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Sample records for catalytic base arginine

  1. Theoretical insights into catalytic mechanism of protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihan Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1, the major arginine asymmetric dimethylation enzyme in mammals, is emerging as a potential drug target for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Understanding the catalytic mechanism of PRMT1 will facilitate inhibitor design. However, detailed mechanisms of the methyl transfer process and substrate deprotonation of PRMT1 remain unclear. In this study, we present a theoretical study on PRMT1 catalyzed arginine dimethylation by employing molecular dynamics (MD simulation and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM calculation. Ternary complex models, composed of PRMT1, peptide substrate, and S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet as cofactor, were constructed and verified by 30-ns MD simulation. The snapshots selected from the MD trajectory were applied for the QM/MM calculation. The typical SN2-favored transition states of the first and second methyl transfers were identified from the potential energy profile. Deprotonation of substrate arginine occurs immediately after methyl transfer, and the carboxylate group of E144 acts as proton acceptor. Furthermore, natural bond orbital analysis and electrostatic potential calculation showed that E144 facilitates the charge redistribution during the reaction and reduces the energy barrier. In this study, we propose the detailed mechanism of PRMT1-catalyzed asymmetric dimethylation, which increases insight on the small-molecule effectors design, and enables further investigations into the physiological function of this family.

  2. The Rap-RapGAP complex: GTP hydrolysis without catalytic glutamine and arginine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrima, Andrea; Thomas, Christoph; Deaconescu, Delia; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2008-04-01

    The GTP-binding protein Rap1 regulates integrin-mediated and other cell adhesion processes. Unlike most other Ras-related proteins, it contains a threonine in switch II instead of a glutamine (Gln61 in Ras), a residue crucial for the GTPase reaction of most G proteins. Furthermore, unlike most other GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for small G proteins, which supply a catalytically important Arg-finger, no arginine residue of RapGAP makes a significant contribution to the GTPase reaction of Rap1. For a detailed understanding of the reaction mechanism, we have solved the structure of Rap1 in complex with Rap1GAP. It shows that the Thr61 of Rap is away from the active site and that an invariant asparagine of RapGAPs, the Asn-thumb, takes over the role of the cis-glutamine of Ras, Rho or Ran. The structure and biochemical data allow to further explain the mechanism and to define the important role of a conserved tyrosine. The structure and biochemical data furthermore show that the RapGAP homologous region of the tumour suppressor Tuberin is sufficient for catalysis on Rheb.

  3. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-02-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed.

  4. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of MitochondrialRespiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent AdductWith a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Sun, Gang; Cobessi, David; Wang, Andy C.; Shen,John T.; Tung, Eric Y.; Anderson, Vernon E.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-12-01

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation.

  5. 3-Nitropropionic Acid is a Suicide Inhibitor of Mitochondrial Respiration that, Upon Oxidation by Complex II, Forms a Covalent Adduct With a Catalytic Base Arginine in the Active Site of the Enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report three new structures of mitochondrial respiratory Complex II (succinate ubiquinone oxidoreductase, E.C. 1.3.5.1) at up to 2.1 (angstrom) resolution, with various inhibitors. The structures define the conformation of the bound inhibitors and suggest the residues involved in substrate binding and catalysis at the dicarboxylate site. In particular they support the role of Arg297 as a general base catalyst accepting a proton in the dehydrogenation of succinate. The dicarboxylate ligand in oxaloacetate-containing crystals appears to be the same as that reported for Shewanella flavocytochrome c treated with fumarate. The plant and fungal toxin 3-nitropropionic acid, an irreversible inactivator of succinate dehydrogenase, forms a covalent adduct with the side chain of Arg297. The modification eliminates a trypsin cleavage site in the flavoprotein, and tandem mass spectroscopic analysis of the new fragment shows the mass of Arg 297 to be increased by 83 Da and to have potential of losing 44 Da, consistent with decarboxylation, during fragmentation

  6. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

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    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey (Case Western); (Colorado)

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  7. Role of arginine 293 and glutamine 288 in communication between catalytic and allosteric sites in yeast ribonucleotide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Md Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-06-22

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 (α) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 (β) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  8. Arginine-based biodegradable ether-ester polymers with low cytotoxicity as potential gene carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memanishvili, Tamar; Zavradashvili, Nino; Kupatadze, Nino; Tugushi, David; Gverdtsiteli, Marekh; Torchilin, Vladimir P; Wandrey, Christine; Baldi, Lucia; Manoli, Sagar S; Katsarava, Ramaz

    2014-08-11

    The success of gene therapy depends on safe and effective gene carriers. Despite being widely used, synthetic vectors based on poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), poly(l-lysine) (PLL), or poly(l-arginine) (poly-Arg) are not yet fully satisfactory. Thus, both improvement of established carriers and creation of new synthetic vectors are necessary. A series of biodegradable arginine-based ether-ester polycations was developed, which consists of three main classes: amides, urethanes, and ureas. Compared to that of PEI, PLL, and poly-Arg, much lower cytotoxicity was achieved for the new cationic arginine-based ether-ester polymers. Even at polycation concentrations up to 2 mg/mL, no significant negative effect on cell viability was observed upon exposure of several cell lines (murine mammary carcinoma, human cervical adenocarcinoma, murine melanoma, and mouse fibroblast) to the new polymers. Interaction with plasmid DNA yielded compact and stable complexes. The results demonstrate the potential of arginine-based ether-ester polycations as nonviral carriers for gene therapy applications. PMID:24963693

  9. Mannitol/l-Arginine-Based Formulation Systems for Freeze Drying of Protein Pharmaceuticals: Effect of the l-Arginine Counter Ion and Formulation Composition on the Formulation Properties and the Physical State of Mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein storage stability in freeze-dried l-arginine-based systems improved in the presence of chloride ions. However, chloride ions reduced the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (Tg') and made freeze drying more challenging. In this study, l-arginine was freeze dried with mannitol to obtain partially crystalline solids that can be freeze dried in a fast process and result in elegant cakes. We characterized the effect of different l-arginine counter ions on physicochemical properties of mannitol compared with mannitol/sucrose systems. Thermal properties of formulations with different compositions were correlated to thermal history during freeze drying and to physicochemical properties (cake appearance, residual moisture, reconstitution time, crystallinity). Partially crystalline solids were obtained even at the highest l-arginine level (mannitol:l-arginine of 2:1) used in this study. All l-arginine-containing formulations yielded elegant cakes. Only cakes containing l-arginine chloride and succinate showed a surface "crust" formed by phase separation. X-ray powder diffraction showed that inhibition of mannitol crystallization was stronger for l-arginine compared with sucrose and varied with the type of l-arginine counter ion. The counter ion affected mannitol polymorphism and higher levels of mannitol hemi-hydrate were obtained at high levels of l-arginine chloride. PMID:27506270

  10. Mannitol/l-Arginine-Based Formulation Systems for Freeze Drying of Protein Pharmaceuticals: Effect of the l-Arginine Counter Ion and Formulation Composition on the Formulation Properties and the Physical State of Mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that protein storage stability in freeze-dried l-arginine-based systems improved in the presence of chloride ions. However, chloride ions reduced the glass transition temperature of the freeze concentrate (Tg') and made freeze drying more challenging. In this study, l-arginine was freeze dried with mannitol to obtain partially crystalline solids that can be freeze dried in a fast process and result in elegant cakes. We characterized the effect of different l-arginine counter ions on physicochemical properties of mannitol compared with mannitol/sucrose systems. Thermal properties of formulations with different compositions were correlated to thermal history during freeze drying and to physicochemical properties (cake appearance, residual moisture, reconstitution time, crystallinity). Partially crystalline solids were obtained even at the highest l-arginine level (mannitol:l-arginine of 2:1) used in this study. All l-arginine-containing formulations yielded elegant cakes. Only cakes containing l-arginine chloride and succinate showed a surface "crust" formed by phase separation. X-ray powder diffraction showed that inhibition of mannitol crystallization was stronger for l-arginine compared with sucrose and varied with the type of l-arginine counter ion. The counter ion affected mannitol polymorphism and higher levels of mannitol hemi-hydrate were obtained at high levels of l-arginine chloride.

  11. Arginine-based cationic liposomes for efficient in vitro plasmid DNA delivery with low cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarker SR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Satya Ranjan Sarker, Yumiko Aoshima, Ryosuke Hokama, Takafumi Inoue, Keitaro Sou, Shinji Takeoka Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University (TWIns, Tokyo, Japan Background: Currently available gene delivery vehicles have many limitations such as low gene delivery efficiency and high cytotoxicity. To overcome these drawbacks, we designed and synthesized two cationic lipids comprised of n-tetradecyl alcohol as the hydrophobic moiety, 3-hydrocarbon chain as the spacer, and different counterions (eg, hydrogen chloride [HCl] salt or trifluoroacetic acid [TFA] salt in the arginine head group. Methods: Cationic lipids were hydrated in 4-(2-hydroxyethyl-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES buffer to prepare cationic liposomes and characterized in terms of their size, zeta potential, phase transition temperature, and morphology. Lipoplexes were then prepared and characterized in terms of their size and zeta potential in the absence or presence of serum. The morphology of the lipoplexes was determined using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The gene delivery efficiency was evaluated in neuronal cells and HeLa cells and compared with that of lysine-based cationic assemblies and Lipofectamine™ 2000. The cytotoxicity level of the cationic lipids was investigated and compared with that of Lipofectamine™ 2000. Results: We synthesized arginine-based cationic lipids having different counterions (ie, HCl-salt or TFA-salt that formed cationic liposomes of around 100 nm in size. In the absence of serum, lipoplexes prepared from the arginine-based cationic liposomes and plasmid (p DNA formed large aggregates and attained a positive zeta potential. However, in the presence of serum, the lipoplexes were smaller in size and negative in zeta potential. The morphology of the lipoplexes was vesicular. Arginine-based cationic liposomes with HCl-salt showed the

  12. Mass spectrometry-based identification and characterisation of lysine and arginine methylation in the human proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremang, Michael; Cuomo, Alessandro; Agresta, Anna Maria; Stugiewicz, Magdalena; Spadotto, Valeria; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-09-01

    Protein methylation is a post-translational modification (PTM) by which a variable number of methyl groups are transferred to lysine and arginine residues within proteins. Despite increased interest in this modification due to its reversible nature and its emerging role in a diverse set of biological pathways beyond chromatin, global identification of protein methylation has remained an unachieved goal. To characterise sites of lysine and arginine methylation beyond histones, we employed an approach that combines heavy methyl stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture (hmSILAC) with high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Through a broad evaluation of immuno-affinity enrichment and the application of two classical protein separation techniques prior to mass spectrometry, to nucleosolic and cytosolic fractions separately, we identified a total of 501 different methylation types, on 397 distinct lysine and arginine sites, present on 139 unique proteins. Our results considerably extend the number of known in vivo methylation sites and indicate their significant presence on several protein complexes involved at all stages of gene expression, from chromatin remodelling and transcription to splicing and translation. In addition, we describe the potential of the hmSILAC approach for accurate relative quantification of methylation levels between distinct functional states. PMID:23748837

  13. A novel nitric oxide-based anticancer therapeutics by macrophage-targeted poly(l-arginine)-based nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Shinpei; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-11-10

    In the immune system, macrophages in tumor tissue generate nitric oxide (NO), producing versatile effects including apoptosis of tumor cells, because inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in the cytoplasm of a macrophage produces NO using l-arginine as a substrate. Here, we propose novel NO-triggered immune therapeutics based on our newly designed nanoparticle system. We designed a poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(l-arginine) (i.e., PEG-b-P(l-Arg)) block copolymer and prepared polyion complex micelles (PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m) composed of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) and chondroitin sulfate for systemic anticancer immunotherapy. iNOS treatment of PEG-b-P(l-Arg) did not generate NO, but NO molecules were detected after trypsin pretreatment, indicating that hydrolysis of P(l-Arg) to monomeric arginine was taking place in vitro. RAW264.7 macrophages abundantly generated NO from the PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m in comparison with control micelles; this finding is indicative of robustness of the proposed method. It is interesting to note that systemic administration of PEG-b-P(l-Arg)/m had no noticeable adverse effects and suppressed the tumor growth rate in C26 tumor-bearing mice in a dose-dependent manner. Our newly designed nanoparticle-assisted arginine delivery system seems to hold promise as an NO-mediated anticancer immunotherapy.

  14. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, S.A., E-mail: shehabsallam@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt); Abbas, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift.

  15. Freeze-Drying of L-Arginine/Sucrose-Based Protein Formulations, Part 2: Optimization of Formulation Design and Freeze-Drying Process Conditions for an L-Arginine Chloride-Based Protein Formulation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stärtzel, Peter; Gieseler, Henning; Gieseler, Margit; Abdul-Fattah, Ahmad M; Adler, Michael; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Goldbach, Pierre

    2015-12-01

    We recently reported that the presence of chloride counter ions in freeze-dried l-arginine/sucrose formulations provided the greatest protein stability, but led to low collapse temperatures and glass transition temperatures of the freeze concentrates. The objectives of this study were to identify l-arginine chloride-based formulations and optimize freeze-drying process conditions to deliver a freeze-dried product with good physical quality attributes (including cake appearance, residual moisture, and reconstitution time). Additional properties were tested such as thermal properties, cake microstructure, and protein physical stability. Excipient concentrations were varied with and without a model protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). Formulations were frozen with and without annealing or with and without controlled nucleation. Primary drying was conducted at high and low shelf temperature. Cakes with least defects and optimum physical attributes were achieved when protein to excipient ratios were high. Controlled nucleation led to elegant cakes for most systems at a low shelf temperature. Replacing BSA by a monoclonal antibody showed that protein (physical) stability was slightly improved under stress storage temperature (i.e., 40°C) in the presence of a low concentration of l-arginine in a sucrose-based formulation. At higher l-arginine concentrations, cake defects increased. Using optimized formulation design, addition of l-arginine chloride to a sucrose-based formulation provided elegant cakes and benefits for protein stability.

  16. Polydiacetylenyl β-cyclodextrin based smart vesicles for colorimetric assay of arginine and lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Kim, Hwanhee; Choi, Youngjin; Paik, Seung R.; Jung, Seunho

    2016-01-01

    Selective visualization of arginine and lysine has been explored among 20 amino acids using the hybrid conjugate of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and polydiacetylene (PDA). The mono pentacosa-10,12-diynyl aminomethyl group was successfully coupled to either the primary or the secondary face of β-CD, where mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-β-CD or mono-3-amino-3-deoxy-β-CD reacted with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid. In this combinatorial system, the cylindrical β-cyclodextrin functions as a channel for the introduction of the cationic amino acids to the artificial membrane. The membrane perturbation and aggregation by the target amino acids could be exclusively visualized as a blue to red color change based on the responsive polydiacetylene domain. These interesting findings demonstrated that the developed β-CD conjugated PDA system may offer a new method of cell-penetrating mechanism, a promising vector system, as well as impact the production industry of arginine or lysine. PMID:27502314

  17. Improved Activity Assay Method for Arginine Kinase Based on a Ternary Heteropolyacid System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宝玉; 郭勤; 郭智; 王希成

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new system for the activity assay of arginine kinase (AK), based on the spectrophotometric determination of an ascorbic acid-reduced blue ternary heteropolyacid composed of bismuth, molybdate and the released phosphate from N-phospho-L-arginine (PArg) formed in the forward catalysis reaction.The assay conditions, including the formulation of the phosphate determination reagent (PDR), the assay timing, and the linear activity range of the enzyme concentration, have been tested and optimized.For these conditions, the ternary heteropolyacid color is completely developed within 1 min and is stable for at least 15 min, with an absorbance maximum at 700 nm and a molar extinction coefficient of 15.97 (mmol/L)-1 · cm-1 for the phosphate.Standard curves for phosphate show a good linearity of 0.999.Compared with previous activity assay methods for AK, this system exhibits superior sensitivity, reproducibility, and adaptability to various conditions in enzymological studies.This method also reduces the assay time and avoids the use of some expensive instruments and reagents.

  18. Polydiacetylenyl β-cyclodextrin based smart vesicles for colorimetric assay of arginine and lysine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Kim, Hwanhee; Choi, Youngjin; Paik, Seung R.; Jung, Seunho

    2016-08-01

    Selective visualization of arginine and lysine has been explored among 20 amino acids using the hybrid conjugate of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and polydiacetylene (PDA). The mono pentacosa-10,12-diynyl aminomethyl group was successfully coupled to either the primary or the secondary face of β-CD, where mono-6-amino-6-deoxy-β-CD or mono-3-amino-3-deoxy-β-CD reacted with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid. In this combinatorial system, the cylindrical β-cyclodextrin functions as a channel for the introduction of the cationic amino acids to the artificial membrane. The membrane perturbation and aggregation by the target amino acids could be exclusively visualized as a blue to red color change based on the responsive polydiacetylene domain. These interesting findings demonstrated that the developed β-CD conjugated PDA system may offer a new method of cell-penetrating mechanism, a promising vector system, as well as impact the production industry of arginine or lysine.

  19. Sensitive determination of bisphenol A base on arginine functionalized nanocomposite graphene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The water-soluble arginine functionalized graphene was produced successfully by an environment-friendly method. ► Electrochemical behaviors and some kinetic parameters of bisphenol A on the Arg-G/GCE were investigated. ► The proposed sensor showed more outstanding sensitivity properties toward the bisphenol A than the reported sensors. ► The proposed method opened a new simply way to detection of bisphenol A in the environmental protection. - Abstract: Arginine (Arg) functionalized graphene (Arg-G) nanocomposite was produced successfully by an environment-friendly method, and the morphology of the nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectra, etc. Based on Arg-G nanocomposite, an electrochemical sensor was fabricated for sensitive detection of bisphenol A (BPA). The electrochemical behaviors of BPA on Arg-G modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Experimental parameters, such as the accumulation potential and time, scan rate, and the pH value of buffer solution were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the oxidation peak current was proportional to BPA concentration in the range between 5.0 nmol/L and 40.0 μmol/L with the correlation coefficient of 0.9986 and the limit of detection of 1.1 nmol/L (S/N = 3). Moreover, the fabricated electrode also exhibited good reproducibility and stability. The proposed sensor was successfully employed to determine BPA in real plastic products and the recoveries were satisfactory.

  20. Glutamine, glutamate, and arginine-based acid resistance in Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Januana S; Seeras, Arisha; Sanchez-Maldonado, Alma Fernanda; Zhang, Chonggang; Su, Marcia Shu-Wei; Gänzle, Michael G

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether glutamine deamidation improves acid resistance of Lactobacillus reuteri, and to assess whether arginine, glutamine, and glutamate-mediated acid resistance are redundant or complementary mechanisms of acid resistance. Three putative glutaminase genes, gls1, gls2, and gls3, were identified in L. reuteri 100-23. All three genes were expressed during growth in mMRS and wheat sourdough. L. reuteri consistently over-expressed gls3 and the glutamate decarboxylase gadB. L. reuteri 100-23ΔgadB over-expressed gls3 and the arginine deiminase gene adi. Analysis of the survival of L. reuteri in acidic conditions revealed that arginine conversion is effective at pH of 3.5 while glutamine or glutamate conversion were effective at pH of 2.5. Arginine conversion increased the pHin but not ΔΨ; glutamate decarboxylation had only a minor effect on the pHin but increased the ΔΨ. This study demonstrates that glutamine deamidation increases the acid resistance of L. reuteri independent of glutamate decarboxylase activity. Arginine and glutamine/glutamate conversions confer resistance to lactate at pH of 3.5 and phosphate at pH of 2.5, respectively. Knowledge of L. reuteri's acid resistance improves the understanding of the adaptation of L. reuteri to intestinal ecosystems, and facilitates the selection of probiotic and starter cultures.

  1. Arginine ADP-ribosylation mechanism based on structural snapshots of iota-toxin and actin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Tsumori, Yayoi; Qiu, Hao; Oda, Masataka; Sakurai, Jun; Nagahama, Masahiro; Tsuge, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota-toxin (Ia) mono-ADP ribosylates Arg177 of actin, leading to cytoskeletal disorganization and cell death. To fully understand the reaction mechanism of arginine-specific mono-ADP ribosyl transferase, the structure of the toxin-substrate protein complex must be characterized. Recently, we solved the crystal structure of Ia in complex with actin and the nonhydrolyzable NAD+ analog βTAD (thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide); however, the structures of the NAD+...

  2. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, E.A.; Seshan, K.; Brem, G.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatm

  3. Arginine Vasopressin Is a Blood-Based Biomarker of Social Functioning in Children with Autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean S Carson

    Full Text Available Brain arginine vasopressin (AVP critically regulates normative social behavior in mammals, and experimental disruption of the AVP signaling pathway produces social impairments in rodent models. We therefore hypothesized that AVP signaling deficits may contribute to social impairments in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Since blood measures (which are far easier to obtain than brain measures of AVP are most meaningful if they are related to brain AVP activity, Study 1 tested the relationship between AVP concentrations in concomitantly collected blood and CSF samples from children and adults (N = 28 undergoing clinical procedures. Study 2 tested whether blood AVP concentrations: 1 differed between children with ASD (N = 57, their ASD discordant siblings (N = 47, and neurotypical controls (N = 55; and 2 predicted social functioning (using the NEPSY-II Theory of Mind and Affect Recognition tasks and the Social Responsiveness Scale in this large, well-characterized child cohort. Blood AVP concentrations significantly and positively predicted CSF AVP concentrations (F1,26 = 7.17, r = 0.46, p = 0.0127 in Study 1. In Study 2, blood AVP concentrations did not differ between groups or by sex, but significantly and positively predicted Theory of Mind performance, specifically in children with ASD, but not in non-ASD children (F1,144 = 5.83, p = 0.017. Blood AVP concentrations can be used: 1 as a surrogate for brain AVP activity in humans; and 2 as a robust biomarker of theory of mind ability in children with ASD. These findings also suggest that AVP biology may be a promising therapeutic target by which to improve social cognition in individuals with ASD.

  4. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  5. Mechanistic studies on transcriptional coactivator protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Heather L; Zurita-Lopez, Cecilia I; Clarke, Steven; Thompson, Paul R

    2011-04-26

    Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to the guanidinium group of arginine residues in a number of important cell signaling proteins. PRMT1 is the founding member of this family, and its activity appears to be dysregulated in heart disease and cancer. To begin to characterize the catalytic mechanism of this isozyme, we assessed the effects of mutating a number of highly conserved active site residues (i.e., Y39, R54, E100, E144, E153, M155, and H293), which are believed to play key roles in SAM recognition, substrate binding, and catalysis. The results of these studies, as well as pH-rate studies, and the determination of solvent isotope effects (SIEs) indicate that M155 plays a critical role in both SAM binding and the processivity of the reaction but is not responsible for the regiospecific formation of asymmetrically dimethylated arginine (ADMA). Additionally, mutagenesis studies on H293, combined with pH studies and the lack of a normal SIE, do not support a role for this residue as a general base. Furthermore, the lack of a normal SIE with either the wild type or catalytically impaired mutants suggests that general acid/base catalysis is not important for promoting methyl transfer. This result, combined with the fact that the E144A/E153A double mutant retains considerably more activity then the single mutants alone, suggests that the PRMT1-catalyzed reaction is primarily driven by bringing the substrate guanidinium into the proximity of the S-methyl group of SAM and that the prior deprotonation of the substrate guanidinium is not required for methyl transfer.

  6. Computer-based design of novel HIV-1 entry inhibitors: neomycin conjugated to arginine peptides at two specific sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berchanski, Alexander; Lapidot, Aviva

    2009-03-01

    Aminoglycoside-arginine conjugates (AAC and APAC) are multi-target inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Here, we predict new conjugates of neomycin with two arginine peptide chains binding at specific sites on neomycin [poly-arginine-neomycin-poly-arginine (PA-Neo-PA)]. The rationale for the design of such compounds is to separate two short arginine peptides with neomycin, which may extend the binding region of the CXC chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4). We used homology models of CXCR4 and unliganded envelope glycoprotein 120 (HIV-1(IIIB) gp120) and docked PA-Neo-PAs and APACs to these using a multistep docking procedure. The results indicate that PA-Neo-PAs spread over two negatively charged patches of CXCR4. PA-Neo-PA-CXCR4 complexes are energetically more favorable than AACs/APAC-CXCR4 complexes. Notably, our CXCR4 model and docking procedure can be applied to predict new compounds that are either inhibitors of gp120-CXCR4 binding without affecting stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF-1 alpha) chemotaxis activity, or inhibitors of SDF-1 alpha-CXCR4 binding resulting in an anti-metastasis effect. We also predict that PA-Neo-PAs and APACs can interfere with CD4-gp120 binding in unliganded conformation.

  7. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Havstad, Mark A.

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  8. Graphene-based materials in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; Ribeiro, Rui; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Silva, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    In catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO),an advanced oxidation process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is decomposed catalytically giving rise to hydroxyl radicals (HO•).These radicals, exhibiting high oxidizing potential, serve as effective and non selective species for the degradation of several organic pollutants in liquid phase. Since the report of Lücking et al. [1], carbon materials have been explored as catalysts for CWPO[2]. Recent reports address process intensification issues, br...

  9. Structure-based molecular design for thermostabilization of N-acetyltransferase Mpr1 involved in a novel pathway of L-arginine synthesis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuno, Ryo; Hirase, Saeka; Norifune, Saki; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Previously, N-Acetyltransferase Mpr1 was suggested to be involved in a novel pathway of L-arginine biosynthesis in yeast. Our recent crystallographic analysis demonstrated that the overall structure of Mpr1 is a typical folding among proteins in the Gcn5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, and also provided clues to the design of mutations for improvement of the enzymatic functions. Here, we constructed new stable variants, Asn203Lys- and Asn203Arg-Mpr1, which exhibited 2.4-fold and 2.2-fold longer activity half-lives than wild-type Mpr1, respectively, by structure-based molecular design. The replacement of Asn203 with a basic amino acid was suggested to stabilize α-helix 2, which is important for the Mpr1 structure, probably by neutralizing its dipole. In addition, the combination of two amino acid substitutions at positions 65 and 203 in Mpr1, Phe65Leu, which was previously isolated by the screening from PCR random mutagenesis library of MPR1, and Asn203Lys or Asn203Arg, led to further stabilization of Mpr1. Our growth assay suggests that overexpression of the stable Mpr1 variants increase L-arginine synthesis in yeast cells. Our finding is the first report on the rational engineering of Mpr1 for thermostabilization and could be useful in the construction of new yeast strains with higher L-arginine synthetic activity and also improved fermentation ability.

  10. L-arginine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that taking L-arginine, alone or together with antioxidants (Niteworks, Herbalife International, Inc), does not improve performance ... administered as a shot, or applied to the skin, short-term. It can cause some side effects ...

  11. Catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over ZRO2-based defective oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Jianjun

    2005-01-01

    the work presented in this thesis provides both fundamental scientific knowledge as well as a new technical dual-bed concept for synthesis gas production via catalytic partial oxidation of methane over defective ZrO2-based oxides.

  12. Perspective on Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Oils: Essential Roles of Fe-based Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Yongchun; Hensley, Alyssa; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-27

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis is the most promising approach for biofuel production, due to its simple process and versatility to handle lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks with varying and complex compositions. Compared with in situ catalytic fast pyrolysis, ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has the flexibility of optimizing the pyrolysis step and catalytic process individually to improve the quality of pyrolysis oil (stability, oxygen content, acid number, etc.) and to maximize the carbon efficiency in the conversion of biomass to pyrolysis oil. Hydrodeoxygenation is one of the key catalytic functions in ex situ catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recently, Fe-based catalysts have been reported to exhibit superior catalytic properties in hydrodeoxygenation of model compounds in pyrolysis oil, which potentially makes the ex situ pyrolysis of biomass commercially viable due to the abundance and low cost of Fe. Here, we briefly summarize the recent progress on Fe-based catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation of biomass, and provide perspectives on how to further improve Fe-based catalysts (activity and stability) for their potential applications in the emerging area of biomass conversion.

  13. Catalytic X-H insertion reactions based on carbenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Dennis; Fei, Na

    2013-06-21

    Catalysed X-H insertion reactions into diazo compounds (where X is any heteroatom) are a powerful yet underutilized class of transformations. The following review will explore the historical development of X-H insertion and give an up-to-date account of the metal catalysts most often employed, including an assessment of their strengths and weaknesses. Despite decades of development, recent work on enantioselective variants, as well as applying catalytic X-H insertion towards problems in chemical biology indicate that this field has ample room for innovation. PMID:23407887

  14. Synthesis of Borohydride and Catalytic Dehydrogenation by Hydrogel Based Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynuegri, Tugba Akkas; Karabulut, Ahmet F.; Guru, Metin

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with the synthesis of calcium borohydride (Ca(BH4)2) as hydrogen storage material. Calcium chloride salt (CaCl2), magnesium hydride (MgH2), and boron oxide (B2O3) were used as reactants in the mechanochemical synthesis of Ca(BH4)2. The mechanochemical reaction was carried out by means of Spex type ball milling without applying high pressure and temperature. Parametric studies have been established at different reaction times and for different amounts of reactants at a constant ball to powder ratio (BPR) 4:1. The best combination was determined by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) analysis. According to the FT-IR analysis, reaction time, the first reaction parameter, was found as 1600 min. After the reaction time was fixed at 1600 min, the difference of the B-H peak areas was dependent on the amount of reactant MgH2 that was investigated. The amount of the reactant (MgH2), the second reaction parameter, was measured to be 2.85 times more than the stoichiometric amount of MgH2. According to our previous studies, BPR was selected as 4:1 for all experiments. Samples were prepared in a glove box under argon atmosphere but the time that elapsed for FT-IR analysis highly affected B-H bonds. B-H peak areas clearly decreased with time because of negative effect of ambient atmosphere. A catalyst was prepared by absorbing cobalt fluoride (CoF2) in poly (acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel matrices type and its catalytic dehydrogenation performance that has been characterized by the catalytic reaction of sodium borohydride's known hydrogen capacity in an alkaline medium. The metal amount of hydrogel catalyst was determined as 135.82 mg Co by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The specific dehydrogenation capacity of the Co active compound in the catalyst thanks to catalytic dehydrogenation of commercial sodium borohydride was measured as 1.66 mL H2/mg Co.

  15. Alkali resistivity of Cu based selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jensen, Anker Degn; Riisager, Anders;

    2012-01-01

    The deactivation of V2O5–WO3–TiO2, Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR plate type monolithic catalysts was investigated when exposed to KCl aerosols in a bench-scale reactor. Fresh and exposed catalysts were characterized by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity measurements, scanning electron microscope...... catalysts revealed that the potassium salt not only deposited on the catalyst surface, but also penetrated into the catalyst wall. Thus, the K/M ratio (M = V or Cu) was high on V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst and comparatively less on Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts. NH3-TPD revealed that the KCl exposed Cu–HZSM5...

  16. Arginine metabolism in wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arginine metabolism in wounds was investigated in the rat in 1) lambda-carrageenan-wounded skeletal muscle, 2) Schilling chambers, and 3) subcutaneous polyvinyl alcohol sponges. All showed decreased arginine and elevated ornithine contents and high arginase activity. Arginase could be brought to the wound by macrophages, which were found to contain arginase activity. However, arginase was expressed by macrophages only after cell lysis and no arginase was released by viable macrophages in vitro. Thus the extracellular arginase of wounds may derive from dead macrophages within the injured tissue. Wound and peritoneal macrophages exhibited arginase deiminase activity as demonstrated by the conversion of [guanido-14C]arginine to radiolabeled citrulline during culture, the inhibition of this reaction by formamidinium acetate, and the lack of prokaryotic contamination of the cultures. These findings and the known metabolic fates of the products of arginase and arginine deiminase in the cellular populations of the wound suggest the possibility of cooperativity among cells for the production of substrates for collagen synthesis

  17. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatment of the pyrolysis vapors. The in-situ catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in an entrained flow reactor system using a premixed feedstock of Na2CO3 and biomass and post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in a downstream fixed bed reactor of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3. Results have shown that both Na2CO3 and Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 can be used for the production of a high quality bio-oil from catalytic pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake. The catalytic bio-oil had very low oxygen content, water content as low as 1wt.%, a neutral pH, and a high calorific value upto 41.8MJ/kg. The bio-oil consisted of high value chemical compounds mainly hydrocarbons and undesired compounds in the bio-oil were either completely removed or considerably reduced. Increasing the triglycerides content (vegetable oil) in the wood enhanced the formation of hydrocarbons in the bio-oil. Post treatment of the pyrolysis vapor over a fixed bed of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 produced superior quality bio-oil compared to in-situ catalytic pyrolysis with Na2CO3. This high quality bio-oil may be used as a precursor in a fractionating process for the production of alternative fuels. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  18. A reagentless electrochemiluminescent immunosensor for apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 detection based on the new Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/bi-arginine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Min; Chai, Xi Deng Ya-Qin; Han, Jing; Gui, Guo-Feng; Yuan, Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn; Zhuo, Ying, E-mail: yingzhuo@swu.edu.cn

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • A reagentless ECL biosensor based on the new Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/bi-arginine system. • The successful preparation of bi-Arg/Au@Fe3O4–rGO as enhancer. • Using the APE-1 as target by the sandwich-type immunoassay format. - Abstract: Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE-1), a kind of multifunctional protein widely-distributed in the body, plays an essential role in the DNA base excision repair and serves as multiple possible roles in the response of human cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In this work, an ultrasensitive solid-state electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor is designed to determine APE-1 based on the new Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}/bi-arginine system. The bi-arginine (bi-Arg) is decorated on the Au nanoparticles functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/reduced graphene oxide (bi-Arg/Au@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–rGO) according to the self-assembling and covalent cross-linking interaction to obtain the functionalized nanocomposite of bi-Arg/Au@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–rGO. Herein, the bi-Arg/Au@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–rGO plays not only an amplification label to enhance the ECL signal of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} due to the coreactant of bi-Arg but also an ideal nanocarrier to load numerous secondary antibody. Based on sandwich-type immunoassay format, this proposed method offers a linear range of 1.0 fg mL{sup −1}–5.0 pg mL{sup −1} and an estimated detection limit of 0.3 fg mL{sup −1} for the APE-1. Moreover, the reagentless ECL immunosensor also exhibits high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and good stability, which has greatly potential development and application in clinical diagnostics, immunology and biomedical research.

  19. The Ergogenic Potential of Arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Bounty Paul M

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arginine is a conditionally essential amino acid that is involved in protein synthesis, the detoxification of ammonia, and its conversion to glucose as well as being catabolized to produce energy. In addition to these physiological functions, arginine has been purported to have ergogenic potential. Athletes have taken arginine for three main reasons: 1 its role in the secretion of endogenous growth hormone; 2 its involvement in the synthesis of creatine; 3 its role in augmenting nitric oxide. These aspects of arginine supplementation will be discussed as well as a review of clinical investigations involving exercise performance and arginine ingestion.

  20. A novel clay-based catalytic material: Preparation and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lussier, R.J. (W.R. Grace Co.-Conn., Baltimore, Md. (USA))

    1991-05-01

    A novel acid-leached calcined laolin has been prepared by careful control of the calcination and acid leach conditions. A narrow calcination window gives an extremely acid-reactive calcined kaolin, which develops high surface areas at a rate much faster than that of samples calcined outside this range. This more acid active calcined kaolin also allows the use of extremely low levels of acid, which results in most of the alumina being in the solid phase during the entire leach step. Al{sup 27} NMR results indicate that most acid-reactive calcined clay has the lowest level of octahedral and the highest level of five-coordinate Al. Acids containing anions that do not complex with aluminum such as hydrochloric, nitric, or aluminum chloride work in this process, while acids containg anions that complex with aluminum such a sulfuric or phosphoric do not lead to the same high surface area, catalytically active products. Properly calcined and leached materials show a broad distribution of pores centered at about 40 (angstrom).

  1. Mono-arginine Cholesterol-based Small Lipid Nanoparticles as a Systemic siRNA Delivery Platform for Effective Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinju; Saw, Phei Er; Gujrati, Vipul; Lee, Yonghyun; Kim, Hyungjun; Kang, Sukmo; Choi, Minsuk; Kim, Jae-Il; Jon, Sangyong

    2016-01-01

    Although efforts have been made to develop a platform carrier for the delivery of RNAi therapeutics, systemic delivery of siRNA has shown only limited success in cancer therapy. Cationic lipid-based nanoparticles have been widely used for this purpose, but their toxicity and undesired liver uptake after systemic injection owing to their cationic surfaces have hampered further clinical translation. This study describes the development of neutral, small lipid nanoparticles (SLNPs) made of a nontoxic cationic cholesterol derivative, as a suitable carrier of systemic siRNA to treat cancers. The cationic cholesterol derivative, mono arginine-cholesterol (MA-Chol), was synthesized by directly attaching an arginine moiety to cholesterol via a cleavable ester bond. siRNA-loaded SLNPs (siRNA@SLNPs) were prepared using MA-Chol and a neutral helper lipid, dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), as major components and a small amount of PEGylated phospholipid mixed with siRNA. The resulting nanoparticles were less than ~50 nm in diameter with neutral zeta potential and much lower toxicity than typical cationic cholesterol (DC-Chol)-based lipid nanoparticles. SLNPs loaded with siRNA against kinesin spindle protein (siKSP@SLNPs) exhibited a high level of target gene knockdown in various cancer cell lines, as shown by measurement of KSP mRNA and cell death assays. Furthermore, systemic injection of siKSP@SLNPs into prostate tumor-bearing mice resulted in preferential accumulation of the delivered siRNA at the tumor site and significant inhibition of tumor growth, with little apparent toxicity, as shown by body weight measurements. These results suggest that these SLNPs may provide a systemic delivery platform for RNAi-based cancer therapy.

  2. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durzan Don J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compounds were also probably present in decoctions prepared in the severe winter. The semi-essential arginine, proline and all the essential amino acids, would have provided additional nutritional benefits for the rapid recovery from scurvy by vitamin C when food supply was limited. The value of arginine, especially in the recovery of the critically ill sailors, is postulated as a source of nitric oxide, and the arginine-derived guanidino compounds as controlling factors for the activities of different nitric oxide synthases. This review provides further insights into the use of the candidate "trees of life" by indigenous peoples in eastern Canada. It raises hypotheses on the nutritional and synergistic roles of arginine, its metabolites, and other biofactors complementing the role of vitamin C especially in treating Cartier's critically ill sailors.

  3. Catalytic thermal treatment (catalytic thermolysis) of a rice grain-based biodigester effluent of an alcohol distillery plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Abhinesh Kumar; Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar; Mazumdar, Bidyut; Choudhary, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic thermolysis (CT) process is an effective and novel approach to treat rice grain-based biodigester effluent (BDE) of the distillery plant. CT treatment of rice grain-based distillery wastewater was carried out in a 0.5 dm(3) thermolytic batch reactor using different catalysts such as CuO, copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate. With the CuO catalyst, a temperature of 95°C, catalyst loading of 4 g/dm(3) and pH 5 were found to be optimal, obtaining a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal of 80.4% and 72%, respectively. The initial pH (pHi) was an important parameter to remove COD and colour from BDE. At higher pHi (pH 9.5), less COD and colour reduction were observed. The settling characteristics of CT-treated sludge were also analysed at different temperatures. It was noted that the treated slurry at a temperature of 80°C gave best settling characteristics. Characteristics of residues are also analysed at different pH. PMID:25833556

  4. Catalytic thermal treatment (catalytic thermolysis) of a rice grain-based biodigester effluent of an alcohol distillery plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Abhinesh Kumar; Chaudhari, Parmesh Kumar; Mazumdar, Bidyut; Choudhary, Rumi

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic thermolysis (CT) process is an effective and novel approach to treat rice grain-based biodigester effluent (BDE) of the distillery plant. CT treatment of rice grain-based distillery wastewater was carried out in a 0.5 dm(3) thermolytic batch reactor using different catalysts such as CuO, copper sulphate and ferrous sulphate. With the CuO catalyst, a temperature of 95°C, catalyst loading of 4 g/dm(3) and pH 5 were found to be optimal, obtaining a maximum chemical oxygen demand (COD) and colour removal of 80.4% and 72%, respectively. The initial pH (pHi) was an important parameter to remove COD and colour from BDE. At higher pHi (pH 9.5), less COD and colour reduction were observed. The settling characteristics of CT-treated sludge were also analysed at different temperatures. It was noted that the treated slurry at a temperature of 80°C gave best settling characteristics. Characteristics of residues are also analysed at different pH.

  5. Catalytic Study of Copper based Catalysts for Steam Reforming of Methanol

    OpenAIRE

    Purnama, H.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the catalytic properties of copper based catalysts used in the steam reforming of methanol. This method is known as one of the most favourable catalytic processes for producing hydrogen on-board. The catalysts investigated in this work are CuO/ZrO2 catalysts, which were prepared using different kinds of preparation methods and a commercial CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst which was used as a reference. The results of the studies can be divided into three sections: (i) T...

  6. Recent advances in noble metal based composite nanocatalysts: colloidal synthesis, properties, and catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Yao, Weitang; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-06-01

    This Review article provides a report on progress in the synthesis, properties and catalytic applications of noble metal based composite nanomaterials. We begin with a brief discussion on the categories of various composite materials. We then present some important colloidal synthetic approaches to the composite nanostructures; here, major attention has been paid to bimetallic nanoparticles. We also introduce some important physiochemical properties that are beneficial from composite nanomaterials. Finally, we highlight the catalytic applications of such composite nanoparticles and conclude with remarks on prospective future directions.

  7. Catalytic Kinetics of the Schiff Base Metal Complexes Bearing Side Chain of Cyclic morpholine in Carboxylic Ester Hydrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Shu-Lin; LI,Min-Jiao; OU,Zhong-Wen; CHEN,Guo-Xu; LIU,Fu-An; XIE,Jia-Qing

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that two Schiff base transition metal complexes bearing the side chain of the morpholine ring were synthesized and characterized, and two complexes with the same base agent but different metal ions were used as a simulant hydrolase in the catalytic hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl picolinate in this paper. The mechanism of PNPP catalytic hydrolysis is proposed and supported by the results of the spectral analysis and the kinetic calculation. A kinetic mathematical model, applied to the calculation of the kinetic and thermodynamics parameters of PNPP catalytic hydrolysis, has been established on the foundation of the mechanism proposed. The result of the study shows that the two complexes have a good catalytic activity in PNPP catalytic hydrolysis, and the rate of the PNPP catalytic hydrolysis was increased with the increase of the pH values in the buffer solution and affected by the polarization effect of metal ion of the complexes.

  8. Novel Base Metal-Palladium Catalytic Diesel Filter Coating with NO2 Reducing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.; Dahl, S.; Mogensen, G.;

    2007-01-01

    price structure. The novel base metal/palladium catalytic coat has been applied on commercial silicon carbide wall flow diesel filters and tested in an engine test bench. Results from engine bench tests concerning soot combustion, HC-, CO-, NO2- removal with the novel coat will are compared to present...

  9. Development of a model-based controller for a three-way catalytic converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, T. de; Balenovic, M.; Backx, T.

    2002-01-01

    The performance of a three-way catalytic converter under transient operation can be improved by controlling the level of oxygen stored on ceria at some optimal level. A model-based controller with the model estimating the level of ceria coverage by oxygen, can achieve this goal. A simple, dynamic mo

  10. Dealloying-based facile synthesis and highly catalytic properties of Au core/porous shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minho; Ko, Sung Min; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-06-01

    Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts.Porous nanostructures exhibit excellent catalytic properties due to high surface-to-volume ratio, good surface reactivity and various structural features, but controlling the distribution, size, shape and density of pores and structural features of these particles is highly challenging. Herein, we report a tunable dealloying-based facile synthetic strategy to form highly porous Au core/porous shell nanoparticles (CPS NPs) in high yield by selectively dissolving Ag atoms from Au/Au-Ag core/alloy shell NPs. The CPS NPs exhibit a very short induction time, high conversion rate constant, low activation energy and high turnover frequency due to their catalytically active porous shells containing networked thin ligaments, surface defects, ultra-high porosity and photothermal properties. The CPS NPs are more catalytic Au NPs than other reported Au nanostructures, and the strategy and results open avenues in porous nanostructures and nanocatalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01321j

  11. Determination of arginine catabolism by salivary pellet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Hoogenkamp; J.M. ten Cate

    2014-01-01

    To determine the formation of ammonium from arginine by oral bacteria residing in saliva and dental plaque, an arginolytic activity assay based on the work described by Nascimento et al. [2] was developed. Following the original methodology, insufficient ammonium production could be determined. To i

  12. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation with a Methandiide-Based Carbene Complex: An Experimental and Computational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weismann, Julia; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2015-11-01

    The transfer hydrogenation (TH) reaction of ketones with catalytic systems based on a methandiide-derived ruthenium carbene complex was investigated and optimised. The complex itself makes use of the noninnocent behaviour of the carbene ligand (M=CR2 →MH-C(H)R2 ), but showed only moderate activity, thus requiring long reaction times to achieve sufficient conversion. DFT studies on the reaction mechanism revealed high reaction barriers for both the dehydrogenation of iPrOH and the hydrogen transfer. A considerable improvement of the catalytic activity could be achieved by employing triphenylphosphine as additive. Mechanistic studies on the role of PPh3 in the catalytic cycle revealed the formation of a cyclometalated complex upon phosphine coordination. This ruthenacycle was revealed to be the active species under the reaction conditions. The use of the isolated complex resulted in high catalytic activities in the TH of aromatic as well as aliphatic ketones. The complex was also found to be active under base-free conditions, suggesting that the cyclometalation is crucial for the enhanced activity. PMID:26403918

  13. Synthesis and catalytic activities of porphyrin-based PCP pincer complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Keisuke; Yoneda, Tomoki; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    2,18-Bis(diphenylphosphino)porphyrins undergo peripheral cyclometalation with group 10 transition-metal salts to afford the corresponding porphyrin-based PCP pincer complexes. The porphyrinic plane and the PCP-pincer unit are apparently coplanar, with small strain. The catalytic activities of the porphyrin-based pincer complexes at the periphery were investigated in the allylation of benzaldehyde with allylstannane and in the 1,4-reduction of chalcone to discover the electronic interplay betw...

  14. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  15. A new surface catalytic model for silica-based thermal protection material for hypersonic vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Silica-based materials are widely employed in the thermal protection system for hypersonic vehicles, and the investigation of their catalytic characteristics is crucially important for accurate aerothermal heating prediction. By analyzing the disadvantages of Norman’s high and low temperature models, this paper combines the two models and proposes an eight-reaction combined surface catalytic model to describe the catalysis between oxygen and silica surface. Given proper evaluation of the parameters according to many references, the recombination coefficient obtained shows good agreement with experimental data. The catalytic mechanisms between oxygen and silica surface are then analyzed. Results show that with the increase of the wall temperature, the dominant reaction contributing to catalytic coefficient varies from Langmuir–Hinshelwood (LH recombination (TW  1350 K. The surface coverage of chemisorption areas varies evidently with the dominant reactions in the high temperature (HT range, while the surface coverage of physisorption areas varies within quite low temperature (LT range (TW < 250 K. Recommended evaluation of partial parameters is also given.

  16. Crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase complexed with FMN and substrate. Identification of the catalytic base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jun Yong; Min, Ji Young; Lee, Su Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Lee, Hyung Ho; Kim, Hye Kyung; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Suh, Se Won

    2006-07-01

    Nitroalkane compounds are widely used in chemical industry and are also produced by microorganisms and plants. Some nitroalkanes have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic, and enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes is of considerable interest. 2-Nitropropane dioxygenases from Neurospora crassa and Williopsis mrakii (Hansenula mrakii), members of one family of the nitroalkane-oxidizing enzymes, contain FMN and FAD, respectively. The enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes by 2-nitropropane dioxygenase operates by an oxidase-style catalytic mechanism, which was recently shown to involve the formation of an anionic flavin semiquinone. This represents a unique case in which an anionic flavin semiquinone has been experimentally observed in the catalytic pathway for oxidation catalyzed by a flavin-dependent enzyme. Here we report the first crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two forms: a binary complex with FMN and a ternary complex with both FMN and 2-nitropropane. The structure identifies His(152) as the proposed catalytic base, thus providing a structural framework for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:16682407

  17. Molecular basis of the general base catalysis of an α/β-hydrolase catalytic triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueru; Yin, Shuhui; Feng, Yitao; Li, Jie; Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Changdong; Zhu, Guang; Guo, Zhihong

    2014-05-30

    The serine-histidine-aspartate triad is well known for its covalent, nucleophilic catalysis in a diverse array of enzymatic transformations. Here we show that its nucleophilicity is shielded and its catalytic role is limited to being a specific general base by an open-closed conformational change in the catalysis of (1R,6R)-2-succinyl-6-hydroxy-2,4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate synthase (or MenH), a typical α/β-hydrolase fold enzyme in the vitamin K biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found to adopt an open conformation without a functional triad in its ligand-free form and a closed conformation with a fully functional catalytic triad in the presence of its reaction product. The open-to-closed conformational transition involves movement of half of the α-helical cap domain, which causes extensive structural changes in the α/β-domain and forces the side chain of the triad histidine to adopt an energetically disfavored gauche conformation to form the functional triad. NMR analysis shows that the inactive open conformation without a triad prevails in ligand-free solution and is converted to the closed conformation with a properly formed triad by the reaction product. Mutation of the residues crucial to this open-closed transition either greatly decreases or completely eliminates the enzyme activity, supporting an important catalytic role for the structural change. These findings suggest that the open-closed conformational change tightly couples formation of the catalytic triad to substrate binding to enhance the substrate specificities and simultaneously shield the nucleophilicity of the triad, thus allowing it to expand its catalytic power beyond the nucleophilic catalysis.

  18. Pulsed plasma sources for the production of intense ion beams based on catalytic resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe a technique to produce planar and volumetric ion sources of nearly every element. This technique is based on a generalization of the LIBORS-process (Laser Ionization Based On Resonant Saturation) which because of its similarity to chemical catalytic reactions has been called CATRION (CATalytic Resonance IONization). A vapor containing the desired atomic species is doped with a suitable element processing resonance transitions that can be pumped ro saturation with a laser. By superelastic collisions with the excited atoms and by simulated bremsstrahlung absorption seed electrons are heated. It is the heated electron component which then by collisional processes ionizes the desired atomic species and are multiplied. 41 refs.; 4 figs.; 3 tabs

  19. Cross-catalytic peptide nucleic acid (PNA) replication based on templated ligation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singhal, Abhishek; Nielsen, Peter E

    2014-01-01

    We report the first PNA self-replicating system based on template directed cross-catalytic ligation, a process analogous to biological replication. Using two template PNAs and four pentameric precursor PNAs, all four possible carbodiimide assisted amide ligation products were detected and identif...... oligonucleotides are feasible, thereby strengthening the foundation for the discussion of a possible role for PNA (like) genetic material in the prebiotic evolution of life and lay the ground for further studies into evolution of such potentially prebiotic systems....

  20. Modeling and Model-Based Control of a Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balenovic, M.

    2002-03-25

    The subject of the research presented in this thesis was the development of new control strategies for automotive three-way catalytic converters in order to fulfill future ultra-low exhaust emission standards. The goal was to develop a model-based control strategy that can reduce the emissions under highly dynamic operation of the process, i.e.city driving. Also a possible improvement of the catalyst light-off (reduction of the temperature needed for the converter to become operational) has been studied. The main contribution of the thesis is the development of a model-based controller on the basis of information extracted from the first principle modeling of the converter. The three main parts of the research were: development of the rigorous first principle model of the catalytic converter; development of the control-oriented model of the catalytic converter and connecting it with the engine model; development and testing of the novel model-based controller by both simulations and experiments.

  1. A novel sensor based on electropolymerization of β-cyclodextrin and L-arginine on carbon paste electrode for determination of fluoroquinolones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenfen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Gu, Shuqing [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Ding, Yaping, E-mail: wdingyp@sina.com [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zhang, Zhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Linyi University, 18 TongDa Road, Linyi 276005 (China); Li, Li [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2013-04-03

    Graphical abstract: The inner cavities of β-CD could restrain fluoroquinolones to form stable host–guest inclusion complexes, and the guanidyl group of L-arg could enable L-arg to form electrostatic interactions with negatively charged groups -COO{sup −} of fluoroquinolones. Highlights: ► Electropolymerization of β-cyclodextrin and L-arginine on carbon paste electrode. ► The electrooxidation and reaction of FQs on the modified CPE were surmised. ► The sensor is used to detect ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin and gatifloxacin. ► Determine FQs drugs in pharmaceutical formulations and human serum samples. ► It showed high stability, repeatability, reproducibility, good sensitivity. -- Abstract: An electrochemical sensor for fluoroquinolones (FQs) based on polymerization of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and L-arginine (L-arg) modified carbon paste electrode (CPE) (P-β-CD-L-arg/CPE) was built for the first time. Synergistic effect of L-arg and β-CD was used to construct this sensor for quantification of these important antibiotics. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) image shows that polymer of β-CD and L-arg has been successfully modified on electrode. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammograms (CV) further indicate that polymer of β-CD and L-arg efficiently decreased the charge transfer resistance value of electrode and improved the electron transfer kinetic between analyte and electrode. Under the optimized conditions, this modified electrode was utilized to determine the concentrations of ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, norfloxacin and gatifloxacin. The differential pulse voltammogram (DPV) exhibits the oxidation peak currents were linearly proportional to their concentration in the range of 0.05–100 μM for ciprofloxacin, 0.1–100 μM for ofloxacin, 0.1–40 μM for norfloxacin and 0.06–100 μM for gatifloxacin, respectively. This method was also successfully used to detect the concentrations of each drug in

  2. Long-term replacement of a mutated nonfunctional CNS gene: reversal of hypothalamic diabetes insipidus using an EIAV-based lentiviral vector expressing arginine vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienemann, Alison S; Martin-Rendon, Enca; Cosgrave, Anna S; Glover, Colin P J; Wong, Liang-Fong; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Uney, James B

    2003-05-01

    Due to the complexity of brain function and the difficulty in monitoring alterations in neuronal gene expression, the potential of lentiviral gene therapy vectors to treat disorders of the CNS has been difficult to fully assess. In this study, we have assessed the utility of a third-generation equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in the Brattleboro rat model of diabetes insipidus, in which a mutation in the arginine vasopressin (AVP) gene results in the production of nonfunctional mutant AVP precursor protein. Importantly, by using this model it is possible to monitor the success of the gene therapy treatment by noninvasive assays. Injection of an EIAV-CMV-AVP vector into the supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus resulted in expression of functional AVP peptide in magnocellular neurons. This was accompanied by a 100% recovery in water homeostasis as assessed by daily water intake, urine production, and urine osmolality lasting for a 1-year measurement period. These data show that a single gene defect leading to a neurological disorder can be corrected with a lentiviral-based strategy. This study highlights the potential of using viral gene therapy for the long-term treatment of disorders of the CNS. PMID:12718901

  3. Feed intake and brain neuropeptide Y (NPY) and cholecystokinin (CCK) gene expression in juvenile cobia fed plant-based protein diets with different lysine to arginine ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh Van; Jordal, Ann-Elise Olderbakk; Espe, Marit; Buttle, Louise; Lai, Hung Van; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2013-07-01

    Cobia (Rachycentron canadum, Actinopterygii, Perciformes;10.5±0.1g) were fed to satiation with three plant-based protein test diets with different lysine (L) to arginine (A) ratios (LL/A, 0.8; BL/A, 1.1; and HL/A, 1.8), using a commercial diet as control for six weeks. The test diets contained 730 g kg(-1) plant ingredients with 505-529 g protein, 90.2-93.9 g lipid kg(-1) dry matter; control diet contained 550 g protein and 95 g lipid kg(-1) dry matter. Periprandial expression of brain NPY and CCK (npy and cck) was measured twice (weeks 1 and 6). At week one, npy levels were higher in pre-feeding than postfeeding cobia for all diets, except LL/A. At week six, npy levels in pre-feeding were higher than in postfeeding cobia for all diets. cck in pre-feeding cobia did not differ from that in postfeeding for all diets, at either time point. Cobia fed LL/A had lower feed intake (FI) than cobia fed BL/A and control diet, but no clear correlations between dietary L/A ratio and FI, growth and expression of npy and cck were detected. The data suggest that NPY serves as an orexigenic factor, but further studies are necessary to describe links between dietary L/A and regulation of appetite and FI in cobia.

  4. Removal of dissolved oxygen from water using a Pd-resin based catalytic reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxin SHI; Chongwei CUI; Liye ZHAO; Shuili YU; Xia YUN

    2009-01-01

    The removal of dissolved oxygen (DO) from water was studied experimentally in a Pd-resin base catalyst reactor using purified hydrogen gas as a reducing agent. The effects of various operating conditions, such as hydrogen and water flow rates, height of the catalytic resin bed, temperature, pH value and nan time, on the removal of DO, had been studied extensively. The results shows that DO could be removed by the reactor from ppm to ppb levels at ambient temperature. Increases of temperature, H2gas rate and the height of the catalytic resin were helpful to improve the DO removal rate. The change of pH value fom 4 to 12 resulted in no effect on DO removal. Reaction time was the key factor to control the DO removal efficiency. Only when the reaction time was longer than 2.3 minutes under the experimental conditions, could a very low DO level be achieved.

  5. Arginine-aromatic interactions and their effects on arginine-induced solubilization of aromatic solutes and suppression of protein aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Shah, Dhawal

    2011-09-21

    We examine the interaction of aromatic residues of proteins with arginine, an additive commonly used to suppress protein aggregation, using experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. An aromatic-rich peptide, FFYTP (a segment of insulin), and lysozyme and insulin are used as model systems. Mass spectrometry shows that arginine increases the solubility of FFYTP by binding to the peptide, with the simulations revealing the predominant association of arginine to be with the aromatic residues. The calculations further show a positive preferential interaction coefficient, Γ XP, contrary to conventional thinking that positive Γ XP\\'s indicate aggregation rather than suppression of aggregation. Simulations with lysozyme and insulin also show arginine\\'s preference for aromatic residues, in addition to acidic residues. We use these observations and earlier results reported by us and others to discuss the possible implications of arginine\\'s interactions with aromatic residues on the solubilization of aromatic moieties and proteins. Our results also highlight the fact that explanations based purely on Γ XP, which measures average affinity of an additive to a protein, could obscure or misinterpret the underlying molecular mechanisms behind additive-induced suppression of protein aggregation. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  6. Catalytic Spectrophotometry for Vanadium Determination Based on Oxidation of Arsenazo Ⅲ by Bichromate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A catalytic spectrophotometry for the determination of trace amount of vanadium was developed based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of arsenazo Ⅲ by potassium bichromate in weak acidic medium. The optimized conditions for determinations are: cK2Cr2O7=3.0×10-5 mol·L-1, carsenazo Ⅲ=3.0×10-5 mol·L-1, pH=4.0, t=90℃. The calibration graph is linear for 0.02~0.2 μg·ml-1, and the detection limit is 0.02 μg·ml-1 V. The apparent active energy of this catalytic reaction is 21.72 kJ·mol-1. Most foreign ions do not interfere with the determination of vadadium, except for Fe(Ⅱ) and Co(Ⅱ), and their interferences could be eliminated by ion exchange. The present method has been used to make the determination of vanadium in human hair, tea, potato and wastewater, and the results were satisfactory.

  7. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  8. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Hua [School of Urban Rail Transportation, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Li, Zhihu [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China); Xu, Yanhui, E-mail: xuyanhui@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy, Soochow University, Moye Rd. 688, Suzhou 215006 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm{sup −2} for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm{sup −2} (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10{sup −7}–10{sup −6} cm s{sup −1}. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER.

  9. Electro-catalytic activity of Ni–Co-based catalysts for oxygen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electro-catalytic activity of different electro-catalysts with a porous electrode structure was compared considering the real electrode area that was evaluated by cyclic measurement. - Highlights: • Ni–Co-based electro-catalysts for OER have been studied and compared. • The real electrode area is calculated and used for assessing the electro-catalysts. • Exchange current and reaction rate constant are estimated. • Ni is more useful for OER reaction than Co. - Abstract: In the present work, Ni–Co-based electrocatalysts (Ni/Co = 0:6, 1:5, 2:4, 3:3, 4:2, 5:1 and 6:0) have been studied for oxygen evolution reaction. The phase structure has been analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Based on the XRD and SEM results, it is believed that the synthesized products are poorly crystallized. To exclude the disturbance of electrode preparation technology on the evaluation of electro-catalytic activity, the real electrode surface area is calculated based on the cyclic voltammetry data, assumed that the specific surface capacitance is 60 μF cm−2 for metal oxide electrode. The real electrode area data are used to calculate the current density. The reaction rate constant of OER at different electrodes is also estimated based on basic reaction kinetic equations. It is found that the exchange current is 0.05–0.47 mA cm−2 (the real surface area), and the reaction rate constant has an order of magnitude of 10−7–10−6 cm s−1. The influence of the electrode potential on OER rate has been also studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique. Our investigation has shown that the nickel element has more contribution than the cobalt; the nickel oxide has the best electro-catalytic activity toward OER

  10. Direct catalytic transformation of carbohydrates into 5-ethoxymethylfurfural with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Catalytic conversion of carbohydrates into HMF and EMF in ethanol/DMSO with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres prepared from self-assembly of corresponding basic amino acids and HPA. - Highlights: • Acid–base bifunctional nanospheres were efficient for production of EMF from sugars. • Synthesis of EMF in a high yield of 76.6% was realized from fructose. • Fructose based biopolymers could also be converted into EMF with good yields. • Ethyl glucopyranoside was produced in good yields from glucose in ethanol. - Abstract: A series of acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres prepared from the self-assembly of basic amino acids and phosphotungstic acid (HPA) with different molar ratios were employed as efficient and recyclable catalysts for synthesis of liquid biofuel 5-ethoxymethylfurfural (EMF) from various carbohydrates. A high EMF yield of 76.6%, 58.5%, 42.4%, and 36.5% could be achieved, when fructose, inulin, sorbose, and sucrose were used as starting materials, respectively. Although, the acid–base bifunctional nanocatalysts were inert for synthesis of EMF from glucose based carbohydrates, ethyl glucopyranoside in good yields could be obtained from glucose in ethanol. Moreover, the nanocatalyst functionalized with acid and basic sites was able to be reused several times with no significant loss in catalytic activity

  11. Arginine, scurvy and Cartier's "tree of life"

    OpenAIRE

    Durzan Don J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Several conifers have been considered as candidates for "Annedda", which was the source for a miraculous cure for scurvy in Jacques Cartier's critically ill crew in 1536. Vitamin C was responsible for the cure of scurvy and was obtained as an Iroquois decoction from the bark and leaves from this "tree of life", now commonly referred to as arborvitae. Based on seasonal and diurnal amino acid analyses of candidate "trees of life", high levels of arginine, proline, and guanidino compoun...

  12. A simple red-ox titrimetric method for the evaluation of photo-catalytic activity of titania based catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y S Satpute; S A Borkar; S R Dharwadkar

    2003-12-01

    A simple red-ox titrimetry method has been developed for rapid evaluation of the photo catalytic activity of TiO2 based photo-catalysts. The analytical procedure employs monitoring the kinetics of a simple one electron transfer reduction reaction of conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+ in dilute aqueous solution in presence of sunlight. The photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 synthesized by two different routes was evaluated by the above technique. The effect of surface area, crystallite size and polymorphic contents on the photo-catalytic activity of TiO2 was also studied employing this method.

  13. Dioxygen Affinities and Biomimetic Catalytic Performance of Transition-metal Complexes with Crowned Bis-Schiff Bases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The dioxygen affinities and biomimetic catalytic performance of transition-metal complexes with (15-crown-5) salophen and its substituted derivatives were examined. The oxygenation constants of Co(II) complexes with crowned bis-Schiff bases were measured and their Mn(III) complexes were employed as models to mimic monooxygenase in catalytic epoxidation of styrene. The highest conversion and selectivity were up to 57.2% and 100% respectively at ambient temperature and pressure. The effects of crown ether ring and substituents R on the dioxygen affinities and catalytic activities were also investigated through comparing with the uncrowned analogues.

  14. New URJC-1 Material with Remarkable Stability and Acid-Base Catalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Leo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging new metal-organic structures with tunable physicochemical properties is an exciting research field for diverse applications. In this work, a novel metal-organic framework Cu(HIT(DMF0.5, named URJC-1, with a three-dimensional non-interpenetrated utp topological network, has been synthesized. This material exhibits a microporous structure with unsaturated copper centers and imidazole–tetrazole linkages that provide accessible Lewis acid/base sites. These features make URJC-1 an exceptional candidate for catalytic application in acid and base reactions of interest in fine chemistry. The URJC-1 material also displays a noteworthy thermal and chemical stability in different organic solvents of different polarity and boiling water. Its catalytic activity was evaluated in acid-catalyzed Friedel–Crafts acylation of anisole with acetyl chloride and base-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with malononitrile. In both cases, URJC-1 material showed very good performance, better than other metal organic frameworks and conventional catalysts. In addition, a remarkable structural stability was proven after several consecutive reaction cycles.

  15. Catalytic processes during preferential oxidation of CO in H 2-rich streams over catalysts based on copper-ceria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamarra, D.; Hornés, A.; Koppány, Zs.; Schay, Z.; Munuera, G.; Soria, J.; Martínez-Arias, A.

    Nanostructured catalysts based on combinations between oxidised copper and cerium entities prepared by two different methods (impregnation of ceria and coprecipitation of the two components within reverse microemulsions) have been examined with respect to their catalytic performance for preferential oxidation of CO in a H 2-rich stream (CO-PROX). Correlations between their catalytic and redox properties are established on the basis of parallel analyses of temperature programmed reduction results employing both H 2 and CO as reactants as well as by XPS. Although general catalytic trends can be directly correlated with the redox properties observed upon separate interactions with each of the two reductants (CO and H 2), the existence of interferences between both reductants must be considered to complete details for such activity/redox correlation. Differences in the nature of the active oxidised copper-cerium contacts present in each case determine the catalytic properties of these systems for the CO-PROX process.

  16. Catalytic processes towards the production of biofuels in a palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Thiam Leng; Bhatia, Subhash

    2008-11-01

    In Malaysia, there has been interest in the utilization of palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of environmental friendly biofuels. A biorefinery based on palm oil and oil palm biomass for the production of biofuels has been proposed. The catalytic technology plays major role in the different processing stages in a biorefinery for the production of liquid as well as gaseous biofuels. There are number of challenges to find suitable catalytic technology to be used in a typical biorefinery. These challenges include (1) economic barriers, (2) catalysts that facilitate highly selective conversion of substrate to desired products and (3) the issues related to design, operation and control of catalytic reactor. Therefore, the catalytic technology is one of the critical factors that control the successful operation of biorefinery. There are number of catalytic processes in a biorefinery which convert the renewable feedstocks into the desired biofuels. These include biodiesel production from palm oil, catalytic cracking of palm oil for the production of biofuels, the production of hydrogen as well as syngas from biomass gasification, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) for the conversion of syngas into liquid fuels and upgrading of liquid/gas fuels obtained from liquefaction/pyrolysis of biomass. The selection of catalysts for these processes is essential in determining the product distribution (olefins, paraffins and oxygenated products). The integration of catalytic technology with compatible separation processes is a key challenge for biorefinery operation from the economic point of view. This paper focuses on different types of catalysts and their role in the catalytic processes for the production of biofuels in a typical palm oil and oil palm biomass-based biorefinery. PMID:18434141

  17. Electrochemical biosensor for detection of DNA hydroxymethylation based on glycosylation and alkaline phosphatase catalytic signal amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • DNA Hydroxymethylation was detected by electrochemical method. • 5-Hydroxymethylation cytosine in target DNA was chemically modified with glucose group. • Alkaline phosphatase catalytic signal amplification strategy was used. • The developed method also showed excellent reproducibility and stability. - Abstract: DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hydroxymethylcytosine, 5hmC) is a kind of new epigenetic modification, which plays key roles in nuclear reprogramming, regulates the gene activity, and initiates the DNA demethylation in mammals. For further understanding the functions of 5hmC and the correlation with tumour, it is essential to develop sensitive and selective methods for detecting and sequencing 5hmC. Herein, a kind of electrochemical biosensor was fabricated for 5hmC detection based on the glycosylation modification of 5hmC and enzymatic signal amplification. Under the catalytic effect of T4 β-glucosyltransferase, the 5hmC in target DNA was chemically modified with glucose. Then with the bridge connection of 1,4-phenyldiboronic acid, alkaline phosphatase was further captured on the electrode surface to catalyze the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate disodium salt to produce p-nitrophenol. Based on the relationship between the electrochemical oxidation signal of p-nitrophenol and the concentration of target DNA, the 5hmC level can be detected with high sensitivity and selectivity. The developed method also showed excellent reproducibility and stability

  18. Ruthenium(II) hydrazone Schiff base complexes: Synthesis, spectral study and catalytic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, R.; Viswanathamurthi, P.; Muthukumar, M.

    2011-12-01

    Ruthenium(II) hydrazone Schiff base complexes of the type [RuCl(CO)(B)(L)] (were B = PPh 3, AsPh 3 or Py; L = hydrazone Schiff base ligands) were synthesized from the reactions of hydrazone Schiff base ligand (obtained from isonicotinoylhydrazide and different hydroxy aldehydes) with [RuHCl(CO)(EPh 3) 2(B)] (where E = P or As; B = PPh 3, AsPh 3 or Py) in 1:1 molar ratio. All the new complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C and 31P NMR) data. They have been tentatively assigned an octahedral structure. The synthesized complexes have exhibited catalytic activity for oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone in the presence of N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMO) as co-oxidant. They were also found to catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of aliphatic and aromatic ketones to alcohols in KOH/Isopropanol.

  19. Emergence of the First Catalytic Oligonucleotides in a Formamide-Based Origin Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šponer, Judit E; Šponer, Jiří; Nováková, Olga; Brabec, Viktor; Šedo, Ondrej; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Costanzo, Giovanna; Pino, Samanta; Saladino, Raffaele; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    50 years after the historical Miller-Urey experiment, the formamide-based scenario is perhaps the most powerful concurrent hypothesis for the origin of life on our planet besides the traditional HCN-based concept. The information accumulated during the last 15 years in this topic is astonishingly growing and nowadays the formamide-based model represents one of the most complete and coherent pathways leading from simple prebiotic precursors up to the first catalytically active RNA molecules. In this work, we overview the major events of this long pathway that have emerged from recent experimental and theoretical studies, mainly concentrating on the mechanistic, methodological, and structural aspects of this research.

  20. Arginine transport in catabolic disease states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Choudry, Haroon A; Epler, Mark J; Meng, Qinghe; Karinch, Anne; Lin, Chengmao; Souba, Wiley

    2004-10-01

    Arginine appears to be a semiessential amino acid in humans during critical illness. Catabolic disease states such as sepsis, injury, and cancer cause an increase in arginine utilization, which exceeds body production, leading to arginine depletion. This is aggravated by the reduced nutrient intake that is associated with critical illness. Arginine depletion may have negative consequences on tissue function under these circumstances. Nutritional regimens containing arginine have been shown to improve nitrogen balance and lymphocyte function, and stimulate arginine transport in the liver. We have studied the effects of stress mediators on arginine transport in vascular endothelium, liver, and gut epithelium. In vascular endothelium, endotoxin stimulates arginine uptake, an effect that is mediated by the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and by the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. This TNF-alpha stimulation involves the activation of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC). A significant increase in hepatic arginine transport activity also occurs following burn injury and in rats with progressive malignant disease. Surgical removal of the growing tumor results in a normalization of the accelerated hepatic arginine transport within days. Chronic metabolic acidosis and sepsis individually augment intestinal arginine transport in rats and Caco-2 cell culture. PKC and mitogen-activated protein kinases are involved in mediating the sepsis/acidosis stimulation of arginine transport. Understanding the regulation of plasma membrane arginine transport will enhance our knowledge of nutrition and metabolism in seriously ill patients and may lead to the design of improved nutritional support formulas. PMID:15465794

  1. Physics-based enzyme design: predicting binding affinity and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Sarah; Pearlman, David A; Sherman, Woody

    2014-12-01

    Computational enzyme design is an emerging field that has yielded promising success stories, but where numerous challenges remain. Accurate methods to rapidly evaluate possible enzyme design variants could provide significant value when combined with experimental efforts by reducing the number of variants needed to be synthesized and speeding the time to reach the desired endpoint of the design. To that end, extending our computational methods to model the fundamental physical-chemical principles that regulate activity in a protocol that is automated and accessible to a broad population of enzyme design researchers is essential. Here, we apply a physics-based implicit solvent MM-GBSA scoring approach to enzyme design and benchmark the computational predictions against experimentally determined activities. Specifically, we evaluate the ability of MM-GBSA to predict changes in affinity for a steroid binder protein, catalytic turnover for a Kemp eliminase, and catalytic activity for α-Gliadin peptidase variants. Using the enzyme design framework developed here, we accurately rank the most experimentally active enzyme variants, suggesting that this approach could provide enrichment of active variants in real-world enzyme design applications.

  2. High performance catalytic distillation using CNTs-based holistic catalyst for production of high quality biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Wei, Dali; Li, Qi; Ge, Xin; Guo, Xuefeng; Xie, Zaiku; Ding, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    For production of biodiesel from bio oils by heterogeneous catalysis, high performance catalysts of transesterification and the further utilization of glycerol have been the two points of research. The process seemed easy, however, has never been well established. Here we report a novel design of catalytic distillation using hierachically integrated CNTs-based holistic catalyst to figure out the two points in one process, which shows high performance both for the conversion of bio oils to biodiesel and, unexpectedly, for the conversion of glycerol to more valuable chemicals at the same time. The method, with integration of nano, meso to macro reactor, has overwhelming advantages over common technologies using liquid acids or bases to catalyze the reactions, which suffer from the high cost of separation and unsolved utilization of glycerol.

  3. Synthesis of novel carbon/silica composites based strong acid catalyst and its catalytic activities for acetalization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yueqing Lu; Xuezheng Liang; Chenze Qi

    2012-06-01

    Novel solid acid based on carbon/silica composites are synthesized through one-pot hydrothermal carbonization of hydroxyethylsulfonic acid, sucrose and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS). The novel solid acid owned the acidity of 2.0 mmol/g, much higher than that of the traditional solid acids such as Nafion and Amberlyst-15 (0.8 mmol/g). The catalytic activities of the solid acid are investigated through acetalization. The results showed that the novel solid acid was very efficient for the reactions. The high acidity and catalytic activities made the novel carbon/silica composites based solid acid hold great potential for the green chemical processes.

  4. Dietary arginine and linear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Vught, Anneke J A H; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Arts, Ilja C W;

    2013-01-01

    Child Intervention Study during 2001-2 (baseline), and at 3-year and 7-year follow-up, were used. Arginine intake was estimated via a 7 d precoded food diary at baseline and 3-year follow-up. Data were analysed in a multilevel structure in which children were embedded within schools. Random intercept...

  5. Electro-catalytic oxidation of phenol with Ti-base lead dioxide electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王东田; 魏杰; 于秀娟; 杨红

    2003-01-01

    The Ti-base PbO2 electrode prepared by electrodeposition of PbO2 on the surface of titanium was used for electro-catalytic oxidation of phenol in waste water. The experimental results show that the electrodeposition of PbO2 at a higher current density for a short time, then followed by a lower current density can get a compact and combinative PbO2 layer. The properties of a Ti/PbO2 electrode with an interlayer of oxide are the best. When this kind of electrode is used to treat phenol containing waste water, the phenol-removal rate is higher and the slot voltage is lower. In addition, by using the phenol-removal rate as an index, the influences of electrolysis current density, mass transfer condition and pH were studied and the optimal condition was confirmed.

  6. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P.; Manikandan, R.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Viswanathamurthi, P.

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HLn (n = 1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HLn (n = 1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  7. Removal of ammonia from aqueous solutions by catalytic oxidation with copper-based rare earth composite metal materials: catalytic performance, characterization, and cytotoxicity evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Mao Hung

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) has an important use in the chemical industry and is widely found in industrial wastewater.For this investigation of copper-based rare earth composite metal materials,aqueous solutions containing 400 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a batch-bed reactor with a catalyst prepared by the co-precipitation of copper nitrate,lanthanum nitrate and cerium nitrate.Barely any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation without a catalyst,but about 88% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over the catalysts at 423 K with an oxygen partial pressure of 4.0 MPa.The catalytic redox behavior was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV).Furthermore,the catalysts were characterized using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX),which showed that the catalytic behavior was related to the metal oxide properties of the catalyst.In addition,the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite-induced cytotoxicity in the human lung MRC-5 cell line was tested,and the percentage cell survival was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetra-zolium (MTS) analysis in vitro.No apparent cytotoxicity was observed when the human lung cells were exposed to the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite.

  8. The arginine-ornithine antiporter ArcD contributes to biological fitness of Streptococcus suis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus eFulde

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The arginine-ornithine antiporter (ArcD is part of the Arginine Deiminase System (ADS, a catabolic, energy-providing pathway found in a variety of different bacterial species, including the porcine zoonotic pathogen Streptococcus suis. The ADS has recently been shown to play a role in the pathogenicity of S. suis, in particular in its survival in host cells. The contribution of arginine and arginine transport mediated by ArcD, however, has yet to be clarified. In the present study, we showed by experiments using [U-13C6]arginine as a tracer molecule that S. suis is auxotrophic for arginine and that bacterial growth depends on the uptake of extracellular arginine. To further study the role of ArcD in arginine metabolism, we generated an arcD-specific mutant strain and characterized its growth compared to the wild-type (WT strain, a virulent serotype 2 strain. The mutant strain showed a markedly reduced growth rate in chemically defined media supplemented with arginine when compared to the WT strain, indicating that ArcD promotes arginine uptake. To further evaluate the in vivo relevance of ArcD, we studied the intracellular bacterial survival of the arcD mutant strain in an epithelial cell culture infection model. The mutant strain was substantially attenuated, and its reduced intracellular survival rate correlated with a lower ability to neutralize the acidified environment. Based on these results, we propose that ArcD, by its function as an arginine-ornithine antiporter, is important for supplying arginine as substrate of the ADS and, thereby, contributes to biological fitness and virulence of S. suis in the host.

  9. Microlith-Based Catalytic Reactor for Air Quality and Trace Contaminant Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilekar, Saurabh; Hawley, Kyle; Junaedi, Christian; Crowder, Bruce; Prada, Julian; Mastanduno, Richard; Perry, Jay L.; Kayatin, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, gaseous compounds such as methane, carbon monoxide, and trace contaminants have posed challenges for maintaining clean air in enclosed spaces such as crewed spacecraft cabins as they are hazardous to humans and are often difficult to remove by conventional adsorption technology. Catalytic oxidizers have provided a reliable and robust means of disposing of even trace levels of these compounds by converting them into carbon dioxide and water. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA - Marshall (MSFC) have been developing, characterizing, and optimizing high temperature catalytic oxidizers (HTCO) based on PCI's patented Microlith® technology to meet the requirements of future extended human spaceflight explorations. Current efforts have focused on integrating the HTCO unit with a compact, simple recuperative heat exchanger to reduce the overall system size and weight while also reducing its energy requirements. Previous efforts relied on external heat exchangers to recover the waste heat and recycle it to the oxidizer to minimize the system's power requirements; however, these units contribute weight and volume burdens to the overall system. They also result in excess heat loss due to the separation of the HTCO and the heat recuperator, resulting in lower overall efficiency. Improvements in the recuperative efficiency and close coupling of HTCO and heat recuperator lead to reductions in system energy requirements and startup time. Results from testing HTCO units integrated with heat recuperators at a variety of scales for cabin air quality control and heat melt compactor applications are reported and their benefits over previous iterations of the HTCO and heat recuperator assembly are quantified in this paper.

  10. Interpretation of Ostwald ripening of catalytic nanoparticles based on the radial breathing mode in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wooseok; Hwan Kim, Sung; Sung Jung, Dae; Kim, Yooseok; Youn Kim, Soo; An, Ki-Seok; Park, Chong-Yun

    2014-11-01

    Catalytic nanoparticle (NP) size is the crucial factor that determines carbon nanotube (CNT) diameter. Therefore, we explored the Ostwald ripening phenomenon of catalytic NPs from the radial breathing modes in resonant Raman spectra of synthesized single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). SWCNTs were synthesized using chemically derived monodisperse Fe oxide catalytic NPs by a conventional thermal chemical vapor deposition system. The density of the NPs was manipulated by simply adjusting the spin-coating speed and cycle. The diameter distribution and tube type (SWCNTs or multi-walled CNTs) were thereby determined, which can be understood by density-dependent Ostwald ripening of the NPs. As a result, the diameter-selective growth of SWCNTs was successfully achieved, which will be useful for SWCNTs-based electronic applications.

  11. Chloride ions promoted the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over clay-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Zhang, Changbo; Xu, Rui; Gu, Chuantao; Song, Zhengguo; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol over clay-based catalysts in the presence and absence of NaCl was investigated. Changes in the H2O2, Cl(-), and dissolved metal ion concentration, as well as solution pH during phenol oxidation, were also studied. Additionally, the intermediates formed during phenol oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and the chemical bonding information of the catalyst surfaces was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the presence of Cl(-) increased the oxidation rate of phenol to 155%, and this phenomenon was ubiquitous during the oxidation of phenolic compounds by H2O2 over clay-based catalysts. Cl(-)-assisted oxidation of phenol was evidenced by several analytical techniques such as mass spectroscopy (MS) and XPS, and it was hypothesized that the rate-limiting step was accelerated in the presence of Cl(-). Based on the results of this study, the CWPO technology appears to be promising for applications in actual saline phenolic wastewater treatment. PMID:26942523

  12. DNA base-stacking assay utilizing catalytic hairpin assembly-induced gold nanoparticle aggregation for colorimetric protein sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chen; Chen, Chie-Pein; Chen, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-03-18

    A label-free and enzyme-free colorimetric sensing platform for the amplified detection of fibronectin was developed based on an ingenious combination of catalytic hairpin assembly and a base stacking hybridization-based gold nanoparticle aggregation strategy. The detection limit of 2.3 pM is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of established fibronectin biosensors. PMID:26906691

  13. Biogas Catalytic Reforming Studies on Nickel-Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Gregory B.; Hjalmarsson, Per; Norrman, Kion;

    2016-01-01

    of experiments were performed to study catalytic activity and effect of sulfur poisoning: (i) CH4 and CO2 dissociation; (ii) biogas (60% CH4 and 40% CO2) temperature-programmed reactions (TPRxn); and (iii) steady-state biogas reforming reactions followed by postmortem catalyst characterization by temperature......-programmed oxidation and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Results showed thatNi/ScYSZ/Pd-CGO was more active for catalytic dissociation of CH4 at 750°C and subsequent reactivity of deposited carbonaceous species. Sulfur deactivated most catalytic reactions except CO2 dissociation at 750°C. The presence...

  14. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Wild Reed over a Zeolite-Based Waste Catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Myung Lang Yoo; Yong Ho Park; Young-Kwon Park; Sung Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Fast catalytic pyrolysis of wild reed was carried out at 500 °C. Waste fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst disposed from a petroleum refinery process was activated through acetone-washing and calcination and used as catalyst for pyrolysis. In order to evaluate the catalytic activity of waste FCC catalyst, commercial HY zeolite catalyst with a SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of 5.1 was also used. The bio-oil produced from pyrolysis was analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). When...

  15. Enhancing the Activity of Peptide-Based Artificial Hydrolase with Catalytic Ser/His/Asp Triad and Molecular Imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengfan; Lv, Yuqi; Liu, Xiaojing; Qi, Wei; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an artificial hydrolase was developed by combining the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad with N-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl diphenylalanine (Fmoc-FF), followed by coassembly of the peptides into nanofibers (CoA-HSD). The peptide-based nanofibers provide an ideal supramolecular framework to support the functional groups. Compared with the self-assembled catalytic nanofibers (SA-H), which contain only the catalytic histidine residue, the highest activity of CoA-HSD occurs when histidine, serine, and aspartate residues are at a ratio of 40:1:1. This indicates that the well-ordered nanofiber structure and the synergistic effects of serine and aspartate residues contribute to the enhancement in activity. Additionally, for the first time, molecular imprinting was applied to further enhance the activity of the peptide-based artificial enzyme (CoA-HSD). p-NPA was used as the molecular template to arrange the catalytic Ser/His/Asp triad residues in the proper orientation. As a result, the activity of imprinted coassembled CoA-HSD nanofibers is 7.86 times greater than that of nonimprinted CoA-HSD and 13.48 times that of SA-H. PMID:27191381

  16. Catalytic mechanism of LENR in quasicrystals based on localized anharmonic vibrations and phasons

    CERN Document Server

    Dubinko, Volodymyr; Irwin, Klee

    2016-01-01

    Quasicrystals (QCs) are a novel form of matter, which are neither crystalline nor amorphous. Among many surprising properties of QCs is their high catalytic activity. We propose a mechanism explaining this peculiarity based on unusual dynamics of atoms at special sites in QCs, namely, localized anharmonic vibrations (LAVs) and phasons. In the former case, one deals with a large amplitude (~ fractions of an angstrom) time-periodic oscillations of a small group of atoms around their stable positions in the lattice, known also as discrete breathers, which can be excited in regular crystals as well as in QCs. On the other hand, phasons are a specific property of QCs, which are represented by very large amplitude (~angstrom) oscillations of atoms be-tween two quasi-stable positions determined by the geometry of a QC. Large amplitude atomic motion in LAVs and phasons results in time-periodic driving of adjacent potential wells occupied by hydrogen ions (protons or deuterons) in case of hydrogenated QCs. This drivin...

  17. A flameless catalytic combustion-based thermoelectric generator for powering electronic instruments on gas pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► MPPT is used to improve the feature that TEG output is sensitive to load variation. ► The improved feature makes TEG suitable to power electronic device on gas pipeline. ► Test shows heat transfer uniformity plays an important role in improving TEG output. ► It can get an optimized TEG by uniformly filling a thermal insulation material. - Abstract: This paper presents a flameless catalytic combustion-based thermoelectric power generator that uses commercial thermoelectric modules. The structure of the thermoelectric generator (TEG) is introduced and the power performance is measured based on a designed circuit system. The open circuit voltage of the TEG is about 7.3 V. The maximum power output can reach up to 6.5 W when the load resistance matches the TEG internal resistance. However, the system output is sensitive to load variation. To improve this characteristic, maximum power point tracking technique is used and results in an open circuit voltage of 13.8 V. The improved characteristic makes the TEG system a good charger to keep the lead acid battery fully charged so as to meet the needs of electronic instruments on gas pipelines. In addition, the combustion features have been investigated based on the temperature measurement. Test results show that the uniformity of combustion heat transfer process and the combustion chamber structure play important roles in improving system power output. It can get an optimized TEG system (maximum power output: 8.3 W) by uniformly filling a thermal insulation material (asbestos) to avoid a non-uniform combustion heat transfer process

  18. Noncanonical Myo9b-RhoGAP Accelerates RhoA GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Arginine-Finger Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fengshuang; Kong, Ruirui; Ren, Jinqi; Zhu, Li; Lou, Jizhong; Wu, Jane Y; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-31

    The GTP hydrolysis activities of Rho GTPases are stimulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which contain a RhoGAP domain equipped with a characteristic arginine finger and an auxiliary asparagine for catalysis. However, the auxiliary asparagine is missing in the RhoGAP domain of Myo9b (Myo9b-RhoGAP), a unique motorized RhoGAP that specifically targets RhoA for controlling cell motility. Here, we determined the structure of Myo9b-RhoGAP in complex with GDP-bound RhoA and magnesium fluoride. Unexpectedly, Myo9b-RhoGAP contains two arginine fingers at its catalytic site. The first arginine finger resembles the one within the canonical RhoGAP domains and inserts into the nucleotide-binding pocket of RhoA, whereas the second arginine finger anchors the Switch I loop of RhoA and interacts with the nucleotide, stabilizing the transition state of GTP hydrolysis and compensating for the lack of the asparagine. Mutating either of the two arginine fingers impaired the catalytic activity of Myo9b-RhoGAP and affected the Myo9b-mediated cell migration. Our data indicate that Myo9b-RhoGAP accelerates RhoA GTP hydrolysis by a previously unknown dual-arginine-finger mechanism, which may be shared by other noncanonical RhoGAP domains lacking the auxiliary asparagine. PMID:27363609

  19. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun eWinter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO, although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions.

  20. Physiological implications of arginine metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Gudrun; Todd, Christopher D; Trovato, Maurizio; Forlani, Giuseppe; Funck, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen is a limiting resource for plant growth in most terrestrial habitats since large amounts of nitrogen are needed to synthesize nucleic acids and proteins. Among the 21 proteinogenic amino acids, arginine has the highest nitrogen to carbon ratio, which makes it especially suitable as a storage form of organic nitrogen. Synthesis in chloroplasts via ornithine is apparently the only operational pathway to provide arginine in plants, and the rate of arginine synthesis is tightly regulated by various feedback mechanisms in accordance with the overall nutritional status. While several steps of arginine biosynthesis still remain poorly characterized in plants, much wider attention has been paid to inter- and intracellular arginine transport as well as arginine-derived metabolites. A role of arginine as alternative source besides glutamate for proline biosynthesis is still discussed controversially and may be prevented by differential subcellular localization of enzymes. Apparently, arginine is a precursor for nitric oxide (NO), although the molecular mechanism of NO production from arginine remains unclear in higher plants. In contrast, conversion of arginine to polyamines is well documented, and in several plant species also ornithine can serve as a precursor for polyamines. Both NO and polyamines play crucial roles in regulating developmental processes as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. It is thus conceivable that arginine catabolism serves on the one hand to mobilize nitrogen storages, while on the other hand it may be used to fine-tune development and defense mechanisms against stress. This review summarizes the recent advances in our knowledge about arginine metabolism, with a special focus on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and pinpoints still unresolved critical questions. PMID:26284079

  1. Synthesis and catalytic activity of Ln(III) complexes with an unsymmetrical Schiff base including multigroups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Kemin; (

    2003-01-01

    [1]Elder, R. C., Tridentate and unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base ligands from salicylaldehydes and dimeric nickel(II) complexes, Aust. J. Chem., 1978, 31:35-45.[2]Atkins, R., Brewer, G., Kokot, G. et al., Copper(II) and nickel(II) complexesof unsymmetrical tetradentate Schiff base ligand, Inorg. Chem., 1985, 24: 127-134.[3]Meng Qingjin, Wang Ruixue, Bu Xiuren et al., New Ni (II) complexes with mixedtrimeric double Schiff ligands, Chemical Journal of Chinese Universities (in Chinese), 1990, 10: 1126-1130.[4]Yao Kemin, Zhou Wen, Lu Gui et al., Synthesis, mechanism and NMR spectra of lanthanide complexes with a novel unsymmetrical Schiff base, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42(2): 164-169.[5]Yao Kemin, Li Ning, Huang Qiaohong et al., Synthesis and catalytic activity of novel heteronuclear Ln(III)-Cu(II) complexes with noncyclic polyether-amino acid Schiff base, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42 (1) : 54-81.[6]Li Ning, Yao Kemin, Lou Kaiyan, Synthesis of La(III), Y(III) complexes with polyglycol aldehyde-amino acid Schiff base and their high resolution solid state 13C NMR spectra, Science in China, Series B, 1999, 42(6): 599-604.[7]Lam Berf, J. B., Shurvell, H. F., Verbet, L. et al., Organic Structural Analysis, New York: Macmillan Publishing Co. Inc., 1975, 234-250.[8]Yao Kemin, Cai Lezhen, Shen Liangfang et al., Synthesis and characterization of lanthanide perchlorates with noncyclic polyethylene glycols and their 13C-NMRspectra, Polyhedron, 1992,11(7): 2245-2251.[9]Dewar, M. J. S., Zoebisch, E. G., Healy, E. F., AM1: A new general purpose quantum mechanical molecular model, J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 1985, 107: 3902-3909.[10]Feifer, P., Avnjr, D., Chemistry in noninteger dimensions between two and three, I. Fractal theory of heterogeneous surfaces, J. Chem. Phys., 1983, 79(7): 3558-3565.[11]Yang Haifeng, Wang Hui, Duan Jinxia et al., Ab initio research of organic ligand Schiff base 4-[(2-hydroxyphenyl) imine]-2

  2. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  3. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  4. The effect of noble metals on catalytic methanation reaction over supported Mn/Ni oxide based catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar; Rusmidah Ali; Nurul Shafeeqa Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in sour natural gas can be removed using green technology via catalytic methanation reaction by converting CO2 to methane (CH4) gas. Using waste to wealth concept, production of CH4 would increase as well as creating environmental friendly approach for the purification of natural gas. In this research, a series of alumina supported manganese–nickel oxide based catalysts doped with noble metals such as ruthenium and palladium were prepared by wetness impregnation method. T...

  5. Synthesis of a Novel Carbon Based Acid Catalyst and Its Catalytic Activity for the Acetalization and Ketalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Xue-Zheng; GAO Shan; CHEN Wen-Ping; WANG Wen-Juan; YANG Jian-Guo

    2007-01-01

    A novel carbon based strong solid acid catalyst has been synthesized successfully.The catalytic activity for acetalization and ketalization was investigated.The results showed that the novel catalyst was very efficient with the average yield over 92%.The novel heterogeneous catalyst also has the advantages of high activity,wide applicability even to the preparation of 7 membered ring acetals and ketals,strikingly simple workup procedure,non-pollution and reusability,which will contribute to the green process greatly.

  6. Development of novel catalytically active polymer-metal-nanocomposites based on activated foams and textile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Berta; Ziegler, Kharla K.; Carrillo, Fernando; Muñoz, Maria; Muraviev, Dimitri N.; Macanás, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we report the intermatrix synthesis of Ag nanoparticles in different polymeric matrices such as polyurethane foams and polyacrylonitrile or polyamide fibers. To apply this technique, the polymer must bear functional groups able to bind and retain the nanoparticle ion precursors while ions should diffuse through the matrix. Taking into account the nature of some of the chosen matrices, it was essential to try to activate the support material to obtain an acceptable value of ion exchange capacity. To evaluate the catalytic activity of the developed nanocomposites, a model catalytic reaction was carried out in batch experiments: the reduction of p-nitrophenol by sodium borohydride.

  7. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of Cu2+ ion based on catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kun; Li, Bowei; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-02-15

    As an essential element, copper ion (Cu(2+)) plays important roles in human beings for its participation in diverse metabolic processes as a cofactor and/or a structural component of enzymes. However, excessive uptake of Cu(2+) ion gives rise to the risk of certain diseases. So, it is important to develop simple ways to monitor and detect Cu(2+) ion. In this study, a simple, facile colorimetric sensor for the ultrasensitive determination of Cu(2+) ion was developed based on the following principle: L-cysteine and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) could be conjugated to form the yellow product 2,4-dinitrophenylcysteine (DNPC), which was measurable at 355nm; however, upon addition of Cu(2+) ion, the absorbance of DNPC would be decreased owing to the Cu(2+) ion catalytic oxidation of L-cysteine to L-cystine in the presence of O2. Thus, the colorimetric detection of Cu(2+) ion could be achieved. The optimal pH, buffer, temperature and incubation time for the colorimetric sensor were obtained of pH 6.8 in 0.1M HEPES solution, 90 °C and 50 min, respectively. A good linearity within the range of 0.8-10 nM (r = 0.996) was attained, with a high detectability up to 0.5nM. Analyses of Cu(2+) ion in drinking water, lake water, seawater and biological samples were carried out and the method performances were found to agree well with that obtained by ICP-MS. The developed simple colorimetric sensor proved applicable for Cu(2+) ion determination in real samples with high sensitivity and selectivity. PMID:25194800

  8. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Wild Reed over a Zeolite-Based Waste Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung Lang Yoo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast catalytic pyrolysis of wild reed was carried out at 500 °C. Waste fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC catalyst disposed from a petroleum refinery process was activated through acetone-washing and calcination and used as catalyst for pyrolysis. In order to evaluate the catalytic activity of waste FCC catalyst, commercial HY zeolite catalyst with a SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of 5.1 was also used. The bio-oil produced from pyrolysis was analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. When the biomass-to-catalyst ratio was 1:1, the production of phenolics and aromatics was promoted considerably by catalysis, whereas the content of oxygenates was affected little. Significant conversion of oxygenates to furans and aromatics was observed when the biomass-to-catalyst ratio of 1:10 was used. Activated waste FCC catalyst showed comparable catalytic activity for biomass pyrolysis to HY in terms of the promotion of valuable chemicals, such as furans, phenolics and aromatics. The results of this study imply that waste FCC catalyst can be an important economical resource for producing high-value-added chemicals from biomass.

  9. Catalytic production of sulfur heterocycles (dihydrobenzodithiins): a new application of ligand-based alkene reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Daniel J; Fekl, Ulrich

    2009-12-28

    Activation of bis-o-phenylene tetrasulfide to render it a practical benzodithiete equivalent for [4+2] cycloadditions with alkenes has been achieved with catalytic amounts of Mo(tfd)(2)(bdt) (tfd = S(2)C(2)(CF(3))(2); bdt = S(2)C(6)H(4)). Substituted 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodithiins are produced. PMID:20024283

  10. Synthesis and catalytic activity of histidine-based NHC ruthenium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Monney, Angèle; Venkatachalam, Galmari; Albrecht, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Main-chain C,N-protected histidine has been successfully alkylated at both side-chain nitrogens. The corresponding histidinium salt was metallated with ruthenium(II) by a transmetalation procedure, thus providing histidine-derived NHC ruthenium complexes. These bio-inspired comsxsxsplexes show appreciable activity in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketones. peer-reviewed

  11. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    OpenAIRE

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M.L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon ...

  12. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lock Sow Mei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by using co-precipitation technique. The introduction of Pd promotes better catalytic activity, operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst. As expected, highest methane conversion was achieved at reaction temperature of 800 °C while the bimetallic catalyst (1 wt.% Ni -1wt.% Pd/Al2O3 gave the highest methane conversion of 70% over 15 min of time-on-stream (TOS. Interestingly, the introduction of Pd as promoter onto Ni-based catalyst also has a positive effect on the operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst as the methane conversion has improved significantly over 240 min of TOS. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 6th February 2016; Accepted: 6th March 2016 How to Cite: Mei, I.L.S., Lock, S.S.M., Vo, D.V.N., Abdullah, B. (2016. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 191-199 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199

  13. Effect of BaO on catalytic performance of Pd-based catalysts for purification of gasoline-methanol exhaust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪乔; 赵明; 徐成华; 汪嘉扬; 陈耀强

    2014-01-01

    Barium oxide was developed successfully to modify palladium catalysts supported on CeO2-ZrO2-La2O3-Al2O3 (CZLA) compound oxides by impregnation method. N2 adsorption (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), H2-temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the influence of BaO on the physicochemical properties of catalyst. And catalytic activity tests for methanol, CO, C3H8 and NO conversion were evaluated. Catalytic activity re-sults showed that BaO had a positive effect on the conversion of all pollutants. H2-TPR results suggested that the addition of BaO in-creased the reductive ability of the palladium catalysts. The XPS results indicated that doping BaO also improved the dispersion of Pd species and increased the amounts of Ce3+on the Pd-Ba/CZLA catalyst surface, which led to a better redox property. The excellent redox property helped to improve the catalytic activities toward all the pollutants over Pd-based catalysts.

  14. Catalytic activities of fungal oxidases in hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate-based microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gui-Ping; Zhang, Yun; Huang, Xi-Rong; Shi, Chuan-Hong; Liu, Wei-Feng; Li, Yue-Zhong; Qu, Yin-Bo; Gao, Pei-Ji

    2008-10-01

    For hydrophobic ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]), an H(2)O-in-[BMIM][PF(6)] microemulsion could be formed in the presence of nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100). In such a medium, both lignin peroxidase (LiP) and laccase could express their catalytic activity with the optimum molar ratio of H(2)O to TX-100 at 8.0 for LiP and >20 for laccase, and the optimum pH values at 3.2 for LiP and 4.2 for laccase, respectively. As compared with pure or water saturated [BMIM][PF(6)], in which the two oxidases had negligible catalytic activity due to the strong inactivating effect of [BMIM][PF(6)] on both enzymes, the use of the [BMIM][PF(6)]-based microemulsion had some advantages. Not only the catalytic activities of both fungal oxidases greatly enhanced, but also the apparent viscosity of the medium decreased. PMID:18602799

  15. Preparation of Photo catalytic Materials Based on Bi4Ti3O12 Doped with Transition Metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of hydrogen from water using ceramic semiconductors with photo catalytic properties has gained special relevance in the last years, due to their potential use for the generation of hydrogen in a direct and clean way. Doping with transition metals has demonstrated to be an effective method to obtain new active photo catalysts in the visible range of the solar spectrum by changing the band gap of the material. In this paper we study the effect of the addition of various dopants (Fe, Ni, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu) in the structure and band gap of Bi4Ti3O12, in order to improve its photo catalytic activity and make it visible light active. Accordingly, doped BIT based materials have been obtained by solid state processing and different amounts of an additional phase with sillenite structure, Bi12TiO20, have been detected. With the dopant a shift of the absorption spectra is produced towards higher wavelengths and consequently towards lower band gap values. The band gap values obtained for many of the prepared compositions are quite promising, promoting the study of their catalytic properties.. (Author)

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. Piet; M. Geldhoff; B.D.C. van Schaik; M.C. Brouwer; M. Valls Seron; M.E. Jakobs; K. Schipper; Y. Pannekoek; A.H. Zwinderman; T. van der Poll; A.H.C. van Kampen; F. Baas; A van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with

  17. Synthesis, spectral, characterization, catalytic and biological studies of new RuII N2O Schiff base complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complexes of the type (RuCl(CO)(B)(L)) (B = PPh3, AsPh3, py or pip; L monobasic tridentate Schiff base) have been synthesized by the reaction of equimolar amounts of (RuHCl(CO)(EPh3)2(B)) and Schiff bases in benzene. The resulting complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral (IR, electronic, NMR) data. An octahedral structure has been assigned to all these complexes. The new complexes have been exhibit catalytic activity for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and cyclohexanol in the presence of N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide as co-oxidant. (author)

  18. Biodiesel from waste cooking oil via base-catalytic and supercritical methanol transesterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, Ayhan [Sila Science, Trabzon 61040 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    In this study, waste cooking oil has subjected to transesterification reaction by potassium hydroxide (KOH) catalytic and supercritical methanol methods obtaining for biodiesel. In catalyzed methods, the presence of water has negative effects on the yields of methyl esters. In the catalytic transesterification free fatty acids and water always produce negative effects since the presence of free fatty acids and water causes soap formation, consumes catalyst, and reduces catalyst effectiveness. Free fatty acids in the waste cooking oil are transesterified simultaneously in supercritical methanol method. Since waste cooking oil contains water and free fatty acids, supercritical transesterification offers great advantage to eliminate the pre-treatment and operating costs. The effects of methanol/waste cooking oils ratio, potassium hydroxide concentration and temperature on the biodiesel conversion were investigated. (author)

  19. H2 production by catalytic methane decomposition on Cu based catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermo-catalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane has been investigated in a laboratory scale fixed bed reactor using a copper dispersed on γ-alumina as a catalyst. The usefulness of a fluidized bed operation instead of a fixed bed one has been assessed in terms of methane to hydrogen conversion, amount of carbon accumulated on the catalyst, possibility of the catalyst regeneration. The results highlight some promising features in using fluidized bed reactors in the TCD process. (authors)

  20. Simulation of a fuel reforming system based on catalytic partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Keith L.; DuBois, Terry

    Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) has potential for producing hydrogen that can be fed to a fuel cell for portable power generation. In order to be used for this purpose, catalytic partial oxidation must be combined with other processes, such as water-gas shift and preferential oxidation, to produce hydrogen with minimal carbon monoxide. This paper evaluates the use of catalytic partial oxidation in an integrated system for conversion of a military logistic fuel, JP-8, to high-purity hydrogen. A fuel processing system using CPO as the first processing step is simulated to understand the trade-offs involved in using CPO. The effects of water flow rate, CPO reactor temperature, carbon to oxygen ratio in the CPO reactor, temperature of preferential oxidation, oxygen to carbon ratio in the preferential oxidation reactor, and temperature for the water-gas shift reaction are evaluated. The possibility of recycling water from the fuel cell for use in fuel processing is evaluated. Finally, heat integration options are explored. A process efficiency, defined as the ratio of the lower heating value of hydrogen to that of JP-8, of around 53% is possible with a carbon to oxygen ratio of 0.7. Higher efficiencies are possible (up to 71%) when higher C/O ratios are used, provided that olefin production can be minimized in the CPO reactor.

  1. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  2. New Element Organic Frameworks Based on Sn, Sb, and Bi, with Permanent Porosity and High Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Fritsch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We present new element organic frameworks based on Sn, Sb and Bi atoms connected via organic linkers by element-carbon bonds. The open frameworks are characterized by specific surface areas (BET of up to 445 m2 g-1 and a good stability under ambient conditions resulting from a highly hydrophobic inner surface. They show good performance as heterogeneous catalysts in the cyanosylilation of benzaldehyde as a test reaction. Due to their catalytic activity, this class of materials might be able to replace common homogeneous element-organic and often highly toxic catalysts especially in the food industry.

  3. Study on Carbon Nanotubes Prepared from Catalytic Decomposition of CH4 over Lanthanum Containing Ni-Base Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Minwei; Li Fengyi

    2004-01-01

    A series of lanthanum containing Ni-base catalysts were prepared by citric acid complex method.Carbon nanotubes (CNT) were synthesized bY catalytic decomposing CH4 over these catalysts and characterized by XRD, TEM and TGA.It is found that the addition of lanthanum can not increase the yield of carbon nanotube, but can make the diameter of carbon nanotube thinner and even.The more the lanthanum addsr, the thinner the diameter of CNTs becomes.With the CNTs prepared on Ni-Mg catalyst, the CNTs prepared on Ni-La-Mg catalyst has better crystallinity and thermal stability.

  4. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  5. Herbo-mineral based Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic potential and biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Abdul; Laxmi; Arshad, Mohammad; Nami, Shahab A A; Nishat, Nahid

    2016-07-01

    Schiff base ligand, (L), derived from condensation reaction of 1,7-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione, (curcumin), with pyridine-3-carboxamide, (nicotinamide), and its complexes of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) ions, containing 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand were synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical techniques. From the micro analytical data, the stoichiometry of the complexes 1:1 (metal: ligand) was ascertained. The Co(II) and Cu(II) forms octahedral complexes, while the geometric structure around Ni(II) atom can be described as square planar. The catalytic potential of the metal complexes have been evaluated by recording the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results reveal that the percent decomposition of H2O2increases with time and the highest value (50.50%) was recorded for Co(II) complex. The ligand and its complexes were also screened for their in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The relative order of antibacterial activity against S. Pyogenes, S. aureus and E. coli is Cu(II)>Ni(II)>Co(II)>(L); while with P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae the order of activity is Cu(II)>Co(II)>Ni(II)>(L). The anthelmintic screening was performed using Pheretima posthuma. The order of anthelmintic activity of ligand and its complexes is [(Phen)CuLCl2]>[(Phen)CoLCl2]>[(Phen)NiL]Cl2>(L). PMID:27107703

  6. Strip biosensor for amplified detection of nerve growth factor-beta based on a molecular translator and catalytic DNA circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Lai, Ting; Mu, Kejie; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    We have demonstrated a new visual detection approach based on a molecular translator and a catalytic DNA circuit for the detection of nerve growth factor-beta (NGF-β). In this assay, a molecular translator based on the binding-induced DNA strand-displacement reaction was employed to convert the input protein to an output DNA signal. The molecular translator is composed of a target recognition element and a signal output element. Target recognition is achieved by the binding of the anti-NGF-β antibody to the target protein. Polyclonal anti-NGF-β antibody is conjugated to DNA1 and DNA2. The antibody conjugated DNA1 is initially hybridized to DNA3 to form a stable DNA1/DNA3 duplex. In the presence of NGF-β, the binding of the same target protein brings DNA1 and DNA2 into close proximity, resulting in an increase in their local effective concentration. This process triggers the strand-displacement reaction between DNA2 and DNA3 and releases the output DNA3. The released DNA3 is further amplified by a catalytic DNA circuit. The product of the catalytic DNA circuit is detected by a strip biosensor. This proposed assay has high sensitivity and selectivity with a dynamic response ranging from 10 fM to 10 pM, and its detection limit is 10 fM of NGF-β. This work provides a sensitive, enzyme-free, and universal strategy for the detection of other proteins. PMID:25068151

  7. Low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 over Mn-based catalyst: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TsungYu Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The removals of NOx by catalytic technology at low temperatures (100–300 °C for industrial flue gas treatment have received increasing attention. However, the development of low temperature catalysts for selective catalytic reduction (SCR of NOx with ammonia is still a challenge especially in the presence of SO2. The current status of using Mn-based catalysts for low temperature SCR of NOx with ammonia (NH3-SCR is reviewed. Reaction mechanisms and effects of operating factors on low temperature NH3-SCR are addressed, and the SCR efficiencies of Mn-based metal oxides with and without SO2 poisoning have also been discussed with different supports and co-metals. The key factors for enhancing low temperature NH3-SCR efficiency and SO2 resistance with Mn-based catalysts are identified to be (1 high specific surface area; (2 high surface acidity; (3 oxidation states of manganese; (4 well dispersion of manganese oxide metals; (5 more surface adsorbed oxygen; (6 more absorbed NO3− on the catalyst surface; (7 easier decomposition of ammonium sulfates. Moreover, the regenerative methods such as water washing, acid and/or alkali washing and heat treatment to the poisoned catalysts could help to recover the low temperature SCR efficiency to its initial level.

  8. Arginine regulation of gramicidin S biosynthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier, A.; Demain, A L

    1981-01-01

    Several amino acids are known to affect the gramicidin S producer Bacillus brevis ATCC 9999 with respect ot growth, soluble gramicidin S synthetase formation, antibiotic production, or a combination of these. Our studies confirmed that arginine has paradoxical effects on the B. brevis fermentation; it markedly increased growth and antibiotic production, yet decreased the soluble heavy gramicidin S synthetase activity. We found that arginine did not repress heavy gramicidin S synthetase. The a...

  9. Synthesis and catalytic application of palladium nanoparticles supported on kaolinite-based nanohybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngnie, Gaelle; Dedzo, Gustave K; Detellier, Christian

    2016-05-31

    Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) were deposited on the surface of the modified clay mineral, kaolinite. To improve compatibility, abundance and control of the size of the nanoparticles, kaolinite was modified by the grafting of an amino alcohol (triethanolamine (TEA)) and an ionic liquid (1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium (ImIL)). Characterization techniques (XRD, TGA, solid state (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy) confirmed the effective grafting of these compounds on the internal surface of kaolinite. After the synthesis of PdNPs onto clay particles, TEM allowed the visualization of abundant PdNPs with sizes ranging from 4 to 6 nm, uniformly distributed onto the platelets of modified kaolinite. Unmodified clay showed low abundance and random distribution of the nanoparticles. The catalysts obtained were effective for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), the material with TEA being the most effective. These materials have exhibited excellent performance during the Heck and particularly the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions, with reaction yields up to 100%. These catalysts showed a very slight loss in activity for three consecutive catalytic cycles (less than 10% decrease of the activity compared to the first cycle). This was an evidence that the prior grafting modification of kaolinite helps in significantly improving the quality of the synthesized NPs and also promotes their strong attachment onto the clay mineral surface. PMID:27160392

  10. Catalytic performance and molecular dynamic simulation of immobilized CC bond hydrolase based on carbon nanotube matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Chunlei; Li, Duanxing; Shen, E; Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Xuwang; Wang, Jingwei; Zhou, Jiti

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has been proved to be a kind of novel support for enzyme immobilization. In this study, we tried to find the relationship between conformation and catalytic performance of immobilized enzyme. Two CC bond hydrolases BphD and MfphA were immobilized on CNTs (SWCNT and MWCNT) via physical adsorption and covalent attachment. Among the conjugates, the immobilized BphD on chemically functionalized SWCNT (BphD-CSWCNT) retained the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km value) compared to free BphD (92.9%). On the other hand, when MfphA bound to pristine SWCNT (MfphA-SWCNT), it was completely inactive. Time-resolved fluorescence spectrum indicated the formation of static ground complexes during the immobilization processes. Circular dichroism (CD) showed that the secondary structures of immobilized enzymes changed in varying degrees. In order to investigate the inhibition mechanism of MfphA by SWCNT, molecular dynamics simulation was employed to analyze the adsorption process, binding sites and time evolution of substrate tunnels. The results showed that the preferred binding sites (Trp201 and Met81) of MfphA for SWCNT blocked the main substrate access tunnel, thus making the enzyme inactive. The "tunnel-block" should be a novel possible inhibition mechanism for enzyme-nanotube conjugate.

  11. Investigating the Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Properties of Versatile Gold-Based Nanocatalvsts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer, Lori A.

    Transition metal nanomaterials are used to catalyze many chemical reactions, including those key to environmental, medicinal, and petrochemical fields. Improving their catalytic properties and lifetime would have significant economic and environmental rewards. Potentially expedient options to make such advancements are to alter the shape, size, or composition of transition metal nanocatalysts. This work investigates the relationships between structure and catalytic properties of synthesized Au, Pd-on-Au, and Au-enzyme model transition metal nanocatalysts. Au and Pd-on-Au nanomaterials were studied due to their wide-spread application and structure-dependent electronic and geometric properties. The goal of this thesis is to contribute design procedures and synthesis methods that enable the preparation of more efficient transition metal nanocatalysts. The influence of the size and composition of Pd-on-Au nanoparticles (NPs) was systematically investigated and each was found to affect the catalyst's surface structure and catalytic properties. The catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethene and reduction of 4-nitrophenol by Pd-on-Au nanoparticles were investigated as these reactions are useful for environmental and pharmaceutical synthesis applications, respectively. Structural characterization revealed that the dispersion and oxidation state of surface Pd atoms are controlled by the Au particle size and concentration of Pd. These structural changes are correlated with observed Pd-on-Au NP activities for both probe reactions, providing new insight into the structure-activity relationships of bimetallic nanocatalysts. Using the structure-dependent electronic properties of Au NPs, a new type of light-triggered biocatalyst was prepared and used to remotely control a model biochemical reaction. This biocatalyst consists of a model thermophilic glucokinase enzyme covalently attached to the surface of Au nanorods. The rod-like shape of the Au nanoparticles made the

  12. Colorimetric kinetic determination of potassium ions based on the use of a specific aptamer and catalytically active gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a simple, highly sensitive, and selective colorimetric kinetic assay for the determination of potassium(I) by exploiting the specific recognition capability of an appropriate aptamer and catalytic signal amplification by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Amplification is based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol by borohydride which is catalyzed by AuNPs. This leads to a color change of the solution from yellow to colorless, and the color change can be recognized with bare eyes or via photometry. The K(I)-selective aptamer is placed on the AuNPs and forms a tightly bound G-quadruplex with K(I) which partially masks the surface of the AuNPs and prevents 4-nitrophenol to be reduced at the catalytically active surface of the AuNPs. Hence, the rate of decoloration is retarded. The assay displays high selectivity for K(I) over other cations, has a linear response in the 0.1 nM to 10 μM concentration range, and a detection limit as low as 0.06 nM. In addition, these findings pave the way to novel analytical methods based on the use of gold nanoparticle-catalyzed chemical reactions. (author)

  13. Supported catalysts based on layered double hydroxides for catalytic oxidation and hydrogenation: general functionality and promising application prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junting; He, Yufei; Liu, Yanan; Du, Yiyun; Li, Dianqing

    2015-08-01

    Oxidation and hydrogenation catalysis plays a crucial role in the current chemical industry for the production of key chemicals and intermediates. Because of their easy separation and recyclability, supported catalysts are widely used in these two processes. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) with the advantages of unique structure, composition diversity, high stability, ease of preparation and low cost have shown great potential in the design and synthesis of novel supported catalysts. This review summarizes the recent progress in supported catalysts by using LDHs as supports/precursors for catalytic oxidation and hydrogenation. Particularly, partial hydrogenation of acetylene, hydrogenation of dimethyl terephthalate, methanation, epoxidation of olefins, elimination of NOx and SOx emissions, and selective oxidation of biomass have been chosen as representative reactions in the petrochemical, fine chemicals, environmental protection and clean energy fields to highlight the potential application and the general functionality of LDH-based catalysts in catalytic oxidation and hydrogenation. Finally, we concisely discuss some of the scientific challenges and opportunities of supported catalysts based on LDH materials. PMID:25962432

  14. Large-Scale Identification of the Arginine Methylome by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The attachment of one or more methylation groups to the side chain of arginine residues is a regulatory mechanism for cellular proteins. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based characterization allow comprehensive identification of arginine methylation sites by peptide-level enrichment...... strategies. Described in this unit is a 4-day protocol for enrichment of arginine-methylated peptides and subsequent identification of thousands of distinct sites by mass spectrometry. Specifically, the protocol explains step-by-step sample preparation, enrichment using commercially available antibodies......, prefractionation using strong cation exchange, and identification using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. A strategy for relative quantification is described using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). Approaches for analysis of arginine methylation site occupancy...

  15. Deletion of Genes Encoding Arginase Improves Use of "Heavy" Isotope-Labeled Arginine for Mass Spectrometry in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronika E Borek

    Full Text Available The use of "heavy" isotope-labeled arginine for stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC mass spectrometry in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is hindered by the fact that under normal conditions, arginine is extensively catabolized in vivo, resulting in the appearance of "heavy"-isotope label in several other amino acids, most notably proline, but also glutamate, glutamine and lysine. This "arginine conversion problem" significantly impairs quantification of mass spectra. Previously, we developed a method to prevent arginine conversion in fission yeast SILAC, based on deletion of genes involved in arginine catabolism. Here we show that although this method is indeed successful when (13C6-arginine (Arg-6 is used for labeling, it is less successful when (13C6(15N4-arginine (Arg-10, a theoretically preferable label, is used. In particular, we find that with this method, "heavy"-isotope label derived from Arg-10 is observed in amino acids other than arginine, indicating metabolic conversion of Arg-10. Arg-10 conversion, which severely complicates both MS and MS/MS analysis, is further confirmed by the presence of (13C5(15N2-arginine (Arg-7 in arginine-containing peptides from Arg-10-labeled cells. We describe how all of the problems associated with the use of Arg-10 can be overcome by a simple modification of our original method. We show that simultaneous deletion of the fission yeast arginase genes car1+ and aru1+ prevents virtually all of the arginine conversion that would otherwise result from the use of Arg-10. This solution should enable a wider use of heavy isotope-labeled amino acids in fission yeast SILAC.

  16. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance.

  17. Research on Integration of an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator and a Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. L.; Chen, S.; Xianyu, W. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    A key research topic related to thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive applications is to improve their compatibility with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. A new TEG integrated with a three-way catalytic converter (CTEG) by reshaping the converter as the heat exchanger is proposed. A heat-flux coupling simulation model of the integrated TEG is established at the light-off stage of the original three-way catalytic converter (TWC). Temperature distribution maps of the integrated heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules, and cooling-water tank are obtained to present the process of energy flow among the parts of the CTEG. Based on the simulation results, the output power of the CTEG is calculated by a mathematical model. A minimum output power of 31.93 W can be obtained by conversion when the TWC starts working at steady conditions. Theoretically, this case study demonstrates the great potential for use of CTEGs in vehicles.

  18. Divalent metal ion-based catalytic mechanism of the Nudix hydrolase Orf153 (YmfB) from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Myoung-Ki; Ribeiro, António J M; Kim, Jin-Kwang; Ngo, Ho-Phuong-Thuy; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Choong Hwan; Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Li, Qing; Ramos, Maria Joao; Kang, Lin-Woo

    2014-05-01

    YmfB from Escherichia coli is the Nudix hydrolase involved in the metabolism of thiamine pyrophosphate, an important compound in primary metabolism and a cofactor of many enzymes. In addition, it hydrolyzes (d)NTPs to (d)NMPs and inorganic orthophosphates in a stepwise manner. The structures of YmfB alone and in complex with three sulfates and two manganese ions determined by X-ray crystallography, when compared with the structures of other Nudix hydrolases such as MutT, Ap4Aase and DR1025, provide insight into the unique hydrolysis mechanism of YmfB. Mass-spectrometric analysis confirmed that water attacks the terminal phosphates of GTP and GDP sequentially. Kinetic analysis of binding-site mutants showed that no individual residue is absolutely required for catalytic activity, suggesting that protein residues do not participate in the deprotonation of the attacking water. Thermodynamic integration calculations show that a hydroxyl ion bound to two divalent metal ions attacks the phosphate directly without the help of a nearby catalytic base. PMID:24816099

  19. The Significance of Lewis Acid Sites for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitric Oxide on Vanadium-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marberger, Adrian; Ferri, Davide; Elsener, Martin; Kröcher, Oliver

    2016-09-19

    The long debated reaction mechanisms of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia (NH3 ) on vanadium-based catalysts rely on the involvement of Brønsted or Lewis acid sites. This issue has been clearly elucidated using a combination of transient perturbations of the catalyst environment with operando time-resolved spectroscopy to obtain unique molecular level insights. Nitric oxide reacts predominantly with NH3 coordinated to Lewis sites on vanadia on tungsta-titania (V2 O5 -WO3 -TiO2 ), while Brønsted sites are not involved in the catalytic cycle. The Lewis site is a mono-oxo vanadyl group that reduces only in the presence of both nitric oxide and NH3 . We were also able to verify the formation of the nitrosamide (NH2 NO) intermediate, which forms in tandem with vanadium reduction, and thus the entire mechanism of SCR. Our experimental approach, demonstrated in the specific case of SCR, promises to progress the understanding of chemical reactions of technological relevance. PMID:27553251

  20. Advances in catalytic production of bio-based polyester monomer 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Li, Junke; Tang, Yanjun; Lin, Lu; Long, Minnan

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the production and utilization of 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) have become a hot research topic in catalyst field and polyester industry for its special chemical structure and a wide range of raw material source. FDCA is a potential replacement for the terephthalic acid monomer used in the production of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT), which opens up a new pathway for obtaining biomass-based polyester to replace or partially replace petroleum based polyester. Here, we mainly reviewed the catalytic pathway for the synthesis of FDCA derived from lignocellulosic biomass or from the related downstream products, such as glucose, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Moreover, the utilization of oxidation catalysts, the reaction mechanism, the existing limitations and unsolved challenges were also elaborated in detail. Therefore, we hope this mini review provides a helpful overview and insight to readers in this exciting research area. PMID:26076643

  1. Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 enhances polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and toxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M J; Polanco, Maria J; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Taylor, J Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis.

  2. Geometry of guanidinium groups in arginines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinska, Maura; Dauter, Miroslawa; Dauter, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The restraints in common usage today have been obtained based on small molecule X-ray crystal structures available 25 years ago and recent reports have shown that the values of bond lengths and valence angles can be, in fact, significantly different from those stored in libraries, for example for the peptide bond or the histidine ring geometry. We showed that almost 50% of outliers found in protein validation reports released in the Protein Data Bank on 23 March 2016 come from geometry of guanidine groups in arginines. Therefore, structures of small molecules and atomic resolution protein crystal structures have been used to derive new target values for the geometry of this group. The most significant difference was found for NE-CZ-NH1 and NE-CZ-NH2 angles, showing that the guanidinium group is not symmetric. The NE-CZ-NH1 angle is larger, 121.5(10)˚, than NE-CZ-NH2, 119.2(10)˚, due to the repulsive interaction between NH1 and CD1 atom.

  3. Arginine Adjunctive Therapy in Active Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Farazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dietary supplementation has been used as a mechanism to augment the immune system. Adjunctive therapy with L-arginine has the potential to improve outcomes in active tuberculosis. Methods. In a randomized clinical trial 63 participants with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Markazi Province of Iran were given arginine or placebo for 4 weeks in addition to conventional chemotherapy. The final treatment success, sputum conversion, weight gain, and clinical symptoms after one and two months were considered as primary outcomes and secondary outcomes were ESR, CRP, and Hg. Data were collected and analyzed with SPSS software (ver. 18. Results. Arginine supplementation reduced constitutional symptoms (P=0.032 in patients with smear-positive TB at the end of the first month of treatment. Arginine treated patients had significantly increased BMI at the end of the first and second months of treatment (P=0.032 and P=0.04 and a reduced CRP at the end of the first month of treatment (P=0.03 versus placebo group. Conclusion. Arginine is useful as an adjunctive therapy in patients with active tuberculosis, in which the effects are more likely mediated by the increased production of nitric oxide and improved constitutional symptoms and weight gain. This trial is registered with Clinical Trials Registry of Iran: IRCT201211179855N2.

  4. Arginase and Arginine Dysregulation in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée C. Benson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, evidence has accumulated indicating that the enzyme arginase, which converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders such as asthma through dysregulation of L-arginine metabolism and modulation of nitric oxide (NO homeostasis. Allergic asthma is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation, and remodeling. Through substrate competition, arginase decreases bioavailability of L-arginine for nitric oxide synthase (NOS, thereby limiting NO production with subsequent effects on airway tone and inflammation. By decreasing L-arginine bioavailability, arginase may also contribute to the uncoupling of NOS and the formation of the proinflammatory oxidant peroxynitrite in the airways. Finally, arginase may play a role in the development of chronic airway remodeling through formation of L-ornithine with downstream production of polyamines and L-proline, which are involved in processes of cellular proliferation and collagen deposition. Further research on modulation of arginase activity and L-arginine bioavailability may reveal promising novel therapeutic strategies for asthma.

  5. A cyanase is transcriptionally regulated by arginine and involved in cyanate decomposition in Sordaria macrospora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elleuche, Skander; Pöggeler, Stefanie

    2008-11-01

    Cyanase degrades toxic cyanate to NH3 and CO2 in a bicarbonate-dependent reaction. High concentrations of cyanate are fairly toxic to organisms. Here, we characterize a eukaryotic cyanase for the first time. We have isolated the cyn1 gene encoding a cyanase from the filamentous ascomycete Sordaria macrospora and functionally characterized the cyn1 product after heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed a predicted catalytic centre of three conserved amino-acids. A Deltacyn1 knockout in S. macrospora was totally devoid of cyanase activity and showed an increased sensitivity to exogenously supplied cyanate in an arginine-depleted medium, defects in ascospore germination, but no other obvious morphological phenotype. By means of real-time PCR we have demonstrated that the transcriptional level of cyn1 is markedly elevated in the presence of cyanate and down-regulated by addition of arginine. The putative functions of cyanase in fungi are discussed.

  6. Ruthenium (II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: synthesis, characterization and catalytic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of ruthenium (II) complexes containing ONS and ONO donor ligands of general formula (RuX(CO)(B)(L)) (X = H or Cl; B = PPh3, AsPh3 or Py; L = mono negative tridentate ligand) were synthesized from the reactions of tridentate ligand with (RuHX(CO)(EPh3)2(B)) (X = H or Cl; E = P or As; B = PPh3, AsPh3 or Py) in 1:1 molar ratio. All the new complexes have been characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C and 31PNMR) data. They have been tentatively assigned an octahedral structure. The synthesized complexes have exhibited catalytic activity for oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde and cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone in the presence of N-methyl morpholine N-oxide (NMO) as co-oxidant. They were also found to catalyze the transfer hydrogenation of aliphatic and aromatic ketones to alcohols in KOH/lsopropanol. (author)

  7. A quartz-based micro catalytic methane sensor by high resolution screen printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro catalytic methane sensor was proposed and fabricated on a bulk fused quartz substrate using a high resolution screen printing technique for the first time, with reduced power consumption and optimized sensitivity. The sensor was designed by the finite element method and quartz was chosen as the substrate material and alumina support with optimized dimensions. Fabrication of the sensor consisted of two MEMS processes, lift-off and high resolution screen printing, with the advantages of high yield and uniformity. When the sensor’s regional working temperature changes from 250 °C to 470 °C, its sensitivity increases, as well as the power consumption. The highest sensitivity can reach 1.52 mV/% CH4. A temperature of 300 °C was chosen as the optimized working temperature, and the sensor’s sensitivity, power consumption, nonlinearity and response time are 0.77 mV/% CH4, 415 mW, 2.6%, and 35 s, respectively. This simple, but highly uniform fabrication process and the reliable performance of this sensor may lead to wide applications for methane detection. (paper)

  8. Synthesis of ceramic catalytic system based on CuO/CeO2 for preferential oxidation reaction of CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim this is work is to develop catalysts based on CuO/CeO2 by means two different types of synthesis methods: combustion synthesis and Pechini. CuO/CeO2 catalysts were synthesized with 0.5 mol of CuO for both synthesis methods used. The catalysts were characterized by XRD with the Rietveld refinement, EDX and textural analysis by the BET method. The results show that both methods of synthesis led to the formation of catalysts with segregated phases formed on the structures of the obtained materials, such segregated phases were formed by the presence of catalytic active species CuO and these phases had different characteristics depending on the type of method synthesis used. Small differences were observed in the evaluation of textural characteristics of the catalysts developed in this work according to the synthesis method employed. (author)

  9. Flow Injection Determination of Oxalate Based on Its Catalytic Effect on the Oxidation of p-Chloride Aniline by Dichromate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In a sulfuric acid medium, oxalate exhibits a strong catalytic effect on the oxidation of p-chloride aniline (ClBN) by dichromate, and the red oxidation product of ClBN has a maximum absorbancy at 520 nm. Based on this founding, a new FI method for determining oxalate was developed. A calibration curve of oxalate in the range of 0. 40-17.0 tg/mL was obtained. The detection limit was 0. 10 μg/mL. Sampling rate was 103-samples/h. The possible interference by the co-existing substances or ions was examined. This new method was applied to the determination of micro amounts of oxalate in real samples with satisfactory results.

  10. Hydrogen production by catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst in a fluidized bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Torres; S.de Llobet; J.L.Pinilla; M.J.Lázaro; I.Suelves; R.Moliner

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst for hydrogen production has been studied in this work.A Fe/Al2O3 catalyst previously developed by our research group has been tested in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR).A parametric study of the effects of some process variables,including reaction temperature and space velocity,is undertaken.The operating conditions strongly affect the catalyst performance.Methane conversion was increased by increasing the temperature and lowering the space velocity.Using temperatures between 700 and 900 ℃ and space velocities between 3 and 6 LN/(gcat·h),a methane conversion in the range of 25%-40% for the gas exiting the reactor could be obtained during a 6 h run.In addition,carbon was deposited in the form of nanofilaments (chain like nanofibers and multiwall nanotubes) with similar properties to those obtained in a fixed bed reactor.

  11. High Selectively Catalytic Conversion of Lignin-Based Phenols into para-/m-Xylene over Pt/HZSM-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozhu Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High selectively catalytic conversion of lignin-based phenols (m-cresol, p-cresol, and guaiacol into para-/m-xylene was performed over Pt/HZSM-5 through hydrodeoxygenation and in situ methylation with methanol. It is found that the p-/m-xylene selectivity is uniformly higher than 21%, and even increase up to 33.5% for m-cresol (with phenols/methanol molar ratio of 1/8. The improved p-/m-xylene selectivity in presence of methanol is attributed to the combined reaction pathways: methylation of m-cresol into xylenols followed by HDO into p-/m-xylene, and HDO of m-cresol into toluene followed by methylation into p-/m-xylene. Comparison of the product distribution over a series of catalysts indicates that both metals and supporters have distinct effect on the p-/m-xylene selectivity.

  12. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh;

    2008-01-01

    on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity......Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...

  13. The effect of noble metals on catalytic methanation reaction over supported Mn/Ni oxide based catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 in sour natural gas can be removed using green technology via catalytic methanation reaction by converting CO2 to methane (CH4 gas. Using waste to wealth concept, production of CH4 would increase as well as creating environmental friendly approach for the purification of natural gas. In this research, a series of alumina supported manganese–nickel oxide based catalysts doped with noble metals such as ruthenium and palladium were prepared by wetness impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were run catalytic screening process using in-house built micro reactor coupled with Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy to study the percentage CO2 conversion and CH4 formation analyzed by GC. Ru/Mn/Ni(5:35:60/Al2O3 calcined at 1000 °C was found to be the potential catalyst which gave 99.74% of CO2 conversion and 72.36% of CH4 formation at 400 °C reaction temperature. XRD diffractogram illustrated that the supported catalyst was in polycrystalline with some amorphous state at 1000 °C calcination temperature with the presence of NiO as active site. According to FESEM micrographs, both fresh and used catalysts displayed spherical shape with small particle sizes in agglomerated and aggregated mixture. Nitrogen Adsorption analysis revealed that both catalysts were in mesoporous structures with BET surface area in the range of 46–60 m2/g. All the impurities have been removed at 1000 °C calcination temperature as presented by FTIR, TGA–DTA and EDX data.

  14. An urea, arginine and carnosine based cream (Ureadin Rx Db ISDIN shows greater efficacy in the treatment of severe xerosis of the feet in Type 2 diabetic patients in comparison with glycerol-based emollient cream. A randomized, assessor-blinded, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federici Adalberto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xerosis is a common skin disorder frequently observed in diabetic patients. An effective hydration of foot skin in diabetics is a relevant preventive strategy in order to maintain a healthy foot. Urea is considered an effective hydrating and emollient topical product. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of topical urea 5% with arginine and carnosine (Ureadin Rx Db, ISDIN Spain (UC in comparison with glycerol-based emollient topical product (Dexeryl, Pierre Fabre (EC, in Type 2 diabetic patients. Methods We assessed the effect of UC on skin hydration in a randomized, evaluator-blinded comparative study in 40 type II diabetic patients, aged 40–75 years, treated with UC or the comparator for 28 days with a twice-daily application. The principal outcomes were the Dryness Area Severity Index (DASI Score and the Visual Analogue Score (VAS for skin dryness evaluated at baseline and at the end of study period by an investigator unaware of treatment allocation. Results UC induced significantly greater hydration than EC with an 89% reduction in DASI score (from 1.6 to 0.2; p  Conclusion Application of urea 5%, arginine and carnosine cream increases skin hydration and alleviates the condition of skin dryness in Type 2 diabetic patients in comparison with a control glycerol-based emollient product. (Dutch Trials Register trial number 3328.

  15. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  16. Modulators of arginine metabolism support cancer immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freschi Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor-associated accrual of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC in the blood, lymphoid organs and tumor tissues may lead to perturbation of the arginine metabolism and impairment of the endogenous antitumor immunity. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether accumulation of MDSC occurred in Th2 prone BALB/c and Th1 biased C57BL/6 mice bearing the C26GM colon carcinoma and RMA T lymphoma, respectively, and to investigate whether N(G nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME and sildenafil, both modulators of the arginine metabolism, restored antitumor immunity. Results We report here that MDSC accumulate in the spleen and blood of mice irrespective of the mouse and tumor model used. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with either the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil or the nitric-oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor L-NAME significantly restrained tumor growth and expanded the tumor-specific immune response. Conclusion Our data emphasize the role of MDSC in modulating the endogenous tumor-specific immune response and underline the anti-neoplastic therapeutic potential of arginine metabolism modulators.

  17. Low plasma arginine:asymmetric dimethyl arginine ratios predict mortality after intracranial aneurysm rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staalsø, Jonatan Myrup; Bergström, Anita; Edsen, Troels;

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, predicts mortality in cardiovascular disease and has been linked to cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In this prospective study, we assessed whether circulating ADMA, arginine...

  18. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; M Allewell, Norma; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-08-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  19. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure determination and catalytic activity in epoxidation reaction of two new oxidovanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Vida; Grivani, Gholamhossein; Bruno, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    The five coordinated vanadium(IV) Schiff base complexes of VOL1 (1) and VOL2 (2), HL1 = 2-{(E)-[2-bromoethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, HL2 = 2-{(E)-[2-chloroethyl)imino]methyl}-2- naphthol, have been synthesized and they were characterized by using single-crystal X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis (CHN) and FT-IR spectroscopy. Crystal structure determination of these complexes shows that the Schiff base ligands (L1 and L2) act as bidentate ligands with two phenolato oxygen atoms and two imine nitrogen atoms in the trans geometry. The coordination geometry around the vanadium(IV) is distorted square pyramidal in which vanadium(IV) is coordinated by two nitrogen and two oxygen atoms of two independent ligands in the basal plane and by one oxygen atom in the apical position. The catalytic activity of the Schiff base complexes of 1 and 2 in the epoxidation of alkenes were investigated using different reaction parameters such as solvent effect, oxidant, alkene/oxidant ratio and the catalyst amount. The results showed that in the presence of TBHP as oxidant in 1: 4 and 1:3 ratio of the cyclooctene/oxidant ratio, high epoxide yield was obtained for 1 (76%) and 2 (80%) with TON(= mole of substrate/mole of catalyst) of 27 and 28.5, respectively, in epoxidation of cyclooctene.

  20. Adsorptive removal of lead and cadmium ions using Cross -linked CMC Schiff base: Isotherm, Kinetics and Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moganavally

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Water plays a vital role to human and other living organisms. Due to the effluent coming from chemical industries, the industrial activity, contamination of ground water level is goes on increasing nowadays. Therefore, there is a need to develop technologies that can remove toxic pollutants in wastewater. Hence the cross linked Carboxymethyl chitosan(CMC/ 2,3-dimethoxy Benzaldehyde Schiff base complex has been synthesized and characterized by using FT-IR and SEM analysis. All these results revealed that cross linked Schiff base has formed with high adsorption capacity. The prepared effective adsorbent used for the removal of heavy metals like lead (II and cadmium (II ions from aqueous solution and the adsorption data follow the Freundlich model, which follows pseudo first order kinetics. Effect of various parameters like solution pH, adsorbent dose and contact time for the removal of heavy metals has been studied. The synthesized sample undergoes catalytic oxidation process significantly at 24 hrs. The results showed that cross linked Schiff base is an effective, eco-friendly, low-cost adsorbent.

  1. Characterization of the PRMT gene family in rice reveals conservation of arginine methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Post-translational methylation of arginine residues profoundly affects the structure and functions of protein and, hence, implicated in a myriad of essential cellular processes such as signal transduction, mRNA splicing and transcriptional regulation. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs, the enzymes catalyzing arginine methylation have been extensively studied in animals, yeast and, to some extent, in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Eight genes coding for the PRMTs were identified in Oryza sativa, previously. Here, we report that these genes show distinct expression patterns in various parts of the plant. In vivo targeting experiment demonstrated that GFP-tagged OsPRMT1, OsPRMT5 and OsPRMT10 were localized to both the cytoplasm and nucleus, whereas OsPRMT6a and OsPRMT6b were predominantly localized to the nucleus. OsPRMT1, OsPRMT4, OsPRMT5, OsPRMT6a, OsPRMT6b and OsPRMT10 exhibited in vitro arginine methyltransferase activity against myelin basic protein, glycine-arginine-rich domain of fibrillarin and calf thymus core histones. Furthermore, they depicted specificities for the arginine residues in histones H3 and H4 and were classified into type I and Type II PRMTs, based on the formation of type of dimethylarginine in the substrate proteins. The two homologs of OsPRMT6 showed direct interaction in vitro and further titrating different amounts of these proteins in the methyltransferase assay revealed that OsPRMT6a inhibits the methyltransferase activity of OsPRMT6b, probably, by the formation of heterodimer. The identification and characterization of PRMTs in rice suggests the conservation of arginine methylation in monocots and hold promise for gaining further insight into regulation of plant development.

  2. Characterization of catalytic supports based in mixed oxides for control reactions of NO and N2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic supports Al2O3, La2O3 and Al2O3-La2O3 were prepared by the Precipitation and Coprecipitation techniques. The catalytic supports Al2O3, La2O3 and Al2O3-La2O3 were characterized by several techniques to determine: texture (Bet), crystallinity (XRD), chemical composition (Sem)(Ftir) and it was evaluated their total acidity by reaction with 2-propanol. The investigation will be continued with the cobalt addition and this will be evaluated for its catalytic activity in control reactions of N O and N2O. (Author)

  3. Direct catalytic transformation of carbohydrates into 5-ethoxymethylfurfural with acid–base bifunctional hybrid nanospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hu; Khokarale, Santosh Govind; Kotni, Ramakrishna;

    2014-01-01

    carbohydrates. A high EMF yield of 76.6%, 58.5%, 42.4%, and 36.5% could be achieved, when fructose, inulin, sorbose, and sucrose were used as starting materials, respectively. Although, the acid–base bifunctional nanocatalysts were inert for synthesis of EMF from glucose based carbohydrates, ethyl...

  4. Enumerating pathways of proton abstraction based on a spatial and electrostatic analysis of residues in the catalytic site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The pathways of proton abstraction (PA, a key aspect of most catalytic reactions, is often controversial and highly debated. Ultrahigh-resolution diffraction studies, molecular dynamics, quantum mechanics and molecular mechanic simulations are often adopted to gain insights in the PA mechanisms in enzymes. These methods require expertise and effort to setup and can be computationally intensive. We present a push button methodology--Proton abstraction Simulation (PRISM--to enumerate the possible pathways of PA in a protein with known 3D structure based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of residues in the proximity of a given nucleophilic residue. Proton movements are evaluated in the vicinity of this nucleophilic residue based on distances, potential differences, spatial channels and characteristics of the individual residues (polarity, acidic, basic, etc. Modulating these parameters eliminates their empirical nature and also might reveal pathways that originate from conformational changes. We have validated our method using serine proteases and concurred with the dichotomy in PA in Class A β-lactamases, both of which are hydrolases. The PA mechanism in a transferase has also been corroborated. The source code is made available at www.sanchak.com/prism.

  5. Synthesis of copper/nickel nanoparticles using newly synthesized Schiff-base metals complexes and their cytotoxicity/catalytic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazam, Elham S; El-Said, Waleed Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Transition metal complexes compounds with Schiff bases ligand representing an important class of compounds that could be used to develop new metal-based anticancer agents and as precursors of metal NPs. Herein, 2,3-bis-[(3-ethoxy-2-hydroxybenzylidene)amino]but-2-enedinitrile Schiff base ligand and its corresponding copper/nickel complexes were synthesized. Also, we reported a facile and rapid method for synthesis nickel/copper nanoparticles based on thermal reduction of their complexes. Free ligand, its metal complexes and metals nanoparticles have been characterized based on elemental analysis, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, magnetic measurements and by various spectroscopic (UV-vis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR, GC-MS) techniques. Additionally, the in vitro cytotoxic activity of free ligand and its complexes compounds were assessed against two cancer cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7 cells)and one healthy cell line (HEK293 cell). The copper complex was found to be active against these cancer cell lines at very low LD50 than the free ligand, while nickel complex did not show any anticancer activity against these cell lines. Also, the antibacterial activity of as-prepared copper nanoparticles were screened against Escherichia coli, which demonstrated minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values lower than those values of the commercial Cu NPs as well as the previous reported values. Moreover, the synthesized nickel nanoparticles demonstrated remarkable catalytic performance toward hydrogenation of nitrobenzene that producing clean aniline with high selectivity (98%). This reactivity could be attributed to the high degree of dispersion of Ni nanoparticles.

  6. The role of arginine in infection and sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiking, Yvette C; Poeze, Martijn; Ramsay, Graham; Deutz, Nicolaas E P

    2005-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic response to an infection, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Metabolic changes during infection and sepsis could be related to changes in metabolism of the amino acid L-arginine. In sepsis, protein breakdown is increased, which is a key process to maintain arginine delivery because both endogenous de novo arginine production from citrulline and food intake are reduced. Arginine catabolism, on the other hand, is markedly increased by enhanced use of arginine via the arginase and nitric oxide pathways. As a result, lowered plasma arginine levels are usually found. Arginine may therefore be considered as an essential amino acid in sepsis, and supplementation could be beneficial in sepsis by improving microcirculation and protein anabolism. L-Arginine supplementation in a hyperdynamic pig model of sepsis prohibits the increase in pulmonary arterial blood pressure, improves muscle and liver protein metabolism, and restores the intestinal motility pattern. Arguments raised against arginine supplementation are mainly pointed at stimulating nitric oxide (NO) production, with concerns about toxicity of increased NO and hemodynamic instability with refractory hypotension. NO synthase inhibition, however, increased mortality. Arginine supplementation in septic patients has transient effects on hemodynamics when supplied as a bolus but seems without hemodynamic side effects when supplied continuously. In conclusion, arginine could have an essential role in infection and sepsis.

  7. Mononuclear Ru(III) Schiff base complexes: Synthesis, spectral, redox, catalytic and biological activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, N. Padma; Arunachalam, S.; Manimaran, A.; Muthupriya, D.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.

    2009-04-01

    An octahedral ruthenium(III) Schiff base complexes of the type [RuX(EPh 3)(L)] (where, X = Cl/Br; E = As/P; L = dianion of the Schiff bases derived from acetoacetanilide with o-phenylenediamine and salicylaldehyde/ o-hydroxyacetophenone/ o-vanillin/2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde) have been synthesized from the reactions of equimolar reactions of [RuX 3(EPh 3) 3] and Schiff bases in benzene. The new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra, EPR spectral studies, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and electrochemical studies. The new complexes were found to be effective catalysts for aryl-aryl coupling and the oxidation of alcohols into their corresponding carbonyl compounds, respectively, using molecular oxygen atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new Ru(III) Schiff base complexes were screened for their antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Vibrio cholera, Salomonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureaus.

  8. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Lock Sow Mei; S.S.M. Lock; Dai-Viet N. Vo; Bawadi Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd) as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by u...

  9. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  10. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoruiko, A N [G.K. Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  11. Kinetics for Cu(2+) induced Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase inactivation and aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, Li-Li; Wu, Feng; Fu, Yang-Yong; Yin, Shang-Jun; Si, Yue-Xiu; Park, Yong-Doo

    2016-10-01

    Arginine kinase plays an important role in cellular energy metabolism and is closely related to the environmental stress response in marine invertebrates. We studied the Cu(2+)-mediated inhibition and aggregation of Sepia pharaonis arginine kinase (SPAK) and found that Cu(2+) markedly inhibited the SPAK activity along with mixed-type inhibition against the arginine substrate and noncompetitive inhibition against the ATP cofactor. Spectrofluorimetry results showed that Cu(2+) induced a tertiary structure change in SPAK, resulting in exposure of the hydrophobic surface and increased aggregation. Cu(2+)-mediated SPAK aggregation followed first-order kinetics consistent with monophasic and a biphasic processes. Addition of osmolytes, including glycine and proline, effectively blocked SPAK aggregation and restored SPAK activity. Our results demonstrated the effects of Cu(2+) on SPAK catalytic function, conformation, and aggregation, as well as the protective effects of osmolytes on SPAK folding. This study provided important insights into the role of Cu(2+) as a negative effector of the S. pharaonis metabolic enzyme AK and the possible responses of cephalopods to unfavorable environmental conditions. PMID:27318110

  12. Deep catalytic oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) with oxalate-based deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Hongying; Li, Pengcheng; Deng, Changliang; Ren, Wanzhong; Wang, Shunan; Liu, Pan; Zhang, Han

    2015-07-01

    An oxalate-based DES with a tetrabutyl ammonium chloride and oxalate acid molar ratio of 1/2 (TBO1 : 2) exhibited high activity in oxidative desulfurization (ODS) of dibenzothiophene (DBT) under mild reaction conditions. It is potentially a promising and highly environmentally friendly approach for desulfurization of fuels. PMID:26051675

  13. Lanthanide-Based Metal Organic Frameworks: Synthetic Strategies and Catalytic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pagis; M. Ferbinteanu; G. Rothenberg; S. Grecea

    2016-01-01

    This short critical review outlines the main synthetic strategies used in the designed synthesis of lanthanide-based metal organic frameworks (Ln-MOFs). It explains the impact of the choice of organic linker on the final network topology, and it highlights the applications of Ln-MOFs in the catalysi

  14. Arginine: A Potent Prey Attractant to Predatory Newts in Mountain Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, R. P.; Zimmer, R. K.

    2005-05-01

    Chemoreception of aquatic organisms has been well-studied in the laboratory, but rarely in the field. The California newt, Taricha torosa, in natural stream habitats is an excellent animal for exploring behavioral responses to prey odors. Here, we selected 13 amino acids for field bioassays based on their concentrations in prey tissue extracts. Bioassays were calibrated for stimulus dilution by means of fluorescent dye releases and flow-through spectrofluorometry. Moreover, hydrodynamic properties of stream flows were determined using an electromagnetic current meter. Of all amino acids tested, only arginine, alanine and glycine were significantly attractive (relative to stream water controls). These three substances caused free-ranging newts to turn upstream and swim towards the odor sources. Additional experiments showed that arginine was the most effective attractant, evoking plume-tracking behavior at concentrations as low as 10 nM. In subsequent trials, nine arginine analogs were tested, but each compound failed to elicit a significant response. Even subtle changes to arginine, such as the addition of a single carbon to the side chain, destroyed all bioactivity. Within its natural habitat, the California newt thus exhibits keen sensitivity and narrow tuning to the free amino acid, arginine, a chemical signal of its prey.

  15. Catalytic transformation of persistent contaminants using a new composite material based on nanosized zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ishai; Jacov, Osnat Merom; Cortis, Andrea; Berkowitz, Brian

    2012-07-25

    A new composite material based on deposition of nanosized zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles and cyanocobalamine (vitamin B12) on a diatomite matrix is presented, for catalytic transformation of organic contaminants in water. Cyanocobalamine is known to be an effective electron mediator, having strong synergistic effects with nZVI for reductive dehalogenation reactions. This composite material also improves the reducing capacity of nZVI by preventing agglomeration of iron nanoparticles, thus increasing their active surface area. The porous structure of the diatomite matrix allows high hydraulic conductivity, which favors channeling of contaminated water to the reactive surface of the composite material resulting in faster rates of remediation. The composite material rapidly degrades or transforms completely a large spectrum of water contaminants, including halogenated solvents like TCE, PCE, and cis-DCE, pesticides like alachlor, atrazine and bromacyl, and common ions like nitrate, within minutes to hours. A field experiment where contaminated groundwater containing a mixture of industrial and agricultural persistent pollutants was conducted together with a set of laboratory experiments using individual contaminant solutions to analyze chemical transformations under controlled conditions.

  16. Determining the storage, availability and reactivity of NH3 within Cu-Chabazite-based Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Deka, U; Arstad, B; Van Yperen-De Deyne, A; Hemelsoet, K; Waroquier, M; Van Speybroeck, V; Weckhuysen, B M; Beale, A M

    2014-01-28

    Three different types of NH3 species can be simultaneously present on Cu(2+)-exchanged CHA-type zeolites, commonly used in Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (NH3-SCR) systems. These include ammonium ions (NH4(+)), formed on the Brønsted acid sites, [Cu(NH3)4](2+) complexes, resulting from NH3 coordination with the Cu(2+) Lewis sites, and NH3 adsorbed on extra-framework Al (EFAl) species, in contrast to the only two reacting NH3 species recently reported on Cu-SSZ-13 zeolite. The NH4(+) ions react very slowly in comparison to NH3 coordinated to Cu(2+) ions and are likely to contribute little to the standard NH3-SCR process, with the Brønsted groups acting primarily as NH3 storage sites. The availability/reactivity of NH4(+) ions can be however, notably improved by submitting the zeolite to repeated exchanges with Cu(2+), accompanied by a remarkable enhancement in the low temperature activity. Moreover, the presence of EFAl species could also have a positive influence on the reaction rate of the available NH4(+) ions. These results have important implications for NH3 storage and availability in Cu-Chabazite-based NH3-SCR systems. PMID:24322601

  17. A Dinuclear Cu(Ⅱ)-based Coordination Framework with Two-fold Interpenetrated 3D pcu Topology Displaying Catalytic Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Chun-Lun; MA Pei-Juan; LI Guang-Yue; CUI Guang-Hua

    2014-01-01

    A new Cu(Ⅱ) coordination polymer,[Cu2(mip)2(bmix)]n (bmix =1,4-bis(2-methyl-imidazole-1-ylmethyl)benzene,H2mip =5-methylisophthalic acid),has been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses,IR,TGA and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.The title compound belongs to the triclinic system,space group P(i) with a =9.435(5),b =12.241(6),c =13.666(6) (A),β =94.396(8)°,V=1565.5(13) (A)3,Z=2,C34H30Cu2N4O8,Mr =749.70,Dc =1.590 g/cm3,μ =1.419 mm1 and F(000) =768.The title metal-organic coordination polymer exhibits the first two-fold interpenetrated pcu topological structure assembled by two types of dinuclear copper(Ⅱ) clusters and a flexible bis(imidazole)-based ligand.In addition,the fluorescence and catalytic performances of the complex for the degradation of Congo red azo dye in Fenton-like process were presented.

  18. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  19. Development of advanced catalytic layer based on vertically aligned conductive polymer arrays for thin-film fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shangfeng; Yi, Baolian; Cao, Longsheng; Song, Wei; Zhao, Qing; Yu, Hongmei; Shao, Zhigang

    2016-10-01

    The degradation of carbon supports significantly influences the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), particularly in the cathode, which must be overcome for the wide application of fuel cells. In this study, advanced catalytic layer with electronic conductive polymer-polypyrrole (PPy) nanowire as ordered catalyst supports for PEMFCs is prepared. A platinum-palladium (PtPd) catalyst thin layer with whiskerette shapes forms along the long axis of the PPy nanowires. The resulting arrays are hot-pressed on both sides of a Nafion® membrane to construct a membrane electrode assembly (without additional ionomer). The ordered thin catalyst layer (approximately 1.1 μm) is applied in a single cell as the anode and the cathode without additional Nafion® ionomer. The single cell yields a maximum performance of 762.1 mW cm-2 with a low Pt loading (0.241 mg Pt cm-2, anode + cathode). The advanced catalyst layer indicates better mass transfer in high current density than that of commercial Pt/C-based electrode. The mass activity is 1.08-fold greater than that of DOE 2017 target. Thus, the as-prepared electrodes have the potential for application in fuel cells.

  20. A facile reporter system for the experimental identification of twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptides from all kingdoms of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widdick, David A.; Eijlander, Robyn T.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Palmer, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a reporter protein system for the experimental verification of twin-arginine signal peptides. This reporter system is based on the Streptomyces coelicolor agarase protein, which is secreted into the growth medium by the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway and whose extracellu

  1. Development of glycerol-based carbon materials for environmental catalytic applications in advanced oxidation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; Ribeiro, Rui; Silva, Adrián; Pinho, Teresa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    A glycerol-based carbon material was initially produced by partial carbonization of glycerol with sulphuric acid followed by calcination under inert atmosphere. This material, characterized by high thermal stability, low ash content, non-porous structure and basic character, was further activated in air atmosphere at different temperatures (from 150 to 350 oC), resulting in materials with less basic character, due to the incorporation of oxygenated surface groups, and to a notorious evolution...

  2. Fuzzy, copper-based multi-functional composite particles serving simultaneous catalytic and signal-enhancing roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Hu, Yingmo; An, Qi; Luan, Xinglong; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Multifunctional plasmonic particles serving simultaneously as catalysts and label-free reporting agents are highly pursued due to their great potential in enhancing reaction operational efficiencies. Copper is an abundant and economic resource, and it possesses practical applicability in industries, but no dual-functional copper-based catalytic and self-reporting particles have been reported so far. This study proposes a facile strategy to prepare high-performance dual-functional copper-based composite particles that catalyze reactions and simultaneously serve as a SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectra) active, label-free reporting agent. Polyelectrolyte-modified reduced graphene oxide particles are used as the reactive precursors in the fabrication method. Upon adding Cu(NO3)2 solutions into the precursor dispersions, composite particles comprised by copper/copper oxide core and polyelectrolyte-graphene shell were facilely obtained under sonication. The as-prepared composite particles efficiently catalyzed the conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and simultaneously acted as the SERS-active substrate to give enhanced Raman spectra of the produced 4-aminophenol. Taking advantage of the assembling capabilities of polyelectrolyte shells, the composite particles could be further assembled onto a planar substrate to catalyze organic reactions, facilitating their application in various conditions. We expect this report to promote the fabrication and application of copper-based multifunctional particles.Multifunctional plasmonic particles serving simultaneously as catalysts and label-free reporting agents are highly pursued due to their great potential in enhancing reaction operational efficiencies. Copper is an abundant and economic resource, and it possesses practical applicability in industries, but no dual-functional copper-based catalytic and self-reporting particles have been reported so far. This study proposes a facile strategy to prepare high

  3. Catalytic graphitization of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers coated with Prussian blue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Qi-ling; ZHOU Hai-hui; HUANG Zhen-hua; CHEN Jin-hua; KUANG Ya-fei

    2010-01-01

    Prussian blue(PB)was used as catalyst to improve the extent of graphitization of polyacrylonitrile(PAN)-based carbon fibers.PB was deposited on carbon fibers by anodic electrodeposition and the thickness of PB coating(PB content)was controlled by adjusting the electrodeposition time.PAN-based carbon fibers with PB coating were heat-treated and the extent of graphitization was measured by X-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy.The results indicate that the extent of graphitization of PAN-based carbon fibers is enhanced in the presence of the coating.When the PB-coated carbon fibers were heat-treated at 1 900 ℃,interlayer spacing(d002)and crystallite size(Lc)reach 0.336 8 and 21.2 nm respectively.Contrarily,the values of d002 and Lc are 0.341 4 and7.4 nm respectively when the bare carbon fibers were heat-treated at 2 800℃.Compared with the bare carbon fibers,PB can make the heat treatment temperature(HTT)drop more than 500 ℃ in order to reach the same extent of graphitization.Furthermore,the research results show that PB content also has a certain influence on the extent of graphitization at the same HTT.

  4. Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in phytopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A J; Minocha, S C

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that while bacteria and higher plants possess two different pathways for the biosynthesis of putrescine, via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC); the fungi, like animals, only use the former pathway. We found that contrary to the earlier reports, two of the phytopathogenic fungi (Ceratocystis minor and Verticillium dahliae) contain significant levels of ADC activity with very little ODC. The ADC in these fungi has high pH optimum (8.4) and low Km (0.237 mM for C. minor, 0.103 mM for V. dahliae), and is strongly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), putrescine and spermidine, further showing that this enzyme is probably involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and not in the catabolism of arginine as in Escherichia coli. The growth of these fungi is strongly inhibited by DFMA while alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has little effect.

  5. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  6. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of acid-base bifunctional materials through protection of amino groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yanqiu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Mudanjiang Normal University, Mudanjiang 157012 (China); Liu, Heng; Yu, Xiaofang [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Kan, Qiubin, E-mail: qkan@mail.jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acid-base bifunctional material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized through protection of amino groups. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} catalyst containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties. -- Abstract: Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous material SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} was successfully synthesized under low acidic medium through protection of amino groups. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, transmission electron micrographs (TEM), back titration, {sup 13}C magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR and {sup 29}Si magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR were employed to characterize the synthesized materials. The obtained bifunctional material was tested for aldol condensation reaction between acetone and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde. Compared with monofunctional catalysts of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15 and SBA-15-NH{sub 2}, the bifunctional sample of SO{sub 3}H-SBA-15-NH{sub 2} containing amine and sulfonic acid groups exhibited excellent acid-basic properties, which make it possess high activity for the aldol condensation.

  7. High Efficiency Solar-based Catalytic Structure for CO{sub 2} Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menkara, Hisham

    2013-09-30

    Throughout this project, we developed and optimized various photocatalyst structures for CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbon fuels and various commodity chemical products. We also built several closed-loop and continuous fixed-bed photocatalytic reactor system prototypes for a larger-scale demonstration of CO{sub 2} reforming into hydrocarbons, mainly methane and formic acid. The results achieved have indicated that with each type of reactor and structure, high reforming yields can be obtained by refining the structural and operational conditions of the reactor, as well as by using various sacrificial agents (hole scavengers). We have also demonstrated, for the first time, that an aqueous solution containing acid whey (a common bio waste) is a highly effective hole scavenger for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor system and can help reform CO{sub 2} into several products at once. The optimization tasks performed throughout the project have resulted in efficiency increase in our conventional reactors from an initial 0.02% to about 0.25%, which is 10X higher than our original project goal. When acid whey was used as a sacrificial agent, the achieved energy efficiency for formic acid alone was ~0.4%, which is 16X that of our original project goal and higher than anything ever reported for a solar-based photocatalytic reactor. Therefore, by carefully selecting sacrificial agents, it should be possible to reach energy efficiency in the range of the photosynthetic efficiency of typical crop and biofuel plants (1-3%).

  8. Discovery of a Potent Class I Protein Arginine Methyltransferase Fragment Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Freitas, Renato; Eram, Mohammad S; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Steuber, Holger; Smil, David; Wu, Hong; Li, Fengling; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dong, Aiping; Brown, Peter J; Hitchcock, Marion; Moosmayer, Dieter; Stegmann, Christian M; Egner, Ursula; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-02-11

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a promising target class in oncology and other disease areas. They are composed of SET domain methyltransferases and structurally unrelated Rossman-fold enzymes that include protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). In the absence of a well-defined medicinal chemistry tool-kit focused on PMTs, most current inhibitors were identified by screening large and diverse libraries of leadlike molecules. So far, no successful fragment-based approach was reported against this target class. Here, by deconstructing potent PRMT inhibitors, we find that chemical moieties occupying the substrate arginine-binding site can act as efficient fragment inhibitors. Screening a fragment library against PRMT6 produced numerous hits, including a 300 nM inhibitor (ligand efficiency of 0.56) that decreased global histone 3 arginine 2 methylation in cells, and can serve as a warhead for the development of PRMT chemical probes.

  9. Catalytic Properties of ZSM-5 based Cu-Zn Catalysts Applies to Ethanol Synthesis from Syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu He-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu-Zn catalysts based on ZSM-5 were prepared with impregnation method. Their catalatic behaviors for the synthesis of ethanol from syngas were investigated in a fixed bed. XRD and H2-TPR were adopted to characterize the structure and of the catalysts. In the synthesis procession, such factors as ZSM-5 with varied n(Si/n(Al ratio, reaction temperature and space velocity were inspected carefully. The results showed that: changing the ratio of silica to alumina in the carrier zeolite has a great influence on the conversion of CO.with a n(Si/n(Al ratio of 80, the conversion rate of CO peaked at 25% and the selectivity to ethanol reached 22%. Optimal space velocity for Cu-Zn catalysts was 8400·mL−1·h−1·g−1.

  10. Catalytic graphitization of Mo-B-doped polyacrylonitrile(PAN)-based carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Shi-hai; ZHANG Feng-ying; LIU Shao-huan; HE Dong-mei; CAI Qing-yun

    2010-01-01

    A novel carbon fiber pretreatment was proposed.Polyacrylonitrile(PAN)-based carbon fibers were first anodized in H3PO4electrolyte to achieve an active surface,and then coated with Mo-B catalysts by immersed the carbon fibers in a uniformly dispersed Mo-B sol.The as-treated carbon fibers were then graphitized at 2 400 ℃ for 2 h.The structural changes were characterized by X-ray diffractometry(XRD),Raman spectroscopy,scanning electron microscopy(SEM)and high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy(HRTEM).The results show that much better graphitization can be achieved in the presence of Mo-B,with an interlayer spacing(d002)of 0.335 8 nm and a crystalline size(Lc)of 28 nm.

  11. Catalytic and capacity properties of nanocomposites based on cobalt oxide and nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga Yu. Podyacheva; Andrei I. Stadnichenko; Svetlana A. Yashnik; Olga A. Stonkus; Elena M. Slavinskaya; Andrei I. Boronin; Andrei V. Puzynin; Zinfer R. Ismagilov

    2014-01-01

    The nanocomposites based on cobalt oxide and nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) with cobalt oxide contents of 10-90 wt%were examined as catalysts in the CO oxidation and superca-pacity electrodes. Depending on Со3О4 content, such nanocomposites have different morphologies of cobalt oxide nanoparticles, distributions over the bulk, and ratios of Со3+/Co2+ cations. The 90%Со3О4-N-CNFs nanocomposite showed the best activity because of the increased concentration of defects in N-CNFs. The capacitance of electrodes containing 10%Со3О4-N-CNFs was 95 F/g, which is 1.7 times higher than electrodes made from N-CNFs.

  12. Insight on an arginine synthesis metabolon from the tetrameric structure of yeast acetylglutamate kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio de Cima

    Full Text Available N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK catalyzes the second, generally controlling, step of arginine biosynthesis. In yeasts, NAGK exists either alone or forming a metabolon with N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase (NAGS, which catalyzes the first step and exists only within the metabolon. Yeast NAGK (yNAGK has, in addition to the amino acid kinase (AAK domain found in other NAGKs, a ~150-residue C-terminal domain of unclear significance belonging to the DUF619 domain family. We deleted this domain, proving that it stabilizes yNAGK, slows catalysis and modulates feed-back inhibition by arginine. We determined the crystal structures of both the DUF619 domain-lacking yNAGK, ligand-free as well as complexed with acetylglutamate or acetylglutamate and arginine, and of complete mature yNAGK. While all other known arginine-inhibitable NAGKs are doughnut-like hexameric trimers of dimers of AAK domains, yNAGK has as central structure a flat tetramer formed by two dimers of AAK domains. These dimers differ from canonical AAK dimers in the -110° rotation of one subunit with respect to the other. In the hexameric enzymes, an N-terminal extension, found in all arginine-inhibitable NAGKs, forms a protruding helix that interlaces the dimers. In yNAGK, however, it conforms a two-helix platform that mediates interdimeric interactions. Arginine appears to freeze an open inactive AAK domain conformation. In the complete yNAGK structure, two pairs of DUF619 domains flank the AAK domain tetramer, providing a mechanism for the DUF619 domain modulatory functions. The DUF619 domain exhibits the histone acetyltransferase fold, resembling the catalytic domain of bacterial NAGS. However, the putative acetyl CoA site is blocked, explaining the lack of NAGS activity of yNAGK. We conclude that the tetrameric architecture is an adaptation to metabolon formation and propose an organization for this metabolon, suggesting that yNAGK may be a good model also for yeast and human NAGSs.

  13. Protective Effects of Arginine on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Against Ethanol Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanfei; Du, Zhaoli; Zhu, Hui; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping

    2016-01-01

    Yeast cells are challenged by various environmental stresses in the process of industrial fermentation. As the currently main organism for bio-ethanol production, Saccharomyces cerevisiae suffers from ethanol stress. Some amino acids have been reported to be related to yeast tolerance to stresses. Here the relationship between arginine and yeast response to ethanol stress was investigated. Marked inhibitions of ethanol on cell growth, expression of genes involved in arginine biosynthesis and intracellular accumulation of arginine were observed. Furthermore, extracellular addition of arginine can abate the ethanol damage largely. To further confirm the protective effects of arginine on yeast cells, yeast strains with different levels of arginine content were constructed by overexpression of ARG4 involved in arginine biosynthesis or CAR1 encoding arginase. Intracellular arginine was increased by 18.9% or 13.1% respectively by overexpression of ARG4 or disruption of CAR1, which enhanced yeast tolerance to ethanol stress. Moreover, a 41.1% decrease of intracellular arginine was observed in CAR1 overexpressing strain, which made yeast cells keenly sensitive to ethanol. Further investigations indicated that arginine protected yeast cells from ethanol damage by maintaining the integrity of cell wall and cytoplasma membrane, stabilizing the morphology and function of organellae due to low ROS generation. PMID:27507154

  14. Environmental Technology Verification: Test Report of Mobile Source Selective Catalytic Reduction--Nett Technologies, Inc., BlueMAX 100 version A urea-based selective catalytic reduction technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett Technologies’ BlueMAX 100 version A Urea-Based SCR System utilizes a zeolite catalyst coating on a cordierite honeycomb substrate for heavy-duty diesel nonroad engines for use with commercial ultra-low–sulfur diesel fuel. This environmental technology verification (ETV) repo...

  15. Carbon-based catalysts:Opening new scenario to develop next-generation nano-engineered catalytic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudio Ampelli; Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

    2014-01-01

    This essay analyses some of the recent development in nanocarbons (carbon materials having a defined and controlled nano-scale dimension and functional properties which strongly depend on their nano-scale features and architecture), with reference to their use as advanced catalytic materials. It is remarked how their features open new possibilities for catalysis and that they represent a new class of catalytic materials. Although carbon is used from long time in catalysis as support and electrocatalytic applications, nanocarbons offer unconventional ways for their utilization and to address some of the new challenges deriving from moving to a more sustainable future. This essay comments how nanocarbons are a key element to develop next-generation catalytic materials, but remarking that this goal requires overcoming some of the actual limits in current research. Some aspects are discussed to give a glimpse on new directions and needs for R&D to progress in this direction.

  16. The Role of Protein Arginine Methyltransferases in Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs mediate the methylation of a number of protein substrates of arginine residues and serve critical functions in many cellular responses, including cancer development, progression, and aggressiveness, T-lymphocyte activation, and hepatic gluconeogenesis. There are nine members of the PRMT family, which are divided into 4 types (types I–IV. Although most PRMTs do not require posttranslational modification (PTM to be activated, fine-tuning modifications, such as interactions between cofactor proteins, subcellular compartmentalization, and regulation of RNA, via micro-RNAs, seem to be required. Inflammation is an essential defense reaction of the body to eliminate harmful stimuli, including damaged cells, irritants, or pathogens. However, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several types of diseases, including some cancers, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and periodontitis. Therefore, inflammation responses should be well modulated. In this review, we briefly discuss the role of PRMTs in the control of inflammation. More specifically, we review the roles of four PRMTs (CARM1, PRMT1, PRMT5, and PRMT6 in modulating inflammation responses, particularly in terms of modulating the transcriptional factors or cofactors related to inflammation. Based on the regulatory roles known so far, we propose that PRMTs should be considered one of the target molecule groups that modulate inflammatory responses.

  17. The effect of copper valence on catalytic combustion of styrene over the copper based catalysts in the absence and presence of water vapor☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Pan; Zhiyan He; Qian Lin; Fei Liu; Zhong Li

    2016-01-01

    Catalysts CuOx/γ-Al2O3-IH and CuOx/γ-Al2O3-IM were prepared, characterized, and tested for styrene combustion in the absence and presence of water vapor. The effect of copper valence of the catalysts on the catalytic activity for styrene combustion was discussed using the theory of hard soft acids and bases (HSAB). The results showed that the existence of water vapor in feed stream inhibited the catalytic activity for styrene combustion due to the competition adsorption of water molecule. HSAB theory confirmed that the local soft acidity of the catalyst CuOx/γ-Al2O3-IH was much stronger than that of the catalyst CuOx/γ-Al2O3-IM because of the higher content of soft acid Cu+on its surface, which increased the adsorption ability toward soft base of styrene and reduced the adsorption toward hard base of water vapor, and thus increased the catalytic activity for styrene combustion and weakened the negative influence of water vapor.

  18. Low-temperature growth of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers by acetonitrile catalytic CVD using Ni-based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Makino, Yuri; Fukukawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2016-06-01

    To synthesize nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers (N-CNFs) at high growth rates and low temperatures less than 673 K, nickel species (metallic nickel and nickel oxide) supported on alumina particles were used as the catalysts for an acetonitrile catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The nickel:alumina mass ratio in the catalysts was fixed at 0.05:1. The catalyst precursors were prepared from various nickel salts (nitrate, chloride, sulfate, acetate, and lactate) and then calcined at 1073 K for 1 h in oxidative (air), reductive (hydrogen-containing argon), or inert (pure argon) atmospheres to activate the nickel-based catalysts. The effects of precursors and calcination atmosphere on the catalyst activity at low temperatures were studied. We found that the catalysts derived from nickel nitrate had relatively small crystallite sizes of nickel species and provided N-CNFs at high growth rates of 57 ± 4 g-CNF/g-Ni/h at 673 K in the CVD process using 10 vol% hydrogen-containing argon as the carrier gas of acetonitrile vapor, which were approximately 4 times larger than that of a conventional CVD process. The obtained results reveal that nitrate ions in the catalyst precursor and hydrogen in the carrier gas can contribute effectively to the activation of catalysts in low-temperature CVD. The fiber diameter and nitrogen content of N-CNFs synthesized at high growth rates were several tens of nanometers and 3.5 ± 0.3 at.%, respectively. Our catalysts and CVD process may lead to cost reductions in the production of N-CNFs.

  19. Synthesis, characterizations and catalytic studies of a new two-dimensional metal−organic framework based on Co–carboxylate secondary building units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba, E-mail: bagherzadeh@sharif.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11155-3516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashouri, Fatemeh [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11155-3516, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Đaković, Marijana [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2015-03-15

    A metal–organic framework [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] was synthesized and structurally characterized. X-ray single crystal analysis revealed that the framework contains a 2D polymeric chain through coordination of 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid linker ligand to cobalt centers. The polymer crystallize in monoclinic P2{sub 1}/n space group with a=13.989(3) Å, b=9.6728(17) Å, c=16.707(3) Å, and Z=2. The polymer features a framework based on the perfect octahedral Co–O6 secondary building units. The catalytic activities of [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} for olefins oxidation was conducted. The heterogeneous catalyst could be facilely separated from the reaction mixture, and reused three times without significant degradation in catalytic activity. Furthermore, no contribution from homogeneous catalysis of active species leaching into reaction solution was detected. - Graphical abstract: A metal–organic framework of [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] was synthesized by hydrothermal method. This 2D-periodic framework is constructed from the infinite Co–O–C secondary building units and crystallizes in the monoclinic P2{sub 1}/n space group based on Co(II)–carboxylate units. The catalytic oxidation of various olefins was effectively carried out with [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} catalyst by TBHP as oxidant. - Highlights: • A metal–organic framework of [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] is prepared by hydrothermal method. • The [Co{sub 3}(BDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub n} is constructed from Co–carboxylate secondary building units. • This coordination polymer displayed high catalytic activity for olefin oxidation reactions. • The catalytic reaction is heterogeneous and catalyst can be simply separated. • The heterogeneous catalyst can be reused several times without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  20. Spectrophotometric Determination of Arginine in Grape Juice Using 8-Hydroquinoline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LIANG Xin-hong; ZHAO Rui-xiang; FENG Li-dan; LI Hua

    2008-01-01

    Arginine in grape juice can be metabolized by wine yeasts and malolactic bacteria to precursors of ethyl carbamate, known as carcinogen. The aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast, and accurate method for determining arginine in grape juice with Sakaguchi reaction by separating arginine with strong cation-exchange resins. Parameters were optimized including the concentrations of 8-hydroquinoline and sodium hydrobromite. The color stability lasted for 4 min, which is sufficient to finish the measurement. The method is simple, reproducible and accurate, and can be applied for quick measurement of arginine in grape juice to take necessary measures for controlling the level of ethyl carbamate.

  1. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ruthenium(III) complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Priyarega; M Muthu Tamizh; R Karvembu; R Prabhakaran; K Natarajan

    2011-05-01

    Six different ruthenium(III) complexes of Schiff bases derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde and -aminophenol/-aminothiophenol have been synthesized. The compounds with the general formula [RuX(EPh3)2(L)] (X = Cl or Br; E = P or As; L = bifunctional tridentate ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ligand) were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and elemental analyses. Spectroscopic investigation reveals coordination of Schiff base ligand through ONO/ONS donor atoms and octahedral geometry around ruthenium metal. Redox property of complexes has been examined by using cyclic voltammetry. The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also investigated.

  2. Effects of sol-gel method and lanthanum addition on catalytic performances of nickel-based catalysts for methane reforming with carbon dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiancai; HU Quanhong; YANG Yifeng; CHEN Juanrong; LAI Zhihua

    2008-01-01

    The nickel-based catalysts were prepared by the sol-gel method and used for the CH4 reforming with CO2. The effects of the sol-gel method on the specific surface area, catalytic activity, desorption, and reduction performances of catalysts were investigated with BET, TPR, and TPD. Compared with the catalyst prepared by the impregnation method, the results indicated that the catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method had larger specific surface area, showing higher catalytic activities and exhibiting perfect desorption and reduction per-formances. In addition, the modification effects of adding La were studied, and it was found that the 0.75NLBT catalyst constituted of 5wt.%Ni-0.75wt.%La was optimal.

  3. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  4. Local Environment and Nature of Cu Active Sites in Zeolite-Based Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deka, U.; Lezcano-Gonzalez, I.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Beale, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Cu-exchanged zeolites have demonstrated widespread use as catalyst materials in the abatement of NOx, especially from mobile sources. Recent studies focusing on Cu-exchanged zeolites with the CHA structure have demonstrated them to be excellent catalysts in the ammonia-assisted selective catalytic r

  5. Determining the storage, availability and reactivity of NH3 within Cu-Chabazite-based Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezcano-Gonzalez, I; Deka, U; Arstad, B; Van Yperen-De Deyne, A; Hemelsoet, K; Waroquier, M; Van Speybroeck, V; Weckhuysen, B M; Beale, A M

    2014-01-01

    Three different types of NH3 species can be simultaneously present on Cu(2+)-exchanged CHA-type zeolites, commonly used in Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (NH3-SCR) systems. These include ammonium ions (NH4(+)), formed on the Brønsted acid sites, [Cu(NH3)4](2+) complexes, resulting from NH3 co

  6. Histidine-40 of ribonuclease T1 acts as base catalyst when the true catalytic base, glutamic acid-58, is replaced by alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, J; Hallenga, K; Wyns, L; Stanssens, P

    1990-09-25

    Mechanisms for the ribonuclease T1 (RNase T1; EC 3.1.27.3) catalyzed transesterification reaction generally include the proposal that Glu58 and His92 provide general base and general acid assistance, respectively [Heinemann, U., & Saenger, W. (1982) Nature (London) 299, 27-31]. This view was recently challenged by the observation that mutants substituted at position 58 retain high residual activity; a revised mechanism was proposed in which His40, and not Glu58, is engaged in catalysis as general base [Nishikawa, S., Morioka, H., Kim, H., Fuchimura, K., Tanaka, T., Uesugi, S., Hakoshima, T., Tomita, K., Ohtsuka, E., & Ikehara, M. (1987) Biochemistry 26, 8620-8624]. To clarify the functional roles of His40, Glu58, and His92, we analyzed the consequences of several amino acid substitutions (His40Ala, His40Lys, His40Asp, Glu58Ala, Glu58Gln, and His92Gln) on the kinetics of GpC transesterification. The dominant effect of all mutations is on Kcat, implicating His40, Glu58, and His92 in catalysis rather than in substrate binding. Plots of log (Kcat/Km) vs pH for wild-type, His40Lys, and Glu58Ala RNase T1, together with the NMR-determined pKa values of the histidines of these enzymes, strongly support the view that Glu58-His92 acts as the base-acid couple. The curves also show that His40 is required in its protonated form for optimal activity of wild-type enzyme. We propose that the charged His40 participates in electrostatic stabilization of the transition state; the magnitude of the catalytic defect (a factor of 2000) from the His40 to Ala replacement suggests that electrostatic catalysis contributes considerably to the overall rate acceleration. For Glu58Ala RNase T1, the pH dependence of the catalytic parameters suggests an altered mechanism in which His40 and His92 act as base and acid catalyst, respectively. The ability of His40 to adopt the function of general base must account for the significant activity remaining in Glu58-mutated enzymes.

  7. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%. PMID:15120115

  8. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%.

  9. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (pancreas) were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight. PMID:25775142

  10. ARCD, THE 1ST GENE OF THE ARC OPERON FOR ANAEROBIC ARGININE CATABOLISM IN PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA, ENCODES AN ARGININE-ORNITHINE EXCHANGER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERHOOGT, HJC; SMIT, H; ABEE, T; GAMPER, M; DRIESSEN, AJM; KONINGS, WN

    1992-01-01

    In the absence of oxygen and nitrate, Pseudomonas aeruginosa metabolizes arginine via the arginine deiminase pathway, which allows slow growth on rich media. The conversion of arginine to ornithine, CO2, and NH3 is coupled to the production of ATP from ADP. The enzymes of the arginine deiminase path

  11. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  12. Arginine specific aminopeptidase from Lactobacillus brevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Nandan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The proteolytic system of lactic acid bacteria contribute to the development of flavor during the ripening of cheese through the generation of short peptides and free amino acids, which directly or indirectly act as flavor precursors. Newly isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB as well as those procured from culture collection centers were screened for the production of various substrate specific aminopeptidases. Among all the strains screened, L. brevis (NRRL B-1836 was found to produce quantifiable amount of intracellular arginine specific aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.6. The productivity of arginine aminopeptidase in 5 L fermentor was 36 IU/L/h. The Luedeking and Piret model was tested for intracellular production of aminopeptidase and the data seemed to fit well, as the correlation coefficient was 0.9964 for MRS. The αAP and βAP was 0.4865 and 0.0046, respectively in MRS medium indicating that the yield was predominantly depended on growth. The culture produced lactic acid and also tolerated pH 2.0-3.0 and 0.3-0.5% bile salts, the most important probiotic features.

  13. Preparation of acid-base bifunctional mesoporous KIT-6 (KIT: Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology) and its catalytic performance in Knoevenagel reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ling [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University for Nationalities, Tongliao 028000 (China); Wang, Chunhua [Key Laboratory of Surface and Interface Chemistry of Jilin Province, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Guan, Jingqi, E-mail: guanjq@jlu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Surface and Interface Chemistry of Jilin Province, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Acid-base bifunctional mesoporous catalysts Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} containing different aluminum content have been synthesized through post synthetic grafting method. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron micrographs (SEM), transmission electron micrographs (TEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), IR spectra of pyridine adsorption, NH{sub 3}-TPD and TG analysis. The characterization results indicated that the pore structure of KIT-6 was well kept after the addition of aluminum and grafting of aminopropyl groups. The acid amount of Al-KIT-6 increased with enhancing aluminum content. Catalytic results showed that weak acid and weak base favor the Knoevenagel reaction, while catalysts with strong acid and weak base exhibited worse catalytic behavior. - Graphical abstract: The postulated steps of mechanism for the acid-base catalyzed process are as follows: (1) the aldehyde gets activated by the surface acidic sites which allow the amine undergoes nucleophilic to attack the carbonyl carbon of benzaldehyde. (2) Water is released in the formation of imine intermediate. (3) The ethyl cyanoacetate reacts with the intermediate. (4) The benzylidene ethyl cyanoacetate is formed and the amine is regenerated. - Highlights: • KIT-6 and Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} with different Si/Al ratios has been successfully prepared. • 79.4% Yield was obtained over 46-Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} within 20 min in Knoevenagel reaction. • Low Al-content Al-KIT-6-NH{sub 2} shows better catalytic stability than high Al-content catalysts. • There is acid-base synergistic effect in Knoevenagel reaction.

  14. Catalytic synthesis of 2-methylpyrazine over Cr-promoted copper based catalyst via a cyclo-dehydrogenation reaction route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fangli Jing; Yuanyuan Zhang; Shizhong Luo; Wei Chu; Hui Zhang; Xinyu Shi

    2010-07-01

    The cyclo-dehydrogenation of ethylene diamine and propylene glycol to 2-methylpyrazine was performed under the atmospheric conditions at 380°C. The Cr-promoted Cu-Zn/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and characterized by ICP-AES, N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, XPS, N2O chemisorption, TPR and NH3-TPD techniques. The amorphous chromium species existing in Cu-Zn-Cr/Al2O3 catalyst enhanced the dispersion of active component Cu, promoted the reduction of catalyst. Furthermore, the catalytic performance was significantly improved. The acidity of the catalyst played an important role in increasing the 2-MP selectivity. To optimize the reaction parameters, influences of different chromium content, reaction temperature, liquid hourly space velocity (LHSV), reactants molar ratio and time on stream on the product pattern were studied. The results demonstrated that addition of chromium promoter revealed satisfying catalytic activity, stability and selectivity of 2-methylpyrazine.

  15. Promotional Effect of Ce on Iron-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A series of Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts were prepared via co-precipitation method to investigate the effect of doping Ce into Fe–Ti catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3. The NO conversion over Fe–Ce–Ti catalysts was considerably improved after Ce doping compared to that of Fe–Ti catalysts. The Fe(0.2–Ce(0.4–Ti catalysts exhibited superior catalytic activity to that of Fe(0.2–Ti catalysts. The obtained catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption (BET, X-ray diffraction (XRD, temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR, temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectrophotometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. The data showed that the introduction of Ce results in higher surface area and better dispersion of active components on the catalyst surface and enhances the amount of surface acid sites. The interactions between Fe and Ce species were found to improve the redox ability of the catalyst, which promotes catalytic performance at low temperature. The XPS results revealed that Fe3+/Fe2+ and Ce4+/Ce3+ coexisted on the catalyst surface and that Ti was in 4+ oxidation state on catalyst surface. Ce doping increased the atomic ratio of Fe/Ti and Ce/Ti and enhanced the surface adsorbed oxygen species. In addition, Fe(0.2–Ce(0.4–Ti catalyst also showed better tolerance to H2O and SO2 and up to 92% NO conversion at 270 °C with 200 ppm SO2 added over 25 h, which suggests that it is a promising industrial catalyst for mid-low temperature NH3–selective catalytic reduction (SCR reaction.

  16. Arginine depletion by arginine deiminase does not affect whole protein metabolism or muscle fractional protein synthesis rate in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Marini

    Full Text Available Due to the absolute need for arginine that certain cancer cells have, arginine depletion is a therapy in clinical trials to treat several types of cancers. Arginine is an amino acids utilized not only as a precursor for other important molecules, but also for protein synthesis. Because arginine depletion can potentially exacerbate the progressive loss of body weight, and especially lean body mass, in cancer patients we determined the effect of arginine depletion by pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20 on whole body protein synthesis and fractional protein synthesis rate in multiple tissues of mice. ADI-PEG 20 successfully depleted circulating arginine (<1 μmol/L, and increased citrulline concentration more than tenfold. Body weight and body composition, however, were not affected by ADI-PEG 20. Despite the depletion of arginine, whole body protein synthesis and breakdown were maintained in the ADI-PEG 20 treated mice. The fractional protein synthesis rate of muscle was also not affected by arginine depletion. Most tissues (liver, kidney, spleen, heart, lungs, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas were able to maintain their fractional protein synthesis rate; however, the fractional protein synthesis rate of brain, thymus and testicles was reduced due to the ADI-PEG 20 treatment. Furthermore, these results were confirmed by the incorporation of ureido [14C]citrulline, which indicate the local conversion into arginine, into protein. In conclusion, the intracellular recycling pathway of citrulline is able to provide enough arginine to maintain protein synthesis rate and prevent the loss of lean body mass and body weight.

  17. Arginine, citrulline and nitric oxide metabolism in sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine has vasodilatory effects, via its conversion by nitric oxide (NO) synthase into NO, and immunomodulatory actions that play important roles in sepsis. Protein breakdown affects arginine availability, and the release of asymmetric dimethylarginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase, may therefore a...

  18. Arginine Deiminase Resistance in Melanoma Cells Is Associated with Metabolic Reprogramming, Glucose Dependence and Glutamine Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Yan; Tsai, Wen-Bin; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Savaraj, Niramol; Feun, Lynn G.; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2013-01-01

    Many malignant human tumors, including melanomas are auxotrophic for arginine due to reduced expression of argininosuccinate synthetase1 (ASS1), the rate-limiting enzyme for arginine biosynthesis. Pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), which degrades extracellular arginine resulting in arginine deprivation, has shown favorable results in clinical trials for treating arginine-auxotrophic tumors. Drug resistance is the major obstacle for effective ADI-PEG20 usage. To elucidate mechanisms of ...

  19. Binary and Ternary Catalytic Systems for Olefin Metathesis Based on MoCl5/SiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Victor I.; Belyaev, Boris A.; Butenko, Tamara A.; Finkelshtein, Eugene Sh.

    Kinetics of α-olefin metathesis in the presence of binary (MoCl5/ SiO2-Me4Sn) and ternary catalytic systems (MoCl5/SiO2-Me4Sn-ECl4, E = Si or Ge) was studied. Specifically, kinetics and reactivity of 1-decene, 1-octene, and 1-hexene in the metathesis reaction at 27°C and 50°C in the presence of MoCl5/ SiO2-SnMe4 were examined and evaluated in detail. It was shown that experimental data comply well with the simple kinetic equation for the rate of formation of symmetrical olefins with allowance for the reverse reaction and catalyst deactivation: r = left( {k_1 \\cdot c_α - k_{ - 1} \\cdot c_s } right) \\cdot e^{ - k_d \\cdot tilde n_{tot} } . The coefficients for this equation were determined, and it was shown that these α-olefins had practically the same reactivity. It was found that reactivation in the course of metathesis took place due to the addition of a third component (silicon tetrachloride or germanium tetrachloride in combination with tetramethyltin) to a partially deactivated catalyst. The number of active centers was determined (5-6% of the amount of Mo) and the mechanisms of formation, deactivation, and reactivation were proposed for the binary and ternary catalytic systems. The role of individual components of the catalytic systems was revealed.

  20. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  1. Microwave heating of arginine yields highly fluorescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippidis, Aggelos [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Stefanakis, Dimitrios [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece); Anglos, Demetrios, E-mail: anglos@iesl.forth.gr [Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (Greece); Ghanotakis, Demetrios, E-mail: ghanotakis@chemistry.uoc.gr [University of Crete, Department of Chemistry (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Brightly fluorescent nanoparticles were produced via a single-step, single-precursor procedure based on microwave heating of an aqueous solution of the amino acid arginine. Key structural and optical properties of the resulting Arg nanoparticles, Arg-dots, are reported and discussed with emphasis on the pH dependence of their fluorescence emission. The surface of the Arg-dots was functionalised through coupling to folic acid, opening up ways for connecting fluorescent nanoparticles to cancer cells. The generality and versatility of the microwave heating procedure was further demonstrated by the synthesis of different types of carbon nanoparticles, such as CE-dots, that were produced by use of citric acid and ethanolamine as precursors and compared to the Arg-dots.

  2. Progressin catalytic applications of graphene-based composites%石墨烯基复合材料的催化应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张家华; 王亚明; 伍水生; 蒋丽红

    2015-01-01

    Abstact:Grapheneis a kind of unique two‐dimensional carbon material .For its high surface area ,easily dispers‐ed ,easy functionalization and excellent chemical stability ,it has been widespread concerned in the catalytic field .Catalytic applications of graphene‐based composite materials are important research direction .Currently , the graphene‐based catalyst material not only used in photocatalysis ,electrocatalysis ,but also has made great progress in terms of Suzuki ,hydrogenation and oxidation .In this paper ,we make the relevant discussion on the synthetic route graphene‐based materials .The development ,application and catalytic properties of graphene‐based catalyst present were reviewed .%石墨烯作为一种新型碳材料,由于其高比表面积、易分散、易于功能化和化学环境稳定性高等特点,在催化体系中得到了广泛的关注。催化应用是石墨烯基复合材料应用领域中的重要研究方向,目前石墨烯基催化材料除了常应用于光催化、电催化外,其在Suzuki、加氢以及氧化等方面也有了较大发展。对石墨烯基材料相关的合成路线进行讨论,对当下石墨烯基催化剂的研制、应用及其催化性能进行评述。

  3. Anti-aging effects of l-arginine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Z. Gad

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available l-Arginine is one of the most metabolically versatile amino acids. In addition to its role in the synthesis of nitric oxide, l-arginine serves as a precursor for the synthesis of polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine, agmatine and urea. Several human and experimental animal studies have indicated that exogenous l-arginine intake has multiple beneficial pharmacological effects when taken in doses larger than normal dietary consumption. Such effects include reduction in the risk of vascular and heart diseases, reduction in erectile dysfunction, improvement in immune response and inhibition of gastric hyperacidity. This review summarises several positive studies and personal experiences of l-arginine. The demonstrated anti-aging benefits of l-arginine show greater potential than any pharmaceutical or nutraceutical agent ever previously discovered.

  4. L-Arginine Pathway in COPD Patients with Acute Exacerbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzsics, Istvan; Nagy, Lajos; Keki, Sandor;

    2016-01-01

    (ADMA, SDMA) is related to hypoxia. In COPD, a rise in ADMA results in a shift of L-arginine breakdown, contributing to airway obstruction. We aimed to compare serum levels of ADMA, SDMA and L-arginine in patients with and without AECOPD. METHODS: L-arginine metabolites quantified by high......BACKGROUND: Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) remains a major cause of mortality. Clinical criteria of AECOPD are subjective. Biomarkers for AECOPD may aid in the initiation of early treatment. Increased production of asymmetric and symmetric dimethylarginine......-arginine, ADMA and SDMA serum levels. In patients with AECOPD, production of ADMA and SDMA are more pronounced presumably due to more severe hypoxic insult. Methylated arginine derivatives in the sera may help early recognition of AECOPD....

  5. High performance anodes with tailored catalytic properties for La5.6WO11.4-δ based proton conducting fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaguer, M.; Solis, C.; Bozza, Francesco;

    2013-01-01

    A new generation of anodes for PC-SOFCs based on catalytically promoted La0.75Ce0.1Sr0.15CrO3−δ (LSCCe) is presented. LSCCe is selected as the electrode backbone structure, due to its superior total conductivity over that of LSC. The infiltration of catalytically highly active nickel nanoparticles...... into the sintered LSCCe electrode boosted the surface limiting reactions. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  6. Highly sensitive fluorescent probe for clenbuterol hydrochloride detection based on its catalytic oxidation of eosine Y by NaIO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaming; Liu, Zhen-bo; Huang, Qitong; Lin, Chang-Qing; Lin, Xiaofeng

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive fluorescent probe for clenbuterol hydrochloride (CLB) detection has been first designed based on its catalytic effect on NaIO4 oxidating eosine Y (R). And this environment-friendly, simple, rapid, selective and sensitive fluorescent probe has been utilized to detect CLB in the practical samples with the results consisting with those obtained by GC/MS. The structures of R and CLB were characterized by infrared spectra. The mechanism of the proposed assay for the detection of CLB was also discussed.

  7. DNA strand break dependence on Tris and arginine scavenger concentrations under ultra-soft X-ray irradiation: the contribution of secondary arginine radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souici, Mounir; Khalil, Talat Tariq; Boulanouar, Omar; Belafrites, Abdelfettah; Mavon, Christophe; Fromm, Michel

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used a bench-top cold-cathode ultra-soft X-ray (USX) generator to expose aqueous DNA plasmid solutions to low-LET radiation under various scavenging conditions. Single- and double-strand breaks were assessed using classic gel electrophoresis quantification of linear, circular and supercoiled plasmid DNA topologies. With their very low penetration range in water, USX can only interact with matter up to short distances, of the order of 50 μm. We validated a stirring procedure which makes it possible to expose 100 µL of aqueous samples (2 mm thick). The scavenging of OH radicals by Tris buffer was studied at ambient temperature under aerobic conditions and compared to data gathered in the literature. A very good agreement was found with the rare data dealing with DNA plasmid exposed to Al Kα photons at low temperature (T ≤ 277 K), which therefore validated the experimental procedure. The yields for DNA single-strand breaks determined during this study enabled the ratio of indirect to direct effects to be determined at 96.2%, in good agreement with the value of 97.7% stemming from a study based on γ-ray irradiation of frozen solutions of plasmid DNA. Then, arginine was used both to create a "biological-like" chemical environment around the DNA plasmids and as an OH radical scavenger, in vitro. Although arginine has a greater scavenging (protecting) power than Tris, surprisingly, it led to higher rates of strand breakage. Based on the specific binding modes of arginine to DNA, we suggest that the side effects observed are due to the presence of arginine near to, but also inside, the DNA double helix. PMID:26994994

  8. Asymmetric Dimethyl Arginine in Hypothyroid Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid diseases may lead to endothelial dysfunction, however, the mechanism underlying the endothelial dysfunction in thyroid disease is still not clear. Asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA), a novel inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS), was reported to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from L-arginine. The present study was carried out to investigate ADMA levels together with effects of dislipidemia in sub-clinical and overt hypothyroid females. There were significant increase in the levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and ADMA in hypothyroid females as compared to controls while the levels of NO and free T4 were significantly decreased than controls. Sub-clinical hypothyroid females had significant high TSH, LDL-c and non-significantly high ADMA levels and total cholesterol as compared to controls while they had significant decrease in NO, HDL-c and non-significant decrease in free T4 as compared to controls. There were significant negative correlations between NO and both ADMA (r2 = 0.84) and free T4 (r2 = 0.95) in overt hypothyroid group while significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.85) was detected between TSH and HDL-c in the same group. These results are highly suggestive that the decrease of nitric oxide secondary to accumulation of ADMA represent an important pathogenic factor together with dyslipidemia in endothelial dysfunction and increased cardiovascular risk especially in hypothyroid females

  9. Catabolism and safety of supplemental L-arginine in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenlong; Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Bazer, Fuller W; Meininger, Cynthia J; McNeal, Catherine J; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-07-01

    L-arginine (Arg) is utilized via multiple pathways to synthesize protein and low-molecular-weight bioactive substances (e.g., nitric oxide, creatine, and polyamines) with enormous physiological importance. Furthermore, Arg regulates cell signaling pathways and gene expression to improve cardiovascular function, augment insulin sensitivity, enhance lean tissue mass, and reduce obesity in humans. Despite its versatile roles, the use of Arg as a dietary supplement is limited due to the lack of data to address concerns over its safety in humans. Data from animal studies are reviewed to assess arginine catabolism and the safety of long-term Arg supplementation. The arginase pathway was responsible for catabolism of 76-85 and 81-96 % Arg in extraintestinal tissues of pigs and rats, respectively. Dietary supplementation with Arg-HCl or the Arg base [315- and 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for 91 d] had no adverse effects on male or female pigs. Similarly, no safety issues were observed for male or female rats receiving supplementation with 1.8- and 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) for at least 91 d. Intravenous administration of Arg-HCl to gestating sheep at 81 and 180 mg Arg/(kg BW d) is safe for at least 82 and 40 d, respectively. Animals fed conventional diets can well tolerate large amounts of supplemental Arg [up to 630-mg Arg/(kg BW d) in pigs or 3.6-g Arg/(kg BW d) in rats] for 91 d, which are equivalent to 573-mg Arg/(kg BW d) for humans. Collectively, these results can help guide studies to determine the safety of long-term oral administration of Arg in humans. PMID:27156062

  10. Toxoplasma gondii lacks the enzymes required for de novo arginine biosynthesis and arginine starvation triggers cyst formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Barbara A; Gigley, Jason P; Bzik, David J

    2004-03-01

    Two separate carbamoyl phosphate synthetase activities are required for the de novo synthesis of pyrimidines and arginine in most eukaryotes. Toxoplasma gondii is novel in possessing a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II gene that corresponds to a glutamine-dependent form required for pyrimidine biosynthesis. We therefore examined arginine acquisition in T. gondii to determine whether the single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II activity could provide both pyrimidine and arginine biosynthesis. We found that arginine deprivation efficiently blocks the replication of intracellular T. gondii, yet has little effect on long-term parasite viability. Addition of citrulline, but not ornithine, rescues the growth defect observed in the absence of exogenous arginine. This rescue with citrulline is ablated when parasites are cultured in a human citrullinemia fibroblast cell line that is deficient in argininosuccinate synthetase activity. These results reveal the absence of genes and activities of the arginine biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that T. gondii is an arginine auxotroph. Arginine starvation was also found to efficiently trigger differentiation of replicative tachyzoites into bradyzoites contained within stable cyst-like structures. These same parasites expressing bradyzoite antigens can be efficiently switched back to rapidly proliferating tachyzoites several weeks after arginine starvation. We hypothesise that the absence of gene activities that are essential for the biosynthesis of arginine from carbamoyl phosphate confers a selective advantage by increasing bradyzoite switching during the host response to T. gondii infection. These findings are consistent with a model of host-parasite evolution that allowed host control of bradyzoite induction by trading off virulence for increased transmission. PMID:15003493

  11. Enzymes of creatine biosynthesis, arginine and methionine metabolism in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Soumen; Wallimann, Theo; Ray, Subhankar; Ray, Manju

    2008-12-01

    The creatine/creatine kinase system decreases drastically in sarcoma. In the present study, an investigation of catalytic activities, western blot and mRNA expression unambiguously demonstrates the prominent expression of the creatine-synthesizing enzymes l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase in sarcoma, Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, whereas both enzymes were virtually undetectable in normal muscle. Compared to that of normal animals, these enzymes remained unaffected in the kidney or liver of sarcoma-bearing mice. High activity and expression of mitochondrial arginase II in sarcoma indicated increased ornithine formation. Slightly or moderately higher levels of ornithine, guanidinoacetate and creatinine were observed in sarcoma compared to muscle. Despite the intrinsically low level of creatine in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells, these cells could significantly take up and release creatine, suggesting a functional creatine transport, as verified by measuring mRNA levels of creatine transporter. Transcript levels of arginase II, ornithine-decarboxylase, S-adenosyl-homocysteine hydrolase and methionine-synthase were significantly upregulated in sarcoma and in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and Sarcoma 180 cells. Overall, the enzymes related to creatine and arginine/methionine metabolism were found to be significantly upregulated in malignant cells. However, the low levels of creatine kinase in the same malignant cells do not appear to be sufficient for the building up of an effective creatine/phosphocreatine pool. Instead of supporting creatine biosynthesis, l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase and N-guanidinoacetate methyltransferase appear to be geared to support cancer cell metabolism in the direction of polyamine and methionine synthesis because both these compounds are in high demand in proliferating cancer cells.

  12. Converting the yeast arginine can1 permease to a lysine permease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaddar, Kassem; Krammer, Eva-Maria; Mihajlovic, Natalija; Brohée, Sylvain; André, Bruno; Prévost, Martine

    2014-03-01

    Amino acid uptake in yeast cells is mediated by about 16 plasma membrane permeases, most of which belong to the amino acid-polyamine-organocation (APC) transporter family. These proteins display various substrate specificity ranges. For instance, the general amino acid permease Gap1 transports all amino acids, whereas Can1 and Lyp1 catalyze specific uptake of arginine and lysine, respectively. Although Can1 and Lyp1 have different narrow substrate specificities, they are close homologs. Here we investigated the molecular rules determining the substrate specificity of the H(+)-driven arginine-specific permease Can1. Using a Can1-Lyp1 sequence alignment as a guideline and a three-dimensional Can1 structural model based on the crystal structure of the bacterial APC family arginine/agmatine antiporter, we introduced amino acid substitutions liable to alter Can1 substrate specificity. We show that the single substitution T456S results in a Can1 variant transporting lysine in addition to arginine and that the combined substitutions T456S and S176N convert Can1 to a Lyp1-like permease. Replacement of a highly conserved glutamate in the Can1 binding site leads to variants (E184Q and E184A) incapable of any amino acid transport, pointing to a potential role for this glutamate in H(+) coupling. Measurements of the kinetic parameters of arginine and lysine uptake by the wild-type and mutant Can1 permeases, together with docking calculations for each amino acid in their binding site, suggest a model in which residues at positions 176 and 456 confer substrate selectivity at the ligand-binding stage and/or in the course of conformational changes required for transport.

  13. A direct screen for c-di-GMP modulators reveals a Salmonella Typhimurium periplasmic ʟ-arginine-sensing pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Erez; Petersen, Erik; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that transduces internal and external signals and regulates bacterial motility and biofilm formation. Some organisms encode more than 100 c-di-GMP-modulating enzymes, but only for a few has a signal been defined that modulates their activity. We developed and applied a high-throughput, real-time flow cytometry method that uses a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensor of free c-di-GMP to screen for signals that modulate its concentration within Salmonella Typhimurium. We identified multiple compounds, including glucose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, salicylic acid, and ʟ-arginine, that modulated the FRET signal and therefore the free c-di-GMP concentration. By screening a library of mutants, we identified proteins required for the c-di-GMP response to each compound. Furthermore, low micromolar concentrations of ʟ-arginine induced a rapid translation-independent increase in c-di-GMP concentrations and c-di-GMP-dependent cellulose synthesis, responses that required the regulatory periplasmic domain of the diguanylate cyclase STM1987. ʟ-Arginine signaling also required the periplasmic putative ʟ-arginine-binding protein ArtI, implying that ʟ-arginine sensing occurred in the periplasm. Among the 20 commonly used amino acids, S. Typhimurium specifically responded to ʟ-arginine with an increase in c-di-GMP, suggesting that ʟ-arginine may serve as a signal during S. Typhimurium infection. Our results demonstrate that a second-messenger biosensor can be used to identify environmental signals and define pathways that alter microbial behavior.

  14. Top-dressing 1% arginine supplementation in the lactation diet of sows does not affect the litter performance and milk composition

    OpenAIRE

    Djane Dallanora; Marina Patricia Walter; Jéssica Marcon; Camila Saremba; Mari Lourdes Bernardi; Ivo Wentz; Fernando Pandolfo Bortolozzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to evaluate the effects of arginine supplementation in the lactation diet of sows on their milk composition, litter performance and piglet survival. Sixty-four lactating Landrace x Large White sows, parity 1 to 7, were randomly assigned to two treatments: 1) Control - a corn/soybean meal based diet with 1.10% standardized ileal digestible (SID) lysine and 3,475kcal of metabolizable energy (ME) kg-1, and 2) arginine - the control diet top-dressed daily with arginine a...

  15. An arginine-aspartate network in the active site of bacterial TruB is critical for catalyzing pseudouridine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedt, Jenna; Leavens, Fern M V; Mercier, Evan; Wieden, Hans-Joachim; Kothe, Ute

    2014-04-01

    Pseudouridine synthases introduce the most common RNA modification and likely use the same catalytic mechanism. Besides a catalytic aspartate residue, the contributions of other residues for catalysis of pseudouridine formation are poorly understood. Here, we have tested the role of a conserved basic residue in the active site for catalysis using the bacterial pseudouridine synthase TruB targeting U55 in tRNAs. Substitution of arginine 181 with lysine results in a 2500-fold reduction of TruB's catalytic rate without affecting tRNA binding. Furthermore, we analyzed the function of a second-shell aspartate residue (D90) that is conserved in all TruB enzymes and interacts with C56 of tRNA. Site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical and kinetic studies reveal that this residue is not critical for substrate binding but influences catalysis significantly as replacement of D90 with glutamate or asparagine reduces the catalytic rate 30- and 50-fold, respectively. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of TruB wild type and TruB D90N, we propose an electrostatic network composed of the catalytic aspartate (D48), R181 and D90 that is important for catalysis by fine-tuning the D48-R181 interaction. Conserved, negatively charged residues similar to D90 are found in a number of pseudouridine synthases, suggesting that this might be a general mechanism.

  16. Unique Photobleaching Phenomena of the Twin-Arginine Translocase Respiratory Enzyme Chaperone DmsD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivardo, Fabrizio; Leach, Thorin G.H.; Chan, Catherine S.; Winstone, Tara M.L.; Ladner, Carol L.; Sarfo, Kwabena J.; Turner, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    DmsD is a chaperone of the redox enzyme maturation protein family specifically required for biogenesis of DMSO reductase in Escherichia coli. It exists in multiple folding forms, all of which are capable of binding its known substrate, the twin-arginine leader sequence of the DmsA catalytic subunit. It is important for maturation of the reductase and targeting to the cytoplasmic membrane for translocation. Here, we demonstrate that DmsD exhibits an irreversible photobleaching phenomenon upon 280 nm excitation irradiation. The phenomenon is due to quenching of the tryptophan residues in DmsD and is dependent on its folding and conformation. We also show that a tryptophan residue involved in DmsA signal peptide binding (W87) is important for photobleaching of DmsD. Mutation of W87, or binding of the DmsA twin-arginine signal peptide to DmsD in the pocket that includes W72, W80, and W91 significantly affects the degree of photobleaching. This study highlights the advantage of a photobleaching phenomenon to study protein folding and conformation changes within a protein that was once considered unusable in fluorescence spectroscopy. PMID:24497893

  17. Low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 based on MnOx-CeOx/ACFN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boxiong SHEN; Ting LIU; Zhanliang SHI; Jianwei SHI; Tingting YANG; Ning ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    MnOx-CeOx/ACFN were prepared by the impregnation method and used as catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 at 80℃-150℃.The catalyst was characterized by N2-BET,scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spec-troscopy (FT-IR).The fraction of the mesopore and the oxygen functional groups on the surface of activated car-bon fiber (ACF) increased after the treatment with nitric acid,which was favorable to improve the catalytic activ-ities of MnOx-CeOx/ACFN.The experimental results show that the conversion of NO is nearly 100% in the range 100℃-150℃ under the optimal preparation condi-tions of MnOx-CeOx/ACFN.In addition,the effects of a series of performance parameters,including initial NH3 concentration,NO concentration and O2 concentration,on the conversion of NO were studied.

  18. Development of catalytic systems for selective hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis based on statistical planning methods coupled with kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhorov, Yu.M.; Morozova, E.V.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient catalyst design methodology is described, which was used in developing an active and stable mixed oxide catalytic composition for selective hydrogenation of m-bonds under conditions excluding hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds. Catalysts of optimum composition, i.e., 40-50Vertical Bar3< CuO/25-30Vertical Bar3< NiO/20-35Vertical Bar3< SiO/sub 2/, and structure (20-30 A. average pore radius) can be prepared by coprecipitation of copper and nickel salts with silica gel powder in a sodium silicate solution at 90/sup 0/C. By using these catalysts, crotonaldehyde (CA) was hydrogenated to n-butanol in one stage with over 99Vertical Bar3< yields at 180/sup 0/C. The same catalyst was efficient in selective hydrogenation of acetylene (contained in relatively high concentrations in pyrolysis gases) to ethylene at 130/sup 0/C, hydrogenation of piperylene (a by-product in isoprene manufacture) to n-pentenes at 160/sup 0/C, with almost 100Vertical Bar3< selectivity, and in hydrogenolysis of C-S and C-N bonds at 290/sup 0/-370/sup 0/C. Catalytic hydrorefining of a gasoline fraction (105/sup 0/-180/sup 0/C bp) at 350/sup 0/C and 40 atm, reduced its sulfur content from 0.03Vertical Bar3< to 0.00001Vertical Bar3<, and completely removed nitrogen.

  19. Catalytic activity and effect of modifiers on Ni-based catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso-Quiroga, Maria Martha; Castro-Luna, Adolfo Eduardo [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico-Sociales INTEQUI-CONICET-UNSL, Av. 25 de Mayo 384 (5730) Villa Mercedes (S.L.) (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    Ni catalysts supported on different ceramic oxides (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}) were prepared by wet impregnation. The catalytic behavior toward hydrogen production through the dry reforming of methane using a fixed-bed reactor was evaluated under certain experimental conditions, and the catalyst supported on ZrO{sub 2} showed the highest stable activity during the period of time studied. The catalyst supported on CeO{sub 2} has a relatively good activity, but shows signs of deactivation after a certain time during the reaction. This catalyst was chosen to be studied after the addition of 0.5 wt% Li and K as activity modifiers. The introduction of the alkaline metals produces a reduction of the catalytic activity but a better stability over the reactant conversion time. The reverse water-gas shift reaction influences the global system of reactions, and as the results indicate, should be considered near equilibrium. (author)

  20. Non-Catalytic and MgSO4 - Catalyst based Degradation of Glycerol in Subcritical and Supercritical Water Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Mahfud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the glycerol degradation reaction in subcritical and supercritical water media. The degradation of glycerol into other products was performed both with sulphate salt catalysts and without catalyst. The reactant was made from glycerol and water with the mass ratio of 1:10. The experiments were carried out using a batch reactor at a constant pressure of 250 kgf/cm2, with the temperature range of 200-400oC, reaction time of 30 minutes, and catalyst mol ratio in glycerol of 1:10 and 1:8. The products of the non-catalytic glycerol degradation were acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. The use of sulphate salt as catalyst has high selectivity to acetaldehyde and still allows the formation alcohol product in small quantities. The mechanism of ionic reaction and free radical reaction can occur at lower temperature in hydrothermal area or subcritical water. Conversion of glycerol on catalytic reaction showed a higher yield when compared with the reaction performed without catalyst

  1. Chitosan based polymer matrix with silver nanoparticles decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Saad M; Almuqati, Turki; Almuqati, Naif; Al-Farraj, Eida; Alhokbany, Norah; Ahamad, Tansir

    2016-10-20

    A novel catalyst for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) was prepared using carboxyl group-functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), polymer matrix, and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The AgNPs were prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate by trisodium citrate in the MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite; the size of the synthesized AgNPs was found to be 3nm (average diameter). The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized using several analytical techniques. Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in aqueous solution is an effective catalyst for the reduction of 4-NP. The apparent kinetics of reduction has a pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the rate constant and catalytic activity parameter were found to be respectively 7.88×10(-3)s(-1)and 11.64s(-1)g(-1). The MWCNTs-polymer nanocomposite renders stability to AgNPs against the environment and the reaction medium, which means that the Ag@MWCNTs-polymer composite can be re-used for many catalytic cycles. PMID:27474552

  2. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  3. Simple, chemoselective, catalytic olefin isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Steven W M; Barabé, Francis; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-12-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(Sal(tBu,tBu))Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated.

  4. Preparation, characterization and testing of SiC-based catalytic sponges as structured catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudry, A.; Schaub, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Engler-Bunte-Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Solid sponges (open-cell foams) may be used as catalyst support, due to favorable thermal properties and low pressure drop. As an example, they may lead to improved temperature control in Fischer-Tropsch applications, if compared to fixed beds of catalyst particles. The aim of this study was to develop and test a wet method for impregnating ceramic foam materials with a CoRe/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. Defined catalyst layers were generated on 20 ppi SiC-sponges. Resulting catalytic activities are nearly identical to those of the corresponding powder catalyst material. The difference observed can be explained by either mass transfer limitation or backmixing in the fixed bed configuration used. (orig.)

  5. Physico-chemical characterisations and catalytic performance of Ni-based catalyst systems for dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlach, K.; Hoang, D.L.; Schneider, M.; Pohl, M.M.; Armbruster, U.; Martin, A. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Leibniz-Institut fuer Katalyse e.V.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, ternary perovskite type oxides LaNi{sub x}Cu{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.2, 0.5, 0.8, 1) were synthesized using NaOH and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (H{sub 5}DTPA). The catalysts resulting from perovskite precursors exhibit catalytic activities for CO{sub 2} reforming of CH{sub 4} at 700 C that increase with a higher Ni content. Characterization methods showed that the activation led to formation of small metallic Ni/Cu particles. Methane and carbon dioxide conversions varied from 20 to 65% for CH{sub 4} and 3 to 58% for CO{sub 2}. Selectivities from 46 to 93% for CO and from 4 to 64% for H{sub 2} were obtained. (orig.)

  6. Progress in palladium-based catalytic systems for the sustainable synthesis of annulated heterocycles: a focus on indole backbones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Mélanie; Amardeil, Régine; Djakovitch, Laurent; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2012-05-21

    A survey highlighting the most recent palladium catalytic systems produced and their performances for progress in direct synthesis of indole backbones by heterocarbocyclization of reactive substrates is provided. The discussion is developed in relation with the principles of sustainable chemistry concerning atom and mass economy. In this respect, the general convergent character of the syntheses is of particular interest (one-pot, domino, cascade or tandem reactions), and the substrates accessibility and reactivity, together with the final waste production, are also important. This critical review clearly indicates that the development of ligand chemistry, mainly phosphines and carbenes, in the last few decades gave a significant impetus to powerful functionalization of indoles at virtually all positions of this ubiquitous backbone (118 references). PMID:22447100

  7. Enhanced catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles doped in a mesoporous organic gel based on polymeric phloroglucinol carboxylic acid-formaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han; Nagai, Keiji; Abe, Toshiyuki; Homma, Hirofumi; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Ramaraj, Ramasamy

    2009-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles were supported by a phloroglucinolcarboxylic acid-formaldehyde (PF) gel, a new organic gel with a 30 nm spheroid-like structure. The surface area of the PF gel with gold nanoparticles was 550 m(2)/g. Gold nanoparticles supported on a PF gel exhibited catalytic activity in the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with a reaction rate constant of 7.4 x 10(-3) s(-1), which is high in the reported heterogeneous reaction system. The adsorption behavior of 4-nitrophenol into the gel support was observed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Gold nanoparticles in the PF network were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy observation. The high reduction rate would be attributed to the extraction and diffusion of the reactant through the pores of a PF gel support to encounter the highly dispersed gold nanoparticles on the surface and inside the material.

  8. Catalytic Oxidation of Phenol over Zeolite Based Cu/Y-5 Catalyst: Part 1: Catalyst Preparation and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Maduna Valkaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity to remove organic pollutants from the industrial wastewater streams has forced the development of new technologies that can produce better results in terms of pollutant removal and process efficiency in combination with low investment and operating costs. One of the new emerging processes with a potential to fulfil these demands is catalytic wet peroxide oxidation, commonly known as the CWPO process. The oxidative effect of the hydrogen peroxide is intensified by the addition of a heterogeneous catalyst that can reduce the operating conditions to atmospheric pressure and temperatures below 383 K. Zeolites, among others, are especially appealing as catalysts for selective oxidation processes due to their unique characteristics such as shape selectivity, thermal and chemical stability, and benign effect on nature and the living world. In this work, catalytic activity, selectivity and stability of Cu/Y-5 zeolite in phenol oxidation with hydrogen peroxide was examined. Catalyst samples were prepared by ion exchange method of the protonic form of commercial zeolite. The catalysts were characterized with powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and AAS elemental analysis, while the adsorption techniques were used for the measurement of the specific surface area. The catalytic tests were carried out in a stainless steel Parr reactor in batch operation mode at the atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range from 323 to 353 K. The catalyst was prepared in powdered form and the mass fraction of the active metal component on the zeolite was 3.46 %. The initial concentration of phenol solution was equal to 0.01 mol dm−3 and the concentration of hydrogen peroxide ranged from 0.01 to 0.10 mol dm−3. The obtained experimental data was tested to a proposed kinetic model for phenol oxidation r = k1 cF cVP and hydrogen peroxide decomposition rHP = k2 cHP. The kinetic parameters were estimated using the Nelder

  9. Measurement of arginine metabolites: regulators of nitric oxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Molly S; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-01-01

    Arginine is the substrate for nitric oxide synthases (NOS), and arginine availability regulates the production of nitric oxide. Through the activity of methyltransferases, arginine can be methylated to form monomethylarginine (NMMA), asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA). NMMA and ADMA directly inhibit NOS, whereas SDMA inhibits the cellular import of arginine through the cationic amino acid transporter. Increased levels of methylarginine compounds have been associated with many diseases including atherosclerosis, renal failure, pulmonary hypertension, and preeclampsia. Previous HPLC methods to measure these molecules rely on derivatization with ortho-phthalaldehyde, which is unstable and requires immediate pre- or post-column reactions. We have identified a new fluorometric agent that is stable for at least 1 week and provides chromatographic properties that facilitate separation of these chemically similar compounds by reverse phase chromatography. PMID:24510541

  10. Plant PRMTs Broaden the Scope of Arginine Methylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ayaz Ahmad; Xiaofeng Cao

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational methylation at arginine residues is one of the most important covalent modifications of proteins,involved in a myriad of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes,such as transcriptional regulation,RNA processing,signal transduction,and DNA repair.Methylation at arginine residues is catalyzed by a family of enzymes called protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs).PRMTs have been extensively studied in various taxa and there is a growing tendency to unveil their functional importance in plants.Recent studies in plants revealed that this evolutionarily conserved family of enzymes regulates essential traits including vegetative growth,flowering time,circadian cycle,and response to high medium salinity and ABA.In this review,we highlight recent advances in the field of posttranslational arginine methylation with special emphasis on the roles and future prospects of this modification in plants.

  11. The catalytic properties of Ce-based catalysts for H{sub 2}S selective oxidation with SO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No-Kuk Park; Dong Cheul Han; Gi Bo Han; Tae Jin Lee; Si Ok Ryu [Yeungnam University, Daedong Kyongsan (Republic of Korea). National Research Laboratory, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology

    2007-07-01

    Claus reaction was applied for the removal of H{sub 2}S contained in the gasified coal gas. Major components of a flue gas exiting from a gasifier in IGCC system are CO and H{sub 2}. Since the considerable moisture content is present in the gasified coal gas, the effects of reducing gases and H{sub 2}O on the catalytic activity were investigated over Ce-based catalysts. A series of experiments were carried out in a tubular quartz reactor packed with 0.4 grams of Ce-based composite catalysts in order to investigate the characteristics of Claus reaction. Concentrations H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} were 10000 ppm and 5000 ppm, respectively. Temperature was fixed at 200 for the experiments and space velocity was maintained in 30000 ml/g-cat.h. In order to find out the catalytic reaction mechanism, the reactivity test was performed in a packed-bed reactor. About 1.5 gram of Ce-based catalyst was filled into the reactor. 5000 ppm of H{sub 2}S was fed into the reactor at the rate of 100 ml/min. The concentration of H{sub 2}S was monitored at the outlet of reactor. In conclusions, power of the lattice oxygen for the oxidation of H{sub 2}S and the oxidation ability of the Ce-based catalyst for the reduction of SO{sub 2} were excellent. It was confirmed that Claus reaction over the Ce-based catalysts was carried out by the redox mechanism. 20 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.

  13. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.  ……

  14. Nickel-based xerogel catalysts: Synthesis via fast sol-gel method and application in catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Dongliang; Ma, Lirong; Jiang, Deli; Xie, Jimin; Zhu, Jianjun

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the roles of three-dimensional network structure and calcium on Ni catalysts, the Ni, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Ca-Al2O3 xerogel catalysts were successfully synthesized via the fast sol-gel process and chemical reduction method. The crystal structure of three different catalysts was observed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption were employed to investigate the role of network structure of xerogel catalysts and the size distribution of Ni nanoparticles. The catalyst composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) measurement and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments were carried out to investigate the reducibility of nickel species and the interaction between nickel species and alumina. The catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol was investigated over the prepared nickel-based xerogel catalysts. The conversion of p-nitrophenol was monitored by UV spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that the catalysts are highly selective for the conversion of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol and the order of catalytic activities of the catalysts is Ni < Ni-Al2O3 < Ni-Ca-Al2O3. The catalysts were recycled and were used to evaluate the reutilization.

  15. Iminopyridine-Based Cobalt(II and Nickel(II Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Their Catalytic Behaviors for 1,3-Butadiene Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanquan Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of iminopyridine ligated Co(II (1a–7a and Ni(II (1b–7b complexes were synthesized. The structures of complexes 3a, 4a, 5a, 7a, 5b, and 6b were determined by X-ray crystallographic analyses. Complex 3a formed a chloro-bridged dimer, whereas 4a, 5a, and 7a, having a substituent (4a, 5a: CH3; 7a: Br at the 6-position of pyridine, producing the solid structures with a single ligand coordinated to the central metal. The nickel atom in complex 5b features distorted trigonal-bipyramidal geometry with one THF molecule ligating to the metal center. All the complexes activated by ethylaluminum sesquichloride (EASC were evaluated in 1,3-butadiene polymerization. The catalytic activity and selectivity were significantly influenced by the ligand structure and central metal. Comparing with the nickel complexes, the cobalt complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity and cis-1,4-selectivity. For both the cobalt and nickel complexes, the aldimine-based complexes showed higher catalyst activity than their ketimine counterparts.

  16. The Enhanced Catalytic Activities of Asymmetric Au-Ni Nanoparticle Decorated Halloysite-Based Nanocomposite for the Degradation of Organic Dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lei; Zhou, Tao; Xu, Jun; Li, Xiaohui; Dong, Kun; Huang, Jiancui; Xu, Zhouqing

    2016-12-01

    Janus particles (JPs) are unique among the nano-/microobjects because they provide asymmetry and can thus impart drastically different chemical or physical properties. In this work, we have fabricated the magnetic halloysite nanotube (HNT)-based HNTs@Fe3O4 nanocomposite (NCs) and then anchored the Janus Au-Ni or isotropic Au nanoparticles (NPs) to the surface of external wall of sulfydryl modified magnetic nanotubes. The characterization by physical methods authenticates the successful fabrication of two different magnetic HNTs@Fe3O4@Au and HNTs@Fe3O4@Au-Ni NCs. The catalytic activity and recyclability of the two NCs have been evaluated considering the degradation of Congo red (CR) and 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) using sodium borohydride as a model reaction. The results reveal that the symmetric Au NPs participated NCs display low activity in the degradation of the above organic dyes. However, a detailed kinetic study demonstrates that the employ of bimetallic Janus Au-Ni NPs in the NCs indicates enhanced catalytic activity, owing to the structurally specific nature. Furthermore, the magnetic functional NCs reported here can be used as recyclable catalyst which can be recovered simply by magnet. PMID:26852228

  17. L-(--(N-trans-Cinnamoyl-arginine, an Acylamino Acid from Glinus oppositifolius (L. Aug. DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripetch Kanchanapoom

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An amino acid derivative, L-(--(N-trans-cinnamoyl-arginine, was isolated from the whole plant of Glinus oppositifolius (L. Aug. DC. along with kaempferol 3-O-galactopyranoside, isorhamnetin 3-O-b-D-xylopyranosyl-(1®2-b-D-galactopyranoside, vitexin, vicenin-2, adenosine and L-phenylalanine. The structure determinations were based on analyses of chemical and spectroscopic methods.

  18. Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Masood, Omar

    2013-01-01

    AbstractThe University Of ManchesterOmar MasoodMD Thesis 2013Cellular Mechanisms of L-arginine Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis. IntroductionImpairment of cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) signaling and in particular calcium overload has emerged as a possible unifying mechanism for precipitating acute pancreatitis (AP.)In the L-arginine (L-arg) experimental model of AP, nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated however the disease progression is largely unaffected by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) ...

  19. Local Administration of L-Arginine Accelerates Wound Closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Varedi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sThe process of wound healing involves tightly integrated events including inflammation, granulation tissue formation and remodeling. Systemic administration of L arginine promotes wound healing but its global side effects are undesirable. To confine the action of L-arginine at the site of injury, we tested the effects of local administration of L arginine on the healing of excisional wound in the rat.Materials and MethodsFull thickness excisional wounds were generated on the dorsum of adult male rats. The test wounds received 200 µm or 400 µm of L-arginine on day 3 and 5 post-wounding. Normal saline was injected into the sham wounds which were otherwise treated as the test wounds. Control wounds remained unmanipulated. The wound size was monitored daily by imaging. To determine the rate of wound closure, wound images were scanned and the rate of size reduction was analyzed and quantified by ScnImage software. The repaired tissues were harvested on day 12 post-wounding. The tissue sections were prepared and stained for microscopic examination. ResultsWounds treated with L-arginine showed a significant increase in the rate of wound closure. The morphology of basal keratinocytes was altered, and the thickness of neoepidermis was markedly reduced in the wounds treated with L-arginine. Both tested dose of L-arginine were equally effective. ConclusionLocal administration of L-arginine accelerates wound closure and has profound effects on keratinocytes performance during the process of healing. Therefore, it can be potentially used for treatment of skin disorders, in particular, those characterized by hyperkeratosis.

  20. Clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of a dentifrice containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in providing instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, D

    2011-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses recent scientific and clinical research validating the effectiveness of a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate, known as Pro-Argin technology, including clinical evidence for the superior efficacy of this toothpaste versus a potassium-based desensitizing toothpaste. It also introduces new clinical data which prove that a toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate delivers superior instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity compared to a toothpaste containing 8% strontium acetate.

  1. Acellular matrix of bovine pericardium bound with L-arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo Joo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jin Woo [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chun Ho [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul 139-240 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Woo [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jung Woog [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Inje University, Gimhae 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ki Dong [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    Surface immobilization of bioactive molecules onto natural tissues has been interestingly studied for the development of new functional matrices for the replacement of lost or malfunctioning tissues. In this study, an acellular matrix of bovine pericardium (ABP) was chemically modified by the direct coupling of L-arginine after glutaraldehyde (GA) cross-linking. The effects of L-arginine coupling on durability and calcification were investigated and the biocompatibility was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. A four-step detergent and enzymatic extraction process has been utilized to remove cellular components from fresh bovine pericardium (BP). Microscopic observation confirmed that nearly all cellular constituents are removed. Thermal and mechanical properties showed that the durability of L-arginine-treated matrices increased as compared with control ABP and GA-treated ABP. Resistance to collagenase digestion revealed that modified matrices have greater resistance to enzyme digestion than control ABP and GA-treated ABP. The in vivo calcification study demonstrated much less calcium deposition on L-arginine-treated ABP than GA-treated one. In vitro cell viability results showed that ABP modified with L-arginine leads to a significant increase in attachment of human dermal fibroblasts. The obtained results attest to the usefulness of L-arginine-treated ABP matrices for cardiovascular bioprostheses.

  2. Mutations in the codon for a conserved arginine-1563 in the COL4A5 collagen gene in Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J; Gregory, M C; Hertz, Jens Michael;

    1993-01-01

    for arginine to the translation stop codon TGA. In Utah kindred 2123 and in the Danish kindred A13, there was a C-->T mutation in the noncoding strand changing the same codon to CAA for glutamine. Both mutations were confirmed by allele-specific hybridization on PCR-amplified DNA from other family members....... kindreds. All three kindreds have classical Alport syndrome of the juvenile type. DNA-sequencing analyses demonstrated two different single base changes in the codon for arginine-1563 located in exon 48. In Utah kindred 2103, there was a substitution of C by T resulting in the change of the CGA codon...

  3. The hydrophobic region of the DmsA twin-arginine leader peptide determines specificity with chaperone DmsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstone, Tara M L; Tran, Vy A; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-10-29

    The system specific chaperone DmsD plays a role in the maturation of the catalytic subunit of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reductase, DmsA. Pre-DmsA contains a 45-amino acid twin-arginine leader peptide that is important for targeting and translocation of folded and cofactor-loaded DmsA by the twin-arginine translocase. DmsD has previously been shown to interact with the complete twin-arginine leader peptide of DmsA. In this study, isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the thermodynamics of binding between synthetic peptides composed of different portions of the DmsA leader peptide and DmsD. Only those peptides that included the complete and contiguous hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader sequence were able to bind DmsD with a 1:1 stoichiometry. Each of the peptides that were able to bind DmsD also showed some α-helical structure as indicated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that DmsD gained very little thermal stability upon binding any of the DmsA leader peptides tested. Together, these results suggest that a portion of the hydrophobic region of the DmsA leader peptide determines the specificity of binding and may produce helical properties upon binding to DmsD. Overall, this study demonstrates that the recognition of the DmsA twin-arginine leader sequence by the DmsD chaperone shows unexpected rules and confirms further that the biochemistry of the interaction of the chaperone with their leaders demonstrates differences in their molecular interactions.

  4. Different methylation characteristics of protein arginine methyltransferase 1 and 3 toward the Ewing Sarcoma protein and a peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlich, Steffen; Bschir, Karim; Chiavi, Claudio; Belyanskaya, Larisa; Gehring, Heinz

    2005-10-01

    The multifunctional Ewing Sarcoma (EWS) protein, a member of a large family of RNA-binding proteins, is extensively asymmetrically dimethylated at arginine residues within RGG consensus sequences. Using recombinant proteins we examined whether type I protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT)1 or 3 is responsible for asymmetric dimethylations of the EWS protein. After in vitro methylation of the EWS protein by GST-PRMT1, we identified 27 dimethylated arginine residues out of 30 potential methylation sites by mass spectrometry-based techniques (MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS). Thus, PRMT1 recognizes most if not all methylation sites of the EWS protein. With GST-PRMT3, however, only nine dimethylated arginines, located mainly in the C-terminal region of EWS protein, could be assigned, indicating that structural determinants prevent complete methylation. In contrary to previous reports this study also revealed that trypsin is able to cleave after methylated arginines. Pull-down experiments showed that endogenous EWS protein binds efficiently to GST-PRMT1 but less to GST-PRMT3, which is in accordance to the in vitro methylation results. Furthermore, methylation of a peptide containing different methylation sites revealed differences in the site selectivity as well as in the kinetic properties of GST-PRMT1 and GST-PRMT3. Kinetic differences due to an inhibition effect of the methylation inhibitor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine could be excluded by determining the corresponding K(i) values of the two enzymes and the K(d) values for the methyl donor S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The study demonstrates the strength of MS-based methods for a qualitative and quantitative analysis of enzymic arginine methylation, a posttranslational modification that becomes more and more the object of investigations.

  5. Plasma arginine and ornithine are the main citrulline precursors in mice infused with arginine-free diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Juan C; Didelija, Inka Cajo; Castillo, Leticia; Lee, Brendan

    2010-08-01

    Dietary arginine is the main dietary precursor for citrulline synthesis, but it is not known if other precursors can compensate when arginine is absent in the diet. To address this question, the contributions of plasma and dietary precursors were determined by using multitracer protocols in conscious mice infused i.g. either an arginine-sufficient diet [Arg(+)] or an arginine-free diet [Arg(-)]. The plasma entry rate of citrulline and arginine did not differ between the 2 diet groups (156 +/- 6 and 564 +/- 30 micromol kg(-1) h(-1), respectively); however, the entry rate of ornithine was greater in the mice fed the Arg(+) than the Arg(-) diet (332 +/- 33 vs. 180 +/- 16 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). There was a greater utilization of plasma ornithine for the synthesis of citrulline (49 +/- 4 vs. 36 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1), 30 +/- 3% vs. 24 +/- 2% of citrulline entry rate) in the mice fed the Arg(-) diet than the Arg(+) diet. The utilization of plasma arginine did not differ between the 2 diet groups for citrulline synthesis, either through plasma ornithine (approximately 29 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)) or at the site of citrulline synthesis (approximately 12 +/- 3 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). The contribution of dietary proline to the synthesis of citrulline was mainly at the site of citrulline production (17 +/- 1 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)), rather than through plasma ornithine (5 +/- 0.4 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). Dietary glutamine was utilized only at the site of citrulline synthesis (4 +/- 0.2 micromol kg(-1) h(-1)). Dietary glutamine and proline made a greater contribution to the synthesis of citrulline in mice fed the Arg(-) diet but remained minor sources for citrulline production. Plasma arginine and ornithine are able to support citrulline synthesis during arginine-free feeding.

  6. Rare earth metal doped CeO2-based catalytic materials for diesel soot oxidation at lower temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Rangaswamy; Putla Sudarsanam; Benjaram M Reddy

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the influence of trivalent rare-earth dopants (Sm and La) on the structure-activity properties of CeO2 was thor-oughly studied for diesel soot oxidation. For this, an optimized 40%of Sm and La was incorporated into the CeO2 using a facile co-precipitation method from ultra-high dilute aqueous solutions. A systematic physicochemical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brumauer-Emmett-teller method (BET) surface area, X-ray pho-toelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman, and H2-temperature programmed reduction (TPR) techniques. The soot oxidation efficiency of the catalysts was investigated using a thermogravimetric method. The XRD results suggested the formation of nanocrystalline sin-gle phase CeO2-Sm2O3 and CeO2-La2O3 solid solutions. The Sm-and La-doped CeO2 materials exhibited smaller crystallite size and higher BET surface area compared with the pure CeO2. Owing to the difference in the oxidation states of the dopants (Sm3+and La3+) and the Ce4+, a number of oxygen vacancies were generated in CeO2-Sm2O3 and CeO2-La2O3 samples. The H2-TPR studies evidenced the improved reducible nature of the CeO2-Sm2O3 and CeO2-La2O3 samples compared with the CeO2. It was found that the addition of Sm and La to the CeO2 outstandingly enhanced its catalytic efficiency for the oxidation of diesel soot. The observed 50%soot con-version temperatures for the CeO2-Sm2O3, CeO2-La2O3 and CeO2 were~790, 843 and 864 K (loose contact), respectively, and similar activity order was also found under the tight contact condition. The high soot oxidation efficacy of the CeO2-Sm2O3 sample was at-tributed to numerous catalytically favourable properties, like smaller crystallite size, larger surface area, abundant oxygen vacancies, and superior reducible nature.

  7. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co

  8. Highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor using thiosulfate catalytic etching of silver nanoplates for trace determination of copper ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyo, Sudkate; Siangproh, Weena; Apilux, Amara; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2015-03-25

    A novel, highly selective and sensitive paper-based colorimetric sensor for trace determination of copper (Cu(2+)) ions was developed. The measurement is based on the catalytic etching of silver nanoplates (AgNPls) by thiosulfate (S2O3(2-)). Upon the addition of Cu(2+) to the ammonium buffer at pH 11, the absorption peak intensity of AuNPls/S2O3(2-) at 522 nm decreased and the pinkish violet AuNPls became clear in color as visible to the naked eye. This assay provides highly sensitive and selective detection of Cu(2+) over other metal ions (K(+), Cr(3+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+), As(3+), Mn(2+), Co(2+), Pb(2+), Al(3+), Ni(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Hg(2+) and Bi(3+)). A paper-based colorimetric sensor was then developed for the simple and rapid determination of Cu(2+) using the catalytic etching of AgNPls. Under optimized conditions, the modified AgNPls coated at the test zone of the devices immediately changes in color in the presence of Cu(2+). The limit of detection (LOD) was found to be 1.0 ng mL(-1) by visual detection. For semi-quantitative measurement with image processing, the method detected Cu(2+) in the range of 0.5-200 ng mL(-1)(R(2)=0.9974) with an LOD of 0.3 ng mL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied to detect Cu(2+) in the wide range of real samples including water, food, and blood. The results were in good agreement according to a paired t-test with results from inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). PMID:25732695

  9. Arginine side chain interactions and the role of arginine as a gating charge carrier in voltage sensitive ion channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Craig T.; Mason, Philip E.; Anderson, J. L. Ross; Dempsey, Christopher E.

    2016-02-01

    Gating charges in voltage-sensing domains (VSD) of voltage-sensitive ion channels and enzymes are carried on arginine side chains rather than lysine. This arginine preference may result from the unique hydration properties of the side chain guanidinium group which facilitates its movement through a hydrophobic plug that seals the center of the VSD, as suggested by molecular dynamics simulations. To test for side chain interactions implicit in this model we inspected interactions of the side chains of arginine and lysine with each of the 19 non-glycine amino acids in proteins in the protein data bank. The arginine guanidinium interacts with non-polar aromatic and aliphatic side chains above and below the guanidinium plane while hydrogen bonding with polar side chains is restricted to in-plane positions. In contrast, non-polar side chains interact largely with the aliphatic part of the lysine side chain. The hydration properties of arginine and lysine are strongly reflected in their respective interactions with non-polar and polar side chains as observed in protein structures and in molecular dynamics simulations, and likely underlie the preference for arginine as a mobile charge carrier in VSD.

  10. Performance of supported catalysts based on a new copper vanadate-type precursor for catalytic oxidation of toluene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio, L.A. [Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 - Medellin (Colombia); Silva, E.R.; Catalao, R. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, J.M. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Instituto Superior Engenharia de Lisboa, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica. Av. Cons. Emidio Navarro, 1959-007 Lisboa (Portugal); Hoyos, D.A. [Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 - Medellin (Colombia); Ribeiro, F.R. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, M.F. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: filipa.ribeiro@ist.utl.pt

    2008-05-01

    A new copper vanadate precursor with the formula NH{sub 4}[Cu{sub 2.5}V{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O was synthesized and deposited on two different supports, ZSM-5 and amorphous SiO{sub 2}, by a hydrothermal method or by mechanical mixture. The catalytic behaviour was evaluated in the total oxidation of toluene and the characterization was performed by H{sub 2}-temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found that the copper vanadate phase comprises two mixed oxides, one of them crystalline, the Ziesite phase, and the other one amorphous. The supported catalysts presented a content of copper vanadate phase of about 9-11 wt.%. The copper vanadate deposited on ZSM-5 by the hydrothermal method evidences the best performance in the oxidation of toluene. This behaviour can be associated with the smaller size and higher dispersion of the particles on the support, which was confirmed by their better reducibility and higher band gap energy value compared with the other series of studied catalysts.

  11. Comparison and analysis of zinc and cobalt-based systems as catalytic entities for the hydration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond Y Lau

    Full Text Available In nature, the zinc metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrase II (CAII efficiently catalyzes the conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2 to bicarbonate under physiological conditions. Many research efforts have been directed towards the development of small molecule mimetics that can facilitate this process and thus have a beneficial environmental impact, but these efforts have met very limited success. Herein, we undertook quantum mechanical calculations of four mimetics, 1,5,9-triazacyclododedacane, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododedacane, tris(4,5-dimethyl-2-imidazolylphosphine, and tris(2-benzimidazolylmethylamine, in their complexed form either with the Zn(2+ or the Co(2+ ion and studied their reaction coordinate for CO2 hydration. These calculations demonstrated that the ability of the complex to maintain a tetrahedral geometry and bind bicarbonate in a unidentate manner were vital for the hydration reaction to proceed favorably. Furthermore, these calculations show that the catalytic activity of the examined zinc complexes was insensitive to coordination states for zinc, while coordination states above four were found to have an unfavorable effect on product release for the cobalt counterparts.

  12. Significantly Improved Catalytic Performance of Ni-Based MgO Catalyst in Steam Reforming of Phenol by Inducing Mesostructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxuan Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A Ni/meso-MgO catalyst with high surface area and small Ni nanoparticles was synthesized and investigated for hydrogen production by steam reforming of phenol for the first time. Compared to conventional Ni/MgO, the Ni/meso-MgO catalyst showed higher catalytic activity and stability. X-ray Diffraction, N2 adsorption, hydrogen temperature programmed reduction, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravimetry results indicated that the Ni/meso-MgO catalyst had higher surface area than Ni/MgO and Ni particles of Ni/meso-MgO were narrowly distributed in the range of 5~6 nm with an average size of 5.3 nm, while Ni particles of Ni/MgO were in the range of 6~10 nm with an average size of 7.92 nm. The small and uniform Ni nanoparticles in Ni/meso-MgO were attributed to the high surface area and the confinement effect of the mesoporous structure of meso-MgO, which could effectively limit the growth of the active metal and stabilize Ni particles during the procedure of NiO reduction. The mesoporous structure of Ni/meso-MgO also played an important role in suppressing Ni nanoparticle sintering and carbon deposition during the steam reforming of phenol reaction.

  13. Synthesis, Thermal, Electrical and Catalytic Studies of Some Transition Metal Polychelates of Bis-bidentate Schiff Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BANSOD Ashish; ASWAR Anand

    2007-01-01

    Polychelates of Mn(Ⅱ),Fe(Ⅱ),Co(Ⅱ), Ni(Ⅱ),Cu(Ⅱ),Zn(Ⅱ) and Cd(Ⅱ) with the bis salen-type ligand derivedfrom 4,4'-bis[(salicylaldehyde-5)azo]biphenyl and 1,4-diaminobutane have been synthesized.All the polychelates have been characterized by elemental analysis,magnetic susceptibility measurements,IR,electronic spectra and thermogravimetric studies.All the complexes isolated in solid state are dark coloured and insoluble in water and common organic solvents.The ligand behaves as a bis-bidentate molecule coordinating through the phenolic oxygen and azomethine nitrogen atoms.The thermal decomposition of these metal complexes was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and data have been analyzed for kinetic parameters using Broido equation.The solid-state electrical conductivity of the ligand and its polychelates in the form of compressed pellet was studied in the temperature range from 313 to 413 K.All the polychelates were found to show semiconducting nature.The Mn(Ⅱ),Fe(Ⅱ),Co(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ) polychelates have been assessed for the catalytic epoxidation of styrene.

  14. Enzyme catalytic amplification of miRNA-155 detection with graphene quantum dot-based electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tianxing; Zhang, Le; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-03-15

    A specific and sensitive method was developed for quantitative detection of miRNA by integrating horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-assisted catalytic reaction with a simple electrochemical RNA biosensor. The electrochemical biosensor was constructed by a double-stranded DNA structure. The structure was formed by the hybridization of thiol-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes (capture DNA), assembled on the gold electrode surface, with target DNA and aminated indicator probe (NH2-DNA). After the construction of the double-stranded DNA structure, the activated carboxyl groups of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) assembled on NH2-DNA. GQDs were used as a new platform for HRP immobilization through noncovalent assembly. HRP modified biosensor can effectively catalyze the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), accompanied by a change from colorless to blue in solution color and an increased electrochemical current signal. Due to GQDs and enzyme catalysis, the proposed biosensor could sensitively detect miRNA-155 from 1 fM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.14 fM. High performance of the biosensor is attributed to the large surface-to-volume ratio, excellent compatibility of GQDs. For these advantages, the proposed method holds great potential for analysis of other interesting tumor makers. PMID:26453906

  15. Engagement of Arginine Finger to ATP Triggers Large Conformational Changes in NtrC1 AAA+ ATPase for Remodeling Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Baoyu; Sysoeva, Tatyana A.; Chowdhury, Saikat; Guo, Liang; De Carlo, Sacha; Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Yang, Haw; Nixon, B. Tracy (IIT); (UCB); (City U/NY); (Penn)

    2010-11-19

    The NtrC-like AAA+ ATPases control virulence and other important bacterial activities through delivering mechanical work to {sigma}54-RNA polymerase to activate transcription from {sigma}54-dependent genes. We report the first crystal structure for such an ATPase, NtrC1 of Aquifex aeolicus, in which the catalytic arginine engages the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP. Comparing the new structure with those previously known for apo and ADP-bound states supports a rigid-body displacement model that is consistent with large-scale conformational changes observed by low-resolution methods. First, the arginine finger induces rigid-body roll, extending surface loops above the plane of the ATPase ring to bind {sigma}54. Second, ATP hydrolysis permits Pi release and retraction of the arginine with a reversed roll, remodeling {sigma}54-RNAP. This model provides a fresh perspective on how ATPase subunits interact within the ring-ensemble to promote transcription, directing attention to structural changes on the arginine-finger side of an ATP-bound interface.

  16. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells. Part II. Exergy analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Li, Yongdan [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Catalysis Science and Technology and State Key Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Thompson, Levi T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    A methane catalytic decomposition reactor-direct carbon fuel cell-internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (MCDR-DCFC-IRSOFC) energy system is highly efficient for converting the chemical energy of methane into electrical energy. A gas turbine cycle is also used to output more power from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. In part I of this work, models of the fuel cells and the system are proposed and validated. In this part, exergy conservation analysis is carried out based on the developed electrochemical and thermodynamic models. The ratio of the exergy destruction of each unit is examined. The results show that the electrical exergy efficiency of 68.24% is achieved with the system. The possibility of further recovery of the waste heat is discussed and the combined power-heat exergy efficiency is over 80%. (author)

  17. Coordination behavior of ligand based on NNS and NNO donors with ruthenium(III) complexes and their catalytic and DNA interaction studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, R.; Viswnathamurthi, P.

    2012-11-01

    Reactions of 2-acetylpyridine-thiosemicarbazone HL1, 2-acetylpyridine-4-methyl-thiosemicarbazone HL2, 2-acetylpyridine-4-phenyl-thiosemicarbazone HL3 and 2-acetylpyridine-semicarbazone HL4 with ruthenium(III) precursor complexes were studied and the products were characterized by analytical and spectral (FT-IR, electronic, EPR and EI-MS) methods. The ligands coordinated with the ruthenium(III) ion via pyridine nitrogen, azomethine nitrogen and thiolate sulfur/enolate oxygen. An octahedral geometry has been proposed for all the complexes based on the studies. All the complexes are redox active and display an irreversible and quasireversible metal centered redox processes. Further, the catalytic activity of the new complexes has been investigated for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones in the presence of isopropanol/KOH and the Kumada-Corriu coupling of aryl halides with aryl Grignard reagents. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  18. Biochemical Characterization of An Arginine-Specific Alkaline Trypsin from Bacillus licheniformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Song Gong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we isolated a trypsin-producing strain DMN6 from the leather waste and identified it as Bacillus licheniformis through a two-step screening strategy. The trypsin activity was increased up to 140 from 20 U/mL through culture optimization. The enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity with a molecular mass of 44 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the specific activity of purified enzyme is 350 U/mg with Nα-Benzoyl-l-arginine ethylester as the substrate. The optimum temperature and pH for the trypsin are 65 °C and pH 9.0, respectively. Also, the enzyme can be significantly activated by Ba2+. This enzyme is relatively stable in alkaline environment and displays excellent activity at low temperatures. It could retain over 95% of enzyme activity after 180 min of incubation at 45 °C. The distinguished activity under low temperature and prominent stability enhance its catalytic potential. In the current work, the open reading frame was obtained with a length of 1371 nucleotides that encoded a protein of 456 amino acids. These data would warrant the B. licheniformis trypsin as a promising candidate for catalytic application in collagen preparation and leather bating through further protein engineering.

  19. L-Arginine Supplementation and Metabolism in Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Linderholm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available L-Arginine, the amino acid substrate for nitric oxide synthase, has been tested as a therapeutic intervention in a variety of chronic diseases and is commonly used as a nutritional supplement. In this study, we hypothesized that a subset of moderate to severe persistent asthma patients would benefit from supplementation with L-arginine by transiently increasing nitric oxide levels, resulting in bronchodilation and a reduction in inflammation. The pilot study consisted of a 3 month randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of L-arginine (0.05 g/kg twice daily in patients with moderate to severe asthma. We measured spirometry, exhaled breath nitric oxide, serum arginine metabolites, questionnaire scores, daily medication use and PEFR with the primary endpoint being the number of minor exacerbations at three months. Interim analysis of the 20 subjects showed no difference in the number of exacerbations, exhaled nitric oxide levels or lung function between groups, though participants in the L-arginine group had higher serum L-arginine at day 60 (2.0 ± 0.6 × 10−3 vs. 1.1 ± 0.2 × 10−3 µmol/L, p < 0.05, ornithine at day 30 (2.4 ± 0.9 vs. 1.2 ± 0.3 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 and ADMA at day 30 (6.0 ± 1.5 × 10−1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10−1 µmol/L serum, p < 0.05 on average compared to the placebo group. The study was terminated prematurely. Supplementing asthma subjects with L-arginine increases plasma levels; whether subgroups might benefit from such supplementation requires further study.

  20. Inhibition of lytic infection of pseudorabies virus by arginine depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a member of Alphahepesviruses; it is an enveloped virus with a double-stranded DNA genome. Polyamines (such as spermine and spermidine) are ubiquitous in animal cells and participate in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Previous results of our laboratory showed that the PRV can accomplish lytic infection either in the presence of exogenous spermine (or spermidine) or depletion of cellular polyamines. The amino acid arginine is a precursor of polyamine biosynthesis. In this work, we investigated the role of arginine in PRV infection. It was found that the plaque formation of PRV was inhibited by arginase (enzyme catalyzing the conversion of arginine into ornithine and urea) treatment whereas this inhibition can be reversed by exogenous arginine, suggesting that arginine is essential for PRV proliferation. Western blotting was conducted to study the effect of arginine depletion on the levels of structural proteins of PRV in virus-infected cells. Four PRV structural proteins (gB, gE, UL47, and UL48) were chosen for examination, and results revealed that the levels of viral proteins were obviously reduced in long time arginase treatment. However, the overall protein synthesis machinery was apparently not influenced by arginase treatment either in mock or PRV-infected cells. Analyzing with native gel, we found that arginase treatment affected the mobility of PRV structural proteins, suggesting the conformational change of viral proteins by arginine depletion. Heat shock proteins, acting as molecular chaperons, participate in protein folding and translocation. Our results demonstrated that long time arginase treatment could reduce the expression of cellular heat shock proteins 70 (hsc70 and hsp70), and transcriptional suppression of heat shock protein 70 gene promoter was one of the mechanisms involved in this reduced expression

  1. The effect of arginine on oral biofilm communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, M M; Browngardt, C; Xiaohui, X; Klepac-Ceraj, V; Paster, B J; Burne, R A

    2014-02-01

    Alkali production by oral bacteria via the arginine deiminase system (ADS) increases the pH of oral biofilms and reduces the risk for development of carious lesions. This study tested the hypothesis that increased availability of arginine in the oral environment through an exogenous source enhances the ADS activity levels in saliva and dental plaque. Saliva and supra-gingival plaque samples were collected from 19 caries-free (CF) individuals (DMFT = 0) and 19 caries-active (CA) individuals (DMFT ≥ 2) before and after treatment, which comprised the use of a fluoride-free toothpaste containing 1.5% arginine, or a regular fluoride-containing toothpaste twice daily for 4 weeks. ADS activity was measured by quantification of ammonia produced from arginine by oral samples at baseline, after washout period, 4 weeks of treatment, and 2 weeks post-treatment. Higher ADS activity levels were observed in plaque samples from CF compared to those of CA individuals (P = 0.048) at baseline. The use of the arginine toothpaste significantly increased ADS activity in plaque of CA individuals (P = 0.026). The plaque microbial profiles of CA treated with the arginine toothpaste showed a shift in bacterial composition to a healthier community, more similar to that of CF individuals. Thus, an anti-caries effect may be expected from arginine-containing formulations due in large part to the enhancement of ADS activity levels and potential favorable modification to the composition of the oral microbiome.

  2. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  3. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  4. Iron Compound-Based Heterogeneous Fenton Catalytic Oxidation Technology%基于铁化合物的异相Fenton催化氧化技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦斌; 赵红颖; 赵国华; 王宇晶; 杨修春

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous Fenton catalytic oxidation technology is a powerful method for degradation of various kinds of non-biodegradable pollutants at moderate condition.Heterogeneous Fenton as the evolution of homogeneous Fenton reaction,offer the advantage of allowing easier separation from treated water and reuse,and wider field of application.This article mainly reviews the development of various iron-based materials,such as zero-valent iron,iron oxides,iron (hydr)oxides,ferrihydrite and other iron compounds,as heterogeneous catalysts for degrading organic pollutants.The mechanisms of Fenton reaction are comprehensively illustrated,including the free radical mechanism and the high-valent iron mechanism.Particularly,the emphasis is to summarize the catalytic activity of different heterogeneous Fenton catalysts,and point out that the catalytic efficiency of heterogeneous Fenton catalyst is strongly affected by the surface oxidation state,specific surface area,kinds of doped transition metal and the crystalline phase of catalysts.The different ways to improve the catalytic efficiency of heterogeneous Fenton catalysts are also concluded as:reducing the size of catalysts to nano-scales,loading the catalysts onto carriers with high specific surface area,introducing transition metal (such as Ti,Co,Mn,Cr and V) into the structure of iron oxide.In addition,some novel catalysts such as ferrites are especially paid attention due to their high catalytic activity and stability.Finally,the prospects of the development of the heterogeneous Fenton catalytic oxidation technology is given.We believe that an ideal heterogeneous Fenton catalyst should possess high catalytic efficiency and H2O2 utilization,good chemical stability,effectiveness at extend pH range and the ability of easy to be recycled.%异相Fenton催化氧化技术是一种非常有效的处理难生物降解有机污染物的方法,它可以在温和的条件下实现反应.作为均相Fenton的发展,异相Fenton具有容

  5. Glutamine, arginine, and leucine signaling in the intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc Rhoads, J; Wu, Guoyao

    2009-05-01

    Glutamine and leucine are abundant constituents of plant and animal proteins, whereas the content of arginine in foods and physiological fluids varies greatly. Besides their role in protein synthesis, these three amino acids individually activate signaling pathway to promote protein synthesis and possibly inhibit autophagy-mediated protein degradation in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, glutamine and arginine stimulate the mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 (s6) kinase pathways, respectively, to enhance mucosal cell migration and restitution. Moreover, through the nitric oxide-dependent cGMP signaling cascade, arginine regulates multiple physiological events in the intestine that are beneficial for cell homeostasis and survival. Available evidence from both in vitro and in vivo animal studies shows that glutamine and arginine promote cell proliferation and exert differential cytoprotective effects in response to nutrient deprivation, oxidative injury, stress, and immunological challenge. Additionally, when nitric oxide is available, leucine increases the migration of intestinal cells. Therefore, through cellular signaling mechanisms, arginine, glutamine, and leucine play crucial roles in intestinal growth, integrity, and function.

  6. Influence of L-arginine during bovine in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago Velasco Guimarães; da Silva, Bruno Baraúna; de Sá, André Luiz Alves; da Costa, Nathalia Nogueira; Sampaio, Rafael Vilar; Cordeiro, Marcela da Silva; Santana, Priscila Di Paula Bessa; Adona, Paulo Roberto; Santos, Simone do Socorro Damasceno; Miranda, Moysés dos Santos; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of using L-arginine during in vitro fertilization (IVF) on in vitro embryonic development using Bos taurus and Bos indicus semen. Effect of different concentrations (0, 1, 10 and 50 mM) of L-arginine, added to the IVF medium, was evaluated on the fertilization rate at 18 h post-fertilization (hpf), NO3(-)/NO2(-) production during IVF by the Griess colorimetric method (30 hpf), cleavage and blastocyst rates (on Day 2 and Day 7 of culture, respectively) and total blastocyst cell number (Day 7 of culture). The results reveal that the addition of 50 mM L-arginine to IVF medium, with either Bos taurus or Bos indicus spermatozoa, decreased the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate compared to the control group. Other concentrations did not affect embryo production. However, 1 mM L-arginine with Bos indicus semen increased the proportion of hatched blastocysts. These results indicate that high L-arginine concentrations may exhibit toxic effects on bovine gametes during in vitro fertilization. PMID:25651608

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Two Novel Organic-Inorganic Compounds Based on Tetrahexyl and Tetraheptyl Ammonium Ions and the Preyssler Anion and Their Catalytic Activities in the Synthesis of 4-Aminopyrazolo[3,4-d]- Pyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Farrash Bamoharram

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Two novel organic–inorganic compounds based on tetrahexylammonium (THA and tetraheptylammonium (THPA ions and the Preyssler anion, [NaP5W30O110]14-, were synthesized and formulated as (THA7.7H6.3 [NaP5W30O110] (A and (THPA7.5 H6.5[N aP5W30O110] (B. The synthesized compounds were characterized by IR, UV, and TGA and used for the catalytic synthesis of 4-aminopyrazolo[3,4,-d]pyrimidine derivatives 2a-2d. Our findings showed efficient catalytic activities for A and B.

  8. Local Structures and Chemical Properties of Deprotonated Arginine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bao Li; Zi-jing Lin; Yi Luo

    2012-01-01

    The potential energy surface of gaseous deprotonated arginine has been systematically investigated by first principles calculations.At the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level,apart from the identification of several stable local structures,a new global minimum is located which is about 6.56 kJ/mol more stable than what has been reported.The deprotonated arginine molecule has two distinct forms with the deprotonation at the carboxylate group (COO-).These two forms are bridged by a very high energy barrier and possess very different IR spectral profiles.Our calculated proton dissociation energy and gas-phase acidity of arginine molecule are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results.The predicted geometries,dipole moments,rotational constants,vertical ionization energies and IR spectra of low energy conformers will be useful for future experimental measurements.

  9. Mitochondria: role of citrulline and arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Craigen, William J; Scaglia, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are found in all nucleated human cells and generate most of the cellular energy. Mitochondrial disorders result from dysfunctional mitochondria that are unable to generate sufficient ATP to meet the energy needs of various organs. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a frequent maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder. There is growing evidence that nitric oxide (NO) deficiency occurs in MELAS syndrome and results in impaired blood perfusion that contributes significantly to several complications including stroke-like episodes, myopathy, and lactic acidosis. Both arginine and citrulline act as NO precursors and their administration results in increased NO production and hence can potentially have therapeutic utility in MELAS syndrome. Citrulline raises NO production to a greater extent than arginine, therefore, citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect. Controlled studies assessing the effects of arginine or citrulline supplementation on different clinical aspects of MELAS syndrome are needed.

  10. Functional role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 in double stranded RNA cleavage by human pancreatic ribonuclease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Tabish Rehman

    Full Text Available Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HPR, a member of RNase A superfamily, has a high activity on double stranded (ds RNA. By virtue of this activity HPR appears to be involved in the host-defense against pathogenic viruses. To delineate the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by HPR, we have investigated the role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 of HPR in its activity on dsRNA. A non-basic residue glycine 38, earlier shown to be important for dsRNA cleavage by HPR was also included in the study in the context of glutamine 28 and arginine 39. Nine variants of HPR respectively containing Q28A, Q28L, R39A, G38D, Q28A/R39A, Q28L/R39A, Q28A/G38D, R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A mutations were generated and functionally characterized. The far-UV CD-spectral analysis revealed all variants, except R39A, to have structures similar to that of HPR. The catalytic activity of all HPR variants on single stranded RNA substrate was similar to that of HPR, whereas on dsRNA, the catalytic efficiency of all single residue variants, except for the Q28L, was significantly reduced. The dsRNA cleavage activity of R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A variants was most drastically reduced to 4% of that of HPR. The variants having reduced dsRNA cleavage activity also had reduction in their dsDNA melting activity and thermal stability. Our results indicate that in HPR both glutamine 28 and arginine 39 are important for the cleavage of dsRNA. Although these residues are not directly involved in catalysis, both arginine 39 and glutamine 28 appear to be facilitating a productive substrate-enzyme interaction during the dsRNA cleavage by HPR.

  11. Functional role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 in double stranded RNA cleavage by human pancreatic ribonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Md Tabish; Dey, Punyatirtha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Batra, Janendra K

    2011-03-08

    Human pancreatic ribonuclease (HPR), a member of RNase A superfamily, has a high activity on double stranded (ds) RNA. By virtue of this activity HPR appears to be involved in the host-defense against pathogenic viruses. To delineate the mechanism of dsRNA cleavage by HPR, we have investigated the role of glutamine 28 and arginine 39 of HPR in its activity on dsRNA. A non-basic residue glycine 38, earlier shown to be important for dsRNA cleavage by HPR was also included in the study in the context of glutamine 28 and arginine 39. Nine variants of HPR respectively containing Q28A, Q28L, R39A, G38D, Q28A/R39A, Q28L/R39A, Q28A/G38D, R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A mutations were generated and functionally characterized. The far-UV CD-spectral analysis revealed all variants, except R39A, to have structures similar to that of HPR. The catalytic activity of all HPR variants on single stranded RNA substrate was similar to that of HPR, whereas on dsRNA, the catalytic efficiency of all single residue variants, except for the Q28L, was significantly reduced. The dsRNA cleavage activity of R39A/G38D and Q28A/G38D/R39A variants was most drastically reduced to 4% of that of HPR. The variants having reduced dsRNA cleavage activity also had reduction in their dsDNA melting activity and thermal stability. Our results indicate that in HPR both glutamine 28 and arginine 39 are important for the cleavage of dsRNA. Although these residues are not directly involved in catalysis, both arginine 39 and glutamine 28 appear to be facilitating a productive substrate-enzyme interaction during the dsRNA cleavage by HPR.

  12. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  13. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  14. In situ FTIR spectroscopic assessment of methylbutynol catalytic conversion products in relation to the surface acid-base properties of systematically modified aluminas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemer, Gamal A. H.; Zaki, Mohamed I.

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to assess the credibility of methylbutynol (MBOH) as an infrared (IR) reactive probe molecule for surface acid-base properties of metal oxides. Accordingly, pure alumina was systematically modified with varied amounts (0.5-10 wt.%) of K+ or SO42 - additives. Then, the influence of nature and amount of the additive on the following alumina properties were examined: (i) bulk composition and structure by X-ray powder diffractometry and ex-situ IR spectroscopy, (ii) surface area and net charge by N2 sorptiometry and pH-metry, respectively, and (iii) nature and strength of exposed surface acid sites by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine at ambient and higher temperatures. Results obtained were correlated with IR-identified product distribution of MBOH catalytic decomposition/conversion at 200 °C. It is thereby concluded that MBOH is superior to conventional IR inactive probe molecules in gauging sensitively the prevailing acid or base character, availability of base sites, relative population of Bronsted to Lewis acid sites, and strength and reactivity of the sites exposed on metal oxide surfaces. Hence, all that is needed to get this information is to handle IR spectra taken from the gas phase, a task that is experimentally much more accessible than taking spectra from adsorbed species of irreactive probe molecules.

  15. Arginine protection against ammonia toxicity in exhausted rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Mohan, P; Indira, K; Rajendra, W

    1987-01-01

    Arginine administration (5 m moles/kg/day) to albino rats for 7 days, revealed that this vital basic amino acid possesses latent potentiality for the accentuation of urea cycle or at least for arginase activity. The mitigation of ammonia toxicity was observed to be more effective in the case of gastrocnemius and red vastus as compared to white vastus. Further, ammonia and lactate levels were also decreased by arginine in blood and thereby delaying the onset of fatigue by preventing ammonotoxemia and lactic acidemia. PMID:3666875

  16. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  17. 基于丝网印刷碳电极的微囊藻毒素-(亮氨酸-精氨酸)的电流型免疫传感器%An Amperometric lmmunosensor for Microcystin-( Leucine-Arginine) Based on Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈向强; 何苗; 施汉昌; 蔡强

    2011-01-01

    An amperometric immunosensor for the detection of microcystin-(leucine-arginine)(MCLR) was prepared by immobilizing an MCLR-ovalbumin (MCLR-OVA) conjugate to an osmium bipyridyl complex-attached poly(4-vinylpyridine) membrane modified onto a screen-printed carbon electrode. The immunosensor was based on the indirect competitive immunoassay format with the labeled agent of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-mouse immunoglobulin-G antibody. The current response decreased proportionally with the concentration of MCLR in the range of 0. 43-10.72 μg/L with a detection limit of 0.17 μg/L. The mean recoveries of standard additions in three real water samples were in the range of 83% to 121%, and the RSD were in the range of 3.6% to 7.6%. Thus, the proposed method is a promising technique for the detection of MCLR in environmental monitoring.%将微囊藻毒素-(亮氨酸-精氨酸)-鸡卵白蛋白 (Microcystin-(leucinc-arginine)-ovalbumin,MCLR-OVA)固定在锇联吡啶聚(4-乙烯基吡啶)聚合物修饰的丝网印刷碳电极表面,制备了一种检测 MCLR的电流型免疫传感器.该传感器基于间接竞争免疫分析模式,以辣根过氧化物酶偶联的羊抗鼠免疫球蛋白抗体为标记物.其电流信号响应与MCLR的浓度在0.43~10.72 μg/L 范围内呈负线性相关,检出限为0.17 μg/L.3种实际水样的平均添加回收率为 83%~121%,相对标准偏差为 3.6%~7.6%.本方法为MCLR 的环境监测提供了科学依据.

  18. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  19. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the diffusi

  20. A catalytically and genetically optimized β-lactamase-matrix based assay for sensitive, specific, and higher throughput analysis of native henipavirus entry characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holbrook Michael R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nipah virus (NiV and Hendra virus (HeV are the only paramyxoviruses requiring Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4 containment. Thus, study of henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions necessitates the use of cell-cell fusion or pseudotyped reporter virus assays. Yet, these surrogate assays may not fully emulate the biological properties unique to the virus being studied. Thus, we developed a henipaviral entry assay based on a β-lactamase-Nipah Matrix (βla-M fusion protein. We first codon-optimized the bacterial βla and the NiV-M genes to ensure efficient expression in mammalian cells. The βla-M construct was able to bud and form virus-like particles (VLPs that morphologically resembled paramyxoviruses. βla-M efficiently incorporated both NiV and HeV fusion and attachment glycoproteins. Entry of these VLPs was detected by cytosolic delivery of βla-M, resulting in enzymatic and fluorescent conversion of the pre-loaded CCF2-AM substrate. Soluble henipavirus receptors (ephrinB2 or antibodies against the F and/or G proteins blocked VLP entry. Additionally, a Y105W mutation engineered into the catalytic site of βla increased the sensitivity of our βla-M based infection assays by 2-fold. In toto, these methods will provide a more biologically relevant assay for studying henipavirus entry at less than BSL-4 conditions.

  1. Base Catalytic Approach: A Promising Technique for the Activation of Biochar for Equilibrium Sorption Studies of Copper, Cu(II Ions in Single Solute System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifah Bee Abdul Hamid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the feasibility of catalytically pretreated biochar derived from the dried exocarp or fruit peel of mangostene with Group I alkali metal hydroxide (KOH. The pretreated char was activated in the presence of carbon dioxide gas flow at high temperature to upgrade its physiochemical properties for the removal of copper, Cu(II cations in single solute system. The effect of three independent variables, including temperature, agitation time and concentration, on sorption performance were carried out. Reaction kinetics parameters were determined by using linear regression analysis of the pseudo first, pseudo second, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models. The regression co-efficient, R2 values were best for the pseudo second order kinetic model for all the concentration ranges under investigation. This implied that Cu(II cations were adsorbed mainly by chemical interactions with the surface active sites of the activated biochar. Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models were used to interpret the equilibrium data at different temperature. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the sorption process was spontaneous and endothermic. The surface area of the activated sample was 367.10 m2/g, whereas before base activation, it was only 1.22 m2/g. The results elucidated that the base pretreatment was efficient enough to yield porous carbon with an enlarged surface area, which can successfully eliminate Cu(II cations from waste water.

  2. Study on the catalytic performance of laccase in the hydrophobic ionic liquid-based bicontinuous microemulsion stabilized by polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinxin; Li, Qian; Wang, Miaomiao; Du, Na; Huang, Xirong

    2016-02-14

    To formulate a compatible green medium for the conversion of a hydrophobic substrate by a hydrophilic enzyme, we investigated the phase behavior of pseudo ternary hydrophobic ionic liquid (HIL)/buffer/polyoxyethylene-type nonionic surfactant (CnEm)/n-alcohol system and the effects of the components on the formulation of the HIL-based bicontinuous microemulsion. It is found that small head group of the surfactant, high concentration of n-alcohol (medium/long alkyl chain) and low cohesive energy density of the HIL result in low phase transition temperature. In the CnEm stabilized compatible bicontinuous microemulsion, the kinetics of laccase catalyzed oxidation of 2,6-dimethoxyphenol were also investigated. It is found that in addition to temperature, n-alcohol is the key parameter affecting the catalytic performance of laccase, and the optimum n-alcohol depends on the type of HIL as an oil phase. All the kinetic parameters, such as Km, kcat, kcat/Km, and Ea (apparent activation energy), indicate that the bicontinuous microemulsion consisting of [Omim]NTf2/buffer/CnEm/n-hexanol is a suitable medium for the laccase-catalyzed reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the formulation of HIL-based bicontinuous microemulsion for enzyme catalysis. PMID:26686358

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography method with radiochemical detection for measurement of nitric oxide synthase, arginase, and arginine decarboxylase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volke, A; Wegener, G; Vasar, E; Volke, V

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be involved in numerous biological processes, and many studies have aimed to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Recently, it has been demonstrated that arginase and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two enzymes that also employ arginine as a substrate, may regulate NOS activity. We aimed to develop a HPLC-based method to measure simultaneously the products of these three enzymes. Traditionally, the separation of amino acids and related compounds with HPLC has been carried out with precolumn derivatization and reverse phase chromatography. We describe here a simple and fast HPLC method with radiochemical detection to separate radiolabeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, and agmatine. 3H-labeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and 14C-labeled L-citrulline were used as standards. These compounds were separated in the normal phase column (Allure Acidix 250 x 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions in less than 20 min with good sensitivity. Using the current method, we have shown the formation of L-citrulline and L-ornithine in vitro using brain tissue homogenate of rats and that of agmatine by Escherichia coli ADC. PMID:16541190

  4. Study and Analysis on Naphtha Catalytic Reforming Reactor Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ke min; Song Yongji; Pan Shiwei

    2004-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors connected in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reaction characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture to represent the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups with individual compounds. The simulation results based on above models agree very well with actual operating data of process unit.

  5. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ke-min; GUO Hai-yan; PAN Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  6. Contents of corticotropin-releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin immunoreativity in the spleen and thymus during a chronic inflammatory stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdrey, H.S.; Lightman, S.L.; Harbuz, M.S.;

    1994-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone, spleen, thymus, immune system, stress, arthritis, arginine vasopressin......Corticotropin-releasing hormone, spleen, thymus, immune system, stress, arthritis, arginine vasopressin...

  7. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  8. Effect of oral L-arginine administration on exhaled nitric oxide (no) concentration in healthy volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, Hiroshi; Yatabe, Midori; Misaka, Shingen; Shikama, Yayoi; Sato, Suguru; Munakata, Mitsuru; Kimura, Junko

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported a case of pulmonary hypertension, where the symptoms were improved by oral L-arginine (arginine) administration. Arginine may increase nitric oxide (NO) production in the pulmonary artery. Exhaled NO may reflect pulmonary artery NO production. It has been demonstrated that exhaled NO concentration is higher in patients with allergic diseases, but whether oral arginine administration alters exhaled NO is unknown. Therefore, in this study, we investigated whether oral arg...

  9. Whole-body synthesis of L-homoarginine in pigs and rats supplemented with L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yongqing; Hu, Shengdi; Jia, Sichao; Nawaratna, Gayan; Che, Dongsheng; Wang, Fenglai; Bazer, Fuller W; Wu, Guoyao

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies suggest an important role for L-homoarginine in cardiovascular, hepatic and neurological functions, as well as the regulation of glucose metabolism. However, little is known about whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis or its response to dietary L-arginine intake in animals. Four series of experiments were conducted to determine L-homoarginine synthesis and catabolism in pigs and rats. In Experiment 1, male and female pigs were fed a corn- and soybean meal-based diet supplemented with 0.0-2.42 % L-arginine-HCl. In Experiment 2, male and female rats were fed a casein-based diet, while receiving drinking water containing supplemental L-arginine-HCl to provide 0.0-3.6 g L-arginine/kg body-weight/day. In both experiments, urine collected from the animals for 24 h was analyzed for L-homoarginine and related metabolites. In Experiment 3, pigs and rats received a single oral dose of 1 or 10 mg L-homoarginine/kg body-weight, respectively, and their urine was collected for 24 h for analyses of L-homoarginine and related substances. In Experiment 4, slices of pig and rat tissues (including liver, brain, kidney, heart, and skeletal-muscle) were incubated for 1 h in Krebs-bicarbonate buffer containing 5 or 50 µM L-homoarginine. Our results indicated that: (a) animal tissues did not degrade L-homoarginine in the presence of physiological concentrations of other amino-acids; (b) 95-96 % of orally administered L-homoarginine was recovered in urine; (c) L-homoarginine was quantitatively a minor product of L-arginineg catabolism in the body; and (d) dietary L-arginine supplementation dose-dependently increased whole-body L-homoarginine synthesis. These novel findings provide a new framework for future studies of L-homoarginine metabolism and physiology in animals and humans. PMID:26676627

  10. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapours over Sodium-Based Catalyst; A Study on teh State of Sodium on the Catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Tang Son; Lefferts, Leon; Gupta, K.B. Sai Sankar; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2015-01-01

    In situ upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours over Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor at 500 °C. Catalytic oil exhibits a significant improvement over its non-catalytic counterpart, such as lower oxygen content (12.3 wt % compared to 42.1 wt %), higher ener

  11. In vivo arginine production and intravascular nitric oxide synthesis in hypotensive sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine is important in the response to infections and is a precursor for the synthesis of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO). Low plasma arginine is correlated with a worse prognosis in patients with sepsis, and increased NO has been implicated in the hypotension of sepsis. Data on in vivo arginine...

  12. High plasma arginine concentrations in critically ill patients suffering from hepatic failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Nijveldt (Robin); M.P.C. Siroen; B. van der Hoven (Ben); T. Teerlink (Tom); H.A. Prins (Hubert); A.R.J. Girbes (Armand); P.A.M. van Leeuwen

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: In physiological conditions, the liver plays an important role in the regulation of plasma arginine concentrations by taking up large amounts of arginine from the hepatic circulation. When hepatic failure is present, arginine metabolism may be disturbed. Therefore, we hypothes

  13. Arginine dimethylation products in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram E. El-Sadek

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Disturbed serum levels of arginine and its dimethyl derivatives may underlie development and/or progression of CKD. Elevated serum SDMA level is strongly correlated with impaired kidney functions and could be considered as a predictor for kidney functions deterioration and CKD progression.

  14. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  15. One-Pot Catalysis Using a Chiral Iridium Complex/Brønsted Base: Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Catalponol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takeyuki; Ismiyarto; Ishizaka, Yuka; Zhou, Da-Yang; Asano, Kaori; Sasai, Hiroaki

    2015-11-01

    Tandem asymmetric hydrogen transfer oxidation/aldol condensation under relay catalysis of a chiral iridium complex/achiral Brønsted base binary system is described for the synthesis of α-benzylidene-γ-hydroxytetralones with high ee's. A two-step synthesis of catalponol was achieved using this sequential methodology together with regio- and stereoselective hydroboration. PMID:26496409

  16. Effects of Arginine Vasopressin on musical short-term memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Y. Granot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP and musical working memory (WM. The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP – placebo design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo in a second session, one week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's Musical Aptitude Profile, the interval subtest from the Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA, and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP (p < .05 with no main Session effect nor Group * Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p < .05 with scores higher in the second as compared to the first session, a marginal main Group effect (p = .093 and a marginal Group X Session interaction (p = 0.88. In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, (PANAS. Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other.

  17. Effects of arginine vasopressin on musical working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Roni Y; Uzefovsky, Florina; Bogopolsky, Helena; Ebstein, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Previous genetic studies showed an association between variations in the gene coding for the 1a receptor of the neuro-hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and musical working memory (WM). The current study set out to test the influence of intranasal administration (INA) of AVP on musical as compared to verbal WM using a double blind crossover (AVP-placebo) design. Two groups of 25 males were exposed to 20 IU of AVP in one session, and 20 IU of saline water (placebo) in a second session, 1 week apart. In each session subjects completed the tonal subtest from Gordon's "Musical Aptitude Profile," the interval subtest from the "Montreal Battery for Evaluation of Amusias (MBEA)," and the forward and backward digit span tests. Scores in the digit span tests were not influenced by AVP. In contrast, in the music tests there was an AVP effect. In the MBEA test, scores for the group receiving placebo in the first session (PV) were higher than for the group receiving vasopressin in the first session (VP) (p effect nor Group × Session interaction. In the Gordon test there was a main Session effect (p effect (p = 0.093) and a marginal Group × Session interaction (p = 0.88). In addition we found that the group that received AVP in the first session scored higher on scales indicative of happiness, and alertness on the positive and negative affect scale, (PANAS). Only in this group and only in the music test these scores were significantly correlated with memory scores. Together the results reflect a complex interaction between AVP, musical memory, arousal, and contextual effects such as session, and base levels of memory. The results are interpreted in light of music's universal use as a means to modulate arousal on the one hand, and AVP's influence on mood, arousal, and social interactions on the other. PMID:24151474

  18. Circadian variation of plasma arginine vasopressin concentration, or arginine vasopressin in enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, T; Kasahara, T; Uchiyama, M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to determine a relationship between primary nocturnal enuresis and arginine vasopressin (AVP) secretion. The first study compared 24-h AVP secretion profiles of enuretic (n = 9) and non-enuretic children (n = 8). Blood samples were collected at 1-h intervals for 24 h. In the second study, nocturnal AVP secretion in group A (n = 40)--with low urinary osmotic pressure (UOP) and large nocturnal urine output (NUO)--was compared with that in group D (n = 11) with normal UOP and small NUO. Plasma AVP levels were measured at 30-min intervals, immediately after falling asleep until 06.00 the following morning. The results of the first study showed that the plasma AVP level was significantly lower (p < 0.05-0.001) in the enuretic group between 23.00 and 04.00. The second study showed that group A had significantly lower AVP levels (p < 0.05-0.001) than group D throughout the night. The mean AVP level during night sleep was 0.64 +/- 0.23 pg/ml in group A and 1.43 +/- 0.66 pg/ml in group D. The results of the first study suggest that decreased nocturnal AVP secretion is a cause of bedwetting. However, the results of the second study suggest that nocturnal enuresis cannot be explained by a decrease in nocturnal AVP secretion alone.

  19. Distributive Processing by the Iron(II)/α-Ketoglutarate-Dependent Catalytic Domains of the TET Enzymes Is Consistent with Epigenetic Roles for Oxidized 5-Methylcytosine Bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamanaha, Esta; Guan, Shengxi; Marks, Katherine; Saleh, Lana

    2016-08-01

    The ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins catalyze oxidation of 5-methylcytosine ((5m)C) residues in nucleic acids to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine ((5hm)C), 5-formylcytosine ((5f)C), and 5-carboxycytosine ((5ca)C). These nucleotide bases have been implicated as intermediates on the path to active demethylation, but recent reports have suggested that they might have specific regulatory roles in their own right. In this study, we present kinetic evidence showing that the catalytic domains (CDs) of TET2 and TET1 from mouse and their homologue from Naegleria gruberi, the full-length protein NgTET1, are distributive in both chemical and physical senses, as they carry out successive oxidations of a single (5m)C and multiple (5m)C residues along a polymethylated DNA substrate. We present data showing that the enzyme neither retains (5hm)C/(5f)C intermediates of preceding oxidations nor slides along a DNA substrate (without releasing it) to process an adjacent (5m)C residue. These findings contradict a recent report by Crawford et al. ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2016 , 138 , 730 ) claiming that oxidation of (5m)C by CD of mouse TET2 is chemically processive (iterative). We further elaborate that this distributive mechanism is maintained for TETs in two evolutionarily distant homologues and posit that this mode of function allows the introduction of (5m)C forms as epigenetic markers along the DNA. PMID:27362828

  20. Colorimetric determination of copper ions based on the catalytic leaching of silver from the shell of silver-coated gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method for the colorimetric determination of copper ions (Cu2+) that is based on the use of silver-coated gold nanorods (Au–Ag NRs). Its outstanding selectivity and sensitivity result from the catalytic leaching process that occurs between Cu2+, thiosulfate (S2O32−), and the surface of the Au–Ag NRs. The intrinsic color of the Au–Ag NRs changes from bright red to bluish green with decreasing thickness of the silver coating. The addition of Cu2+ accelerates the leaching of silver from the shell caused in the presence of S2O32−. This result in a decrease in the thickness of the silver shell which is accompanied a change in color and absorption spectra of the colloidal solution. The shifts in the absorption maxima are linearly related to the concentrations of Cu2+ over the 3–1,000 nM concentration range (R = 0.996). The method is cost effective and was applied to the determination of Cu2+ in real water samples. (author)

  1. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells: Part I. Process modeling and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Li, Yongdan [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Catalysis Science and Technology and State Key Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Thompson, Levi T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    A highly efficient integrated energy conversion system is built based on a methane catalytic decomposition reactor (MCDR) together with a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) and an internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC). In the MCDR, methane is decomposed to pure carbon and hydrogen. Carbon is used as the fuel of DCFC to generate power and produce pure carbon dioxide. The hydrogen and unconverted methane are used as the fuel in the IRSOFC. A gas turbine cycle is also used to produce more power output from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. The output performance and efficiency of both the DCFC and IRSOFC are investigated and compared by development of exact models of them. It is found that this system has a unique loading flexibility due to the good high-loading property of DCFC and the good low loading property of IRSOFC. The effects of temperature, pressure, current densities, and methane conversion on the performance of the fuel cells and the system are discussed. The CO{sub 2} emission reduction is effective, up to 80%, can be reduced with the proposed system. (author)

  2. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  3. Radiolytic Synthesis of Pt-Ru Catalysts Based on Functional Polymer-Grafted MWNT and Their Catalytic Efficiency for CO and MeOH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Soo Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pt-Ru catalysts based on functional polymer-grafted MWNT (Pt-Ru@FP-MWNT were prepared by radiolytic deposition of Pt-Ru nanoparticles on functional polymer-grafted multiwalled carbon nanotube (FP-MWNT. Three different types of functional polymers, poly(acrylic acid (PAAc, poly(methacrylic acid (PMAc, and poly(vinylphenyl boronic acid (PVPBAc, were grafted on the MWNT surface by radiation-induced graft polymerization (RIGP. Then, Pt-Ru nanoparticles were deposited onto the FP-MWNT supports by the reduction of metal ions using γ-irradiation to obtain Pt-Ru@FP-MWNT catalysts. The Pt-Ru@FP-MWNT catalysts were then characterized by XRD, XPS, TEM ,and elemental analysis. The catalytic efficiency of Pt-Ru@FP-MWNT catalyst was examined for CO stripping and MeOH oxidation for use in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The Pt-Ru@PVPBAc-MWNT catalyst shows enhanced activity for electro-oxidation of CO and MeOH oxidation over that of the commercial E-TEK catalyst.

  4. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  5. Peculiarities of formation of phase composition, porous structure, and catalytic properties of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials fabricated by sol–gel synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papynov, Evgeniy Konstantinovich, E-mail: Papynov@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation); Mayorov, Vitaliy Yurevich, E-mail: 024205@inbox.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina Sergeevna, E-mail: 02.06.1984@mail.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Avramenko, Valentin Aleksandrovich, E-mail: avramenko1@yandex.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far East Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospect 100-let Vladivostoku, 159, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Natural Sciences, Suhanova, 8, Vladivostok 690091 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    The method of template sol–gel synthesis of tungsten oxide-based macroporous materials using ‘core–shell’ latex particles as colloid templates is described. The chemical composition and structural characteristics of the synthesized macroporous oxide systems have been investigated. The peculiarities of formation of material phase composition and macroporous structure under different template thermal destruction conditions have been revealed. An optimal method of a targeted synthesis of the crystalline tungsten(VI) oxide having a defect-free macroporous structure (average pore size 160 nm) and efficient catalytic properties under organic liquid phase oxidation conditions has been suggested. The prospects of the fabricated material application as catalysts of hydrothermal oxidation of radionuclide organic complexes at radioactive waste decontamination have been demonstrated. - Highlights: • Macroporous tungsten oxides were fabricated via sol–gel process. • The correlation between synthesis conditions and composition was determined. • Influence of synthesis conditions on porous structure has been explained. • The effects of template thermodestruction have been set up. • High potential of such materials for catalysis applications has been shown.

  6. EPR spectroscopy of catalytic systems based on nickel complexes of 1,4-diaza-1,3-butadiene (alpha-diimine) ligands in hydrogenation and polymerization reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic systems based on .-diimine complexes of Ni(0) and Ni(II) of the general formulas NiBr2(DAD-R) (R = -C3H7 or -CH3) and Ni(DAD-CH3)2 (DAD(-C3H7) = 1,4-bis(2,6-diiso-propylphenyl)-2,3-(dimethyl-1,4-diazabuta-1,3-diene, DAD(-CH3) = 1,4-bis 2,6-dimethylphenyl)-2,3-dimethyl-1,4-diazabuta-1,3-diene), with Lewis acids (AlEt3, AlEt2Cl, AlEtCl2, B(F5C6)3, BF3 centre dot OEt2) in hydrogenation and polymerization reactions were investigated by the EPR spectroscopy method. The Ni(I) complexes of a (DAD-R)NiX2AlXy(C2H5)3-y composition (instead of the aluminum atom may be a boron atom) were identified where R = -CH3 or -C3H7, X = Br, X = Cl or -C2H5. The .-diimines radical-anions are included in the derivatives of aluminum or boron. It is found that there occur oxidation reactions between Ni(DAD-CH3)2 and aluminum organic compounds or boron derivatives, resulting in the formation of paramagnetic complexes. It is shown that there is no direct relationship between activity in polymerization or hydrogenation reactions and concentration of paramagnetic particles.

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of isolated modules of the mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated modules of mouse coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 encompassing the protein arginine N-methyltransferase catalytic domain have been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data have been collected and have enabled determination of the structures by multiple isomorphous replacement using anomalous scattering. Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1) plays a crucial role in gene expression as a coactivator of several nuclear hormone receptors and also of non-nuclear receptor systems. Its recruitment by the transcriptional machinery induces protein methylation, leading to chromatin remodelling and gene activation. CARM128–507 and two structural states of CARM1140–480 were expressed, purified and crystallized. Crystals of CARM128–507 belong to space group P6222, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 136.0, c = 125.3 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.5 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and contain one monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of CARM128–507 was solved by multiple isomorphous replacement and anomalous scattering methods. Crystals of apo CARM1140–480 belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 99.0, c = 207.4 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.7 Å resolution and contain two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Crystals of CARM1140–480 in complex with S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine belong to space P21212, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.6, b = 98.65, c = 206.08 Å; they diffract to beyond 2.6 Å resolution and contain four monomers in the asymmetric unit. The structures of apo and holo CARM1140–480 were solved by molecular-replacement techniques from the structure of CARM128–507

  8. Selection of Chelated Fe (III)/Fe (II) Catalytic Oxidation Agents for Desulfurization Based on Iron Complexation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ying; Liu Youzhi; Qi Guisheng; Guo Huidong; Zhu Zhengfeng

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of factors inlfuencing the experiments on reactions involving 8 different chelating agents and sol-uble Fe (III)/Fe (II) salts was carried out to yield chelated iron complexes. A combination of optimized inlfuencing factors has resulted in a Fe chelating capacity of the iron-based desulfurization solution to be equal to 6.83-13.56 g/L at a redox potential of 0.185-0.3. The desulfurization performance of Fe (III)/Fe (II) chelating agents was investigated on a simulated sulfur-containing industrial gas composed of H2S and N2 in a cross-lfow rotating packed bed. Test results have revealed that the proposed iron-based desulfurization solution showed a sulfur removal efifciency of over 99%along with a Fe chelating capacity exceeding 1.35 g/L. This desulfurization technology which has practical application prospect is currently in the phase of commercial scale-up study.

  9. Adsorptive removal of lead and cadmium ions using Cross -linked CMC Schiff base: Isotherm, Kinetics and Catalytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    P.Moganavally; Deepa, M; P.N. SUDHA; Suresh, R.

    2016-01-01

    Water plays a vital role to human and other living organisms. Due to the effluent coming from chemical industries, the industrial activity, contamination of ground water level is goes on increasing nowadays. Therefore, there is a need to develop technologies that can remove toxic pollutants in wastewater. Hence the cross linked Carboxymethyl chitosan(CMC)/ 2,3-dimethoxy Benzaldehyde Schiff base complex has been synthesized and characterized by using FT-IR and SEM analysis. All these results...

  10. Mesoporous Silica Based Gold Catalysts: Novel Synthesis and Application in Catalytic Oxidation of CO and Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonarda F. Liotta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles, particularly with the particle size of 2–5 nm, have attracted increasing research attention during the past decades due to their surprisingly high activity in CO and volatile organic compounds (VOCs oxidation at low temperatures. In particular, CO oxidation below room temperature has been extensively studied on gold nanoparticles supported on several oxides (TiO2, Fe2O3, CeO2, etc.. Recently, mesoporous silica materials (such as SBA-15, MCM-41, MCM-48 and HMS possessing ordered channel structures and suitable pore diameters, large internal surface areas, thermal stabilities and excellent mechanical properties, have been investigated as suitable hosts for gold nanoparticles. In this review we highlight the development of novel mesoporous silica based gold catalysts based on examples, mostly from recently reported results. Several synthesis methods are described herein. In detail we report: the modification of silica with organic functional groups; the one-pot synthesis with the incorporation of both gold and coupling agent containing functionality for the synthesis of mesoporous silica; the use of cationic gold complexes; the synthesis of silica in the presence of gold colloids or the dispersion of gold colloids protected by ligands or polymers onto silica; the modification of silica by other metal oxides; other conventional preparation methods to form mesoporous silica based gold catalysts. The gold based catalysts prepared as such demonstrate good potential for use in oxidation of CO and VOCs at low temperatures. From the wide family of VOCs, the oxidation of methanol and dimethyldisulfide has been addressed in the present review.

  11. Catalytic Enantioselective Aryl Transfer to Aldehydes Using Chiral 2,2’-Bispyrrolidine-Based Salan Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiang Cheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chiral C2-symmetric diamines have emerged as versatile auxiliaries or ligands in numerous asymmetric transformations. Chiral 2,2’-bispyrrolidine-based salan ligands were prepared and applied to the asymmetric aryl transfer to aldehydes with arylboronic acids as the source of transferable aryl groups. The corresponding diarylmethanols were obtained in high yields with moderate to good enantioselectivitives of up to 83% ee.

  12. Catalytic depolymerisation of starch-based industrial waste:use of non-conventional activation methods and novel reaction media

    OpenAIRE

    Hernoux-Villière, A. (Audrey)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The rapid increase of energy demand for transportation generates a rise of environmental pollution, stimulating the development of alternative sources of energy. Biomass is considered as the main organic carbon source of energy to substitute petroleum permitting sustainable production of chemicals and transportation fuels. Biowastes, residues and non-edible feedstock possess high potential resources avoiding food competition. This research aims to convert starch-based industria...

  13. Catalytic activity of acid and base with different concentration on sol-gel kinetics of silica by ultrasonic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, R K; Das, M

    2015-09-01

    The effects of both acid (acetic acid) and base (ammonia) catalysts in varying on the sol-gel synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles using tetra ethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as a precursor was determined by ultrasonic method. The ultrasonic velocity was received by pulsar receiver. The ultrasonic velocity in the sol and the parameter ΔT (time difference between the original pulse and first back wall echo of the sol) was varied with time of gelation. The graphs of ln[ln1/ΔT] vs ln(t), indicate two region - nonlinear region and a linear region. The time corresponds to the point at which the non-linear region change to linear region is considered as gel time for the respective solutions. Gelation time is found to be dependent on the concentration and types of catalyst and is found from the graphs based on Avrami equation. The rate of condensation is found to be faster for base catalyst. The gelation process was also characterized by viscosity measurement. Normal sol-gel process was also carried out along with the ultrasonic one to compare the effectiveness of ultrasonic. The silica gel was calcined and the powdered sample was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectra, X-ray diffractogram, and FTIR spectroscopy. PMID:25600993

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and tyrosinase biomimetic catalytic activity of copper(II) complexes with schiff base ligands derived from α-diketones with 2-methyl-3-amino-(3 H)-quinazolin-4-one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Abd El-Motaleb M.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Shaban, Shaban Y.

    2011-12-01

    A template condensation of α-diketones (biacetyl, benzile and 2,3-pentanedione) with 2-methyl-3-amino-(3 H)-quinazolin-4-one (AMQ) in the presence of CuX 2 (X = Cl -, Br -, NO3- or ClO4-) resulted in the formation of tetradentate Schiff base copper(II) complexes of the type [CuLX]X and [CuL]X 2. Structural characterization of the complex species was achieved by several physicochemical methods, namely elemental analysis, electronic spectra, IR, ESR, molar conductivity, thermal analysis (TAG & DTG), and magnetic moment measurements. The stereochemistry, the nature of the metal chelates, and the catalytic reactivity are markedly dependent upon the type of counter anions and the ligand substituent within the carbonyl moiety. A square planar monomeric structure is proposed for the perchlorate, nitrate, and bromide complexes, in which the counter anions are loosely bonded to copper(II) ion. For the chloride complexes, the molar conductivities and the spectral data indicated that they have square-pyramidal environments around copper(II) center. The reported copper(II) complexes exhibit promising tyrosinase catalytic activity towards the hydroxylation of phenol followed by the aerobic oxidation of the resulting catechol. A linear correlation almost exists between the catalytic reactivity and the Lewis-acidity of the central copper(II) ion created by the donating properties of the parent ligand. The steric considerations could be accounted to clarify the difference in the catalytic activity of these functional models.

  15. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  16. Purification and characterization of an arginine ester hydrolase from the venom of Trimeresurus mucrosqumatus in Hunan province of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xiao-dong; LI Bo; YU Zheng-ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the physical and chemical properties of an arginine ester hydrolase from the venom of Trimeresurus mucrosqumatus in Hunan province of China. Methods :The arginine ester hydrolase (AEH) was isolated from the venom of Chinese Trimeresurus mucrosqumatus by a combination of ionexchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, CM-Sepharose Cl-6B and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Results: The purified protein named TM-AEH,a glycoprotein with carbohydrate content of 0.5 % neutral hexose and 0. 75 % sialic acid,a relative molecular mass of 29.0 kDa,and an isoelectric point (pI) of 5. 2. It shares with an extinction coefficient (E0.1%/cm) of 1.332 at 280 nm,consisted of 225 amino acid residues ,and migrated as a band under reduced or non-reduced condition in basic PAGE. TM-AEH was a highly thermostable protein and was stable to pH changes between 5 and 9. The optimum temperature and optimum pH were 55℃ and 8. 4 for its catalytic activity respectively,which was inhibited by Fe3+ and Cu2+. Conclusion:This protein can exhibit higher BAEE-hydrolysing activity and fibrinogenolytic activity as compared to that of whole venom.

  17. Selection of Chelated Fe (III)/Fe (II) Catalytic Oxidation Agents for Desulfurization Based on Iron Complexation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Ying; Liu Youzhi; Qi Guisheng; Guo Huidong; Zhu Zhengfeng

    2014-01-01

    Optimization of factors inlfuencing the experiments on reactions involving 8 different chelating agents and sol-uble Fe (III)/Fe (II) salts was carried out to yield chelated iron complexes. A combination of optimized inlfuencing factors has resulted in a Fe chelating capacity of the iron-based desulfurization solution to be equal to 6.83—13.56 g/L at a redox potential of 0.185—0.3. The desulfurization performance of Fe (III)/Fe (II) chelating agents was investigated on a simulated sulfur-containing industrial gas composed of H2S and N2 in a cross-lfow rotating packed bed. Test results have revealed that the proposed iron-based desulfurization solution showed a sulfur removal efifciency of over 99%along with a Fe chelating capacity exceeding 1.35 g/L. This desulfurization technology which has practical application prospect is currently in the phase of commercial scale-up study.

  18. Analysis of an Alanine/Arginine Mixture by Using TLC/FTIR Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied TLC/FTIR coupled with mapping technique to analyze an alanine/arginine mixture. Narrow band TLC plates prepared by using AgI as a stationary phase were used to separate alanine and arginine. The distribution of alanine and arginine spots was manifested by a 3D chromatogram. Alanine and arginine can be successfully separated by the narrow band TLC plate. In addition, the FTIR spectra of the separated alanine and arginine spots on the narrow band TLC plate are roughly the same as the corresponding reference IR spectra.

  19. Expression of arg genes of Escherichia coli during arginine limitation dependent upon stringent control of translation.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, M.G.; Rogers, P

    1987-01-01

    The transcription and translation of operons for arginine biosynthetic enzymes after arginine removal (arginine down shift) were studied in relA and relA+ strains of Escherichia coli. After arginine down shift, derepression of synthesis of the arginine biosynthetic enzymes ornithine carbamoyltransferase (argF) and argininosuccinate lyase (argH) began at about 15 min in relA+ cells but was delayed in relA cells for more than 2 h. However, both relA+ and relA cells accumulated high levels of ar...

  20. SYNTHESIS AND CATALYTIC PROPERTY OF POLYSTYRENE SUPPORTED PHENYLALANINE SCHIFF BASE COMPLEX OF Mn(Ⅱ) IN AEROBIC OXIDATION OF CYCLOHEXENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ganqing; XIE Jimin; LU Xiaoqing; SUN Lu

    2006-01-01

    The polystyrene supported phenylalanine Schiff base complex of Mn(Ⅱ)(PS-Sal-Phe-Mn)was prepared with chloromethylated styrene polymer beads, 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde,L-phenylalanine and manganese(Ⅱ)acetate tetrahyrate., The polymeric ligand and the complex were characterized by FT-IR,, small area X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS), and ICP-AES. In the presence of the manganese complex, cyclohexene(1)was effectively oxidized by molecular oxygen without reductant. The major products of the reaction were 2-cyclohexen-1-ol(2),2-cyclohexen-1-one(3)and 2-cyclohexen-1- hydroperoxide(4), which was different with typical oxidation of cyclohexene. The influence of reaction temperature and additive for oxidation had been studied. The selectivity of 2-cyclohexen-l-hydroperoxide varied with reaction time and different additives. The mechanism of cyclohexene oxidation had also been discussed.

  1. Catalytic Enantioselective Olefin Metathesis in Natural Product Synthesis. Chiral Metal-Based Complexes that Deliver High Enantioselectivity and More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolmson, Steven J.; Meek, Simon J.; Zhugralin, Adil R.

    2012-01-01

    Chiral olefin metathesis catalysts enable chemists to access enantiomerically enriched small molecules with high efficiency; synthesis schemes involving such complexes can be substantially more concise than those that would involve enantiomerically pure substrates and achiral Mo alkylidenes or Ru-based carbenes. The scope of research towards design and development of chiral catalysts is not limited to discovery of complexes that are merely the chiral versions of the related achiral variants. A chiral olefin metathesis catalyst, in addition to furnishing products of high enantiomeric purity, can offer levels of efficiency, product selectivity and/or olefin stereoselectivity that are unavailable through the achiral variants. Such positive attributes of chiral catalysts (whether utilized in racemic or enantiomerically enriched form) should be considered as general, applicable to other classes of transformations. PMID:19967680

  2. Highly catalytic carbon nanotube counter electrode on plastic for dye solar cells utilizing cobalt-based redox mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flexible, slightly transparent and metal-free random network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on plain polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic substrate outperformed platinum on conductive glass and on plastic as the counter electrode (CE) of a dye solar cell employing a Co(II/III)tris(2,2′-bipyridyl) complex redox mediator in 3-methoxypropionitrile solvent. The CE charge-transfer resistance of the SWCNT film was 0.60 Ω cm2, 4.0 Ω cm2 for sputtered platinum on indium tin oxide-PET substrate and 1.7 Ω cm2 for thermally deposited Pt on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass, respectively. The solar cell efficiencies were in the same range, thus proving that an entirely carbon-based SWCNT film on plastic is as good CE candidate for the Co electrolyte

  3. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic applications of triden tate Schiff base derivatives of bis and mono(cyclopentadienyl) lanthanocene complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOUSAF, Muhammad; QIAN, Yan-Long

    2000-01-01

    Seven kinds of lanthanocene complexes were prepared by the reaction of tridentate Schiff base { N-(2-methoxyphenyi)sali cylideneamine} with tris(cyclopentadienyl)lanthanide tetrahy drofuranate or bis (cyclopentadienyl) lanthanide chloride te trahydrofuranate in THF. All the complexes were character ized by MS, EA and IR respeectively. The structure of {Cp2LnC14H13NO2) Ln=Sm, Dy, Y, Er} (1-4) was fur ther confirmed by X-ray determination of Cp2Sm(C14H13NO2) (1) which indicates that the complex is monomeric in which central metal is coordinatively saturated by two cyclopentadi enyl rings, two oxygens and one nitrogen of the ligand. The i somerization of 1,5-hexadiene explains that complexes (1-4) isomerize this monomer into a -mixture of 1,4-hexadiene, 2,4- hexadiene, 1,3-hexadiene,methylenecyclopentane and methyl cyclopentene. Similarly complexes{CpLn(Cl)C14H13NO2) (THF) (Ln= Sm, Dy, Y, Er)} (5-7) polymerize methyi methacrylate (MMA) to give polyMMA (PMMA) in 51.8% yield and high molecular weight (274 × 103), which shows narrow molecular weight distributions and partially syndiotac tic.

  5. Catalytic Upgrading of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to Drop-in Biofuels by Solid Base and Bifunctional Metal-Acid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohre, Ashish; Saha, Basudeb; Abu-Omar, Mahdi M

    2015-12-01

    Design and synthesis of effective heterogeneous catalysts for the conversion of biomass intermediates into long chain hydrocarbon precursors and their subsequent deoxygenation to hydrocarbons is a viable strategy for upgrading lignocellulose into distillate range drop-in biofuels. Herein, we report a two-step process for upgrading 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to C9 and C11 fuels with high yield and selectivity. The first step involves aldol condensation of HMF and acetone with a water tolerant solid base catalyst, zirconium carbonate (Zr(CO3 )x ), which gave 92 % C9 -aldol product with high selectivity at nearly 100 % HMF conversion. The as-synthesised Zr(CO3 )x was analysed by several analytical methods for elucidating its structural properties. Recyclability studies of Zr(CO3 )x revealed a negligible loss of its activity after five consecutive cycles over 120 h of operation. Isolated aldol product from the first step was hydrodeoxygenated with a bifunctional Pd/Zeolite-β catalyst in ethanol, which showed quantitative conversion of the aldol product to n-nonane and 1-ethoxynonane with 40 and 56 % selectivity, respectively. 1-Ethoxynonane, a low oxygenate diesel range fuel, which we report for the first time in this paper, is believed to form through etherification of the hydroxymethyl group of the aldol product with ethanol followed by opening of the furan ring and hydrodeoxygenation of the ether intermediate. PMID:26549016

  6. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  7. Comparison between a Water-Based and a Solvent-Based Impregnation Method towards Dispersed CuO/SBA-15 Catalysts: Texture, Structure and Catalytic Performance in Automotive Exhaust Gas Abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Xin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Supported copper oxide nanoparticles are a potential candidate for replacing the rare and expensive precious metals within the automotive three-way catalyst. However, a well-designed dispersion method is necessary to allow a stable high loading of active material, compensating its lower intrinsic activity and stability. In this work, a CuO-loaded SBA-15 catalyst has been manufactured by two methods. The ammonia-driven deposition precipitation (ADP and the molecular designed dispersion (MDD methods are both considered as efficient deposition methods to provide well-dispersed copper oxide-based catalysts. Their morphology, copper dispersion and the chemical state of copper were characterized and compared. Due to the differences in the synthesis approach, a difference in the obtained copper oxide phases has been observed, leading to a distinct behavior in the catalytic performance. The structure-activity correlation of both catalysts has also been revealed for automotive exhaust gas abatement. Results demonstrate that various copper species can be formed depending on the precursor–support interaction, affecting selectivity and conversion during the catalytic reaction.

  8. Syntheses, structures, molecular and cationic recognitions and catalytic properties of two lanthanide coordination polymers based on a flexible tricarboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yan-Mei; Xu, Ji; Liu, Pan; Weththasinha, H.A.B.M.D.; Wu, Yun-Long; Lu, Xiao-Qing; Xie, Ji-Min, E-mail: xiejm391@sohu.com

    2014-11-15

    Two lanthanide coordination polymers, namely, ([La(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (La-TTTA) and [Nd(TTTA)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·2H{sub 2}O){sub n} (Nd-TTTA) have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of lanthanide ions (La{sup 3+} and Nd{sup 3+}) with the flexible tripodal ligand 2,2′,2″-[1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyltris(thio)]tris-acetic acid (H{sub 3}TTTA). La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA are isostructural and both show three dimensional structures. La-TTTA and Nd-TTTA show good recognition of amine molecules via quenching the luminescent intensities in amines emulsions. They can also recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions with the quenching the peak around 361 nm when the compounds immersed in ionic solutions. The two compounds act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation of benzaldehyde and derivatives in high yields shortly due to the strong Lewis acidity and the possible open sites of the lanthanide ions. - Graphical abstract: We have synthesized two isostructural 3D compounds based on H{sub 3}TTTA. They are chemical sensor of amine solvents and cations. They have higher yields and TOFs to catalyze cyanosilylation reactions. - Highlights: • The compounds show recognition of amine molecules via quenching luminescent intensities. • The compounds recognize Fe{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+} and Co{sup 2+} ions via quenching the peak around 361 nm. • They act as efficient Lewis acid catalysts for the cyanosilylation reactions in high yields.

  9. Proteome-wide analysis of arginine monomethylation reveals widespread occurrence in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sara C; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Mund, Andreas; Lyon, David; Mullari, Meeli; Madsen, Maria V; Daniel, Jeremy A; Jensen, Lars J; Nielsen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    The posttranslational modification of proteins by arginine methylation is functionally important, yet the breadth of this modification is not well characterized. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified 8030 arginine methylation sites within 3300 human proteins in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, indicating that the occurrence of this modification is comparable to phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. A site-level conservation analysis revealed that arginine methylation sites are less evolutionarily conserved compared to arginines that were not identified as modified by methylation. Through quantitative proteomics and RNA interference to examine arginine methylation stoichiometry, we unexpectedly found that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) family of arginine methyltransferases catalyzed methylation independently of arginine sequence context. In contrast to the frequency of somatic mutations at arginine methylation sites throughout the proteome, we observed that somatic mutations were common at arginine methylation sites in proteins involved in mRNA splicing. Furthermore, in HeLa and U2OS cells, we found that distinct arginine methyltransferases differentially regulated the functions of the pre-mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 (serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2) and the RNA transport ribonucleoprotein HNRNPUL1 (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U-like 1). Knocking down PRMT5 impaired the RNA binding function of SRSF2, whereas knocking down PRMT4 [also known as coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1)] or PRMT1 increased the RNA binding function of HNRNPUL1. High-content single-cell imaging additionally revealed that knocking down CARM1 promoted the nuclear accumulation of SRSF2, independent of cell cycle phase. Collectively, the presented human arginine methylome provides a missing piece in the global and integrative view of cellular physiology and protein regulation. PMID:27577262

  10. Restoration of impaired nitric oxide production in MELAS syndrome with citrulline and arginine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Hsu, Jean W; Emrick, Lisa T; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Craigen, William J; Jahoor, Farook; Scaglia, Fernando

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is one of the most common mitochondrial disorders. Although the pathogenesis of stroke-like episodes remains unclear, it has been suggested that mitochondrial proliferation may result in endothelial dysfunction and decreased nitric oxide (NO) availability leading to cerebral ischemic events. This study aimed to assess NO production in subjects with MELAS syndrome and the effect of the NO precursors arginine and citrulline. Using stable isotope infusion techniques, we assessed arginine, citrulline, and NO metabolism in control subjects and subjects with MELAS syndrome before and after arginine or citrulline supplementation. The results showed that subjects with MELAS had lower NO synthesis rate associated with reduced citrulline flux, de novo arginine synthesis rate, and plasma arginine and citrulline concentrations, and higher plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentration and arginine clearance. We conclude that the observed impaired NO production is due to multiple factors including elevated ADMA, higher arginine clearance, and, most importantly, decreased de novo arginine synthesis secondary to decreased citrulline availability. Arginine and, to a greater extent, citrulline supplementation increased the de novo arginine synthesis rate, the plasma concentrations and flux of arginine and citrulline, and NO production. De novo arginine synthesis increased markedly with citrulline supplementation, explaining the superior efficacy of citrulline in increasing NO production. The improvement in NO production with arginine or citrulline supplementation supports their use in MELAS and suggests that citrulline may have a better therapeutic effect than arginine. These findings can have a broader relevance for other disorders marked by perturbations in NO metabolism.

  11. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  12. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  13. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  14. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  15. Gliclazide directly inhibits arginine-induced glucagon release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cejvan, Kenan; Coy, David H; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2002-01-01

    Arginine-stimulated insulin and somatostatin release is enhanced by the sulfonylurea gliclazide. In contrast, gliclazide inhibits the glucagon response. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether this inhibition of glucagon release was mediated by a direct suppressive effect of...... specific antagonist of type 2 somatostatin receptor, DC-41-33 (2 micro mol/l), which fully antagonizes the suppressive somatostatin effect on rat A cells. Gliclazide (30 micro mol/l) inhibited glucagon release by 54% in the perfusion experiments, whereas the somatostatin response was nearly abolished. In...... islet perifusions with DC-41-33, arginine-induced glucagon release was inhibited by 66%. We therefore concluded that gliclazide inhibits glucagon release by a direct action on the pancreatic A cell....

  16. Molybdenum(VI) network polymers based on anion-π interaction and hydrogen bonding: Synthesis, crystal structures and oxidation catalytic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Wang, Ge; Shi, Zhan; Yang, Mu; Luck, Rudy L.

    2009-11-01

    A crystallographic investigation of anion-π interactions and hydrogen bonds on the preferred structural motifs of molybdenum(VI) complexes has been carried out. Two molybdenum(VI) network polymers MoO 2F 4·(Hinca) 2 ( 1) and MoO 2F 3(H 2O)·(Hinpa) ( 2), where inca = isonicotinamide and inpa = isonipecotamide, have been synthesized, crystallographically characterized and successfully applied to alcohol oxidation reaction. Complex 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic space C2/ c: a = 16.832(3) Å, b = 8.8189(15) Å, c = 12.568(2) Å, β = 118.929(3)°, V = 1560.1(5) Å 3, Z = 4. Complex 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space P-1: a = 5.459(2) Å, b = 9.189(4) Å, c = 12.204(5) Å, α = 71.341(6)°, β = 81.712(7)°, γ = 77.705(7)°, V = 564.8(4) Å 3, Z = 2. Complex 1 consists of hydrogen bonding and anion-π interactions, both of which are considered as important factors for controlling the geometric features and packing characteristics of the crystal structure. The geometry of the sandwich complex of [MoO 2F 4] 2- with two pyridine rings indicates that the anion-π interaction is an additive and provides a base for the design and synthesis of new complexes. For complex 2, the anions and the protonated inpa ligands form a 2D supramolecular network by four different types of hydrogen contacts (N-H⋯F, N-H⋯O, O-H⋯F and O-H⋯O). The catalytic ability of complexes 1 and 2 has also been evaluated by applying them to the oxidation of benzyl alcohol with TBHP as oxidant.

  17. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P.; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K.; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-01-01

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields. PMID:27657143

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Sulfonated Carbon-Based Catalysts Derived From Rubber Tree Leaves and Pulp and Paper Mill Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Sinin, E.; Hiew, S. F.; Kong, A. M. T.; Lahin, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Sulfonated carbon-based catalysts derived from rubber tree leaves, and pulp and paper mill waste were synthesized and characterized. Three types of catalyst synthesized were sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL), pyrolysed sludge char (P-SC) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC). Sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC) were prepared through pyrolysis followed by functionalization via sulfonation process whereas, P- SC was only pyrolyzed without sulfonation. The characterization results indicated sulfonic acids, hydroxyl, and carboxyl moieties were detected in S-RTL and S-SC, but no sulfonic acid was detected in P-SC. Total acidity test showed S-RTL had the highest value followed by S-SC and P-SC. The thermal stability of S-RTL and S-SC were up to 230oC as the loss was associated with the decomposition of sulfonic acid group, whereas, P-SC showed higher stability than the S-RTL and S-SC. Morphology analysis showed that S-RTL consisted of an amorphous carbon structure, and a crystalline structure for P-SC and S-SC. Furthermore, traces of metal components were also detected on all of the catalysts. The catalyst catalytic activity was tested through esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The results showed that the reaction using S-RTL catalyst produced the highest conversion (99.9%) followed by P-SC (88.4%) and lastly S-SC (82.7%). The synthesized catalysts showed high potential to be used in biodiesel production.

  19. An oxyferrous heme/protein-based radical intermediate is catalytically competent in the catalase reaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase (KatG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Javier; Ranguelova, Kalina; Jarzecki, Andrzej A; Manzerova, Julia; Krymov, Vladimir; Zhao, Xiangbo; Yu, Shengwei; Metlitsky, Leonid; Gerfen, Gary J; Magliozzo, Richard S

    2009-03-13

    A mechanism accounting for the robust catalase activity in catalase-peroxidases (KatG) presents a new challenge in heme protein enzymology. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, KatG is the sole catalase and is also responsible for peroxidative activation of isoniazid, an anti-tuberculosis pro-drug. Here, optical stopped-flow spectrophotometry, rapid freeze-quench EPR spectroscopy both at the X-band and at the D-band, and mutagenesis are used to identify catalase reaction intermediates in M. tuberculosis KatG. In the presence of millimolar H2O2 at neutral pH, oxyferrous heme is formed within milliseconds from ferric (resting) KatG, whereas at pH 8.5, low spin ferric heme is formed. Using rapid freeze-quench EPR at X-band under both of these conditions, a narrow doublet radical signal with an 11 G principal hyperfine splitting was detected within the first milliseconds of turnover. The radical and the unique heme intermediates persist in wild-type KatG only during the time course of turnover of excess H2O2 (1000-fold or more). Mutation of Met255, Tyr229, or Trp107, which have covalently linked side chains in a unique distal side adduct (MYW) in wild-type KatG, abolishes this radical and the catalase activity. The D-band EPR spectrum of the radical exhibits a rhombic g tensor with dual gx values (2.00550 and 2.00606) and unique gy (2.00344) and gz values (2.00186) similar to but not typical of native tyrosyl radicals. Density functional theory calculations based on a model of an MYW adduct radical built from x-ray coordinates predict experimentally observed hyperfine interactions and a shift in g values away from the native tyrosyl radical. A catalytic role for an MYW adduct radical in the catalase mechanism of KatG is proposed.

  20. Arginine vasopressin in septic shock: supplement or substitute for norepinephrine?

    OpenAIRE

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2009-01-01

    In the current issue of Critical Care, Simon and coworkers investigated the effects of first-line arginine vasopressin (AVP) on organ function and systemic metabolism compared with norepinephrine in a pig model of fecal peritonitis. AVP was titrated according to the mean arterial pressure suggesting a vasopressor rather than a hormone replacement therapy. The study provides some evidence for the safety of this therapeutic approach. It needs to be determined whether AVP is most beneficial as a...

  1. PRMT1-mediated arginine methylation controls ATXN2L localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaehler, Christian; Guenther, Anika; Uhlich, Anja; Krobitsch, Sylvia, E-mail: krobitsc@molgen.mpg.de

    2015-05-15

    Arginine methylation is a posttranslational modification that is of importance in diverse cellular processes. Recent proteomic mass spectrometry studies reported arginine methylation of ataxin-2-like (ATXN2L), the paralog of ataxin-2, a protein that is implicated in the neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. Here, we investigated the methylation state of ATXN2L and its significance for ATXN2L localization. We first confirmed that ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo, and observed that the nuclear localization of ATXN2L is altered under methylation inhibition. We further discovered that ATXN2L associates with the protein arginine-N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1). Finally, we showed that neither mutation of the arginine–glycine-rich motifs of ATXN2L nor methylation inhibition alters ATXN2L localization to stress granules, suggesting that methylation of ATXN2L is probably not mandatory. - Highlights: • ATXN2L is asymmetrically dimethylated in vivo. • ATXN2L interacts with PRMT1 under normal and stress conditions. • PRMT1-mediated dimethylation of ATXN2L controls its nuclear localization. • ATXN2L localization to stress granules appears independent of its methylation state.

  2. Different effects of L-arginine on morphine tolerance in sham and ovariectomized female mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reza KARAMI; Mahmoud HOSSEINI; Fatimeh KHODABANDEHLOO; Leila KHATAMI; Zahra TAIARANI

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The roles of gonadal hormones and nitric oxide (NO) on the analgesic effects of morphine,tolerance to morphine,and their interactions have been widely investigated.In the present study,the effect of L-arginine (an NO precursor) on morphine tolerance in sham and ovariectomized (OVX) female mice was investigated.Methods: Forty mice were divided into sham and OVX groups.On the first day,a hot plate test ((55±0.2) ℃; cut-off 30 s)was carried out as a base record 15 min before injection of morphine (10 mg/kg,subcutaneously (s.c.)) and was repeated every 15 min after injection.The sham group was then divided into two subgroups: sham-toleranceL-arginine (Sham-ToI-LA) and sham-tolerance-saline (Sham-ToI-Sal) which received either L-arginine 50 mg/kg (intraperitoneally (i.p.)) or saline 10 mi/kg (i.p.),respectively,three times in a day for three consecutive days.Morphine tolerance was induced in animals by injecting 30 mg/kg morphine (s.c.) three times/day for three days.This treatment was also used for OVX subgroups.On the fifth day,the hot plate test was repeated.The analgesic effect of morphine was calculated as the maximal percent effect (MPE).The results were compared using repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA).Results: There was no significant difference in MPE between the OVX and sham groups.The MPEs in both the Sham-ToI-Sal and OVX-ToI-Sal groups were lower than those in both the sham and OVX groups (P<0.01).The MPE in the OVX-ToI-Sal group was greater than that in the Sham-ToI-Sal group (P<0.01).The MPE in the Sham-ToI-LA group was higher than that in the Sham-ToI-Sal group (P<0.01).However,there was no significant difference between the Sham-ToI-LA and sham groups or between the OVX-ToI-LA and OVX-ToI-Sal groups.Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that repeated administration of morphine causes tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine.L-Arginine could prevent tolerance to morphine but its effect was different in

  3. Effects of L-Arginine on Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Pork Sausage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunliu Zhou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of L-arginine on physicochemical and sensory properties of pork sausage. CL decreased while pH increased with L-arginine levels (p<0.05. WHC increased at 0.8% L-arginine, but decreased at 0.2% L-arginine, compared with the control. L* decreased while a* increased at 0.4-0.8% L-arginine, compared with the control. Hardness, springiness and chewiness increased at 0.2-0.8% L-arginine (p<0.05, compared with the control. SEM illustrated that the addition of 0.6% L-arginine induced myofibrillar proteins to form a more smooth, compact and uniform gel matrix. DSC disclosed that the addition of 0.6% L-arginine increased the two thermal transition temperatures (Tp. The sample containing 0.6% L-arginine had higher sensory color, flavor, mouthfeel and slice traits than the control. Therefore, L-arginine showed a potential for improvement of yield, texture and sensory qualities of pork sausage.

  4. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L(-1) L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g(-1) glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  5. Systems pathway engineering of Corynebacterium crenatum for improved L-arginine production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Zaiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Rao, Zhiming; Guo, Jing; Yang, Taowei; Zhang, Xian; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    L-arginine is an important amino acid in food and pharmaceutical industries. Until now, the main production method of L-arginine in China is the highly polluting keratin acid hydrolysis. The industrial level L-arginine production by microbial fermentation has become an important task. In previous work, we obtained a new L-arginine producing Corynebacterium crenatum (subspecies of Corynebacterium glutamicum) through screening and mutation breeding. In this work, we performed systems pathway engineering of C. crenatum for improved L-arginine production, involving amplification of L-arginine biosynthetic pathway flux by removal of feedback inhibition and overexpression of arginine operon; optimization of NADPH supply by modulation of metabolic flux distribution between glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; increasing glucose consumption by strengthening the preexisting glucose transporter and exploitation of new glucose uptake system; channeling excess carbon flux from glycolysis into tricarboxylic acid cycle to alleviate the glucose overflow metabolism; redistribution of carbon flux at α-ketoglutarate metabolic node to channel more flux into L-arginine biosynthetic pathway; minimization of carbon and cofactor loss by attenuation of byproducts formation. The final strain could produce 87.3 g L−1 L-arginine with yield up to 0.431 g L-arginine g−1 glucose in fed-batch fermentation. PMID:27338253

  6. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  7. A catalytic cracking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, T.F.; Helton, T.E.

    1995-07-20

    Heavy oils are subjected to catalytic cracking in the absence of added hydrogen using a catalyst containing a zeolite having the structure of ZSM-12 and a large-pore crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index less than about 1. The process is able to effect a bulk conversion of the oil at the same time yielding a higher octane gasoline and increased light olefin content. (author)

  8. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  9. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Goldman-Pinkovich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3, as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade.

  10. An Arginine Deprivation Response Pathway Is Induced in Leishmania during Macrophage Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman-Pinkovich, Adele; Balno, Caitlin; Strasser, Rona; Zeituni-Molad, Michal; Bendelak, Keren; Rentsch, Doris; Ephros, Moshe; Wiese, Martin; Jardim, Armando; Myler, Peter J; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Amino acid sensing is an intracellular function that supports nutrient homeostasis, largely through controlled release of amino acids from lysosomal pools. The intracellular pathogen Leishmania resides and proliferates within human macrophage phagolysosomes. Here we describe a new pathway in Leishmania that specifically senses the extracellular levels of arginine, an amino acid that is essential for the parasite. During infection, the macrophage arginine pool is depleted due to its use to produce metabolites (NO and polyamines) that constitute part of the host defense response and its suppression, respectively. We found that parasites respond to this shortage of arginine by up-regulating expression and activity of the Leishmania arginine transporter (LdAAP3), as well as several other transporters. Our analysis indicates the parasite monitors arginine levels in the environment rather than the intracellular pools. Phosphoproteomics and genetic analysis indicates that the arginine-deprivation response is mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase-2-dependent signaling cascade. PMID:27043018

  11. Oral L-Arginine Stimulates GLP-1 Secretion to Improve Glucose Tolerance in Male Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Christoffer; Smajilovic, Sanela; Smith, Eric P;

    2013-01-01

    -induced obesity, may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. Importantly, recent evidence suggests the amino acid l-arginine, a well-known insulin secretagogue, can also stimulate release of GLP-1 from isolated rat intestine. Here we tested the hypothesis that oral l-arginine acts as a GLP-1 secretagogue...... in vivo, to augment postprandial insulin secretion and improve glucose tolerance. To test this, we administered l-arginine or vehicle by oral gavage, immediately prior to an oral glucose tolerance test in lean and diet-induced obese mice. In both lean and obese mice oral l-arginine increased plasma GLP-1...... and insulin and substantially improved glucose clearance. To directly assess the contribution of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R)-signaling to these improvements, l-arginine was given to Glp1r knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. In this experiment oral l-arginine significantly augmented insulin secretion...

  12. Top-dressing 1% arginine supplementation in the lactation diet of sows does not affect the litter performance and milk composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djane Dallanora

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The study aimed to evaluate the effects of arginine supplementation in the lactation diet of sows on their milk composition, litter performance and piglet survival. Sixty-four lactating Landrace x Large White sows, parity 1 to 7, were randomly assigned to two treatments: 1 Control - a corn/soybean meal based diet with 1.10% standardized ileal digestible (SID lysine and 3,475kcal of metabolizable energy (ME kg-1, and 2 arginine - the control diet top-dressed daily with arginine at 1% of feed allowance. The daily feed allowance per sow was 5.0 and 7.5kg from day (D0 to D7 and D8 to D21, respectively. The average litter size was 12.8 piglets after cross-fostering. Litters were weighed on D1, D10, and D21 of lactation and pre-weaning mortality was recorded. Samples of milk (60mL were collected from all functional teats at D10 and D20 of lactation. There were no effects (P>0.05 of arginine supplementation on piglet weight, litter weight, and average daily gain of piglets at D10 and D21 of lactation. The interaction between weight day and treatment was not significant (P>0.05 for any of these response variables. The percentages of piglets that survived until D10 and D21 were 90.3% and 88.3%, respectively, with no difference (P>0.05 between treatments. There were no effects (P>0.05 of the lactation day (D10 or D20, treatment or the interaction between them on crude protein and amino acid content in milk. Top-dressing arginine at 1% of feed allowance of the lactation diet of sows does not affect litter performance and survival and does not influence the amino acid content or arginine: lysine ratio of milk.

  13. Remission of diabetes mellitus in cats cannot be predicted by the arginine stimulation test

    OpenAIRE

    Tschuor, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: Responsiveness of β-cells to arginine persists the longest during diabetes progression, making the intravenous arginine stimulation test (IVAST) a useful tool to assess residual insulin and glucagon secretion. Hypothesis: Diabetic cats with and without remission will have different arginine-induced insulin or glucagon response. Animals: 17 cats with diabetes, 7 healthy cats. Methods: Response to IVAST was assessed by calculating insulin and glucagon area under the c...

  14. Arginine synthesis from enteral glutamine in healthy adults in the fed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Chris; Rafii, Mahroukh; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have documented transfer of labeled nitrogen from [2-(15)N]glutamine to citrulline and arginine in fasting human adults. Conversely, in neonates and piglets we have shown no synthesis of arginine from [2-(15)N]glutamate, and others have shown in mice that glutamine is a nitrogen, but not a carbon donor, for arginine synthesis. Therefore, we performed a multitracer study to determine whether glutamine is a nitrogen and/or carbon donor for arginine in healthy adult men. Two glutamine tracers, 2-(15)N and 1-(13)C, were given enterally to five healthy men fed a standardized milkshake diet. There was no difference in plasma enrichments between the two glutamine tracers. 1-(13)C isotopomers of citrulline and arginine were synthesized from [1-(13)C]glutamine. Three isotopomers each of citrulline and arginine were synthesized from the [2-(15)N]glutamine tracer: 2-(15)N, 5-(15)N, and 2,5-(15)N(2). Significantly greater enrichment was found of both [5-(15)N]arginine (0.75%) and citrulline (3.98%) compared with [2-(15)N]arginine (0.44%) and [2-(15)N]citrulline (2.62%), indicating the amino NH(2) from glutamine is mostly transferred to arginine and citrulline by transamination. Similarly, the enrichment of the 1-(13)C isotopomers was significantly less than the 2-(15)N isotopomers, suggesting rapid formation of α-ketoglutarate and recycling of the nitrogen label. Our results show that the carbon for 50% of newly synthesized arginine comes from dietary glutamine but that glutamine acts primarily as a nitrogen donor for arginine synthesis. Hence, studies using [2-(15)N]glutamine will overestimate arginine synthesis rates.

  15. Hyponatraemia in the first week of life in preterm infants. Part I. Arginine vasopressin secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, L; Brook, C G; Shaw, J C; Forsling, M L

    1984-01-01

    Continuous sequential urinary arginine vasopressin measurements in 14 preterm, ventilated infants suggest that both osmoreceptor and volume receptor systems are able to stimulate the prolonged secretion of arginine vasopressin from 26 weeks' gestation. The kidney is able to respond to arginine vasopressin stimulation from the first day of life and from 26 weeks' gestation. A maximum urine osmolality not exceeding 550 mOsm/kg was reached which varied with hydration of the infant. Excretion of ...

  16. Vasodilator effects of L-arginine are stereospecific and augmented by insulin in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Susanne; Sieder, Anna; Strametz, Jeanette; Bayerle-Eder, Michaela; Wolzt, Michael; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-06-01

    The amino acid l-arginine, the precursor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, induces vasodilation in vivo, but the mechanism behind this effect is unclear. There is, however, some evidence to assume that the l-arginine membrane transport capacity is dependent on insulin plasma levels. We hypothesized that vasodilator effects of l-arginine may be dependent on insulin plasma levels. Accordingly, we performed two randomized, double-blind crossover studies in healthy male subjects. In protocol 1 (n = 15), subjects received an infusion of insulin (6 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1) for 120 min) or placebo and, during the last 30 min, l-arginine or d-arginine (1 g/min for 30 min) x In protocol 2 (n = 8), subjects received l-arginine in stepwise increasing doses in the presence (1.5 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) or absence of insulin. Renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate were assessed by the para-aminohippurate and inulin plasma clearance methods, respectively. Pulsatile choroidal blood flow was assessed with laser interferometric measurement of fundus pulsation, and mean flow velocity in the ophthalmic artery was measured with Doppler sonography. l-arginine, but not d-arginine, significantly increased renal and ocular hemodynamic parameters. Coinfusion of l-arginine with insulin caused a dose-dependent leftward shift of the vasodilator effect of l-arginine. This stereospecific renal and ocular vasodilator potency of l-arginine is enhanced by insulin, which may result from facilitated l-arginine membrane transport, enhanced intracellular NO formation, or increased NO bioavailability.

  17. Protective Effect of Arginine on Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Sickle Mouse Models

    OpenAIRE

    Dasgupta, Trisha; Hebbel, Robert P.; Kaul, Dhananjay K.

    2006-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is characterized by reperfusion injury and chronic oxidative stress. Oxidative stress and hemolysis in SCD result in inactivation of nitric oxide (NO) and depleted arginine levels. We hypothesized that augmenting NO production by arginine supplementation will reduce oxidative stress in SCD. To this end, we measured the effect of arginine (5% in mouse chow) on NO metabolites (NOx), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and selected antioxidants in transgenic sickle mouse models. U...

  18. Hybrid membrane with TiO2 based bio-catalytic nanoparticle suspension system for the degradation of bisphenol-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingwei; Dong, Guangxi; Luu, Belinda; Sengpiel, Robert G; Ye, Yun; Wessling, Matthias; Chen, Vicki

    2014-10-01

    The removal of micropollutant in wastewater treatment has become a key environmental challenge for many industrialized countries. One approach is to use enzymes such as laccase for the degradation of micropollutants such as bisphenol-A. In this work, laccase was covalently immobilized on APTES modified TiO2 nanoparticles, and the effects of particle modification on the bio-catalytic performance were examined and optimized. These bio-catalytic particles were then suspended in a hybrid membrane reactor for BPA removal with good BPA degradation efficiency observed. Substantial improvement in laccase stability was achieved in the hybrid system compared with free laccase under simulated harsh industrial wastewater treatment conditions (such as a wide range of pH and presence of inhibitors). Kinetic study provided insight of the effect of immobilization on the bio-degradation reaction. PMID:25084046

  19. Nonaqueous catalytic fluorometric trace determination of vanadium based on the pyronine B-hydrogen peroxide reaction and flow injection after cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleologos, E K; Koupparis, M A; Karayannis, M I; Veltsistas, P G

    2001-09-15

    The catalytic effect of vanadium on the pyronine B-H2O2 system is examined. Enhancement of the catalytic reaction rate along with the efficiency and selectivity against vanadium is achieved in a formic acid environment in the presence of a nonionic surfactant (Triton X-114). Elimination of drastic interference caused by inorganic acids and aqueous matrix along with a 50-fold preconcentration of vanadium are facilitated through cloud point extraction of its neutral complex with 8-quinolinol in an acidic solution. Subsequent flow injection analysis (FIA) with fluorometric detection renders the proposed method ideal for selective and cost-effective determination of as little as 0.020 microng L(-1) vanadium in environmental, biological, and food substrates. The preconcentration step can be applied simultaneously to multiple samples, allowing for massive preparation prior to analysis, compensating, thus, for the time-consuming procedure.

  20. Automobile air pollution: control equipment--catalytic converters. Volume 2. 1977-January, 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for 1977-Jan 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    The citations of worldwide engineering literature cover automotive catalytic converters. Included are such topics as converter design and materials, performance tests, effectiveness in pollutant reduction, catalyst poisoning, catalyst selection, chemistry involved in the emission control, and the overall feasibility of using these converters under normal driving conditions. Control of sulfuric acid and sulfate emissions is also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 142 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  1. Session 6: Novel catalytic converter with low light off temperature based on LaNiO{sub 3} perovskite synthesized from Raney Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamedmonfared, A.A.; Khodadadi, A.A.; Mortazavi, Y. [Tehran, Univ., Catalysis and Reaction Eng. Lab., Chemical Eng. Dept.(Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tousi, F. [Tehran, Univ., Dept. of chemistry, Faculty of Science (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In the present investigation we use Raney nickel catalyst to prepare LaNiO{sub 3} perovskite with and without the use of citric acid. The performance of these catalysts was compared with other types of LaNiO{sub 3} made by conventional preparation methods, in which nitrate solutions of nickel and lanthanum are used. The catalytic activities of the catalysts were studied by using a simulated exhaust gas, containing carbon monoxide and ethane. (authors)

  2. Expression and Characterization of ArgR, An Arginine Regulatory Protein in Corynebacterium crenatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue Lan; ZHANG Bin; TANG Li; JIAO Hai Tao; XU Heng Yi; XU Feng; XU Hong; WEI Hua; XIONG Yong Hua

    2014-01-01

    Objective Corynebacterium crenatum MT, a mutant from C. crenatum AS 1.542 with a lethal argR gene, exhibits high arginine production. To confirm the effect of ArgR on arginine biosynthesis in C. crenatum, an intact argR gene from wild-type AS 1.542 was introduced into C. crenatum MT, resulting in C. crenatum MT. sp, and the changes of transcriptional levels of the arginine biosynthetic genes and arginine production were compared between the mutant strain and the recombinant strain. Methods Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was employed to analyze the changes of the related genes at the transcriptional level, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to determine ArgR binding with the argCJBDF, argGH, and carAB promoter regions, and arginine production was determined with an automated amino acid analyzer. Results Arginine production assays showed a 69.9%reduction in arginine from 9.01±0.22 mg/mL in C. crenatum MT to 2.71±0.13 mg/mL (P Conclusion The arginine biosynthetic genes in C. crenatum are clearly controlled by the negative regulator ArgR, and intact ArgR in C. crenatum MT results in a significant descrease in arginine production.

  3. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  4. Proteomic analysis of arginine methylation sites in human cells reveals dynamic regulation during transcriptional arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvestersen, Kathrine B; Horn, Heiko; Jungmichel, Stephanie;

    2014-01-01

    The covalent attachment of methyl groups to the side-chain of arginine residues is known to play essential roles in regulation of transcription, protein function and RNA metabolism. The specific N-methylation of arginine residues is catalyzed by a small family of gene products known as protein......, transcription, and chromatin remodeling are predominantly found modified with MMA. Despite this, MMA sites prominently are located outside RNA-binding domains as compared to the proteome-wide distribution of arginine residues. Quantification of arginine methylation in cells treated with Actinomycin D uncovers...

  5. Bioinformatic evaluation of L-arginine catabolic pathways in 24 cyanobacteria and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding enzymes of L-arginine catabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pistorius Elfriede K

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far very limited knowledge exists on L-arginine catabolism in cyanobacteria, although six major L-arginine-degrading pathways have been described for prokaryotes. Thus, we have performed a bioinformatic analysis of possible L-arginine-degrading pathways in cyanobacteria. Further, we chose Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for a more detailed bioinformatic analysis and for validation of the bioinformatic predictions on L-arginine catabolism with a transcript analysis. Results We have evaluated 24 cyanobacterial genomes of freshwater or marine strains for the presence of putative L-arginine-degrading enzymes. We identified an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway in all 24 strains. In addition, cyanobacteria have one or two further pathways representing either an arginase pathway or L-arginine deiminase pathway or an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. An L-arginine amidinotransferase pathway as a major L-arginine-degrading pathway is not likely but can not be entirely excluded. A rather unusual finding was that the cyanobacterial L-arginine deiminases are substantially larger than the enzymes in non-photosynthetic bacteria and that they are membrane-bound. A more detailed bioinformatic analysis of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 revealed that three different L-arginine-degrading pathways may in principle be functional in this cyanobacterium. These are (i an L-arginine decarboxylase pathway, (ii an L-arginine deiminase pathway, and (iii an L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase pathway. A transcript analysis of cells grown either with nitrate or L-arginine as sole N-source and with an illumination of 50 μmol photons m-2 s-1 showed that the transcripts for the first enzyme(s of all three pathways were present, but that the transcript levels for the L-arginine deiminase and the L-arginine oxidase/dehydrogenase were substantially higher than that of the three isoenzymes of L-arginine decarboxylase. Conclusion The evaluation of 24

  6. NO synthesis from arginine is favored by α-linolenic acid in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, Dominique; Guelzim, Najoua; Martin, Pascal G P; Huneau, Jean-François; Mathé, Véronique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie; Lasserre, Frédéric; Mariotti, François

    2016-09-01

    Alterations in NO availability and signaling play a pivotal role at early stages of the metabolic syndrome (MetSynd). We hypothesized that dietary α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3 n-3) favors NO availability by modulating amino acid metabolism, with a specific impact on the arginine-NO pathway. Mice were fed a hyperlipidic diet (285 g lipid/kg, 51.1 % energy), rich in either saturated fatty acids (SFA, provided by palm oil, PALM group) or ALA (provided by linseed oil, LIN group). We measured whole-body NO synthesis and systemic arginine hydrolysis with a tracer-based method, plasma concentration of related metabolites, and hepatic mRNA level of related enzymes, and the study was completed by a transcriptomic analysis in the liver. As expected with this model, hyperlipidic diets resulted in increased adiposity and glycemia after 5 weeks. As compared to PALM mice, LIN mice had a higher plasma nitrite and nitrate concentration, a higher whole-body conversion of arginine into NO vs urea, and a similar plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), despite a higher expression of the liver dimethylargininase-1. In LIN mice, there was a higher expression of genes involved in PPARα signaling, but a little impact on gene expression related to amino acids and arginine metabolism. This effect cannot be directly ascribed to changes in arginase activity in the liver or ADMA metabolism, nor to direct regulation of the related target genes. In conclusion, dietary ALA favors NO synthesis, which could contribute to rescue NO availability when jeopardized by the nutritional conditions in relation with the initiation of the MetSynd. PMID:27178023

  7. Different roles of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans in controlling gene delivery by arginine-rich peptides with varied distribution of arginines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rangeetha J; Chatterjee, Anindo; Ganguli, Munia

    2013-06-01

    The role of cell surface and exogenous glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in DNA delivery by cationic peptides is controlled to a large extent by the peptide chemistry and the nature of its complex with DNA. We have previously shown that complexes formed by arginine homopeptides with DNA adopt a GAG-independent cellular internalization mechanism and show enhanced gene delivery in presence of exogenous GAGs. In contrast, lysine complexes gain cellular entry primarily by a GAG-dependent pathway and are destabilized by exogenous GAGs. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the factors governing the role of cell surface and soluble glycosaminoglycans in DNA delivery by sequences of arginine-rich peptides with altered arginine distributions (compared to homopeptide). Using peptides with clustered arginines which constitute known heparin-binding motifs and a control peptide with arginines alternating with alanines, we show that complexes formed by these peptides do not require cell surface GAGs for cellular uptake and DNA delivery. However, the charge distribution and the spacing of arginine residues affects DNA delivery efficiency of these peptides in presence of soluble GAGs, since these peptides show only a marginal increase in transfection in presence of exogenous GAGs unlike that observed with arginine homopeptides. Our results indicate that presence of arginine by itself drives these peptides to a cell surface GAG-independent route of entry to efficiently deliver functional DNA into cells in vitro. However, the inherent stability of the complexes differ when the distribution of arginines in the peptides is altered, thereby modulating its interaction with exogenous GAGs.

  8. Intravenous Selenium Modulates L-Arginine-Induced Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Hardman

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Oxidative stress is understood to have a critical role in the development of acinar injury in experimental acute pancreatitis. We have previously demonstrated that compound multiple antioxidant therapy ameliorates end-organ damage in the intra-peritoneal L-arginine rat model. As the principal co-factor for glutathione, selenium is a key constituent of multiple antioxidant preparations. Objective The intention of this study was to investigate the effect of selenium on pancreatic and remote organ injury in a wellvalidated experimental model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to one of 3 groups (n=5/group and sacrificed at 72 hours. Acute pancreatitis was induced by 250 mg per 100 g body weight of 20% L-arginine hydrochloride in 0.15 mol/L sodium chloride. Group allocations were: Group 1, control; Group 2, acute pancreatitis; Group 3, selenium. Main outcome measures Serum amylase, anti-oxidant levels, bronchoalveolar lavage protein, lung myeloperoxidase activity, and histological assessment of pancreatic injury. Results L-arginine induced acute pancreatitis characterised by oedema, neutrophil infiltration, acinar cell degranulation and elevated serum amylase. Selenium treatment was associated with reduced pancreatic oedema and inflammatory cell infiltration. Acinar degranulation and dilatation were completely absent. A reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage protein content was also demonstrated. Conclusion Intravenous selenium given 24 hours after induction of experimental acute pancreatitis was associated with a reduction in the histological stigmata of pancreatic injury and a dramatic reduction in broncho-alveolar lavage protein content. Serum selenium fell during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis and this effect was not reversed by exogenous selenium supplementation.

  9. Detection of a novel arginine vasopression defect by dideoxy fingerprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamani, M.R.S.; Phillips, J.A. III; Copeland, K.C. (Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States) Univ. of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is a familial form of diabetes insipidus. This disorder is associated with variable levels of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and diabetes insipidus of varying severity, which responds to exogenous AVP. To determine the molecular basis of autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, the AVP genes of members of a large kindred were analyzed. A new method, called dideoxy fingerprinting, was used to detect an AVP mutation that was characterized by DNA sequencing. The novel defect found changes the last codon of the AVP signal peptide from alanine to threonine, which should perturb cleavage of mature AVP from its precursor protein and inhibit its secretion or action. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  10. The subcellular compartmentalization of arginine metabolizing enzymes and their role in endothelial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng eChen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO mediates endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and restrains vascular inflammation, smooth muscle proliferation and platelet aggregation. Impaired production of NO is a hallmark of endothelial dysfunction and promotes the development of cardiovascular disease. In endothelial cells, NO is generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS through the conversion of its substrate, L-arginine to L-citrulline. Reduced access to L-arginine has been proposed as a major mechanism underlying reduced eNOS activity and NO production in cardiovascular disease. The arginases (Arg1 and Arg2 metabolize L-arginine to generate L-ornithine and urea and increased expression of arginase has been proposed as a mechanism of reduced eNOS activity secondary to the depletion of L-arginine. Indeed, supplemental L-arginine and suppression of arginase activity has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent relaxation and ameliorate cardiovascular disease. However, L-arginine concentrations in endothelial cells remain sufficiently high to support NO synthesis suggesting additional mechanisms. The compartmentalization of intracellular L-arginine into poorly interchangeable pools has been proposed to allow for the local depletion of L-arginine. Indeed the subcellular location of L-arginine metabolizing enzymes plays important functional roles. In endothelial cells, eNOS is found in discrete intracellular locations and the capacity to generate NO is heavily influenced by its localtion. Arg1 and Arg2 also reside in different subcellular environments and are thought to differentially influence endothelial function. The plasma membrane solute transporter, CAT-1 and the arginine recycling enzyme, ASL, co-localize with eNOS and facilitate NO release. This review highlights the importance of the subcellular location of eNOS and arginine transporting and metabolizing enzymes to NO release and cardiovascular disease.

  11. Oral L-arginine supplementation impacts several reproductive parameters during the postpartum period in mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dale E; Warren, Lori K; Mortensen, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    L-arginine is an amino acid which can alter pituitary function and increase blood flow to the reproductive tract. The objective was to determine the effect of supplementing 100g of L-arginine on plasma arginine concentrations, follicular dynamics and ovarian and uterine artery blood flow during the estrus that occurs subsequent to foaling. In Experiment 1, mares were fed 100g L-arginine for 1 day during the last 3 weeks of pregnancy and plasma samples taken for every hour for the first 4h and every other hour until 12h.L-arginine supplementation elevated plasma arginine concentrations from 1 to 8h post feeding; arginine peaked at 6h (arginine: 515±33μmol/L; control: 80±33μmol/L). In Experiment 2, mares received either 100g L-arginine or control diets beginning 21 d before the expected foaling date and continued for 30 d postpartum. The reproductive tract was evaluated by transrectal Doppler ultrasonography from Day 1 postpartum through Day 30. There were no differences in ovarian follicular dynamics, ovarian or uterine resistance indices between groups. Vascular perfusion of the F1 follicular wall was greater in L-arginine supplemented mares (37.3±2.6%) than controls (25.4±2.7%; Pmares had a smaller uterine body and horns and accumulated less uterine fluid than controls (Pfollicular development, raises the possible use of L-arginine supplementation as a breeding management tool during the postpartum period to increase reproductive success. PMID:23523236

  12. An allosteric inhibitor of protein arginine methyltransferase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siarheyeva, Alena; Senisterra, Guillermo; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Wasney, Gregory A; Chau, Irene; Marcellus, Richard; Hajian, Taraneh; Liu, Feng; Korboukh, Ilia; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Min, Jinrong; Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Loppnau, Peter; Poda, Gennadiy; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Brown, Peter J; Jin, Jian; Al-Awar, Rima; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Schapira, Matthieu; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-08-01

    PRMT3, a protein arginine methyltransferase, has been shown to influence ribosomal biosynthesis by catalyzing the dimethylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S2. Although PRMT3 has been reported to be a cytosolic protein, it has been shown to methylate histone H4 peptide (H4 1-24) in vitro. Here, we report the identification of a PRMT3 inhibitor (1-(benzo[d][1,2,3]thiadiazol-6-yl)-3-(2-cyclohexenylethyl)urea; compound 1) with IC50 value of 2.5 μM by screening a library of 16,000 compounds using H4 (1-24) peptide as a substrate. The crystal structure of PRMT3 in complex with compound 1 as well as kinetic analysis reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Mutating PRMT3 residues within the allosteric site or using compound 1 analogs that disrupt interactions with allosteric site residues both abrogated binding and inhibitory activity. These data demonstrate an allosteric mechanism for inhibition of protein arginine methyltransferases, an emerging class of therapeutic targets.

  13. Adverse effects associated with arginine alpha-ketoglutarate containing supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, J M; Majlesi, N; Chan, G M; Olsen, D; Hoffman, R S; Nelson, L S

    2009-05-01

    The athletic performance supplement industry is a multibillion-dollar business and one popular category claims to increase nitric oxide (NO) production. We report three patients presenting to the emergency department with adverse effects. A 33-year-old man presented with palpitations, dizziness, vomiting, and syncope, after the use of NO(2) platinum. His examination and electrocardiogram (ECG) were normal. The dizziness persisted, requiring admission overnight. A 21-year-old man with palpitations and near syncope had used a "nitric oxide" supplement. He was tachycardic to 115 bpm with otherwise normal examination. Laboratory values including methemoglobin, and ECG were unremarkable. He was treated with 1 L of saline with no change in heart rate. He was admitted for observation. A 24-year-old man presented after taking NO-Xplode with palpitations and a headache. His examination, laboratory values, and ECG were normal. He was discharged. The purported active ingredient in these products is arginine alpha-ketoglutarate (AAKG), which is claimed to increase NO production by supplying the precursor L-arginine. The symptoms could be due to vasodilation from increased levels of NO, though other etiologies cannot be excluded. AAKG containing supplements may be associated with adverse effects requiring hospital admission. PMID:19755457

  14. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  15. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (pconcentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects.

  16. Pd(II and Zn(II Based Complexes with Schiff Base Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization, Luminescence, and Antibacterial and Catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Feng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new metal complexes involving Schiff base ligands, namely, [Pd(L12] (1 and [Zn(L22] (2, [HL1: 2,4-dibromo-6-((E-(mesityliminomethylphenol and HL2: 2-((E-(2,6-diisopropylphenyliminomethyl-4,6-dibromophenol], have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR-spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, powder X-ray diffraction, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Both 1 and 2 are mononuclear cyclometalated complexes with square planar and tetrahedral coordination geometry, respectively. 1 and 2 display photoluminescence in the solid state at 298 K (fluorescence lifetimes τ = 5.521 μs at 508 nm for 1; τ = 3.697 μs at 506 nm for 2. These Schiff base ligands and their metal complexes have been screened for antibacterial activity against several bacteria strains, and the results are compared with the activity of penicillin. Moreover, the Suzuki reaction of 4-bromoanisole with phenylboronic acid by 1 has also been studied.

  17. A model of protocell based on the introduction of a semi-permeable membrane in a stochastic model of catalytic reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Villani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work we introduce some preliminary analyses on the role of a semi-permeable membrane in the dynamics of a stochastic model of catalytic reaction sets (CRSs of molecules. The results of the simulations performed on ensembles of randomly generated reaction schemes highlight remarkable differences between this very simple protocell description model and the classical case of the continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR. In particular, in the CSTR case, distinct simulations with the same reaction scheme reach the same dynamical equilibrium, whereas, in the protocell case, simulations with identical reaction schemes can reach very different dynamical states, despite starting from the same initial conditions.

  18. Photoresponse of indium oxide particulate-based thin films fabricated using milled nanorods grown by the self-catalytic vapor–liquid–solid process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium oxide (In2O3) nanorods were grown on silica substrates by using the self-catalytic vapor–liquid–solid growth process. The photoresponse of the nanorods was compared to that of the thin film, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO). The nanorods demonstrated a wavelength-dependent photoresponse with high responsivity of 1.82 A W−1 at 405 nm. In contrast, the conductive ITO thin film did not show a photoresponse to light. Analysis results showed that different surface states of materials as well as doping in ITO contributed to the significant difference in the photoresponse of samples. (paper)

  19. Giardia duodenalis arginine deiminase modulates the phenotype and cytokine secretion of human dendritic cells by depletion of arginine and formation of ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Stefanie; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Seeber, Frank; Klotz, Christian; Ignatius, Ralf; Aebischer, Toni

    2013-07-01

    Depletion of arginine is a recognized strategy that pathogens use to evade immune effector mechanisms. Depletion depends on microbial enzymes such as arginases, which are considered virulence factors. The effect is mostly interpreted as being a consequence of successful competition with host enzymes for the substrate. However, both arginases and arginine deiminases (ADI) have been associated with pathogen virulence. Both deplete arginine, but their reaction products differ. An ADI has been implicated in the virulence of Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite that infects humans and animals, causing significant morbidity. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in host defense and also in a murine G. duodenalis infection model. The functional properties of these innate immune cells depend on the milieu in which they are activated. Here, the dependence of the response of these cells on arginine was studied by using Giardia ADI and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte-derived DC. Arginine depletion by ADI significantly increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p40 secretion. It also reduced the upregulation of surface CD83 and CD86 molecules, which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Arginine depletion also reduced the phosphorylation of S6 kinase in DC, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The changes were due to arginine depletion and the formation of reaction products, in particular, ammonium ions. Comparison of NH(4)(+) and urea revealed distinct immunomodulatory activities of these products of deiminases and arginases, respectively. The data suggest that a better understanding of the role of arginine-depleting pathogen enzymes for immune evasion will have to take enzyme class and reaction products into consideration.

  20. Arginine Catabolism by Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria: Purification and Characterization of the Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes from Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1

    OpenAIRE

    De Angelis, Maria; Mariotti, Liberato; Rossi, Jone; Servili, Maurizio; Fox, Patrick F.; Rollán, Graciela; Gobbetti, Marco

    2002-01-01

    The cytoplasmic extracts of 70 strains of the most frequently isolated sourdough lactic acid bacteria were screened initially for arginine deiminase (ADI), ornithine transcarbamoylase (OTC), and carbamate kinase (CK) activities, which comprise the ADI (or arginine dihydrolase) pathway. Only obligately heterofermentative strains such as Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis CB1; Lactobacillus brevis AM1, AM8, and 10A; Lactobacillus hilgardii 51B; and Lactobacillus fructivorans DD3 and DA106 showed al...

  1. Effect of L-arginine, dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA and the association of L-arginine and DMSA on tissue lead mobilization and blood pressure level in plumbism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malvezzi C.K.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb-induced hypertension is characterized by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO. In the present study we evaluated the effect of L-arginine (NO precursor, dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, a chelating agent and ROS scavenger, and the association of L-arginine/DMSA on tissue Pb mobilization and blood pressure levels in plumbism. Tissue Pb levels and blood pressure evolution were evaluated in rats exposed to: 1 Pb (750 ppm, in drinking water, for 70 days, 2 Pb plus water for 30 more days, 3 Pb plus DMSA (50 mg kg-1 day-1, po, L-arginine (0.6%, in drinking water, and the combination of L-arginine/DMSA for 30 more days, and 4 their respective matching controls. Pb exposure increased Pb levels in the blood, liver, femur, kidney and aorta. Pb levels in tissues decreased after cessation of Pb administration, except in the aorta. These levels did not reach those observed in nonintoxicated rats. All treatments mobilized Pb from the kidney, femur and liver. Pb mobilization from the aorta was only effective with the L-arginine/DMSA treatment. Blood Pb concentrations in Pb-treated groups were not different from those of the Pb/water group. Pb increased blood pressure starting from the 5th week. L-arginine and DMSA treatments (4th week and the combination of L-arginine/DMSA (3rd and 4th weeks decreased blood pressure levels of intoxicated rats. These levels did not reach those of nonintoxicated rats. Treatment with L-arginine/DMSA was more effective than the isolated treatments in mobilizing Pb from tissues and in reducing the blood pressure of intoxicated rats.

  2. Giardia duodenalis Arginine Deiminase Modulates the Phenotype and Cytokine Secretion of Human Dendritic Cells by Depletion of Arginine and Formation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Stefanie; Renner Viveros, Pablo; Seeber, Frank; Klotz, Christian; Ignatius, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Depletion of arginine is a recognized strategy that pathogens use to evade immune effector mechanisms. Depletion depends on microbial enzymes such as arginases, which are considered virulence factors. The effect is mostly interpreted as being a consequence of successful competition with host enzymes for the substrate. However, both arginases and arginine deiminases (ADI) have been associated with pathogen virulence. Both deplete arginine, but their reaction products differ. An ADI has been implicated in the virulence of Giardia duodenalis, an intestinal parasite that infects humans and animals, causing significant morbidity. Dendritic cells (DC) play a critical role in host defense and also in a murine G. duodenalis infection model. The functional properties of these innate immune cells depend on the milieu in which they are activated. Here, the dependence of the response of these cells on arginine was studied by using Giardia ADI and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte-derived DC. Arginine depletion by ADI significantly increased tumor necrosis factor alpha and decreased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12p40 secretion. It also reduced the upregulation of surface CD83 and CD86 molecules, which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Arginine depletion also reduced the phosphorylation of S6 kinase in DC, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway. The changes were due to arginine depletion and the formation of reaction products, in particular, ammonium ions. Comparison of NH4+ and urea revealed distinct immunomodulatory activities of these products of deiminases and arginases, respectively. The data suggest that a better understanding of the role of arginine-depleting pathogen enzymes for immune evasion will have to take enzyme class and reaction products into consideration. PMID:23589577

  3. Enteral L-Arginine and Glutamine Supplementation for Prevention of NEC in Preterm Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shimi, M S; Awad, H A; Abdelwahed, M A; Mohamed, M H; Khafagy, S M; Saleh, G

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of arginine and glutamine supplementation in decreasing the incidence of NEC among preterm neonates. Methods. Prospective case-control study done on 75 preterm neonates ≤34 weeks, divided equally into L-arginine group receiving enteral L-arginine, glutamine group receiving enteral glutamine, and control group. Serum L-arginine and glutamine levels were measured at time of enrollment (sample 1), after 14 days of enrollment (sample 2), and at time of diagnosis of NEC (sample 3). Results. The incidence of NEC was 9.3%. There was no difference in the frequency of NEC between L-arginine and control groups (P > 0.05). NEC was not detected in glutamine group; L-arginine concentrations were significantly lower in arginine group than control group in both samples while glutamine concentrations were comparable in glutamine and control groups in both samples. No significant difference was found between groups as regards number of septic episodes, duration to reach full oral intake, or duration of hospital stay. Conclusion. Enteral L-arginine supplementation did not seem to reduce the incidence of NEC. Enteral glutamine may have a preventive role against NEC if supplied early to preterm neonates. However, larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. This work is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01263041).

  4. Enteral L-Arginine and Glutamine Supplementation for Prevention of NEC in Preterm Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. El-Shimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Evaluating the efficacy and safety of arginine and glutamine supplementation in decreasing the incidence of NEC among preterm neonates. Methods. Prospective case-control study done on 75 preterm neonates ≤34 weeks, divided equally into L-arginine group receiving enteral L-arginine, glutamine group receiving enteral glutamine, and control group. Serum L-arginine and glutamine levels were measured at time of enrollment (sample 1, after 14 days of enrollment (sample 2, and at time of diagnosis of NEC (sample 3. Results. The incidence of NEC was 9.3%. There was no difference in the frequency of NEC between L-arginine and control groups (P>0.05. NEC was not detected in glutamine group; L-arginine concentrations were significantly lower in arginine group than control group in both samples while glutamine concentrations were comparable in glutamine and control groups in both samples. No significant difference was found between groups as regards number of septic episodes, duration to reach full oral intake, or duration of hospital stay. Conclusion. Enteral L-arginine supplementation did not seem to reduce the incidence of NEC. Enteral glutamine may have a preventive role against NEC if supplied early to preterm neonates. However, larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. This work is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01263041.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and behaviour of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis, the characterization and the behaviour to gamma radiation of trans-bis (argininate) copper (II) are presented. The synthesis is made from copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide and hydrochloride of L (+) arginine, in aqueous medium, and the characterization by infrared spectroscopy, visible and ultraviolet spectroscopy and elementary analysis. (C.G.C.)

  6. Antibacterial action of a novel functionalized chitosan-arginine against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Kieft, Thomas L; Ryan, Shannon J; Baker, Shenda M; Wiesmann, William P; Rogelj, Snezna

    2010-07-01

    The antimicrobial activity of chitosan and chitosan derivatives has been well established. However, although several mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action is still unclear. Here we report on the investigation of antibacterial activity and the antibacterial mode of action of a novel water-soluble chitosan derivative, arginine-functionalized chitosan, on the Gram-negative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli. Two different arginine-functionalized chitosans (6% arginine-substituted and 30% arginine-substituted) each strongly inhibited P. fluorescens and E. coli growth. Time-dependent killing efficacy experiments showed that 5000 mg l(-1) of 6%- and 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine killed 2.7 logs and 4.5 logs of P. fluorescens, and 4.8 logs and 4.6 logs of E. coli in 4h, respectively. At low concentrations, the 6%-substituted chitosan-arginine was more effective in inhibiting cell growth even though the 30%-substituted chitosan-arginine appeared to be more effective in permeabilizing the cell membranes of both P. fluorescens and E. coli. Studies using fluorescent probes, 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN), nile red (NR) and propidium iodide (PI), and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) suggest that chitosan-arginine's antibacterial activity is, at least in part, due to its interaction with the cell membrane, in which it increases membrane permeability. PMID:20060936

  7. Facilitation of peptide fibre formation by arginine-phosphate/carboxylate interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Krishna Prasad; Sandeep Verma

    2008-01-01

    This study describes peptide fibre formation in a hexapeptide, derived from the V3 loop of HIV-1, mediated by the interactions between arginine residues and phosphate/carboxylate anions. This charge neutralization approach was further confirmed when the deletion of arginine residue from the hexapeptide sequence resulted in fibre formation, which was studied by a combination of microscopic techniques.

  8. Enzymatic Synthesis of Agmatine by Immobilized Escherichia coli Cells with Arginine Decarboxylase Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wei-guo; ZHAO Gen-hai; LIU Jun-zhong; LIU Qian; JIAO Qing-cai

    2011-01-01

    A new method for the enzymatic synthesis of agmatine by immobilized Escherichia coli cells with arginine decarboxylase(ADC)activity was established and a series of optimal reaction conditions was set down.The arginine decarboxylase showed the maximum activity when the pyridoxal phosphate(PLP)concentration was 50 mmol/L,pH=7 and 45 ℃.The arginine decarboxylase exhibited the maximum production efficiency when the substrate concentration was 100 mmol/L and the reaction time was 15 h.It was also observed that the appropriate concentration of Mg2+,especially at 0.5 mmol/L promoted the arginine decarboxylase activity; Mn2+ had little effect on the arginine decarboxylase activity.The inhibition of Cu2+ and Zn2+ to the arginine decarboxylase activity was significant.The immobilized cells were continuously used 6 times and the average conversion rate during the six-time usage was 55.6%.The immobilized cells exhibited favourable operational stability.After optimization,the maximally cumulative amount of agmatine could be up to 20 g/L.In addition,this method can also catalyze D,L-arginine to agmatine,leaving the pure optically D-arginine simultaneously.The method has a very important guiding significance to the enzymatic preparation of agmatine.

  9. Acute hypothalamic administration of L-arginine increases feed intake in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Ricardo Maneck Malfatti; Luiz Augusto da Silva; Ricardo Aparecido Pereira; Renan Garcia Michel; André Luiz Snak; Fabio Seidel dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the chronic (oral) and acute (hypothalamic infusion) effects of L-arginine supplementation on feed intake, body composition, and behavioral changes in rats. Methods: Twenty rats were divided into two groups treated orally for 60 days; one group received L-arginine (1 g/kg body weight) and one group received saline (1 mL/NaCl ...

  10. Solid-state properties and dissolution behaviour of tablets containing co-amorphous indomethacin-arginine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Jensen, Katrine Birgitte Tarp; Blaabjerg, Lasse Ingerslev;

    2015-01-01

    arginine in a larger production scale. In this work, a tablet formulation was developed for a co-amorphous salt, namely spray dried indomethacin–arginine (SD IND–ARG). The effects of compaction pressure on tablet properties, physical stability and dissolution profiles under non-sink conditions were examined...

  11. Arginine-responsive terbium luminescent hybrid sensors triggered by two crown ether carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Lasheng [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Ke; Ding, Xiaoping [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Zhan; Xiao, Rui [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Crown ether carboxylic acids constitute main building blocks for the synthesis of terbium containing covalent cross-linked luminescent materials. Both the complexes and the hybrid nanomaterials could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water. More importantly, they were found to have a profound effect on the luminescence responses to arginine compared with glutamic acid, histidine, tryptophan, threonine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in aqueous environment. The present study provided the possibility of using a host–guest mechanism as a way of signal transduction based on lanthanide supramolecular hybrid materials. - Highlights: • Crown ether carboxylic acids were found to sensitize terbium ions among a group of ethers. • The complexes and silica hybrid materials were both prepared and characterized. • They could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water.

  12. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  13. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (pNOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (pNOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (plow-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects. PMID:27156372

  14. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

    2012-12-31

    In this collaborative program, scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Ford Motor Company have investigated laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We have also studied materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we have examined the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measured the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model. Since this CRADA has now been completed, in this annual report we will provide very brief summaries of most of the work carried out on this CRADA over the last several years.

  15. Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-12-22

    This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model.

  16. Differential effects of cranial radiation on growth hormone response to arginine and insulin infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth hormone responses to arginine infusion and to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were studied in 13 patients with neoplastic disease after treatment with radiation and chemotherapy. Patients who received intensive cranial radiation (greater than 2,400 rads) had no response to either arginine or insulin; those who received moderate cranial radiation (greater than or equal to 2,400 rads) had GH response to arginine but not to insulin; patients receiving no cranial radiation responded to both arginine and insulin. These data support the hypothesis that GH secretion in response to arginine infusion has a different mechanism in contrast to the response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that the latter is more vulnerable to cranial radiation

  17. Arginine does not exacerbate markers of inflammation in cocultures of human enterocytes and leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Negrier, I.; Neveux, N.;

    2007-01-01

    with arginine did not affect epithelial integrity, production of any of the cytokines investigated, or the amount of nitric oxide. The amino acid used primarily by nonstimulated intestinal epithelial cells cocultured with leukocytes was glutamine. Activation of IEC with bacteria significantly enhanced...... the catabolism of serine, asparagine, and lysine, and reduced glutamine catabolism. Addition of arginine increased ornithine formation and moderately reduced transepithelial transport of methionine and other amino acids. Hence, arginine supplementation does not interfere with inflammation-associated cross......Enteral arginine supplementation in the critically ill has become a matter of controversy. In this study, we investigated effects of the addition of 0.4 and 1.2 mmol/L arginine in a coculture model on markers of inflammation, enterocyte layer integrity, and amino acid transport. In this model...

  18. A novel method for oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels based on catalytic oxidation using molecular oxygen coupled with selective adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Song, Chunshan [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 209 Academic Projects Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhou, Anning [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 209 Academic Projects Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xian University of Science and Technology, Xian 710054 (China)

    2007-05-30

    The present study explored a novel oxidative desulfurization (ODS) method of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, which combines a catalytic oxidation step of the sulfur compounds directly in the presence of molecular oxygen and an adsorption step of the oxidation-treated fuel over activated carbon. The ODS of a model jet fuel and a real jet fuel (JP-8) was conducted in a batch system at ambient conditions. It was found that the oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen with Fe(III) salts was able to convert the thiophenic compounds in the fuel to the corresponding sulfone and/or sulfoxide compounds at 25 C. The oxidation reactivity of the sulfur compounds decreases in the order of 2-methylbenzothiophene > 5-methylbenzothiophene > benzothiophene >> dibenzothiophene. The alkyl benzothiophenes with more alkyl substituents have higher oxidation reactivity. In real JP-8 fuel, 2,3-dimethylbenzothiophene was found to be the most refractory sulfur compound to be oxidized. The catalytic oxidation of the sulfur compounds to form the corresponding sulfones and/or sulfoxides improved significantly the adsorptivity of the sulfur compounds on activated carbon, because the activated carbon has higher adsorptive affinity for the sulfones and sulfoxides than thiophenic compounds due to the higher polarity of the former. The remarkable advantages of the developed ODS method are that the ODS can be run in the presence of O{sub 2} at ambient condition without using peroxides and aqueous solvent and thus without involving the biphasic oil-aqueous-solution system. (author)

  19. Preparation, Characterization, and Enhanced Photo catalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity of Y2Cu2O5-Based Compounds under Simulated Sunlight Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Y2Cu2O5 photo catalyst was successfully prepared via solid state reaction and further combined with TiO2 by a sol-gel method and a solid phase method, respectively. For comparison, Pt Y2Cu2O5particles were loaded to prepare Pt- via a hydrogen reduction method. All the samples were characterized by thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-vis DRS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Photo catalytic H2 evolution activities of the as-obtained samples were evaluated from aqueous oxalic acid solution under simulated sunlight irradiation. The effects of photo catalyst concentration, TiO2 content, and composite method on the H2 evolution activities of the as-obtained photo catalysts were investigated. The results show that, when the concentration of photo catalyst is 0.8 gL-1, the TiO2 Y2Cu2O5 composite photo catalyst prepared by a sol-gel method exhibits the optimized photo catalytic activity, and the H2 production rate is 4.35 m mol with 30 wt.% content of TiO2

  20. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  1. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  2. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  3. Histone H2A and H4 N-terminal tails are positioned by the MEP50 WD repeat protein for efficient methylation by the PRMT5 arginine methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Emmanuel S; Wilczek, Carola; Onikubo, Takashi; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Jansong, Janina; Reimer, Ulf; Shechter, David

    2015-04-10

    The protein arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 is complexed with the WD repeat protein MEP50 (also known as Wdr77 or androgen coactivator p44) in vertebrates in a tetramer of heterodimers. MEP50 is hypothesized to be required for protein substrate recruitment to the catalytic domain of PRMT5. Here we demonstrate that the cross-dimer MEP50 is paired with its cognate PRMT5 molecule to promote histone methylation. We employed qualitative methylation assays and a novel ultrasensitive continuous assay to measure enzyme kinetics. We demonstrate that neither full-length human PRMT5 nor the Xenopus laevis PRMT5 catalytic domain has appreciable protein methyltransferase activity. We show that histones H4 and H3 bind PRMT5-MEP50 more efficiently compared with histone H2A(1-20) and H4(1-20) peptides. Histone binding is mediated through histone fold interactions as determined by competition experiments and by high density histone peptide array interaction studies. Nucleosomes are not a substrate for PRMT5-MEP50, consistent with the primary mode of interaction via the histone fold of H3-H4, obscured by DNA in the nucleosome. Mutation of a conserved arginine (Arg-42) on the MEP50 insertion loop impaired the PRMT5-MEP50 enzymatic efficiency by increasing its histone substrate Km, comparable with that of Caenorhabditis elegans PRMT5. We show that PRMT5-MEP50 prefers unmethylated substrates, consistent with a distributive model for dimethylation and suggesting discrete biological roles for mono- and dimethylarginine-modified proteins. We propose a model in which MEP50 and PRMT5 simultaneously engage the protein substrate, orienting its targeted arginine to the catalytic site.

  4. Controlling attachment and growth of Listeria monocytogenes in polyvinyl chloride model floor drains using a peroxide chemical, chitosan-arginine, or heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, Mark E; Hofacre, Charles L; Frank, Joseph F

    2014-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize a poultry processing plant as a resident in floor drains. Limiting growth and attachment to drain surfaces may help lessen the potential for cross-contamination of product. The objective of this study was to compare a hydrogen peroxide-peroxyacetic acid-based chemical to chitosan-arginine or heat to prevent attachment of or destroy existing L. monocytogenes on the inner surface of model floor drains. L. monocytogenes was introduced to result in about 10(9) planktonic and attached cells within untreated polyvinyl chloride model drain pipes. Treatments (0.13 % peroxide-based sanitizer, 0.1 % chitosan-arginine, or 15 s of hot water at 95 to 100°C) were applied immediately after inoculation or after 24 h of incubation. Following treatment, all pipes were incubated for an additional 24 h; planktonic and attached cells were enumerated by plate count. All treatments significantly (P < 0.05) lowered numbers of planktonic and attached cells recovered. Chitosan-arginine resulted in approximately a 6-log reduction in planktonic cells when applied prior to incubation and a 3-log reduction after the inoculum had a chance to grow. Both heat and peroxide significantly outperformed chitosan-arginine (8- to 9-log reduction) and were equally effective before and after incubation. Heat was the only treatment that eliminated planktonic L. monocytogenes. All treatments were less effective against attached cells. Chitosan-arginine provided about a 4.5-log decrease in attached cells when applied before incubation and no significant decrease when applied after growth. Like with planktonic cells, peroxide-peroxyacetic acid and heat were equally effective before or after incubation, causing decreases ranging from 7 to 8.5 log for attached L. monocytogenes. Applied at the most efficacious time, any of these techniques may lessen the potential for L. monocytogenes to remain as a long-term resident in processing plant floor drains.

  5. Copper(II complex of (±trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine azo-linked Schiff base ligand encapsulated in nanocavity of zeolite-Y for the catalytic oxidation of olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lashanizadegan Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A Schiff base ligand derived from 4-(benzeneazo salicylaldehyde and (±trans-1,2-cyclohexanediamine (H2L and its corresponding Cu(II complex (CuL has been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, UV-VIS and 1H NMR. The copper Schiff base complex encapsulated in the nanopores of zeolite-Y (CuL-Y by flexible ligand method and its encapsulation have been ensured by different studies. The homogeneous and its corresponding heterogeneous catalysts have been used for oxidation of different alkenes with tert-butyl hydroperoxide. Under the optimized reaction conditions, the oxidation of cyclooctene, cyclohexene, styrene and norbornene catalyzed by CuL gave 89, 63, 46 and 13% conversion, respectively. These olefins were oxidized efficiently with 50, 96, 96 and 92% conversion in the presence of CuL-Y, respectively. Comparison of the catalytic behavior of CuL and CuL-Y showed the higher catalytic activity and selectivity of the heterogeneous catalyst with respect to the homogenous one.

  6. Application of tungsten-based catalytic materials to direct alcohol fuel cell production%钨基催化材料在直接醇类燃料电池中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘喜慧; 周阳; 梁福永; 曲慧男; 温和瑞

    2015-01-01

    直接醇类燃料电池(DAFC)具有能量密度高、携带方便以及环境友好等优点。电极催化剂是改善DAFC性能的关键材料,目前DAFC催化剂要解决的关键问题是提高催化剂的电催化活性、抗CO等中间产物毒化能力以及降低催化剂成本,文中综述了2种钨基催化材料的制备、性能表征及其在DAFC中的应用研究进展,指出了目前钨基复合催化剂需要重点研究的基础问题。%Direct alcohol fuel cell (DAFC) has the advantages of high energy density , convenient packaging and environment friendliness. The key problem of anode catalyst for DAFC is how to improve the catalytic activity of anodic oxidation, and enhance the ability of resistance to CO poisoning and lower the price of catalyst. This paper reviews the synthesis , electric catalytic properties and applications in DAFC of two kinds of tungsten-based catalysts. The existing basic problems of tungsten-based composite catalysts are proposed.

  7. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  8. Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabater

    2014-01-01

    rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability.

  9. 'Click' generated 1,2,3-triazole based organosulfur/selenium ligands and their Pd(ii) and Ru(ii) complexes: their synthesis, structure and catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satyendra; Saleem, Fariha; Singh, Ajai K

    2016-07-28

    1-(2,6-Diisopropylphenyl)-4-(phenylthio/selenomethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole (L1/L2) was synthesized by a 'Click' reaction and treated with [Pd(CH3CN)2Cl2] for 5 h or [(η(6)-C6H6)RuCl(μ-Cl)]2 for 8 h (followed by reaction with NH4PF6) at room temperature, resulting in complexes [Pd(L)Cl2] (1 and 2) or [(η(6)-C6H6)Ru(L)Cl]PF6 (3 and 4) (L = L1 or L2), respectively. The four complexes (1-4) and ligands (L1 and L2) were characterized with (1)H, (13)C{(1)H} and (77)Se{(1)H} NMR spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. The single crystal structures of 1-4 were solved. The geometry of Pd in 1 and 2 is distorted square planar. The Pd-S and Pd-Se bond distances in 1 and 2 are 2.277(3) and 2.384(6) Å respectively. In 3 and 4, there is a pseudo-octahedral "piano-stool" type disposition of donor atoms around Ru. The Ru-S and Ru-Se bond lengths in 3 and 4 are 2.3728(12) and 2.4741(6) Å respectively. The catalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 was explored for Suzuki-Miyaura coupling (SMC) in water and the Sonogashira coupling reaction. For various aryl bromides, including deactivated ones, complexes 1 and 2 were found to be efficient catalysts for both couplings. The optimum loading of 1 and 2 required to catalyze both coupling reactions is of the order of 0.001-2 mol% of Pd. For SMC, no additive or phase transfer catalyst was added. For catalysis of the transfer hydrogenation (TH) of aldehydes and ketones, the half-sandwich Ru(ii) complexes 3 and 4 were explored. Their optimum catalytic loading was found to be 0.1-0.4 mol% of Ru. For TH, both the water solvent and the glycerol hydrogen source are environmentally friendly. The catalytic efficiencies of 3 and 4 are comparable with those reported for other catalysts for TH carried out with 2-propanol or glycerol as a H-source. 1, with a sulfur ligand, is more efficient than 2 (Se analog) for both SMC and the Sonogashira coupling. The activities of 3 and 4 for TH are in the order Se > S. PMID:27338234

  10. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  11. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  12. Risk assessment for the amino acids taurine, L-glutamine and L-arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Andrew; Hathcock, John N

    2008-04-01

    Taurine, glutamine and arginine are examples of amino acids which have become increasingly popular as ingredients in dietary supplements and functional foods and beverages. Animal and human clinical research suggests that oral supplementation of these amino acids provides additional health and/or performance benefits beyond those observed from normal intake of dietary protein. The increased consumer awareness and use of these amino acids as ingredients in dietary supplements and functional foods warrant a comprehensive review of their safety through quantitative risk assessment, and identification of a potential safe upper level of intake. The absence of a systematic pattern of adverse effects in humans in response to orally administered taurine (Tau), l-glutamine (Gln) and l-arginine (Arg) precluded the selection of a no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) or lowest observed adverse effect level (LOAEL). Therefore, by definition, the usual approach to risk assessment for identification of a tolerable upper level of intake (UL) could not be used. Instead, the newer method described as the Observed Safe Level (OSL) or Highest Observed Intake (HOI) was utilized. The OSL risk assessments indicate that based on the available published human clinical trial data, the evidence for the absence of adverse effects is strong for Tau at supplemental intakes up to 3 g/d, Gln at intakes up to 14 g/d and Arg at intakes up to 20 g/d, and these levels are identified as the respective OSLs for normal healthy adults. Although much higher levels of each of these amino acids have been tested without adverse effects and may be safe, the data for intakes above these levels are not sufficient for a confident conclusion of long-term safety, and therefore these values are not selected as the OSLs.

  13. Expression of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase genes in apple cells and stressed shoots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jin; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Honda, Chikako; Nada, Kazuyoshi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2005-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are two important enzymes responsible for putrescine biosynthesis. In this study, a full-length ADC cDNA (MdADC) was isolated from apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.]. Meanwhile, a partial ODC (pMdODC) could be amplified only by a second RCR from the RT-PCR products, whereas a full-length ODC could not be obtained by either cDNA library screening or 5'- and 3'-RACEs, suggesting quite low expression. Moreover, D-arginine, an ADC inhibitor, caused a decrease in ADC activity and severely inhibited the growth of apple callus, which could be partially resumed by exogenous addition of putrescine, whereas alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor for ODC, caused the incomplete repression of callus growth without changing ODC activity. RNA gel blot showed that the expression level of MdADC was high in young tissues/organs with rapid cell division and was positively induced by chilling, salt, and dehydration, implying its involvement in both cell growth and these stress responses. By contrast, the transcript of ODC could not be detected by RNA gel blot analysis. Based on the present study, it is possible to conclude that (i) the ODC pathway is active in apple, although the expression level of the pMdODC gene homologous with its counterparts found in other plant species is quite low; and (ii) MdADC expression correlates with cell growth and stress responses to chilling, salt, and dehydration, suggesting that ADC is a primary biosynthetic pathway for putrescine biosynthesis in apple.

  14. Functionality of promoter microsatellites of arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A: implications for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Katherine E

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine vasopressin (AVP has been hypothesized to play a role in aetiology of autism based on a demonstrated involvement in the regulation of social behaviours. The arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A is widely expressed in the brain and is considered to be a key receptor for regulation of social behaviour. Moreover, genetic variation at AVPR1A has been reported to be associated with autism. Evidence from non-human mammals implicates variation in the 5'-flanking region of AVPR1A in variable gene expression and social behaviour. Methods We examined four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs3803107, rs1042615, rs3741865, rs11174815 and three microsatellites (RS3, RS1 and AVR at the AVPR1A gene for association in an autism cohort from Ireland. Two 5'-flanking region polymorphisms in the human AVPR1A, RS3 and RS1, were also tested for their effect on relative promoter activity. Results The short alleles of RS1 and the SNP rs11174815 show weak association with autism in the Irish population (P = 0.036 and P = 0.008, respectively. Both RS1 and RS3 showed differences in relative promoter activity by length. Shorter repeat alleles of RS1 and RS3 decreased relative promoter activity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Conclusions These aligning results can be interpreted as a functional route for this association, namely that shorter alleles of RS1 lead to decreased AVPR1A transcription, which may proffer increased susceptibility to the autism phenotype.

  15. Functionality of promoter microsatellites of arginine vasopressin receptor 1A (AVPR1A): implications for autism

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tansey, Katherine E

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Arginine vasopressin (AVP) has been hypothesized to play a role in aetiology of autism based on a demonstrated involvement in the regulation of social behaviours. The arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A) is widely expressed in the brain and is considered to be a key receptor for regulation of social behaviour. Moreover, genetic variation at AVPR1A has been reported to be associated with autism. Evidence from non-human mammals implicates variation in the 5\\'-flanking region of AVPR1A in variable gene expression and social behaviour. Methods We examined four tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs3803107, rs1042615, rs3741865, rs11174815) and three microsatellites (RS3, RS1 and AVR) at the AVPR1A gene for association in an autism cohort from Ireland. Two 5\\'-flanking region polymorphisms in the human AVPR1A, RS3 and RS1, were also tested for their effect on relative promoter activity. Results The short alleles of RS1 and the SNP rs11174815 show weak association with autism in the Irish population (P = 0.036 and P = 0.008, respectively). Both RS1 and RS3 showed differences in relative promoter activity by length. Shorter repeat alleles of RS1 and RS3 decreased relative promoter activity in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Conclusions These aligning results can be interpreted as a functional route for this association, namely that shorter alleles of RS1 lead to decreased AVPR1A transcription, which may proffer increased susceptibility to the autism phenotype.

  16. Inlfuence of the Alkali Treatment of HZSM-5 Zeolite on Catalytic Performance of PtSn-Based Catalyst for Propane Dehydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Li; Zhou Shijian; Zhou Yuming; Zhang Yiwei; Xu Jun; Wang Li

    2013-01-01

    The porous material ATZ with micro-mesopore hierarchical porosity was prepared by alkali treatment of parent HZSM-5 zeolite and applied for propane dehydrogenation. The zeolite samples were characterized by XRD, N2-physisorption, and NH3-TPD analysis. The results showed that the alkali treatment can modify the physicochemical prop-erties of HZSM-5 zeolite. In this case, the porous material ATZ showed larger external surface area with less acid sites as compared to the HZSM-5 zeolite. It was found out that the alkali treatment of HZSM-5 zeolite could promote the catalytic performance of PtSn/ATZ catalyst. The possible reason was ascribed to the low acidity of ATZ. Furthermore, the presence of mesopores could reduce the carbon deposits on the metallic surface, which was also favorable for the dehydrogenation reaction.

  17. Structural analyses of Legionella LepB reveal a new GAP fold that catalytically mimics eukaryotic RasGAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yu; Liyan Hu; Qing Yao; Yongqun Zhu; Na Dong; Da-Cheng Wang; Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are emerging targets of diverse bacterial pathogens.Here,we perform biochemical and structural analyses of LepB,a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) effector from Legionellapneumophila.We map LepB GAP domain to residues 313-618 and show that the GAP domain is Rab1 specific with a catalytic activity higher than the canonical eukaryotic TBC GAP and the newly identified VirA/EspG family of bacterial RabGAP effectors.Exhaustive mutation analyses identify Arg444 as the arginine finger,but no catalytically essential glutamine residues.Crystal structures of LepB313-618 alone and the GAP domain of Legionella drancourtii LepB in complex with Rab1-GDP-AIF3 support the catalytic role of Arg444,and also further reveal a 3D architecture and a GTPase-binding mode distinct from all known GAPs.Glu449,structurally equivalent to TBC RabGAP glutamine finger in apo-LepB,undergoes a drastic movement upon Rab1 binding,which induces Rab1 Gin70 side-chain flipping towards GDP-AIF3 through a strong ionic interaction.This conformationally rearranged Gln70 acts as the catalytic cis-glutamine,therefore uncovering an unexpected RasGAP-like catalytic mechanism for LepB.Our studies highlight an extraordinary structural and catalytic diversity of RabGAPs,particularly those from bacterial pathogens.

  18. Control of a catalytic fluid cracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbel, A.; Huang, Z.; Rinard, I.; Shinnar, R.

    1993-12-13

    Control offers an important tool for savings in refineries, mainly by integration of process models into on-line control. This paper is part of a research effort to better understand problems of partial control; control of a Fluid Catalytic Cracker (FCC) is used as example. Goal is to understand better the control problems of an FCC in context of model based control of a refinery, and to understand the general problem of designing partial control systems.

  19. Nd(III) and Dy(III) coordination compounds based on 1H-tetrazolate-5-acetic acid ligands: Synthesis, crystal structures and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Qiaoyun; Chen Dianyu; He Minghua [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500, Jiangsu (China); Yang Gaowen, E-mail: ygwsx@126.com [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500, Jiangsu (China); Shen Lei; Zhai Chun; Shen Wei; Gu Kun; Zhao Jingjing [Jiangsu Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, Department of Chemistry and Materials Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500, Jiangsu (China)

    2012-06-15

    Reactions of 1H-tetrazolate-5-acetic acid(H{sub 2}tza) with Nd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O or Dy(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O with the presence of KOH under solvothermal conditions, produced two new coordination compounds, [M{sub 2}(tza){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O [M=Nd(1), Dy(2)]. Both compounds were structurally characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 1 and 2 reveal 1D structures via bridging tza as linker. Furthermore, the compounds 1 and 2 showed a specific and good catalytic behavior for the polymerization of styrene, and the polymerization showed controlled characteristics. - Graphical Abstract: Two new coordination compounds, [M{sub 2}(tza){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O [M=Nd(1), Dy(2)] have been synthesis. 1 and 2 reveal 1D structures via bridging tza as linker, and showed a specific and good catalytic behavior for the polymerization of styrene. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we have reported two novel compounds formed by H{sub 2}tza and Nd(III) or Dy(III). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1 and 2 were found to have catalysis property for the photo-polymerization of styrene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The high molecular weight polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions were obtained.

  20. The Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor NG-Nitro-L-Arginine Methyl Ester Diminishes the Immunomodulatory Effects of Parental Arginine in Rats with Subacute Peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hui-Chen; Hung, Ching-Yi; Huang, Fu-Huan; Su, Tzu-Cheng; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    The combined treatment of parenteral arginine and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) have been shown to improve liver function and systemic inflammation in subacute peritonitic rats. Here, we investigated the effects of single and combined parenteral arginine and L-NAME treatments on leukocyte and splenocyte immunity. Male Wistar rats were subjected to cecal punctures and were intravenously given total parenteral nutrition solutions with or without arginine and/or L-NAME supplementations for 7 days. Non-surgical and sham-operated rats with no cecal puncture were given a chow diet and parenteral nutrition, respectively. Parenteral feeding elevated the white blood cell numbers and subacute peritonitis augmented the parenteral nutrition-induced alterations in the loss of body weight gain, splenomegaly, and splenocyte decreases. Parenteral arginine significantly increased the B-leukocyte level, decreased the natural killer T (NKT)-leukocyte and splenocyte levels, alleviated the loss in body weight gain and total and cytotoxic T-splenocyte levels, and attenuated the increases in plasma nitrate/nitrite and interferon-gamma production by T-splenocytes. L-NAME infusion significantly decreased NKT-leukocyte level, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha production by T-splenocytes and macrophages, and interferon-gamma production by T-leukocytes, monocytes, and T-splenocytes, as well as increased interleukin-6 production by T-leukocytes and monocytes and nitrate/nitrite production by T-leukocytes. Combined treatment significantly decreased plasma nitrate/nitrite, the NKT-leukocyte level, and TNF-alpha production by T-splenocytes. Parenteral arginine may attenuate immune impairment and L-NAME infusion may augment leukocyte proinflammatory response, eliminate splenocyte proinflammatory and T-helper 1 responses, and diminish arginine-induced immunomodulation in combined treatment in subacute peritonitic rats.

  1. Hydrogénations catalytiques. De la recherche de base à l'application industrielle Catalytic Hydrogenation from Basic Research to Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boitiaux J. P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les premiers travaux concernant l'hydrogénation catalytique ont montré la spécificité des différents métaux pour les différents types d'hydrogénation (acétyléniques, oléfines, aromatiques, aldéhydes, nitriles. . . . Cette observation incluait de façon encore vague la notion de l'importance du couple métal-substrat. Une contradiction avec le caractère non sensible à la structure de ces réactions apparaissait alors. Des travaux récents effectués sur des catalyseurs au palladium de dispersions variées ont clairement démontré l'influence de la taille de particule sur la vitesse d'hydrogénation des acétyléniques et dioléfines en C4. Un tel comportement a été depuis confirmé par d'autres travaux sur palladium, platine et rhodium. Le phénomène est dû à une adsorption trop forte des réactifs sur les petites particules : celles-ci sont électrodéficientes et adsorbent très fortement les composés électrodonneurs comme les hydrocarbures insaturés. L'explication est confirmée par l'effet additif que produit la pipéridine. Sa coadsorption sur le catalyseur déstabilise la liaison métal-substrat et augmente l'activité. Une étude cinétique complète a permis d'affiner cette interprétation en démontrant la constance de l'activité intrinsèque et la relation entre la sensibilité à la dispersion métallique et une complexation du site métallique du type de celle que l'on rencontre sur les catalyseurs homogènes. Ces études fondamentales ont des conséquences très importantes pour la mise au point des catalyseurs industriels : pour chaque procédé, et donc pour chaque hydrogénation, il est nécessaire de déterminer la dispersion optimale du métal pour obtenir l'activité et la sélectivité les plus élevées, c'est-à-dire la meilleure rentabilité du procédé. Par ailleurs, les concepts établis grâce à ces recherches de base permettent d'unifier l'interprétation de l'influence des solvants, des

  2. Numerical Study of Passive Catalytic Recombiner for Hydrogen Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K Sharma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant amount of hydrogen is expected to be released within the containment of a water cooled power reactor after a severe accident. To reduce the risk of deflagration/detonation various means for hydrogen control have been adopted all over the world. Passive catalytic recombiner with vertical flat catalytic plate is one of such hydrogen mitigating device. Passive catalytic recombiners are designed for the removal of hydrogen generated in order to limit the impact of possible hydrogen combustion. Inside a passive catalytic recombiner, numerous thin steel sheets coated with catalyst material are vertically arranged at the bottom opening of a sheet metal housing forming parallel flow channels for the surrounding gas atmosphere. Already below conventional flammability limits, hydrogen and oxygen react exothermally on the catalytic surfaces forming harmless steam. Detailed numerical simulations and experiments are required for an in-depth knowledge of such plate type catalytic recombiners. Specific finite volume based in-house CFD code has been developed to model and analyse the working of these recombiner. The code has been used to simulate the recombiner device used in the Gx-test series of Battelle-Model Containment (B-MC experiments. The present paper briefly describes the working principle of such passive catalytic recombiner and salient feature of the CFD model developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC. Finally results of the calculations and comparison with existing data are discussed.

  3. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077: IC50 = 134 nM whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135: LLE = 2.91.

  4. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91). PMID:26938528

  5. Diffusion Coefficients ofl-Lysine Hydrochloride and l-Arginine Hydrochloride in Their Aqueous Solutions at 25℃

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The diffusion coefficients** ofl-lysine hydrochloride andl-arginine hydrochloride in their aqueous solu- tions at 25℃ were determined by the metallic diaphragm cell method which is characterized by accuracy, promptness and convenience. Meanwhile, the densities and viscosities of the solutions were also determined. Based on all these data a semi-empirical model for correlating the diffusion coefficients of solid organic salts in their aqueous solutions at 25℃ was proposed. The fitting result of this model is comparatively satisfactory. Compared to a former model, Gordon Model, this model can avoid a number of difficulties and arduous work.

  6. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechteld A. R. Vermeulen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%. Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  7. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Brinkmann, Saskia J H; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Goudoever, Johannes B; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285.

  8. L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide synthase,inhibits fertility of male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. D. Ramasooriya; M. G. Dharmasiri

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effect of L-arginine, the substrate of nitric oxide (NO) synthase, on reproductive function of male rots. Methods: Male rats were gavaged with either L-arginine (100 or 200 mg@ kg- 1@ d-1), D-arginine (200 mg@ kg- 1@ d-1 ) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl) for seven consecutive days. Their sexual behaviour and fertility were evaluat ed using receptive females. Results: L-arginine (200 mg/kg) had no significant effect on sexual competence (in terms of sexual arousal, libido, sexual vigour and sexual performance). In mating experiments, the higher dose of L arginine effectively and reversibly inhibited fertility, whilst the lower dose and the inactive stereoisomer D-arginine had no significant effect. The antifertility effect caused by L-arginine was due to a profound elevation in the preimplantation loss mediated possibly by impairment in epididymal sperm maturation, hyperactivated sperm motility and sperm capaci ration. Conclusion: Elevated NO production may be detrimental to male fertility.

  9. Enteral Glutamine Administration in Critically Ill Nonseptic Patients Does Not Trigger Arginine Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Mechteld A. R.; Brinkmann, Saskia J. H.; Buijs, Nikki; Beishuizen, Albertus; Bet, Pierre M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine supplementation in specific groups of critically ill patients results in favourable clinical outcome. Enhancement of citrulline and arginine synthesis by glutamine could serve as a potential mechanism. However, while receiving optimal enteral nutrition, uptake and enteral metabolism of glutamine in critically ill patients remain unknown. Therefore we investigated the effect of a therapeutically relevant dose of L-glutamine on synthesis of L-citrulline and subsequent L-arginine in this group. Ten versus ten critically ill patients receiving full enteral nutrition, or isocaloric isonitrogenous enteral nutrition including 0.5 g/kg L-alanyl-L-glutamine, were studied using stable isotopes. A cross-over design using intravenous and enteral tracers enabled splanchnic extraction (SE) calculations. Endogenous rate of appearance and SE of glutamine citrulline and arginine was not different (SE controls versus alanyl-glutamine: glutamine 48 and 48%, citrulline 33 versus 45%, and arginine 45 versus 42%). Turnover from glutamine to citrulline and arginine was not higher in glutamine-administered patients. In critically ill nonseptic patients receiving adequate nutrition and a relevant dose of glutamine there was no extra citrulline or arginine synthesis and glutamine SE was not increased. This suggests that for arginine synthesis enhancement there is no need for an additional dose of glutamine when this population is adequately fed. This trial is registered with NTR2285. PMID:27200186

  10. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhongjun; Zhu Hui; Wang Xiaolei; Yang Fan; Yang Xiurong, E-mail: xryang@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin, 130022 (China)

    2009-11-18

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl{sub 2} with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 {mu}mol mg{sup -1} for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe{sup 2+}/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  11. One-pot green synthesis of biocompatible arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A green one-step approach has been developed for the synthesis of amino-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis was accomplished by simply mixing FeCl2 with arginine under ambient conditions. It was found that the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, reaction duration and temperature greatly influence the size, morphology and composition of magnetic nanoparticles. The arginine-stabilized magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy techniques. The results show that the prepared nanoparticles are spherically shaped with a nearly uniform size distribution and pure magnetite phase. The presence of arginine on the magnetic nanoparticle surface has been confirmed and the amount of surface arginine varies with the Fe2+/arginine molar ratio. The surface amine densities are calculated to be 5.60 and 7.84 μmol mg-1 for magnetic nanoparticles prepared at 1:1 and 1:2 Fe2+/arginine molar ratio, respectively. The as-synthesized nanoparticles show superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and good solubility in water. In addition, using a similar synthesis procedure, we have been able to synthesize superparamagnetic manganese and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  12. Investigation on the remineralization effect of arginine toothpaste for early enamel caries: nanotribological and nanomechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Arola, Dwayne D.; Min, Jie; Yu, Dandan; Xu, Zhou; Li, Zhi; Gao, Shanshan

    2016-11-01

    Remineralization is confirmed as a feasible method to restore early enamel caries. While there is evidence that the 8% arginine toothpaste has a good remineralization effect by increasing surface microhardness, the repair effect on wear-resistance and nanomechanical properties still remains unclear. Therefore, this research was conducted to reveal the nanotribological and nanomechanical properties changes of early caries enamel after remineralized with arginine toothpaste. Early enamel caries were created in bovine enamel blocks, and divided into three groups according to the treatment solutions: distilled and deionized water (DDW group), arginine toothpaste slurry (arginine group) and fluoride toothpaste slurry (fluoride group). All of the samples were subjected to pH cycling for 12 d. The nanotribological and nanomechanical properties were evaluated via the nanoscratch and nanoindentation tests. The wear depth and scratch morphology were observed respectively by scanning probe microscopic (SPM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Finally, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used for element analysis of remineralized surfaces. Results showed that the wear depth of early caries enamel decreased after remineralization treatment and both the nanohardness and elastic modulus increased. Compared with the fluoride group, the arginine group exhibited higher nanohardness and elastic modulus with higher levels of calcium, fluoride, nitrogen and phosphorus; this group also underwent less wear and related damage. Overall, the synergistic effect of arginine and fluoride in arginine toothpaste achieves better nanotribological and nanomechanical properties than the single fluoride toothpaste, which could have significant impact on fight against early enamel caries.

  13. Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

    2013-05-08

    Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

  14. Atropine and ODQ antagonize tetanic fade induced by L-arginine in cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Cruciol-Souza

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Although it has been demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO released from sodium nitrite induces tetanic fade in the cat neuromuscular preparations, the effect of L-arginine on tetanic fade and its origin induced by NO have not been studied in these preparations. Furthermore, atropine reduces tetanic fade induced by several cholinergic and anticholinergic drugs in these preparations, whose mechanism is suggested to be mediated by the interaction of acetylcholine with inhibitory presynaptic muscarinic receptors. The present study was conducted in cats to determine the effects of L-arginine alone or after pretreatment with atropine or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ on neuromuscular preparations indirectly stimulated at high frequency. Drugs were injected into the middle genicular artery. L-arginine (2 mg/kg and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP; 16 µg/kg induced tetanic fade. The Nw-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 2 mg/kg alone did not produce any effect, but reduced the tetanic fade induced by L-arginine. D-arginine (2 mg/kg did not induce changes in tetanic fade. The tetanic fade induced by L-arginine or SNAP was reduced by previous injection of atropine (1.0 µg/kg or ODQ (15 µg/kg. ODQ alone did not change tetanic fade. The data suggest that the NO-synthase-GC pathway participates in the L-arginine-induced tetanic fade in cat neuromuscular preparations. The tetanic fade induced by L-arginine probably depends on the action of NO at the presynaptic level. NO may stimulate guanylate cyclase increasing acetylcholine release and thereby stimulating presynaptic muscarinic receptors.

  15. Hepatic adaptation compensates inactivation of intestinal arginine biosynthesis in suckling mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Marion

    Full Text Available Suckling mammals, including mice, differ from adults in the abundant expression of enzymes that synthesize arginine from citrulline in their enterocytes. To investigate the importance of the small-intestinal arginine synthesis for whole-body arginine production in suckling mice, we floxed exon 13 of the argininosuccinate synthetase (Ass gene, which codes for a key enzyme in arginine biosynthesis, and specifically and completely ablated Ass in enterocytes by crossing Ass (fl and Villin-Cre mice. Unexpectedly, Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice showed no developmental impairments. Amino-acid fluxes across the intestine, liver, and kidneys were calculated after determining the blood flow in the portal vein, and hepatic and renal arteries (86%, 14%, and 33%, respectively, of the transhepatic blood flow in 14-day-old mice. Relative to control mice, citrulline production in the splanchnic region of Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice doubled, while arginine production was abolished. Furthermore, the net production of arginine and most other amino acids in the liver of suckling control mice declined to naught or even changed to consumption in Ass (fl/fl /VilCre (tg/- mice, and had, thus, become remarkably similar to that of post-weaning wild-type mice, which no longer express arginine-biosynthesizing enzymes in their small intestine. The adaptive changes in liver function were accompanied by an increased expression of genes involved in arginine metabolism (Asl, Got1, Gpt2, Glud1, Arg1, and Arg2 and transport (Slc25a13, Slc25a15, and Slc3a2, whereas no such changes were found in the intestine. Our findings suggest that the genetic premature deletion of arginine synthesis in enterocytes causes a premature induction of the post-weaning pattern of amino-acid metabolism in the liver.

  16. Arginines Plasma Concentration and Oxidative Stress in Mild to Moderate COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinellu, Angelo; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Sotgia, Salvatore; Sotgiu, Elisabetta; Zinellu, Elisabetta; Bifulco, Fabiana; Mangoni, Arduino A; Pirina, Pietro; Carru, Ciriaco

    2016-01-01

    Background Elevated plasma concentrations of the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) have been observed in respiratory conditions such as asthma and cystic fibrosis. Since oxidative stress has been shown to increase the activity of arginine methylating enzymes, hence increased ADMA synthesis, and to reduce ADMA degrading enzymes, hence increased ADMA concentrations, we assessed methylated arginines concentrations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disease characterized by increased oxidative stress. Methods Plasma arginine, ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), oxidative stress markers (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS, and plasma proteins SH, PSH) and antioxidants (taurine and paraoxonase 1, PON1, activity) were measured in 43 COPD patients with mild (n = 29) or moderate (n = 14) disease and 43 age- and sex-matched controls. Results TBARS significantly increased with COPD presence and severity (median 2.93 vs 3.18 vs 3.64 μmol/L, respectively in controls, mild and moderate group, p<0.0001 by ANOVA) whereas PSH decreased (6.69±1.15 vs 6.04±0.85 vs 5.33±0.96 μmol/gr prot, p<0.0001 by ANOVA). Increased ADMA/arginine ratio, primarily due to reduced arginine concentrations, was also observed with COPD presence and severity (median 0.0067 vs 0.0075 vs 0.0100, p<0.0001 by ANOVA). In multiple logistic regression analysis, only TBARS (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.25–0.77; p = 0.0045) and ADMA/Arginine ratio (OR 1.72, 95% CI 2.27–13.05; p = 0.02) were independently associated with COPD severity. Conclusion COPD presence and severity are associated with increased oxidative stress and alterations in arginine metabolism. The reduced arginine concentrations in COPD may offer a new target for therapeutic interventions increasing arginine availability. PMID:27479314

  17. The effect of L-arginine on guinea-pig and rabbit airway smooth muscle function in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Perez A.C.; Paul W.; Harrison S.; Page C.P.; Spina D.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of L-arginine, D-arginine and L-lysine on airway smooth muscle responsiveness to spasmogens in vitro. Both L-arginine and D-arginine (100 mM) significantly reduced the contractile potency and maximal contractile response to histamine but not to methacholine or potassium chloride in guinea-pig epithelium-denuded isolated trachea. Similarly, the contractile response to histamine was significantly reduced by L-arginine (100 mM) in rabbit epithelium-denuded isolat...

  18. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  19. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  20. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  1. Development of Catalytic Cooking Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden); Tena, Emmanuel; Berger, Marc [Gaz de France (France)

    2004-04-01

    Gas catalytic combustion for gas stoves or cooking plates (closed catalytic burner system with ceramic plates) is a very promising technique in terms of ease of cleaning, power modulation and emissions. Previous investigations show that wire mesh catalysts, prepared and supplied by Catator AB (CAT), seem to be very well suited for such applications. Beside significantly reducing the NOx-emissions, these catalysts offer important advantages such as good design flexibility, low pressure drop and high heat transfer capacity, where the latter leads to a quick thermal response. Prior to this project, Gaz de France (GdF) made a series of measurements with CAT's wire mesh catalysts in their gas cooking plates and compared the measured performance with similar results obtained with theirs cordierite monolith catalysts. Compared to the monolith catalyst, the wire mesh catalyst was found to enable very promising results with respect to both emission levels (<10 mg NO{sub x} /kWh, <5 mg CO/kWh) and life-time (>8000 h vs. 700 h at 200 kW/m{sup 2}). It was however established that the radiation and hence, the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate, was significantly less than is usually measured in combination with the monolith (15 % vs. 32 %). It was believed that the latter could be improved by developing new burner designs based on CAT's wire mesh concept. As a consequence, a collaboration project between GdF, CAT and the Swedish Gas Technology AB was created. This study reports on the design, the construction and the evaluation of new catalytic burners, based on CAT's wire mesh catalysts, used for the combustion of natural gas in gas cooking stoves. The evaluation of the burners was performed with respect to key factors such as thermal efficiency, emission quality and pressure drop, etc, by the use of theoretical simulations and experimental tests. Impacts of parameters such as the the wire mesh number, the wire mesh structure (planar or folded), the

  2. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  3. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪文明; 王梓坤

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brown-ian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d = 3.

  4. Highly sensitive catalytic spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Prasad, Surendra

    2008-01-01

    A new and highly sensitive catalytic kinetic method (CKM) for the determination of ruthenium(III) has been established based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of L-phenylalanine ( L-Pheala) by KMnO 4 in highly alkaline medium. The reaction has been followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance at 526 nm. The proposed CKM is based on the fixed time procedure under optimum reaction conditions. It relies on the linear relationship where the change in the absorbance (Δ At) versus added Ru(III) amounts in the range of 0.101-2.526 ng ml -1 is plotted. Under the optimum conditions, the sensitivity of the proposed method, i.e. the limit of detection corresponding to 5 min is 0.08 ng ml -1, and decreases with increased time of analysis. The method is featured with good accuracy and reproducibility for ruthenium(III) determination. The ruthenium(III) has also been determined in presence of several interfering and non-interfering cations, anions and polyaminocarboxylates. No foreign ions interfered in the determination ruthenium(III) up to 20-fold higher concentration of foreign ions. In addition to standard solutions analysis, this method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of ruthenium(III) in drinking water samples. The method is highly sensitive, selective and very stable. A review of recently published catalytic spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ruthenium(III) has also been presented for comparison.

  5. Colorimetric detection of the flux of hydrogen peroxide released from living cells based on the high peroxidase-like catalytic performance of porous PtPd nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shenguang; Liu, Weiyan; Liu, Haiyun; Liu, Fang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Huang, Jiadong

    2015-09-15

    One-dimensional PtPd porous nanorods (PtPd PNRs) were successfully synthesized through a bromide-induced galvanic replacement reaction between Pd nanowires and K2PtCl6. The PtPd PNRs were porous and alloy-structured with Pt/Pd atomic ratio up to 1:1 which were demonstrated by spectroscopic methods. We had also proved that the nanorods could function as peroxidase mimetic for the detection of H2O2, with the detection limit of 8.6 nM and the linear range from 20 nM to 50 mM. The result demonstrated that PtPd PNRs exhibited much higher affinity to H2O2 over other peroxidase mimetics due to synergistically integrating highly catalytic activity of two metals. On the basis of the peroxidase-like activity, the PtPd PNRs were used as a signal transducer to develop a novel and simple colorimetric method for the study of the flux of H2O2 released from living cell. By using 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine as substrate, the H2O2 concentration could be distinguished by naked-eye observation without any instrumentation or complicated design. The method developed a new platform for a reliable collection of information on cellular reactive oxygen species release. And the nanomaterial could be used as a power tool for a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and medicine.

  6. Structural bases of dimerization of yeast telomere protein Cdc13 and its interaction with the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Sun; Neal F Lue; Ming Lei; Yuting Yang; Ke Wan; Ninghui Mao; Tai-Yuan Yu; Yi-Chien Lin; Diane C DeZwaan; Brian C Freeman; Jing-Jer Lin

    2011-01-01

    Budding yeast Cdc13-Stnl-Tenl (CST) complex plays an essential role in telomere protection and maintenance, and has been proposed to be a telomere-specific replication protein A (RPA)-like complex. Previous genetic and structural studies revealed a close resemblance between Stn1-Ten1 and RPA32-RPA14. However, the relationship between Cdc13 and RPA70, the largest subunit of RPA, has remained unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold of Cdc13. Although Cdc13 has an RPA70-like domain organization, the structures of Cdc13 OB folds are significantly different from their counterparts in RPA70, suggesting that they have distinct evolutionary origins. Furthermore, our structural and biochemical analyses revealed unexpected dimerization by the N-terminal OB fold and showed that homodimerization is probably a conserved feature of all Cdc13 proteins. We also uncovered the structural basis of the interaction between the Cdc13 N-terminal OB ' fold and the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase a (Pol1), and demonstrated a role for Cdc13 dimerization in Pol1 binding. Analysis of the phenotypes of mutants defective in Cdc13 dimerization and Cdc13-Pol1 interaction revealed multiple mechanisms by which dimerization regulates telomere lengths in vivo. Collectively, our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms and evolution of Cdc13.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene and Graphene Oxide Based Palladium Nanocomposites and Their Catalytic Applications in Carbon-Carbon Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minjae [Kunsan National Univ., Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bohyun; Lee, Yuna; Kim, Beomtae; Park, Joon B. [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    We have developed an efficient method to generate highly active Pd and PdO nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on graphene and graphene oxide (GO) by an impregnation method combined with thermal treatments in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} gas flows, respectively. The Pd NPs supported on graphene (Pd/G) and the PdO NPs supported on GO (PdO/GO) demonstrated excellent carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions under a solvent-free, environmentally-friendly condition. The morphological and chemical structures of PdO/GO and Pd/G were fully characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that the remarkable reactivity of the Pd/G and PdO/GO catalysts toward the cross-coupling reaction is attributed to the high degree of dispersion of the Pd and PdO NPs while the oxidative states of Pd and the oxygen functionalities of graphene oxide are not critical for their catalytic performance.

  8. l-Arginine grafted alginate hydrogel beads: A novel pH-sensitive system for specific protein delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Mohy Eldin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Novel pH-sensitive hydrogels based on l-arginine grafted alginate (Arg-g-Alg hydrogel beads were synthesized and utilized as a new carrier for protein delivery (BSA in specific pH media. l-arginine was grafted onto the polysaccharide backbone of virgin alginate via amine functions. Evidences of grafting of alginate were extracted from FT-IR and thermal analysis, while the morphological structure of Arg-g-Alg hydrogel beads was investigated by SEM photographs. Factors affecting on the grafting process e.g. l-arginine concentration, reaction time, reaction temperature, reaction pH, and crosslinking conditions, have been studied. Whereas, grafting efficiency of each factor was evaluated. Grafting of alginate has improved both thermal and morphological properties of Arg-g-Alg hydrogel beads. The swelling behavior of Arg-g-Alg beads was determined as a function of pH and compared with virgin calcium alginate beads. The cumulative in vitro release profiles of BSA loaded beads were studied at different pHs for simulating the physiological environments of the gastrointestinal tract. The amount of BSA released from neat alginate beads at pH 2 was almost 15% after 5 h, while the Arg-g-Alg beads at the same conditions were clearly higher than 45%, then it increased to 90% at pH 7.2. Accordingly, grafting of alginate has improved its release profile behavior particularly in acidic media. The preliminary results clearly suggested that the Arg-g-Alg hydrogel may be a potential candidate for polymeric carrier for oral delivery of protein or drugs.

  9. The free energy barrier for arginine gating charge translation is altered by mutations in the voltage sensor domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine S Schwaiger

    Full Text Available The gating of voltage-gated ion channels is controlled by the arginine-rich S4 helix of the voltage-sensor domain moving in response to an external potential. Recent studies have suggested that S4 moves in three to four steps to open the conducting pore, thus visiting several intermediate conformations during gating. However, the exact conformational changes are not known in detail. For instance, it has been suggested that there is a local rotation in the helix corresponding to short segments of a 3(10-helix moving along S4 during opening and closing. Here, we have explored the energetics of the transition between the fully open state (based on the X-ray structure and the first intermediate state towards channel closing (C1, modeled from experimental constraints. We show that conformations within 3 Å of the X-ray structure are obtained in simulations starting from the C1 model, and directly observe the previously suggested sliding 3(10-helix region in S4. Through systematic free energy calculations, we show that the C1 state is a stable intermediate conformation and determine free energy profiles for moving between the states without constraints. Mutations indicate several residues in a narrow hydrophobic band in the voltage sensor contribute to the barrier between the open and C1 states, with F233 in the S2 helix having the largest influence. Substitution for smaller amino acids reduces the transition cost, while introduction of a larger ring increases it, largely confirming experimental activation shift results. There is a systematic correlation between the local aromatic ring rotation, the arginine barrier crossing, and the corresponding relative free energy. In particular, it appears to be more advantageous for the F233 side chain to rotate towards the extracellular side when arginines cross the hydrophobic region.

  10. Resveratrol inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase and exerts a trypanocidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera Vera, Edward A; Sayé, Melisa; Reigada, Chantal; Damasceno, Flávia S; Silber, Ariel M; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-06-01

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transphosphorylation between ADP and phosphoarginine which plays a critical role in the maintenance of cellular energy homeostasis. Arginine kinase from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, meets the requirements to be considered as a potential therapeutic target for rational drug design including being absent in its mammalian hosts. In this study a group of polyphenolic compounds was evaluated as potential inhibitors of arginine kinase using molecular docking techniques. Among the analyzed compounds with the lowest free binding energy to the arginine kinase active site (market price; and (3) has as a well-defined target enzyme which is absent in the mammalian host, it is a promising compound as a trypanocidal drug for Chagas disease. PMID:26976067

  11. Corrosion Inhibition Effect of Carbon Steel in Sea Water by L-Arginine-Zn2+ System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gowri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency of L-Arginine-Zn2+ system in controlling corrosion of carbon steel in sea water has been evaluated by the weight-loss method. The formulation consisting of 250 ppm of L-Arginine and 25 ppm of Zn2+ has 91% IE. A synergistic effect exists between L-Arginine and Zn2+. Polarization study reveals that the L-Arginine-Zn2+ system functions as an anodic inhibitor and the formulation controls the anodic reaction predominantly. AC impedance spectra reveal that protective film is formed on the metal surface. Cyclic voltammetry study reveals that the protective film is more compact and stable even in a 3.5% NaCl environment. The nature of the protective film on a metal surface has been analyzed by FTIR, SEM, and AFM analysis.

  12. Endothelial arginine resynthesis contributes to the maintenance of vasomotor function in male diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Meens, Merlijn J P M T; Marion, Vincent;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) is essential for recycling L-citrulline, the by-product of NO synthase (NOS), to the NOS substrate L-arginine. Here, we assessed whether disturbed arginine resynthesis modulates endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in normal and diabetic male mice. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: Endothelium-selective Ass-deficient mice (Assfl/fl/Tie2Cretg/- = Ass-KOTie2) were generated by crossing Assfl/fl mice ( = control) with Tie2Cre mice. Gene ablation in endothelial cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Blood pressure (MAP) was recorded in 34-week-old male mice. Vasomotor...... of endothelial citrulline recycling to arginine did not affect blood pressure and systemic arterial vasomotor responses in healthy mice. EDNO-mediated vasodilatation was significantly more impaired in diabetic Ass-KOTie2 than in control mice demonstrating that endothelial arginine recycling becomes a limiting...

  13. Metabolomic analysis of plasma and liver from surplus arginine fed Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Synne M.; Assaad, Houssein I.; Lin, Gang; Wang, Junjun; Aksnes, Anders; Wu, Guoyao; Espe, Marit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the metabolic effect of surplus arginine (36.1 g/kg dry matter) compared to a control diet with required arginine (21.1 g/kg dry matter) in adult Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). Although the feeding trial had no significant effect on growth, there were significant differences in the metabolite profile in both plasma and liver in experimental group as compared to the control group. There was increased concentrations of biliverdin, PGF-2 alpha, oxidized glutathione, selenocysteine, two monoacylglycerols and a tripeptide in the liver as well as decreased concentrations of valine and a vitamin D3 metabolite in plasma of arginine supplemented fish. These results indicate that while surplus arginine does not affect growth or body weight, it induces metabolic changes in Atlantic salmon. PMID:25553364

  14. Utilization of ornithine and arginine as specific precursors of clavulanic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, J; Liras, P; Martín, J F

    1986-01-01

    Ornithine and arginine (5 to 20 mM), but not glutamic acid or proline, exerted a concentration-dependent stimulatory effect on the biosynthesis of clavulanic acid in both resting-cell cultures and long-term fermentations of Streptomyces clavuligerus. Ornithine strongly inhibited cephamycin biosynthesis in the same strain. [1-14C]-, [5-14C]-, or [U-14 C] ornithine was efficiently incorporated into clavulanic acid, whereas the incorporation of uniformly labeled glutamic acid was very poor. [U-14C] citrulline were not incorporated at all. Mutant nca-1, a strain that is blocked in clavulanic acid biosynthesis, did not incorporate arginine into clavulanic acid. S. clavuligerus showed arginase activity, converting arginine into ornithine, but not amidinotransferase activity. Both arginase activity and clavulanic acid formation were enhanced simultaneously by supplementing the production medium with 10 mM arginine. PMID:2877616

  15. Increased arginine vasopressin mRNA expression in the human hypothalamus in depression: A preliminary report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Meynen; U.A. Unmehopa; J.J. van Heerikhuize; M.A. Hofman; D.F. Swaab; W.J.G. Hoogendijk

    2006-01-01

    Background: Elevated arginine vasopressin (AVP) plasma levels have been observed in major depression, particularly in relation to the melancholic subtype. Two hypothalamic structures produce plasma vasopressin: the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). The aim of this study

  16. The effect of citrulline and arginine supplementation on lactic acidemia in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hattab, Ayman W; Emrick, Lisa T; Williamson, Kaitlin C; Craigen, William J; Scaglia, Fernando

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome is a mitochondrial disorder in which nitric oxide (NO) deficiency may play a role in the pathogenesis of several complications including stroke-like episodes and lactic acidosis. Supplementing the NO precursors arginine and citrulline restores NO production in MELAS syndrome. In this study we evaluated the effect of arginine or citrulline on lactic acidemia in adults with MELAS syndrome. Plasma lactate decreased significantly after citrulline supplementation, whereas the effect of arginine supplementation did not reach statistical significance. These results support the potential therapeutic utility of arginine and citrulline in MELAS syndrome and suggest that citrulline supplementation may be more efficacious. However, therapeutic efficacy of these compounds should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  17. Thermal, FT–IR and SHG efficiency studies of L-arginine doped KDP crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K D Parikh; D J Dave; B B Parekh; M J Joshi

    2007-04-01

    Potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) is a well known nonlinear optical (NLO) material with different applications. Since most of the amino acids exhibit NLO property, it is of interest to dope them in KDP. In the present study, amino acid L-arginine was doped in KDP. The doping of L-arginine was confirmed by FT–IR and paper chromatography. Thermogravimetry suggested that as the amount of doping increases the thermal stability decreases as well as the value of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters decreases. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of L-arginine doped KDP crystals was found to be increasing with doping concentration of L-arginine. The results are discussed here.

  18. Arginine metabolism by macrophages promotes cardiac and muscle fibrosis in mdx muscular dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Wehling-Henricks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most common, lethal disease of childhood. One of 3500 new-born males suffers from this universally-lethal disease. Other than the use of corticosteroids, little is available to affect the relentless progress of the disease, leading many families to use dietary supplements in hopes of reducing the progression or severity of muscle wasting. Arginine is commonly used as a dietary supplement and its use has been reported to have beneficial effects following short-term administration to mdx mice, a genetic model of DMD. However, the long-term effects of arginine supplementation are unknown. This lack of knowledge about the long-term effects of increased arginine metabolism is important because elevated arginine metabolism can increase tissue fibrosis, and increased fibrosis of skeletal muscles and the heart is an important and potentially life-threatening feature of DMD. METHODOLOGY: We use both genetic and nutritional manipulations to test whether changes in arginase metabolism promote fibrosis and increase pathology in mdx mice. Our findings show that fibrotic lesions in mdx muscle are enriched with arginase-2-expressing macrophages and that muscle macrophages stimulated with cytokines that activate the M2 phenotype show elevated arginase activity and expression. We generated a line of arginase-2-null mutant mdx mice and found that the mutation reduced fibrosis in muscles of 18-month-old mdx mice, and reduced kyphosis that is attributable to muscle fibrosis. We also observed that dietary supplementation with arginine for 17-months increased mdx muscle fibrosis. In contrast, arginine-2 mutation did not reduce cardiac fibrosis or affect cardiac function assessed by echocardiography, although 17-months of dietary supplementation with arginine increased cardiac fibrosis. Long-term arginine treatments did not decrease matrix metalloproteinase-2 or -9 or increase the expression of utrophin, which have

  19. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  20. Nonspecific blockade of vascular free radical signals by methylated arginine analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro M.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylated arginine analogues are often used as probes of the effect of nitric oxide; however, their specificity is unclear and seems to be frequently overestimated. This study analyzed the effects of NG-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA on the endothelium-dependent release of vascular superoxide radicals triggered by increased flow. Plasma ascorbyl radical signals measured by direct electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in 25 rabbits increased by 3.8 ± 0.7 nmol/l vs baseline (28.7 ± 1.4 nmol/l, P<0.001 in response to papaverine-induced flow increases of 121 ± 12%. In contrast, after similar papaverine-induced flow increases simultaneously with L-NMMA infusions, ascorbyl levels were not significantly changed compared to baseline. Similar results were obtained in isolated rabbit aortas perfused ex vivo with the spin trap a-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (N = 22. However, in both preparations, this complete blockade was not reversed by co-infusion of excess L-arginine and was also obtained by N-methyl-D-arginine, thus indicating that it is not related to nitric oxide synthase. L-arginine alone was ineffective, as previously demonstrated for NG-methyl-L-arginine ester (L-NAME. In vitro, neither L-arginine nor its analogues scavenged superoxide radicals. This nonspecific activity of methylated arginine analogues underscores the need for careful controls in order to assess nitric oxide effects, particularly those related to interactions with active oxygen species.

  1. Effect of L-arginine supplement on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitric oxide (NO has been reported to be a key mediator in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. NO is the oxidative metabolite of L-arginine, and is produced by a family of enzymes, collective termed nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Thus, administration of L-arginine might enhance liver regeneration after a hepatectomy. Another amino acid, L-glutamine, which plays an important role in catabolic states and is a crucial factor in various cellular and organ functions, is widely known to enhance liver regeneration experimentally. Thus, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of an L-arginine supplement on liver regeneration, and to compared this with supplementation with L-glutamine and L-alanine (the latter as a negative control, using a rat partial hepatectomy model. Methods Before and after a 70% hepatectomy, rats received one of three amino acid solutions (L-arginine, L-glutamine, or L-alanine. The effects on liver regeneration of the administered solutions were examined by assessment of restituted liver mass, staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and total RNA and DNA content 24 and 72 hours after the operation. Results At 72 hours after the hepatectomy, the restituted liver mass, the PCNA labeling index and the DNA quantity were all significantly higher in the L-arginine and L-glutamine groups than in the control. There were no significant differences in those parameters between the L-arginine and L-glutamine groups, nor were any significant differences found between the L-alanine group and the control. Conclusion Oral supplements of L-arginine and L-glutamine enhanced liver regeneration after hepatectomy in rats, suggesting that an oral arginine supplement can clinically improve recovery after a major liver resection.

  2. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits.

  3. Effects of inhaled L-arginine administration in a murine model of acute asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Arikan-Ayyildiz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Increased arginase activity in the airways decreases L-arginine and causes deficiency of bronchodilating and anti-inflammatory nitric oxide (NO in asthma. As, it is suggested that L-arginine may have therapeutic potential in asthma treatment, we aimed to investigate the effects of inhaled L-arginine on oxygen saturation (SaO₂ and airway histology in a murine model of acute asthma. Twenty eight BALB/c mice were divided into four groups; I, II, III and IV (control. All groups except the control were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. After establishement of acute asthma attack by metacholine administration, the mice were treated with inhaled L-arginine (Group I, saline (Group II and budesonide (Group III, respectively. SaO₂was measured by pulse oximeter just before and 5 min after methacholine. A third measurement of SaO₂was also obtained 15 min after drug administration in these study groups. Inflammation in the lung tissues of the sacrificed animals were scored to determine the effects of the study drugs. The number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL was determined. The results indicated that inflammatory scores significantly improved in groups receiving study drugs when compared with placebo and L-arginine was similar in decreasing scores when compared with budesonide. SaO₂had a tendency to increase after L-arginine administration after acute asthma attack and this increase was statistically significant (p=0.043. Eosinophilia in BAL significantly reduced in group receiving L-arginine when compared with placebo (p<0.05. Thus in this study we demonstrated that L-arginine improved SaO₂and inflammatory scores in an acute model of asthma.

  4. Influence of in ovo injection of L-arginine on productive and physiological performance of quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Al–Hayani,

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0-day-old quail embryos. On 0 day of incubation, 480 eggs (120 for each treatment group were injected with 0% arginine (C group; 1% arginine (T1; 2% arginine (T2; or 3% arginine (T3. After hatching, 336 quail chicks (84 chicks produced from each in ovo injection treatment were placed in an experimental quail house and distributed into 4 treatment groups of 3 replicates each with 16 quail chicks for each replicate. Traits determined in this study were hatchability rate, initial body weight (7 days of age, final body weight (42 days old, feed intake, weight gain, feed conversion ratio, proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, back bone, wings, neck, abdominal fat, liver, heart, and gizzard, blood serum glucose, protein, cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides, calcium and phosphorus and Results revealed that in ovo injection with different levels of L–arginine on 0 day of incubation resulted in significant increase (P≤0.05 in hatchability rate, initial body weight, final body weight, feed conversion ratio and serum glucose, protein, total protein, calcium, phosphorus and proportional weights of carcass, breast, legs, liver, heart, and gizzard and significant decrease (P≤0.05 in serum cholesterol, total lipids, triglycerides and proportional weight of back bone, wings and abdominal fat. In conclusion, the inoculation of different levels of L–arginine into eggs of 0–day–old quail embryos especially at the levels of 2% and 3% resulted in significant improvement in productive and physiological performance of quail. Hence in ovo injection with L–arginine could be used as a beneficial tool for enhance productive performance of quail.

  5. Chiral pharmacokinetics and inversion of NG-nitro-arginine in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-feiXIN; RuiTONG; YangFANG; Xiang-junZHOU; Yong-xiangWANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore pharmacokinetics of NG-nitro-D-arginine (D-NNA) and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) in conscious rats.METHODS: The plasma concentration of D-NNA and L-NNA were determined by chiral ligand exchange method with capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using non-compartment model and were fitted using a computer program DAS. Chiral inversion rate of D-NNA to L-

  6. L-Arginine but not L-glutamine likely increases exogenous carbohydrate oxidation during endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, David S; Clarke, Jim; Green, Jackson G; Shi, Xiaocai

    2012-07-01

    The addition of L-arginine or L-glutamine to glucose-electrolyte solutions can increase intestinal water, glucose, and sodium absorption in rats and humans. We evaluated the utility of L-arginine and L-glutamine in energy-rehydration beverages through assessment of exogenous glucose oxidation and perceptions of exertion and gastrointestinal distress during endurance exercise. Eight cyclists rode 150 min at 50% of peak power on four occasions while ingesting solutions at a rate of 150 mL 15 min(-1) that contained (13)C-enriched glucose (266 mmol L(-1)) and sodium citrate ([Na(+)] 60 mmol L(-1)), and either: 4.25 mmol L(-1) L-arginine or 45 mmol L(-1) L-glutamine, and as controls glucose only or no glucose. Relative to glucose only, L-arginine invoked a likely 12% increase in exogenous glucose oxidation (90% confidence limits: ± 8%); however, the effect of L-glutamine was possibly trivial (4.5 ± 7.3%). L-Arginine also led to very likely small reductions in endogenous fat oxidation rate relative to glucose (12 ± 4%) and L-glutamine (14 ± 4%), and relative to no glucose, likely reductions in exercise oxygen consumption (2.6 ± 1.5%) and plasma lactate concentration (0.20 ± 0.16 mmol L(-1)). Effects on endogenous and total carbohydrate oxidation were inconsequential. Compared with glucose only, L-arginine and L-glutamine caused likely small-moderate effect size increases in perceptions of stomach fullness, abdominal cramp, exertion, and muscle tiredness during exercise. Addition of L-arginine to a glucose and electrolyte solution increases the oxidation of exogenous glucose and decreases the oxygen cost of exercise, although the mechanisms responsible and impact on endurance performance require further investigation. However, L-arginine also increases subjective feelings of gastrointestinal distress, which may attenuate its other benefits. PMID:22048324

  7. Mechanism of arginine sensing by CASTOR1 upstream of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Robert A; Chantranupong, Lynne; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Sabatini, David M

    2016-08-11

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is a major regulator of eukaryotic growth that coordinates anabolic and catabolic cellular processes with inputs such as growth factors and nutrients, including amino acids. In mammals arginine is particularly important, promoting diverse physiological effects such as immune cell activation, insulin secretion, and muscle growth, largely mediated through activation of mTORC1 (refs 4, 5, 6, 7). Arginine activates mTORC1 upstream of the Rag family of GTPases, through either the lysosomal amino acid transporter SLC38A9 or the GATOR2-interacting Cellular Arginine Sensor for mTORC1 (CASTOR1). However, the mechanism by which the mTORC1 pathway detects and transmits this arginine signal has been elusive. Here, we present the 1.8 Å crystal structure of arginine-bound CASTOR1. Homodimeric CASTOR1 binds arginine at the interface of two Aspartate kinase, Chorismate mutase, TyrA (ACT) domains, enabling allosteric control of the adjacent GATOR2-binding site to trigger dissociation from GATOR2 and downstream activation of mTORC1. Our data reveal that CASTOR1 shares substantial structural homology with the lysine-binding regulatory domain of prokaryotic aspartate kinases, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway exploited an ancient, amino-acid-dependent allosteric mechanism to acquire arginine sensitivity. Together, these results establish a structural basis for arginine sensing by the mTORC1 pathway and provide insights into the evolution of a mammalian nutrient sensor. PMID:27487210

  8. Structural organization of the rat gene for the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Schmale, H.; Heinsohn, S; Richter, D

    1983-01-01

    The rat arginine vasopressin-neurophysin precursor gene has been isolated from a genomic library cloned in lambda phage Charon 4A. Restriction mapping and nucleotide sequence analysis demonstrated that the gene is 1.85 kilobase pairs long and contains two intervening sequences located in the protein coding region. Exon A encodes a putative signal peptide, the hormone arginine vasopressin and the variable N terminus of the carrier protein neurophysin, exon B encodes the highly conserved middle...

  9. Abnormal mitochondrial L-arginine transport contributes to the pathogenesis of heart failure and rexoygenation injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. METHODS AND RESULTS: In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01 compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05. The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1 exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. CONCLUSION: These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury.

  10. Abnormal Mitochondrial L-Arginine Transport Contributes to the Pathogenesis of Heart Failure and Rexoygenation Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Melissa; Joshi, Mandar; Horlock, Duncan; Lam, Nicholas T.; Gregorevic, Paul; McGee, Sean L.; Kaye, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impaired mitochondrial function is fundamental feature of heart failure (HF) and myocardial ischemia. In addition to the effects of heightened oxidative stress, altered nitric oxide (NO) metabolism, generated by a mitochondrial NO synthase, has also been proposed to impact upon mitochondrial function. However, the mechanism responsible for arginine transport into mitochondria and the effect of HF on such a process is unknown. We therefore aimed to characterize mitochondrial L-arginine transport and to investigate the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial L-arginine transport plays a key role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and myocardial injury. Methods and Results In mitochondria isolated from failing hearts (sheep rapid pacing model and mouse Mst1 transgenic model) we demonstrated a marked reduction in L-arginine uptake (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively) and expression of the principal L-arginine transporter, CAT-1 (p<0.001, p<0.01) compared to controls. This was accompanied by significantly lower NO production and higher 3-nitrotyrosine levels (both p<0.05). The role of mitochondrial L-arginine transport in modulating cardiac stress responses was examined in cardiomyocytes with mitochondrial specific overexpression of CAT-1 (mtCAT1) exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation stress. mtCAT1 cardiomyocytes had significantly improved mitochondrial membrane potential, respiration and ATP turnover together with significantly decreased reactive oxygen species production and cell death following mitochondrial stress. Conclusion These data provide new insights into the role of L-arginine transport in mitochondrial biology and cardiovascular disease. Augmentation of mitochondrial L-arginine availability may be a novel therapeutic strategy for myocardial disorders involving mitochondrial stress such as heart failure and reperfusion injury. PMID:25111602

  11. Probing catalytic rate enhancement during intramembrane proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, Elena; Smithers, Cameron C; Corradi, Valentina; Espiritu, Adam C; Young, Howard S; Tieleman, D Peter; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-09-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases involved in various signaling pathways. While the high-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed an active site comprised of a serine-histidine dyad and an extensive oxyanion hole, the molecular details of rhomboid catalysis were unclear because substrates are unknown for most of the family members. Here we used the only known physiological pair of AarA rhomboid with its psTatA substrate to decipher the contribution of catalytically important residues to the reaction rate enhancement. An MD-refined homology model of AarA was used to identify residues important for catalysis. We demonstrated that the AarA active site geometry is strict and intolerant to alterations. We probed the roles of H83 and N87 oxyanion hole residues and determined that substitution of H83 either abolished AarA activity or reduced the transition state stabilization energy (ΔΔG‡) by 3.1 kcal/mol; substitution of N87 decreased ΔΔG‡ by 1.6-3.9 kcal/mol. Substitution M154, a residue conserved in most rhomboids that stabilizes the catalytic general base, to tyrosine, provided insight into the mechanism of nucleophile generation for the catalytic dyad. This study provides a quantitative evaluation of the role of several residues important for hydrolytic efficiency and oxyanion stabilization during intramembrane proteolysis. PMID:27071148

  12. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  13. Arginine Inhibits Adsorption of Proteins on Polystyrene Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikiya, Yui; Tomita, Shunsuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific adsorption of protein on solid surfaces causes a reduction of concentration as well as enzyme inactivation during purification and storage. However, there are no versatile inhibitors of the adsorption between proteins and solid surfaces at low concentrations. Therefore, we examined additives for the prevention of protein adsorption on polystyrene particles (PS particles) as a commonly-used material for vessels such as disposable test tubes and microtubes. A protein solution was mixed with PS particles, and then adsorption of protein was monitored by the concentration and activity of protein in the supernatant after centrifugation. Five different proteins bound to PS particles through electrostatic, hydrophobic, and aromatic interactions, causing a decrease in protein concentration and loss of enzyme activity in the supernatant. Among the additives, including arginine hydrochloride (Arg), lysine hydrochloride, guanidine hydrochloride, NaCl, glycine, and glucose, Arg was most effective in preventing the binding of proteins to PS particles as well as activity loss. Moreover, even after the mixing of protein and PS particles, the addition of Arg caused desorption of the bound protein from PS particles. This study demonstrated a new function of Arg, which expands the potential for application of Arg to proteins. PMID:23967100

  14. Syntheses and molecular structures of novel Ru(II) complexes with bidentate benzimidazole based ligands and their catalytic efficiency for oxidation of benzyl alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Osman; Tercan, Melek; Özdemir, Namık

    2016-11-01

    Five bidentate ligands derived from quinoline-2-carboxylic acid, i.e. 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)quinoline (L1), 2-(1-benzyl-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)quinoline (L2), 2-[1-(2,3,5,6-tetramethylbenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L3), 2-[1-(4-chlorobenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L4), and 2-[1-(4-methylbenzyl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]quinoline (L5) were synthesized. Treatment of L1-5 with [RuCl2(p-cymene)]2 and KPF6 afforded six-coordinate piano-stool Ru(II) complexes, namely, [RuCl(L1)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C1), [RuCl(L2)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C2), [RuCl(L3)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C3), [RuCl(L4)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C4), and [RuCl(L5)(p-cymene)]PF6 (C5). Synthesized compounds were characterized with different techniques such as 1H and 13C NMR, FT-IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The solid state structure of L1 and C3 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The single crystal structure of C3 verified coordination of L3 to the Ru(II) center. The Ru(II) center has a pseudo-octahedral three legged piano stool geometry. The complexes C1-5 were tested as catalysts for the catalytic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde in the presence of periodic acid (H5IO6) (Substrate/Catalyst/Oxidant = 1/0.01/0.5). The best result was obtained with C2 (3 h→90%).

  15. Constructing a Catalytic Cycle for C-F to C-X (X = O, S, N) Bond Transformation Based on Gold-Mediated Ligand Nucleophilic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ji-Yun; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Gao-Xiang; Sun, Hao-Ling; Zhang, Jun-Long

    2016-03-01

    A tricoordinated gold(I) chloride complex, tBuXantphosAuCl, supported by a sterically bulky 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)xanthene ligand (tBuXantphos) was synthesized. This complex features a remarkably longer Au-Cl bond length [2.632(1) Å] than bicoordinated linear gold complexes (2.27-2.30 Å) and tricoordinated XantphosAuCl [2.462(1) Å]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of a cocrystal of tBuXantphosAuCl and pentafluoronitrobenzene (PFNB) and UV-vis spectroscopic titration experiments revealed the existence of an anion-π interaction between the Cl anion ligand and PFNB. Stoichiometric reaction between PFNB and tBuXantphosAuOtBu, after replacement of Cl by a more nucleophilic tBuO anion ligand, showed higher reactivity and para selectivity in the transformation of C-F to C-OtBu bond, distinctively different from that when only KOtBu was used (ortho selectivity) under the identical condition. Mechanistic studies including density functional theory calculations suggested a gold-mediated nucleophilic ligand attack of the C-F bond pathway via an SNAr process. On the basis of these results, using trimethylsilyl derivatives TMS-X (X = OMe, SEt, NEt2) as the nucleophilic ligand source and the fluorine acceptor, catalytic transformation of the C-F bond of aromatic substrates to the C-X (X = O, S, N) bond was achieved with tBuXantphosAuCl as the catalyst (up to 20 turnover numbers). PMID:26872251

  16. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3). PMID:25600300

  17. Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijs, Nikki; Vermeulen, Mechteld A R; Weeda, Viola B; Bading, James R; Houdijk, Alexander P J; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Malignancies induce disposal of arginine, an important substrate for the immune system. To sustain immune function, the tumor-bearing host accelerates arginine's intestinal-renal axis by glutamine mobilization from skeletal muscle and this may promote cachexia. Glutamine supplementation stimulates argi-nine production in healthy subjects. Arginine's intestinal-renal axis and the effect of glutamine supplementation in cancer cach-exia have not been investigated. This study evaluated the long-term adaptations of the interorgan pathway for arginine production following the onset of cachexia and the metabolic effect of glutamine supplementation in the cachectic state. Fischer-344 rats were randomly divided into a tumor-bearing group (n = 12), control group (n = 7) and tumor-bearing group receiving a glutamine-enriched diet (n = 9). Amino acid fluxes and net fractional extractions across intestine, kidneys, and liver were studied. Compared to controls, the portal-drained viscera of tumor-bearing rats took up significantly more glutamine and released significantly less citrulline. Renal metabolism was unchanged in the cachectic tumor-bearing rats compared with controls. Glutamine supplementation had no effects on intestinal and renal adaptations. In conclusion, in the cachectic state, an increase in intestinal glutamine uptake is not accompanied by an increase in renal arginine production. The adaptations found in the cachectic, tumor-bearing rat do not depend on glutamine availability.

  18. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Gong

    Full Text Available Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  19. Arginine- and Polyamine-Induced Lactic Acid Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zheng; Tang, M Matt; Wu, Xueliang; Phillips, Nancy; Galkowski, Dariusz; Jarvis, Gary A; Fan, Huizhou

    2016-01-01

    Microbe-derived lactic acid protects women from pathogens in their genital tract. The purpose of this study was to determine lactic acid susceptibility of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and identify potential acid resistance mechanisms present in this pathogen. Tested in vitro, lactic acid killed all 10 gonococcal strains analyzed in a low pH-dependent manner. Full inactivation occurred at pH 4.5. At low pH, lactic acid treatment resulted in the entry of the DNA-binding fluorochrome propidium iodide into the microbial cells, suggesting that hydrogen ions from lactic acid compromise the integrity of the bacterial cell wall/membrane. Most likely, hydrogen ions also inactivate intracellular proteins since arginine rendered significant protection against lactic acid presumably through action of the gonococcal arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme located in the bacterial cytoplasm. Surprisingly, arginine also lessened lactic acid-mediated cell wall/membrane disruption. This effect is probably mediated by agmatine, a triamine product of arginine decarboxylase, since agmatine demonstrated a stronger protective effect on GC than arginine at equal molar concentration. In addition to agmatine, diamines cadaverine and putrescine, which are generated by bacterial vaginosis-associated microbes, also induced significant resistance to lactic acid-mediated GC killing and cell wall/membrane disruption. These findings suggest that the arginine-rich semen protects gonococci through both neutralization-dependent and independent mechanisms, whereas polyamine-induced acid resistance contributes to the increased risk of gonorrhea in women with bacterial vaginosis.

  20. Relationship of arginine with lysine in diets for laying Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Souza Reis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the relationship of arginine with lysine for Japanese quails during the period of production, an experiment was conducted using 360 subspecies of Japanese quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica with 162 days of age, distributed in a completely randomized design. Diets were formulated with corn, soybean meal, sorghum and wheat bran containing 20.0% crude protein and 2,800 kcal ME/kg. The basal diet contained suboptimal level of lysine equal to 1% and was supplemented with five levels of L-arginine 99% (0.032; 0.083; 0.134; 0.185 and 0.236% to replace the glutamic acid, corresponding to the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine of 1.16, 1.21, 1.26, 1.31 and 1.36. The parameters studied were: feed intake, egg production per hen/day, egg production per hen housed, commercial egg production, egg weight, egg mass, feed conversion by egg mass, feed conversion per dozen eggs, weight and percentage of components of the eggs (yolk, albumen and shell and specific gravity. There was no significant effect on the relationship of arginine with digestible lysine in the diet of Japanese quails for any of the parameters examined. The arginine/lysine ratio of 1.16, which corresponds to a daily intake of 288.84 mg of arginine, provides satisfactory performance and egg quality of Japanese quails.