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Sample records for cast case-shaped parts

  1. Prediction of Part Distortion in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Allen Miller

    2005-03-30

    The die casting process is one of the net shape manufacturing techniques and is widely used to produce high production castings with tight tolerances for many industries. An understanding of the stress distribution and the deformation pattern of parts produced by die casting will result in less deviation from the part design specification, a better die design and eventually more productivity and cost savings. This report presents methods that can be used to simulate the die casting process in order to predict the deformation and stresses in the produced part and assesses the degree to which distortion modeling is practical for die casting at the current time. A coupled thermal-mechanical finite elements model was used to simulate the die casting process. The simulation models the effect of thermal and mechanical interaction between the casting and the die. It also includes the temperature dependant material properties of the casting. Based on a designed experiment, a sensitivity analysis was conducted on the model to investigate the effect of key factors. These factors include the casting material model, material properties and thermal interaction between casting and dies. To verify the casting distortion predictions, it was compared against the measured dimensions of produced parts. The comparison included dimensions along and across the parting plane and the flatness of one surface.

  2. Physical Simulation of Investment Casting of Complex Shape Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Mehdi; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Maestro, Laura; De Azua, Aitor Eguidazu Ruiz; Sabirov, Ilchat

    2015-05-01

    Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/ γ' eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation.

  3. Study on heat treatment blister of squeeze casting parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Wen-jun; QI Lin; QI Pi-xiang

    2007-01-01

    Heat treatment blister is one of the common defects found in squeeze casting parts, which is related to squeeze mode, process and mold. For direct squeeze-casting parts, solution heat treatment can be performed smoothly as long as oil-based paint is not used and air exhaust is well arranged. For indirect squeeze casting parts,solution heat treatment can also be applied when additional factors are taken into consideration, including well designed internal feeding system and strictly controlled liquid metal filling velocity to prevent from inclusions.

  4. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important

  5. The cast aluminum denture base. Part I: Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, A R

    1980-06-01

    Experiments with various casting techniques have been done, and aluminum base dentures have been made for many patients. The subjective clinical response from patients wearing aluminum dentures has not been different from patients wearing acrylic resin dentures. However, Brudvik and Holt have stated that they have had marked clinical success in using aluminum bases. A literature review on using aluminum as a denture base material has been presented, and the rationale for its use has been discussed. In part II, a technique will be described that can be used for casting aluminum denture bases.

  6. The potential of centrifugal casting for the production of near net shape uranium parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E. [United States Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO (US). Dept. of Engineering Mechanics

    1993-09-01

    This report was written to provide a detailed summary of a literature survey on the near net shape casting process of centrifugal casting. Centrifugal casting is one potential casting method which could satisfy the requirements of the LANL program titled Near Net Shape Casting of Uranium for Reduced Environmental, Safety and Health Impact. In this report, centrifugal casting techniques are reviewed and an assessment of the ability to achieve the near net shape and waste minimization goals of the LANL program by using these techniques is made. Based upon the literature reviewed, it is concluded that if properly modified for operation within a vacuum, vertical or horizontal centrifugation could be used to safely cast uranium for the production of hollow, cylindrical parts. However, for the production of components of geometries other than hollow tubes, vertical centrifugation could be combined with other casting methods such as semi-permanent mold or investment casting.

  7. Dimensional accuracy of small gold alloy castings. Part 4. The casting ring and ring liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, E F

    1992-04-01

    The role of the casting ring and its asbestos liner is discussed. Asbestos as a liner has now largely been replaced by two alternative materials, one based on cellulose and the other on ceramic fibres. The limited literature on the effect of these newer materials on casting accuracy is also reviewed as their introduction may require significant changes in the traditional technology of dental casting.

  8. Wear of double crown systems: electroplated vs. casted female part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The wear of telescopic crowns is a common problem often reducing the patient's satisfaction with the denture and resulting in a renewal of the denture. The study aims to compare the wear behavior of conical crowns using electroplated copings (group E with standard telescopic crowns with cast female parts (group C. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 10 conical crowns were milled for each group of a cast gold alloy. The specimen of group E had a conicity of 2º. The cast secondary crowns of group C had a 0º design. The electroplated coping was established by direct electroforming. An apparatus accomplishing 10,000 wear cycles performed the wear test. The retentive forces and the correlating distance during insertion and separation were measured. The wear test was separated in a start phase, an initial wear phase and the long term wear period. The retention force value and the force-distance integral of the first 0.33 mm of each cycle were calculated. RESULTS: The retentive forces were significantly higher for group E and the integrals were significantly lower for this group except the integral at cycle 10,000. The changes of retention force and integral did not differ significantly between both groups in all phases. The change of the integrals as well as the integral at the particular cycles showed higher interquartile distances for group C. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this study the tested conical crowns showed clinically acceptable retentive properties. The values reached a range comparable to retentive elements tested in recent literature. The values of group C showed higher ranges. The force measured for group E was significantly higher than for group C but the integrals showed an opposite tendency. The results indicate that an exclusive analysis of the force is not sufficient as the integral is not equivalent to the force although it describes the retentive property of the system in a better way than the force over a distance is

  9. Modelling the solidification of ductile cast iron parts with varying wall thicknesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mathias Karsten; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Thorborg, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    ] with a 2D FE solution of the heat conduction equation is developed in an in-house code and model parameters are calibrated using experimental data from representative castings made of ductile cast iron. The main focus is on the influence of casting thickness and resulting local cooling conditions......In the present paper modelling the solidification of cast iron parts is considered. Common for previous efforts in this field is that they have mainly considered thin walled to medium thickness castings. Hence, a numerical model combining the solidification model presented by Lesoultet al. [1...

  10. Temperature measurement during solidification of thin wall ductile cast iron. Part 2: Numerical simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Temperature measurements in castings are carried out with thermocouples (TC’s), which are inserted in the melt. The TC influence solidification of the casting, especially in thin wall castings where the heat content of the melt is small compared to the cooling power of the TC. A numerical analysis...... of factors influencing temperature measurement in thin walled castings was carried out. The calculations are based on and compared with experiments presented in part 1 of this paper. The analysis shows that the presence of the TC has only a minor influence on the microstructure of the casting. The influence...

  11. The Properties of Ammonium Dinitramine (ADN): Part 2: Melt Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahma, A.; Edvinsson, H.; Östmark, H.

    2010-04-01

    A melt casting technique for ammonium dinitramine (ADN) and ADN/aluminum was developed. ADN proved relatively easy to cast, when 1% of magnesium oxide was used as a stabilizer and crystallization kernels. Densities of ADN/MgO 99/1 were 92 to 97% of theoretical mean density (TMD) and those of ADN/Al/MgO 64/35/1 were between 95 and 99% of TMD. Sedimentation of Al in the melt was prevented and the particle wetting was ensured by selecting a suitable particle size for Al. No gelling agents or other additives were used. The casting process and factors influencing it are discussed.

  12. Cast Steels for Creep-resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

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    A. Drotlew

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium ironalloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  13. Cast Steels for Creep-Resistant Parts Used in Heat Treatment Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Creep-resistant parts of heat treatment furnaces are in most cases made from high-alloyed chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium iron alloys, both cast and wrought. This paper presents the types of casting alloys used for this particular purpose, since the majority of furnace components are made by the casting process. Standards were cited which give symbols of alloy grades used in technical specifications by the domestic industry. It has been indicated that castings made currently are based on a wider spectrum of the creep-resistant alloy grades than the number of alloys covered by the standards. Alloy grades recommended by the technical literature for individual parts of the furnace equipment were given. The recommendations reflect both the type of the technological process used and the technical tasks performed by individual parts of the furnace equipment. Comments were also made on the role of individual alloying elements in shaping the performance properties of castings.

  14. Integrated Modeling of Process, Structures and Performance in Cast Parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr

    the importance of a good gating system design. Hence, it is common to see, especially in gravity sand casting, “traditional gating systems” which are known for a straight tapered down runner a well base and 90º bends in the runner system. There are theories supported by experimental results claiming that flow...... patterns induced by non-optimal gating systems can cause a variety of defects which are generally not considered to be filling related, such as hot tears and channel segregates. By improving the gating technology in traditional gating systems it is possible to achieve much higher casting integrity.......g. chill design, riser design, gating system design, etc., which would satisfy these objectives the most. The first step in the numerical casting process simulation is to analyze mould filling where the emphasis is put on the gating system design. There are still a lot of foundry specialists who ignore...

  15. Rapid precision casting for complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts

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    Xuanpu DONG

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Based on Vacuum Differential Pressure Casting (VDPC precision forming technology and the Selective Laser Sintering (SLS Rapid Prototyping (RP technology, a rapid manufacturing method called Rapid Precision Casting (RPC process from computer three-dimensional solid models to metallic parts was investigated. The experimental results showed that the main advantage of RPC was not only its ability to cast higher internal quality and more accurate complex thin-walled aluminum alloy parts, but also the greatly-reduced lead time cycle from Selective Laser Sintering(SLS plastic prototyping to metallic parts. The key forming technology of RPC for complex thin-walled metallic parts has been developed for new casting production and Rapid Tooling (RT, and it is possible to rapidly manufacture high-quality and accurate metallic parts by means of RP in foundry industry.

  16. Optimization of die filling in high pressure die cast part using MAGMAsoft®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    using the commercial software code MAGMAsoft®. The first process analysis revealed problems and defects of the casting which were cold shuts and out-of plane distortions. Secondly adjustment in the geometry of the casting and the gating system were carried out and evaluated. Last, modifications...... in the process and machine parameters were done and assessed. All simulations revealed that, the main causes of the problems were: a poor geometry of the casting leading to an improper filling pattern, and a massive gating system bringing thermal imbalance into the solidification process. Thus deformations due......Integrated modeling of an entire casting process has become a tool which favors design and optimization of manufactured parts. The aim of this project was to examine and optimize a high-pressure die cast part and its production process with respect to die filling and issues of residual stresses...

  17. 3D scanning based mold correction for planar and cylindrical parts in aluminum die casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Seno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum die casting is an important manufacturing process for mechanical components. Die casting is known to be more accurate than other types of casting; however, post-machining is usually necessary to achieve the required accuracy. The goal of this investigation is to develop machining- free aluminum die casting. Improvement of the accuracy of planar and cylindrical parts is expected by correcting metal molds. In the proposed method, the shape of cast aluminum made with the initial metal molds is measured by 3D scanning. The 3D scan data includes information about deformations that occur during casting. Therefore, it is possible to estimate the deformation and correction amounts by comparing 3D scan data with product computer-aided design (CAD data. We corrected planar and cylindrical parts of the CAD data for the mold. In addition, we corrected the planar part of the metal mold using the corrected mold data. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by evaluating the accuracy improvement of the cast aluminum made with the corrected mold.

  18. Understanding the Relationship Between Filling Pattern and Part Quality in Die Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerald Brevick; R. Allen Miller

    2004-03-15

    The overall objective of this research project was to investigate phenomena involved in the filling of die cavities with molten alloy in the cold chamber die-casting process. It has long been recognized that the filling pattern of molten metal entering a die cavity influences the quality of die-cast parts. Filling pattern may be described as the progression of molten metal filling the die cavity geometry as a function of time. The location, size and geometric configuration of points of metal entry (gates), as well as the geometry of the casting cavity itself, have great influence on filling patterns. Knowledge of the anticipated filling patterns in die-castings is important for designers. Locating gates to avoid undesirable flow patterns that may entrap air in the casting is critical to casting quality - as locating vents to allow air to escape from the cavity (last places to fill). Casting quality attributes that are commonly flow related are non-fills, poor surface finish, internal porosity due to trapped air, cold shuts, cold laps, flow lines, casting skin delamination (flaking), and blistering during thermal treatment.

  19. Solidified structure of thin-walled titanium parts by vertical centrifugal casting

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    Wu Shiping

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The solidified structure of the thin-walled and complicated Ti-6Al-4V castings produced by the vertical centrifugal casting process was studied in the present work. The results show that the wall thickness of the section is featured with homogeneously distributed fine equiaxial grains, compared with the microstructure of the thick-walled section. The grain size of the castings has a tendency to decrease gradually with the increasing of the centrifugal radius. The inter-lamellar space in thick-walled casting parts is bigger than that of the thin-walled parts, and the profile of inter-lamellar space is not susceptible to the centrifugal radius.

  20. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC Casting of 6063 Type Billets. Part I: Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, W.; Jensen, E. K.

    Influence on starting crack tendency (hot cracks in billet center) of varying a number of casting parameters was studied by experiments (Part I) and by model calculations (Part II). Effects of varying the following factors were examined in detail: casting conditions, starting block material, insulating various parts of the starting block, starting block shape. Both experiments and calculations pointed to starting block shape as a most important single factor controlling starting cracks. By using the in experiments determined and calculated depth of the liquid sump as a criterion, a proper shape was found that practically eliminates the starting crack problems in billets of the AA 606 3 type alloys.

  1. Dimensional accuracy of small gold alloy castings. Part 1. A brief history and the behaviour of inlay waxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morey, E F

    1991-08-01

    Part 1 reviews published studies which relate to materials and techniques contributing to the dimensional accuracy of small dental castings. A brief history of the cire perdue or lost-wax method of casting alloys and the development of modern dental casting materials and techniques are presented. Data on the behaviour of inlay wax, in particular its contraction and distortion, are reviewed as is the extensive literature about the casting shrinkage of gold alloys (Part 2) and the setting and thermal expansion of investments under both laboratory and practical conditions (Part 3). Part 4 discusses the role of the casting ring and its asbestos liner. Asbestos as a liner has now largely been replaced by two alternative materials, one based on cellulose and the other on ceramic fibres. The limited literature on the effect of these newer materials on casting accuracy is also reviewed, as their introduction may require significant changes in the traditional technology of dental casting.

  2. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper continues the article published by Archives of Foundry Engineering, vol. 9, issue 1/2009, pp. 185-290, that presented influence of chemical composition of hypo- and hypereutectic nickel-manganese-copper alloyed cast iron on properties of the contained flake graphite. In this second part of the research, effect of chemical composition of hypereutectic cast iron containing 3.5÷5.1% C, 1.7÷2.8% Si, 3.5÷10.5 %Ni, 2.0÷8.0% Mn, 0.1÷3.5% Cu, 0.14÷0.17% P and 0.02÷0.04% S on properties of flake graphite is determined. Evolution of graphite properties with changing eutecticity degree of the examined cast iron is presented. For selected castings, histograms of primary and eutectic graphite are presented, showing quantities of graphite precipitates in individual size ranges and their shape determined by the coefficient ξ defined as ratio of a precipitate area to square of its circumference. Moreover, presented are equations obtained by discriminant analysis to determine chemical composition of Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron which guarantee the most favourable distribution of A-type graphite from the point of view of castings properties.

  3. The forty years of vermicular graphite cast iron development in China (Part

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    QIU han-quan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In China, the research and development of vermicular graphite cast iron (VGCI as a new type of engineering material, were started in the same period as in other developed countries; however, its actual industrial application was even earlier. In China, the deep and intensive studies on VGCI began as early as the 1960s. According to the incomplete statistics to date, more than 600 papers on VGCI have been published by Chinese researchers and scholars at national and international conferences, and in technical journals. More than ten types of production methods and more than thirty types of treatment alloy have been studied. Formulae for calculating the critical addition of treatment alloy required to produce VGCI have been put forward, and mechanisms for explaining the formation of dross during treatment were brought forward. The casting properties, metallographic structure, mechanical and physical properties and machining performance of VGCI, as well as the relationships between them, have all been studied in detail. The Chinese Standards for VGCI and VGCI metallographic structure have been issued. In China, the primary crystallization of VGCI has been studied by many researchers and scholars. The properties of VGCI can be improved by heat treatment and addition of alloying elements enabling its applications to be further expanded. Hundreds of kinds of VGCI castings have been produced and used in vehicles, engines, mining equipment, metallurgical products serviced under alternating thermal load, machinery, hydraulic components, textile machine parts and military applications. The heaviest VGCI casting produced is 38 tons and the lightest is only 1 kg. Currently, the annual production of the VGCI in China is about 200 000 tons. The majority of castings are made from cupola iron without pre-treatment, however, they are also produced from electric furnaces and by duplex melting from cupolaelectric furnaces or blast furnace-electric furnace

  4. The forty years of vermicular graphite cast iron development in China (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Zheng-de

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available In China, the research and development of vermicular graphite cast iron (VGCI as a new type of engineering material, were started in the same period as in other developed countries; however, its actual industrial application was even earlier. In China, the deep and intensive studies on VGCI began as early as the 1960s. According to the incomplete statistics to date, more than 600 papers on VGCI have been published by Chinese researchers and scholars at national and international conferences, and in technical journals. More than ten types of production methods and more than thirty types of treatment alloy have been studied. Formulae for calculating the critical addition of treatment alloy required to produce VGCI have been put forward, and mechanisms for explaining the formation of dross during treatment were brought forward. The casting properties, metallographic structure, mechanical and physical properties and machining performance of VGCI, as well as the relationships between them, have all been studied in detail. The Chinese Standards for VGCI and VGCI metallographic structure have been issued. In China, the primary crystallization of VGCI has been studied by many researchers and scholars. The properties of VGCI can be improved by heat treatment and addition of alloying elements enabling its applications to be further expanded. Hundreds of kinds of VGCI castings have been produced and used in vehicles, engines, mining equipment, metallurgical products serviced under alternating thermal load, machinery, hydraulic components, textile machine parts and military applications. The heaviest VGCI casting produced is 38 tons and the lightest is only 1 kg. Currently, the annual production of the VGCI in China is about 200 000 tons. The majority of castings are made from cupola iron without pre-treatment, however, they are also produced from electric furnaces and by duplex melting from cupolaelectric furnaces or blast furnace-electric furnace

  5. Investigations about Starting Cracks in DC-Casting of 6063-Type Billets Part II: Modelling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, E. K.; Schneider, W.

    Influence on starting crack tendency of varying a number of casting parameters has been studied by experiments, Part I (1), and by model calculations, Part II. Both studies point to starting block shape as a most important single factor in controlling starting cracks. By using the thermal model ALSIM-2 in analysing initial experimental results, the variable heat transfer towards the starting block was determined. This made possible a satisfactory model analysis of the starting phase and likewise the formulation of a useful cracking concept. Thus by using calculated and measured liquid pool depth curve in the starting phase of casting as a basis, an effective starting block shape was found. This new shape practically eliminates the starting crack problems in extrusion billets of the AA6063 type alloys.

  6. Casting traceability with direct part marking using reconfigurable pin-type tooling based on paraffin–graphite actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2012-01-01

    Green sand moulding machines for cast iron foundries are presently unable to uniquely identify individual castings. An insert tool concept is developed and tested via incremental mock-up development. The tool is part of the pattern plate and changes shape between each moulding, thus giving each...... simulated processing conditions. The marker geometry limitations have been tested using static symbol patterns, both for sand embossing and actual casting marking. The marked castings have successfully been identified with decoding software. The study shows that the function of each element...

  7. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. Janus

    2010-01-01

    .... In this second part of the research, effect of chemical composition of hypereutectic cast iron containing 3.5÷5.1% C, 1.7÷2.8% Si, 3.5÷10.5 %Ni, 2.0÷8.0% Mn, 0.1÷3.5% Cu, 0.14÷0.17% P and 0.02÷0.04...

  8. Sand, die and investment cast parts via the SLS selective laser sintering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Crommert, Simon; Seitz, Sandra; Esser, Klaus K.; McAlea, Kevin

    1997-09-01

    Complex three-dimensional parts can be manufactured directly from CAD data using rapid prototyping processes. SLS selective laser sintering is a rapid prototyping process developed at the University of Texas at Austin and commercialized by DTM Corporation. SLS parts are constructed layer by layer from powdered materials using laser energy to melt CAD specified cross sections. Polymer, metal, and ceramic powders are all potential candidate materials for this process. In this paper the fabrication of complex metal parts rapidly using the investment, die and sand casting technologies in conjunction with the selective laser sintering process are being explained and discussed. TrueForm and polycarbonate were used for investment casting, while RapidSteel metal mould inserts were used for the die casting trials. Two different SandForm materials, zircon and silica sand, are currently available for the direct production of sand moulds and cores. The flexible and versatile selective laser sintering process all these materials on one single sinterstation. Material can be changed fast and easily between two different builds.

  9. APPLICATION OF POLYSTYRENE FOAM CORE FUSIBLE PATTERNS IN PRODUCTION OF GAS TURBINES’ CAST PARTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Shinsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The task of replacing the LVM dissolves polystyrene molding on models is at the present time, technologically, economically and environmentally promising from the point of view of industrial applications for gas turbine plants in Ukraine. The authors proposed and tested manufacturing process of casting ceramic molds way to remove the polystyrene model of the dissolution of her organic solvents. Kinetic parameters of the process of dissolving and removing patterns of degradation products the polystyrene in the group of solvents depending on the type and amount of polystyrene were identified. The absence of surface defects of castings, reduction of roughness, increased their accuracy class in comparison to accepted technological regulations of the process of production, which reduced the cost of machined parts and increased utilization of expensive heat-resistant alloys were produced.

  10. High-strength cast irons used for manufacturing parts of vaz passenger cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaigora, N. I.

    1996-10-01

    Methods for solving problems arising in the production of high-strength cast iron with stable properties and structure are considered. Results of introduction of new grades of high-strength cast iron instead of malleable cast iron and camshaft cast iron in the Volzhskii Automobile Plant are described.

  11. Theoretic and Experimental Studies on the Casting of Large Die-Type Parts Made of Lamellar Graphite Grey Pig Irons by Using the Technology of Polystyrene Moulds Casting from Two Sprue Cups

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    Constantin Marta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative analysis between the practical results of pig iron die-type part casting and the results reached by simulation. The insert was made of polystyrene, and the casting was downward vertical. As after the part casting and heat treatment cracks were observed in the part, it became necessary to locate and identify these fissures and to establish some measures for eliminating the casting defects and for locating them. The research method was the comparisons of defects identified through verifications, measurements, and metallographic analyses applied to the cast part with the results of some criteria specific to simulation after simulating the casting process. In order to verify the compatibility between reality and simulation, we then simulated the part casting respecting the real conditions in which it was cast. By visualising certain sections of the cast part during solidification, relevant details occur about the possible evolution of defects. The simulation software was AnyCasting, the measurements were done through nondestructive methods.

  12. Temperature measurement during solidification of thin wall ductile cast iron. Part 1: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Temperature measurement using thermocouples (TC’s) influence solidification of the casting, especially in thin wall castings. The problems regarding acquisition of detailed cooling curves from thin walled castings is discussed. Experiments were conducted where custom made TC’s were used to acquire...... cooing curves in thin wall ductile iron castings. The experiments show how TC’s of different design interact with the melt and how TC design and surface quality affect the results of the data acquisition. It is discussed which precautions should be taken to ensure reliable acquisition of cooling curves...

  13. Thermo-mechanical modelling of aluminium cast parts during solution treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, A.; Hattel, J. H.; Thorborg, J.

    2006-06-01

    The increasing interest of the automotive industry in reducing the weight of cars has resulted in increasing replacement of steel with aluminium parts as well as in an optimization of the design of the components, through structural analysis by FE-codes. The design and manufacturing of these components are important for the lifetime and reliability of the final parts. It is common practice to do load analyses in order to evaluate component lifetime and to do design optimization. However, in order to improve these structural analyses it is important to include the full load history of the material including the influence of the casting process and the subsequent solution treatment phase, quenching and artificial ageing. These manufacturing stages can have a high influence on the deformation and development of residual stresses which are important as initial conditions for subsequent load analysis during service. This paper presents a 3D numerical procedure capable of modelling the development of deformations and stresses from the full thermal history starting from mould filling through solidification to cooling and subsequent reheating for solution treatment, quenching and artificial ageing. However, in the present work the focus is on the modelling of the solution treatment only. The mechanical material model is described by a unified creep model to include rate effects and inelastic behaviour. An industrial component is used as an example to present the influence of creep at high temperature and calculated results with regard to deformations are compared with measurements.

  14. Reducing non value adding aluminium alloy in production of parts through high pressure die casting

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pereira, MFVT

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties and issues associated with the economics of the process and die life in casting Aluminium alloys, as experienced by the high pressure die casting industry, were reasons behind undertaking this research project. The use of a tungsten...

  15. Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100: Part II. Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Max A.; Fuchs, Gerhard E.

    2016-05-01

    Oxide bifilms are a proposed casting inclusion reported to have been observed in vacuum investment cast polycrystalline Ni-based superalloys. Ongoing research seeks to determine if current superalloy casting practices can result in the formation of oxide bifilms, and subsequently if it is possible to observe and characterize this phenomenon. The effect of casting atmosphere, turbulence, filtering, hot isostatic pressing, and heat treatment has been investigated to identify the critical parameters that have been reported to result in bifilm formation in Ni-based superalloy IN100. Scanning Auger microscopy (SAM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) were utilized to characterize samples from each casting condition. In situ ultrahigh vacuum Auger fractography did not indicate the presence of bifilms on the fracture behavior of IN100 in any processing condition. SAM analysis identified a sulfur-enriched monolayer on the surface of dendritic casting porosity, and identified heterogeneous Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100. SEM analysis also indicated the presence of Ti oxycarbide inclusions in air cast IN100, and determined that these inclusion structures consist of fine blocky external M(Ti, Mo)C carbide enveloping an internal core of alumina. HR-TEM analysis indicated that none of the oxycarbide inclusion interfaces exist as discontinuous unbound interfaces, and that the internal alumina core is an ultra-fine polycrystalline structure.

  16. Numerical modelling of thin-walled hypereutectic ductile cast iron parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Karl Martin; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2006-01-01

    Solidification of hypereutectic thin-walled ductile cast iron has been modelled in one dimension taking into account the precipitation of off-eutectic austenite dendrites during solidification. The simulations have been compared with casting experiments on plate geometries with plate thicknesses...

  17. Characteristics of flake graphite in Ni-Mn-Cu cast iron. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Janus

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between chemical composition of cast iron and properties of flake graphite occurring in hypoeutectic and eutectic nickelmanganese-copper cast iron was determined. The research covered over 60 alloys of cast iron containing 1.6 to 4.1 % C, 1.3 to 2.8 % Si,2.4 to 10.5 % Ni, 0.2 to 8.2 % Mn, 0.1 to 3.5 % Cu, 0.14 to 0.17 % P and 0.02 to 0.04 % S. Evolution of graphite properties with changingeutecticity degree of the examined cast iron is presented. For selected castings, histograms of eutectic graphite colonies are presented, showing numbers of graphite precipitates in individual size ranges and their shape described by the coefficient

  18. Transient Fluid Flow during Steady Continuous Casting of Steel Slabs: Part II. Effect of Double-Ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cho, Seong-Mook; Kim, Seon-Hyo; Thomas, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    ... steady steel slab casting. In Part II of this two-part article, the effect of applying a static magnetic field on stabilizing the transient flow is investigated by modeling a double-ruler Electro-Magnetic Braking (EMBr...

  19. Modernity of parts in casting machines and coefficients of total productive maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Borkowski

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of equipment efficiency in casting machines on the quality of die castings made of Al-Si alloys in consideration of their modernity. Analysis focused on two cold-chamber die-casting machines. The assessment of modernity ofthe equipment was made based on ABC analysis of technology and Parker’s scale. Then, the coefficients of total productive maintenance(TPM were employed for assessment of the efficiency of both machines. Using correlation coefficients r allowed authors to demonstrate the relationships between individual TPM coefficients and the number of non-conforming products. The finding of the study is pointing to the differences between the factors which determine the quality of castings resulting from the level of modernity of machines.

  20. FORMING A PARTING LAYER OF COATING ON THE SURFACE OF THE MOULD DURING DIE-CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pivovarchik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research on the study of the possibility of accumulation of the lubricating layer coating on the surface of the separation process of foundry equipment with high pressure die casting aluminum alloys.

  1. CA Investment Casting Process of Complex Castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CA (Computer aided) investment casting technique used in superalloy castings of aerospace engine parts was presented. CA investment casting integrated computer application, RP (Rapid Prototyping) process, solidification simulation and investment casting process. It broke the bottle neck of making metal die. Solid model of complex parts were produced by UGII or other software, then translated into STL(Stereolithography) file, after RP process of SLS(Selective Laser Sintering), wax pattern used in investment ...

  2. Development of industry processes simulators. Part III (Continuous casting); Desarrollo de Simulares para Procesos Industriales. Parte III (Colada continua)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.; Morales, R.; Morales, A. J.; Ramos, A.; Solorio, G.

    2006-07-01

    This work written for illustrating the use of Monte Carlo methods and generating of random number in combination with the information of the simulation system of thermal behaviour described previously in order to reproduce in a computer the solidification process of the steel and simulate the formation of strictures of casting step by step. (Author). 12 refs.

  3. Thermal distortion of disc-shaped ductile iron castings in vertically parted moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Rasmussen, Jakob; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2015-01-01

    A disc-shaped casting with an inner boss and an outer rim, separated by a thin walled section, was examined. This measurable deformation varied with the feeding modulus. The influence of alloy composition, particularly Si content, was examined with a pearlitic ductile iron (EN-GJS-500......-7) and a fully ferritic ductile iron (EN-GJS-450-10). The experiment showed that both the alloy composition and choice of feeder influenced the degreeof deformation measured in the finished casting. It was found that the deformation of the pearlitic alloy was influenced controllably by changing the feeder...

  4. [Flow of molten metal in denture base in horizontal centrifugal casting procedure. (Part 2) Flow, inflow volume and casting time of molten metal passing through several sprues into model denture plate mold (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, H

    1978-10-01

    Two types of spruing methods were used in the casting of the denture type model pattern (thickness, 0.43 mm). Flow of molten metal in the mold was filmed by the improved system of Part 1. When three sprues were attached to the pattern vertically, molten metal passed through each sprue gate flowed being affected by the direction of gravity and revolution of casting machine, and gathered at the lower part of the mold. Next molten metal filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part. In this spruing type, molten metal turned its direction of flow several times. At the middle stage of casting, the inflow volume per unit time (inflow rate), v (mm3/10-2)s)was evaluated as v = 12.36 + 5.16A-0.16 A2 (A: total cross-sectional areas of sprues). The inflow rate increased with increase of the area of the sprues, but it saturated. When the main sprue and the subsprues were attached at the posterior border, the molten metal filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part quietly. In this spruing type, the casting mold was set facing its sprue gates downwards. The inflow rate at the middle stage of casting was evaluated as v = 21.05 + 1.79 C (C: the cross-sectional area of the main sprue). The inflow rate increased linearly with increase of the area of the main sprue.

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the OCEANUS as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1982-01-06 (NODC Accession 8200009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OCEANUS from 06 January 1982. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the ENDEAVOR as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-07-16 (NODC Accession 8100627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the ENDEAVOR from 16 July 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as part...

  7. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information form the voxel model for display to the user.

  8. Simple visualization techniques for die casting part and die design. Final report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.A.; Lu, S.C.; Rebello, A.B.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and test die casting design evaluation techniques based on the visualization of geometric data that is related to potential defects of problems. Specifically, thickness information is used to provide insight into potential thermal problems in the part and die. Distance from the gate and a special type of animation of the fill pattern is used to provide an assessment of gate, vent and overflow locations. Techniques have been developed to convert part design information in the form of STL files to a volume-based representation called a voxel model. The use of STL files makes the process CAD system independent. Once in voxel form, methods that were developed in this work are used to identify thick regions in the part, thin regions in the part and/or die, distance from user specified entry locations (gates), and the qualitative depiction of the fill pattern. The methods were tested with a prototype implementation on the UNIX platform. The results of comparisons with numerical simulation and field reported defects were surprisingly good. The fill-related methods were also compared against short-shots and a water analog study using high speed video. The report contains the results of the testing plus detailed background material on the construction of voxel models, the methods used for displaying results, and the computational geometric reasoning methods used to create die casting-related information from the voxel model for display to the user.

  9. Semi-solid Thixoforming Simulation of Al-Cu-Mn-Ti Alloy Parts via AnyCasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jianzhong CUI; Guimin LU

    2007-01-01

    The software AnyCasting was used to simulate the thixotropic die-casting process of semi-solid Al-Cu-Mn-Ti alloy slurry to form the parts of a particular shape, especially on how the in-gate size of die and injection speed affect the process. The results showed that the die cavity can be filled well with the semi-solid slurry in form of laminar flow under conditions that the temperature of the semi-solid slurry is 640℃ and that of die 200-240 ℃, thickness of in-gate is 11 mm and, more important, the injection speed should be changed from 0.1 to 1.0 m/s when 60% of die cavity has been filled. The simulation result is highly proved in conformity to the actual die-casting specimens in accordance to the filling process as simulated. Moreover, the hardness of the specimens is up to 116.6 HV after the treatment of solid solution plus underaging, i.e. 45.7% higher than that in conventional ones.

  10. Development of industry processes simulators. Part II (continuous casting); Desarrollo de simuladores para procesos industriales. Parte II (Colada continua)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A.; Mosqueda, A.; Sauce, V.; Morales, R.; Ramos, A.; Solario, G.

    2006-07-01

    The understanding of steel thermal behavior is very important in order to take care the quality of the products like billets and slabs due to these; this work shows the joint of a subroutine to simulate the heat transfer conditions during the continuous casting process to the model for simulating the process described by the present authors in a previous work; the result is the temperature profiles and surface temperature graphics of the steel, then they are compared with data carried out or real operating conditions. (Author). 15 refs.

  11. Design of casting blanks in CAPP system for parts of piston-cylinder assembly of internal combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Todić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of information technology industry provided great possibilities in the area of integration of diff erent CAx systems, such as CAD, CAM, CAE and others. In order to successfully link systems of automated-design (or Computer Aided Design - CAD with automated manufacturing systems (or Computer Aided Manufacturing – CAM, automation of manufacturing process planning is needed, i.e. CAPP (Computer-Aided Process Planning systems can bridge a gap between design and manufacturing. In this paper is shown design of casting blanks in CAPP system for parts of piston-cylinder assembly of internal combustion engines in a manufacturing system.

  12. On Corrosion of Ferrous Metals in Typical Indian Soils Part I : Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brajendra Nath Tripathi

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrodibility of cast iron in ten typical Indian soils, employing Schwerdtfeger's soil corrosion cell procedure and the physico-chemical properties of the soils responsible for their corrosivity have been determined. The results have been statistically analysed, interpreted and correlated with various factors. Corrosion of cast iron in non acidic soils (p/supH4-10 proceeds through electro-chemical mechanism. Usually the rate of corrosion is maximum at the beginning and with development of the film of corrosion products, the rate gradually decrease with time until it becomes more or less constant, 'Even' general corrosion is observed on most of the cases. The maximum penetration is directly proportional corrodibility. The corrosivity of soils in situ is directly poroportional to the moisture equivalent or, in turn, to the clay content. The corrosivity of soils increases with the concentration at soluble electrolytes. Ferric oxide present in a laterite soil functions as a cathodic depolariser and hence increases its corrosivity. In an acidic soil, the corrosion mainly proceeds through the mechanism of direct chemical reaction.

  13. [Flow of molten metal in denture base in horizontal centrifugal casting procedure. (Part 1) Flow, inflow volume and casting time of molten metal passing through single aprue into disk type mold (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, H

    1976-01-01

    A pyrex glass plate was fitted at the bottom of casting ring, and disk type wax pattern (thickness. 0.43 mm) was put on the plate. Five types of sprueing were applied. Pure tin was casted using holizontal centrifugal casting machine. Flow of molten metal was filmed by the motor drive camera with the method of stroboscope. The results were summarized as follows. 1) When the sprue was attached at the center of the disk type mold vertically, moten metal flowed like a concentric circle at the early stage of casting. It was affected gradually by the direction of gravity and revolution, and it filled the mold from the lower part to the upper part. 2) When the sprue gate was attached to the side edge of the mold, and the sprue gate was placed to the forward and backward direction against the revolution direction, molten metal filled from lower part to the upper part. 3) When the sprue gate was placed against upper edge, molten metal flow was affected by the direction of gravity and revolution. When the sprue gate was placed against lower edge, molten metal filled quietry from the lower part to the upper part. 4) Inflow volume per unit time (inflow rate) was small at the early stage of casting. Inflow rate increased and became constant at the next stage. At the latter stage it became small again. 5) Inflow rate increased with the increase of area of sprue. 6) The time which was necessary to fill the volume of 1 cm (about 80% of the mold volume) became short with the increase of area of sprue. It was also influenced by the type of sprueing.

  14. Part I: In-situ fluorometric quantification of microalgal neutral lipids. Part II: Thermal degradation behavior of investment casting polymer patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongfang

    Research described in this dissertation covers two topics. Part-I is focused on in-situ determination of neutral lipid content of microalgae using a lipophilic fluorescent dye. The traditional Nile red stain-based method for detecting microalgal intracellular lipids is limited due to varying composition and thickness of rigid cell walls. In this study, the addition of dilute acid and heating of solution, were found to greatly enhance staining efficiency of Nile red for microalgal species evaluated. Oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion stabilized by a non-ionic surfactant was employed as a pseudo-standard that mimics lipid-bearing microalgal cells suspended in water. The average neutral lipid contents determined were very close to the results obtained by traditional gravimetric method and solid phase extraction. Part II of the dissertation explores thermo-physico-chemical properties of polymeric pattern materials, including expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam, polyurethane foam, and epoxy stereolithography (SLA) patterns, that are used in investment casting. Density, elastic modulus, expansion coefficient, thermal degradation behavior, etc. were experimentally investigated for their effects on metal casting quality. The reduction in toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) generated during thermal decomposition of polyurethane pattern was achieved by increasing either oxidant level or residence time in heated zone. Thermal degradation kinetics of the pattern materials were examined with a thermogravimetric analysis and activation energies were determined by Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa methods.

  15. Droplet impinging behavior on surfaces: Part II - Water on aluminium and cast iron surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangavi, S.; Balaji, S.; Mithran, N.; Venkatesan, M.

    2016-09-01

    Droplet cooling of metal surfaces is an important area of research in industrial applications such as material quenching, nozzle spraying, etc. Fluids (water) act as an excellent agent in heat transfer to remove excess heat in various processes by convection and conduction. Such cooling process varies the material properties. The bubbles formed during droplet impinging on the surface act as heat sink and causes variation of height and spreading radius of the droplet with increase in temperature. In the present work, an experimental study of the droplet impinging behavior on Aluminium and Cast iron surfaces is reported. The water droplets are made to fall on the surface of the specimens from a specific height, which also influences the spreading radius. The effect of temperature on droplet height and droplet spreading radius is detailed.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part I—Microstructure Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Watkins, Thomas R.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The present study stages a comparative evaluation of microstructure and associated mechanical and thermal response for common cast aluminum alloys that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads. The systems considered are Al-Cu (206-T6), Al-Si-Cu (319-T7), and Al-Si (356-T6, A356-T6, and A356 + 0.5Cu-T6). The focus of the present manuscript is on the evaluation of microstructure at various length scales after aging, while the second manuscript will deal with the mechanical and thermal response of these alloys due to short-term (aging) and long-term (pre-conditioning) heat treatments. At the grain-scale, the Al-Cu alloy possessed an equiaxed microstructure as opposed to the dendritic structure for the Al-Si-Cu or Al-Si alloys which is related to the individual solidification conditions for these alloy systems. The composition and morphology of intermetallic precipitates within the grain and at the grain/dendritic boundary are dictated by the alloy chemistry, solidification, and heat treatment conditions. At the nanoscale, these alloys contain various metastable strengthening precipitates (GPI and θ^'' in Al-Cu alloy, θ^' in Al-Si-Cu alloy, and β^' in Al-Si alloys) with varying size, morphology, coherency, and thermal stability.

  17. Effect of Injection Velocity on Structure Part Characteristic in AZ50 Die Casting Process with High Vacuum System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    When diecasting large and thin Mg alloy parts, material defects occur, which include porosity, nonuniform mechanical properties, irregular surfaces, and incomplete filling. To resolve these problems, it is necessary to have uniform injection velocities and temperatures as well as control the melt. This study investigated the feasibility of producing large and thin components using a die caster by attaching a high vacuum system. In particular, the effects of injection velocity on surface quality and the mechanical properties of the products were investigated. Hence, an injection velocity scheme and a die structure capable of casting in a vacuum were proposed. As a result, it was found that the critical low injection velocity was 0.2 m/s to produce large thin Mg alloy structures having good mechanical properties.

  18. LLNL casting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. B.; Comfort, W. J., III

    1994-01-01

    Competition to produce cast parts of higher quality, lower rejection rate, and lower cost is a fundamental factor in the global economy. To gain an edge on foreign competitors, the US casting industry must cut manufacturing costs and reduce the time from design to market. Casting research and development (R&D) are the key to increasing US competiveness in the casting arena. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is the home of a wide range of R&D projects that push the boundaries of state-of-the art casting. LLNL casting expertise and technology include: casting modeling research and development, including numerical simulation of fluid flow, heat transfer, reaction/solidification kinetics, and part distortion with residual stresses; special facilities to cast toxic material; extensive experience casting metals and nonmetals; advanced measurement and instrumentation systems. Department of Energy (DOE) funding provides the leverage for LLNL to collaborate with industrial partners to share this advanced casting expertise and technology. At the same time, collaboration with industrial partners provides LLNL technologists with broader insights into casting industry issues, casting process data, and the collective experience of industry experts. Casting R&D is also an excellent example of dual-use technology; it is the cornerstone for increasing US industrial competitiveness and minimizing waste nuclear material in weapon component production. Annual funding for casting projects at LLNL is $10M, which represents 1% of the total LLNL budget. Metal casting accounts for about 80% of the funding. Funding is nearly equally divided between development directed toward US industrial competitiveness and weapon component casting.

  19. Microstructure and Wear Properties of Electron Beam Melted Ti-6Al-4V Parts: A Comparison Study against As-Cast Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Quan Toh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64 parts of varying thicknesses were additively manufactured (AM by the powder-bed-based electron beam melting (EBM technique. Microstructure and wear properties of these EBM-built Ti-6Al-4V parts have been investigated in comparison with conventionally cast Ti64 samples. Sliding wear tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc micro-tribometer under ambient conditions. Experimental results reveal that EBM-built Ti64 samples exhibited higher microhardness and an overall larger coefficient of friction as compared to the as-cast counterpart. Of interest is that the corresponding specific wear volumes were lower for EBM-built Ti64 samples, while the as-cast Ti64 showed the poorest wear resistance despite its lower coefficient of friction. Wear mechanisms were provided in terms of quantitative microstructural characterization and detailed analysis on coefficient of friction (COF curves.

  20. Preliminary physical, nutrients, biological, meteorological, and other data from bottle casts, CTD casts, ADCP casts, moored current meters, and meteorological sensors from the GYRE from as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX PART A) from 04 November 1992 to 05 August 1994 (NODC Accession 9500054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary physical, nutrients, biological, meteorological, and other data from bottle casts, CTD casts, ADCP casts, and meteorological sensors from the GYRE from...

  1. Quantification of Feeding Effects of Spot Feeding Ductile Iron Castings made in Vertically Parted Moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Smith, Nikolaj Kjelgaard; Tiedje, Niels Skat; Sällström, J.

    In vertically parted molds it is traditionally difficult to feed heavy sections that cannot be reached by traditional side/top feeders or other conventional methods. This project aims at quantifying the effects of using molded-in ram-up spot feeders as a means of feeding isolated sections...... analyses the effect of different exothermic and insulating spot feeders and their interaction with traditional parting line feeders, with respect to porosities and surface shrinkage. Experiments were performed using EN-GJS-500-7 and EN-GJS-450-10 alloys. The experiment shows that the geometry cannot...

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Cast Aluminum Alloys for Automotive Cylinder Heads: Part II—Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shibayan; Allard, Lawrence F.; Rodriguez, Andres; Porter, Wallace D.; Shyam, Amit

    2017-05-01

    The first part of this study documented the as-aged microstructure of five cast aluminum alloys namely, 206, 319, 356, A356, and A356+0.5Cu, that are used for manufacturing automotive cylinder heads (Roy et al. in Metall Mater Trans A, 2016). In the present part, we report the mechanical response of these alloys after they have been subjected to various levels of thermal exposure. In addition, the thermophysical properties of these alloys are also reported over a wide temperature range. The hardness variation due to extended thermal exposure is related to the evolution of the nano-scale strengthening precipitates for different alloy systems (Al-Cu, Al-Si-Cu, and Al-Si). The effect of strengthening precipitates (size and number density) on the mechanical response is most obvious in the as-aged condition, which is quantitatively demonstrated by implementing a strength model. Significant coarsening of precipitates from long-term heat treatment removes the strengthening efficiency of the nano-scale precipitates for all these alloys systems. Thermal conductivity of the alloys evolve in an inverse manner with precipitate coarsening compared to the strength, and the implications of the same for the durability of cylinder heads are noted.

  3. Modeling of mould cavity filling process with cast iron in Lost Foam method Part 2. Mathematical model – Pouring rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work pouring rate equation for cast iron in lost foam process was shown. For description of this phenomenon the motion dynamic equation was used. Pressure affecting the liquid cast iron surface was described using Bernoulli formulae. Numerical simulation results were analyzed with respect to permeability, refractory coating thickness and foamed polystyrene pattern density influence on pouring rate.

  4. Iron Melt Flow in Thin Walled Sections Cast in Vertically Parted Green Sand Moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per; Andersen, Uffa; Rasmussen, Niels

    consumption and pollution of passenger cars, trucks etc. The engine design can be optimized for higher efficiency, the wind resistance can be reduced, combinations of combustion engines and electrical power can be used etc. But no matter which approach is taken, parts have to be used for building the vehicles...... and in thin sections have been made via videos of the metal flow. Conventional bottom filling gating systems are shown to give relatively low control over the melt flow. The result is flow patterns being able to change radically from mould to mould due to minor fluctuations in the pouring conditions...

  5. Oceanographic data from CTD casts from as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX PART A) from 01 May 1992 to 08 May 1992 (NODC Accession 9200259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic data from CTD casts from from 01 May 1992 to 08 May 1992. Data were collected by Texas A&M Universtiy (TAMU) as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf...

  6. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Ph.D Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Note: This book consists of five sections: Chapter 1 Introduction, Chapter 2 Grey Iron, Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, Chapter 4 Vermicular Cast Iron, and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishes this book in several parts serially, starting from the first issue of 2009.

  7. Bimetallic layered castings alloy steel – carbon cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast processso-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic carbon cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X10CrNi 18-8. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The quality of the bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic NDT (non-destructive testing, structure and macro- and microhardness researches.

  8. Benthic organism and other data from net casts in the Beaufort Sea as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 July 1978 to 23 September 1978 (NODC Accession 8000425)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from net casts in the Beaufort Sea by the Alaska Research Associates and LGL LTD. Data were collected as part of the...

  9. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the GERDA as part of the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) project from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957 (NODC Accession 7000057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the GERDA from 20 July 1955 to 29 May 1957. Data were collected as part of the Rosenstiel...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-03-22 (NODC Accession 7800644)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO from 22 March 1978. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of the Marine...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH TURKIYE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1976-11-22 to 1976-11-23 (NODC Accession 7700127)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH TURKIYE from 22 November 1976 to 23 November 1976. Data were collected by the US NAVY as part of...

  12. Physical and other data from CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 May 1976 to 18 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601627)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) as part of Outer...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-05-07 (NODC Accession 7800391)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 07 May 1978. Data were collected as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring,...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-05-17 to 1974-06-12 (NODC Accession 7400570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 17 May 1974 to 12 June 1974. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as part of the...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-05-02 to 1980-06-02 (NODC Accession 8000380)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO from 02 May 1980 to 02 June 1980. Data were collected by Moore-McCormack Lines Inc. as part...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-03-22 to 1975-04-27 (NODC Accession 7500653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 22 March 1975 to 27 April 1975. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as part of...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-02-09 to 1975-03-16 (NODC Accession 7500643)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 09 February 1975 to 16 March 1975. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as part...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-07-14 to 1979-08-20 (NODC Accession 8000421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 14 July 1979 to 20 August 1979. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as part of...

  19. Temperature profile data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 27 July 1986 to 11 November 1987 (NODC Accession 8800064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX from 27 July 1986 to 11 November 1987. Data were...

  20. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ALPHA HELIX as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 September 1987 to 15 December 1987 (NODC Accession 8800043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ALPHA HELIX from 10 September 1987 to 15 December...

  1. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 April 1976 to 26 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7601823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the University of...

  2. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 August 1977 to 16 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7800311)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of...

  3. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 September 1979 to 11 September 1979 (NODC Accession 8100441)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA from 04 September 1979 to 11 September 1979....

  4. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 August 1976 to 02 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7800654)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of...

  5. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 31 July 1978 to 30 September 1978 (NODC Accession 7900202)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA from 31 July 1978 to 30 September 1978. Data...

  6. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 12 February 1979 to 09 April 1979 (NODC Accession 7900193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA from 12 February 1979 to 09 April 1979. Data...

  7. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 August 1974 to 30 August 1974 (NODC Accession 7601559)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of...

  8. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  9. Epigenetics as an answer to Darwin’s special difficulty, Part 2: Natural selection of metastable epialleles in honeybee castes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Mark Ruden

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In a recent perspective in this journal, Brian R. Herb discussed how epigenetics is a possible mechanism to circumvent Charles Darwin’s special difficulty in using natural selection to explain the existence of the sterile-fertile dimorphism in eusocial insects. Darwin’s classic book On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection explains how natural selection of the fittest individuals in a population can allow a species to adapt to a novel or changing environment. However, in bees and other eusocial insects, such as ants and termites, there exist two or more castes of genetically similar females, from fertile queens to multiple sub-castes of sterile workers, with vastly different phenotypes, lifespans, and behaviors. This necessitates the selection of groups (or kin rather than individuals in the evolution of honeybee hives, but group and kin selection theories of evolution are controversial and mechanistically uncertain. Also, group selection would seem to be prohibitively inefficient because the effective population size of a colony is reduced from thousands to a single breeding queen. In this follow-up perspective, we elaborate on possible mechanisms for how a combination of both epigenetics, specifically, the selection of metastable epialleles, and genetics, the selection of mutations generated by the selected metastable epialleles, allows for a combined means for selection amongst the fertile members of a species to increase colony fitness. This intra-caste evolution hypothesis is a variation of the epigenetic directed genetic error (EDGE hypothesis, which proposes that selected metastable epialleles increase genetic variability by directing mutations specifically to the epialleles. Natural selection of random metastable epialleles followed by a second round of natural selection of random mutations generated by the metastable epialleles would allow a way around the small effective population size of eusocial insects.

  10. Research progress on squeeze casting in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yuanyuan; Zhang Weiwen; Zhao Haidong; You Dongdong; Zhang Datong; Shao Ming; Zhang Wen

    2014-01-01

    Squeeze casting is a technology with short route, high efficiency and precise forming, possessing features of casting and plastic processing. It is widely used to produce high performance metallic structural parts. As energy conservation and environmental protection concerns have risen, lightweight and high performance metal parts are urgently needed, which accelerated the development of squeeze casting technology over the past two decades in China. In this paper, research progress on squeeze casting aloys, typical parts manufacturing and development of squeeze casting equipment in China are introduced. The future trend and development priorities of squeeze casting are discussed.

  11. Inoculation of chromium white cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structureof castings. Castings after inoculation revealed a different structure with numerous grains. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  12. Modeling of mould cavity filling process with cast iron in Lost Foam method Part 1. Mathematical model – rate of pattern gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work a mathematical model of mould cavity filling process with cast iron for lost foam method was shown, enclosing phenomena connected with gasification of foamed polystyrene pattern. For its description the thermal balance equation was used, which together with pouring rate equations (part 2 and pressure change equations (part 3 enabled determination of permeability, refractory coating thickness and foam pattern density influence on pouring rate, gas pressure in gas gap and its size. In this work authors showed results of numerical simulation concerning rate of pattern gasification and gas gap size, based on developed mathematical model. Presented studies indicated, that with decrease in coating permeability and increase in its thickness the gas gap size increased causing the decrease of foamed polystyrene pattern gasification rate.

  13. A three-dimensional mathematical model of electromagnetic casting and testing against a physical model: Part I. The mathematical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. P.; Evans, J. W.

    1995-02-01

    This first of two related articles describes a mathematical model for electromagnetic casting in three dimensions, i.e., where the dependent variables are functions of all three spatial coordinates. It is shown how the method of inductances can be extended to three dimensions in order to solve Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field in and around the caster. The principal task here is the calculation of the inductances between loops of irregular shape, and the method by which this is done is described. The computations are self-consistent ones in that the free surface of the molten metal is adjusted in response to the supporting electromagnetic forces which are themselves dependent on the shape of that surface. The computed electromagnetic forces are input into a second phase of the calculation where melt flow is computed in three dimensions using the finite element package FIDAP.

  14. Production of Steel Casts in Two-Layer Moulds with Alkaline Binders Part 1. Backing sand with the alkaline inorganic binder RUDAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Steel casts in Z.N. POMET were produced in moulds made of the moulding sand Floster. This sand did not have good knocking outproperties, required a significant binder addition (4.5-5.0 parts by weight, and the casting surface quality gave rise to clients objections.Therefore a decision of implementing two-layer moulds, in which the facing sand would consist of the moulding sand with an alkalineorganic binder while the backing sand would be made of the moulding sand with an inorganic binder also of an alkaline character - wasundertaken. The fraction of this last binder in the moulding sand mass would be smaller than that of the binder used up to now (waterglass. The application of two moulding sands of the same chemical character (highly alkaline should facilitate the reclamation processand improve the obtained reclaimed material quality, due to which it would be possible to increase the reclaim fraction in the mouldingsand (up to now it was 50%. The results of the laboratory investigations of sands with the RUDAL binder are presented in the paper.

  15. Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Karla

    2016-01-01

    In standard economics, individuals are rational actors and economic forces undermine institutions that impose large inefficiencies. The persistence of the caste system is evidence of the need for psychologically more realistic models of decision-making in economics. The caste system divides South Asian society into hereditary groups whose lowest ranks are represented as innately polluted. ...

  16. Casting larger polycrystalline silicon ingots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Tomlinson, T.; Cliber, J.; Shea, S.; Narayanan, M.

    1995-08-01

    Solarex has developed and patented a directional solidification casting process specifically designed for photovoltaics. In this process, silicon feedstock is melted in a ceramic crucible and solidified into a large grained semicrystalline silicon ingot. In-house manufacture of low cost, high purity ceramics is a key to the low cost fabrication of Solarex polycrystalline wafers. The casting process is performed in Solarex designed casting stations. The casting operation is computer controlled. There are no moving parts (except for the loading and unloading) so the growth process proceeds with virtually no operator intervention Today Solarex casting stations are used to produce ingots from which 4 bricks, each 11.4 cm by 11.4 cm in cross section, are cut. The stations themselves are physically capable of holding larger ingots, that would yield either: 4 bricks, 15 cm by 15 an; or 9 bricks, 11.4 cm by 11.4 an in cross-section. One of the tasks in the Solarex Cast Polycrystalline Silicon PVMaT Program is to design and modify one of the castings stations to cast these larger ingots. If successful, this effort will increase the production capacity of Solarex`s casting stations by 73% and reduce the labor content for casting by an equivalent percentage.

  17. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2009-01-01

    @@ This book consists of five sections:Chapter 1 Introduction,Chapter 2 Grey Iron,Chapter 3 Ductile Iron,Chapter 4Vermicular Cast Iron,and Chapter 5 White Cast Iron. CHINA FOUNDRY publishs this book in several parts serially,starting from the first issue of 2009.

  18. Hair casts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta S Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hair casts or pseudonits are circumferential concretions,which cover the hair shaft in such a way that, it could be easily removed. They are thin, cylindrical, and elongated in length. We present an unusual case of an 8-year-old girl presenting with hair casts. Occurrence of these is unusual, and they may have varied associations. This patient was suffering from developmental delay. It is commonly misdiagnosed as and very important to differentiate from pediculosis capitis.

  19. Casting fine grained, fully dense, strong inorganic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Sam W.; Spencer, Larry S.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2015-11-24

    Methods and apparatuses for casting inorganic materials are provided. The inorganic materials include metals, metal alloys, metal hydrides and other materials. Thermal control zones may be established to control the propagation of a freeze front through the casting. Agitation from a mechanical blade or ultrasonic energy may be used to reduce porosity and shrinkage in the casting. After solidification of the casting, the casting apparatus may be used to anneal the cast part.

  20. The quality of the joint between alloy steel and unalloyed cast steel in bimetallic layered castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wróbel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast process so-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. ferritic-pearlitic unalloyed cast steel, whereas working part (layer is plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The aim of paper was assessed the quality of the joint between bearing and working part in dependence of pouring temperature and carbon concentration in cast steel. The quality of the joint in bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing, structure and microhardness researches.

  1. Solidification and casting

    CERN Document Server

    Cantor, Brian

    2002-01-01

    INDUSTRIAL PERSPECTIVEDirect chillcasting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of aluminium alloysContinuous casting of steelsCastings in the automotive industryCast aluminium-silicon piston alloysMODELLING AND SIMULATIONModelling direct chill castingMold filling simulation of die castingThe ten casting rulesGrain selection in single crystal superalloy castingsDefects in aluminium shape castingPattern formation during solidificationPeritectic solidificationSTRUCTURE AND DEFECTSHetergeneous nucleation in aluminium alloysCo

  2. Numerical Simulation of Casting Deformation and Stress in the Ti-Alloy Parts with Framework Structure%钛合金框架铸件铸造变形和应力的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔新鹏; 张晨; 范世玺; 南海

    2015-01-01

    基于ProCAST软件对框架型钛合金铸件铸造过程中的温度场、应力场及铸造变形进行了数值模拟。在应力计算初期将石墨型壳设为RIGID模型,后期设为VACANT模型。模拟结果显示铸件上部及内部框架处温度较低,下部浇道处温度较高;铸件两侧尖部有沿-Y方向的弯曲变形;内部框架结构的转角处会出现应力集中。实际尺寸测量结果与模拟结果吻合较好,验证了模拟的准确性。%The temperature field,stress field and casting deformation of the Ti-Alloy framework castings during pouring and solidification process were simulated based on the ProCAST software.The model of the graphite mould was set as RIGID at the initial stage of the stress calculation whereas VACANT at the later stage.The simulation results reveal that the temperature of the upper and inner part of the framework castings is much lower than the one of the bottom part and the pouring gates.The bending deflection along -Y axis was observed at two tips of the framework castings.Stress concentration was observed at the corners of the internal framework structure.The actual casting dimension measurement results are well in agreement with the simulated ones,which virified the accuracy of the simulation.

  3. Physical and other data from current meters, bottle casts, CTD casts, meteorological sensors, and other instruments from the GYRE as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX PART A) from 09 April 1992 to 02 October 1994 (NODC Accession 9500056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from current meters, bottle casts, CTD casts, meteorological sensors, and other instruments from the GYRE from 09 April 1992...

  4. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al Part II: Scale Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. Details of the oxidation kinetics of these alloys were discussed in Part I. This paper analyzes the microstructures of the scale and its composition in an attempt to elucidate the oxidation mechanisms in these alloys. The scales formed on Cu-17%Cr specimens oxidized between 773 and 973 K consisted of external CuO and subsurface Cu2O layers. The total thickness of these scales varied from about 10 m at 773 K to about 450 m at 973 K. In contrast, thin scales formed on Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloys oxidized between 773 and 1173 K. The exact nature of these scales could not be determined by x-ray diffraction but energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses were used to construct a scale composition map. Phenomenological oxidation mechanisms are proposed for the two alloys.

  5. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al. Part 2; Scale Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. Details of the oxidation kinetics of these alloys were discussed in Part I. This paper analyzes the microstructures of the scale and its composition in an attempt to elucidate the oxidation mechanisms in these alloys. The scales formed on Cu-17%Cr specimens oxidized between 773 and 973 K consisted of external CuO and subsurface Cu2O layers. The total thickness of these scales varied from about 10 m at 773 K to about 450 m at 973 K. In contrast, thin scales formed on Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloys oxidized between 773 and 1173 K. The exact nature of these scales could not be determined by x-ray diffraction but energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses were used to construct a scale composition map. Phenomenological oxidation mechanisms are proposed for the two alloys.

  6. Response to Discussion of "Investigation of Oxide Bifilms in Investment Cast Superalloy IN100 Part I and II"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M. A.; Fuchs, G. E.

    2017-10-01

    In his most recent letter (Campbell in Met Trans A, 2017), Professor Campbell provides additional comments on Kaplan and Fuchs papers "Oxides Bifilms in Superalloy: IN100, Parts I and II (Met Trans A 47A:2346-2361, 2016; Met Trans A 47A:2362-2375, 2016) and on their response to his initial comments (Met Trans A 47A:3806-3809, 2016). In this recent submission, Campbell provides some very interesting thoughts on why bifilms were not observed by Kaplan and Fuchs and creates a new theory for the formation of defects referred to as bifilms. However, Campbell again provides no evidence to substantiate the presence of bifilms in Ni-base superalloys or his newly theorized mechanism. The vast majority of Campbell's comments are based solely on the re-interpretation of the photomicrographs and the data reported in the literature, including those presented by Kaplan and Fuchs (Met Trans A 47A:2346-2361, 2016; Met Trans A 47A:2362-2375, 2016). Campbell claims that bifilms are present throughout Ni-base superalloys, even though no one else has reported the presence of bifilms in Ni-base superalloys. In re-interpreting the data and images, Campbell ignores the extensive surface characterization results reported by Kaplan and Fuchs (Met Trans A 47A:2346-2361, 2016; Met Trans A 47A:2362-2375, 2016) that clearly indicate that there are no oxide films or bifilms on the fracture surfaces examined. Please note that this discussion of Campbell's most recent letter will be limited to Ni-base superalloys, since that is the subject of the research reported by Kaplan and Fuchs.

  7. Northern elephant seal temperature cast data collected as part of the Tagging of Pacific Predators (TOPP) program from February 22 2004 to January 25, 2011 (NCEI Accession 0077805)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a large collection of temperature casts recorded by fast-response archival time-depth recorder tags on northern elephant seals during their natural...

  8. Water physics and chemistry data from bottle casts from the AMIGO as part of the SEAGRANT project from 19 January 1972 to 20 April 1973 (NODC Accession 7400540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from bottle casts from the AMIGO from 19 January 1972 to 20 April 1973. Data were submitted by the Moss Landing...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the ENDEAVOR as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-10-22 (NODC Accession 8000588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the ENDEAVOR from 22 October 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the RELIANCE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-09-30 (NODC Accession 8000592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the RELIANCE from 30 September 1980. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as...

  11. Modeling of mould cavity filling process with cast iron in Lost Foam method Part 3. Mathematical model – pressure inside the gas gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pacyniak

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work mathematical model describing changes of pressure inside the gas gap was shown during manufacturing gray cast iron castings with use of lost foam process. Authors analyzed the results of numerical simulation enclosing influence of foamed polystyrene pattern density, permeability and thickness of refractory coating on pressure changes in the gap. Studies have shown, that all these parameters have significant influence on pressure inside the gas gap.

  12. Development of casting investment preventing blackening of noble metal alloys part 1. Application of developed investment for Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Kiyoshi; Nakai, Akira; Goto, Shin-ichi; Wakamatsu, Yasushi; Yara, Atushi; Miyagawa, Yukio; Ogura, Hideo

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a casting investment that prevents the blackening of the cast surface of noble metal alloys. The experimental investments were prepared using a gypsum-bonded investment in which the metallic powders such as boron (B), silicon (Si), aluminum (Al) and titanium (Ti) were added as oxidizing agents. An Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy was cast into the mold made of the prepared investment. The effect of the addition of each metal powder was evaluated from the color difference between the as-cast surface and the polished surface of the cast specimen. The color of the as-cast surface approached that of the polished surface with increasing B and Al content. A lower mean value in the color difference was obtained at 0.25-1.00 mass% B content. B and Al are useful as an additive in a gypsum-bonded investment to prevent the blackening of an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy. The effects of Si and Ti powder addition could not be found.

  13. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  14. Nodular cast iron and casting monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper quality monitoring of nodular cast iron and casting made of it is presented. A control system of initial liquid cast iron to spheroidization, after spheroidization and inoculation with using of TDA method was shown. An application of an ultrasonic method to assessment of the graphite form and the metal matrix microstructure of castings was investigated.

  15. Quality standardisation for casting wind powered turbine parts using advanced process simulation; Estandarizaciond e la calidad en fundicion de grandes piezas eolicas mediante la simulacion avanzada del proceso de fabricacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez Arranz, A.; Anglada Izaguirre, E.

    2008-07-01

    This paper arose from a work on advanced simulation on casting wind powered turbine parts made from high tenacity ductile iron. The technical target was extracted from the Haizelan Project, carried out with Basque Country Foundrymens Association (Spanish Foundrymens Federation), two foundries, TS Fundiciones (Zestoa-Guipuzcoa) and Fundiciones Urbina (Urbina-Alava) as process suppliers and Gamesa Eolica (Huarte-Navarra) as part and geometry supplier. The study shows it is now possible to obtain highly accurate predictions in pouring and solidification using microstructure calculations simultaneously, and from then on good predictions about final microstructures and subsequent mechanical properties of castings. All related tasks in simulation were performed using FEM (Finite Elemets Method). Referred to metallographic studies and tests, which were done at Inasmet-Tecnalia laboratories. (Author)

  16. Continuous squeeze casting process by mass production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Xia; Rich Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Squeeze casting has become the most competitive casting process in the automotive industry because of its many advantages over high pressure die casting (HPDC). Many squeeze casting R & D and small amount volume making have been implemented around the world, but the mass production control still exists problem. SPX Contech squeeze casting process P2000 successfully achieved the goal of mass production; it includes lower metal turbulence, less gas entrapment, minimum volumetric shrinkage, and thus less porosity. Like other casting processes, however, the quality of squeeze castings is still sensitive to process control and gate and runner design. Casting defects can form in both die-filling and metal solidification phases. The occurrence of casting defects is directly attributed to improper adjustment or lack of control of process parameters including metal filling velocity, temperature, dwell time, cooling pattern, casting design, and etc. This paper presents examples using P2000 techniques to improve part quality in the following areas: runner & gate design, casting & runner layout in the die, squeeze pin application, high thermal conductivityinserts, cooling/heating systems, spray & lubricant techniques,and part stress calculation from shrinkage or displacement prediction after stress relief.

  17. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    responsible for con- verting the available 2D CATIA casting design into a 3D Pro/Engineering geometric model of the casting, for use by Clinkenbeard...changes to the draw- ings. MWM. As the part designer, MWM reviewed and evalu- ated proposed changes to the design. MWM also updated the CATIA ...creation of solid models of the cores and molds, using IGES translations of the CATIA files secured from MWM through GE Transportation Sys- tems. Due

  18. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  19. Fabrication of bulk metallic glasses by centrifugal casting method

    OpenAIRE

    R. Nowosielski; R. Babilas

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present work is characterization of the centrifugal casting method, apparatus andproduced amorphous materials, which are also known as bulk metallic glassesDesign/methodology/approach: The studied centrifugal casting system consists of two main parts: castingapparatus and injection system of molten alloy. The described centrifugal casting method was presented bypreparing a casting apparatus “CentriCast – 5”. The apparatus includes a cylindrical copper mold, which isrot...

  20. Simulating a high pressure die casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldak, J.; Zhou, J.; Downey, D.; Aldea, V.; Li, G.; Mocanita, M. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    High pressure die casting is simulated for parts with complex geometry such as a large automotive transmission case. The closed die is filled in approximately 40 ms, the casting cools in the closed die for approximately 40s, to open the die, eject the casting and spray the die cavity surface requires another 40s. This 3D cyclic process is simulated using the following coupled composite solvers: the energy equation in the die and in the casting with solidification; filling of the casting by a droplet or a Navier-Stokes solver, and thermal stress analysis of the casting machine, casting and die during the cycle. This thermal analysis can be done for both starting and stopping transients and for the cyclic steady state. The software enables this analysis to be done almost automatically by designers. (author)

  1. Newly developed vacuum differential pressure casting of thin-walled complicated Al-alloy castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The newly designed vacuum differential pressure casting (VDPC) unit was introduced, by which the capability of the VDPC process to produce thin-walled complicated Al-alloy castings, that are free from oxides, gas pore and shrinkage cavity and thus enhance overall part quality, was studied. Experimental results were compared with those of traditional gravity pouring and vacuum suction casting. The first series of experiments were focused on investigating the castability of thin section Al-alloy casting. In the second series of experiments the metallographic evidence, casting strength and soundness were examined. Finally, case studies of very interesting thin walled complicated casting applications were described. The advantages of the described technique have made possible to produce thin walled complicated Al-alloy casting (up to a section thickness of 1 mm), which is not practical for gravity pouring and vacuum suction casting.

  2. An Efficient and Accurate Numerical Algorithm for Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Casting Solidification, Part Ⅱ: Combination of FEM and FDM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Xuesong; Tsai Hailung

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of Ref. [1]. It employs frist-order accurate Taylor-Galerkin-based finite element approach for casting solidification. The approach is based on expressing the finite-difference approximation of the transient time derivative of temperature, while the expressions of the governing equations are discretized in space via the classical Galerkin scheme using finiteelement formulations. The detailed technique is reported in this study. Several casting solidification examples are solved to demonstrate the excellent agreements in comparison with the results obtained by using the control volume method, and to show the availability of combination of the finite element method and the finite difference method in multi-dimensional modeling of casting solidification.

  3. Casting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  4. Method for casting thin metal objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2015-04-14

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  5. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ashwin

    2006-01-01

    Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early wr...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the YELCHO as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / International Ocean Studies / First Dynamic Response and Kinematics Experiment in the Drake Passage (IDOE/ISOS/FDRAKE) from 1979-04-11 to 1979-05-05 (NODC Accession 7900298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the YELCHO from 11 April 1979 to 05 May 1979. Data were collected by Texa A&M University (TAMU) as part...

  7. Titanium Aluminide Casting Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünck, Matthias; Stoyanov, Todor; Schievenbusch, Jan; Michels, Heiner; Gußfeld, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Titanium aluminide alloys have been successfully introduced into civil aircraft engine technology in recent years, and a significant order volume increase is expected in the near future. Due to its beneficial buy-to-fly ratio, investment casting bears the highest potential for cost reduction of all competing production technologies for TiAl-LPTB. However, highest mechanical properties can be achieved by TiAl forging. In view of this, Access e.V. has developed technologies for the production of TiAl investment cast parts and TiAl die cast billets for forging purposes. While these parts meet the highest requirements, establishing series production and further optimizing resource and economic efficiency are present challenges. In order to meet these goals, Access has recently been certified according to aircraft standards, aiming at qualifying parts for production on technology readiness level 6. The present work gives an overview of the phases of development and certification.

  8. The UK Casting Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jincheng Liu

    2006-01-01

    The casting production in the UK in 2004 is presented and analysed. The UK casting industry has played an important role in world casting and manufacturing production. However recent years the rapid development of some developing countries has been shifting the casting production from the western industrialized countries including the UK. The UK casting industry and associated research and technology organizations, universities have been working together very hard to face the serious competition to make the UK casting industry have a sustainable future. The UK casting industry remains strong and plays an important role in world casting and manufacturing production.

  9. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  10. 水平分型大型金属型模具设计及其应用%Design and Application of Large Permanent Casting Mold with Horizontal Parting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀; 梁建忠; 师文琴; 侯建兵; 原建明; 袁际章

    2013-01-01

    介绍了大型复杂铝合金箱体铸件采用水平分型的模具结构设计及铸造工艺的设计,侧重于直浇道正斜度浇注反斜度出型,冒口反斜度出型正斜度补缩的设计,以及通过在普通重力浇注机上增加反压装置的设计,实现了普通浇注机在无顶出油缸情况下完成铸件的出型和顶出.%The structure design and casting process of the large permanent casting mold with the horizontal parting for large and complex Al-alloy housing castings were introduced,focus on the process design with the positive draft angle sprue and the mold open with negative angle,as well as the process design of the mold open with negative draft angle dead head and the feeding with positive angle,by equipping the ordinary gravity filler with counterpressure device to assure that the ordinary filler fulfills the open and ejection without hydrocylinder.

  11. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast ir...

  12. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  13. THE WEAR RESISTANCE INCREASE OF CHROMIUM CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Ilyushenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the tests on the wear resistance of chromium cast irons of different compositions obtained in sand forms. It has been shown that increase of the wear resistance and mechanical properties of the cast iron is possible to obtain using the casting in metal molds. A further increase in wear resistance of parts produced in metal molds is possible by changing the technological parameters of casting and alloying by titanium.

  14. Examples of material solutions in bimetallic layered castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tenerowicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented technology of bimetallic layered castings based on founding method of layer coating directly in cast process so-called method of mould cavity preparation. Prepared castings consist two fundamental parts i.e. bearing part and working part (layer. The bearing part of bimetallic layered casting is typical foundry material i.e. pearlitic grey cast iron, whereas working part (layer is depending on accepted variant plates of alloy steels sort X6Cr13, X12Cr13, X10CrNi18-8 and X2CrNiMoN22-5-3. The ratio of thickness between bearing and working part is 8:1. The verification of the bimetallic layered castings was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic NDT (non-destructive testing, structure and macro- and microhardness researches.

  15. Relationship Between Casting Distortion, Mold Filling, and Interfacial Heat Transfer in Sand Molds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. K. Parker; K. A. Woodbury; T. S. Piwonka; Y. Owusu

    1999-09-30

    This project sought to determine the relationship between casting dimensions and interfacial heat transfer in aluminum alloy sand castings. The program had four parts; measurement of interfacial heat transfer coefficients in resin bonded and green sand molds, the measurement of gap formation in these molds, the analysis of castings made in varying gatings, orientations and thicknesses, and the measurement of residual stresses in castings in the as-cast and gate removed condition. New values for interfacial heat transfer coefficients were measured, a novel method for gap formation was developed, and the variation of casting dimensions with casting method, gating, and casting orientation in the mold was documented.

  16. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-08 to 1976-11-19 (NODC Accession 7700461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from NOAA Ship...

  17. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 May 1980 to 15 May 1983 (NODC Accession 8300155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ALPHA HELIX and other...

  18. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 October 1976 to 05 May 1978 (NODC Accession 7800636)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms. Data were collected by...

  19. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-29 to 1977-04-02 (NODC Accession 7700681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN. Data...

  20. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 22 July 1976 to 02 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7800045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR and other...

  1. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-28 to 1975-11-17 (NODC Accession 7601830)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR. Data were...

  2. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 18 March 1977 to 04 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7800309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by...

  3. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-09 to 1977-11-16 (NODC Accession 7800384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by the...

  4. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 April 1977 to 01 May 1977 (NODC Accession 7800310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by...

  5. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 February 1978 to 25 February 1978 (NODC Accession 7800444)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  6. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 April 1977 to 10 April 1977 (NODC Accession 7700680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected...

  7. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 April 1976 to 20 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601825)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the MOANA WAVE. Data...

  8. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 March 1977 to 17 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska and other locations from the ACONA...

  9. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-05-22 to 1977-06-09 (NODC Accession 7800308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 22 May 1977 to 09 June 1977....

  10. Temperature profile data from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts from the Bering Sea from the R/V ALPHA HELIX as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 April 1988 to 20 May 1988 (NODC Accession 8800172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from the R/V ALPHA HELIX from 21 April 1988 to 20 May...

  11. Centrifugal Casting of High Speed Steel/Nodular Cast Iron Compound Roll Collar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The centrifugal casting of compound HSS/nodular cast iron roll collar was studied, and the factors affecting transition zone quality were analyzed. The pouring temperature and interval in pouring are the main factors affecting transition zone quality. By controlling process parameter and flux adding during casting, high quality roll collar was obtained. The cause, why in the casting of HSS part, segregation appears easily, was analyzed and the countermeasure eliminating segregation was put forward, the measure eliminating heat treatment crackling was also put forward.

  12. SEM/EDX and vis spectrophotometry study of the stability of resin-bound mortars used for casting replicas and filling missing parts of historic stone fountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig-Salom, José-Luis; Doménech-Carbó, María-Teresa; de la Cruz-Cañizares, Juana; Bolívar-Galiano, Fernando; Pelufo-Carbonell, María-José; Peraza-Zurita, Yaiza

    2003-04-01

    A study by SEM/EDX and spectrophotometry in the visible region attempting to assess the stability of new resin-bound mortars used for casting replicas of marble historic fountains is presented in this paper. Different accelerating tests such as thermal ageing, UV light ageing, ageing in an SO(2) pollutant chamber, freezing cycles ageing, salt crystallisation ageing, natural ageing and biological attack have been applied to a series of test specimens prepared with polyester-, epoxy- and gel-coat-bound mortars. Examination of morphology, measurement of chemical composition and chromatic coordinates before and after ageing treatments establish the higher stability and resistance properties of these resin-bound mortars by comparison to those from the natural marbles.

  13. Manufacturing of thin walled near net shape iron castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per Leif

    2003-01-01

    The demand for near net shape thin walled iron castings is growing. This has several reasons, the main one is the need for lowering the fuel consumption of cars; the easiest way to do that is to lower the weight of the cars. The best way to do this was for a period of time believed...... to be substituting iron casings with aluminum castings. Substituting iron castings with aluminum castings is not as easy as first believed, and hence the substitution is very slow. This combined with the lack of fully exploiting the potential in iron castings, makes research in iron castings interesting. The 60.......000.000 cars produced world wide each year consumes enormous amounts of cast parts ! The aim of the project is to develop the green sand molding method on DISAMATIC to be able to deal with the new demands for thin walled near net shape castings in iron....

  14. Temperature and salinity from bottle and STD casts from the ACONA part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 09 October 1974 to 27 March 1975 (NODC Accession 7601139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hydrochemical, hydrophysical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors, bottle casts, and STD casts from the ACONA. Data were collected by...

  15. 49 CFR 192.373 - Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. 192.373... Regulators, and Service Lines § 192.373 Service lines: Cast iron and ductile iron. (a) Cast or ductile iron... cast iron pipe or ductile iron pipe is installed for use as a service line, the part of the...

  16. Clean cast steel technology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, C.E.; Griffin, J.A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents the results obtained from the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program financially supported by the DOE Metal Casting Competitiveness Research Program and industry. The primary objective of this program is to develop technology for delivering steel free of oxide macroinclusions to mold cavities. The overall objective is to improve the quality of cast steel by developing and demonstrating the technology for substantially reducing surface and sub-surface oxide inclusions. Two approaches are discussed here. A total of 23 castings were produced by submerge pouring along with sixty conventionally poured castings. The submerged poured castings contained, on average, 96% fewer observable surface inclusions (11.9 vs 0.4) compared to the conventionally poured cast parts. The variation in the population of surface inclusions also decreased by 88% from 5.5 to 0.7. The machinability of the casting was also improved by submerged pouring. The submerge poured castings required fewer cutting tool changes and less operator intervention during machining. Subsequent to these trials, the foundry has decided to purchase more shrouds for continued experimentation on other problem castings where submerge pouring is possible. An examination of melting and pouring practices in four foundries has been carried out. Three of the four foundries showed significant improvement in casting quality by manipulating the melting practice. These melting practice variables can be grouped into two separate categories. The first category is the pouring and filling practice. The second category concerns the concentration of oxidizable elements contained in the steel. Silicon, manganese, and aluminum concentrations were important factors in all four foundries. Clean heats can consistently be produced through improved melting practice and reducing exposure of the steel to atmospheric oxygen during pouring and filling.

  17. Segregation in cast products

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ghosh

    2001-02-01

    Microsegregation gets eliminated significantly if subsequent hot working and/or annealing are done on cast products. Macrosegregation however persists, causing problems in quality, and hence, has to be attended to. Microsegregation is a consequence of rejection of solutes by the solid into the interdendritic liquid. Scheil’s equation is mostly employed. However, other equations have been proposed, which take into account diffusion in solid phase and/or incomplete mixing in liquid. Macrosegregation results from movements of microsegregated regions over macroscopic distances due to motion of liquid and free crystals. Motion of impure interdendritic liquid causes regions of positive macrosegregation, whereas purer solid crystals yield negative macrosegregation. Flow of interdendritic liquid is primarily natural convection due to thermal and solutal buoyancy, and partly forced convection due to suction by shrinkage cavity formation etc. The present paper briefly deals with fundamentals of the above and contains some recent studies as well. Experimental investigations in molten alloys do not allow visualization of the complex flow pattern as well as other phenomena, such as dendrite-tip detachment. Experiments with room temperature analogues, and mathematical modelling have supplemented these efforts. However, the complexity of the phenomena demands simplifying assumptions. The agreement with experimental data is mostly qualitative. The paper also briefly discusses centreline macrosegregation during continuous casting of steel, methods to avoid it, and the, importance of early columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET) as well as the fundamentals of CET.

  18. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    four time s the distance of a non-pressurized riser, and can increase casting yield by decreasing the required number of risers. All case studies for this projects were completed and compiled into an SFSA Technical Report that is submitted part of this Final Report

  19. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj. Sai V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu- 17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9 9.5 kJ mol-1. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr- 5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR- 5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  20. Comparison of the Isothermal Oxidation Behavior of As-Cast Cu-17 Percent Cr and Cu-17 Percent Cr-5 Percent Al. Part 1; Oxidation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    The isothermal oxidation kinetics of as-cast Cu-17%Cr and Cu-17%Cr-5%Al in air were studied between 773 and 1173 K under atmospheric pressure. These observations reveal that Cu-17%Cr-5%Al oxidizes at significantly slower rates than Cu-17%Cr. The rate constants for the alloys were determined from generalized analyses of the data without an a priori assumption of the nature of the oxidation kinetics. Detailed analyses of the isothermal thermogravimetric weight change data revealed that Cu-17%Cr exhibited parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 165.9+/-9.5 kJ/mol. In contrast, the oxidation kinetics for the Cu-17%Cr-5%Al alloy exhibited a parabolic oxidation kinetics during the initial stages followed by a quartic relationship in the later stages of oxidation. Alternatively, the oxidation behavior of Cu-17%CR-5%Al could be better represented by a logarithmic relationship. The parabolic rate constants and activation energy data for the two alloys are compared with literature data to gain insights on the nature of the oxidation mechanisms dominant in these alloys.

  1. Eutectic modification in a low-chromium white cast iron by a mixture of titanium, rare earths, and bismuth: Part II. effect on the wear behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedolla-Jacuinde, A.; Aguilar, S. L.; Maldonado, C.

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we studied the wear behavior of a low-Cr white cast iron (WCI) modified with ferrotitanium-rare earths-bismuth (Fe-Ti-RE-Bi) up to 2%. These additions modified the eutectic carbide structure of the alloy from continuous ledeburite into a blocky, less interconnected carbide network. The modified structure was wear tested under pure sliding conditions against a hardened M2 steel counter-face using a load of 250 N. It was observed that wear resistance increased as the modifier admixture increased. The modified structure had smaller more isolated carbides than the WCI with no Fe-Ti-RE-Bi additions. It was observed that large carbides fracture during sliding, which destabilizes the structure and causes degradation in the wear behavior. A transition from abrasive to oxidative wear after 20 km sliding occurred for all alloys. In addition, the modified alloys exhibited higher values of hardness and fracture toughness. These results are discussed in terms of the modified eutectic carbide microstructure.

  2. Conservative and esthetic cast gold fixed partial dentures-inlay, onlay, and partial veneer retainers, custom composite pontics, and stress-breakers: part I: fundamental design principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Richard G; Refela, Jane A

    2009-01-01

    Although in today's dental world implant restorations are considered the standard of care in the replacement of missing teeth, clinical contraindications and patient nonacceptance of implant placement can be encountered. Several scenarios are discussed here in which a single missing tooth can be restored with conservative fixed partial dentures (FPD) that employ cast gold retainers; each with a customized design in order to preserve tooth structure, maintain esthetics, and provide a long-term prognosis. The abutment teeth are prepared for conservative partial coverage restorations by using Brasseler burs (Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA, USA). Impressions are taken of the preparations, along with any retentive features, utilizing either the Vented Pin Channel technique or the Shooshan Plastic Pin technique. The latter technique utilizes Kodex twist drills and corresponding impression pins (Coltene Whaledent Inc., Mahwah, NJ, USA). The conservative FPD with non-rigid connectors is fabricated by using type III gold alloy. The pontic cage portion is chemically prepared utilizing the Panavia F2.0 cement kit (Kuraray America Inc., Houston, TX, USA) or other dual-polymerizing resin cement and restored with any type of direct composite resin material. A palette of opaquers and tints are used for chairside characterization of the esthetic pontic facing. The final polish of the pontic is completed by using FlexiDisc and FlexiBuff discs (Cosmedent Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE In cases where an implant restoration is contraindicated for replacement of a single tooth, a semi-precision FPD is a conservative, functional, and esthetic alternative.

  3. Glovebox Advanced Casting System Casting Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Casting optimization in the GACS included three broad areas; casting of U-10Zr pins, incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier, and development of a permanent crucible coating. U-10Zr casting was improved over last year’s results by modifying the crucible design to minimize contact with the colder mold. Through these modifications casting of a three pin batch was successful. Incorporation of an integral FCCI barrier also was optimized through furnace chamber pressure changes during the casting cycle to reduce gas pressures in the mold cavities which led to three full length pins being cast which incorporated FCCI barriers of three different thicknesses. Permanent crucible coatings were tested against a base case; 1500°C for 10 minutes in a U-20Pu-10Zr molten alloy. None of the candidate coating materials showed evidence of failure upon initial visual examination. In all areas of work a large amount of characterization will be needed to fully determine the effects of the optimization activities. The characterization activities and future work will occur next year.

  4. Fatigue life of ablation-cast 6061-T6 components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiryakioglu, Murat, E-mail: m.tiryakioglu@unf.edu [School of Engineering. University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Eason, Paul D. [School of Engineering. University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Campbell, John [Department of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-01

    The fatigue life of 6061-T6 alloy, normally used in its wrought form, was investigated in this study in cast form from parts produced by the new ablation casting process. All specimens were excised from military castings. Unidirectional tensile test results yielded elongation values comparable to forgings and extrusions. A total of 39 fatigue specimens were tested by the rotating cantilever beam technique at five maximum stress levels. Moreover nine specimens excised from a forging were also tested for comparison. Results revealed that the fatigue life of ablation-cast 6061-T6 (i) follows a three-parameter Weibull distribution, and (ii) is comparable to data from the 6061 forging and is superior to conventionally cast Al-7% Si-Mg alloy castings published in the literature. Analysis of the fracture surfaces of ablation-cast 6061-T6 via scanning electron microscopy showed the existence of fracture surface facets and multiple cracks propagating in different directions.

  5. High integrity automotive castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, D. [Eck Industries Inc., St. Manitowoc, WI (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper described the High Integrity Magnesium Automotive Casting (HI-MAC) program, which was developed to ensure the widespread adoption of magnesium in structural castings. The program will encourage the use of low pressure permanent molds, squeeze casting, and electromagnetic pumping of magnesium into dies. The HI-MAC program is currently investigating new heat treatment methods, and is in the process of creating improved fluid flow and solidification modelling to produce high volume automotive components. In order to address key technology barriers, the program has been divided into 8 tasks: (1) squeeze casting process development; (2) low pressure casting technology; (3) thermal treatment; (4) microstructure control; (5) computer modelling and properties; (6) controlled molten metal transfer and filling; (7) emerging casting technologies; and (8) technology transfer throughout the automotive value chain. Technical challenges were outlined for each of the tasks. 1 ref., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  6. Improving Metal Casting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Don Sirois, an Auburn University research associate, and Bruce Strom, a mechanical engineering Co-Op Student, are evaluating the dimensional characteristics of an aluminum automobile engine casting. More accurate metal casting processes may reduce the weight of some cast metal products used in automobiles, such as engines. Research in low gravity has taken an important first step toward making metal products used in homes, automobiles, and aircraft less expensive, safer, and more durable. Auburn University and industry are partnering with NASA to develop one of the first accurate computer model predictions of molten metals and molding materials used in a manufacturing process called casting. Ford Motor Company's casting plant in Cleveland, Ohio is using NASA-sponsored computer modeling information to improve the casting process of automobile and light-truck engine blocks.

  7. Performance Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    alloys , foundry, muzzle brake, supply center, tooling, sources Notice Distribution Statement A Format Information Report created in Microsoft Word...Development of Sand Properties 103 Advanced Modeling Dataset.. 105 High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) Steels 107 Steel Casting and Engineering Support...University, University of Northern Iowa, Non- Ferrous Founders’ Society, QuesTek, buyCASTINGS.com, Spokane Industries, Nova Precision Casting, Waukesha

  8. Fundamentals of Numerical Modelling of Casting Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini; Thorborg, Jesper; Lipinski, Marek;

    Fundamentals of Numerical Modelling of Casting Processes comprises a thorough presentation of the basic phenomena that need to be addressed in numerical simulation of casting processes. The main philosophy of the book is to present the topics in view of their physical meaning, whenever possible......, rather than relying strictly on mathematical formalism. The book, aimed both at the researcher and the practicing engineer, as well as the student, is naturally divided into four parts. Part I (Chapters 1-3) introduces the fundamentals of modelling in a 1-dimensional framework. Part II (Chapter 4...

  9. Evolution of halictine castes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knerer, Gerd

    1980-03-01

    Social halictine bees have female castes that range from species with no size differences to those with a discrete bimodality. Female caste differences are inversely correlated with the number of males produced in the first brood. It is proposed that the sexual dimorphism of solitary forms is being usurped by the female caste system of species in the process of turning social. Thus, caste differences and summer male suppression are greatest in the social species originating from solitary precursors with distinct sexual dimorphism, and are least in species evolving from solitary ancestors with a continuous sexual polymorphism.

  10. Analysis of the structure of castings made from chromium white cast iron resistant to abrasive wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kopyciński

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been proved that an addition of boron carbide and disintegrated steel scrap introduced as an inoculant to the chromium white cast iron changes the structure of castings. The said operation increases the number of crystallization nuclei for dendrites of the primary austenite. In this case, the iron particles act as substrates for the nucleation of primary austenite due to a similar crystallographic lattice. The more numerous are the dendrites of primary austenite and the structure more refined and the mechanical properties higher. Castings after B4C inoculation revealed a different structure of fine grained fracture. Primary precipitates of chromium carbide also appeared, reducing the mechanical properties of as-cast parts. Properly established heat treatment regime makes chromium iron castings regain their, originally high, mechanical properties.

  11. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    OpenAIRE

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-01-01

    After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1) the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc.), and (2) the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  12. The most recent worldwide and Chinese technical standards and development trends for cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-cheng Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Technical standards are important documents for the development, application and expansion of any engineering material. In the casting industry, technical standards are the premise for producing high quality castings and they provide tools for inspection and acceptance of castings, and aid both the purchaser and the producer. In this paper, the most recent worldwide and Chinese technical standards for SG iron, ADI, CGI and heat resisting iron castings are described. It can be seen that these Chinese national standards have reached the level of world-class standards. This will be beneficial for enhancing the Chinese foundry industry, improving Chinese casting quality and aid the supply of good quality castings to China’s own industry. It is also good for the international buyer to source castings in China, and for the Chinese casting producer to export castings to other parts of the world. Current development trends for cast irons are also discussed.

  13. Method and mold for casting thin metal objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehrson, Brandon P; Moore, Alan F

    2014-04-29

    Provided herein are various embodiments of systems for casting thin metal plates and sheets. Typical embodiments include layers of mold cavities that are oriented vertically for casting the metal plates. In some embodiments, the mold cavities include a beveled edge such that the plates that are cast have a beveled edge. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled with a molten metal through an open horizontal edge of the cavity. In some embodiments, the mold cavities are filled through one or more vertical feed orifices. Further disclosed are methods for forming a thin cast metal plate or sheet where the thickness of the cast part is in a range from 0.005 inches to 0.2 inches, and the surface area of the cast part is in a range from 16 square inches to 144 square inches.

  14. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  15. Theory of uniqueness of Indian Caste System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kumar

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Classical studies on pre-modern Indian social structure have suggested apparent differences between the Indian caste system and social stratification as one can discern in other parts of the world. However, one needs to question such dogmatic assertions that such vast differences really existed. An endeavor is made in this research paper to reflect on the nature of caste hierarchy in pre-modern India. The caste system forms the significant basis of pre-modern Indian social structure. Early writers conceived the caste system of pre-modern India as something unique to India. An attempt is made to question this application of theory of uniqueness in the case of India.

  16. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to

  17. Abrasive Wear of Alloyed Cast Steels Applied for Heavy Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results and analysis of abrasive wear studies were shown for two grades of cast steels: low-alloyed cast steel applied for heavy machinery parts such as housing, covers etc. and chromium cast steels applied for kinetic nodes of pin-sleeve type. Studies were performed using the modified in Department of Foundry pin-on-disc method.

  18. Gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics fabricated by freeze casting method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Kai-hui; zhang, Yuan; Jiang, Dongliang; Zeng, Yu-Ping

    2011-04-01

    By controlling the cooling rates and the composition of slurries, the gradient porous hydroxyapatite ceramics are fabricated by the freeze casting method. According to the different cooling rate, the pores of HAP ceramics fabricated by gradient freeze casting are divided into three parts: one is lamellar pores, another is column pore and the last one is fine round pores. The laminated freeze casting is in favour of obtaining the gradient porous ceramics composed of different materials and the ceramics have unclear interfaces.

  19. CHOICE OF MATERIAL AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY OF CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kupriyanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the carried out work abundant type of steel was chosen for casting production of asterisk of the excavator «Kamatsu». This type of steel is widely used as the wearproof steel working in the conditions of abrasive and shock – abrasive wear. Mathematical modeling of process of filling and hardening of casting was done and it confirmed a choice of the technology to produce casting without faulty parts.

  20. Higher Education's Caste System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannone, Ron

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the history of the present caste system in higher education. He shows how the public's perception of this caste system is based on image and not usually on the quality of teaching and curriculum in colleges and universities. Finally, he discusses a model for accessibility to higher education and how higher…

  1. A cast orientation index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanhoe, J R; Mahanna, G K

    1994-12-01

    This article describes a technique that allows multiple master casts to be precisely oriented to the same path of insertion and withdrawal. This technique is useful in situations where multiple fixed prosthodontic preparations require surveyed restorations and a single master cast is not available.

  2. Caste and power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roy, Dayabati

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the institution of caste and its operation in a micro-level village setting of West Bengal, an Indian state, where state politics at grass roots level is vibrant with functioning local self-government and entrenched political parties. This ethnographic study reveals that caste...

  3. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  4. PRINCIPALLY NEW EFFECTIVE CASTING PROCESS OF THE HOLLOW CYLINDRICAL SLUGS OF CAST IRON BY METHOD OF DIRECTIONAL SOLIDIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The advantages of the new method of the hollow ingots production of cast iron are presented. The thermal state of crystallizer at cyclic temperature influences on its inside face, the ingot hardening and cast iron structure formation in conditions of intensive one-sided heat sink is examined. The comparative data on properties and exploitation characteristics of the parts, produced by different ways of casting is given.

  5. SYSTEMATIC AND DYNAMIC PROPER-TIES OF CASTING HOT SPOT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The variation of casting hot spot with proceeding of solidification and components of casting-mold system is studied by the technique of numerical simulation of solidification.The result shows that the thickest part of casting is not exactly the last part of solidification in the casting, while the last part of solidification is not exactly casting hot spot at the early stage of solidification.The location, size, shape and number of casting hot spot change with geomitric, physical and technological factors of the casting-mold system such as thickness of the casting secondary wall and with the passage of time in the course of the solidification.The former is known as the systematic property of hot spot and the latter, dynamic property.Only when the properties of hot spot are grasped completely and accurately, can it be fed more effectively.By doing so, not only sound castings can be obtained, but also riser efficiency can be improved.

  6. Caste in Itself, Caste and Class, or Caste in Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkrishna Mukherjee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available After the British conquered Bengal and eventually the whole of India,they set out to administer the colony. In this context they encountered two phenomena with which they were not familiar: (1 the relation of people to land for production (and not for revenue receiving, household living, etc., and (2 the caste system of India, viz. the jati strati?cation of society.

  7. The ancient Chinese casting techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Derui

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the course of Chinese civilization, which lasted more than 5,000 years, casting production has made a huge contribution. In this paper, some representative metal castings were presented. According to their forming techniques, they can be grouped into stone mould casting, clay mould casting, ablation casting, lost wax casting, stack casting, permanent mould casting, sand casting, etc. According to their materials, they can be categorized into tin bronze, bimetallic bronze, malleable cast iron, ductile cast iron, brass, cupronickel alloy (Packtong, etc. According to their surface decorative techniques they can be devided into gem inlay, gilding, gold and silver inlay, copper inlay, engraved decoration, surface tin-enrichment, mother-of-pearl inlay, burnished works with gold or silver inlay, surface coloring and cloisonné enamel, etc.

  8. Genetic evidence on the origins of Indian caste populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamshad, M; Kivisild, T; Watkins, W S; Dixon, M E; Ricker, C E; Rao, B B; Naidu, J M; Prasad, B V; Reddy, P G; Rasanayagam, A; Papiha, S S; Villems, R; Redd, A J; Hammer, M F; Nguyen, S V; Carroll, M L; Batzer, M A; Jorde, L B

    2001-06-01

    The origins and affinities of the approximately 1 billion people living on the subcontinent of India have long been contested. This is owing, in part, to the many different waves of immigrants that have influenced the genetic structure of India. In the most recent of these waves, Indo-European-speaking people from West Eurasia entered India from the Northwest and diffused throughout the subcontinent. They purportedly admixed with or displaced indigenous Dravidic-speaking populations. Subsequently they may have established the Hindu caste system and placed themselves primarily in castes of higher rank. To explore the impact of West Eurasians on contemporary Indian caste populations, we compared mtDNA (400 bp of hypervariable region 1 and 14 restriction site polymorphisms) and Y-chromosome (20 biallelic polymorphisms and 5 short tandem repeats) variation in approximately 265 males from eight castes of different rank to approximately 750 Africans, Asians, Europeans, and other Indians. For maternally inherited mtDNA, each caste is most similar to Asians. However, 20%-30% of Indian mtDNA haplotypes belong to West Eurasian haplogroups, and the frequency of these haplotypes is proportional to caste rank, the highest frequency of West Eurasian haplotypes being found in the upper castes. In contrast, for paternally inherited Y-chromosome variation each caste is more similar to Europeans than to Asians. Moreover, the affinity to Europeans is proportionate to caste rank, the upper castes being most similar to Europeans, particularly East Europeans. These findings are consistent with greater West Eurasian male admixture with castes of higher rank. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial genome and the Y chromosome each represents only a single haploid locus and is more susceptible to large stochastic variation, bottlenecks, and selective sweeps. Thus, to increase the power of our analysis, we assayed 40 independent, biparentally inherited autosomal loci (1 LINE-1 and 39 Alu elements

  9. The influence of solidification speed during heating on allotropic transformations of chromium cast iron casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Przybył

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The unique stand to founding dilatometric samples ("on ready” which solidify with different cooling speeds was presented. The dilatometric investigations, X-ray, metallographic they disclosed the occurrence in matrix of chromium cast iron of considerable quantity of austenite in dependence from concentration of chromium (18% and 23% and the speed of solidification. Castings these despite large part of austenite mark with high hardness in raw state.

  10. Clean Metal Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The objective of this project is to develop a technology for clean metal processing that is capable of consistently providing a metal cleanliness level that is fit for a given application. The program has five tasks: Development of melt cleanliness assessment technology, development of melt contamination avoidance technology, development of high temperature phase separation technology, establishment of a correlation between the level of melt cleanliness and as cast mechanical properties, and transfer of technology to the industrial sector. Within the context of the first task, WPI has developed a standardized Reduced Pressure Test that has been endorsed by AFS as a recommended practice. In addition, within the context of task1, WPI has developed a melt cleanliness sensor based on the principles of electromagnetic separation. An industrial partner is commercializing the sensor. Within the context of the second task, WPI has developed environmentally friendly fluxes that do not contain fluorine. Within the context of the third task, WPI modeled the process of rotary degassing and verified the model predictions with experimental data. This model may be used to optimize the performance of industrial rotary degassers. Within the context of the fourth task, WPI has correlated the level of melt cleanliness at various foundries, including a sand casting foundry, a permanent mold casting foundry, and a die casting foundry, to the casting process and the resultant mechanical properties. This is useful in tailoring the melt cleansing operations at foundries to the particular casting process and the desired properties of cast components.

  11. Latest results of cast and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Vafeiadis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is currently the most sensitive axion helioscope designed to search for axions and axion-like particles produced in the Sun. CAST completed successfully the second part of CAST phase II where the magnet bores were lled with 3He gas at variable pressure scanning axion masses up to 1.2 eV In the absence of signal it has set the best experimental limit on the axion-photon coupling constant over a broad range of axion masses. In 2013 CAST has improved its sensitivity to solar axions with rest mass below 0.02 eV by upgrading the Micromegas detectors and it will continue in 2014 with the implementation of a second X-ray optic and a new type detector (InGRID). In addition, CAST has extended its sensitivity into the sub-keV energy range using a silicon detector (SDD), to search for solar chameleons. Thus, CAST also became sensitive to dark energy particles. A new generation axion helioscope (IAXO) aims to improve the current axion-photon coupling by 1-1.5 orders of magnitude. This wi...

  12. An heuristic based practical tool for casting process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, N.K.; Smith, K.A.; Voller, V.R.; Haberle, K.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The work in this paper reports on an heuristic based computer tool directed at casting process design; in particular key design parameters, such as part orientation, location of sprues, feeding rates, etc. The underlying principal used is that a given casting can be represented on identifying and classifying its critical features. The input to the system consists of the attributes of the features and the graphical output provides semi-quantitative information on key design parameters. Results on real castings match those of the expert casting designers and in some cases potential design improvements have been suggested by the system.

  13. Characterization of Bimetallic Castings with an Austenitic Working Surface Layer and an Unalloyed Cast Steel Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróbel, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents the technology of bimetallic castings based on the founding method of layer coating directly in the cast process of the so-called method of mold cavity preparation. The prepared castings consist of two fundamental parts, i.e., the base and the working surface layer. The base part of the bimetallic casting is typical foundry material, i.e., unalloyed cast steel, whereas the working layer is a plate of austenitic alloy steel sort X2CrNi 18-9. The quality of the joint between the base part and the working layer was evaluated on the basis of ultrasonic non-destructive testing and structure examinations containing metallographic macro- and microscopic studies with the use of a light microscope (LOM) with microhardness measurements and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with microanalysis of the chemical composition (energy dispersive spectroscopy—EDS). On the basis of the obtained results it was confirmed that the decisive phenomena needed to create a permanent joint between the two components of the bimetallic casting are carbon and heat transport in the direction from the high-carbon and hot base material which was poured into the mold in the form of liquid metal to the low-carbon and cold material of the working layer which was placed in the mold cavity in the form of a monolithic insert.

  14. Aluminium Foam and Magnesium Compound Casting Produced by High-Pressure Die Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iban Vicario

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions are two of the main focal points in vehicle design, promoting the reduction in the weight of vehicles by using lighter materials. The aim of the work is to evaluate the influence of different aluminium foams and injection parameters in order to obtain compound castings with a compromise between the obtained properties and weight by high-pressure die cast (HPDC using aluminium foams as cores into a magnesium cast part. To evaluate the influence of the different aluminium foams and injection parameters on the final casting products quality, the type and density of the aluminium foam, metal temperature, plunger speed, and multiplication pressure have been varied within a range of suitable values. The obtained compound HPDC castings have been studied by performing visual and RX inspections, obtaining sound composite castings with aluminium foam cores. The presence of an external continuous layer on the foam surface and the correct placement of the foam to support injection conditions permit obtaining good quality parts. A HPDC processed magnesium-aluminium foam composite has been developed for a bicycle application obtaining a suitable combination of mechanical properties and, especially, a reduced weight in the demonstration part.

  15. Symptomatic stent cast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, John; Moore, Michael; O'Mahony, Seamus; Crosbie, Orla

    2008-02-01

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  16. CENTRIFUGAL CASTING MACHINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, A.B.

    1958-04-01

    A device is described that is specifically designed to cast uraniumn fuel rods in a vacuunn, in order to obtain flawless, nonoxidized castings which subsequently require a maximum of machining or wastage of the expensive processed material. A chamber surrounded with heating elements is connected to the molds, and the entire apparatus is housed in an airtight container. A charge of uranium is placed in the chamber, heated, then is allowed to flow into the molds While being rotated. Water circulating through passages in the molds chills the casting to form a fine grained fuel rod in nearly finished form.

  17. Symptomatic stent cast.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keohane, John

    2012-02-03

    Biliary stent occlusion is a major complication of endoscopic stent insertion and results in repeat procedures. Various theories as to the etiology have been proposed, the most frequently studied is the attachment of gram negative bacteria within the stent. Several studies have shown prolongation of stent patency with antibiotic prophylaxis. We report the case of stent occlusion from a cast of a previously inserted straight biliary stent; a "stent cast" in an 86-year-old woman with obstructive jaundice. This was retrieved with the lithotrypter and she made an uneventful recovery. This is the first reported case of a biliary stent cast.

  18. Empleo de la cáscara de arroz en la fundición de piezas de acero al carbono//Using of rice husk in the carbon steel casting parts process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Cruz-Pérez

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Los materiales auxiliares desempeñan un papel importante en el aumento de la eficiencia tecnológica del proceso de fundición de piezas de acero al carbono. En este artículo se exponen los primeros resultados del empleo de la cáscara de arroz como material termoaislante en la obtención de piezas fundidas de acero al carbono. En los experimentos se evaluó la influencia  de seis combinaciones de las variables espesor de pared del casquillo y capa de cobertura. En la confección de los casquillos se utilizó cáscara de arroz triturada, la que posteriormente fue aglutinada con silicato de sodio, apisonada y endurecida con CO2, mientras que la cobertura se utilizó sin procesamiento previo. El mayor nivel de entrega de acero se obtuvo al emplear un espesor de casquillo de 65 mm y una altura de cobertura de 85 mm. El valor del ASAF generado por las variantes experimentales resultó igual o inferior a 0,48. Palabras claves: casquillo termoaislante, polvo de cobertura, cáscara de arroz, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________ Abstract Feeding auxiliary materials perform a very important role in improves technological efficiency of carbon steel casting parts process. In this article are exposing the first results in the rice husk using as an insulating material in such process. The variables sleeve thickness and covering thickness’ influence were evaluated in six combinations by means of experiments. In sleeves preparation was used crushed rice husk, which was agglutinated with sodium silicate, compacted and hardened with CO2, meanwhile as covering it was uses without previous preparation. The mayor liquid steel delivering level was get employing 65 mm sleeve thickness and 85 mm covering thickness. The ASAF value generated for experimental variants was equal or inferior to 0.48. Key words: insulating sleeve, riser sleeve, hot topping, rice husk, steel cast.

  19. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  20. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2011-01-01

    White Cast Iron (Ⅰ) White cast iron or ‘white iron' refers to the type of cast iron in which all of the carbon exists as carbide;there is no graphite in the as-cast structure and the fractured surface shows a white colour.White cast iron can be divided in three classes:· Normal white cast iron — this iron contains only C,Si,Mn,P and S,with no other alloying elements.· Low-alloy white cast iron — the total mass fraction of alloying elements is less than 5%.

  1. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the South Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 21 November 1981 - 20 November 1983 (NODC Accession 8500258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the South Pacific Ocean from November 21, 1981 to November 20, 1983. Data were submitted by...

  2. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 28 May 1986 to 11 May 1987 (NODC Accession 8900168)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from 28 May 1986 to 01 May 1983. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  3. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 20 January 1979 - 01 April 1984 (NODC Accession 8700077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from January 20, 1979 to April 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  4. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 16 April 1984 - 01 October 1985 (NODC Accession 8700147)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from April 16, 1984 to October 1, 1985. Data were...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the SW Pacific (limit-147 E to 140 W) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 29 September 1985 to 01 April 1986 (NODC Accession 8800136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the SW Pacific (limit-147 E to 140 W) from September 29, 1985 to June 1, 1986. Data were...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 01 May 1987 to 05 May 1987 (NODC Accession 9000211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 01 May 1987 to 06 August 1988. Data were submitted...

  7. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 20 January 1979 to 26 April 1984 (NODC Accession 8500007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from January 20, 1979 to April 26, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  8. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from the HUMDINGER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 May 1978 to 27 September 1978 (NODC Accession 7900086)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from the HUMDINGER from 19 May 1978 to 27 September 1978. Data were collected by the University of...

  9. Physical, chemical, marine fish, shellfish, and other data from bottle casts and bottom trawls from the JEFF AND TINA as part of the EPA/FLOWER GARDENS project from 11 October 1980 to 27 July 1981 (NODC Accession 8200169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, chemical, marine fish, shellfish, and other data from bottle casts and bottom trawls from the JEFF AND TINA from 11 October 1980 to 27 July 1981. Data were...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-06-03 to 1979-06-28 (NODC Accession 7900220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms from 03 June 1979 to 28 June 1979. Data were collected by the...

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the High Energy Benthic Boundary Exp. (HEBBLE) project from 19 March 1983 - 01 August 1984 (NODC Accession 8900107)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from March 19, 1983 to August 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Woods...

  12. Temperature and salinity profiles from CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 August 1976 to 14 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7601779)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from CTD casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 03 August 1976 to 14 September 1976. Data were collected by...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-04-17 to 1984-06-02 (NODC Accession 8400111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 17 April 1984 to 02 June 1984. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon as part of the Land-Margin Ecosystem Research (LEML) project, 06 May 1997 - 19 October 1997 (NODC Accession 9800193)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Washington/Oregon from May 6, 1997 to October 19, 1997. Data were...

  15. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 21 March 1979 - 02 November 1979 (NODC Accession 8000032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from March 21, 1979 to November 2, 1979. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  16. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 25 February 1976 - 01 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7800051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from February 25, 1976 to September 1, 1977. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  17. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 17 June 1977 - 01 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7800337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from June 17, 1977 to August 1, 1977. Data were submitted by University of the...

  18. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 19 December 1977 - 29 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from December 19, 1977 to October 29, 1978. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  19. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 23 February 1977 - 11 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7900307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from February 23, 1977 to December 11, 1977. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  20. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon as part of the Low Level Waste Ocean Disposal project from 13 August 1979 - 27 September 1984 (NODC Accession 9500016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Columbia River estuary - Washington/Oregon from August 13, 1979 to September 27, 1984. Data...

  1. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 30 April 1990 - 15 May 1991 (NODC Accession 9400005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Pacific Ocean from April 30, 1990 to May 15, 1991. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  2. Current meter, phytoplankton, and wind data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the North Pacific Ocean as part of the Deep Ocean Mining and Environmental Study (DOMES) project, 29 August 1975 - 24 February 1977 (NODC Accession 7700458)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter, phytoplankton, and wind data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from August 29, 1975 to...

  3. Temperature and chemical data from CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Arctic Ice Dynamics Joint EXperiment (AIDJEX) project, from 11 November 1980 to 21 November 1980 (NODC Accession 0000212)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and chemical data were collected using CTD casts from the R/V ALPHA HELIX in the Gulf of Alaska from 11 November 1980 to 21 November 1980. Data...

  4. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 27 August 1973 - 27 November 1974 (NODC Accession 7600777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from August 27, 1973 to November 7,...

  5. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 21 May 1963 - 08 July 1975 (NODC Accession 7601561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 21, 1963 to July 8, 1975....

  6. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 24 February 1978 to 04 March 1978 (NODC Accession 8100150)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from 24 February 1978 to 04 March 1978. Data were collected by the...

  7. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 03 June 1981 - 09 June 1981 (NODC Accession 8100724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from June 3, 1981 to June 9, 1981. Data...

  8. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 08 March 1974 - 13 May 1974 (NODC Accession 7501210)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from March 8, 1974 to May 13, 1974....

  9. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 27 July 1982 - 02 August 1982 (NODC Accession 8400002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from July 27, 1982 to August 2, 1982....

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 15 April 1981 - 20 April 1981 (NODC Accession 8100656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 15, 1981 to April 20, 1981....

  11. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-08-15 to 1975-08-26 (NCEI Accession 7601521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 15 August 1975 to 26 August 1975. Data were collected by the University of...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CIUDAD DE SALAMANCA and other platforms as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 1966-06-02 to 1974-08-29 (NODC Accession 7500613)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CIUDAD DE SALAMANCA and other platforms from 02 June 1966 to 29 August 1974. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the KNORR as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 18 May 1972 to 03 June 1972 (NODC Accession 7200809)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the KNORR from 18 May 1972 to 03 June 1972. Data were collected by the Woods Hole Oceanographic...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 05 November 1976 - 01 February 1977 (NODC Accession 7700607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from November 5, 1976 to February 1, 1977. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  15. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 13 February 1976 - 01 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7601638)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from February 13, 1976 to May 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  16. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 14 December 1977 - 19 April 1978 (NODC Accession 8000053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from December 14, 1977 to April 19, 1978. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  17. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 27 October 1975 - 06 November 1975 (NODC Accession 7700454)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the COLUMBUS ISELIN from October 27, 1975 to November 6, 1975. Data were...

  18. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 27 October 1980 - 01 November 1982 (NODC Accession 8600087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) from November 27, 1980 to November 1, 1982. Data were...

  19. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 02 November 1977 - 14 September 1978 (NODC Accession 7900289)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from November 2, 1977 to September 14, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  20. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 08 September 1978 - 01 October 1979 (NODC Accession 8100506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from September 8, 1978 to October 1, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  1. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in the Kodiak Lease Area from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-03-29 to 1978-04-20 (NCEI Accession 7900194)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in the Kodiak Lease Area from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 29 March 1978 to 20 April 1978. Data were collected...

  2. Oceanographic station, meteorological and other data from bottle casts from the MURRE II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 12 September 1972 to 16 November 1972 (NODC Accession 7300554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle casts from the MURRE II from 12 September 1972 to 16 November 1972. Data were...

  3. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 August 1977 to 07 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7900087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER from 01 August 1977 to 07 September 1977. Data were collected by the...

  4. Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-08-09 to 1975-08-28 (NCEI Accession 7601623)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 09 August 1975 to 28 August 1975. Data were collected...

  5. Primary productivity and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-18 to 1977-06-09 (NCEI Accession 7800449)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 18 March 1977 to 09 June 1977. Data were...

  6. Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-05-18 to 1975-06-20 (NODC Accession 7601624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 18 May 1975 to 20 June 1975. Data were collected by...

  7. Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data from bottle casts in the Cook Inlet from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 July 1976 to 15 July 1976 (NODC Accession 7601824)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Cook Inlet and other locations from the ACONA from 08 July 1976 to 15 July...

  8. Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-21 to 1975-11-10 (NCEI Accession 7600841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 21 October 1975 to 10 November 1975. Data were...

  9. Temperature data from XBT casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the Gulf of Mexico NOAA/NMFS Ship of Opportunity (SOOP) project from 07 July 2002 to 17 September 2002 (NODC Accession 0000790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature data were collected using XBT casts in a world-wide distribution from 07 July 2002 to 17 September 2002. Data were submitted by Atlantic Oceanographic...

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 04 December 1979 - 11 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8000476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 4, 1979 to June 11, 1980. Data were...

  11. Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 December 1977 - 30 September 1979 (NODC Accession 7900336)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  12. Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data from CTD casts from the G.B. KELEZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 06 May 1971 to 10 May 1972 (NODC Accession 7300833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data were collected from CTD casts from the G.B. KELEZ from 06 May 1971 to 10 May 1972. Data were collected by the...

  13. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from fixed stations as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Controlled Ecosystem Pollution Experiment (IDOE/CEPEX) from 13 September 1973 to 09 October 1973 (NODC Accession 7400382)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from fixed stations from 13 September 1973 to 09 October 1973. Data were collected by the Skidway...

  14. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the ACONA as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 06 October 1970 to 30 April 1972 (NODC Accession 7201035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the ACONA from 06 October 1970 to 30 April 1972. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  15. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 26 March 1973 to 14 May 1973 (NODC Accession 7600854)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the THOMAS G. THOMPSON from 26 March 1973 to 14 May 1973. Data were collected by the University of...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1969-08-30 to 1983-03-31 (NODC Accession 8300047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DECATUR and other platforms from 30 August 1969 to 31 March 1983. Data were collected by the National...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-05-02 to 1973-06-09 (NODC Accession 7301215)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II from 02 May 1973 to 09 June 1973. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  18. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in the Kodiak Lease Area from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-10-30 to 1977-11-15 (NCEI Accession 7900068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in the Kodiak Lease Area from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 30 October 1977 to 15 November 1977. Data were...

  19. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-05-18 to 1975-06-20 (NCEI Accession 7601619)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 18 May 1975 to 20 June 1975. Data were collected by the University of Alaska...

  20. Wind wave spectra and other data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 September 1979 - 01 May 1980 (NODC Accession 8000462)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra and other data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22, 1979 to May 1, 1980....

  1. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-11-12 to 1975-11-26 (NCEI Accession 7601620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 12 November 1975 to 26 November 1975. Data were collected by the...

  2. Wind wave spectra data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 26 July 1978 - 21 May 1979 (NODC Accession 8000225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter and moored buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 22, 1978 to May 21, 1979. Data were...

  3. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, from 1978-06-28 to 1979-02-28 (NODC Accession 7900169)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, salinity, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 28, 1978 to February 28,...

  4. Temperature profile data from XBT casts from a world-wide distribution from the SEA-LAND HAWAII and other platforms as part of NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program from 05 January 2000 to 26 February 2002 (NODC Accession 0000679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected by using XBT casts from the SEA-LAND HAWAII and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 05 January 2000 to 26...

  5. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-09-01 to 1972-11-05 (NODC Accession 7201439)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 01 September 1972 to 05 November 1972. Data were collected by the...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) as part of the Ocean Dumping project, 24 May 1990 - 17 June 1991 (NODC Accession 9300112)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit -40 W) from May 24, 1990 to June 17, 1991. Data were...

  7. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1979-05-07 to 1979-07-18 (NODC Accession 8000466)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 07 May 1979 to 18 July 1979. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  8. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 28 June 1977 to 16 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7700756)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  9. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1977 to 11 July 1977 (NODC Accession 7800451)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the lower Cook Inlet from the ACONA. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  10. Phytoplankton, chemical, physical, and other data were collected using bottle, CTD casts, and other instruments in the North Sea as part of the North Sea Project, 15 April 1988 - 30 July 1991 (NODC Accession 9300008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton, chemical, physical, and other data were collected using bottle, current meter, net, pump, and CTD casts in the North Sea from April 15, 1988 to July...

  11. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 04 February 1976 - 14 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the GILLISS and other platforms from February 4, 1976 to September 14,...

  12. Water physical and chemical data from current meter and bottle casts from the G.W. PIERCE as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf - Mid Atlantic (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 22 October 1975 - 31 October 1975 (NODC Accession 8200067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physical and chemical data were collected using current meter and bottle casts from the G.W. PIERCE from October 22, 1975 to October 31, 1975. Data were...

  13. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the OCONOSTOTA as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 06 January 1976 to 14 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7700612)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the OCONOSTOTA from 06 January 1976 to 14 December 1976. Data were collected by the Moss Landing...

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-04 to 1975-09-30 (NODC Accession 7601585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  15. Oceanographic Station Data from bottle casts from the MELVILLE as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Geochemical Ocean Study (IDOE/GEOSECS) from 30 August 1973 to 08 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7601522)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data were collected from bottle casts from the MELVILLE from 30 August 1973 to 08 June 1974. Data were collected by the Scripps Institution of...

  16. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 02 September 1980 - 06 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8100628)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from September 2, 1980 to September 6,...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 28 May 1982 - 04 June 1982 (NODC Accession 8300008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from May 28, 1982 to June 4, 1982. Data...

  18. Temperature and salinity data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 15 September 1977 - 19 December 1977 (NODC Accession 7800318)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 15, 1977 to January 19, 1977. Data were...

  19. Water physics and chemistry data from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms as part of the Ocean Dumping project from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977 (NODC Accession 7800049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected from XBT casts from the OCEAN PRINCE and other platforms from 04 December 1976 to 27 October 1977. Data were...

  20. Marine toxic substance and other data from pump casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-04-03 to 1979-07-25 (NODC Accession 8100691)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from pump casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 03 April 1977 to 25 July 1979. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  1. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 27 December 1980 - 26 June 1986 (NODC Accession 9400011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from December 27, 1980 to June 26, 1986. Data were...

  2. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 18 October 1977-10-18 to 1979-07-01 (NCEI Accession 8000284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from October 18, 1977 to June 1, 1979. Data were submitted by Atlantic...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1971-04-01 to 1972-10-01 (NCEI Accession 7300061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship DELAWARE II and other platforms from 01 April 1971 to 01 October 1972. Data were collected by the...

  4. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts from the USCGC STATEN ISLAND as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 August 1974 to 15 August 1974 (NODC Accession 8000564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts from the USCGC STATEN ISLAND from 07 August 1974 to 15 August 1974. Data were collected by the...

  5. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts from the ICE ISLANDS and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 April 1979 to 23 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8200100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts from the ICE ISLANDS and other platforms from 19 April 1979 to 23 June 1980. Data were...

  6. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 March 1977 to 11 March 1977 (NODC Accession 7700757)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters. Data were collected by the...

  7. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Flow Over Abrupt Topography project from 06 January 1990 - 03 December 1991 (NODC Accession 9500077)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from January 6, 1990 to December 3, 1991. Data were submitted by...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-01-26 to 1981-01-27 (NODC Accession 8100488)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE from 26 January 1981 to 27 January 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  9. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-08-13 to 1974-09-18 (NODC Accession 7400814)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 13 August 1974 to 18 September 1974. Data...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-12-05 to 1976-03-08 (NODC Accession 7600730)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II and other platforms from 05 December 1975 to 08 March 1976. Data were collected by the...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the VALIANT and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-08-23 to 1979-09-17 (NODC Accession 7900292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the VALIANT and other platforms from 23 August 1979 to 17 September 1979. Data were collected by the National...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the OLEANDER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-08-13 to 1981-08-14 (NODC Accession 8100625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER from 13 August 1981 to 14 August 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-11-07 to 1978-11-24 (NODC Accession 7800870)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms from 07 November 1978 to 24 November 1978. Data were collected by...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-08-28 to 1973-09-04 (NODC Accession 7301173)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO from 28 August 1973 to 04 September 1973. Data were collected by Moore-McCormack Lines Inc....

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-10-14 to 1973-11-21 (NODC Accession 7400075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 14 October 1973 to 21 November 1973. Data were collected by the...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-11-08 to 1974-11-14 (NODC Accession 7500079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 08 November 1974 to 14 November 1974. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-11-02 to 1977-12-27 (NODC Accession 7800006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER and other platforms from 02 November 1977 to 27 December 1977. Data were collected by the...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-07-23 to 1981-07-24 (NODC Accession 8100676)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE from 23 July 1981 to 24 July 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  19. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 13 August 1980 to 21 February 1981 (NODC Accession 8100531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 13 August 1980 to 21 February 1981. Data were collected by...

  20. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978 (NODC Accession 8100533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 01 July 1974 to 31 August 1978. Data were collected by...

  1. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1981-05-11 to 1981-06-04 (NODC Accession 8200099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 11 May 1981 to 04 June 1981. Data were...

  2. Toxic substance and other data from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program from 1975-10-08 to 1975-11-09 (NODC Accession 7600630)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Toxic substances and pollutants data were collected from bottle casts in the Gulf of Alaska from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine...

  3. Marine toxic substance and other data from grab casts in the Bering Sea from the USCGC POLAR STAR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 29 April 1980 to 28 June 1980 (NODC Accession 8100551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from grab casts in the Bering Sea from the USCGC POLAR STAR from 29 April 1980 to 28 June 1980. Data were...

  4. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the Beaufort Seas as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 August 1970 (NODC Accession 8100505)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from 01 August 1970. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 15 April 1976 - 01 June 1976 (NODC Accession 7601843)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from April 15, 1976 to June 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska/Brit.Colum. as part of the Long-Range Effects Program Puget Sound project from 15 March 1983 - 01 November 1983 (NODC Accession 8600321)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of SE Alaska/Brit.Colum. from March 15, 1983 to November 1, 1983. Data were...

  7. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 23 October 1980 to 04 November 1980 (NODC Accession 8200118)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 23 October 1980 to 04 November 1980. Data...

  8. Temperature profile data from XBT casts from a world-wide distribution from the SKOGAFOSS and other vessels as part of NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program from 06 February 2002 to 10 April 2002 (NODC Accession 0000718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SKOGAFOSS and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 06 February 2002 to 10 April 2002. Data...

  9. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 23 September 1980 - 01 December 1980 (NODC Accession 8100469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii from September 23, 1980 to December 1, 1980. Data were submitted...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-06-03 to 1981-11-20 (NODC Accession 8100721)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE EVANGELINE and other platforms from 03 June 1981 to 20 November 1981. Data were collected by the...

  11. Chemical data from moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 18 May 1978 - 19 October 1978 (NODC Accession 7900280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical data were collected using moored current meter, bottle casts, and other instruments in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from May 18, 1978 to October 19,...

  12. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1978-05-05 to 1978-05-16 (NCEI Accession 7900274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 05 May 1978 to 16 May 1978. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  13. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 02 February 1977 - 31 January 1979 (NODC Accession 7900144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, salinity, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from February 2, 1978 to January 31,...

  14. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from GLACIER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 August 1976 to 04 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from the GLACIER from 07 August 1976 to 04 September 1976. Data were...

  15. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the SURVEYOR and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 23 February 1981 to 30 April 1983 (NODC Accession 8300167)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from the SURVEYOR and other platforms from 23 February 1981 to 30 April...

  16. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts from the NORTHWIND and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 September 1970 to 20 May 1979 (NODC Accession 7900338)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts from the NORTHWIND and other platforms from 10 September 1970 to 20 May 1979. Data were...

  17. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from the ACONA and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1974 to 15 May 1975 (NODC Accession 7601458)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from the ACONA and other platforms from 02 July 1974 to 15 May 1975. Data were collected by the University...

  18. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in Prince William Sound from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-10-03 to 1975-10-10 (NCEI Accession 7601873)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in Prince William Sound from the SURVEYOR from 03 October 1975 to 10 October 1975. Data were collected by...

  19. Zooplankton data from zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Ocean Continental Shelf (OCS - Mid Atlantic) project, 03 November 1976 - 18 November 1977 (NODC Accession 7800340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton data were collected using zooplankton net casts and other instruments in the Delaware Bay and North Atlantic Ocean from November 3, 1976 to November 18,...

  20. Zooplankton and other data from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975 (NODC Accession 7601809)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR from 30 September 1975 to 24 October 1975. Data were collected by...

  1. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-06-28 to 1977-07-04 (NCEI Accession 7900066)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 28 June 1977 to 04 July 1977. Data were collected by the University of Alaska,...

  2. Zooplankton and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-03-17 to 1976-04-26 (NCEI Accession 7601628)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 17 March 1976 to 26 April 1976. Data were collected by the University of Alaska...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-02-09 to 1973-03-13 (NODC Accession 7400051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OREGON II from 09 February 1973 to 13 March 1973. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH TURKIYE as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-01-30 to 1977-03-05 (NCEI Accession 7700259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH TURKIYE from 30 January 1977 to 05 March 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - South Atlantic (OCS-South Atlantic) project from 01 August 1978 - 20 March 1979 (NODC Accession 7900312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from August 1, 1978 to March 20, 1979. Data were submitted by Science...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North American Coastline-South as part of the Florida Atlantic Coastal Transport Study (FACTS) project 07 March 1984 - 01 September 1985 (NODC Accession 8600136)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North American Coastline-South from March 7, 1984 to September 1, 1985. Data were submitted...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-11-10 to 1979-11-11 (NODC Accession 7900331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY from 10 November 1979 to 11 November 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  8. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 August 1977 to 15 September 1977 (NODC Accession 7800013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental...

  9. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 20 February 1976 to 29 February 1976 (NODC Accession 7601640)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters. Data were collected by the...

  10. Temperature profile data from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1981-10-22 to 1982-10-13 (NODC Accession 8400037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 22 October 1981 to 13 October 1982....

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-11-14 to 1973-01-02 (NODC Accession 7300035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA and other platforms from 14 November 1972 to 02 January 1973. Data were collected by the...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-03-24 to 1979-05-23 (NODC Accession 7900199)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 24 March 1979 to 23 May 1979. Data were collected by the United...

  13. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-01-17 to 1975-04-10 (NODC Accession 7500672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 17 January 1975 to 10 April 1975. Data...

  14. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1974-04-01 to 1974-05-09 (NODC Accession 7400626)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 01 April 1974 to 09 May 1974. Data were...

  15. Oceanographic Station, temperature profiles, and other data from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1973-02-12 to 1973-03-23 (NCEI Accession 7300813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station,temperature profiles, and other data were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 12 February 1973 to 23 March 1973. Data...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1983-09-14 to 1983-11-09 (NCEI Accession 8400160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 14 September 1983 to 09 November 1983. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1984-09-11 to 1984-10-11 (NODC Accession 8400249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 11 September 1984 to 11 October 1984. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  18. Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 15 September 1977 - 30 June 1979 (NODC Accession 7900295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, marine toxic substances, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  19. Phytoplankton and other data from net and bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from aircraft and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 07 June 1975 to 30 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Phytoplankton and other data were collected from net and bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from aircraft and other platforms from 07 June 1975 to 30 September 1975....

  20. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from helicopters as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 19 May 1976 to 29 May 1976 (NODC Accession 7700018)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from helicopters. Data were collected by the University...

  1. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean as part of the Ocean Prediction Through Observation Modeling and Analysis (OPTOMA) project, 26 September 1984 - 16 July 1985 (NODC Accession 9600075)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northeast Pacific Ocean from September 26, 1984 to July 16, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  2. Physical and other data from bottle and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-05-15 to 1975-05-30 (NODC Accession 7601550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 15 May 1975 to 30 May 1975. Data were collected by the University of...

  3. Temperature and salinity profiles from bottle and STD casts in the Bering Sea from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 02 July 1974 to 10 July 1974 (NODC Accession 7601138)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from bottle and STD casts in the Bering Sea from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  4. Physical, meteorological, and other data from bottle and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 February 1975 to 05 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601433)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the University of Alaska-Fairbanks;...

  5. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska as part of the Fisheries-Oceanography Cooperative Investigations (FOCI) project from 21 August 1984 - 01 July 1985 (NCEI Accession 8700053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Coastal Waters of S. Alaska from August 21, 1984 to July 1, 1985. Data were submitted by...

  6. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the ACTIVE and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-02-01 to 1979-04-01 (NODC Accession 7900172)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the ACTIVE and other platforms from 01 February 1979 to 01 April 1979. Data were collected by the National...

  7. Physical, biological, and chemical data from radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the SeaWiFS/SIMBIOS project from 13 September 1981 to 16 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, and chemical data were collected using radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 13...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-02-18 to 1977-02-19 (NODC Accession 7700191)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the MARINE CRUISER from 18 February 1977 to 19 February 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN RIGEL as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-02-12 to 1978-03-22 (NODC Accession 7800316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN RIGEL from 12 February 1978 to 22 March 1978. Data were collected by Moore-McCormack Lines Inc....

  10. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 10 April 1984 - 31 October 1984 (NODC Accession 8500225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the New York Bight from April 10, 1984 to October 31, 1984. Data were...

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 25 February 1976 - 01 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7800052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from February 25, 1976 to December 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific...

  12. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1980-11-10 to 1980-11-13 (NODC Accession 8100539)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER from 10 November 1980 to 13 November 1980. Data...

  13. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 18 June 1978 - 28 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from June 18, 1978 to August 28, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  14. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 22 September 1977 - 10 November 1978 (NODC Accession 7900325)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from September 22, 1977 to November 10, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  15. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 12 May 1977 - 28 August 1979 (NODC Accession 7900300)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the North Atlantic Ocean from May 12, 1977 to August 28, 1979. Data were submitted by Edgerton,...

  16. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf - Georges Bank (OCS -Georges Bank) project from 25 October 1980 - 01 November 1982 (NODC Accession 8600046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean (limit-40 W) from October 25, 1980 to November 1, 1982. Data were...

  17. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 05 November 1973 to 06 June 1974 (NODC Accession 7500931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from November 5, 1973 to June 6,...

  18. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-04-17 to 1976-02-07 (NODC Accession 7600888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 17 April 1975 to 07 February 1976. Data were...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the YANKEE CLIPPER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1982-06-11 to 1982-06-12 (NODC Accession 8200126)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the YANKEE CLIPPER from 11 June 1982 to 12 June 1982. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  20. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 31 October 1976 to 04 November 1976 (NODC Accession 7700163)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopters. Data were collected by the...

  1. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-06-22 to 1975-09-17 (NODC Accession 7500932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 22 June 1975 to 17 September 1975. Data were collected by Grace...

  2. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1976-09-08 to 1976-09-24 (NODC Accession 7700044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  3. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 August 1977 to 03 September 1977 (NODC Accession 8000247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from the USCGC GLACIER and other platforms from 03 August 1977 to 03 September 1977. Data were...

  4. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 June 1971 (NODC Accession 8100514)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Beaufort Sea from 01 June 1971. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  5. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-03-22 to 1978-08-18 (NODC Accession 8000246)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 22 March 1977 to 18 August 1978. Data were...

  6. Toxic substance and pollutant data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-16 to 1975-11-01 (NODC Accession 7600631)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Toxic substance and pollutant data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL)...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1981-02-14 to 1981-02-15 (NODC Accession 8100486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY from 14 February 1981 to 15 February 1981. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-03-08 to 1974-05-21 (NODC Accession 7400454)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 08 March 1974 to 21 May 1974. Data were collected by Grace Prudential...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-05-27 to 1974-10-10 (NODC Accession 7400728)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 27 May 1974 to 10 October 1974. Data were collected by Grace...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1980-02-09 to 1980-03-21 (NODC Accession 8000165)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the AMERICAN ARGO and other platforms from 09 Februay 1980 to 21 March 1980. Data were collected by...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the GULF SHIPPER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-02-12 to 1973-03-25 (NODC Accession 7300433)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the GULF SHIPPER from 12 February 1973 to 25 March 1973. Data were collected by the Lykes Brothers Lines as...

  12. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the INGHAM as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-03-26 to 1975-03-27 (NODC Accession 7500244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the INGHAM from 26 March 1975 to 27 March 1975. Data were collected by the United States Coast Guard (USCG)...

  13. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-08-31 to 1975-09-19 (NODC Accession 7600375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 31 August 1975 to 19 September 1975. Data were...

  14. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from helicopters as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 08 February 1977 to 02 March 1977 (NODC Accession 7800004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Bering Sea from helicopter. Data were collected by the University...

  15. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the PORT JEFFERSON as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-03-28 to 1978-03-29 (NODC Accession 7800452)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the PORT JEFFERSON from 28 March 1978 to 29 March 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1973-09-21 to 1973-10-17 (NODC Accession 7301174)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ARGENTINA from 21 September 1973 to 17 October 1973. Data were collected by Delata Steamship Co. as...

  17. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1976-08-28 to 1976-09-21 (NODC Accession 7700036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 28 August 1976 to 21 September 1976. Data were...

  18. Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 14 October 1977 - 24 August 1979 (NODC Accession 7900335)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, chemical, benthic organisms, and wind direction data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Mexico...

  19. Temperature and salinity profiles from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 21 September 1975 to 22 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7601224)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific...

  20. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 05 June 1975 to 12 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the SURVEYOR. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine...

  1. Physical and chemical data from bottle casts and visual observations in the North and South Atlantic Ocean as part of the Data Archaeology and Rescue project, from 1970-08-27 to 1976-11-19 (NCEI Accession 9900036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and chemical data were collected using bottle casts and visual observation from the ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT in the North and South Atlantic Ocean from August...

  2. Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data from bottle casts from the DAN BRAMAN and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 07 May 1971 to 25 August 1971 (NODC Accession 7201264)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle casts from the DAN BRAMAN and other platforms from 07 May 1971 to 25 August 1971....

  3. Temperature profile data collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts in part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / North Pacific Experiment (IDOE/NORPAX) project from 01 November 1977 to 28 February 1978 (NODC Accession 8100400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile data were collected using bathythermograph (BT/XBT) casts from the KANA KEOKI from November 1, 1977 to February 28, 1978. Data were submitted by...

  4. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 15 February 1979 - 01 February 1980 (NODC Accession 8100608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea from February 15, 1979 to February 1, 1980. Data were submitted by University...

  5. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopter as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 26 October 1975 to 10 November 1975 (NODC Accession 7601680)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts in the Beaufort Sea from helicopter. Data were collected by the University...

  6. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea as part of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) project from 27 September 1979 - 01 December 1979 (NODC Accession 8100607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Caribbean Sea from September 27, 1979 to December 1, 1979. Data were submitted by...

  7. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-10-01 to 1974-11-28 (NODC Accession 7400823)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ and other platforms from 01 October 1974 to 28 November 1974. Data were collected by the Delta...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1972-09-01 to 1972-10-09 (NODC Accession 7201316)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SANTA CRUZ from 01 September 1972 to 09 October 1972. Data were collected by Grace Prudential Lines as...

  9. Wind wave spectra data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 01 October 1978 - 01 October 1980 (NODC Accession 8000619)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter and moored buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from October 1, 1980 to October 1, 1980. Data were...

  10. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 22 December 1977 - 01 July 1978 (NODC Accession 7900123)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from December 22, 1977 to October...

  11. Current meter components, physical, and other data from current meters and CTD casts from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN and other platforms as part of the VENTS program from 14 June 1996 to 05 October 1997 (NODC Accession 9800031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter components and physical data were collected from current meters and CTD casts from NOAA Ship RONALD H. BROWN and other platforms from 14 June 1996 to...

  12. Temperature profile and other data from CTD casts in the Pacific Ocean as part of the Vents Program from 01 June 1985 to 31 August 2001 (NODC Accession 0000656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile, conductivity, pressure, and other data were collected using CTD casts in the Pacific Ocean from 01 June 1985 to 31 August 2001. Data were...

  13. Current direction and wind wave spectra data from moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 28 June 1978 - 31 December 1978 (NODC Accession 7900128)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current direction, temperature, and wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Gulf of Mexico from June 28, 1978 to December 31,...

  14. Wind wave spectra data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 01 September 1980 - 01 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8000594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter and moored buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from September 1, 1980 to September 1, 1980. Data were...

  15. Wind wave spectra data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Brine Disposal project, 01 July 1980 - 01 August 1980 (NODC Accession 8000496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wind wave spectra data were collected using moored current meter and moored buoy casts in the Gulf of Mexico from July 1, 1980 to August 1, 1980. Data were submitted...

  16. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the EVERGREEN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-04-02 to 1977-04-30 (NCEI Accession 7700355)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the EVERGREEN from 02 April 1977 to 30 April 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-06-02 to 1978-06-03 (NCEI Accession 7800532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 02 June 1978 to 03 June 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  18. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-07-17 to 1978-07-18 (NCEI Accession 7800744)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO from 17 July 1978 to 18 July 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  19. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-05-22 to 1978-05-23 (NCEI Accession 7800456)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CARIBOU REEFER from 22 May 1978 to 23 May 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  20. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-04-30 to 1978-05-01 (NCEI Accession 7800512)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the LASH ATLANTICO from 30 April 1978 to 01 May 1978. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  1. Physical and other data from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 03 June 1975 to 13 June 1975 (NODC Accession 7601552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from bottle and CTD casts in the Gulf of Alaska from the ACONA. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks;...

  2. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 10 April 1978 - 09 August 1978 (NODC Accession 7900249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 10, 1978 to August 9,...

  3. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project from 12 April 1976 - 13 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700770)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 12, 1976 to September 13,...

  4. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey as part of the Mesa New York Bight (MESA - NYB) project, 09 April 1979 - 23 August 1979 (NODC Accession 8100440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Coastal Waters of New Jersey from April 9, 1979 to August 23,...

  5. Water physics and chemistry data from moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean as part of the North East Monitoring Program (NEMP) project, 21 April 1980 - 18 July 1980 (NODC Accession 8100501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water physics and chemistry data were collected using moored current meter and bottle casts in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean from April 21, 1980 to July 18, 1980....

  6. Drifting buoy data from buoy casts in a world wide distribution as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) from 1989-07-01 to 1989-07-31 (NODC Accession 8900227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data were collected using buoy casts in a world wide distribution from July 1, 1989, to July 31, 1989. Data were submitted by National Data Buoy Center...

  7. Oceanographic station, meteorological and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1972-07-19 to 1972-08-16 (NODC Accession 7300276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic station, meteorological, and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship ALBATROSS IV from 19 July 1972 to 16 August 1972. Data were...

  8. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-11 to 1978-08-01 (NODC Accession 7900267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER and other platforms from 11 November 1977 to 01 August 1978. Data...

  9. Benthic organism and other data from net casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-08-16 to 1975-10-20 (NCEI Accession 7601834)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Benthic organism and other data were collected from net casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 16 August 1975 to 20 October 1975. Data were collected by the...

  10. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from core casts from the ALUMINIAK in the Beaufort Sea as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 14 August 1977 to 25 August 1977 (NODC Accession 7900067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from core casts in the Beaufort Sea from the ALUMINIAK. Data were collected by the University of Alaska -...

  11. Physical, meteorological, and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 15 August 1980 to 05 September 1980 (NODC Accession 8200116)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, meteorological, and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from the NOAA Ship SURVEYOR from 15 August 1980 to 05 September 1980. Data...

  12. Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-11-12 to 1975-11-26 (NCEI Accession 7601622)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Primary productivity, nutrients, and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN from 12 November 1975 to 26 November 1975. Data were...

  13. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-09-27 to 1979-09-28 (NODC Accession 7900308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the EDGAR M. QUEENY from 27 September 1979 to 28 September 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine...

  14. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the WIECZNO as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1979-11-13 to 1979-11-14 (NODC Accession 7900334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the WIECZNO from 13 November 1979 to 14 November 1979. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  15. Temperature profile and sound velocity data using CTD casts from the US Naval Oceanographic Office as part of the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) project, from 1975-04-11 to 1998-08-31 (NODC Accession 9900220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and sound velocity data were collected using CTD, XCTD, and XBT casts in the Arctic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin, North Pacific...

  16. Current meter and pressure gauge data from moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Alaska as part of the Fisheries-Oceanography Cooperative Investigations (FOCI) project, 26 April 1989 - 26 September 1989 (NODC Accession 9100068)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter and pressure gauge data were collected using moored current meter casts and other instruments in the Gulf of Alaska from April 22, 1989 to September...

  17. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration (IDOE) from 1973-02-13 to 1973-06-10 (NODC Accession 7300904)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship OCEANOGRAPHER from 13 February 1973 to 10 June 1973. Data were collected by the National Ocean...

  18. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1977-01-18 to 1977-05-22 (NCEI Accession 7800595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from bottle and XBT casts from the DOLPHIN from 18 January 1977 to 22 May 1977. Data were...

  19. Marine Toxic Substance and other data from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from helicopter as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 16 September 1976 to 20 September 1976 (NODC Accession 7700783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine Toxic Substance and other data were collected from bottle casts in the Bering Sea from a helicopter. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental...

  20. Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) from 1975-12-03 to 1975-12-06 (NODC Accession 7600754)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Station Data and temperature profiles were collected from XBT and bottle casts from the DOLPHIN from 03 December 1975 to 06 December 1975. Data were...

  1. Marine toxic substance and other data from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1975-09-12 to 1975-11-10 (NODC Accession 7700045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine toxic substance and other data were collected from bottle casts from NOAA Ship DISCOVERER. Data were collected by Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  2. Physical and other data from surface sensors and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 10 March 1976 to 23 March 1976 (NODC Accession 7601227)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and other data were collected from surface sensors and CTD casts from the MOANA WAVE. Data were collected by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory...

  3. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-09-30 to 1978-10-05 (NODC Accession 7800858)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA ECUADOR and other platforms from 30 September 1978 to 05 October 1978. Data were collected by the...

  4. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the CRUSADER as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1977-03-15 to 1977-03-16 (NODC Accession 7700277)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the CRUSADER from 15 March 1977 to 16 March 1977. Data were collected by the National Marine Fisheries...

  5. Temperature and salinity profiles from STD casts in the Bering Sea from the SILAS BENT as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 01 September 1975 to 26 September 1975 (NODC Accession 7600747)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature and salinity profiles were collected from STD casts in the Bering Sea from the SILAS BENT. Data were collected by the University of Alaska - Fairbanks...

  6. Temperature profiles from STD casts from the Oregon Coast from the YAQUINA as part of the International Decade of Ocean Exploration / Coastal Upwelling Ecosystems Analysis (IDOE/CUEA) from 07 August 1972 to 26 August 1972 (NODC Accession 9800111)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from STD casts from the Oregon Coast from the YAQUINA from 07 August 1972 to 26 August 1972. Data were collected by the...

  7. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Long-Range Effects Program Puget Sound project from 29 November 1983 - 01 August 1984 (NODC Accession 8800119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from November 29, 1983 to August 1, 1984. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  8. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-08-09 to 1975-10-02 (NCEI Accession 7501218)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms from 09 August 1975 to 02 October 1975. Data were collected by the Delta...

  9. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1975-01-01 to 1975-02-01 (NODC Accession 7500154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 01 January 1975 to 01 February 1975. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as...

  10. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1978-10-14 to 1978-11-21 (NODC Accession 7900155)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD from 14 October 1978 to 21 November 1978. Data were collected by the Delta Steamship Co. as...

  11. Temperature profiles from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms as part of the Marine Resources Monitoring, Assessment and Prediction (MARMAP) project from 1974-11-18 to 1974-12-23 (NODC Accession 7500059)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the DELTA SUD and other platforms from 18 November 1974 to 23 December 1974. Data were collected by the Delta...

  12. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound as part of the Mesa Puget Sound/PSERP project, 16 September 1975 - 01 April 1976 (NODC Accession 7601229)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the Puget Sound from September 16, 1975 to April 1, 1976. Data were submitted by Pacific Marine...

  13. Modelling of Filling, Microstructure Formation, Local Mechanical Properties and Stress – Strain Development in High-Pressure Die Cast Aluminium Castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Thorborg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    inherently affects the component’s properties depending on design, metallurgy and casting technique. The wall thickness influences the coarseness of the microstructure and the material will have properties depending on the local metallurgical and thermal histories. This is independent on the material, i.......e. whether the casting is based on cast iron- or aluminium-alloys. The distribution of local properties in a casting might vary substantially which makes it complex to optimize the casting with good accuracy. Often, mechanical simulations of the load situation are based on the assumption that the cast...... product has constant material properties throughout the entire casting. Thus, if the microstructure is determined or predicted at a given point, it gives the possibility to calculate the local material behavior more realistically. In the present work, a test case of a complex high-pressure die cast part...

  14. Experimental analysis of flow of ductile cast iron in stream lined gating systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Hansen, Søren; Green, Nick; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2008-01-01

    Streamlined gating systems have been developed for production of high integrity ductile cast iron parts. Flow of ductile cast iron in streamlined gating systems was studied in glass fronted sand moulds where flow in the gating system and casting was recorded by a digital video camera. These resul...

  15. Fermilab joins in global live Web cast

    CERN Multimedia

    Polansek, Tom

    2005-01-01

    From 2 to 3:30 p.m., Lederman, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1988, will host his own wacky, science-centered talk show at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory as part of a lvie, 12-hour, international Web cast celebrating Albert Einstein and the world Year of Physics (2/3 page)

  16. Modeling of casting microstructures and defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, A.B.; Summers, L.T.; Eckels, D.J.; Sahai, V.

    1997-09-26

    Casting is an ancient art that has been a trial-and-error process for more than 4000 years. To predict the size, shape, and quality of a cast product, casting manufacturers typically cast full-size prototypes. If one part of the process is done incorrectly, the entire process is repeated until an acceptable product is achieved. One way to reduce the time, cost, and waste associated with casting is to use computer modeling to predict not only the quality of a product on the macro- scale, such as distortion and part shape, but also on the micro-scale such as grain defects. Modeling of solidification is becoming increasingly feasible with the advent of parallel computers. There are essentially two approaches to solidification modeling.The first is that of macro-modeling where heat transfer codes model latent heat release during solidification as a constant and based solely on the local temperature. This approach is useful in predicting large scale distortion and final part shape. The second approach, micro-modeling, is more fundamental. The micro-models estimate the latent heat release during solidification using nucleation and grain growth kinetics. Micro-models give insight into cast grain morphology and show promise in the future to predict engineering properties such as tensile strength. The micro-model solidification kinetics can be evaluated using first principles or they can be evaluated using experiments. This work describes an implementation of a micro-model for uranium which uses experimental results to estimate nucleation and growth kinetics.

  17. An Integrated Die Casting Design System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y; K; Woon; K; S; Lee

    2002-01-01

    Die casting process is one of the prime options for m anufacturing precisely dimensioned, sharply defined metal parts. The design of d ie casting dies comprises several stages and entails a large amount of time. Tra ditionally, the different stages of the die design were not integrated but exist as separate entities. Moreover, recurring modifications or even redesigns are r equired due to the complexity in achieving an accurate initial die design. As a result, die design is usually time-consuming and cos...

  18. Reengineering of Permanent Mould Casting with Lean Manufacturing Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Władysiak

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available At the work were introduced main areas of production system project of casts produced in permanent moulds, that constitutes reengineering of conventional production system according to Lean Manufacturing (LM methods. New resolution of cooling of dies with water mist was shown to casting of car wheels made from aluminium alloys in low pressure casting process. It was implemented as a part of goal-oriented project in R.H. Alurad Sp.z o.o. in Gorzyce. Its using intensifies solidification and self-cooling of casts shortening the time of casting cycle by the 30%. It was described reorganizing casting stations into multi-machines cells production and the process of their fast tool’s exchange with applying the SMED method. A project of the system was described controlling the production of the foundry with the computer aided light Kanban system. A visualization of the process was shown the production of casts with use the value stream mapping method. They proved that applying casting new method in the technology and LM methods allowed to eliminate down-times, to reduce the level of stocks, to increase the productivity and the flow of the castings production.

  19. Analysis of nucleation modelling in ductile cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moumeni, Elham; Tutum, Cem Celal; Tiedje, Niels Skat;

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nucleation of nodular graphite at inclusions in ductile iron during eutectic solidification has been investigated. The experimental part of this work deals with casting of ductile iron samples with two different inoculants in four different thicknesses. Chemical analysis...

  20. A new casting defect healing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, E.S.; Reddoch, T.W. [ForMat Industries, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States); Viswanathan, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A new technology is presented for healing of defects in 356 aluminium alloys that provides economic upgrading of these cast alloys. It uses pneumatic isostatic forging (PIF) to produce high quality Al alloys products with enhanced mechanical properties uniform throughout the part, allowing higher design allowables and increased usage of Al alloy castings. The fundamental mechanism underlying PIF is a single mode plastic deformation process that uses isostatic application of pressures for 10-30 seconds at temperature. The process can be integrated in-line with other production operations, i.e., using the latent heat from the previous casting step. Results of applying the PIF process indicate lower cost and significant improvement in mechanical properties that rival and often exceed corresponding properties of other technologies like hot isostatic pressing and related processes. This process offers many advantages that are described in this paper in addition to presenting case histories of property enhancement by PIF and the mechanism responsible for property enhancement.

  1. Virtual Mold Technique in Thermal Stress Analysis during Casting Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Si-Young Kwak; Jae-Wook Baek; Jeong-Ho Nam; Jeong-Kil Choi

    2008-01-01

    It is important to analyse the casting product and the mold at the same time considering thermal contraction of the casting and thermal expansion of the mold. The analysis considering contact of the casting and the mold induces the precise prediction of stress distribution and the defect such as hot tearing. But it is difficult to generate FEM mesh for the interface of the casting and the mold. Moreover the mesh for the mold domain spends lots of computational time and memory for the analysis due to a number of meshes. Consequently we proposed the virtual mold technique which only uses mesh of the casting part for thermal stress analysis in casting process. The spring bar element in virtual mold technique is used to consider the contact of the casting and the mold. In general, a volume of the mold is much bigger than that of casting part, so the proposed technique decreases the number of mesh and saves the computational memory and time greatly. In this study, the proposed technique was verified by the comparison with the traditional contact technique on a specimen. And the proposed technique gave satisfactory results.

  2. STUDY KOMPARASI LOST FOAM DAN KONVENSIONAL CASTING PRODUK DISC BRAKE

    OpenAIRE

    Yoso, Sumeru; -, Suyitno

    2014-01-01

    Disc brake component is a vital component with gray cast iron base material, it’s also fast lasting wearing part, so it has be replaced often. The disc brake replacement component in a local market is being supplied by the small scale local metal casting industries have the same quality as the genuine part.Disc brake making process is utilizing casting method inserting RCS core between drag and coup, than metal molten poured inside mold. The problem of this method is the product result often ...

  3. Efficient Runner Networks for Investment Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GIVLER,RICHARD C.; SAYLORS,DAVID B.

    2000-07-18

    We present a computational method that finds an efficient runner network for an investment casting, once the gate locations have been established. The method seeks to minimize a cost function that is based on total network volume. The runner segments are restricted to lie in the space not occupied by the part itself. The collection of algorithms has been coded in C and runner designs have been computed for several real parts, demonstrating substantial reductions in rigging volume.

  4. Energy Saving Melting andRevert Reduction Technology (E0SMARRT): Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimension for Investment Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nick Cannell; Dr. Mark Samonds; Adi Sholapurwalla; Sam Scott

    2008-11-21

    The investment casting process is an expendable mold process where wax patterns of the part and rigging are molded, assembled, shelled and melted to produce a ceramic mold matching the shape of the component to be cast. Investment casting is an important manufacturing method for critical parts because of the ability to maintain dimensional shape and tolerances. However, these tolerances can be easily exceeded if the molding components do not maintain their individual shapes well. In the investment casting process there are several opportunities for the final casting shape to not maintain the intended size and shape, such as shrinkage of the wax in the injection tool, the modification of the shape during shell heating, and with the thermal shrink and distortion in the casting process. Studies have been completed to look at the casting and shell distortions through the process in earlier phases of this project. Dr. Adrian Sabau at Oak Ridge National Labs performed characterizations and validations of 17-4 PH stainless steel in primarily fused silica shell systems with good agreement between analysis results and experimental data. Further tasks provided material property measurements of wax and methodology for employing a viscoelastic definition of wax materials into software. The final set of tasks involved the implementation of the findings into the commercial casting analysis software ProCAST, owned and maintained by ESI Group. This included: o the transfer of the wax material property data from its raw form into separate temperature-dependent thermophysical and mechanical property datasets o adding this wax material property data into an easily viewable and modifiable user interface within the pre-processing application of the ProCAST suite, namely PreCAST o and validating the data and viscoelastic wax model with respect to experimental results

  5. Melt Cast High Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Cudziło

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available [b]Abstract[/b]. This paper reviews the current state and future developments of melt-cast high explosives. First the compositions, properties and methods of preparation of trinitrotoluene based (TNT conventional mixtures with aluminum, hexogen (RDX or octogen (HMX are described. In the newer, less sensitive explosive formulations, TNT is replaced with dinitroanisole (DNANDNANDNAN and nitrotriazolone (NTONTONTO, nitroguanidine (NG or ammonium perchlorate (AP are the replacement for RDRDX and HMX. Plasticized wax or polymer-based binder systems for melt castable explosives are also included. Hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HPTB is the binder of choice, but polyethylene glycol, and polycaprolactone with energetic plasticizers are also used. The most advanced melt-cast explosives are compositions containing energetic thermoplastic elastomers and novel highly energetic compounds (including nitrogen rich molecules in whose particles are nanosized and practically defect-less.[b]Keywords[/b]: melt-cast explosives, detonation parameters

  6. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  7. Research on Accuracy of Automatic System for Casting Measuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ensuring the required quality of castings is an important part of the production process. The quality control should be carried out in a fast and accurate way. These requirements can be met by the use of an optical measuring system installed on the arm of an industrial robot. In the article a methodology for assessing the quality of robotic measurement system to control certain feature of the casting, based on the analysis of repeatability and reproducibility is presented. It was shown that industrial robots equipped with optical measuring systems have the accuracy allowing their use in the process of dimensional control of castings manufactured by lost-wax process, permanent-mould casting, and pressure die-casting.

  8. Repair welding of cast iron coated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuk, M.; Górka, J.; Dojka, R.; Czupryński, A.

    2017-08-01

    Welding cast iron is a complex production procedure. Repair welding was used to repair damaged or poorly made castings. This is due to a tendency to cracking of the material during welding as well as after it. Welding cast iron can be carried out on hot or on cold. Hot welding requires high heat material and the use of welding material in the form of cast iron. In the case of cold welding, it is possible to use different materials. Mostly used filler metals are nickel and copper based. The work shows the course of research concerning repairmen of ductile iron with arc welding method. For the reparation process four types of ESAB company coated electrodes dedicated for cast iron were used with diameter 3.2 and 4 mm: ES 18-8-6B (4mm), EB 150 (4mm), OK NiCl, EŻM. In the cast iron examined during the testing grooves were made using plasma methods, in order to simulate the removed casting flaws. Then the welding process with coated electrodes was executed. The process utilized low welding current row of 100A, so there would only be a small amount of heat delivered to the heat affected zone (HAZ). Short stitches were made, after welding it was hammered, in order to remove stresses. After the repair welding the part of studies commenced which purpose was finding surface defects using visual testing (VT) and penetration testing (PT). In the second part, a series of macro and microscopic studies were executed witch the purpose of disclosuring the structure. Then the hardness tests for welds cross sections were performed. An important aspect of welding cast iron is the colour of the padding weld after welding, more precisely the difference between the base material and padding weld, the use of different materials extra gives the extra ability to select the best variant. The research of four types of coated electrode was executed, based on the demands the best option in terms of aesthetic, strength and hardness.

  9. Evaluation of an improved centrifugal casting machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, T E; White, L E

    1985-05-01

    A Type III gold alloy, a silver-palladium alloy, and a base metal alloy were cast in two different centrifugal casting machines. With the number of complete cast mesh squares as an indicator of castability, the Airspin casting machine produced superior castings with all three alloys. The base metal alloy produced the greatest number of complete squares with both casting machines.

  10. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  11. Current meter data from moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) as part of the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Climate Studies (EPOCS) project from 24 May 1988 to 26 May 1989 (NODC Accession 9100207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data were collected using moored current meter casts in the TOGA Area - Pacific (30 N to 30 S) from 24 May 1988 to 26 May 1989. Data were submitted by...

  12. 用于大型铸锻件现场硬度检测的大型硬度计%Large Hardness Testers for Field Hardness Testing of Large Scale Casting and Forging Parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤林

    2016-01-01

    Large hardness testers are mainly applied in field hardness testing of large scale casting and forging parts. The principle,structure,performance,operation method and main feature and technical parameters of typical large hardness testers at home and abroad were introduced.The results show that the rocker type hardness testers which work in manual or semi-automatic manner are mainly applied in testing the hardness of one piece or small quantity large scale workpieces.The bridge type hardness testers work in manual,semi-automatic or fully automatic manner,and they could be applied not only in testing the hardness of one piece or small quantity large scale workpieces,but also in testing the hardness of batches of large scale or medium scale workpieces.The automatic bridge type hardness testers have the feature of high efficiency,and could be applied in testing quantity workpieces one by one.As the center,assembled with functions of workpiece polishing,feeding,blanking,compressing,conveying and telecommunication device,the automatic bridge type hardness tester could become an on-line automatic hardness testing system.%大型硬度计主要用于大型铸锻件的现场硬度检测。介绍了国内外典型大型硬度计的原理、结构、性能、操作方法、主要特点及技术参数。结果表明:摇臂式硬度计,以手动或半自动方式工作,主要用于检测单件或小批量大型工件;门式硬度计以手动、半自动或全自动方式工作,既可用于单件或小批量大型工件的检测,也可用于批量大中型工件的检测;其中自动门式硬度计的检测效率较高,可用于批量工件的逐件检测;以自动门式硬度计为核心,配上打磨、上下料、压紧及输送装置,并且增加远程通信功能,可以构成一套在线自动硬度检测系统。

  13. Control of cast iron and casts manufacturing by Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the usability of cast iron spheroidizing process in mould control by ATD method as well as by ultrasonic method were presented. Structure of instrumentation needed for control form performance of cast iron spheroidizing by Inmold method was illustrated. Author, pointed out that amount of magnesium master alloy should obtain 0,8 ÷ 1,0% of mass in form at all. Such quantity of preliminary alloy assure of obtain of nodular graphite in cast iron. In consequence of this, is reduce the cast iron liquidus temperature and decrease of recalescence temperature of graphite-eutectic crystallization in compare with initial cast iron. Control of casts can be carried out by ultrasonic method. In plain cast iron, ferritic-pearlitic microstructure is obtaining. Additives of 1,5% Cu ensure pearlitic structure.

  14. Development of 2D casting process CAD system based on PDF/image files

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Hongtao; Zhou Jianxin; Wang Lin; Liao Dunming; Tao Qing

    2014-01-01

    A casting process CAD is put forward to design and draw casting process. The 2D casting process CAD, most of the current systems are developed based on one certain version of the AutoCAD system. However the application of these 2D casting process CAD systems in foundry enterprises are restricted because they have several deficiencies, such as being overly dependent on the AutoCAD system, and some part files based on PDF format can not be opened directly. To overcome these deficiencies, for the first time an innovative 2D casting process CAD system based on PDF and image format file has been proposed, which breaks through the traditional research and application notion of the 2D casting process CAD system based on AutoCAD. Several key technologies of this system such as coordinate transformation, CAD interactive drawing, file storage, PDF and image format files display, and image recognition technologies were described in detail. A practical 2D CAD casting process system named HZCAD2D(PDF) was developed, which is capable of designing and drawing the casting process on the part drawing based on the PDF format directly, without spending time on drawing the part produced by AutoCAD system. Final y, taking two actual castings as examples, the casting processes were drawn using this system, demonstrating that this system can significantly shorten the cycle of casting process designing.

  15. The casting of western sculpture during the XIXth century: sand casting versus lost wax casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beentjes, T.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss research into bronze casting techniques as practiced during the XIXth and early XXth century. Both natural sand casting (fonte au sable naturel) and lost wax casting (fonte à la cire perdue) were employed during this period and sometimes rivalled for commissions. Before the X

  16. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyang; Liu Jincheng

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chapter 3 Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron(I) Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron, SG iron in short, refers to the cast iron in which graphite precipitates as spheroidal shape during solidification of liquid iron. The graphite in common commercial cast iron can only be changed from flake to spheroidal shape by spheroidising treatment. Since spheroidal graphite reduces the cutting effect of stress concentration, the metal matrix strength of SG iron can be applied around 70%-90%, thus the mechanical property of SG iron is significantly superior to other cast irons;even the tensile strength of SG iron is higher than that carbon steel.

  17. Cast iron - a predictable material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg C. Sturm

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available High strength compacted graphite iron (CGI or alloyed cast iron components are substituting previously used non-ferrous castings in automotive power train applications. The mechanical engineering industry has recognized the value in substituting forged or welded structures with stiff and light-weight cast iron castings. New products such as wind turbines have opened new markets for an entire suite of highly reliable ductile iron cast components. During the last 20 years, casting process simulation has developed from predicting hot spots and solidification to an integral assessment tool for foundries for the entire manufacturing route of castings. The support of the feeding related layout of the casting is still one of the most important duties for casting process simulation. Depending on the alloy poured, different feeding behaviors and self-feeding capabilities need to be considered to provide a defect free casting. Therefore, it is not enough to base the prediction of shrinkage defects solely on hot spots derived from temperature fields. To be able to quantitatively predict these defects, solidification simulation had to be combined with density and mass transport calculations, in order to evaluate the impact of the solidification morphology on the feeding behavior as well as to consider alloy dependent feeding ranges. For cast iron foundries, the use of casting process simulation has become an important instrument to predict the robustness and reliability of their processes, especially since the influence of alloying elements, melting practice and metallurgy need to be considered to quantify the special shrinkage and solidification behavior of cast iron. This allows the prediction of local structures, phases and ultimately the local mechanical properties of cast irons, to asses casting quality in the foundry but also to make use of this quantitative information during design of the casting. Casting quality issues related to thermally driven

  18. Die casting process otimization using Taguchi method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilson Jose Viana

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aluminum die casting process has developed significantly in recent decades, occupying a prominent place for producing innovative engineering components. Among quality problems of this process is porosity due to several factors, including the process parameters that are difficult to determine, and are commonly selected by trial and error approach. This paper sought to answer the question: How to determine the best set of parameters of the aluminum die casting process to minimize porosity in the parts produced? Aiming to improve die casting aluminum parts quality through reducing of porosity. The main contribution of this paper focuses on the application of Taguchi method using ordinal categorical data (porosity classes as a quality characteristic, by analyzing the weighted signal-to-noise ratio. The experimental results were analyzed from the average effect of factors and analysis of variance (ANOVA.  In conclusion parameters metal temperature and speed of the first and second injection phase were the most significant in reducing the porosity of the part studied. Also, the Taguchi method achieved the expected result, bringing significant reduction of porosity in the part studied by optimizing the process parameters.

  19. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., Columbia Falls, MT (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., Anaconda, MT (United States)

    1998-11-01

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{trademark} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast.

  20. Melting and casting of FeAl-based cast alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.; Wilkening, D. [Columbia Falls Aluminum Co., 2000 Aluminum Dr., Columbia Falls, MT 59912 (United States); Liebetrau, J.; Mackey, B. [AFFCO, L.L.C., P.O. Box 1071, Anaconda, MT 59711 (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The FeAl-based intermetallic alloys are of great interest because of their low density, low raw material cost, and excellent resistance to high-temperature oxidation, sulfidation, carburization, and molten salts. The applications based on these unique properties of FeAl require methods to melt and cast these alloys into complex-shaped castings and centrifugal cast tubes. This paper addresses the melting-related issues and the effect of chemistry on the microstructure and hardness of castings. It is concluded that the use of the Exo-Melt{sup TM} process for melting and the proper selection of the aluminum melt stock can result in porosity-free castings. The FeAl alloys can be melted and cast from the virgin and revert stock. A large variation in carbon content of the alloys is possible before the precipitation of graphite flakes occurs. Titanium is a very potent addition to refine the grain size of castings. A range of complex sand castings and two different sizes of centrifugal cast tubes of the alloy have already been cast. (orig.) 18 refs.

  1. Enhancements in Magnesium Die Casting Impact Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Yulong Zhu; Srinath Viswanathan; Shafik Iskander

    2000-06-30

    The need to produce lighter components in transportation equipment is the main driver in the increasing demand for magnesium castings. In many automotive applications, components can be made of magnesium or aluminum. While being lighter, often times the magnesium parts have lower impact and fatigue properties than the aluminum. The main objective of this study was to identify potential improvements in the impact resistance of magnesium alloys. The most common magnesium alloys in automotive applications are AZ91D, AM50 and AM60. Accordingly, these alloys were selected as the main candidates for the study. Experimental quantities of these alloys were melted in an electrical furnace under a protective atmosphere comprising sulfur hexafluoride, carbon dioxide and dry air. The alloys were cast both in a permanent mold and in a UBE 315 Ton squeeze caster. Extensive evaluation of tensile, impact and fatigue properties was conducted at CWRU on permanent mold and squeeze cast test bars of AZ91, AM60 and AM50. Ultimate tensile strength values between 20ksi and 30ksi were obtained. The respective elongations varied between 25 and 115. the Charpy V-notch impact strength varied between 1.6 ft-lb and 5 ft-lb depending on the alloy and processing conditions. Preliminary bending fatigue evaluation indicates a fatigue limit of 11-12 ksi for AM50 and AM60. This is about 0.4 of the UTS, typical for these alloys. The microstructures of the cast specimens were investigated with optical and scanning electron microscopy. Concomitantly, a study of the fracture toughness in AM60 was conducted at ORNL as part of the study. The results are in line with values published in the literature and are representative of current state of the art in casting magnesium alloys. The experimental results confirm the strong relationship between aluminum content of the alloys and the mechanical properties, in particular the impact strength and the elongation. As the aluminum content increases from about 5

  2. New Approaches to Aluminum Integral Foam Production with Casting Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Güner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Integral foam has been used in the production of polymer materials for a long time. Metal integral foam casting systems are obtained by transferring and adapting polymer injection technology. Metal integral foam produced by casting has a solid skin at the surface and a foam core. Producing near-net shape reduces production expenses. Insurance companies nowadays want the automotive industry to use metallic foam parts because of their higher impact energy absorption properties. In this paper, manufacturing processes of aluminum integral foam with casting methods will be discussed.

  3. [Casting faults and structural studies on bonded alloys comparing centrifugal castings and vacuum pressure castings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P; Küfmann, W

    1978-07-01

    The casting processes in use today such as centrifugal casting and vacuum pressure casting were compared with one another. An effort was made to answer the question whether the occurrence of shrink cavities and the mean diameter of the grain of the alloy is dependent on the method of casting. 80 crowns were made by both processes from the baked alloys Degudent Universal, Degudent N and the trial alloy 4437 of the firm Degusa. Slice sections were examined for macro and micro-porosity and the structural appearance was evaluated by linear analysis. Statistical analysis showed that casting faults and casting structure is independent of the method used and their causes must be found in the conditions of casting and the composition of the alloy.

  4. Light metal compound casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Konrad J.M.PAPIS; Joerg F.LOEFFLER; Peter J.UGGOWITZER

    2009-01-01

    'Compound casting'simplifies joining processes by directly casting a metallic melt onto a solid metal substrate. A continuously metallurgic transition is very important for industrial applications, such as joint structures of spaceframe constructions in transport industry. In this project, 'compound casting' of light metals is investigated, aiming at weight-saving. The substrate used is a wrought aluminium alloy of type AA5xxx, containing magnesium as main alloying element. The melts are aluminium alloys, containing various alloying elements (Cu, Si, Zn), and magnesium. By replacing the natural oxygen layer with a zinc layer, the inherent wetting difficulties were avoided, and compounds with flawless interfaces were successfully produced (no contraction defects, cracks or oxides). Electron microscopy and EDX investigations as well as optical micrographs of the interfacial areas revealed their continu-ously metallic constitution. Diffusion of alloying elements leads to heat-treatable microstructures in the vicinity of the joining interfaces in Al-Al couples. This permits significant variability of mechanical properties. Without significantly cutting down on wettability, the formation of low-melting intermetallic phases (Al3Mg2 and AI12Mg17 IMPs) at the interface of Al-Mg couples was avoided by applying a protec-tive coating to the substrate.

  5. 77 FR 31577 - Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... International Trade Administration Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic of China...'') changed circumstances review with intent to revoke, in part, the AD order on non-malleable cast iron pipe... this particular connector. \\1\\ See Non-Malleable Cast Iron Pipe Fittings From the People's Republic...

  6. Shape Accuracy of Iron Precision Castings in Terms of Ceramic Moulds Physical Properties Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernacki R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While analyzing shape accuracy of ferroalloy precision castings in terms of ceramic moulds physical anisotropy, low-alloy steel castings ("cover" and cast iron ("plate" were included. The basic parameters in addition to the product linear shape accuracy are flatness deviations, especially due to the expanded flat surface which is cast plate. For mentioned castings surface micro-geometry analysis was also carried, favoring surface load capacity tp50 for Rmax = 50%. Surface load capacity tp50 obtained for the cast cover was compared with machined product, and casting plate surface was compared with wear part of the conveyor belt. The results were referred to anisotropy of ceramic moulds physical properties, which was evaluated by studying ceramic moulds samples in computer tomography equipment Metrotom 800

  7. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Stradomski

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  8. Current components, physical, and other data from moored current meters and CTD casts from the J. W. POWELL and other platforms from the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX PART A) from 17 March 1993 to 28 May 1993 (NODC Accession 9400043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current components, physical, and other data were collected by moored current meters and CTD casts from the J. W. POWELL and other platforms from the Gulf of Mexico...

  9. Development of a thin steel strip casting process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    This is a comprehensive effort to develop direct strip casting to the point where a pilot scale program for casting carbon steel strip could be initiated. All important aspects of the technology were being investigated, however the program was terminated early due to a change in the business strategy of the primary contractor, Armco Inc. (focus to be directed at specialty steels, not low carbon steel). At termination, the project was on target on all milestones and under budget. Major part was casting of strip at the experiment casting facility. A new caster, capable of producing direct cast strip of up to 12 in. wide in heats of 1000 and 3000 lb, was used. A total of 81 1000-1200 lb heats were cast as well as one test heat of 3000 lb. Most produced strip of from 0.016 to 0.085 in. thick. Process reliability was excellent for short casting times; quality was generally poor from modern hot strip mill standards, but the practices necessary for good surface quality were identified.

  10. Improved Casting Furnace Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielding, Randall Sidney [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tolman, David Donald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In an attempt to ensure more consistent casting results and remove some schedule variance associated with casting, an improved casting furnace concept has been developed. The improved furnace uses the existing arc melter hardware and glovebox utilities. The furnace concept was designed around physical and operational requirements such as; a charge sized of less than 30 grams, high heating rates and minimal additional footprint. The conceptual model is shown in the report as well as a summary of how the requirements were met.

  11. Strength Estimation of Die Cast Beams Considering Equivalent Porous Defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Shik [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    As a shop practice, a strength estimation method for die cast parts is suggested, in which various defects such as pores can be allowed. The equivalent porosity is evaluated by combining the stiffness data from a simple elastic test at the part level during the shop practice and the theoretical stiffness data, which are defect free. A porosity equation is derived from Eshelby's inclusion theory. Then, using the Mori-Tanaka method, the porosity value is used to draw a stress-strain curve for the porous material. In this paper, the Hollomon equation is used to capture the strain hardening effect. This stress-strain curve can be used to estimate the strength of a die cast part with porous defects. An elastoplastic theoretical solution is derived for the three-point bending of a die cast beam by using the plastic hinge method as a reference solution for a part with porous defects.

  12. Squeeze Casting of Semiolid A356 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Jie Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The rheo-squeeze casting (rheo-SQC combining the rheocasting and the SQC was developed, in which semisolid slurry was produced by the low superheat pouring with a shearing field (LSPSF process. The three-dimensional morphology of the primary α-Al phase and the rest spacing of slurry prepared by LSPSF process have been reconstructed and visualized, and the microstructures of squeeze cast A356 alloy have been obtained. Based on the three-dimensional microstructure reconstructed, their three-dimensional characterizations such as solid volume fraction and equivalent diameter of the extracted primary α-Al phase of the slurry were measured and calculated. And the microstructures of cross-section of squeeze cast product were investigated. Compared and analyzed the typical microstructure characteristics of parts in different positions produced by SQC and rheo-SQC, the results show that the primary α-Al phase was in the form of enriched dendrites across the whole section of parts produced by SQC. Nevertheless, in the relative case of the rheo-SQC, the whole formations of dendrites have been inhibited effectively, revealing a conspicuous modification in morphology and refinement of the primary α-Al phase. In addition, the solid fraction decreased from the centre to the verge of products along the slurry flow orientation.

  13. A Casting Yield Optimization Case Study: Forging Ram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri;

    2010-01-01

    This work summarizes the findings of multi-objective optimization of a gravity sand-cast steel part for which an increase of the casting yield via riser optimization was considered. This was accomplished by coupling a casting simulation software package with an optimization module. The benefits...... of this approach, recently adopted in foundry industry world wide and based on fully automated computer optimization, were demonstrated. First, analyses of filling and solidification of the original casting design were conducted in the standard simulation environment to determine potential flaws and inadequacies....... Based on the initial assessment, the gating system was redesigned and the chills rearranged to improve the solidification pattern. After these two cases were evaluated, the adequate optimization targets and constraints were defined. One multi-objective optimization case with conflicting objectives...

  14. New trends in cold-chamber die casting machine design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Larger and larger proportions of aluminium castings, especially those produced by the die casting process, can be observed during recent years in the automotive industry, house-hold articles and others. In case of the automotive industry, apart from the traditional elements produced by the die pressure method such as engine blocks or crank shaft bedplates, aluminium is displacing steel from structural parts of cars (‘body in white’. The current state and development directions of the structural solutions of cold-chamber die castings are analysed in this paper. These solutions drive the prospective development of these machines and die casting technology. The focus is mainly on essential functional systems such as: hydraulic drives of closing and locking units, as well as pressing in die machines of known companies present on the European market.

  15. A Methodology to Predict Uniform Material Fatigue Life of Cast Iron: Law for Cast Iron%A Methodology to Predict Uniform Material Fatigue Life of Cast Iron: Law for Cast Iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinan Korkmaz

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical, physical and manufacturing properties of east iron make it attractive for many fields of application, such as cranks and cylinder holds. As in design of all metals, fatigue life prediction is an intrinsic part of the design process of structural sections that are made of cast iron. A methodology to predict high-cycle fatigue life of cast iron is proposed. Stress amplitude-strain amplitude, strain amplitude-number of loading cycles relationships of cast iron are investigated. Also, fatigue life prediction in terms of Smith, Watson and Topper parameter is carried out using the proposed method. Results indicate that the analytical outcomes of the proposed methodology are in good accordance with the experimental data for the two studied types of cast iron: EN-GJS-400 and EN-GJS-600.

  16. A Casting Yield Optimization Case Study: Forging Ram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Tutum, Cem Celal; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2010-01-01

    This work summarizes the findings of multi-objective optimization of a gravity sand-cast steel part for which an increase of the casting yield via riser optimization was considered. This was accomplished by coupling a casting simulation software package with an optimization module. The benefits...... of this approach, recently adopted in foundry industry world wide and based on fully automated computer optimization, were demonstrated. First, analyses of filling and solidification of the original casting design were conducted in the standard simulation environment to determine potential flaws and inadequacies....... Based on the initial assessment, the gating system was redesigned and the chills rearranged to improve the solidification pattern. After these two cases were evaluated, the adequate optimization targets and constraints were defined. One multi-objective optimization case with conflicting objectives...

  17. Development Program for Natural Aging Aluminum Casting Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Geoffrey K. Sigworth

    2004-05-14

    A number of 7xx aluminum casting alloys are based on the ternary Al-Zn-Mg system. These alloys age naturally to high strength at room temperature. A high temperature solution and aging treatment is not required. Consequently, these alloys have the potential to deliver properties nearly equivalent to conventional A356-T6 (Al-Si-Mg) castings, with a significant cost saving. An energy savings is also possible. In spite of these advantages, the 7xx casting alloys are seldom used, primarily because of their reputation for poor castibility. This paper describes the results obtained in a DOE-funded research study of these alloys, which is part of the DOE-OIT ''Cast Metals Industries of the Future'' Program. Suggestions for possible commercial use are also given.

  18. New trends in cold-chamber die casting machine design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R. Dańko; W. Kowalczyk

    2015-01-01

    Larger and larger proportions of aluminium castings, especial y those produced by the die casting process, can be observed during recent years in the automotive industry, house-hold articles and others. In case of the automotive industry, apart from the traditional elements produced by the die pressure method such as engine blocks or crank shaft bedplates, aluminium is displacing steel from structural parts of cars (‘body in white’). The current state and development directions of the structural solutions of cold-chamber die castings are analysed in this paper. These solutions drive the prospective development of these machines and die casting technology. The focus is mainly on essential functional systems such as:hydraulic drives of closing and locking units, as wel as pressing in die machines of known companies present on the European market.

  19. Design optimization of gating and feeding system through simulation technique for sand casting of wear plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin L. Nimbulkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Casting is a manufacturing process to make complex shapes of metal materials; during mass production, we may experience many defects, such as gas porosity, pin holes, blow holes, shrinkages and incomplete filling that may occur in sand casting. Porosity is one of the defects most frequently encountered in ductile iron casting. Porosity impacts cost by scrap loss and limits the use of cast parts in critical high strength applications. The amount of porosity is closely related to the parameter of sand casting process. The gating/riser system design plays a very important role for improving casting quality. Many researchers reported that 90% of the defects in casting are obtained only because of improper design of gating and feeding system. The main objectives were to study the existing design of gating and feeding system, to optimize the gating and feeding system using Auto-CAST X1 casting simulation software, to prepare the sand mold and cast the part, to compare the simulated result and experimental results, to reduce rejection rate and to enable the company to again start the production.

  20. Development of Refractories for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shouxin; JIN Congjin; YAO Jinfu; LI Zeya

    2004-01-01

    The paper introduces refractories for continuous casting, especially, refractories for continuous casting for clean steel in baosteel. Developing direction of refractories for continuous casting has been pointed out to satisfy the new metallurgical operating practice.

  1. Biomaterials by freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegst, Ulrike G K; Schecter, Matthew; Donius, Amalie E; Hunger, Philipp M

    2010-04-28

    The functional requirements for synthetic tissue substitutes appear deceptively simple: they should provide a porous matrix with interconnecting porosity and surface properties that promote rapid tissue ingrowth; at the same time, they should possess sufficient stiffness, strength and toughness to prevent crushing under physiological loads until full integration and healing are reached. Despite extensive efforts and first encouraging results, current biomaterials for tissue regeneration tend to suffer common limitations: insufficient tissue-material interaction and an inherent lack of strength and toughness associated with porosity. The challenge persists to synthesize materials that mimic both structure and mechanical performance of the natural tissue and permit strong tissue-implant interfaces to be formed. In the case of bone substitute materials, for example, the goal is to engineer high-performance composites with effective properties that, similar to natural mineralized tissue, exceed by orders of magnitude the properties of its constituents. It is still difficult with current technology to emulate in synthetic biomaterials multi-level hierarchical composite structures that are thought to be the origin of the observed mechanical property amplification in biological materials. Freeze casting permits to manufacture such complex, hybrid materials through excellent control of structural and mechanical properties. As a processing technique for the manufacture of biomaterials, freeze casting therefore has great promise.

  2. Theory of batchwise centrifugal casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesheuvel, P. Maarten; Nijmeijer, Arian; Verweij, Henk

    1998-01-01

    In batchwise centrifugal casting a cylindrical mold is filled with suspension and rotated rapidly around its axis. This results in the movement of the particulate phase toward the cylinder wall and the formation of a tubular cast. Theory is presented for particle transport in the suspension phase an

  3. Lost Foam Casting in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Sheng-ping; WU Zhi-chao

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1. Lost Foam Casting Committee of Foundry Institution of Chinese Mechanical Engineering Society (FICMES) From the beginning of the 1990s, China entered a research and expansion climax in lost foam casting technology realm after the United States, Germany, and Japan etc.

  4. Education and Caste in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Chandra Pal Singh

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyses the policy of reservation for lower castes in India. This policy is similar to that of affirmative action in the United States. The paper provides a brief overview of the caste system and discusses the types of groups that are eligible for reservation, based on data from government reports. The stance of this paper is that…

  5. Squeeze casting of aluminum alloy A380: Microstructure and tensile behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A380 alloy with a relatively thick cross-section of 25 mm was squeeze cast using a hydraulic press with an applied pressure of 90 MPa. Microstructure and tensile properties of the squeeze cast A380 were characterized and evaluated in comparison with the die cast counterpart. Results show that the squeeze cast A380 possesses a porosity level much lower than the die cast alloy, which is disclosed by both optical microscopy and the density measurement technique. The results of tensile testing indicate the improved tensile properties, specifically ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 215.9 MPa and elongation (Ef: 5.4%, for the squeeze cast samples over those of the conventional high-pressure die cast part (UTS: 173.7 MPa, Ef: 1.0%. The analysis of tensile behavior shows that the squeeze cast A380 exhibits a high tensile toughness (8.5 MJ·m-3 and resilience (179.3 kJ·m-3 compared with the die cast alloy (toughness: 1.4 MJ·m-3, resilience: 140.6 kJ·m-3, despite that, during the onset of plastic deformation, the strain-hardening rate of the die cast specimen is higher than that of the squeeze cast specimens. The microstructure analyzed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM shows that both the squeeze and die cast specimens contain the primary α-Al, Al2Cu, Al5FeSi phase and the eutectic Si phase. But, the Al2Cu phase present in the squeeze cast alloy is relatively large in size and quantity. The SEM fractography evidently reveals the ductile fracture features of the squeeze cast A380 alloy.

  6. Micro precision casting based on investment casting for micro structures with high aspect ratio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chuang; LI Bang-sheng; REN Ming-xing; FU Heng-zhi

    2009-01-01

    Microcasting is one of the significant technologies for the production of metallic micro parts with high aspect ratio (ratio of flow length to diameter). A micro precision casting technology based on investment casting using centrifugal method was investigated. The micro parts of Zn-4%Al alloy with an aspect ratio up to 200 was produced at the centrifugal speed of 1 500 r/min and the mold temperature of 270 ℃. The investigations on the relationship between flow length and rotational speed were carried out. For microcasting, the flow length is not only dependent on the centrifugal speed under the constant centrifugal radius, but also on the preheating temperature of mold. The flow length increases as the rotational speed and the mold temperature increase, and is much higher at a mold temperature of 270 ℃ than at other mold temperatures.

  7. EVOLUTION OF AS—CAST MICROSTRUCTURES OF 356 ALUMINIUM ALLOY CAST BY LIQUIDUS CASTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Dong; G.M.Lu; 等

    2003-01-01

    A new method (liquidus casting)was used for 356 Al alloy semi-solid slurry mak-ing.The structures of 356 Al alloy cast by a fe mould and semi-continuous casting machine at different temperatures were inves tigated.How the globular grains form was qlso discussed.The results show that either being cast by single Fe mould or semi-continuous machine,the microstructures are not conventional dendrites but fine and net-globular grains.The average grain size is smaller than 30μm and suitable enough for thixoforming,meanwhile it can improve the mechanical properties of fol-lowing products.Under the suitable casting velocity and cooling intensity,most of global grains prolong their global browth and collide with each other before dendritic growth because of the large amount of the nucleation sites.

  8. Grindability of cast Ti-Hf alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Sato, Hideki; Okuno, Osamu; Nunn, Martha E; Okabe, Toru

    2006-04-01

    As part of our systematic studies characterizing the properties of titanium alloys, we investigated the grindability of a series of cast Ti-Hf alloys. Alloy buttons with hafnium concentrations up to 40 mass% were made using an argon-arc melting furnace. Each button was cast into a magnesia-based mold using a dental titanium casting machine; three specimens were made for each metal. Prior to testing, the hardened surface layer was removed. The specimens were ground at five different speeds for 1 min at 0.98 N using a carborundum wheel on an electric dental handpiece. Grindability was evaluated as the volume of metal removed per minute (grinding rate) and the volume ratio of metal removed compared to the wheel material lost (grinding ratio). The data were analyzed using ANOVA. A trend of increasing grindability was found with increasing amounts of hafnium, although there was no statistical difference in the grindability with increasing hafnium contents. We also found that hafnium may be used to harden or strengthen titanium without deteriorating the grindability.

  9. Comparison of marginal accuracy of castings fabricated by conventional casting technique and accelerated casting technique: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Srikanth Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional casting technique is time consuming when compared to accelerated casting technique. In this study, marginal accuracy of castings fabricated using accelerated and conventional casting technique was compared. Materials and Methods: 20 wax patterns were fabricated and the marginal discrepancy between the die and patterns were measured using Optical stereomicroscope. Ten wax patterns were used for Conventional casting and the rest for Accelerated casting. A Nickel-Chromium alloy was used for the casting. The castings were measured for marginal discrepancies and compared. Results: Castings fabricated using Conventional casting technique showed less vertical marginal discrepancy than the castings fabricated by Accelerated casting technique. The values were statistically highly significant. Conclusion: Conventional casting technique produced better marginal accuracy when compared to Accelerated casting. The vertical marginal discrepancy produced by the Accelerated casting technique was well within the maximum clinical tolerance limits. Clinical Implication: Accelerated casting technique can be used to save lab time to fabricate clinical crowns with acceptable vertical marginal discrepancy.

  10. Erosion-corrosion behavior of austenitic cast iron in an acidic slurry medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Sun, Lan; Liu, Yu-zhen; Fan, Hong-yuan

    2015-06-01

    A series of austenitic cast iron samples with different compositions were cast and a part of nickel in the samples was replaced by manganese for economic reason. Erosion-corrosion tests were conducted under 2wt% sulfuric acid and 15wt% quartz sand. The results show that the matrix of cast irons remains austenite after a portion of nickel is replaced with manganese. (Fe,Cr)3C is a common phase in the cast irons, and nickel is the main alloying element in high-nickel cast iron; whereas, (Fe,Mn)3C is observed with the increased manganese content in low-nickel cast iron. Under erosion-corrosion tests, the weight-loss rates of the cast irons increase with increasing time. Wear plays a more important role than corrosion in determining the weight loss. It is indicated that the processes of weight loss for the cast irons with high and low nickel contents are different. The erosion resistance of the cast iron containing 7.29wt% nickel and 6.94wt% manganese is equivalent to that of the cast iron containing 13.29wt% nickel.

  11. METHODS OF RECEIVING OF FINE-GRAINED STRUCTURE OF CASTINGS AT CRYSTALLIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Tolochko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with methods for fine-grained structure of ingots during crystallization depending on the used foundry technologies. It is shown that by using modern scientific and technological advances may improve the traditional and the development of new casting processes, providing production of cast parts with over fine-grained structure and enhanced properties.

  12. Displaying structural property and inheritance of cast iron surfacing on steel base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shveev, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Graphite inclusions heredity in deposited layer from remelted special cast iron billets was established. The possibility of controlling the structural state and the quality of the deposited layer due to technological parameters of welding and heat treatment of parts is shown. Ways of improving cast iron wear resistance durability are proposed.

  13. Unusually well preserved casts of halite crystals: A case from the Upper Frasnian of northern Lithuania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rychliński, Tomasz; Jaglarz, Piotr; Uchman, Alfred; Vainorius, Julius

    2014-07-01

    Upper Frasnian carbonate-siliciclastics of the Stipinai Formation (northern Lithuania) comprise a bed of calcareous silty arenite with casts of halite crystals, including hopper crystals. Unusually well-preserved casts occur on the lower surface of the bed, while poorly-preserved casts are present on the upper bedding surface. The casts originated as the result of the dissolution of halite crystals which grew in the sediment. The dissolution took place during early stages of diagenesis, when host sediment was soft. Unstable cavities after crystal dissolution were filled by overlying sediment forming their casts. The collapsing sediment form sink-hole deformation structures which disturb wave-ripple cross lamination from the upper part of the bed. Dewatering pipe structures are also present. The casts and accompanying sink-hole and dewatering pipes are classified as the postdepositional deformation structures caused by haloturbation.

  14. Investigation of friction and wear characteristics of cast iron material under various conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Ji Hoon; Kim, Chang Lae; Oh, Jeong Taek; Kim, Dae Eun [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nemati, Narguess [School of Materials and Metallurgy, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Cast iron is widely used in fields such as the transport and heavy industries. For parts where contact damage is expected to occur, it is necessary to understand the friction and wear characteristics of cast iron. In this study, we use cast iron plates as the specimens to investigate their friction and wear characteristics. We perform various experiments using a reciprocating type tribotester. We assess the frictional characteristics by analyzing the friction coefficient values that were obtained during the sliding tests. We observe the wear surfaces of cast iron and steel balls using a scanning electron microscope, confocal microscope, and 3D profiler. We investigate the friction and wear characteristics of cast iron by injecting sand and alumina particles having various sizes. Furthermore, we estimate the effect of temperature on the friction and wear characteristics. The results obtained are expected to aid in the understanding of the tribological characteristics of cast iron in industry.

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HARDENING OF UNINTERRUPTEDLY-CASTED BRONZE CASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Marukovich

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional numerical model for calculation of thermal fields during solidification of continuously casted bronze casting is developed. Coefficients of heat transfer on borders of calculation areas on the basis of the solution of inverse heat transfer conduction problem are determined. The analysis of thermal fields, depending on loop variables of drawing and the sizes of not cooled zone of crystallizer is curried out.

  16. Copper base materials prepared by gel-casting process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Weihua; JIA Chengchang; SHI Yantao; HAN Yuepeng

    2008-01-01

    Gel-casting process was developed as a new molding process in the field of copper base powder metallurgy to manufacture metal parts with excellent performance and complex shapes.Through changing the parameters of gel-casting process,such as dispersant and solid loading,the corresponding effects on the rheology of Cu slurries,molding and sintering behaviors were studied.The results show that the viscosity of Cu slurries was significantly reduced with an increase in dispersant.The most appropriate solid loading was found to be 61% and the sintering temperature was 910℃ in these experiments.After the optimization of parameters of gel-casting process,copper composite parts with relatively high density and better properties were obtained.

  17. Geometrical modulus of a casting and its influence on solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Havlicek

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: The work analyses the importance of the known criterion for evaluating the controlled solidification of castings, so called geometrical modulus defined by N. Chvorinov as the first one. Geometrical modulus influences the solidification process. The modulus has such specificity that during the process of casting formation it is not a constant but its initial value decreases with the solidification progress because the remaining melt volume can decrease faster than its cooling surface.Methodology: The modulus is determined by a simple calculation from the ratio of the casting volume after pouring the metal in the mould to the cooled mould surface. The solidified metal volume and the cooled surface too are changed during solidification. That calculation is much more complicated. Results were checked up experimentally by measuring the temperatures in the cross-section of heavy steel castings during cooling them.Results: The given experimental results have completed the original theoretical calculations by Chvorinov and recent researches done with use of numerical calculations. The contribution explains how the geometrical modulus together with the thermal process in the casting causes the higher solidification rate in the axial part of the casting cross-section and shortening of solidification time. Practical implications: Change of the geometrical modulus negatively affects the casting internal quality. Melt feeding by capillary filtration in the dendritic network in the casting central part decreases and in such a way the shrinkage porosity volume increases. State of stress character in the casting is changed too and it increases.

  18. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  19. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  20. Some Theoretical Considerations on Caste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudan Subedi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Caste as a system of social stratification was an encompassing system in the past. There was reciprocal system of exchange goods and services. With time, occupation and mode of generation of livelihood of various caste groups changed, and the traditional form of jajmani system fizzled out. This paper provides an account of changing perspectives of caste relations in social science writing and political discourse. The discourse of caste has been shifted from ritual hierarchy and social discrimination to an instrument to mobilize people for economic and political gain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v7i0.10437 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 7, 2013; 51-86