unclear. To systematically study the role of the lectin domain in ppGalNAc T glycopeptide substrate utilization, we have developed a series of novel random glycopeptide substrates containing a single GalNAc-O-Thr residue placed near either the N or C terminus of the glycopeptide substrate. Our results reveal that the presence and N- or C-terminal placement of the GalNAc-O-Thr can be important determinants of overall catalytic activity and specificity that differ between transferase isoforms. For example, ppGalNAc T1, T2, and T14 prefer C-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr, whereas ppGalNAc T3 and T6 prefer N-terminally placed GalNAc-O-Thr. Several transferase isoforms, ppGalNAc T5, T13, and T16, display equally enhanced N- or C-terminal activities relative to the nonglycosylated control peptides. This N- and/or C-terminal selectivity is presumably due to weak glycopeptide binding to the lectin domain, whose orientation relative to the catalytic domain is dynamic and isoform-dependent. Such N- or C-terminal glycopeptide selectivity provides an additional level of control or fidelity for the O-glycosylation of biologically significant sites and suggests that O-glycosylation may in some instances be exquisitely controlled.

  3. The PDZ domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZGEF directs binding to phosphatidic acid during brush border formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Consonni

    Full Text Available PDZGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small G protein Rap. It was recently found that PDZGEF contributes to establishment of intestinal epithelial polarity downstream of the kinase Lkb1. By binding to phosphatidic acid enriched at the apical membrane, PDZGEF locally activates Rap2a resulting in induction of brush border formation via a pathway that includes the polarity players TNIK, Mst4 and Ezrin. Here we show that the PDZ domain of PDZGEF is essential and sufficient for targeting PDZGEF to the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Inhibition of PLD and consequently production of phosphatidic acid inhibitis targeting of PDZGEF to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, localization requires specific positively charged residues within the PDZ domain. We conclude that local accumulation of PDZGEF at the apical membrane during establishment of epithelial polarity is mediated by electrostatic interactions between positively charged side chains in the PDZ domain and negatively charged phosphatidic acid.

  4. Fuel rich and fuel lean catalytic combustion of the stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames over noble metal disc burners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal S. Zakhary

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic combustion of stabilized confined turbulent gaseous diffusion flames using Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 disc burners situated in the combustion domain under both fuel-rich and fuel-lean conditions was experimentally studied. Commercial LPG fuel having an average composition of: 23% propane, 76% butane, and 1% pentane was used. The thermal structure of these catalytic flames developed over Pt/Al2O3 and Pd/Al2O3 burners were examined via measuring the mean temperature distribution in the radial direction at different axial locations along the flames. Under-fuel-rich condition the flames operated over Pt catalytic disc attained high temperature values in order to express the progress of combustion and were found to achieve higher activity as compared to the flames developed over Pd catalytic disc. These two types of catalytic flames demonstrated an increase in the reaction rate with the downstream axial distance and hence, an increase in the flame temperatures was associated with partial oxidation towards CO due to the lack of oxygen. However, under fuel-lean conditions the catalytic flame over Pd catalyst recorded comparatively higher temperatures within the flame core in the near region of the main reaction zone than over Pt disc burner. These two catalytic flames over Pt and Pd disc burners showed complete oxidation to CO2 since the catalytic surface is covered by more rich oxygen under the fuel-lean condition.

  5. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  6. Catalytically inactive lipoprotein lipase expression in muscle of transgenic mice increases very low density lipoprotein uptake: Direct evidence that lipoprotein lipase bridging occurs in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Merkel, Martin; Kako, Yuko; Radner, Herbert; Cho, Irene S.; Ramasamy, Ravi; Brunzell, John D.; Goldberg, Ira J.; Breslow, Jan L.

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is the central enzyme in plasma triglyceride hydrolysis. In vitro studies have shown that LPL also can enhance lipoprotein uptake into cells via pathways that are independent of catalytic activity but require LPL as a molecular bridge between lipoproteins and proteoglycans or receptors. To investigate whether this bridging function occurs in vivo, two transgenic mouse lines were established expressing a muscle creatine kinase promoter-driven human LPL (hLPL) minigene ...

  7. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  8. Direct binding of specific AUF1 isoforms to tandem zinc finger domains of tristetraprolin (TTP) family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Vishram P; Zucconi, Beth E; Wilson, Gerald M; Blackshear, Perry J

    2012-02-17

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype of a family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins that can bind to AU-rich elements in mRNAs and promote their decay. TTP binds to mRNA through its central tandem zinc finger domain; it then promotes mRNA deadenylation, considered to be the rate-limiting step in eukaryotic mRNA decay. We found that TTP and its related family members could bind to certain isoforms of another AU-rich element-binding protein, HNRNPD/AUF1, as well as a related protein, laAUF1. The interaction domain within AUF1p45 appeared to be a C-terminal "GY" region, and the interaction domain within TTP was the tandem zinc finger domain. Surprisingly, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP occurred even with TTP mutants that lacked RNA binding activity. In cell extracts, binding of AUF1p45 to TTP potentiated TTP binding to ARE-containing RNA probes, as determined by RNA gel shift assays; AUF1p45 did not bind to the RNA probes under these conditions. Using purified, recombinant proteins and a synthetic RNA target in FRET assays, we demonstrated that AUF1p45, but not AUF1p37, increased TTP binding affinity for RNA ∼5-fold. These data suggest that certain isoforms of AUF1 can serve as "co-activators" of TTP family protein binding to RNA. The results raise interesting questions about the ability of AUF1 isoforms to regulate the mRNA binding and decay-promoting activities of TTP and its family members as well as the ability of AUF1 proteins to serve as possible physical links between TTP and other mRNA decay proteins and structures.

  9. Direct interaction of the N-terminal domain of ribosomal protein S1 with protein S2 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrgazov, Konstantin; Manoharadas, Salim; Kaberdina, Anna C; Vesper, Oliver; Moll, Isabella

    2012-01-01

    Despite of the high resolution structure available for the E. coli ribosome, hitherto the structure and localization of the essential ribosomal protein S1 on the 30 S subunit still remains to be elucidated. It was previously reported that protein S1 binds to the ribosome via protein-protein interaction at the two N-terminal domains. Moreover, protein S2 was shown to be required for binding of protein S1 to the ribosome. Here, we present evidence that the N-terminal domain of S1 (amino acids 1-106; S1(106)) is necessary and sufficient for the interaction with protein S2 as well as for ribosome binding. We show that over production of protein S1(106) affects E. coli growth by displacing native protein S1 from its binding pocket on the ribosome. In addition, our data reveal that the coiled-coil domain of protein S2 (S2α(2)) is sufficient to allow protein S1 to bind to the ribosome. Taken together, these data uncover the crucial elements required for the S1/S2 interaction, which is pivotal for translation initiation on canonical mRNAs in gram-negative bacteria. The results are discussed in terms of a model wherein the S1/S2 interaction surface could represent a possible target to modulate the selectivity of the translational machinery and thereby alter the translational program under distinct conditions.

  10. Induced alignment and measurement of dipolar couplings of an SH2 domain through direct binding with filamentous phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlke Ojennus, Deanna; Mitton-Fry, Rachel M.; Wuttke, Deborah S. [University of Colorado, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    1999-06-15

    Large residual {sup 15}N-{sup 1}H dipolar couplings have been measured in a Src homology II domain aligned at Pf1 bacteriophage concentrations an order of magnitude lower than used for induction of a similar degree of alignment of nucleic acids and highly acidic proteins. An increase in {sup 1} H and {sup 15}N protein linewidths and a decrease in T{sub 2} and T{sub 1}{rho} relaxation time constants implicates a binding interaction between the protein and phage as the mechanism of alignment. However, the associated increased linewidth does not preclude the accurate measurement of large dipolar couplings in the aligned protein. A good correlation is observed between measured dipolar couplings and predicted values based on the high resolution NMR structure of the SH2 domain. The observation of binding-induced protein alignment promises to broaden the scope of alignment techniques by extending their applicability to proteins that are able to interact weakly with the alignment medium.

  11. Effect of induced shielding current transmission in longitudinal direction on levitation force of melt grown single-domain YBa2Cu3O7-x cylindrical superconductor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Wanmin; ZHOU; Lian; FENG; Yong; ZHANG; Pingxiang; R.

    2004-01-01

    A novel layer deletion method is used to experimentally investigate the effect of induced shielding current transmission (ISCT) in the longitudinal direction on the levitation force of a single-domain YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) cylindrical superconductor (φ30x7 mm). In the experiment the sample was gradually sliced into two equal sheets, at the middle height along a diameter with 5 mm every step. The experimental results show that the levitation force is closely related with the ISCT in the longitudinal direction. Any layer deletion, even a small piece of layer deletion can reduce the levitation force of the sample. After the whole layer was deleted the levitation force can diminish about 50%. It is also found that the levitation force is directly proportional to the effective factor of surface area, which is equal to the top surface area divided by the total surface area parallel to the top surface of the sample.

  12. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  13. Cloning, expression, and purification of human cyclophilin in Escherichia coli and assessment of the catalytic role of cysteines by site-directed mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cDNA encoding human cyclophilin from the Jurkat T-cell lymphoma line has been cloned by the expression cassette polymerase chain reaction and sequenced, and an expression vector has been constructed under control of the tac promoter for efficient expression in Escherichia coli. Active cyclophilin is produced at up to 40% of soluble cell protein, facilitating a one-column purification to homogeneity. Wild-type cyclophilin was characterized for binding of the potent immunosuppressant agent cyclosporin A by tryptophan fluorescence enhancement and for inhibition of cyclophilin's peptidyl-proly cis-trans isomerase (rotamase) activity. With N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide as the substrate, recombinant human cyclophilin has a high catalytic efficiency. To test the prior suggestion that a cysteine residue may be essential for catalysis and immunosuppressant binding, the four cysteines at positions 52, 62, 115, and 161 were mutated individually to alanine and the purified mutant proteins were shown to retain full affinity for cyclosporin A and equivalent catalytic efficiency as a rotamase. Clearly the cysteines play no essential role in catalysis or cyclosporin A binding. These results rule out the recently proposed mechanism. Involving the formation of tetrahedral hemithioorthoamide. Whereas mechanisms that embody other tetrahedral intermediates may be operative, an alternative mechanism is considered that involves distortion of bound substrate with a twisted (90 degree) peptidyl-prolyl amide bond

  14. Poly(acrylic acid)-directed synthesis of colloidally stable single domain magnetite nanoparticles via partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan, Cem L.; Gurten, Berna; Sadza, Roel; Yenigul, Elcin; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Bucak, Seyda

    2016-10-01

    Octahedral, single domain magnetite nanoparticles with average size of ~55 nm were synthesized through oxidative aging of a ferrous hydroxide (Fe(OH)2) precursor at high pH in water. The synthesis was also carried out in the presence of the hydrophilic polymer poly(acrylic acid). Presence of the polymer changed the particle morphology from octahedral to spherical while average size decreased to 40-50 nm. Although these particles have a tendency to precipitate due to their high magnetic moment, dispersions of these particles were obtained in the presence of this particular polymer which made the particles stable in water for several days making them suitable for various biotechnological applications such as cell separation owing to their low toxicity.

  15. The lectin domain of UDP-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase-T4 directs its glycopeptide specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, H; Reis, C A; Bennett, E P;

    2000-01-01

    for differential regulation of O-glycan attachment sites and density. Recently, it has emerged that some GalNAc-transferase isoforms in vitro selectively function with partially GalNAc O-glycosylated acceptor peptides rather than with the corresponding unglycosylated peptides. O-Glycan attachment to selected sites......, most notably two sites in the MUC1 tandem repeat, is entirely dependent on the glycosylation-dependent function of GalNAc-T4. Here we present data that a putative lectin domain found in the C terminus of GalNAc-T4 functions as a GalNAc lectin and confers its glycopeptide specificity. A single amino...... by free GalNAc, while the activity with peptides was unaffected....

  16. Designing on-demand education for simultaneous development of domain-specific and self-directed learning skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taminiau, Elisabeth M C; Kester, L.; Corbalan, G.; Spector, J. M.; Kirschner, P. A.; Van Merriënboer, J. J G

    2015-01-01

    On-demand education enables individual learners to choose their learning pathways according to their own learning needs. They must use self-directed learning (SDL) skills involving self-assessment and task selection to determine appropriate pathways for learning. Learners who lack these skills must

  17. Convergence analysis of a class of massively parallel direction splitting algorithms for the Navier-Stokes equations in simple domains

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    We provide a convergence analysis for a new fractional timestepping technique for the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations based on direction splitting. This new technique is of linear complexity, unconditionally stable and convergent, and suitable for massive parallelization. © 2012 American Mathematical Society.

  18. Designing On-Demand Education for Simultaneous Development of Domain-Specific and Self-Directed Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taminiau, E. M. C.; Kester, L.; Corbalan, G.; Spector, J. M.; Kirschner, P. A.; Van Merriënboer, J. J. G.

    2015-01-01

    On-demand education enables individual learners to choose their learning pathways according to their own learning needs. They must use self-directed learning (SDL) skills involving self-assessment and task selection to determine appropriate pathways for learning. Learners who lack these skills must develop them because SDL skills are prerequisite…

  19. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  20. Apo-states of calmodulin and CaBP1 control CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channel function through direct competition for the IQ domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Rumpf, Christine; Minor, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    In neurons, binding of calmodulin (CaM) or calcium-binding protein 1 (CaBP1) to the CaV1 (L-type) voltage-gated calcium channel IQ domain endows the channel with diametrically opposed properties. CaM causes calcium-dependent inactivation (CDI) and limits calcium entry, whereas CaBP1 blocks CDI and allows sustained calcium influx. Here, we combine isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with cell-based functional measurements and mathematical modeling to show that these calcium sensors behave in a competitive manner that is explained quantitatively by their apo-state binding affinities for the IQ domain. This competition can be completely blocked by covalent tethering of CaM to the channel. Further, we show that Ca2+/CaM has a sub-picomolar affinity for the IQ domain that is achieved without drastic alteration of calcium binding properties. The observation that the apo-forms of CaM and CaBP1 compete with each other demonstrates a simple mechanism for direct modulation of CaV1 function and suggests a means by which excitable cells may dynamically tune CaV activity. PMID:23811053

  1. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  2. Characterization and directed evolution of a methyl-binding domain protein for high-sensitivity DNA methylation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, Brandon W; Tam, Brooke E; Sikes, Hadley D

    2015-12-01

    Methyl-binding domain (MBD) family proteins specifically bind double-stranded, methylated DNA which makes them useful for DNA methylation analysis. We displayed three of the core members MBD1, MBD2 and MBD4 on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Using the yeast display platform, we determined the equilibrium dissociation constant of human MBD2 (hMBD2) to be 5.9 ± 1.3 nM for binding to singly methylated DNA. The measured affinity for DNA with two methylated sites varied with the distance between the sites. We further used the yeast display platform to evolve the hMBD2 protein for improved binding affinity. Affecting five amino acid substitutions doubled the affinity of the wild-type protein to 3.1 ± 1.0 nM. The most prevalent of these mutations, K161R, occurs away from the DNA-binding site and bridges the N- and C-termini of the protein by forming a new hydrogen bond. The F208Y and L170R mutations added new non-covalent interactions with the bound DNA strand. We finally concatenated the high-affinity MBD variant and expressed it in Escherichia coli as a green fluorescent protein fusion. Concatenating the protein from 1× to 3× improved binding 6-fold for an interfacial binding application. PMID:26384511

  3. The methoxychlor metabolite, HPTE, directly inhibits the catalytic activity of cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc) in cultured rat ovarian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Yucel; Derk, Raymond C; Meighan, Terence; Rao, K Murali Krishna; Murono, Eisuke P

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to the pesticide methoxychlor in rodents is linked to impaired steroid production, ovarian atrophy and reduced fertility. Following in vivo administration, it is rapidly converted by the liver to 2,2-bis-(p-hydroxyphenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (HPTE), the reported active metabolite. Both methoxychlor and HPTE have weak estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, and these effects are thought to be mediated through the estrogen and androgen receptors, respectively. Previous in vivo studies on methoxychlor exposure to female animals have demonstrated decreased progesterone production but no change in serum estrogen levels. We recently showed that HPTE specifically inhibits the P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage (P450scc, CYP11A1) step resulting in decreased androgen production by cultured rat testicular Leydig cells. The current studies examined the mechanism of action of HPTE on progesterone production by cultured ovarian cells (granulosa and theca-interstitial) from pregnant mare serum gonadotropin-primed immature rats. In addition, we evaluated whether the effects of HPTE on rat ovarian cell progesterone biosynthesis were mediated through the estrogen or androgen receptors. Exposure to HPTE (0, 10, 50 or 100nM) alone progressively inhibited progesterone formation in cultured theca-interstitial and granulosa cells and the P450scc catalytic activity in theca-interstitial cells in a dose-dependent manner with significant declines starting at 50nM. However, HPTE did not change mRNA levels of the P450scc system (P450scc, adrenodoxin reductase and adrenodoxin) as well as P450scc protein levels. Of interest, estradiol, xenoestrogens (bisphenol-A or 4-tert-octylphenol), a pure antiestrogen (ICI 182,780), or antiandrogens (4-hydroxyflutamide or the vinclozolin metabolite M-2), had no effect on progesterone production even at 1000nM. Co-treatment of HPTE with ICI 182,780 did not block the effect of HPTE on progesterone formation. These studies suggest that the

  4. An Experimental Study on the Fast Light Off of Catalytic Converter in a Gasoline Direct Injection Engine%直喷汽油机催化器快速起燃的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于秀敏; 董伟; 嵇全喜

    2011-01-01

    针对EA888直喷汽油机建立了试验台架及试验测控系统,通过试验研究了过量空气系数和两次喷射比例对催化器起燃特性的影响规律.试验结果表明,采用微稀的混合气有利于催化器的快速起燃,采用两次喷射有助于推迟点火,提高排气温度,缩短催化器起燃时间.%A test bench and its control system are established for EA888 direct injection gasoline engine, and an experimental study is conducted on the rule of the effects of excess air coefficient and the fuel proportion ratio in two-stage fuel injection on the light-off characteristics of catalytic converter. The results show that a slight-lean mixture is conducive to the rapid light off of catalytic converter, and two-stage injection helps delay ignition, raise exhaust temperature and shorten the light-off time of catalyst.

  5. Application of tungsten-based catalytic materials to direct alcohol fuel cell production%钨基催化材料在直接醇类燃料电池中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘喜慧; 周阳; 梁福永; 曲慧男; 温和瑞

    2015-01-01

    直接醇类燃料电池(DAFC)具有能量密度高、携带方便以及环境友好等优点。电极催化剂是改善DAFC性能的关键材料,目前DAFC催化剂要解决的关键问题是提高催化剂的电催化活性、抗CO等中间产物毒化能力以及降低催化剂成本,文中综述了2种钨基催化材料的制备、性能表征及其在DAFC中的应用研究进展,指出了目前钨基复合催化剂需要重点研究的基础问题。%Direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) has the advantages of high energy density , convenient packaging and environment friendliness. The key problem of anode catalyst for DAFC is how to improve the catalytic activity of anodic oxidation, and enhance the ability of resistance to CO poisoning and lower the price of catalyst. This paper reviews the synthesis , electric catalytic properties and applications in DAFC of two kinds of tungsten-based catalysts. The existing basic problems of tungsten-based composite catalysts are proposed.

  6. Direct observation of low-temperature catalytic decomposition of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} shell in core/shell Ni/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.F. [Dalian University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec (Canada); Guan, P.F. [Tohoku University, World Premier International Research Center, Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Sendai (Japan); Dong, X.L. [Dalian University of Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian, Liaoning (China)

    2012-08-15

    Decomposition of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} to B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in core/shell Ni/H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} nanoparticles was in situ recorded by transmission electron microscope as the irradiation time. The direct observation provides compelling evidence of the synergetic effect of the Ni core and the H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} shell, revealing the catalytic mechanisms of metal nanostructures that induce the decomposition at 124 C, lower than the bulk counterpart at 300 C. This phenomenon can be theoretically explained by considering the weakening of B-O bond at the Ni-H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} interface, and has important implications in understanding the lubricant behavior of H{sub 3}BO{sub 3} in frictional wear. (orig.)

  7. ATM Localization and Heterochromatin Repair Depend on Direct Interaction of the 53BP1-BRCT2 Domain with γH2AX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Robert A; Day, Matthew; Wilkinson, Oliver J; Cloney, Ross; Jeggo, Penelope A; Oliver, Antony W; Watts, Felicity Z; Pearl, Laurence H

    2015-12-15

    53BP1 plays multiple roles in mammalian DNA damage repair, mediating pathway choice and facilitating DNA double-strand break repair in heterochromatin. Although it possesses a C-terminal BRCT2 domain, commonly involved in phospho-peptide binding in other proteins, initial recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage depends on interaction with histone post-translational modifications--H4K20me2 and H2AK13/K15ub--downstream of the early γH2AX phosphorylation mark of DNA damage. We now show that, contrary to current models, the 53BP1-BRCT2 domain binds γH2AX directly, providing a third post-translational mark regulating 53BP1 function. We find that the interaction of 53BP1 with γH2AX is required for sustaining the 53BP1-dependent focal concentration of activated ATM that facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks in heterochromatin in G1.

  8. The ETS domain transcription factor ELK1 directs a critical component of growth signaling by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patki, Mugdha; Chari, Venkatesh; Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Gonit, Mesfin; Trumbly, Robert; Ratnam, Manohar

    2013-04-19

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for diverse aspects of prostate development and function. Molecular mechanisms by which prostate cancer (PC) cells redirect AR signaling to genes that primarily support growth are unclear. A systematic search for critical AR-tethering proteins led to ELK1, an ETS transcription factor of the ternary complex factor subfamily. Although genetically redundant, ELK1 was obligatory for AR-dependent growth and clonogenic survival in both hormone-dependent PC and castration-recurrent PC cells but not for AR-negative cell growth. AR required ELK1 to up-regulate a major subset of its target genes that was strongly and primarily enriched for cell growth functions. AR functioned as a coactivator of ELK1 by association through its A/B domain, bypassing the classical mechanism of ELK1 activation by phosphorylation and without inducing ternary complex target genes. The ELK1-AR synergy per se was ligand-independent, although it required ligand for nuclear localization of AR as targeting the AR A/B domain to the nucleus recapitulated the action of hormone; accordingly, Casodex was a poor antagonist of the synergy. ELK3, the closest substitute for ELK1 in structure/function and genome recognition, did not interact with AR. ELK1 thus directs selective and sustained gene induction that is a substantial and critical component of growth signaling by AR in PC cells. The ELK1-AR interaction offers a functionally tumor-selective drug target. PMID:23426362

  9. ATM Localization and Heterochromatin Repair Depend on Direct Interaction of the 53BP1-BRCT2 Domain with γH2AX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Baldock

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available 53BP1 plays multiple roles in mammalian DNA damage repair, mediating pathway choice and facilitating DNA double-strand break repair in heterochromatin. Although it possesses a C-terminal BRCT2 domain, commonly involved in phospho-peptide binding in other proteins, initial recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage depends on interaction with histone post-translational modifications—H4K20me2 and H2AK13/K15ub—downstream of the early γH2AX phosphorylation mark of DNA damage. We now show that, contrary to current models, the 53BP1-BRCT2 domain binds γH2AX directly, providing a third post-translational mark regulating 53BP1 function. We find that the interaction of 53BP1 with γH2AX is required for sustaining the 53BP1-dependent focal concentration of activated ATM that facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks in heterochromatin in G1.

  10. ATM Localization and Heterochromatin Repair Depend on Direct Interaction of the 53BP1-BRCT2 Domain with γH2AX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, Robert A; Day, Matthew; Wilkinson, Oliver J; Cloney, Ross; Jeggo, Penelope A; Oliver, Antony W; Watts, Felicity Z; Pearl, Laurence H

    2015-12-15

    53BP1 plays multiple roles in mammalian DNA damage repair, mediating pathway choice and facilitating DNA double-strand break repair in heterochromatin. Although it possesses a C-terminal BRCT2 domain, commonly involved in phospho-peptide binding in other proteins, initial recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage depends on interaction with histone post-translational modifications--H4K20me2 and H2AK13/K15ub--downstream of the early γH2AX phosphorylation mark of DNA damage. We now show that, contrary to current models, the 53BP1-BRCT2 domain binds γH2AX directly, providing a third post-translational mark regulating 53BP1 function. We find that the interaction of 53BP1 with γH2AX is required for sustaining the 53BP1-dependent focal concentration of activated ATM that facilitates repair of DNA double-strand breaks in heterochromatin in G1. PMID:26628370

  11. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  12. Direct visualization of chemical and thermo-remanent magnetization of pseudo-single-domain magnetite grains and the implications for reliable paleomagentic signal acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, T.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Kasama, T.; Williams, W.; Kovács, A.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.; Hansen, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    In order to reliably interpret paleomagnetic measurements, the mechanisms of chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) and thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) must be fully understood. Currently, most models of CRM and TRM processes only exist for the smallest, uniformly magnetized grains, termed single domain (SD). However, the magnetic signal from rocks is often dominated by slightly larger grains containing non-uniform magnetization states, termed pseudo-SD (PSD) grains. Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most magnetic naturally occurring mineral on Earth, carrying the dominant magnetic signature in rocks and providing a critical tool in paleomagnetism. The oxidation of Fe3O4 to other iron oxides, such as maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and hematite (α-Fe2O3), is of particular interest as it influences the preservation of remanence of the Earth's magnetic field by Fe3O4. Further, TRM in Fe3O4 grains is acquired in the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field as they cool below their Curie temperature (TC) of ~ 580 ˚C. The latest transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques like electron holography and environmental TEM (ETEM) allows for the imaging of magnetization in nano-scale minerals during in situ heating under vacuum and controlled atmospheres. In the present study, synthetic Fe3O4 particles in the PSD size range (CRM was visualized using electron holography, in the form of reconstructed magnetic induction maps, where the oxidized grains exhibited a loss of overall remanence and change in remanent direction. The thermomagnetic behavior of Fe3O4 particles in the PSD size range is also investigated using off-axis electron holography. Magnetic induction maps, which are recorded during in situ heating up to above the TC, reveal the PSD nature of several Fe3O4 grains by visualizing their vortex domain states. The vortex states in small Fe3O4 grains (Fig. 1a & b) are shown to rotate or collapse into a single-domain state close to its unblocking temperature (Fig. 1c), rather than

  13. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... theoretical constructs that can explain language choice which were supposed to be a more powerful explanatory tool than more obvious (and observable) parameters like topic, place (setting) and interlocutor. In the meantime, at least in Scandinavia, the term ‘domain’ has been taken up in the debate among...

  14. A combinatorial approach for directing the amount of fibronectin fibrils assembled by cells that uses surfaces derivatized with mixtures of fibronectin and cell binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshatriya, Pradnya P; Karuri, Stella W; Chiang, Chunyi; Karuri, Nancy W

    2012-01-01

    Fibrillar fibronectin (FN) has the crucial role of attracting and attaching cells as well as molecules that mediate tissue repair during wound healing. A previous study demonstrated higher extracellular staining of FN fibrils in cells cultured on surfaces tethered with an equimolar mixture of a FN binding domain and FN's cell binding domain, III1-2 and III9-10 respectively, than on surfaces with III9-10 alone. The effect of varying surface amounts of III1-2 and III9-10 on the quantity of FN fibrils formed by NIH-3T3 fibroblasts was examined. GST tagged III1-2 and III9-10 were conjugated to polyurethane surfaces and ELISAs were used to identify the experimental design space or the range of concentrations of GST-III1-2 and GST-III9-10 that demarcated the limits of protein loading on the surface. When GST-III1-2 was fixed and GST-III9-10 varied within the design space, the amount of FN fibrils measured by immunoblotting detergent insoluble cell lysates was dependent on the ratio of III9-10 to III1-2. When the total protein concentration was fixed and the mixture composition of GST-III1-2 and GST-III9-10 varied such that it optimally covered the design space, a parabolic relationship between FN fibril amount and the ratio of III9-10 to III1-2 was obtained. This relationship had a maximum value when the surface was bonded to equal amounts of III1-2 and III9-10 (P<0.05). Thus the ratio of III9-10 to III1-2 can be utilized to direct the quantity of FN fibrils formed on surfaces.

  15. Electrochemical and catalytic properties of Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ (Ni/BCY25) was investigated as an anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells. The catalytic activity of Ni/BCY25 for ammonia decomposition was found to be remarkably higher than Ni/8 mol % Y2O3-ZrO2 and Ni/Ce0.90Gd0.10O1.95. The poisoning effect of water and hydrogen on ammonia decomposition reaction over Ni/BCY25 was evaluated. In addition, an electrolyte-supported SOFC employing BaCe0.90Y0.10O3-δ (BCY10) electrolyte and Ni/BCY25 anode was fabricated, and its electrochemical performance was investigated at 550-650 °C with supply of ammonia and hydrogen fuel gases. The effect of water content in anode gas on the cell performance was also studied. Based on these results, it was concluded that Ni/BCY25 was a promising anode for direct ammonia-fueled SOFCs. An anode-supported single cell denoted as Ni/BCY25|BCY10|Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ was also fabricated, and maximum powder density of 216 and 165 mW cm(-2) was achieved at 650 and 600 °C, for ammonia fuel, respectively.

  16. An MHC-I cytoplasmic domain/HIV-1 Nef fusion protein binds directly to the mu subunit of the AP-1 endosomal coat complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I from the surface of infected cells by the Nef proteins of primate immunodeficiency viruses likely contributes to pathogenesis by providing evasion of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 Nef-induced down-regulation involves endosomal trafficking and a cooperative interaction between the cytoplasmic domain (CD of MHC-I, Nef, and the clathrin adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1. The CD of MHC-I contains a key tyrosine within the sequence YSQA that is required for down-regulation by Nef, but this sequence does not conform to the canonical AP-binding tyrosine-based motif Yxxphi, which mediates binding to the medium (micro subunits of AP complexes. We previously proposed that Nef allows the MHC-I CD to bind the mu subunit of AP-1 (micro1 as if it contained a Yxxphimotif. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that a direct interaction between the MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 plays a primary role in the down-regulation of MHC-I: GST pulldown assays using recombinant proteins indicated that most of the MHC-I CD and Nef residues that are required for the down-regulation in human cells contribute to direct interactions with a truncated version of micro1. Specifically, the tyrosine residue of the YSQA sequence in the MHC-I CD as well as Nef residues E62-65 and P78 each contributed to the interaction between MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 in vitro, whereas Nef M20 had little to no role. Conversely, residues F172/D174 and V392/L395 of the binding pocket on micro1 for Yxxphi motifs were required for a robust interaction. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain, Nef, and the C-terminal two thirds of the mu subunit of AP-1 are sufficient to constitute a biologically relevant interaction. The data also reveal an unexpected role for a hydrophobic pocket in micro1 for interaction with MHC-I CD/Nef.

  17. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    -AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change......Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... demonstrated that R162Q conferred resistance to the bisdioxopiperazines ICRF-187 and -193 but not to etoposide or m-AMSA. Both etoposide and m-AMSA induced more DNA cleavage with purified R162Q enzyme than with the wt. The R162Q enzyme has a 20-25% decreased catalytic capacity compared to the wt and was almost...

  18. The role of Y84 on domain 1 and Y87 on domain 2 of Paragonimus westermani taurocyamine kinase: Insights on the substrate binding mechanism of a trematode phosphagen kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarilla, Blanca R; Tokuhiro, Shinji; Nagataki, Mitsuru; Uda, Kouji; Suzuki, Tomohiko; Acosta, Luz P; Agatsuma, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    The two-domain taurocyamine kinase (TK) from Paragonimus westermani was suggested to have a unique substrate binding mechanism. We performed site-directed mutagenesis on each domain of this TK and compared the kinetic parameters Km(Tc) and Vmax with that of the wild-type to determine putative amino acids involved in substrate recognition and binding. Replacement of Y84 on domain 1 and Y87 on domain 2 with R resulted in the loss of activity for the substrate taurocyamine. Y84E mutant has a dramatic decrease in affinity and activity for taurocyamine while Y87E has completely lost catalytic activity. Substituting H and I on the said positions also resulted in significant changes in activity. Mutation of the residues A59 on the GS region of domain 1 also caused significant decrease in affinity and activity while mutation on the equivalent position on domain 2 resulted in complete loss of activity.

  19. Direct coal liquefaction using iron-titanium hydride as a hydrogen distribution and catalytic material. Yearly report No. 1, September 1, 1984-August 31, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.E. Jr.

    1985-09-29

    During this year the experimental apparatus was completed after substantial delays by the manufacturer and eight direct coal liquefaction experiments were accomplished. These experiments have produced conversion and selectivity data on samples of Utah coal slurried in tetralin and catalyzed using iron-titanium hydride. Hydrogen loading of the alloy, catalyst particle size, catalyst concentration, coal particle size, operating temperatures for alloy addition and liquefaction without the catalysts present, have all been studied during these experiments. Conversions as high as 61% DAF in 30 min have been recorded at 500/sup 0/F and 500 psia. Product selectivities favor the oil fraction during the initial phase of the reaction, but as the reaction proceeds the heavier fractions are observed to increase at the expense of the oil fraction. We are currently working on a kinetic model in an effort to predict these results. Additionally, proton NMR, fractional distillation, and chromatographic analyses are currently being performed on the recovered product. We have completed the study of Utah coal and are moving on to samples of Kentucky and Alabama coals after a minor modification of the experimental apparatus is completed. Equipment manufacture, delivery, and installation delays, totaling over 6 months, greatly reduced the time available for research, making a 6 month no cost extension necessary. The extended time will permit completion of the proposed research tasks. 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. RNA-Free and Ribonucleoprotein-Associated Influenza Virus Polymerases Directly Bind the Serine-5-Phosphorylated Carboxyl-Terminal Domain of Host RNA Polymerase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alonso, Mónica; Hengrung, Narin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza viruses subvert the transcriptional machinery of their hosts to synthesize their own viral mRNA. Ongoing transcription by cellular RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is required for viral mRNA synthesis. By a process known as cap snatching, the virus steals short 5′ capped RNA fragments from host capped RNAs and uses them to prime viral transcription. An interaction between the influenza A virus RNA polymerase and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the large subunit of Pol II has been established, but the molecular details of this interaction remain unknown. We show here that the influenza virus ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) complex binds to the CTD of transcriptionally engaged Pol II. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the viral polymerase binds directly to the serine-5-phosphorylated form of the Pol II CTD, both in the presence and in the absence of viral RNA, and show that this interaction is conserved in evolutionarily distant influenza viruses. We propose a model in which direct binding of the viral RNA polymerase in the context of vRNPs to Pol II early in infection facilitates cap snatching, while we suggest that binding of free viral polymerase to Pol II late in infection may trigger Pol II degradation. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses cause yearly epidemics and occasional pandemics that pose a threat to human health, as well as represent a large economic burden to health care systems globally. Existing vaccines are not always effective, as they may not exactly match the circulating viruses. Furthermore, there are a limited number of antivirals available, and development of resistance to these is a concern. New measures to combat influenza are needed, but before they can be developed, it is necessary to better understand the molecular interactions between influenza viruses and their host cells. By providing further insights into the molecular details of how influenza viruses hijack the host transcriptional machinery, we aim to uncover novel targets for

  1. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  2. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  3. Advances in Study on Catalysts for Phenol Synthesis via Catalytic Hydroxylation of Benzene in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhaohui

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis of phenol via direct hydroxylation of benzene as a typical reaction of atomic economy has attracted extensive attention worldwide and has also become an actively investigated domain in China. This article refers to the recent domestic advances in study on phenol synthesis via hydroxylation of benzene from the viewpoint of catalysts, and considers the TS-1/H2O2 and FeZSM-5/N2O catalytic systems to be promising ones with good prospects for commercialization along with some suggestions on future research work.

  4. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Subunits Play a Direct Structural Role in Synaptic Contact Formation via Their N-terminal Extracellular Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laura E; Nicholson, Martin W; Arama, Jessica E; Mercer, Audrey; Thomson, Alex M; Jovanovic, Jasmina N

    2016-07-01

    The establishment of cell-cell contacts between presynaptic GABAergic neurons and their postsynaptic targets initiates the process of GABAergic synapse formation. GABAA receptors (GABAARs), the main postsynaptic receptors for GABA, have been recently demonstrated to act as synaptogenic proteins that can single-handedly induce the formation and functional maturation of inhibitory synapses. To establish how the subunit composition of GABAARs influences their ability to induce synaptogenesis, a co-culture model system incorporating GABAergic medium spiny neurons and the HEK293 cells, stably expressing different combinations of receptor subunits, was developed. Analyses of HEK293 cell innervation by medium spiny neuron axons using immunocytochemistry, activity-dependent labeling, and electrophysiology have indicated that the γ2 subunit is required for the formation of active synapses and that its effects are influenced by the type of α/β subunits incorporated into the functional receptor. To further characterize this process, the large N-terminal extracellular domains (ECDs) of α1, α2, β2, and γ2 subunits were purified using the baculovirus/Sf9 cell system. When these proteins were applied to the co-cultures of MSNs and α1/β2/γ2-expressing HEK293 cells, the α1, β2, or γ2 ECD each caused a significant reduction in contact formation, in contrast to the α2 ECD, which had no effect. Together, our experiments indicate that the structural role of GABAARs in synaptic contact formation is determined by their subunit composition, with the N-terminal ECDs of each of the subunits directly participating in interactions between the presynaptic and postsynaptic elements, suggesting the these interactions are multivalent and specific. PMID:27129275

  5. The heptahelical domain of GABAB2 is activated directly by CGP7930, a positive allosteric modulator of the GABA(B) receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Binet, Virginie; Brajon, Carole; Le Corre, Laurent; Acher, Francine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Prézeau, Laurent

    2004-01-01

    International audience The gamma-aminobutyric acid, type B (GABA(B)) receptor is well recognized as being composed of two subunits, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2). Both subunits share structural homology with other class-III G-protein-coupled receptors. They are composed of two main domains: a heptahelical domain (HD) typical of all G-protein-coupled receptors and a large extracellular domain (ECD). Although GABA(B1) binds GABA, GABA(B2) is required for GABA(B1) to reach the cell surface. However, ...

  6. Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K; Kumar, Geetha B; Tainer, John A; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nair, Bipin G

    2012-10-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1' pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  7. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  8. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  9. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the diffusi

  10. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  11. Enhanced catalytic performance for direct synthesis of dimethyl ether from syngas over a La2O3 modified Cu-ZrO2/γ-Al2O3 hybrid catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo Li; Jianqing Li; Cheng Yang; Jinhu Wu

    2012-01-01

    A series of hybrid catalysts were made by physically mixing Cu-ZrO2 and γ-Al2O3,for former it was modified with different loadings of La2O3 prepared by co-precipitation method.The catalysts were characterized by BET,XRD,N2O-adsorption,EXAFS,H2-TPR,NH3-TPD techniques and evaluated in the synthesis of dimethyl ether from syngas.The results show that La2O3 promoted catalysts displayed a significantly better catalytic performance compared with Cu-ZrO2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst in CO conversion and DME selectivity,and the optimum catalytic activity was obtained when the content of La2O3 was 12 wt%.The characterizations reveal that high copper dispersion,facile reducibility of copper particles and appropriate amount of acidic sites are responsible for the superior catalytic performance.

  12. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  13. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  14. Characterization of DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 reveals the POLXc and PHP domains are both required for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) comprise a highly conserved DNA polymerase family found in all kingdoms. Mammalian PolXs are known to be involved in several DNA-processing pathways including repair, but the cellular functions of bacterial PolXs are less known. Many bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain at their C-termini in addition to a PolX core (POLXc) domain, and possess 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Although both domains are highly conserved in bacteria, their molecular functions, especially for a PHP domain, are unknown. We found Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) has Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent DNA/RNA polymerase, Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease and DNA-binding activities. We identified the domains of ttPolX by limited proteolysis and characterized their biochemical activities. The POLXc domain was responsible for the polymerase and DNA-binding activities but exonuclease activity was not detected for either domain. However, the POLXc and PHP domains interacted with each other and a mixture of the two domains had Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis revealed catalytically important residues in the PHP domain for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Our findings provide a molecular insight into the functional domain organization of bacterial PolXs, especially the requirement of the PHP domain for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

  15. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation.

  16. Direct Labeling of Polyphosphate at the Ultrastructural Level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Using the Affinity of the Polyphosphate Binding Domain of Escherichia coli Exopolyphosphatase

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Katsuharu; Ohtomo, Ryo; Kuga-Uetake, Yukari; Aono, Toshihiro; Saito, Masanori

    2005-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer of orthophosphate and has many biological functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. To investigate polyP localization, we developed a novel technique using the affinity of the recombinant polyphosphate binding domain (PPBD) of Escherichia coli exopolyphosphatase to polyP. An epitope-tagged PPBD was expressed and purified from E. coli. Equilibrium binding assay of PPBD revealed its high affinity for long-chain polyP and its weak affi...

  17. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei;

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  18. A non-stationary model for catalytic converters with cylindrical geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Hoernel, J. -D.

    2006-01-01

    We prove some existence and uniqueness results and some qualitative properties for the solution of a system modelling the catalytic conversion in a cylinder. This model couples parabolic partial differential equations posed in a cylindrical domain and on its boundary.

  19. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  20. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  1. Functional implications of C-terminus of TBX5 with high homology to C-terminal domain of yeast DNA-directed RNA polymerase Ⅱ largest subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhu-ren; GONG Li-guo; GENG Wen-qing; QIU Guang-rong; SUN Kai-lai

    2008-01-01

    @@ TBX5, as a member of the T-box-containing transcription factor family, encodes a protein of 518 amino acids and is expressed in the embryonic heart and developing limb tissues.1 The coding region of TBX5 cDNA is 1.5 kb with eight exons including the N-terminal portion, the DNA binding domain and C-terminal region. We reported that the abnormality in transcription level of the TbX5 gene might be the mechanism underlying human simple congenital heart disease in the absence of TBX5 mutations.

  2. Direct interaction of the kringle domain of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and integrin alpha v beta 3 induces signal transduction and enhances plasminogen activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarui, Takehiko; Akakura, Nobuaki; Majumdar, Mousumi; Andronicos, Nicholas; Takagi, Junichi; Mazar, Andrew P; Bdeir, Khalil; Kuo, Alice; Yarovoi, Serge V; Cines, Douglas B; Takada, Yoshikazu

    2006-03-01

    It has been questioned whether there are receptors for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) that facilitate plasminogen activation other than the high affinity uPA receptor (uPAR/CD87) since studies of uPAR knockout mice did not support a major role of uPAR in plasminogen activation. uPA also promotes cell adhesion, chemotaxis, and proliferation besides plasminogen activation. These uPA-induced signaling events are not mediated by uPAR, but mediated by unidentified, lower-affinity receptors for the uPA kringle. We found that uPA binds specifically to integrin alpha v beta 3 on CHO cells depleted of uPAR. The binding of uPA to alpha v beta 3 required the uPA kringle domain. The isolated uPA kringle domain binds specifically to purified, recombinant soluble, and cell surface alpha v beta 3, and other integrins (alpha 4 beta 1 and alpha 9 beta 1), and induced migration of CHO cells in an alpha v beta 3-dependent manner. The binding of the uPA kringle to alpha v beta 3 and uPA kringle-induced alpha v beta 3-dependent cell migration were blocked by homologous plasminogen kringles 1-3 or 1-4 (angiostatin), a known integrin antagonist. We studied whether the binding of uPA to integrin alpha v beta 3 through the kringle domain plays a role in plasminogen activation. On CHO cell depleted of uPAR, uPA enhanced plasminogen activation in a kringle and alpha v beta 3-dependent manner. Endothelial cells bound to and migrated on uPA and uPA kringle in an alpha v beta 3-dependent manner. These results suggest that uPA binding to integrins through the kringle domain plays an important role in both plasminogen activation and uPA-induced intracellular signaling. The uPA kringle-integrin interaction may represent a novel therapeutic target for cancer, inflammation, and vascular remodeling. PMID:16525582

  3. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  4. pH-dependent electron transfer reaction and direct bioelectrocatalysis of the quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2016-08-26

    A pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea (CcPDH) is an extracellular quinohemoeprotein, which consists a b-type cytochrome domain, a pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ) domain, and a family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module. The electron transfer reaction of CcPDH was studied using some electron acceptors and a carbon electrode at various pH levels. Phenazine methosulfate (PMS) reacted directly at the PQQ domain, whereas cytochrome c (cyt c) reacted via the cytochrome domain of intact CcPDH. Thus, electrons are transferred from reduced PQQ in the catalytic domain of CcPDH to heme b in the N-terminal cytochrome domain, which acts as a built-in mediator and transfers electron to a heterogenous electron transfer protein. The optimal pH values of the PMS reduction (pH 6.5) and the cyt c reduction (pH 8.5) differ. The catalytic currents for the oxidation of l-fucose were observed within a range of pH 4.5 to 11. Bioelectrocatalysis of CcPDH based on direct electron transfer demonstrated that the pH profile of the biocatalytic current was similar to the reduction activity of cyt c characters. PMID:27338639

  5. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of a C-terminal domain of human CHD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Silva, Ana P G; Mackay, Joel P; Ryan, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    Chromatin remodelling proteins are an essential family of eukaryotic proteins. They harness the energy from ATP hydrolysis and apply it to alter chromatin structure in order to regulate all aspects of genome biology. Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) is one such remodelling protein that has specialised nucleosome organising abilities and is conserved across eukaryotes. CHD1 possesses a pair of tandem chromodomains that directly precede the core catalytic Snf2 helicase-like domain, and a C-terminal SANT-SLIDE DNA-binding domain. We have identified an additional conserved domain in the C-terminal region of CHD1. Here, we report the backbone and side chain resonance assignments for this domain from human CHD1 at pH 6.5 and 25 °C (BMRB No. 25638). PMID:26286320

  6. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  7. SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Directly Interacts with the Cytoplasmic Domain of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE and Negatively Regulates Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong; Cui, Yanjiao; Xu, Fan; Xu, Xinxin; Gao, Guanxiao; Wang, Yaxin; Guo, Zhaoxia; Wang, Dan; Wang, Ning Ning

    2015-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases plays an important role in the regulation of leaf senescence. We previously reported that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE (AtSARK) positively regulates leaf senescence in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Here, we report the involvement of a protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2C-type protein phosphatase, SENESCENCE-SUPPRESSED PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE (SSPP), in the negative regulation of Arabidopsis leaf senescence. SSPP transcript levels decreased greatly during both natural senescence and SARK-induced precocious senescence. Overexpression of SSPP significantly delayed leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. Protein pull-down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays demonstrated that the cytosol-localized SSPP could interact with the cytoplasmic domain of the plasma membrane-localized AtSARK. In vitro assays showed that SSPP has protein phosphatase function and can dephosphorylate the cytosolic domain of AtSARK. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of SSPP effectively rescued AtSARK-induced precocious leaf senescence and changes in hormonal responses. All our results suggested that SSPP functions in sustaining proper leaf longevity and preventing early senescence by suppressing or perturbing SARK-mediated senescence signal transduction.

  8. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinde Zheng; Tony Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Pink1,a mitochondrial kinase,and Parkin,an E3 ubiquitin ligase,function in mitochondrial maintenance.Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria,where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-1inked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy.Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 iigase family.Recently,it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine-ubiquitin enzyme intermediate,in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases.However,direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing.Here,we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteinemediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy.Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S)traps ubiquitin,and surprisingly,also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation,indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation.We found that Parkin can bind to K63-1inked ubiquitin chains,and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization.We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism.

  9. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Pink1, a mitochondrial kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, function in mitochondrial maintenance. Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria, where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-linked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy. Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 ligase family. Recently, it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine∼ubiquitin enzyme intermediate, in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases. However, direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing. Here, we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteine-mediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy. Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S) traps ubiquitin, and surprisingly, also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation, indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation. We found that Parkin can bind to K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization. We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism. PMID:23670163

  10. The catalytic residues of Tn3 resolvase

    OpenAIRE

    Olorunniji, F.J.; Stark, W M

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the residues that participate in the catalysis of DNA cleavage and rejoining by the site-specific recombinase Tn3 resolvase, we mutated conserved polar or charged residues in the catalytic domain of an activated resolvase variant. We analysed the effects of mutations at 14 residues on proficiency in binding to the recombination site ('site I'), formation of a synaptic complex between two site Is, DNA cleavage and recombination. Mutations of Y6, R8, S10, D36, R68 and R71 result...

  11. Relationship between structure and catalytic performance of dealuminated Y zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealuminated Y zeolites which have been prepared by hydrothermal and chemical treatments show differences in catalytic performance when tested fresh; however, these differences disappear after the zeolites have been steamed. The catalytic behavior of fresh and steamed zeolites is directly related to zeolite structural and chemical characteristics. Such characteristics determine the strength and density of acid sites for catalytic cracking. Dealuminated zeolites were characterized using x-ray diffraction, porosimetry, solid-state NMR and elemental analysis. Hexadecane cracking was used as a probe reaction to determine catalytic properties. Cracking activity was found to be proportional to total aluminum content in the zeolite. Product selectivity was dependent on unit cell size, presence of extra framework alumina and spatial distribution of active sites. The results from this study elucidate the role that zeolite structure plays in determining catalytic performance

  12. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  13. A catalytic cracking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, T.F.; Helton, T.E.

    1995-07-20

    Heavy oils are subjected to catalytic cracking in the absence of added hydrogen using a catalyst containing a zeolite having the structure of ZSM-12 and a large-pore crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index less than about 1. The process is able to effect a bulk conversion of the oil at the same time yielding a higher octane gasoline and increased light olefin content. (author)

  14. The Impact of Participative and Directive Leadership on Teachers' Performance: The Intervening Effects of Job Structuring, Decision Domain, and Leader-Member Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somech, Anit; Wenderow, Maayan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The contingency model theory suggests that the effects of a leadership style cannot be studied without explicit attention to the given situation. Accordingly, the authors propose a model that allows them to examine simultaneously the relative impact of participative leadership and directive leadership on teachers' performance through the…

  15. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  16. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    Wall Michael E; Ming Dengming; Sanbonmatsu Kevin Y

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quant...

  17. Lectin Domains of Polypeptide GalNAc Transferases Exhibit Glycopeptide Binding Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G;

    2011-01-01

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide a-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection...... of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence...... on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate...

  18. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Gao; Qi Yu; Limin Chen

    2003-01-01

    The removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases has attracted great attention in recent years, and many approaches have been developed depending on the application. Methane, the main component of natural gas, has great potential as a NO reductant. In this paper, a number of catalysts previous reported for this catalytic reduction of NO have been reviewed, including a direct comparison of the relative activities and effective factors of the catalysts. Reaction mechanisms have also been explored preliminarily.

  19. Protein domain organisation: adding order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kummerfeld Sarah K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domains are the building blocks of proteins. During evolution, they have been duplicated, fused and recombined, to produce proteins with novel structures and functions. Structural and genome-scale studies have shown that pairs or groups of domains observed together in a protein are almost always found in only one N to C terminal order and are the result of a single recombination event that has been propagated by duplication of the multi-domain unit. Previous studies of domain organisation have used graph theory to represent the co-occurrence of domains within proteins. We build on this approach by adding directionality to the graphs and connecting nodes based on their relative order in the protein. Most of the time, the linear order of domains is conserved. However, using the directed graph representation we have identified non-linear features of domain organization that are over-represented in genomes. Recognising these patterns and unravelling how they have arisen may allow us to understand the functional relationships between domains and understand how the protein repertoire has evolved. Results We identify groups of domains that are not linearly conserved, but instead have been shuffled during evolution so that they occur in multiple different orders. We consider 192 genomes across all three kingdoms of life and use domain and protein annotation to understand their functional significance. To identify these features and assess their statistical significance, we represent the linear order of domains in proteins as a directed graph and apply graph theoretical methods. We describe two higher-order patterns of domain organisation: clusters and bi-directionally associated domain pairs and explore their functional importance and phylogenetic conservation. Conclusion Taking into account the order of domains, we have derived a novel picture of global protein organization. We found that all genomes have a higher than expected

  20. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Iyoki, Kenta; Dinh, Kimberly; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C–H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483–498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic acti...

  1. Peptide ligands incorporated into the threefold spike capsid domain to re-direct gene transduction of AAV8 and AAV9 in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Michelfelder

    Full Text Available Efficiency and specificity of viral vectors are vital issues in gene therapy. Insertion of peptide ligands into the adeno-associated viral (AAV capsid at receptor binding sites can re-target AAV2-derived vectors to alternative cell types. Also, the use of serotypes AAV8 and -9 is more efficient than AAV2 for gene transfer to certain tissues in vivo. Consequently, re-targeting of these serotypes by ligand insertion could be a promising approach but has not been explored so far. Here, we generated AAV8 and -9 vectors displaying peptides in the threefold spike capsid domain. These peptides had been selected from peptide libraries displayed on capsids of AAV serotype 2 to optimize systemic gene delivery to murine lung tissue and to breast cancer tissue in PymT transgenic mice (PymT. Such peptide insertions at position 590 of the AAV8 capsid and position 589 of the AAV9 capsid changed the transduction properties of both serotypes. However, both peptides inserted in AAV8 did not result in the same changes of tissue tropism as they did in AAV2. While the AAV2 peptides selected on murine lung tissue did not alter tropism of serotypes 8 and -9, insertion of the AAV2-derived peptide selected on breast cancer tissue augmented tumor gene delivery in both serotypes. Further, this peptide mediated a strong but unspecific in vivo gene transfer for AAV8 and abrogated transduction of various control tissues for AAV9. Our findings indicate that peptide insertion into defined sites of AAV8 and -9 capsids can change and improve their efficiency and specificity compared to their wild type variants and to AAV2, making these insertion sites attractive for the generation of novel targeted vectors in these serotypes.

  2. Domains in Ferroelectric Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Marty

    2010-03-01

    Ferroelectric materials have great potential in influencing the future of small scale electronics. At a basic level, this is because ferroelectric surfaces are charged, and so interact strongly with charge-carrying metals and semiconductors - the building blocks for all electronic systems. Since the electrical polarity of the ferroelectric can be reversed, surfaces can both attract and repel charges in nearby materials, and can thereby exert complete control over both charge distribution and movement. It should be no surprise, therefore, that microelectronics industries have already looked very seriously at harnessing ferroelectric materials in a variety of applications, from solid state memory chips (FeRAMs) to field effect transistors (FeFETs). In all such applications, switching the direction of the polarity of the ferroelectric is a key aspect of functional behavior. The mechanism for switching involves the field-induced nucleation and growth of domains. Domain coarsening, through domain wall propagation, eventually causes the entire ferroelectric to switch its polar direction. It is thus the existence and behavior of domains that determine the switching response, and ultimately the performance of the ferroelectric device. A major issue, associated with the integration of ferroelectrics into microelectronic devices, has been that the fundamental properties associated with ferroelectrics, when in bulk form, appear to change quite dramatically and unpredictably when at the nanoscale: new modes of behaviour, and different functional characteristics from those seen in bulk appear. For domains, in particular, the proximity of surfaces and boundaries have a dramatic effect: surface tension and depolarizing fields both serve to increase the equilibrium density of domains, such that minor changes in scale or morphology can have major ramifications for domain redistribution. Given the importance of domains in dictating the overall switching characteristics of a device

  3. A novel ammonia-assisted method for the direct synthesis of Mn3O4 nanoparticles at room temperature and their catalytic activity during the rapid degradation of azo dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansournia, Mohammadreza; Azizi, Fatemeh; Rakhshan, Narges

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we prepared trimanganese tetroxide nanoparticles from MnCl2 solution in an ammonia atmosphere using a new surfactant-free method at room temperature. We analyzed and characterized the effects of different processing conditions, such as the concentrations of manganese and the ammonia source, as well as the reaction time, on the structure, purity, and morphology of the products using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The XRD and FTIR analyses confirmed that the prepared products comprised single phase Mn3O4. At room temperature, the paramagnetic characteristics were also verified by vibrating sample magnetometry. Furthermore, we tested the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles during the degradation of methyl orange and Congo red, which are organic pollutants. Our experiments demonstrated the rapid color removal and reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (>70% and >50% within 10 min, respectively) using aqueous solutions of azo dyes.

  4. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  5. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows...... that enables secure end-to-end communication with home automation devices, and it supports device revocations as well as a structure of intersecting sets of nodes for scalability. Devices in the Trusted Domain are registered in a list that is distributed using a robust epidemic protocol optimized...

  6. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  7. X-ray structure of tRNA pseudouridine synthase TruD reveals an inserted domain with a novel fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Ulrika B; Nordlund, Pär; Hallberg, B Martin

    2004-05-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyse the isomerisation of uridine to pseudouridine in structural RNA. The pseudouridine synthase TruD, that modifies U13 in tRNA, belongs to a recently identified and large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. We report here the crystal structure of Escherichia coli TruD at 2.0 A resolution. The structure reveals an overall V-shaped molecule with an RNA-binding cleft formed between two domains: a catalytic domain and an insertion domain. The catalytic domain has a fold similar to that of the catalytic domains of previously characterised pseudouridine synthases, whereas the insertion domain displays a novel fold.

  8. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  9. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  10. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  11. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  12. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-04-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are "highways" of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  13. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  14. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoruiko, A N [G.K. Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  15. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  16. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  17. Catalytic mechanisms of direct pyrrole synthesis via dehydrogenative coupling mediated by PNP-Ir or PNN-Ru pincer complexes: Crucial role of proton-transfer shuttles in the PNP-Ir system

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Shuanglin

    2014-04-02

    Kempe et al. and Milstein et al. have recently advanced the dehydrogenative coupling methodology to synthesize pyrroles from secondary alcohols (e.g., 3) and β-amino alcohols (e.g., 4), using PNP-Ir (1) and PNN-Ru (2) pincer complexes, respectively. We herein present a DFT study to characterize the catalytic mechanism of these reactions. After precatalyst activation to give active 1A/2A, the transformation proceeds via four stages: 1A/2A-catalyzed alcohol (3) dehydrogenation to give ketone (11), base-facilitated C-N coupling of 11 and 4 to form an imine-alcohol intermediate (18), base-promoted cyclization of 18, and catalyst regeneration via H2 release from 1R/2R. For alcohol dehydrogenations, the bifunctional double hydrogen-transfer pathway is more favorable than that via β-hydride elimination. Generally, proton-transfer (H-transfer) shuttles facilitate various H-transfer processes in both systems. Notwithstanding, H-transfer shuttles play a much more crucial role in the PNP-Ir system than in the PNN-Ru system. Without H-transfer shuttles, the key barriers up to 45.9 kcal/mol in PNP-Ir system are too high to be accessible, while the corresponding barriers (<32.0 kcal/mol) in PNN-Ru system are not unreachable. Another significant difference between the two systems is that the addition of alcohol to 1A giving an alkoxo complex is endergonic by 8.1 kcal/mol, whereas the addition to 2A is exergonic by 8.9 kcal/mol. The thermodynamic difference could be the main reason for PNP-Ir system requiring lower catalyst loading than the PNN-Ru system. We discuss how the differences are resulted in terms of electronic and geometric structures of the catalysts and how to use the features in catalyst development. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  18. Direct Catalytic Conversion of Cellobiose into Sorbitol in Extremely Low Acid over Ruthenium Catalysts%超低酸性环境中Ru/C催化纤维二糖一步法制备山梨醇的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李计彪; 武书彬; 张军

    2012-01-01

    以Ru/C为催化剂,在超低酸环境和氢气气氛下,将纤维二糖一步转化制备山梨醇.考察了反应温度、反应时间以及催化剂用量对山梨醇产率的影响.实验结果表明,在0.05%H3PO4环境,Ru/C催化剂用量15%,转速为600 r/min,反应温度为458 K以及3 MPa氢气条件下反应1h,产物山梨醇的产率最高,可达到87.1%.同时,催化剂重复利用研究表明Ru/C是一种较理想的氢化反应催化剂,可重复利用且催化效率较高.%Ru/C catalyst and extremely low acid were employed for one-step conversion of cellobiose into sorbitol in the presence of hydrogen. Effects of reaction temperature, reaction time and catalyst usage on sorbitol yield were discussed. Experimental results showed that the highest sorbitol yield of 87. 1% was obtained at reaction temperature of 458 K and catalyst usage of 15 % for 1 h under 3 MPa H2 with the stirring rate of 600 r/min. Meanwhile, catalyst recycling showed that Ru/C was an ideal hydro-genation catalyst with high catalytic efficiency, which could be recycled several times.

  19. CO2催化转化为高附加值燃料:现状、挑战及其未来方向%Catalytic conversion of CO2 to value added fuels:Current status, challenges, and future directions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jingjie Wu; Xiao-Dong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 into liquid fuels especially coupling with the intermittent renewable electricity offers a promising means of storing electricity in chemical form, which reduc‐es the dependence on fossil fuels and mitigates the negative impact of anthropogenic CO2 emissions on the planet. Although converting CO2 to fuels is not in itself a new concept, the field has not sub‐stantially advanced in the last 30 years primarily because of the challenge of discovery of structural electrocatalysts and the development of membrane architectures for efficient collection of reactants and separation of products. This overview summarizes recent advances in catalytic conversion of CO2 and presents the challenges and future directions in producing value‐added fuels.

  20. Molecular dynamics characterization of five pathogenic factor X mutants associated with decreased catalytic activity

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Azeim, Safwat

    2014-11-11

    Factor X (FX) is one of the major players in the blood coagulation cascade. Upon activation to FXa, it converts prothrombin to thrombin, which in turn converts fibrinogen into fibrin (blood clots). FXa deficiency causes hemostasis defects, such as intracranial bleeding, hemathrosis, and gastrointestinal blood loss. Herein, we have analyzed a pool of pathogenic mutations, located in the FXa catalytic domain and directly associated with defects in enzyme catalytic activity. Using chymotrypsinogen numbering, they correspond to D102N, T135M, V160A, G184S, and G197D. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for 1.68 μs on the wild-type and mutated forms of FXa. Overall, our analysis shows that four of the five mutants considered, D102N, T135M, V160A, and G184S, have rigidities higher than those of the wild type, in terms of both overall protein motion and, specifically, subpocket S4 flexibility, while S1 is rather insensitive to the mutation. This acquired rigidity can clearly impact the substrate recognition of the mutants.

  1. Aluminosilicate nanoparticles for catalytic hydrocarbon cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2003-03-01

    Aluminosilicate nanoparticles containing 9.0-20 nm mesopores were prepared through the use of protozeolitic nanoclusters as the inorganic precursor and starch as a porogen. The calcined, porogen-free composition containing 2 mol % aluminum exhibited the porosity, hydrothermal stability, and acidity needed for the cracking of very large hydrocarbons. In fact, the hydrothermal stability of the nanoparticles to pure steam at 800 degrees C, along with the cumene cracking activity, surpassed the analogous performance properties of ultrastable Y zeolite, the main catalyst component of commercial cracking catalysts. The remarkable hydrothermal stability and catalytic reactivity of the new nanoparticles are attributable to a unique combination of two factors, the presence of protozeolitic nanoclusters in the pore walls and the unprecedented pore wall thickness (7-15 nm). In addition, the excellent catalytic longevity of the nanoparticles is most likely facilitated by the small domain size of the nanoparticles that greatly improves access to the acid sites on the pore walls and minimizes the diffusion length of coke precursors out of the pores. PMID:12603109

  2. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  3. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  4. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  5. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  6. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪文明; 王梓坤

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brown-ian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d = 3.

  7. DENN Domain Proteins: Regulators of Rab GTPases*

    OpenAIRE

    Marat, Andrea L.; Dokainish, Hatem; McPherson, Peter S

    2011-01-01

    The DENN domain is a common, evolutionarily ancient, and conserved protein module, yet it has gone largely unstudied; until recently, little was known regarding its functional roles. New studies reveal that various DENN domains interact directly with members of the Rab family of small GTPases and that DENN domains function enzymatically as Rab-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. Thus, DENN domain proteins appear to be generalized regulators of Rab function. Study of these proteins w...

  8. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  9. Using advanced electron microscopy for the characterization of catalytic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrz, William D.

    -corrected electron microscopy was used to systematically examine, atomic column by atomic column, the effect of elemental substitution on the long-range crystalline order, atomic coordinates, and site occupancies of the various formulations such that trends could be developed linking these properties to catalytic yields. To accomplish this task, an algorithm was developed that enabled the direct extraction of atomic coordinates and site occupancies from high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) images to within 1% and 15% uncertainty, respectively. Furthermore, this general method could be applied to various crystalline systems and may dramatically improve the quality of initial structural models used in Rietveld refinements. Improvement in the quality of starting models may increase the structural and chemical complexity of inorganic structures that can be solved by using "powder methods" alone. In addition to the development of these trends, HAADF analyses also revealed the presence of coherent compositional miscibility gaps, rotational twin domains, and structural intergrowths in the complex Mo-V-M-O oxide system. Other catalytic systems that are addressed in this dissertation include Pd, Ag, and bimetallic Pd-Ag catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of acetylene in excess ethylene, alkali and alkaline earth promoted Ru catalysts for the production of clean hydrogen through the decomposition of ammonia, the production of Pt nanoparticles using dendrimer templates, and Pt-Re bimetallic catalysts for the conversion of glycerol to hydrocarbons and syn gas. In each of these studies, electron microscopy was used as a complimentary tool to synthetic and reaction studies to better understand interactions between the nanoparticles and the support/template, to determine the effect of adding various promoters, or to understand the nanoscale structural and chemical changes associated with the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles. A final area addressed in this dissertation is the

  10. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  11. A NEW ROUTE TO DIRECT CATALYTIC SYNTHESIS OF ACETIC ACID FROM METHANE BY A LOW-TEMPERATURE REACTION%甲烷低温催化直接合成乙酸的新途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁一慧; 黄伟; 晋萍; 谢克昌

    2001-01-01

    The selective conversion of methane to more useful target products such as acetic acid would be far more attractive. The classical utilization and recent research for methane conversion to acetic acid by both the indirect route involved multi-step process through syngas stage and the direct one avoided syngas production were reviewed in this paper. Technology comparison and results analysis of the indirect route with the direct one, and of homogeneous catalyst systems with heterogeneous ones employed in oxidative carbonylation or carboxylation of methane to synthesize acetic acid directly led to such a suggestion as follows. That is, an environmentally benign route to direct synthesis of acetic acid from inexpensive feedstocks methane and carbon dioxide, in particular, using solid, heterogeneous catalysts at low temperature has its remarkable significance in view of energy, environment and economy. The further research will enrich the theory and practice of green C1 chemistry and performance of thermodynamically unfavo-rable reactions.%对甲烷经合成气路线间接制乙酸的现状及在温和条件下直接转化制乙酸的研究进展作了述评.通过对间接与直接路线的比较,以及在直接路线中,甲烷低温氧化羰化和直接羧化制乙酸均相与非均相催化体系的分析,指出了CH4-CO2低温直接合成乙酸在工艺过程上的显著优势,尤其是采用非均相催化体系.该工艺为乙酸合成和CH4与CO2的绿色化学利用开辟了新途径,其研究将会丰富C1化学化工的理论与实践,并为实现热力学不利反应提供实验方法和理论依据.

  12. Crystal structures of histone and p53 methyltransferase SmyD2 reveal a conformational flexibility of the autoinhibitory C-terminal domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Jiang

    Full Text Available SmyD2 belongs to a new class of chromatin regulators that control gene expression in heart development and tumorigenesis. Besides methylation of histone H3 K4, SmyD2 can methylate non-histone targets including p53 and the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. The methyltransferase activity of SmyD proteins has been proposed to be regulated by autoinhibition via the intra- and interdomain bending of the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD. However, there has been no direct evidence of a conformational change in the CTD. Here, we report two crystal structures of SmyD2 bound either to the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine or to the inhibitor sinefungin. SmyD2 has a two-lobed structure with the active site located at the bottom of a deep crevice formed between the CTD and the catalytic domain. By extensive engagement with the methyltransferase domain, the CTD stabilizes the autoinhibited conformation of SmyD2 and restricts access to the catalytic site. Unexpectedly, despite that the two SmyD2 structures are highly superimposable, significant differences are observed in the first two helices of the CTDs: the two helices bend outwards and move away from the catalytic domain to generate a less closed conformation in the sinefungin-bound structure. Although the overall fold of the individual domains is structurally conserved among SmyD proteins, SmyD2 appear to be a conformational "intermediate" between a close form of SmyD3 and an open form of SmyD1. In addition, the structures reveal that the CTD is structurally similar to tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR, a motif through which many cochaperones bind to the heat shock protein Hsp90. Our results thus provide the first evidence for the intradomain flexibility of the TPR-like CTD, which may be important for the activation of SmyD proteins by Hsp90.

  13. 直流电弧自催化合成β-SiC纳米线%Self-catalytic Synthesis of β-SiC Nanowires by Direct Current Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王峰; 王秋实; 崔启良; 张剑; 邹广田

    2009-01-01

    采用C,Si和SiO2为反应原料,利用直流电弧法制备出长直的β-SiC纳米线.纳米线的直径为100~200 nm,长度为10~20 μm,并且沿着方向生长.通过X射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微术(SEM)、透射电子显微术(TEM)、拉曼光谱等手段,对β-SiC纳米线进行表征.探讨了β-SiC纳米线自催化气-液-固(VLS)生长机制.%Straight and long β-SiC nanowires were synthesized in direct current arc discharge using a mixture of graphite, silicon, and silicon dioxide as the precursor. The diameter of the nanowires is 100~200 nm, and the length is about 10~20 μm. The axis of the nanowire is preferentially along the direction. The morphology and structure of the nanowires were characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The β-SiC nanowires are suggested to be formed via a self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  15. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  16. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  17. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  18. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  19. Genetic identification of essential indels and domains in carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Ristuccia, Jessica G; Bzik, David J

    2009-04-01

    New treatments need to be developed for the significant human diseases of toxoplasmosis and malaria to circumvent problems with current treatments and drug resistance. Apicomplexan parasites causing these lethal diseases are deficient in pyrimidine salvage, suggesting that selective inhibition of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis can lead to a severe loss of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) and thymidine 5'-monophosphate (dTMP) pools, thereby inhibiting parasite RNA and DNA synthesis. Disruption of Toxoplasma gondii carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) induces a severe uracil auxotrophy with no detectable parasite replication in vitro and complete attenuation of virulence in mice. Here we show that a CPSII cDNA minigene efficiently complements the uracil auxotrophy of CPSII-deficient mutants, restoring parasite growth and virulence. Our complementation assays reveal that engineered mutations within, or proximal to, the catalytic triad of the N-terminal glutamine amidotransferase (GATase) domain inactivate the complementation activity of T. gondii CPSII and demonstrate a critical dependence on the apicomplexan CPSII GATase domain in vivo. Surprisingly, indels present within the T. gondii CPSII GATase domain as well as the C-terminal allosteric regulatory domain are found to be essential. In addition, several mutations directed at residues implicated in allosteric regulation in Escherichia coli CPS either abolish or markedly suppress complementation and further define the functional importance of the allosteric regulatory region. Collectively, these findings identify novel features of T. gondii CPSII as potential parasite-selective targets for drug development. PMID:18992249

  20. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  1. Domain Modeling: NP_115871.1 [SAHG[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_115871.1 chr19 Catalytic, N-terminal domain of histone methyltransferase Dot1l d1nw3a_ chr19/NP_115871....1/NP_115871.1_holo_5-332.pdb blast 133P,134E,135V,136Y,137G,138E,139T,161D,162L,163G,

  2. Catalytic conversion of biomass to fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, R. L.; Ushiba, K. K.; Cooper, M.; Mahawili, I.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents an assessment and perspective concerning the application of catalytic technologies to the thermochemical conversion of biomass resources to fuels. The major objectives of the study are: to provide a systematic assessment of the role of catalysis in the direct thermochemical conversion of biomass into gaseous and liquid fuels; to establish the relationship between potential biomass conversion processes and catalytic processes currently under development in other areas, with particular emphasis on coal conversion processes; and to identify promising catalytic systems which could be utilized to reduce the overall costs of fuels production from biomass materials. The report is divided into five major parts which address the above objectives. In Part III the physical and chemical properties of biomass and coal are compared, and the implications for catalytic conversion processes are discussed. With respect to chemical properties, biomass is shown to have significant advantages over coal in catalytic conversion processes because of its uniformly high H/C ratio and low concentrations of potential catalyst poisons. The physical properties of biomass can vary widely, however, and preprocessing by grinding is difficult and costly. Conversion technologies that require little preprocessing and accept a wide range of feed geometries, densities, and particle sizes appear desirable. Part IV provides a comprehensive review of existing and emerging thermochemical conversion technologies for biomass and coal. The underlying science and technology for gasification and liquefaction processes are presented.

  3. The Site-Directed A184S Mutation in the HTH Domain of the Global Regulator IrrE Enhances Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Tolerance to UV Radiation and MMC Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Song, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-28

    IrrE is a highly conserved global regulator in the Deinococcus genus and contributes to survival from high doses of UV radiation, ionizing radiation, and desiccation. Drad-IrrE and Dgob-IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus gobiensis I-0 each share 66% sequence identity. However, Dgob-IrrE showed a stronger protection phenotype against UV radiation than Drad- IrrE in the D. radiodurans irrE-deletion mutant (ΔirrE), which may be due to amino acid residues differences around the DNA-binding HTH domain. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a Drad-IrrE A184S single mutant, which has been characterized and compared with the ΔirrE mutant complemented strain with Drad-irrE, designated ΔirrE-E. The effects of the A184S mutation following UV radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) shock were determined. The A184S mutant displayed significantly increased resistance to UV radiation and MMC shock. The corresponding A184 site in Dgob-IrrE was inversely mutated, generating the S131A mutant, which exhibited a loss of resistance against UV radiation, MMC shock, and desiccation. qPCR analysis revealed that critical genes in the DNA repair system, such as recA, pprA, uvrA, and ddrB, were remarkably induced after UV radiation and MMC shock in the ΔirrE-IE and A184S mutants. These data suggested that A184S improves the ability against UV radiation and MMC shock, providing new insights into the modification of IrrE. We speculated that the serine residue may determine the efficiency of DNA binding, leading to the increased expression of IrrE-dependent genes important for protection against DNA damage.

  4. First crystal structure and catalytic mechanism of a bacterial glucuronosyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (β-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a membrane associated protein involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exo polysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phyto pathogenicity. Xanthan is also used in many important industrial applications. The x-ray crystal structure of apo-GumK was solved at 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme has two well defined Rossmann domains with a catalytic cleft between them. Recently, the crystal structure of GumK complexed with the donor substrate was also solved. We identified a number of catalytically important residues, including Asp157, which serves as the general base in the transfer reaction. The biological and structural data reported here shed light on the molecular basis for donor and acceptor selectivity in glucuronosyltransferases. (author)

  5. Hydrophobic catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange: a review of preparation methods and influencing factors of catalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) between liquid water and gaseous hydro- gen has been developed for various applications, such as tritium recovery, water upgrade and heavy-water production. Good wetproofing properties of the hydrophobic catalysts can make the reaction to proceed smoothly. In this article, the preparation methods of the hydrophobic catalysts and the factors affecting the catalytic activities are reviewed. In particular, progress on the hydrophobic Pt/C/inert carrier catalysts is introduced, including the selection of inert carrier and active metal carrier, and the preparation methods of carbon- supported Pt based catalysts. Basic research activities on controllable fabrication of hydro- phobic catalysts are discussed, including the LPCE reaction mechanism, and the relation between the microstructure of active metal and the catalytic activity, etc. Finally, questions remaining to be answered and future directions in the field of hydrophobic catalysts are discussed. (authors)

  6. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  7. Simple, chemoselective, catalytic olefin isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Steven W M; Barabé, Francis; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-12-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(Sal(tBu,tBu))Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated.

  8. A substrate-driven allosteric switch that enhances PDI catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekendam, Roelof H.; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Lin, Lin; Nag, Partha P.; Pu, Jun; Kennedy, Daniel R.; Feldenzer, Alexandra; Chiu, Joyce; Cook, Kristina M.; Furie, Bruce; Huang, Mingdong; Hogg, Philip J.; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is an oxidoreductase essential for folding proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. The domain structure of PDI is a–b–b′–x–a′, wherein the thioredoxin-like a and a′ domains mediate disulfide bond shuffling and b and b′ domains are substrate binding. The b′ and a′ domains are connected via the x-linker, a 19-amino-acid flexible peptide. Here we identify a class of compounds, termed bepristats, that target the substrate-binding pocket of b′. Bepristats reversibly block substrate binding and inhibit platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in vivo. Ligation of the substrate-binding pocket by bepristats paradoxically enhances catalytic activity of a and a′ by displacing the x-linker, which acts as an allosteric switch to augment reductase activity in the catalytic domains. This substrate-driven allosteric switch is also activated by peptides and proteins and is present in other thiol isomerases. Our results demonstrate a mechanism whereby binding of a substrate to thiol isomerases enhances catalytic activity of remote domains. PMID:27573496

  9. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm;

    2000-01-01

    The effect of electrochemical polarization on the catalytic SO2 oxidation in the molten V2O5-K2S2O7 system has been studied using a gold working electrode in the temperature range 400-460 degrees C. A similar experiment has been performed with the industrial catalyst VK-58. The aim of the present...... investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... caused by the negative charge on the electrode. The Faradaic part of the promoting effect under positive polarization has been explained as the electrochemical pushing of the V(V) V(IV) equilibrium in the direction of V(V) formation. It has also been shown that when using the industrial VK-58 catalyst...

  10. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  11. Structural, catalytic/redox and electrical characterization of systems combining Cu-Ni with CeO{sub 2} or Ce{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 2-{delta}} (M = Gd or Tb) for direct methane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornes, A.; Gamarra, D.; Conesa, J.C.; Bera, P.; Martinez-Arias, A. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Munuera, G. [Universidad de Sevilla, C/Profesor Garcia Gonzalez s/n, Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Fuerte, A.; Valenzuela, R.X.; Escudero, M.J. [CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The present work analyses bimetallic Cu-Ni formulations, in comparison to monometallic Cu ones, combined with CeO{sub 2} or other structurally related mixed oxides resulting from doping of the former with Gd or Tb, focusing to its possible use as anodes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) for direct oxidation of methane. The main objective is the characterization of the various formulations at structural level as well as with regards to the redox changes taking place in the systems upon interaction with methane, in order to evaluate the effects induced by the presence of dopants. In the same sense, an analysis of thermal expansion and electrical properties of the systems is performed, considering its possible implantation in SOFC single cells. For the mentioned purposes, the systems have been analysed by means of CH{sub 4}-TPR tests subsequently followed by TPO tests, as well as by XRD, Raman and XPS, with the aim of exploring structural and redox changes produced in the systems and the formation of carbon deposits during such interactions. The results reveal significant modifications in the structural, catalytic/redox and electrical properties of the systems as a function of the presence of Ni and/or Gd and Tb dopants in the formulation. (author)

  12. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  13. Protein domain prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingolfsson, Helgi; Yona, Golan

    2008-01-01

    Domains are considered to be the building blocks of protein structures. A protein can contain a single domain or multiple domains, each one typically associated with a specific function. The combination of domains determines the function of the protein, its subcellular localization and the interacti

  14. Imaging Ferroelectric Domains and Domain Walls Using Charge Gradient Microscopy: Role of Screening Charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Sheng; Jung, Il Woong; Choi, Yoon-Young; Hong, Seungbum; Roelofs, Andreas

    2016-02-23

    Advanced scanning probe microscopies (SPMs) open up the possibilities of the next-generation ferroic devices that utilize both domains and domain walls as active elements. However, current SPMs lack the capability of dynamically monitoring the motion of domains and domain walls in conjunction with the transport of the screening charges that lower the total electrostatic energy of both domains and domain walls. Charge gradient microscopy (CGM) is a strong candidate to overcome these shortcomings because it can map domains and domain walls at high speed and mechanically remove the screening charges. Yet the underlying mechanism of the CGM signals is not fully understood due to the complexity of the electrostatic interactions. Here, we designed a semiconductor-metal CGM tip, which can separate and quantify the ferroelectric domain and domain wall signals by simply changing its scanning direction. Our investigation reveals that the domain wall signals are due to the spatial change of polarization charges, while the domain signals are due to continuous removal and supply of screening charges at the CGM tip. In addition, we observed asymmetric CGM domain currents from the up and down domains, which are originated from the different debonding energies and the amount of the screening charges on positive and negative bound charges. We believe that our findings can help design CGM with high spatial resolution and lead to breakthroughs in information storage and energy-harvesting devices. PMID:26751281

  15. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue;

    2004-01-01

    will be spherical due to the fast coalescence at the high temperatures in the flame. The primary product from the flame pyrolysis is an aerosol of metal oxide nanoparticles. The aerosol gas from the flame can be utilized for several different purposes, depending on the precursors fed to the flame. With the present...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...... tube, where a part of the gas is sucked through the wall of the substrate, thereby creating a thin filter cake on the inner surface of the substrate tube. The top-layer can be deposited directly on a coarse pore structure. Since the Brownian motion of the aerosol particles is fast compared to the fluid...

  16. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  17. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Borohydride for Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lianbang; ZHAN Xingyue; YANG Zhenzhen; MA Chun'an

    2011-01-01

    Borohydrides present interesting options for the electrochemical power generation acting either as hydrogen source or anodic fuel for direct borohydride fuel cells(DBFC).In this work,Mg-Ni composite synthesized by mechanically alloying method,used as the catalyst for the hydrolysis of borohydride,has been investigated.Co-doping treatment has been carried out for the purpose of improving the hydrolysis rate further.The as-prepared and Co-doped Mg-Ni composites with low cost showed high catalytic activity to the hydrolysis of borohydride for hydrogen generation.After Co-doping,the hydrogen generation rate was around 280 ml·g-1·min-1.Borohydride would be a promising hydrogen source for fuel cells.

  18. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  19. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  20. Degradation of Granular Starch by the Bacterium Microbacterium aurum Strain B8.A Involves a Modular α-Amylase Enzyme System with FNIII and CBM25 Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Vincent; Eeuwema, Wieger; Sarian, Fean D; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-10-01

    The bacterium Microbacterium aurum strain B8.A, originally isolated from a potato plant wastewater facility, is able to degrade different types of starch granules. Here we report the characterization of an unusually large, multidomain M. aurum B8.A α-amylase enzyme (MaAmyA). MaAmyA is a 1,417-amino-acid (aa) protein with a predicted molecular mass of 148 kDa. Sequence analysis of MaAmyA showed that its catalytic core is a family GH13_32 α-amylase with the typical ABC domain structure, followed by a fibronectin (FNIII) domain, two carbohydrate binding modules (CBM25), and another three FNIII domains. Recombinant expression and purification yielded an enzyme with the ability to degrade wheat and potato starch granules by introducing pores. Characterization of various truncated mutants of MaAmyA revealed a direct relationship between the presence of CBM25 domains and the ability of MaAmyA to form pores in starch granules, while the FNIII domains most likely function as stable linkers. At the C terminus, MaAmyA carries a 300-aa domain which is uniquely associated with large multidomain amylases; its function remains to be elucidated. We concluded that M. aurum B8.A employs a multidomain enzyme system to initiate degradation of starch granules via pore formation. PMID:26187958

  1. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  2. Structural analyses of Legionella LepB reveal a new GAP fold that catalytically mimics eukaryotic RasGAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yu; Liyan Hu; Qing Yao; Yongqun Zhu; Na Dong; Da-Cheng Wang; Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are emerging targets of diverse bacterial pathogens.Here,we perform biochemical and structural analyses of LepB,a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) effector from Legionellapneumophila.We map LepB GAP domain to residues 313-618 and show that the GAP domain is Rab1 specific with a catalytic activity higher than the canonical eukaryotic TBC GAP and the newly identified VirA/EspG family of bacterial RabGAP effectors.Exhaustive mutation analyses identify Arg444 as the arginine finger,but no catalytically essential glutamine residues.Crystal structures of LepB313-618 alone and the GAP domain of Legionella drancourtii LepB in complex with Rab1-GDP-AIF3 support the catalytic role of Arg444,and also further reveal a 3D architecture and a GTPase-binding mode distinct from all known GAPs.Glu449,structurally equivalent to TBC RabGAP glutamine finger in apo-LepB,undergoes a drastic movement upon Rab1 binding,which induces Rab1 Gin70 side-chain flipping towards GDP-AIF3 through a strong ionic interaction.This conformationally rearranged Gln70 acts as the catalytic cis-glutamine,therefore uncovering an unexpected RasGAP-like catalytic mechanism for LepB.Our studies highlight an extraordinary structural and catalytic diversity of RabGAPs,particularly those from bacterial pathogens.

  3. The Replication Focus Targeting Sequence (RFTS) Domain Is a DNA-competitive Inhibitor of Dnmt1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syeda, Farisa; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Wean, Matthew; Avvakumov, George V.; Walker, John R.; Xue, Sheng; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Brenner, Charles (Iowa); (Toronto)

    2015-11-30

    Dnmt1 (DNA methyltransferase 1) is the principal enzyme responsible for maintenance of cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides in the mammalian genome. The N-terminal replication focus targeting sequence (RFTS) domain of Dnmt1 has been implicated in subcellular localization, protein association, and catalytic function. However, progress in understanding its function has been limited by the lack of assays for and a structure of this domain. Here, we show that the naked DNA- and polynucleosome-binding activities of Dnmt1 are inhibited by the RFTS domain, which functions by virtue of binding the catalytic domain to the exclusion of DNA. Kinetic analysis with a fluorogenic DNA substrate established the RFTS domain as a 600-fold inhibitor of Dnmt1 enzymatic activity. The crystal structure of the RFTS domain reveals a novel fold and supports a mechanism in which an RFTS-targeted Dnmt1-binding protein, such as Uhrf1, may activate Dnmt1 for DNA binding.

  4. Inhibition of E-cadherin/catenin complex formation by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase is partially independent of its catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyan; Gu, Yuchao; Qi, Jieqiong; Han, Cuifang; Zhang, Xinling; Bi, Chuanlin; Yu, Wengong

    2016-02-01

    p120-catenin (p120) contains a large central armadillo repeat domain, via which it binds to E‑cadherin to stabilize the latter, thereby regulating cell‑to‑cell adhesion. A previous study by our group demonstrated that O‑linked N‑acetylglucosamine (O‑GlcNAc) is involved in the regulation of the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. As O‑GlcNAc transferase (OGT) is able to directly bind to the majority of its target proteins, the present study hypothesized that OGT may additionally regulate the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. To verify this hypothesis, a catalytically inactive OGT mutant was expressed in H1299 cells, and its effects on the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex were assessed. A cytoskeleton‑binding protein extraction assay confirmed that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex independent of its catalytic activity. In addition, co‑immunoprecipitation and pull‑down assays were used to evaluate the interaction between OGT and p120. Immunoblotting indicated that OGT was able to directly bind to p120. To determine the domain of p120 involved in binding to OGT, a series of deletion mutants of p120 were constructed and subjected to protein binding assays by pull‑down assays. Immunoblotting showed that OGT bound to the regulatory and armadillo domains of p120, which might interfere with the interaction between p120 and E‑cadherin. Finally, OGT, p120 and E‑cadherin cytoplasmic domains (ECD) were recombinantly expressed in BL21 (DE3) recombinant E. coli cells, and a glutathione S‑transferase (GST) pull‑down assay was performed to assess the interactions among the purified recombinant proteins. Immunoblotting indicated that maltose‑binding protein (MBP)‑OGT inhibited the binding of His‑p120 to GST‑ECD in a dose‑dependent manner. All of these results suggested that OGT inhibited the formation of the E‑cadherin/catenin complex

  5. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  6. Structural domains in NADPH: Protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases involved in catalysis and substrate binding. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael P.

    1999-09-24

    Until recently little direct information was available about specific structural determinants within the light-dependent NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductases (PORs) required for substrate and cofactor binding, catalytic activity, and thylakoid membrane localization. Based on our previous DOE-funded studies, during the past year we brought to fruition a number of ongoing experiments, initiated several new avenues of investigations, and overall have made considerable progress towards establishing the basic structural parameters governing POR function. Our studies to date have defined residues and domains involved in substrate and cofactor binding and catalysis, and elaborated on the mechanism for membrane localization of POR in developing plastids. Our results and their significance, as well as our work in progress, are detailed.

  7. Tumor-directed lymphocyte-activating cytokines: refolding-based preparation of recombinant human interleukin-12 and an antibody variable domain-fused protein by additive-introduced stepwise dialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integration of lymphocyte-activating cytokines (e.g., interleukin-12: IL-12) to tumor cells offers promise for cancer immunotherapy, but the preparation of such heterodimeric proteins by refolding is difficult because of subunit instability. We achieved the refolding of Escherichia coli-expressed human IL-12 by a stepwise dialysis method, preventing the formation of insoluble aggregates by adding a redox reagent and an aggregation suppressor. We also constructed a tumor-specific IL-12 protein, each subunit of which was fused with one chain of variable domain fragment (Fv) of anticarcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibody T84.66 (aCEA-IL12). Fusion of IL-12 with Fv greatly increased the yield of functional heterodimer. Several assays have indicated that the Fv domain and IL-12 domain of the fused protein had cognate biological activities, and it enhanced the cytotoxicity of T-LAK cells for the cancer cell line

  8. The All-DQ-Domain EMTP

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson H.M. Sianipar

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an improvement to dq-domain method of calculating electromagnetic transients. The proposed methodology works on dq-domain model for all components of the power system and during all time iterations. This is a new direction distinct from the old one where the network is invariably modeled in phase-domain. By modeling the network in dq-domain there is no more problem of interfacing machine to network as usually met in the existing method as machine is modeled invariably in ...

  9. Direct observation of temperature dependent magnetic domain structure of the multiferroic La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3}/BiFeO{sub 3} bilayer system by x-ray linear dichroism- and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism-photoemission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mix, C.; Finizio, S.; Jakob, G.; Kläui, M. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Buzzi, M.; Nolting, F. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Kronast, F. [Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein Straße 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-05-21

    Low-thickness La{sub 0.66}Sr{sub 0.34}MnO{sub 3} (LSMO)/BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) thin film samples deposited on SrTiO{sub 3} were imaged by high resolution x-ray microscopy at different temperatures. The ultra-thin thickness of the top layer allows to image both the ferromagnetic domain structure of LSMO and the multiferroic domain structure of the buried BFO layer, opening a path to a direct observation of coupling at the interface on a microscopic level. By comparing the domain size and structure of the BFO and LSMO, we observed that, in contrast to LSMO single layers, LSMO/BFO multilayers show a strong temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic domain structure of the LSMO. Particularly, at 40 K, a similar domain size for BFO and LSMO is observed. This indicates a persistence of exchange coupling on the microscopic scale at a temperature, where the exchange bias as determined by magnetometer measurements is vanishing.

  10. Thrombomodulin Binding Selects the Catalytically Active Form of Thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Lindsey D; Treuheit, Nicholas A; Venkatesh, Varun J; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2015-11-01

    Human α-thrombin is a serine protease with dual functions. Thrombin acts as a procoagulant, cleaving fibrinogen to make the fibrin clot, but when bound to thrombomodulin (TM), it acts as an anticoagulant, cleaving protein C. A minimal TM fragment consisting of the fourth, fifth, and most of the sixth EGF-like domain (TM456m) that has been prepared has much improved solubility, thrombin binding capacity, and anticoagulant activity versus those of previous TM456 constructs. In this work, we compare backbone amide exchange of human α-thrombin in three states: apo, D-Phe-Pro-Arg-chloromethylketone (PPACK)-bound, and TM456m-bound. Beyond causing a decreased level of amide exchange at their binding sites, TM and PPACK both cause a decreased level of amide exchange in other regions including the γ-loop and the adjacent N-terminus of the heavy chain. The decreased level of amide exchange in the N-terminus of the heavy chain is consistent with the historic model of activation of serine proteases, which involves insertion of this region into the β-barrel promoting the correct conformation of the catalytic residues. Contrary to crystal structures of thrombin, hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry results suggest that the conformation of apo-thrombin does not yet have the N-terminus of the heavy chain properly inserted for optimal catalytic activity, and that binding of TM allosterically promotes the catalytically active conformation. PMID:26468766

  11. Production of filamentous carbon and H{sub 2} by solarthermal catalytic cracking of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillov, V.; Kuvshinov, G. [Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis (Russian Federation); Reller, A. [Hamburg Univ., Hamburg (Germany); Steinfeld, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic thermal decomposition of methane has been experimentally studied using high-temperature solar process heat. Nickel catalyst particles, fluidized in methane, were directly irradiated at the PSI solar furnace. Carbon deposition consisted of randomly interlaced filaments that grew as fibers and hollow nanotubes (of approx. 30 nm diameter) originating at each catalytic particle. (author) 4 figs., 7 refs.

  12. Rather than by direct acquisition via lateral gene transfer, GHF5 cellulases were passed on from early Pratylenchidae to root-knot and cyst nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybarczyk-Mydłowska Katarzyna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant parasitic nematodes are unusual Metazoans as they are equipped with genes that allow for symbiont-independent degradation of plant cell walls. Among the cell wall-degrading enzymes, glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GHF5 cellulases are relatively well characterized, especially for high impact parasites such as root-knot and cyst nematodes. Interestingly, ancestors of extant nematodes most likely acquired these GHF5 cellulases from a prokaryote donor by one or multiple lateral gene transfer events. To obtain insight into the origin of GHF5 cellulases among evolutionary advanced members of the order Tylenchida, cellulase biodiversity data from less distal family members were collected and analyzed. Results Single nematodes were used to obtain (partial genomic sequences of cellulases from representatives of the genera Meloidogyne, Pratylenchus, Hirschmanniella and Globodera. Combined Bayesian analysis of ≈ 100 cellulase sequences revealed three types of catalytic domains (A, B, and C. Represented by 84 sequences, type B is numerically dominant, and the overall topology of the catalytic domain type shows remarkable resemblance with trees based on neutral (= pathogenicity-unrelated small subunit ribosomal DNA sequences. Bayesian analysis further suggested a sister relationship between the lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei and all type B cellulases from root-knot nematodes. Yet, the relationship between the three catalytic domain types remained unclear. Superposition of intron data onto the cellulase tree suggests that types B and C are related, and together distinct from type A that is characterized by two unique introns. Conclusions All Tylenchida members investigated here harbored one or multiple GHF5 cellulases. Three types of catalytic domains are distinguished, and the presence of at least two types is relatively common among plant parasitic Tylenchida. Analysis of coding sequences of cellulases suggests that root

  13. Trends in catalytic NO decomposition over transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe;

    2007-01-01

    The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional...... theory calculations. We show specifically why the key problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen....

  14. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  15. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  16. Regulation of Escherichia coli RelA Requires Oligomerization of the C-Terminal Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Gropp, Michal; Strausz, Yael; Gross, Miriam; Glaser, Gad

    2001-01-01

    The E. coli RelA protein is a ribosome-dependent (p)ppGpp synthetase that is activated in response to amino acid starvation. RelA can be dissected both functionally and physically into two domains: The N-terminal domain (NTD) (amino acids [aa] 1 to 455) contains the catalytic domain of RelA, and the C-terminal domain (CTD) (aa 455 to 744) is involved in regulating RelA activity. We used mutational analysis to localize sites important for RelA activity and control in these two domains. We inse...

  17. Domain architecture of protein-disulfide isomerase facilitates its dual role as an oxidase and an isomerase in Ero1p-mediated disulfide formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulp, M. S.; Frickel, E. M.; Ellgaard, Lars;

    2006-01-01

    reduction/rearrangement of non-native disulfides is poorly understood. We analyzed the role of individual PDI domains in disulfide bond formation in a reaction driven by their natural oxidant, Ero1p. We found that Ero1p oxidizes the isolated PDI catalytic thioredoxin domains, A and A' at the same rate...... catalytic (A) domain. The specific order of thioredoxin domains in PDI is important in establishing the asymmetry in the rate of oxidation of the two active sites thus allowing A and A', two thioredoxin domains that are similar in sequence and structure, to serve opposing functional roles as a disulfide...

  18. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  19. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  20. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  1. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method is described for estimating the temperature in a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. Pressure sensors monitor the flow resistance across the catalytic converter to provide an indication of the temperature inside. This feedback system allows heating devices to be switched off and thus avoid overheating, while maintaining the catalytic converter's efficiency by assuring that it does not operate below its light off temperature. (UK)

  2. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method of estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine is described. Heated exhaust gas oxygen (HEGO) sensors are placed upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. The temperature of the catalytic converter shortly after start-up is measured by monitoring the resistance of the HEGO sensor's heating element. The downstream sensor is used for mixture control and to double check results of the upstream sensor. (UK)

  3. Some Aspects of the Catalytic Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; K.Saikia

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Catalytic reactions are gaining importance due to its low cost, operational simplicity, high efficiency and selectivity. It is also getting much attention in green synthesis. Many useful organic reactions, including the acylation of alcohols and aldehydes, carbon-carbon, carbon-nitrogen, carbon-sulfur bond forming and oxidation reactions are carried out by catalyst. We are exploring the catalytic acylation of alcohols and aldehydes in a simple and efficient manner. Catalytic activation of unr...

  4. Catalytic Oxidation of Methane into Methanol over Copper-Exchanged Zeolites with Oxygen at Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsimhan, Karthik; Iyoki, Kenta; Dinh, Kimberly; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-22

    The direct catalytic conversion of methane to liquid oxygenated compounds, such as methanol or dimethyl ether, at low temperature using molecular oxygen is a grand challenge in C-H activation that has never been met with synthetic, heterogeneous catalysts. We report the first demonstration of direct, catalytic oxidation of methane into methanol with molecular oxygen over copper-exchanged zeolites at low reaction temperatures (483-498 K). Reaction kinetics studies show sustained catalytic activity and high selectivity for a variety of commercially available zeolite topologies under mild conditions (e.g., 483 K and atmospheric pressure). Transient and steady state measurements with isotopically labeled molecules confirm catalytic turnover. The catalytic rates and apparent activation energies are affected by the zeolite topology, with caged-based zeolites (e.g., Cu-SSZ-13) showing the highest rates. Although the reaction rates are low, the discovery of catalytic sites in copper-exchanged zeolites will accelerate the development of strategies to directly oxidize methane into methanol under mild conditions. PMID:27413787

  5. Field induced domain switching as the origin of anomalous lattice strain along non-polar direction in rhombohedral BiScO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} close to the morphotropic phase boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, K. V.; Ranjan, Rajeev, E-mail: rajeev@materials.iisc.ernt.in [Department of Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Fancher, Chris M.; Jones, Jacob L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2015-08-03

    The lattice strain and domain switching behavior of xBiScO{sub 3}–(1-x)PbTiO{sub 3} (x = 0.40) was investigated as a function of cyclic field and grain orientation by in situ X-ray diffraction during application of electric fields. The electric field induced 200 lattice strain was measured to be five times larger than the 111 lattice strain in pseudorhombohedral xBiScO{sub 3}–(1-x)PbTiO{sub 3} (x = 0.40). It is shown that the anomalous 200 lattice strain is not an intrinsic phenomenon, but arises primarily due to stress associated with the reorientation of the 111 domains in dense polycrystalline ceramic.

  6. Functional demonstrations of starch binding domains present in Ostreococcus tauri starch synthases isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Barchiesi, Julieta; Hedin, Nicolás; Gomez-Casati, Diego F.; Miguel A Ballicora; Busi, María V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Starch-binding domains are key modules present in several enzymes involved in polysaccharide metabolism. These non-catalytic modules have already been described as essential for starch-binding and the catalytic activity of starch synthase III from the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In Ostreococcus tauri, a unicellular green alga of the Prasinophyceae family, there are three SSIII isoforms, known as Ostta SSIII-A, SSIII-B and SSIII-C. Results In this work, using in silico and in...

  7. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  8. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  9. Generation of a phage-display library of single-domain camelid VH H antibodies directed against Chlamydomonas reinhardtii antigens, and characterization of VH Hs binding cell-surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenzhi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Wauchope, Akelia D; Tremblay, Jacqueline M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Weeks, Donald P; Oyler, George A

    2013-11-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are powerful tools for the detection, quantification, purification and subcellular localization of proteins of interest in biological research. We have generated camelid (Lama pacos) heavy chain-only variable VH domain (VH H) libraries against antigens in total cell lysates from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The sdAbs in the sera from immunized animals and VH H antibody domains isolated from the library show specificity to C. reinhardtii and lack of reactivity to antigens from four other algae: Chlorella variabilis, Coccomyxa subellipsoidea, Nannochloropsis oceanica and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Antibodies were produced against a diverse representation of antigens as evidenced by sera ELISA and protein-blot analyses. A phage-display library consisting of the VH H region contained at least 10(6) individual transformants, and thus should represent a wide range of C. reinhardtii antigens. The utility of the phage library was demonstrated by using live C. reinhardtii cells to pan for VH H clones with specific recognition of cell-surface epitopes. The lead candidate VH H clones (designated B11 and H10) bound to C. reinhardtii with EC50 values ≤ 0.5 nm. Treatment of cells with VH H B11 fused to the mCherry or green fluorescent proteins allowed brilliant and specific staining of the C. reinhardtii cell wall and analysis of cell-wall genesis during cell division. Such high-complexity VH H antibody libraries for algae will be valuable tools for algal researchers and biotechnologists.

  10. Catalytic reforming feed characterisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Univ. of La Laguna, Chemical Engineering Dept., La Laguna (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The catalytic reforming of naphtha is one of the major refinery processes, designed to increase the octane number of naphtha or to produce aromatics. The naphtha used as catalytic reformer feedstock usually contains a mixture of paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics in the carbon number range C{sub 6} to C{sub 10}. The detailed chemical composition of the feed is necessary to predict the aromatics and hydrogen production as well as the operation severity. The analysis of feed naphtha is usually reported in terms of its ASTM distillation curve and API or specific gravity. Since reforming reactions are described in terms of lumped chemical species (paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics), a feed characterisation technique should be useful in order to predict reforming operating conditions and detect feed quality changes. Unfortunately online analyzer applications as cromatography or recently introduced naphtha NMR [1] are scarce in most of refineries. This work proposes an algorithmic characterisation method focusing on its main steps description. The method could help on the subjects previously described, finally a calculation example is shown. (orig.)

  11. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction.

  12. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  13. Contrasting intra- and extracellular distribution of catalytic ferrous iron in ovalbumin-induced peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Fumiya; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Shi, Lei; Mori, Masahiko; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for every type of life on earth. However, excess iron is cytotoxic and can lead to an increased cancer risk in humans. Catalytic ferrous iron [Fe(II)] is an initiator of the Fenton reaction, which causes oxidative stress by generating hydroxyl radicals. Recently, it became possible to localize catalytic Fe(II) in situ with a turn-on fluorescent probe, RhoNox-1. Here, we screened each organ/cell of rats to globally evaluate the distribution of catalytic Fe(II) and found that eosinophils showed the highest abundance. In various cells, lysosomes were the major organelle, sharing ∼40-80% of RhoNox-1 fluorescence. We then used an ovalbumin-induced allergic peritonitis model to study the dynamics of catalytic Fe(II). Peritoneal lavage revealed that the total iron contents per cell were significantly decreased, whereas an increase in the number of inflammatory cells (macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils and lymphocytes) resulted in an increased total iron content of the peritoneal inflammatory cells. Notably, macrophages, eosinophils and neutrophils exhibited significantly increased catalytic Fe(II) with increased DMT1 expression and decreased ferritin expression, though catalytic Fe(II) was significantly decreased in the peritoneal lavage fluid. In conclusion, catalytic Fe(II) in situ more directly reflects cellular activity and the accompanying pathology than total iron does. PMID:27262439

  14. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  15. SERCA mutant E309Q binds two Ca ions but adopts a catalytically incompetent conformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Johannes D.; Bublitz, Maike; Arnou, Bertrand;

    2013-01-01

    The sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) couples ATP hydrolysis to transport of Ca2+. This directed energy transfer requires cross-talk between the two Ca2+ sites and the phosphorylation site over 50 Å distance. We have addressed the mechano-structural basis for this intramolecular...... signal by analysing the structure and the functional properties of SERCA mutant E309Q. Glu309 contributes to Ca2+ coordination at site II, and a consensus has been that E309Q only binds Ca2+ at site I. The crystal structure of E309Q in the presence of Ca2+ and an ATP analogue, however, reveals two...... occupied Ca2+ sites of a non-catalytic Ca2E1 state. Ca2+ is bound with micromolar affinity by both Ca2+ sites in E309Q, but without cooperativity. The Ca2+-bound mutant does phosphorylate from ATP, but at a very low maximal rate. Phosphorylation depends on the correct positioning of the A-domain, requiring...

  16. Neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by a human monoclonal antibody specific for the catalytic light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC, a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure.

  17. Diamagnetic (Condon) domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the first systematic review of experimental research on diamagnetic (aka Condon) domains that form in nonmagnetic metals at low temperatures due to the development of Landau levels. A variety of methods were used to study the domains. Muon spectroscopy studies showed such domains to be present in all metals studied, pointing to the universal nature of the phenomenon. For silver, the domain structure size as measured by Hall microsensors turned out to be an order of magnitude larger than expected. In beryllium, it was found that domains do not come to the surface but rather remain in the bulk of the crystal. The magnetostriction of beryllium during domain formation is measured. It is shown that magnetization current in a domain wall is entirely caused by the charge density gradient in the wall, due to the lattice being deformed oppositely in neighboring domains. It is observed for the first time that the de Haas-van Alphen effect exhibits hysteresis at the transition to the domain state, and this fact was used for the experimental determination of the phase diagrams for the domain states of silver and beryllium. (reviews of topical problems)

  18. Detailed characterization of the cooperative mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in the Ca(2+) transport (SERCA) ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z; Lewis, D; Strock, C; Inesi, G; Nakasako, M; Nomura, H; Toyoshima, C

    2000-08-01

    Expression of heterologous SERCA1a ATPase in Cos-1 cells was optimized to yield levels that account for 10-15% of the microsomal protein, as revealed by protein staining on electrophoretic gels. This high level of expression significantly improved our characterization of mutants, including direct measurements of Ca(2+) binding by the ATPase in the absence of ATP, and measurements of various enzyme functions in the presence of ATP or P(i). Mutational analysis distinguished two groups of amino acids within the transmembrane domain: The first group includes Glu771 (M5), Thr799 (M6), Asp800 (M6), and Glu908 (M8), whose individual mutations totally inhibit binding of the two Ca(2+) required for activation of one ATPase molecule. The second group includes Glu309 (M4) and Asn796 (M6), whose individual or combined mutations inhibit binding of only one and the same Ca(2+). The effects of mutations of these amino acids were interpreted in the light of recent information on the ATPase high-resolution structure, explaining the mechanism of Ca(2+) binding and catalytic activation in terms of two cooperative sites. The Glu771, Thr799, and Asp800 side chains contribute prominently to site 1, together with less prominent contributions by Asn768 and Glu908. The Glu309, Asn796, and Asp800 side chains, as well as the Ala305 (and possibly Val304 and Ile307) carbonyl oxygen, contribute to site 2. Sequential binding begins with Ca(2+) occupancy of site 1, followed by transition to a conformation (E') sensitive to Ca(2+) inhibition of enzyme phosphorylation by P(i), but still unable to utilize ATP. The E' conformation accepts the second Ca(2+) on site 2, producing then a conformation (E' ') which is able to utilize ATP. Mutations of residues (Asp813 and Asp818) in the M6/M7 loop reduce Ca(2+) affinity and catalytic turnover, suggesting a strong influence of this loop on the correct positioning of the M6 helix. Mutation of Asp351 (at the catalytic site within the cytosolic domain

  19. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Uspal, W E; Dietrich, S; Tasinkevych, M

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governi...

  20. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  1. Role of the NC-loop in catalytic activity and stability in lipase from Fervidobacterium changbaicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binchun Li

    Full Text Available Flexible NC-loops between the catalytic domain and the cap domain of the α/β hydrolase fold enzymes show remarkable diversity in length, sequence, and configuration. Recent investigations have suggested that the NC-loop might be involved in catalysis and substrate recognition in many enzymes from the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. To foster a deep understanding of its role in catalysis, stability, and divergent evolution, we here systemically investigated the function of the NC-loop (residues 131-151 in a lipase (FClip1 from thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium changbaicum by loop deletion, alanine-scanning mutagenesis and site-directed mutagenesis. We found that the upper part of the NC-loop (residues 131-138 was of great importance to enzyme catalysis. Single substitutions in this region could fine-tune the activity of FClip1 as much as 41-fold, and any deletions from this region rendered the enzyme completely inactive. The lower part of the NC-loop (residues 139-151 was capable of enduring extensive deletions without loss of activity. The shortened mutants in this region were found to show both improved activity and increased stability simultaneously. We therefore speculated that the NC-loop, especially the lower part, would be a perfect target for enzyme engineering to optimize the enzymatic properties, and might present a hot zone for the divergent evolution of α/β hydrolases. Our findings may provide an opportunity for better understanding of the mechanism of divergent evolution in the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily, and may also guide the design of novel biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  2. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  3. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  4. Understanding catalytic biomass conversion through data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Ras; B. McKay; G. Rothenberg

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of biomass is a key challenge that we chemists face in the twenty-first century. Worldwide, research is conducted into obtaining bulk chemicals, polymers and fuels. Our project centres on glucose valorisation via furfural derivatives using catalytic hydrogenation. We present her

  5. Visualizing latent domain knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, C.; Kuljis, J; Paul, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge discovery and data mining commonly rely on finding salient patterns of association from a vast amount of data. Traditional citation analysis of scientific literature draws insights from strong citation patterns. Latent domain knowledge, in contrast to the mainstream domain knowledge, often consists of highly relevant but relatively infrequently cited scientific works. Visualizing latent domain knowledge presents a significant challenge to knowledge discovery and quantitative studies...

  6. Frustratingly Easy Domain Adaptation

    CERN Document Server

    Daumé, Hal

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach to domain adaptation that is appropriate exactly in the case when one has enough ``target'' data to do slightly better than just using only ``source'' data. Our approach is incredibly simple, easy to implement as a preprocessing step (10 lines of Perl!) and outperforms state-of-the-art approaches on a range of datasets. Moreover, it is trivially extended to a multi-domain adaptation problem, where one has data from a variety of different domains.

  7. Staggered domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Hoelbling, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We construct domain wall fermions with a staggered kernel and investigate their spectral and chiral properties numerically in the Schwinger model. In some relevant cases we see an improvement of chirality by more than an order of magnitude as compared to usual domain wall fermions. Moreover, we present first results for four-dimensional quantum chromodynamics, where we also observe significant reductions of chiral symmetry violations for staggered domain wall fermions.

  8. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  9. Titanium-Containing Mesoporous Materials: Synthesis and Application in Selective Catalytic Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Li; Chunhui Zhou; Huali Xie; Zhonghua Ge; Liangcai Yuan; Xiaonian Li

    2006-01-01

    Titanium-containing mesoporous molecular sieves are of great significance in selective catalytic oxidation processes with bulky molecules. Recent researches and developments on the designing and synthesis of Ti-containing mesoporous materials have been reviewed. Various strategies for the preparation of Ti-containing mesoporous materials, such as direct synthesis and post-synthesis, are described. Modifications of Ti-containing mesoporous materials by surface-grafting and atom-planting are also discussed. All approaches aimed mainly at the improving of the stability, the hydrophobicity, and mostly the catalytic activity. Structural and mechanistic features of various synthetic systems are discussed. Ticontaining mesoporous materials in liquid phase catalytic oxidation of organic compounds with H2O2 as an oxidant is briefly summarized, showing their broad utilities for green synthesis of fine chemicals by catalytic oxidative reactions.

  10. Catalytic converter applications for two stroke, spark-ignited marine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, Hiroaki; Isogawa, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Naoto

    1995-12-31

    When catalytic converters are used for cleansing of exhaust gas from two-stroke marine engines, new issues must be brought up in combination with prior technology. Therefore, a study was made of V6, 2600cc engine having a large volume of hydrocarbon emissions with respect to three issues: (1) To what degree seawater effects catalytic converter performance and possible countermeasures; (2) Effects attained on cleansing level and catalyst temperature; (3) Finding abatement levels for catalyst deterioration and exhaust emission output in the marine mode. It was found that physical adsorption was a significant factor in catalytic degradation resulting from direct contact with seawater. The cleansing levels obtained when a marine engine is equipped with a catalyst converter were found by clarifying the extent of effects of catalyst volume, performance and temperature. The reduction obtained in exhaust emission allowing for a deterioration factor, is shown in a catalytic converter heated to the maximum temperature of 960 C.

  11. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20-40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The existence of impurities such as water and remnants of alkaline catalyst in crude glycerol will direct the reaction to produce glycidol. Although impurities might not be desirable, the non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate could be an alternative method for conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to value-added glycerol carbonate.Graphical abstractPlausible reaction scheme for conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate. PMID:27386367

  12. Copper nanoparticle heterogeneous catalytic ‘click’ cycloaddition confirmed by single-molecule spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decan, Matthew R.; Impellizzeri, Stefania; Marin, M. Luisa; Scaiano, Juan C.

    2014-08-01

    Colloidal or heterogeneous nanocatalysts can improve the range and diversity of Cu(I)-catalysed click reactions and facilitate catalyst separation and reuse. Catalysis by metal nanoparticles raises the question as to whether heterogeneous catalysts may cause homogeneous catalysis through metal ion leaching, since the catalytic process could be mediated by the particle, or by metal ions released from it. The question is critical as unwanted homogeneous processes could offset the benefits of heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we combine standard bench scale techniques with single-molecule spectroscopy to monitor single catalytic events in real time and demonstrate that click catalysis occurs directly at the surface of copper nanoparticles; this general approach could be implemented in other systems. We use ‘from the mole to the molecule’ to describe this emerging idea in which mole scale reactions can be optimized through an intimate understanding of the catalytic process at the single-molecule—single catalytic nanoparticle level.

  13. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  14. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  15. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  16. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  17. Development and test of a new catalytic converter for natural gas fuelled engine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M A Kalam; H H Masjuki; M Redzuan; T M I Mahlia; M A Fuad; M Mohibah; K H Halim; A Ishak; M Khair; A Shahrir; A Yusoff

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents characteristics of a new catalytic converter (catco) to be used for natural gas fuelled engine. The catco were developed based on catalyst materials consisting of metal oxides such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and cobalt oxide (CoO) with wire mesh substrate. Both of the catalyst materials (such as TiO2 and CoO) are inexpensive in comparison with conventional catalysts (noble metals) such as palladium or platinum. In addition, the noble metals such as platinum group metals are now identified as human health risk due to their rapid emissions in the environment from various resources like conventional catalytic converter, jewelers and other medical usages. It can be mentioned that the TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter and a new natural gas engine such as compressed natural gas (CNG) direct injection (DI) engine were developed under a research collaboration program. The original engine manufacture catalytic conveter (OEM catco) was tested for comparison purposes. The OEM catco was based on noble metal catalyst with honeycomb ceramic substrate. It is experimentally found that the conversion efficiencies of TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter are 93%, 89% and 82% for NOx, CO and HC emissions respectively. It is calculated that the TiO2/CoO based catalytic converter reduces 24%, 41% and 40% higher NOx, CO and HC emissions in comparison to OEM catco respectively. The objective of this paper is to develop a low-cost three way catalytic converter to be used with the newly developed CNG-DI engine. Detailed review on catalytic converter, low-cost catalytic converter development characteristics and CNGDI engine test results have been presented with discussions.

  18. Pragmatic circuits frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Eccles, William

    2006-01-01

    Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain goes through the Laplace transform to get from the time domain to topics that include the s-plane, Bode diagrams, and the sinusoidal steady state. This second of three volumes ends with a-c power, which, although it is just a special case of the sinusoidal steady state, is an important topic with unique techniques and terminology. Pragmatic Circuits: Frequency Domain is focused on the frequency domain. In other words, time will no longer be the independent variable in our analysis. The two other volumes in the Pragmatic Circuits series include titles on DC

  19. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  20. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure

  1. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target.

  2. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    Full Text Available FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686: one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  3. Topological Domain Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Battenfeld, Ingo

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents Topological Domain Theory as a powerful and flexible framework for denotational semantics. Topological Domain Theory models a wide range of type constructions and can interpret many computational features. Furthermore, it has close connections to established frameworks for denotational semantics, as well as to well-studied mathematical theories, such as topology and computable analysis.

  4. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  5. A non-stationary problem coupling PDEs and ODEs modelizing an automotive catalytic converter

    OpenAIRE

    Hoernel, J. -D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution of a non-stationary problem that modelizes the behaviour of the concentrations and the temperature of gases going through a cylindrical passage of an automotive catalytic converter. This problem couples parabolic partial differential equations in a domain with one parabolic partial differential equation and some ordinary differential equations on a part of its boundary.

  6. Development of Catalytic Cooking Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden); Tena, Emmanuel; Berger, Marc [Gaz de France (France)

    2004-04-01

    Gas catalytic combustion for gas stoves or cooking plates (closed catalytic burner system with ceramic plates) is a very promising technique in terms of ease of cleaning, power modulation and emissions. Previous investigations show that wire mesh catalysts, prepared and supplied by Catator AB (CAT), seem to be very well suited for such applications. Beside significantly reducing the NOx-emissions, these catalysts offer important advantages such as good design flexibility, low pressure drop and high heat transfer capacity, where the latter leads to a quick thermal response. Prior to this project, Gaz de France (GdF) made a series of measurements with CAT's wire mesh catalysts in their gas cooking plates and compared the measured performance with similar results obtained with theirs cordierite monolith catalysts. Compared to the monolith catalyst, the wire mesh catalyst was found to enable very promising results with respect to both emission levels (<10 mg NO{sub x} /kWh, <5 mg CO/kWh) and life-time (>8000 h vs. 700 h at 200 kW/m{sup 2}). It was however established that the radiation and hence, the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate, was significantly less than is usually measured in combination with the monolith (15 % vs. 32 %). It was believed that the latter could be improved by developing new burner designs based on CAT's wire mesh concept. As a consequence, a collaboration project between GdF, CAT and the Swedish Gas Technology AB was created. This study reports on the design, the construction and the evaluation of new catalytic burners, based on CAT's wire mesh catalysts, used for the combustion of natural gas in gas cooking stoves. The evaluation of the burners was performed with respect to key factors such as thermal efficiency, emission quality and pressure drop, etc, by the use of theoretical simulations and experimental tests. Impacts of parameters such as the the wire mesh number, the wire mesh structure (planar or folded), the

  7. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali; Reguera, David

    2016-03-01

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  8. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  9. Direct observation of the autophosphorylation of insulin receptor kinase by mass spectrometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Li Li

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic and signaling activities of insulin receptor kinase(IRK)are regulated by the autophosphorylation of three tyrosine residues in a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase domain at Tyro 1158,Tyro 1162 and Tyro 1163.In this study,time-course of the auphosphorylation of the core kinase(residues 978-1283)from IRK was directly investigated by online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.It is found that two tyrosine residues were phosphorylated in reaction time range of 30 min.This study implies that mass spectrometric technique must be a powerful tool to directly monitor the biological macromolecular modification and will also provide the information of the order and the mechanism of autophosphorylation at the tyrosine sites coupled with tandem mass spectrometric technique.

  10. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    details the catalytic partial oxidation of glycerol without preheat: droplets of glycerol are sprayed directly onto the top of the catalyst bed, where they react autothermally with contact times on the order of tau ≈ 30 ms. The reactive flash volatilization of glycerol results in equilibrium syngas production over Rh-Ce catalysts. In addition, water can be added to the liquid glycerol, resulting in true autothermal reforming. This highly efficient process can increase H2 yields and alter the H2 to CO ratio, allowing for flexibility in syngas quality depending on the purpose. Chapter 5 details the results of a time on stream experiment, in which optimal syngas conditions are chosen. Although conversion is 100% for 450 hours, these experiments demonstrate the deactivation of the catalyst over time. Deactivation is exhibited by decreases in H2 and CO 2 production accompanied by a steady increase in CO and temperature. These results are explained as a loss of water-gas shift equilibration. SEM images suggest catalyst sintering may play a role; EDS indicates the presence of impurities on the catalyst. In addition, the instability of quartz in the reactor is demonstrated by etching, resulting in a hole in the reactor tube at the end of the experiment. These results suggest prevaporization may be desirable in this application, and that quartz is not a suitable material for the reactive flash volatilization of oxygenated fuels. In Chapter 6, pyrolysis oil samples from three sources - poplar, pine, and hardwoods - are explored in the context of catalytic partial oxidation. Lessons derived from the tests with model compounds are applied to reactor design, resulting in the reactive flash vaporization of bio oils. Syngas is successfully produced, though deactivation due to coke and ash deposition keeps H2 below equlibrium. Coke formation is observed on the reactor walls, but is avoided between the fuel injection site and catalyst by increasing the proximity of these in the reactor

  11. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  12. Subunit gamma of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump: interaction with other subunits/domains of the complex and binding site for the Zn(2+) metal ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Markus; Wild, Markus R; Dahinden, Pius; Dimroth, Peter

    2002-01-29

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump of Klebsiella pneumoniae is an enzyme complex composed of the peripheral alpha subunit and the two integral membrane-bound subunits beta and gamma. The alpha subunit consists of the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain and the C-terminal biotin domain, which are connected by a flexible proline/alanine-rich linker peptide. To probe interactions between the two domains of the alpha subunit and between alpha-subunit domains and the gamma subunit, the relevant polypeptides were synthesized in Escherichia coli and subjected to copurification studies. The two alpha-subunit domains had no distinct affinity toward each other and could, therefore, not be purified as a unit on avidin-sepharose. The two domains reacted together catalytically, however, performing the carboxyl transfer from oxaloacetate to protein-bound biotin. This reaction was enhanced up to 6-fold in the presence of the Zn(2+)-containing gamma subunit. On the basis of copurification with different tagged proteins, the C-terminal biotin domain but not the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain of the alpha subunit formed a strong complex with the gamma subunit. Upon the mutation of gamma H78 to alanine, the binding affinity to subunit alpha was lost, indicating that this amino acid may be essential for formation of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase enzyme complex. The binding residues for the Zn(2+) metal ion were identified by site-directed and deletion mutagenesis. In the gamma D62A or gamma H77A mutant, the Zn(2+) content of the decarboxylase decreased to 35% or 10% of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. Less than 5% of the Zn(2+) present in the wild-type enzyme was found if the two C-terminal gamma-subunit residues H82 and P83 were deleted. Corresponding with the reduced Zn(2+) contents in these mutants, the oxaloacetate decarboxylase activities were diminished. These results indicate that aspartate 62, histidine 77, and histidine 82 of the gamma subunit are ligands

  13. Catalytic production of conjugated fatty acids and oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippaerts, An; Goossens, Steven; Jacobs, Pierre A; Sels, Bert F

    2011-06-20

    The reactive double bonds in conjugated vegetable oils are of high interest in industry. Traditionally, conjugated vegetable oils are added to paints, varnishes, and inks to improve their drying properties, while recently there is an increased interest in their use in the production of bioplastics. Besides the industrial applications, also food manufactures are interested in conjugated vegetable oils due to their various positive health effects. While the isomer type is less important for their industrial purposes, the beneficial health effects are mainly associated with the c9,t11, t10,c12 and t9,t11 CLA isomers. The production of CLA-enriched oils as additives in functional foods thus requires a high CLA isomer selectivity. Currently, CLAs are produced by conjugation of oils high in linoleic acid, for example soybean and safflower oil, using homogeneous bases. Although high CLA productivities and very high isomer selectivities are obtained, this process faces many ecological drawbacks. Moreover, CLA-enriched oils can not be produced directly with the homogeneous bases. Literature reports describe many catalytic processes to conjugate linoleic acid, linoleic acid methyl ester, and vegetable oils rich in linoleic acid: biocatalysts, for example enzymes and cells; metal catalysts, for example homogeneous metal complexes and heterogeneous catalysts; and photocatalysts. This Review discusses state-of-the-art catalytic processes in comparison with some new catalytic production routes. For each category of catalytic process, the CLA productivities and the CLA isomer selectivity are compared. Heterogeneous catalysis seems the most attractive approach for CLA production due to its easy recovery process, provided that the competing hydrogenation reaction is limited and the CLA production rate competes with the current homogeneous base catalysis. The most important criteria to obtain high CLA productivity and isomer selectivity are (1) absence of a hydrogen donor, (2

  14. Compiling Dictionaries Using Semantic Domains*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Moe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: The task of providing dictionaries for all the world's languages is prodigious, re-quiring efficient techniques. The text corpus method cannot be used for minority languages lacking texts. To meet the need, the author has constructed a list of 1 600 semantic domains, which he has successfully used to collect words. In a workshop setting, a group of speakers can collect as many as 17 000 words in ten days. This method results in a classified word list that can be efficiently expanded into a full dictionary. The method works because the mental lexicon is a giant web or-ganized around key concepts. A semantic domain can be defined as an important concept together with the words directly related to it by lexical relations. A person can utilize the mental web to quickly jump from word to word within a domain. The author is developing a template for each domain to aid in collecting words and in de-scribing their semantics. Investigating semantics within the context of a domain yields many in-sights. The method permits the production of both alphabetically and semantically organized dic-tionaries. The list of domains is intended to be universal in scope and applicability. Perhaps due to universals of human experience and universals of linguistic competence, there are striking simi-larities in various lists of semantic domains developed for languages around the world. Using a standardized list of domains to classify multiple dictionaries opens up possibilities for cross-lin-guistic research into semantic and lexical universals.

    Keywords: SEMANTIC DOMAINS, SEMANTIC FIELDS, SEMANTIC CATEGORIES, LEX-ICAL RELATIONS, SEMANTIC PRIMITIVES, DOMAIN TEMPLATES, MENTAL LEXICON, SEMANTIC UNIVERSALS, MINORITY LANGUAGES, LEXICOGRAPHY

    Opsomming: Samestelling van woordeboeke deur gebruikmaking van se-mantiese domeine. Die taak van die voorsiening van woordeboeke aan al die tale van die wêreld is geweldig en vereis doeltreffende tegnieke. Die

  15. Safe domain and elementary geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Richard, J M

    2004-01-01

    A classical problem of mechanics involves a projectile fired from a given point with a given velocity whose direction is varied. This results in a family of trajectories whose envelope defines the border of a 'safe' domain. In the simple cases of a constant force, harmonic potential and Kepler or Coulomb motion, the trajectories are conic curves whose envelope in a plane is another conic section which can be derived either by simple calculus or by geometrical considerations. The case of harmonic forces reveals a subtle property of the maximal sum of distances within an ellipse.

  16. The nucleotide addition cycle of RNA polymerase is controlled by two molecular hinges in the Bridge Helix domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinzierl Robert OJ

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular RNA polymerases (RNAPs are complex molecular machines that combine catalysis with concerted conformational changes in the active center. Previous work showed that kinking of a hinge region near the C-terminus of the Bridge Helix (BH-HC plays a critical role in controlling the catalytic rate. Results Here, new evidence for the existence of an additional hinge region in the amino-terminal portion of the Bridge Helix domain (BH-HN is presented. The nanomechanical properties of BH-HN emerge as a direct consequence of the highly conserved primary amino acid sequence. Mutations that are predicted to influence its flexibility cause corresponding changes in the rate of the nucleotide addition cycle (NAC. BH-HN displays functional properties that are distinct from BH-HC, suggesting that conformational changes in the Bridge Helix control the NAC via two independent mechanisms. Conclusions The properties of two distinct molecular hinges in the Bridge Helix of RNAP determine the functional contribution of this domain to key stages of the NAC by coordinating conformational changes in surrounding domains.

  17. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  18. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  19. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  20. Distinct functional domains in nesprin-1α and nesprin-2β bind directly to emerin and both interactions are disrupted in X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerin and specific isoforms of nesprin-1 and -2 are nuclear membrane proteins which are binding partners in multi-protein complexes spanning the nuclear envelope. We report here the characterisation of the residues both in emerin and in nesprin-1α and -2β which are involved in their interaction and show that emerin requires nesprin-1 or -2 to retain it at the nuclear membrane. Using several protein-protein interaction methods, we show that residues 368 to 627 of nesprin-1α and residues 126 to 219 of nesprin-2β, which show high homology to one another, both mediate binding to emerin residues 140-176. This region has previously been implicated in binding to F-actin, β-catenin and lamin A/C suggesting that it is critical for emerin function. Confirmation that these protein domains interact in vivo was shown using GFP-dominant negative assays. Exogenous expression of either of these nesprin fragments in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells displaced endogenous emerin from the nuclear envelope and reduced the targeting of newly synthesised emerin. Furthermore, we are the first to report that emerin mutations which give rise to X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, disrupt binding to both nesprin-1α and -2β isoforms, further indicating a role of nesprins in the pathology of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

  1. Structural requirements for assembly of dimeric IgA probed by site-directed mutagenesis of J chain and a cysteine residue of the alpha-chain CH2 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugmann, S; Pleass, R J; Atkin, J D; Woof, J M

    1997-07-01

    The structural features of J chain required for interaction with IgA in IgA dimer assembly were investigated by coexpression of wild-type and mutant forms of J chain with IgA1 in CHO cells. With wild-type J chain, a mixture of J chain-containing dimers and monomers was secreted. Substitution of Cys14 of J chain with Ser resulted in expression of only monomer IgA covalently associated with J chain. Similarly, mutation of Cys68 to Ser also resulted in expression predominantly of a monomer IgA-J chain species. These results suggest that Cys14 and Cys68 play critical roles in formation of J chain-containing IgA dimers, with each forming a disulfide bridge to an IgA monomer. Substitution of Asn48 with Ala, to prevent attachment of N-linked carbohydrate to J chain, also resulted in markedly reduced dimer assembly, suggesting a requirement for the sugar moiety in J chain function. We also mutated Cys311 on the C alpha2 domain of the IgA heavy chain to Ser. When coexpressed with wild-type J chain, this mutant was still capable of forming dimers, indicating that this residue was not involved in dimerization. Taken together, our results are consistent with an arrangement in which IgA monomers are linked end-to-end with J chain interposed. PMID:9200460

  2. Aversive control: A separate domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineline, P N

    1984-11-01

    Traditionally, aversive control has been viewed as a separate domain within behavior theory. Sometimes this separateness has been based upon a distinction between reinforcement and punishment, and sometimes upon a distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. The latter is regarded here as the more compelling basis, due to some inherent procedural asymmetries. An approach to the interpretation of negative reinforcement is presented, with indication of types of experiments that support it and that also point to promising directions for further work. However, most of the interpretive issues that arise here are relevant to positively reinforced behavior as well. These include: possible reformulation of the operant/respondent distinction; the place of emotional concepts in behavior analysis; the need for simultaneous, complementary analysis on differing time scales; the understanding of behavioral situations with rewarding or aversive properties that depend as much upon the contingencies that the situations involve as upon the primary rewarding or aversive stimuli that they include. Thus, an adequate understanding of this domain, which has been traditionally viewed as distinct, has implications for all domains of behavior-analytic theory. PMID:16812404

  3. Aversive control: A separate domain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hineline, P N

    1984-11-01

    Traditionally, aversive control has been viewed as a separate domain within behavior theory. Sometimes this separateness has been based upon a distinction between reinforcement and punishment, and sometimes upon a distinction between positive and negative reinforcement. The latter is regarded here as the more compelling basis, due to some inherent procedural asymmetries. An approach to the interpretation of negative reinforcement is presented, with indication of types of experiments that support it and that also point to promising directions for further work. However, most of the interpretive issues that arise here are relevant to positively reinforced behavior as well. These include: possible reformulation of the operant/respondent distinction; the place of emotional concepts in behavior analysis; the need for simultaneous, complementary analysis on differing time scales; the understanding of behavioral situations with rewarding or aversive properties that depend as much upon the contingencies that the situations involve as upon the primary rewarding or aversive stimuli that they include. Thus, an adequate understanding of this domain, which has been traditionally viewed as distinct, has implications for all domains of behavior-analytic theory.

  4. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...... of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...... work with new possibilities of development of the work, but also suggestions for development of the concept of catalytic processes....

  5. APP蛋白家族胞内段释放与神经干细胞向神经元细胞定向分化的关系研究%Study on the Relationship between the Release of Intracellular Domain of Amyloid-β Precursor Protein and Directional Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells into Neuron Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章建国; Amy Yong Chen Low; 杨武林

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the effects of the intracellular domain of APP family on the directional differentiation of neuron. [Method ] Neural stem cells were isolated and cultured in vitro, which were then transfected with plasmids containing the intracellular domains of APP family for overexpression. Their effects on the directional differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons were studied. [Result ] The over-expression of the intracellular domain of APP protein family can inhibit the differentiation of neural stem cells into neurons, and the effects of intracellular segments of APP and APLP2 were particularly significant. Mutagenesis experiments showed that it was necessary to release 31 amino acid terminal fragment through Capase hydrolysis in this process. The directional differentiation of neural stem cells into neuron cells was controlled through releasing APP-ICD31 by the intracellular domain of APP family. [Conclusion] This research further proved the relationship between APP protein and the incidence of Alzheimers disease,and provided new targets for the treatment of Alzheimers disease.%[目的]研究APP家族胞内段时神经细胞定向分化的影响.[方法]通过分离体外培养神经干细胞,转染导入APP蛋白家族胞内段以过表达后,研究其对神经干细胞向神经元定向分化的影响.[结果]APP家族蛋白胞内段的过表达可以抑制神经干细胞向神经元细胞的分化,其中APP和APLP2胞内段的影响尤为显著.突变试验表明,通过Capase水解释放末端31氧基酸片断是这个过程必需的.APP家族胞内段是通过释放APP-ICD31来抑制神经干细胞向神经元细胞的定向分化.[结论]该研究进一步证实了APP蛋白和老年痴呆病发生的联系,也为老年痴呆症的治疗提供新的靶点.

  6. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  7. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  8. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vedi V.E.; Rovenskii A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  9. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  10. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  11. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  12. Preparation and Catalytic Oxidation Activity on 2-mercaptoethanol of a Novel Catalytic Cellulose Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yu-yuan; LI Ying-jie; CHEN Wen-xing; Lü Wang-yang; Lü Su-fang; XU Min-hong; LIU Fan

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt tetra(N-carbonylacylic) aminophthalocyanine was supported on cellulose fibres by graft reaction to obtain a novel polymer catalyst, catalytic cellulose fibres (CCF),and the optimal supporting conditions were pH = 6, 80℃,t = 120 min. The catalytic oxidation activity of CCF towards oxidation of 2-mereaptoethanol (MEA) in aqueous solution was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that CCF had good catalytic oxidation activity on MEA at room temperature, causing no secondary pollution and remaining efficient for the repetitive tests with no obvious decrease of catalytic activity.

  13. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  14. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  15. Low efficiency deasphalting and catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for converting an asphaltene and metals containing heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter, more valuable products the metals comprising Ni and V. It comprises: demetallizing the feed by deasphalting the feed in a solvent deasphalting means operating at solvent deasphalting conditions including a solvent: feed volume ratio of about 1:1 to 4:1, using a solvent selected from the group of C4 to 400 degrees F. hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof; recovering from the solvent rich fraction a demetallized oil intermediate product, having a boiling range and containing at least 10 wt.% of the asphaltenes, and 5 to 30% of the Ni and V, and at least 10 wt.% of the solvent present in the solvent rich phase produced in the deasphalting means; catalytically cracking the demetallized oil intermediate product in a catalytic cracking means operating at catalytic cracking conditions to produce a catalytically cracked product vapor fraction having a lower boiling range than the boiling range of the demetallized oil intermediate product; and fractionating the catalytically cracked product in a fractionation means to produce catalytically cracked product fractions

  16. An English language interface for constrained domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Brenda J.

    1989-01-01

    The Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) Jargon Interpreter (MJI) demonstrates an English language interface for a constrained domain. A constrained domain is defined as one with a small and well delineated set of actions and objects. The set of actions chosen for the MJI is from the domain of MSOCC Applications Executive (MAE) Systems Test and Operations Language (STOL) directives and contains directives for signing a cathode ray tube (CRT) on or off, calling up or clearing a display page, starting or stopping a procedure, and controlling history recording. The set of objects chosen consists of CRTs, display pages, STOL procedures, and history files. Translation from English sentences to STOL directives is done in two phases. In the first phase, an augmented transition net (ATN) parser and dictionary are used for determining grammatically correct parsings of input sentences. In the second phase, grammatically typed sentences are submitted to a forward-chaining rule-based system for interpretation and translation into equivalent MAE STOL directives. Tests of the MJI show that it is able to translate individual clearly stated sentences into the subset of directives selected for the prototype. This approach to an English language interface may be used for similarly constrained situations by modifying the MJI's dictionary and rules to reflect the change of domain.

  17. Flexible time domain averaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Lei, Yaguo; Wang, Xiufeng

    2013-09-01

    Time domain averaging(TDA) is essentially a comb filter, it cannot extract the specified harmonics which may be caused by some faults, such as gear eccentric. Meanwhile, TDA always suffers from period cutting error(PCE) to different extent. Several improved TDA methods have been proposed, however they cannot completely eliminate the waveform reconstruction error caused by PCE. In order to overcome the shortcomings of conventional methods, a flexible time domain averaging(FTDA) technique is established, which adapts to the analyzed signal through adjusting each harmonic of the comb filter. In this technique, the explicit form of FTDA is first constructed by frequency domain sampling. Subsequently, chirp Z-transform(CZT) is employed in the algorithm of FTDA, which can improve the calculating efficiency significantly. Since the signal is reconstructed in the continuous time domain, there is no PCE in the FTDA. To validate the effectiveness of FTDA in the signal de-noising, interpolation and harmonic reconstruction, a simulated multi-components periodic signal that corrupted by noise is processed by FTDA. The simulation results show that the FTDA is capable of recovering the periodic components from the background noise effectively. Moreover, it can improve the signal-to-noise ratio by 7.9 dB compared with conventional ones. Experiments are also carried out on gearbox test rigs with chipped tooth and eccentricity gear, respectively. It is shown that the FTDA can identify the direction and severity of the eccentricity gear, and further enhances the amplitudes of impulses by 35%. The proposed technique not only solves the problem of PCE, but also provides a useful tool for the fault symptom extraction of rotating machinery.

  18. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments. PMID:22383259

  19. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-09-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field.

  20. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G. F.; Grysan, P.; Guennou, M.; Kreisel, J.; Martinotti, D.; Rountree, C. L.; Mathieu, C.; Barrett, N.

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM – electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM – electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  1. Low energy electron imaging of domains and domain walls in magnesium-doped lithium niobate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataf, G F; Grysan, P; Guennou, M; Kreisel, J; Martinotti, D; Rountree, C L; Mathieu, C; Barrett, N

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of domain structures, specifically domain walls, currently attracts a significant attention in the field of (multi)-ferroic materials. In this article, we analyze contrast formation in full field electron microscopy applied to domains and domain walls in the uniaxial ferroelectric lithium niobate, which presents a large 3.8 eV band gap and for which conductive domain walls have been reported. We show that the transition from Mirror Electron Microscopy (MEM - electrons reflected) to Low Energy Electron Microscopy (LEEM - electrons backscattered) gives rise to a robust contrast between domains with upwards (Pup) and downwards (Pdown) polarization, and provides a measure of the difference in surface potential between the domains. We demonstrate that out-of-focus conditions of imaging produce contrast inversion, due to image distortion induced by charged surfaces, and also carry information on the polarization direction in the domains. Finally, we show that the intensity profile at domain walls provides experimental evidence for a local stray, lateral electric field. PMID:27608605

  2. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G. (Case Western); (Michigan)

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  3. The PE-PPE Domain in Mycobacterium Reveals a Serine α/β Hydrolase Fold and Function: An In-Silico Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Rafiya; Tanneeru, Karunakar; Guruprasad, Lalitha

    2011-01-01

    The PE and PPE proteins first reported in the genome sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv are now identified in all mycobacterial species. The PE-PPE domain (Pfam ID: PF08237) is a 225 amino acid residue conserved region located towards the C-terminus of some PE and PPE proteins and hypothetical proteins. Our in-silico sequence analysis revealed that this domain is present in all Mycobacteria, some Rhodococcus and Nocardia farcinica genomes. This domain comprises a pentapeptide sequence motif GxSxG/S at the N-terminus and conserved amino acid residues Ser, Asp and His that constitute a catalytic triad characteristic of lipase, esterase and cutinase activity. The fold prediction and comparative modeling of the 3-D structure of the PE-PPE domain revealed a “serine α/β hydrolase” structure with a central β-sheet flanked by α-helices on either side. The structure comprises a lid insertion with a closed structure conformation and has a solvent inaccessible active site. The oxyanion hole that stabilizes the negative charge on the tetrahedral intermediate has been identified. Our findings add to the growing list of serine hydrolases in mycobacterium, which are essential for the maintenance of their impermeable cell wall and virulence. These results provide the directions for the design of experiments to establish the function of PE and PPE proteins. PMID:21347309

  4. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  5. Molecular basis of the general base catalysis of an α/β-hydrolase catalytic triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueru; Yin, Shuhui; Feng, Yitao; Li, Jie; Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Changdong; Zhu, Guang; Guo, Zhihong

    2014-05-30

    The serine-histidine-aspartate triad is well known for its covalent, nucleophilic catalysis in a diverse array of enzymatic transformations. Here we show that its nucleophilicity is shielded and its catalytic role is limited to being a specific general base by an open-closed conformational change in the catalysis of (1R,6R)-2-succinyl-6-hydroxy-2,4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate synthase (or MenH), a typical α/β-hydrolase fold enzyme in the vitamin K biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found to adopt an open conformation without a functional triad in its ligand-free form and a closed conformation with a fully functional catalytic triad in the presence of its reaction product. The open-to-closed conformational transition involves movement of half of the α-helical cap domain, which causes extensive structural changes in the α/β-domain and forces the side chain of the triad histidine to adopt an energetically disfavored gauche conformation to form the functional triad. NMR analysis shows that the inactive open conformation without a triad prevails in ligand-free solution and is converted to the closed conformation with a properly formed triad by the reaction product. Mutation of the residues crucial to this open-closed transition either greatly decreases or completely eliminates the enzyme activity, supporting an important catalytic role for the structural change. These findings suggest that the open-closed conformational change tightly couples formation of the catalytic triad to substrate binding to enhance the substrate specificities and simultaneously shield the nucleophilicity of the triad, thus allowing it to expand its catalytic power beyond the nucleophilic catalysis.

  6. Precipitation and calcination synthesis methods forming nano-sized platinum catalytic particles for methanol and hydrogen oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, S.; Naidoo, Q.; Musil, E.; Linkov, V.; Vaivars, G.

    2013-03-01

    Under varying experimental conditions of calcination and precipitation reactions, different particle sizes and levels of platinum on carbon supported (Pt/C) catalysts were obtained. Rapid precipitation following a chemical reaction ensured formation of nano-sized catalytic particles using super-saturated concentrations under controlled conditions was a significant contribution in understanding the synthesis process and how it relates to an increased number of catalytic reaction sites ultimately providing superior electrochemical (EC) activity. These conditions influenced nucleation and growth rates of the catalytic particles. The super-saturation concentrations of the reactants in the reaction vessel played a direct role in producing the desired morphology of the crystallites.

  7. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  8. Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, Keiji, E-mail: iwata.24h.keiji@jp.nssmc.com [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Imafuku, Muneyuki; Orihara, Hideto; Sakai, Yusuke; Ohya, Shin-Ichi [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Tokyo City University, Tokyo, 158-0087 (Japan); Suzuki, Tamaki [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Nippon Steel and Sumitomo Metal Corporation, Futtsu, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Shobu, Takahisa [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Akita, Koichi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishiyama, Kazushi [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Aoba, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    Internal stress distribution for generating closure domains occurring in laser-irradiated Fe–3%Si(110) steels was investigated using high-energy X-ray analysis and domain theory based on the variational principle. The measured triaxial stresses inside the specimen were compressive and the stress in the rolling direction became more dominant than stresses in the other directions. The calculations based on the variational principle of magnetic energy for closure domains showed that the measured triaxial stresses made the closure domains more stable than the basic domain without closure domains. The experimental and calculation results reveal that the laser-introduced internal stresses result in the occurrence of the closure domains.

  9. QM/MM investigation of the catalytic mechanism of angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xia; Zhang, Chunchun; Xu, Dingguo

    2016-06-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) converts angiotensin I to angiotensin II and degrades bradykinin and other vasoactive peptides. ACE inhibitors are used to treat diseases such as hypertension and heart failure. It is thus highly desirable to understand the catalytic mechanism of ACE, as this should facilitate the design of more powerful and selective ACE inhibitors. ACE exhibits two different active domains, the C-domain and the N-domain. In this work, we systematically investigated the inhibitor- and substrate-binding patterns in the N-domain of human ACE using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical approach. The hydrolysis of hippuryl-histidyl-leucine (HHL) as catalyzed by the N-domain of human somatic ACE was explored, and the effects of chloride ion on the overall reaction were also investigated. Two models, one with and one without a chloride ion at the first binding position, were then designed to examine the chloride dependence of inhibitor-substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Our calculations indicate that the hydrolysis reaction follows a stepwise general base/general acid catalysis path. The estimated mean free energy barrier height in the two models is about 15.6 kcal/mol, which agrees very well with the experimentally estimated value of 15.8 kcal/mol. Our simulations thus suggest that the N-domain is in a mixed form during ACE-catalyzed hydrolysis, with the single-chloride-ion and the double-chloride-ion forms existing simultaneously. Graphical Abstract Superposition of ACE C- and N- domains. PMID:27184002

  10. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lock Sow Mei; S.S.M. Lock; Dai-Viet N. Vo; Bawadi Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd) as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by u...

  11. Influence of Preparation Conditions on the Catalytic Performance of MoNx/SBA-15 for Ammonia Decomposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongchao Liu; Hua Wang; Jianghan Shen; Ying Sun; Zhongmin Liu

    2006-01-01

    The influence of preparation conditions (e.g. H2-N2 ratios, final nitriding temperatures) on the performance of MoNx/SBA-15 catalysts for ammonia decomposition was investigated. The variation of catalytic activity with H2-N2 ratios may be attributed to the variation of surface compositions and particle sizes of the active components. The variation of nitriding temperatures leads to the formation of molybdenum nitride domains of varying compositions, which are responsible for the difference in their catalytic performance with respect to ammonia decomposition. At 923 K, ammonia could be completely decomof ammonia.

  12. Structural rearrangements of a polyketide synthase module during its catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Jonathan R; Dutta, Somnath; Hansen, Douglas A; Hale, Wendi A; Chemler, Joseph A; Dosey, Annie M; Narayan, Alison R H; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2014-06-26

    The polyketide synthase (PKS) mega-enzyme assembly line uses a modular architecture to synthesize diverse and bioactive natural products that often constitute the core structures or complete chemical entities for many clinically approved therapeutic agents. The architecture of a full-length PKS module from the pikromycin pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae creates a reaction chamber for the intramodule acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain that carries building blocks and intermediates between acyltransferase, ketosynthase and ketoreductase active sites (see accompanying paper). Here we determine electron cryo-microscopy structures of a full-length pikromycin PKS module in three key biochemical states of its catalytic cycle. Each biochemical state was confirmed by bottom-up liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The ACP domain is differentially and precisely positioned after polyketide chain substrate loading on the active site of the ketosynthase, after extension to the β-keto intermediate, and after β-hydroxy product generation. The structures reveal the ACP dynamics for sequential interactions with catalytic domains within the reaction chamber, and for transferring the elongated and processed polyketide substrate to the next module in the PKS pathway. During the enzymatic cycle the ketoreductase domain undergoes dramatic conformational rearrangements that enable optimal positioning for reductive processing of the ACP-bound polyketide chain elongation intermediate. These findings have crucial implications for the design of functional PKS modules, and for the engineering of pathways to generate pharmacologically relevant molecules. PMID:24965656

  13. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  14. Structure of the Tribolium castaneum Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis,A.; Schuller, A.; Skordalakes, E.

    2008-01-01

    A common hallmark of human cancers is the overexpression of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that is responsible for maintaining the length and integrity of chromosome ends. Telomere length deregulation and telomerase activation is an early, and perhaps necessary, step in cancer cell evolution. Here we present the high-resolution structure of the Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT. The protein consists of three highly conserved domains, organized into a ring-like structure that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and B-family DNA polymerases. Domain organization places motifs implicated in substrate binding and catalysis in the interior of the ring, which can accommodate seven to eight bases of double-stranded nucleic acid. Modelling of an RNA-DNA heteroduplex in the interior of this ring demonstrates a perfect fit between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate, and positions the 3'-end of the DNA primer at the active site of the enzyme, providing evidence for the formation of an active telomerase elongation complex.

  15. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic...... of affine-linear logic. This language adds to HOPLA an interesting tensor operation at the price of linearity constraints on the occurrences of variables. The tensor can be understood as a juxtaposition of independent processes, and allows Affine HOPLA to encode processes of the kind found in treatments...... of nondeterministic dataflow. The domain theory can be generalised to presheaf models, providing a more refined treatment of nondeterministic branching and supporting notions of bisimulation. The operational semantics for HOPLA is guided by the idea that derivations of transitions in the operational semantics should...

  16. Reasoning in incomplete domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, S.

    1979-01-01

    Most real-world domains differ from the micro-worlds traditionally used in A.I. in that they have an incomplete factual data base which changes over time. Understanding in these domains can be thought of as the gneration of plausible infoerences which are able to use the facts available, and respond to changes in them. A traditional rule interpreter such as Planner can be extended to construct plausible inferences in these domains by allowing assumptions to be made in applying rules, resultsing in simplifications of rules which can be used in an incomplete data base; monitoring the antecedents and consequents of a rule so that inferences can be maintained over a changing data base.

  17. Axion domain wall baryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daido, Ryuji; Kitajima, Naoya [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takahashi, Fuminobu [Department of Physics, Tohoku University,Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kavli IPMU, TODIAS, University of Tokyo,Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2015-07-28

    We propose a new scenario of baryogenesis, in which annihilation of axion domain walls generates a sizable baryon asymmetry. Successful baryogenesis is possible for a wide range of the axion mass and decay constant, m≃10{sup 8}–10{sup 13} GeV and f≃10{sup 13}–10{sup 16} GeV. Baryonic isocurvature perturbations are significantly suppressed in our model, in contrast to various spontaneous baryogenesis scenarios in the slow-roll regime. In particular, the axion domain wall baryogenesis is consistent with high-scale inflation which generates a large tensor-to-scalar ratio within the reach of future CMB B-mode experiments. We also discuss the gravitational waves produced by the domain wall annihilation and its implications for the future gravitational wave experiments.

  18. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  19. Domain and domain walls NMR spectra in R Co2 intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR signals in ferromagnets originate from domains and domain walls. THe technique has the ability to distinguish signals originating from these two regions, through the selection of the radiofrequency (RF) power level applied to the sample. The dependence of the spin echo amplitude upon the RF field intensity can give information on magnetic properties such as domain walls mobility, distribution of local magnetic anisotropies, etc. NMR spectra obtained under different RF intensities allow the investigation of different regions of the samples. In this paper we have applied this technique to the study of the spin-echo amplitude and of the spectra of 59 Co in the series of the Laves phase intermetallic compounds R Co2, where R=Gd, Dy, Tb at 4.2 K, as a function of the RF Field. The results were analyzed according to a model which takes into account several features characteristic of ferromagnetic powdered samples. These include the distribution of the direction of the hyperfine fielding respect to the RF field, the variation of the enhancement factor within the domain-walls, the distribution of wall areas, etc. The analysis suggests that whereas in Tb Co2 the NMR signals come purely from domain walls, in Dy Co2 they come mainly from domains. Gd Co2 behaves as an intermediate case where there exists a mixture of contributions to the NMR signals. In this case we were able to observe and measure separately the NMR spectra of nuclei from domains and domain walls. (author)

  20. Recent advances in noble metal based composite nanocatalysts: colloidal synthesis, properties, and catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-06-01

    This Review article provides a report on progress in the synthesis, properties and catalytic applications of noble metal based composite nanomaterials. We begin with a brief discussion on the categories of various composite materials. We then present some important colloidal synthetic approaches to the composite nanostructures; here, major attention has been paid to bimetallic nanoparticles. We also introduce some important physiochemical properties that are beneficial from composite nanomaterials. Finally, we highlight the catalytic applications of such composite nanoparticles and conclude with remarks on prospective future directions.

  1. Slow catalytic pyrolysis of rapeseed cake: Product yield and characterization of the pyrolysis liquid

    OpenAIRE

    Smets, Koen; Roukaerts, A.; Czech, Jan; REGGERS, Guy; Schreurs, Sonja; Carleer, Robert; Yperman, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The performance of three catalysts during slow catalytic pyrolysis of rapeseed cake from 150 to 550 degrees C over a time period of 20 min followed by an isothermal period of 30 min at 550 degrees C was investigated. Na2CO3 was premixed with the rapeseed cake, while gamma-Al2O3 and HZSM-5 were tested without direct biomass contact. Catalytic experiments resulted in lower liquid and higher gas yields. The total amount of organic compounds in the pyrolysis liquid was considerably reduced by the...

  2. Advanced catalytic plasma exhaust clean-up process for ITER-EDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glugla, M. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Radiochemie (Germany); Penzhorn, R.D. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Radiochemie (Germany); Hermann, P. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Radiochemie (Germany); Ache, H.J. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Inst. fuer Radiochemie (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    A new catalyst reactor (PERMCAT) has been developed to further improve the catalytic conversion / permeation based plasma exhaust clean-up process realized in the facility CAPRICE at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). The reactor directly combines a nickel catalyst with permeation tubes and removes residual amounts of tritium from tritiated species by isotopic swamping with hydrogen. Succesful integration of such a unit into the CAPRICE catalytic clean-up approach could lead to a fully continuous process and bring about a considerable reduction in non-recoverable tritium. (orig.).

  3. Advanced catalytic plasma exhaust clean-up process for ITER-EDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new catalyst reactor (PERMCAT) has been developed to further improve the catalytic conversion / permeation based plasma exhaust clean-up process realized in the facility CAPRICE at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). The reactor directly combines a nickel catalyst with permeation tubes and removes residual amounts of tritium from tritiated species by isotopic swamping with hydrogen. Succesful integration of such a unit into the CAPRICE catalytic clean-up approach could lead to a fully continuous process and bring about a considerable reduction in non-recoverable tritium. (orig.)

  4. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  5. Nonlinear analysis of sequence repeats of multi-domain proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many multi-domain proteins have repetitive three-dimensional structures but nearly-random amino acid sequences. In the present paper, by using a modified recurrence plot proposed by us previously, we show that these amino acid sequences have hidden repetitions in fact. These results indicate that the repetitive domain structures are encoded by the repetitive sequences. This also gives a method to detect the repetitive domain structures directly from amino acid sequences

  6. Quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance time domain signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetic resonance time domain signal is often made up of a limited number of exponentially decaying sinusoids plus white noise. Traditionally, quantitative analysis of the signal is carried out in the frequency domain, after applying FFT in conjunction with a time window. It is shown that quantitative analysis directly in the time domain is feasible, and in fact yields several advantages. Various methods are applied and compared. (Auth.)

  7. Domain Wall Mobility in Co-Based Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kladivova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the domain wall between opposite circularly magnetized domains in amorphous cylindrical sample with circular easy direction is theoretically studied. The wall is driven by DC current. Various mechanisms which influence the wall velocity were taken into account: current magnitude, deformation of the mowing wall, Hall effect, axially magnetized domain in the middle of the wire. Theoretical results obtained are in a good agreement with experiments on Cobased amorphous ferromagnetic wires.

  8. Catalytic nanoarchitectonics for environmentally compatible energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally compatible energy management is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Low-temperature conversion of chemical to electrical energy is of particular importance to minimize the impact to the environment while sustaining the consumptive economy. In this review, we shed light on one of the most versatile energy-conversion technologies: heterogeneous catalysts. We establish the integrity of structural tailoring in heterogeneous catalysts at different scales in the context of an emerging paradigm in materials science: catalytic nanoarchitectonics. Fundamental backgrounds of energy-conversion catalysis are first provided together with a perspective through state-of-the-art energy-conversion catalysis including catalytic exhaust remediation, fuel-cell electrocatalysis and photosynthesis of solar fuels. Finally, the future evolution of catalytic nanoarchitectonics is overviewed: possible combinations of heterogeneous catalysts, organic molecules and even enzymes to realize reaction-selective, highly efficient and long-life energy conversion technologies which will meet the challenge we face.

  9. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  10. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh.M.; Bragin, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  11. Catalytic microreactors for portable power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiannidis, Symeon [Paul Scherer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    ''Catalytic Microreactors for Portable Power Generation'' addresses a problem of high relevance and increased complexity in energy technology. This thesis outlines an investigation into catalytic and gas-phase combustion characteristics in channel-flow, platinum-coated microreactors. The emphasis of the study is on microreactor/microturbine concepts for portable power generation and the fuels of interest are methane and propane. The author carefully describes numerical and experimental techniques, providing a new insight into the complex interactions between chemical kinetics and molecular transport processes, as well as giving the first detailed report of hetero-/homogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms for catalytic propane combustion. The outcome of this work will be widely applied to the industrial design of micro- and mesoscale combustors. (orig.)

  12. Use catalytic combustion for LHV gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, E.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper shows how low heating value (LHV) waste gases can be combusted to recover energy even when the gases won't burn in a normal manner. Significant energy and economic savings can result by adopting this process. Catalytic combustion is a heterogeneous surface-catalyzed air oxidation of fuel, gaseous or liquid, to generate thermal energy in a flameless mode. The catalytic combustion process is quite complex since it involves numerous catalytic surface and gas-phase chemical reactions. During low temperature surface-catalyzed combustion, as in start-up, the combustion stage is under kinetically controlled conditions. The discussion covers the following topics - combustor substrates; combustor washcoating and catalyzing; combustor operational modes (turbine or tabular modes); applications in coal gasification and in-situ gasification; waste process gases. 16 refs.

  13. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  14. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  15. [Catalytic ozonation of nitrobenzene in water by acidification-activated red mud].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ya-ning; Li, Hua-nan; Xu, Bing-bing; Qi, Fei; Zhao, Lun

    2013-05-01

    Red mud as one kind of aluminum industrial wastes was used as raw material for catalyst preparation. It was activated by acidification in order to enhance its catalytic activity in the system of catalytic ozonation. Furthermore, removal performance and reaction mechanism in degradation of organic pollutants were discussed. Results showed that acid modified red mud had more significant catalytic activity than the raw red mud. The removal efficiency of nitrobenzene by catalytic ozonation with acidified red mud (RM6.0) increased with the increasing ozone concentration. When the ozone concentration was increased from 0.4 mg x L(-1) to 1.7 mg x L(-1), the removal efficiency of nitrobenzene increased from 45% to 92%. There was a consistent effect of water pH on the removal efficiency and the ozone concentration variation. The variation of the removal efficiency depended on the initial water pH. This was because the concentration of OH(-) led to ozone decomposition to generate hydroxyl radicals. The higher water pH value led to the quenching of hydroxyl radicals, resulting in the reduction of catalytic activity of RM6.0. The experimental results of aqueous ozone concentration variation in the presence of RM6.0 and inhibition by hydroxyl radicals indicated that the main reaction mechanism was catalytic ozonation of NB. Firstly, aqueous ozone was absorbed onto the surface of RM6.0, and then the concentrated ozone oxidized NB in water which was with a combination of direct and indirect oxidation. In catalytic reaction, hydroxyl radicals were present, which were generated during the oxidation of NB on the surface of RM6.0.

  16. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  17. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    CERN Document Server

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, and makes use of, a sufficient condition on the group of divisibility of a domain to guarantee that it is a pseudo-valuation domain.

  18. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    2015-01-01

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual deci

  19. Normed Domains of Holomorphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Krantz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We treat the classical concept of domain of holomorphy in ℂn when the holomorphic functions considered are restricted to lie in some Banach space. Positive and negative results are presented. A new view of the case n=1 is considered.

  20. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Skyrmions and domain walls

    OpenAIRE

    Piette, B.; Zakrzewski, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    We study the 3+1 dimensional Skyrme model with a mass term different from the usual one. We show that this new model possesses domain walls solutions. We describe how, in the equivalent 2+1 dimensional model, the Skyrmion is absorbed by the wall.

  2. Determination of the catalytic activity of binuclear metallohydrolases using isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Marcelo M; Ely, Fernanda; Lonhienne, Thierry; Gahan, Lawrence R; Ollis, David L; Guddat, Luke W; Schenk, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Binuclear metallohydrolases are a large and diverse family of enzymes that are involved in numerous metabolic functions. An increasing number of members find applications as drug targets or in processes such as bioremediation. It is thus essential to have an assay available that allows the rapid and reliable determination of relevant catalytic parameters (k cat, K m, and k cat/K m). Continuous spectroscopic assays are frequently only possible by using synthetic (i.e., nonbiological) substrates that possess a suitable chromophoric marker (e.g., nitrophenol). Isothermal titration calorimetry, in contrast, affords a rapid assay independent of the chromophoric properties of the substrate-the heat associated with the hydrolytic reaction can be directly related to catalytic properties. Here, we demonstrate the efficiency of the method on several selected examples of this family of enzymes and show that, in general, the catalytic parameters obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry are in good agreement with those obtained from spectroscopic assays.

  3. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  4. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  5. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  6. Heterogeneous Catalytic Ozonization of Sulfosalicylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of heterogeneous catalytic ozonization of sulfo-salicylic acid (SSal). It was found that catalytic ozonization in the presence of Mn-Zr-O (a modified manganese dioxide supported on silica gel) had significantly enhanced the removal rate (72%) of total organic carbon (TOC) compared with that of ozonization alone (19%). The efficient removal rate of TOC was probably due to increasing the adsorption ability of catalyst and accelerating decomposition of ozone to produce more powerful oxidants than ozone.

  7. Fuzzy Bases of Fuzzy Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Sanping Rao; Qingguo Li

    2013-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to develop quantitative domain theory over frames. Firstly, we propose the notion of a fuzzy basis, and several equivalent characterizations of fuzzy bases are obtained. Furthermore, the concept of a fuzzy algebraic domain is introduced, and a relationship between fuzzy algebraic domains and fuzzy domains is discussed from the viewpoint of fuzzy basis. We finally give an application of fuzzy bases, where the image of a fuzzy domain can be preserved under some special ...

  8. Atomic Pseudo-Valuation Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Stines, Elijah

    2012-01-01

    Pseudo-valuation domains have been studied since their introduction in 1978 by Hedstrom and Houston. Related objects, boundary valuation domains, were introduced by Maney in 2004. Here, it is shown that the class of atomic pseudo-valuation domains coincides with the class of boundary valuation domains. It is also shown that power series rings and generalized power series rings give examples of pseudo-valuation domains whose congruence lattices can be characterized. The paper also introduces, ...

  9. Designing functional metalloproteins: from structural to catalytic metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Melissa L; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2013-09-01

    Metalloenzymes efficiently catalyze some of the most important and difficult reactions in nature. For many years, coordination chemists have effectively used small molecule models to understand these systems. More recently, protein design has been shown to be an effective approach for mimicking metal coordination environments. Since the first designed proteins were reported, much success has been seen for incorporating metal sites into proteins and attaining the desired coordination environment but until recently, this has been with a lack of significant catalytic activity. Now there are examples of designed metalloproteins that, although not yet reaching the activity of native enzymes, are considerably closer. In this review, we highlight work leading up to the design of a small metalloprotein containing two metal sites, one for structural stability (HgS3) and the other a separate catalytic zinc site to mimic carbonic anhydrase activity (ZnN3O). The first section will describe previous studies that allowed for a high affinity thiolate site that binds heavy metals in a way that stabilizes three-stranded coiled coils. The second section will examine ways of preparing histidine rich environments that lead to metal based hydrolytic catalysts. We will also discuss other recent examples of the design of structural metal sites and functional metalloenzymes. Our work demonstrates that attaining the proper first coordination geometry of a metal site can lead to a significant fraction of catalytic activity, apparently independent of the type of secondary structure of the surrounding protein environment. We are now in a position to begin to meet the challenge of building a metalloenzyme systematically from the bottom-up by engineering and analyzing interactions directly around the metal site and beyond.

  10. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  11. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  12. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  13. Catalytic Mechanism of Perosamine N-Acetyltransferase Revealed by High-Resolution X-ray Crystallographic Studies and Kinetic Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoden, James B.; Reinhardt, Laurie A.; Cook, Paul D.; Menden, Patrick; Cleland, W.W.; Holden, Hazel M. (UW); (Mount Union); (UW-MED)

    2012-09-17

    N-Acetylperosamine is an unusual dideoxysugar found in the O-antigens of some Gram-negative bacteria, including the pathogenic Escherichia coli strain O157:H7. The last step in its biosynthesis is catalyzed by PerB, an N-acetyltransferase belonging to the left-handed {beta}-helix superfamily of proteins. Here we describe a combined structural and functional investigation of PerB from Caulobacter crescentus. For this study, three structures were determined to 1.0 {angstrom} resolution or better: the enzyme in complex with CoA and GDP-perosamine, the protein with bound CoA and GDP-N-acetylperosamine, and the enzyme containing a tetrahedral transition state mimic bound in the active site. Each subunit of the trimeric enzyme folds into two distinct regions. The N-terminal domain is globular and dominated by a six-stranded mainly parallel {beta}-sheet. It provides most of the interactions between the protein and GDP-perosamine. The C-terminal domain consists of a left-handed {beta}-helix, which has nearly seven turns. This region provides the scaffold for CoA binding. On the basis of these high-resolution structures, site-directed mutant proteins were constructed to test the roles of His 141 and Asp 142 in the catalytic mechanism. Kinetic data and pH-rate profiles are indicative of His 141 serving as a general base. In addition, the backbone amide group of Gly 159 provides an oxyanion hole for stabilization of the tetrahedral transition state. The pH-rate profiles are also consistent with the GDP-linked amino sugar substrate entering the active site in its unprotonated form. Finally, for this investigation, we show that PerB can accept GDP-3-deoxyperosamine as an alternative substrate, thus representing the production of a novel trideoxysugar.

  14. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  15. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin. PMID:25686748

  16. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-02-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin.

  17. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lemak

    Full Text Available Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5 is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3, the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  18. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. PMID:26958828

  19. Catalytic processes during preferential oxidation of CO in H 2-rich streams over catalysts based on copper-ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, D.; Hornés, A.; Koppány, Zs.; Schay, Z.; Munuera, G.; Soria, J.; Martínez-Arias, A.

    Nanostructured catalysts based on combinations between oxidised copper and cerium entities prepared by two different methods (impregnation of ceria and coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions) have been examined with respect to their catalytic performance for preferential oxidation of CO in a H 2-rich stream (CO-PROX). Correlations between their catalytic and redox properties are established on the basis of parallel analyses of temperature programmed reduction results employing both H 2 and CO as reactants as well as by XPS. Although general catalytic trends can be directly correlated with the redox properties observed upon separate interactions with each of the two reductants (CO and H 2), the existence of interferences between both reductants must be considered to complete details for such activity/redox correlation. Differences in the nature of the active oxidised copper-cerium contacts present in each case determine the catalytic properties of these systems for the CO-PROX process.

  20. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.